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Sample records for ac quantum transport

  1. AC transport in p-Ge/GeSi quantum well in high magnetic fields

    Drichko, I. L.; Malysh, V. A.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Golub, L. E.; Tarasenko, S. A. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Suslov, A. V. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Mironov, O. A. [Warwick SEMINANO R and D Center, University of Warwick Science Park, Coventry CV4 7EZ (United Kingdom); Kummer, M.; Känel, H. von [Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-08-20

    The contactless surface acoustic wave technique is implemented to probe the high-frequency conductivity of a high-mobility p-Ge/GeSi quantum well structure in the regime of integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) at temperatures 0.3–5.8 K and magnetic fields up to 18 T. It is shown that, in the IQHE regime at the minima of conductivity, holes are localized and ac conductivity is of hopping nature and can be described within the “two-site” model. The analysis of the temperature and magnetic-field-orientation dependence of the ac conductivity at odd filing factors enables us to determine the effective hole g-factor, |g{sub zz}|≈4.5. It is shown that the in-plane component of the magnetic field leads to a decrease in the g-factor as well as increase in the cyclotron mass, which is explained by orbital effects in the complex valence band of germanium.

  2. Kadanoff-Baym approach to time-dependent quantum transport in AC and DC fields

    We have developed a method based on the embedded Kadanoff-Baym equations to study the time evolution of open and inhomogeneous systems. The equation of motion for the Green's function on the Keldysh contour is solved using different conserving many-body approximations for the self-energy. Our formulation incorporates basic conservation laws, such as particle conservation, and includes both initial correlations and initial embedding effects, without restrictions on the time-dependence of the external driving field. We present results for the time-dependent density, current and dipole moment for a correlated tight binding chain connected to one-dimensional non-interacting leads exposed to DC and AC biases of various forms. We find that the self-consistent 2B and GW approximations are in extremely good agreement with each other at all times, for the long-range interactions that we consider. In the DC case we show that the oscillations in the transients can be understood from interchain and lead-chain transitions in the system and find that the dominant frequency corresponds to the HOMO-LUMO transition of the central wire. For AC biases with odd inversion symmetry odd harmonics to high harmonic order in the driving frequency are observed in the dipole moment, whereas for asymmetric applied bias also even harmonics have considerable intensity. In both cases we find that the HOMO-LUMO transition strongly mixes with the harmonics leading to harmonic peaks with enhanced intensity at the HOMO-LUMO transition energy.

  3. Ac response of a coupled double quantum dot

    Xu Jie; W.Z. Shangguan; Zhan Shi-Chang

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phase-breaking process on the ac response of a coupled double quantum dot is studied in this paper based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism. A general expression is derived for the ac current in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. The ac conductance is numerically computed and the results are compared with those in [Anatram M P and Datts S 1995 Phys. Rev. B 51 7632]. Our results reveal that the inter-dot electron tunnelling interplays with that between dots and electron reservoirs, and contributes prominently to the ac current when inter-dot tunnelling coupling is much larger than the tunnelling coupling between dots and electron reservoirs. In addition, the phase-breaking process is found to have a significant effect on the ac transport through the coupled double dot.

  4. Transport AC losses in YBCO coated conductors

    Majoros, M [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Ye, L [IRC in Superconductivity, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Velichko, A V [IRC in Superconductivity, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Coombs, T A [IRC in Superconductivity, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Sumption, M D [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Collings, E W [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Transport AC loss measurements have been made on YBCO-coated conductors prepared on two different substrate templates-RABiTS (rolling-assisted biaxially textured substrate) and IBAD (ion-beam-assisted deposition). RABiTS samples show higher losses compared with the theoretical values obtained from the critical state model, with constant critical current density, at currents lower than the critical current. An origin of this extra AC loss was demonstrated experimentally by comparison of the AC loss of two samples with different I-V curves. Despite a difference in I-V curves and in the critical currents, their measured losses, as well as the normalized losses, were practically the same. However, the functional dependence of the losses was affected by the ferromagnetic substrate. An influence of the presence of a ferromagnetic substrate on transport AC losses in YBCO film was calculated numerically by the finite element method. The presence of a ferromagnetic substrate increases transport AC losses in YBCO films depending on its relative magnetic permeability. The two loss contributions-transport AC loss in YBCO films and ferromagnetic loss in the substrate-cannot be considered as mutually independent.

  5. Inelastic Quantum Transport

    We solve a Schroedinger equation for inelastic quantum transport that retains full quantum coherence, in contrast to previous rate or Boltzmann equation approaches. The model Hamiltonian is the zero temperature 1D Holstein model for an electron coupled to optical phonons (polaron), in a strong electric field. The Hilbert space grows exponentially with electron position, forming a nonstandard Bethe lattice. We calculate nonperturbatively the transport current, electron-phonon correlations, and quantum diffusion. This system is a toy model for the constantly branching open-quotes wave function of the universe.close quotes copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. Transport through quantum rings

    Antonio, B. A. Z.; Lopes, A.A.; Dias, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    The transport of fermions through nanocircuits plays a major role in mesoscopic physics. Exploring the analogy with classical wave scattering, basic notions of nanoscale transport can be explained in a simple way, even at the level of undergraduate Solid State Physics courses, and more so if these explanations are supported by numerical simulations of these nanocircuits. This paper presents a simple tight-binding method for the study of the conductance of quantum nanorings connected to one-di...

  7. Transport through quantum rings

    The transport of fermions through nanocircuits plays a major role in mesoscopic physics. Exploring the analogy with classical wave scattering, basic notions of nanoscale transport can be explained in a simple way, even at the level of undergraduate solid state physics courses, and more so if these explanations are supported by numerical simulations of these nanocircuits. This paper presents a simple tight-binding method for the study of the conductance of quantum nanorings connected to one-dimensional leads. We show how to address the effects of applied magnetic and electric fields and illustrate concepts such as Aharonov–Bohm conductance oscillations, resonant tunneling and destructive interference. (paper)

  8. Transport through quantum rings

    António, B. A. Z.; Lopes, A. A.; Dias, R. G.

    2013-07-01

    The transport of fermions through nanocircuits plays a major role in mesoscopic physics. Exploring the analogy with classical wave scattering, basic notions of nanoscale transport can be explained in a simple way, even at the level of undergraduate solid state physics courses, and more so if these explanations are supported by numerical simulations of these nanocircuits. This paper presents a simple tight-binding method for the study of the conductance of quantum nanorings connected to one-dimensional leads. We show how to address the effects of applied magnetic and electric fields and illustrate concepts such as Aharonov-Bohm conductance oscillations, resonant tunneling and destructive interference.

  9. Crossover of the Hall-voltage distribution in AC quantum Hall effect

    Akera, H.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of the Hall voltage induced by low-frequency AC current is studied theoretically in the incoherent linear transport of quantum Hall systems. It is shown that the Hall-voltage distribution makes a crossover from the uniform distribution to a concentrated-near-edges distribution as the frequency is increased or the diagonal conductivity is decreased. This crossover is also reflected in the frequency dependence of AC magnetoresistance.

  10. Crossover of the Hall-voltage distribution in AC quantum Hall effect

    Akera, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of the Hall voltage induced by low-frequency AC current is studied theoretically in the incoherent linear transport of quantum Hall systems. It is shown that the Hall-voltage distribution makes a crossover from the uniform distribution to a concentrated-near-edges distribution as the frequency is increased or the diagonal conductivity is decreased. This crossover is also reflected in the frequency dependence of AC magnetoresistance.

  11. Noise-induced quantum transport

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Barik, Debashis; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the problem of directed quantum transport induced by external exponentially correlated telegraphic noise. In addition to quantum nature of the heat bath, nonlinearity of the periodic system potential brings in quantum contribution. We observe that quantization, in general, enhances classical current at low temperature, while the differences become insignificant at higher temperature. Interplay of quantum diffusion and quantum correction to system potential is analyzed for various r...

  12. Spin-polarized currents in double and triple quantum dots driven by ac magnetic fields

    Busl, Maria; Platero, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    We analyze transport through both a double quantum dot and a triple quantum dot with inhomogeneous Zeeman splittings in the presence of crossed dc and ac magnetic fields. We find that strongly spin-polarized current can be achieved by tuning the relative energies of the Zeeman-split levels of the dots, by means of electric gate voltages: depending on the energy level detuning, the double quantum dot works either as spin-up or spin-down filter. We show that a triple quantum dot in series under...

  13. Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Beenakker, C. W. J.; Houten, van, H.

    2004-01-01

    I. Introduction (Preface, Nanostructures in Si Inversion Layers, Nanostructures in GaAs-AlGaAs Heterostructures, Basic Properties). II. Diffusive and Quasi-Ballistic Transport (Classical Size Effects, Weak Localization, Conductance Fluctuations, Aharonov-Bohm Effect, Electron-Electron Interactions, Quantum Size Effects, Periodic Potential). III. Ballistic Transport (Conduction as a Transmission Problem, Quantum Point Contacts, Coherent Electron Focusing, Collimation, Junction Scattering, Tunn...

  14. Coherent transport through interacting quantum dots

    Hiltscher, Bastian

    2012-10-05

    The present thesis is composed of four different works. All deal with coherent transport through interacting quantum dots, which are tunnel-coupled to external leads. There a two main motivations for the use of quantum dots. First, they are an ideal device to study the influence of strong Coulomb repulsion, and second, their discrete energy levels can easily be tuned by external gate electrodes to create different transport regimes. The expression of coherence includes a very wide range of physical correlations and, therefore, the four works are basically independent of each other. Before motivating and introducing the different works in more detail, we remark that in all works a diagrammatic real-time perturbation theory is used. The fermionic degrees of freedom of the leads are traced out and the elements of the resulting reduced density matrix can be treated explicitly by means of a generalized master equation. How this equation is solved, depends on the details of the problem under consideration. In the first of the four works adiabatic pumping through an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot embedded in each of the two arms is studied. In adiabatic pumping transport is generated by varying two system parameters periodically in time. We consider the two dot levels to be these two pumping parameters. Since they are located in different arms of the interferometer, pumping is a quantum mechanical effect purely relying on coherent superpositions of the dot states. It is very challenging to identify a quantum pumping mechanism in experiments, because a capacitive coupling of the gate electrodes to the leads may yield an undesired AC bias voltage, which is rectified by a time dependent conductance. Therefore, distinguishing features of these two transport mechanisms are required. We find that the dependence on the magnetic field is the key feature. While the pumped charge is an odd function of the magnetic flux, the rectified current is even, at least in

  15. Coherent transport through interacting quantum dots

    The present thesis is composed of four different works. All deal with coherent transport through interacting quantum dots, which are tunnel-coupled to external leads. There a two main motivations for the use of quantum dots. First, they are an ideal device to study the influence of strong Coulomb repulsion, and second, their discrete energy levels can easily be tuned by external gate electrodes to create different transport regimes. The expression of coherence includes a very wide range of physical correlations and, therefore, the four works are basically independent of each other. Before motivating and introducing the different works in more detail, we remark that in all works a diagrammatic real-time perturbation theory is used. The fermionic degrees of freedom of the leads are traced out and the elements of the resulting reduced density matrix can be treated explicitly by means of a generalized master equation. How this equation is solved, depends on the details of the problem under consideration. In the first of the four works adiabatic pumping through an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot embedded in each of the two arms is studied. In adiabatic pumping transport is generated by varying two system parameters periodically in time. We consider the two dot levels to be these two pumping parameters. Since they are located in different arms of the interferometer, pumping is a quantum mechanical effect purely relying on coherent superpositions of the dot states. It is very challenging to identify a quantum pumping mechanism in experiments, because a capacitive coupling of the gate electrodes to the leads may yield an undesired AC bias voltage, which is rectified by a time dependent conductance. Therefore, distinguishing features of these two transport mechanisms are required. We find that the dependence on the magnetic field is the key feature. While the pumped charge is an odd function of the magnetic flux, the rectified current is even, at least in

  16. Charge transport and ac response under light illumination in gate-modulated DNA molecular junctions

    Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Wen-Huan; Ding, Guo-Hui; Dong, Bing; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2015-05-01

    Using a two-strand tight-binding model and within nonequilibrium Green's function approach, we study charge transport through DNA sequences {{(GC)}{{NGC}}} and {{(GC)}1}{{(TA)}{{NTA}}}{{(GC)}3} sandwiched between two Pt electrodes. We show that at low temperature DNA sequence {{(GC)}{{NGC}}} exhibits coherent charge carrier transport at very small bias, since the highest occupied molecular orbital in the GC base pair can be aligned with the Fermi energy of the metallic electrodes by a gate voltage. A weak distance dependent conductance is found in DNA sequence {{(GC)}1}{{(TA)}{{NTA}}}{{(GC)}3} with large NTA. Different from the mechanism of thermally induced hopping of charges proposed by the previous experiments, we find that this phenomenon is dominated by quantum tunnelling through discrete quantum well states in the TA base pairs. In addition, ac response of this DNA junction under light illumination is also investigated. The suppression of ac conductances of the left and right lead of DNA sequences at some particular frequencies is attributed to the excitation of electrons in the DNA to the lead Fermi surface by ac potential, or the excitation of electrons in deep DNA energy levels to partially occupied energy levels in the transport window. Therefore, measuring ac response of DNA junctions can reveal a wealth of information about the intrinsic dynamics of DNA molecules.

  17. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Nygârd, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike in conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and valley freedom. The interplay between the two is the focus of this review. The energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are explained, together with their consequences for transport measurements through nanotube quantum dots. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly modifies their transport behavior. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, open questions for the field are also clearly stated. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both be reduced to a low level.

  18. Quantum thermal transport in stanene

    Zhou, Hangbo; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-07-01

    By way of the nonequilibrium Green's function simulations and analytical expressions, the quantum thermal conductance of stanene is studied. We find that, due to the existence of Dirac fermion in stanene, the ratio of electron thermal conductance and electric conductance becomes a chemical-potential-dependent quantity, violating the Wiedemann-Franz law. This finding is applicable to any two-dimensional (2D) materials that possess massless Dirac fermions. In strong contrast to the negligible electronic contribution in graphene, surprisingly, the electrons and phonons in stanene carry a comparable heat current. The unusual behaviors in stanene widen our knowledge of quantum thermal transport in 2D materials.

  19. Quantum transport and electroweak baryogenesis

    Konstandin, Thomas

    2013-02-15

    We review the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis. The main focus of the review lies on the development of quantum transport equations from first principles in the Kadanoff-Baym framework. We emphasize the importance of the semi-classical force that leads to reliable predictions in most cases. Besides, we discuss the status of electroweak baryogenesis in the light of recent electric dipole moment probes and collider experiments in a variety of models.

  20. Quantum transport and electroweak baryogenesis

    We review the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis. The main focus of the review lies on the development of quantum transport equations from first principles in the Kadanoff-Baym framework. We emphasize the importance of the semi-classical force that leads to reliable predictions in most cases. Besides, we discuss the status of electroweak baryogenesis in the light of recent electric dipole moment probes and collider experiments in a variety of models.

  1. AC transport in graphene-based Fabry-Perot devices

    Rocha, Claudia G; Torres, Luis E. F. Foa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2009-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the effects of time-dependent fields on electronic transport through graphene nanoribbon devices. The Fabry-P\\'{e}rot interference pattern is modified by an ac gating in a way that depends strongly on the shape of the graphene edges. While for armchair edges the patterns are found to be regular and can be controlled very efficiently by tuning the ac field, samples with zigzag edges exhibit a much more complex interference pattern due to their peculiar elect...

  2. Transport and Dissipation in Quantum Pumps

    Avron, J. E.; Elgart, A.; Graf, G. M.; Sadun, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is about adiabatic transport in quantum pumps. The notion of ``energy shift'', a self-adjoint operator dual to the Wigner time delay, plays a role in our approach: It determines the current, the dissipation, the noise and the entropy currents in quantum pumps. We discuss the geometric and topological content of adiabatic transport and show that the mechanism of Thouless and Niu for quantized transport via Chern numbers cannot be realized in quantum pumps where Chern numbers necessa...

  3. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.;

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries, enabled by sophisticated fabrication, have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin...... of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits, and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the...

  4. Quantum-mechanical wavepacket transport in quantum cascade laser structures

    Lee, S. -C.; Banit, F.; Woerner, M.; Wacker, A.

    2005-01-01

    We present a viewpoint of the transport process in quantum cascade laser structures in which spatial transport of charge through the structure is a property of coherent quantum-mechanical wavefunctions. In contrast, scattering processes redistribute particles in energy and momentum but do not directly cause spatial motion of charge.

  5. Electron transport in quantum dots

    2003-01-01

    When I was contacted by Kluwer Academic Publishers in the Fall of 200 I, inviting me to edit a volume of papers on the issue of electron transport in quantum dots, I was excited by what I saw as an ideal opportunity to provide an overview of a field of research that has made significant contributions in recent years, both to our understanding of fundamental physics, and to the development of novel nanoelectronic technologies. The need for such a volume seemed to be made more pressing by the fact that few comprehensive reviews of this topic have appeared in the literature, in spite of the vast activity in this area over the course of the last decade or so. With this motivation, I set out to try to compile a volume that would fairly reflect the wide range of opinions that has emerged in the study of electron transport in quantum dots. Indeed, there has been no effort on my part to ensure any consistency between the different chapters, since I would prefer that this volume instead serve as a useful forum for the...

  6. Quantum Transport in Graphene Nanonetworks

    Botello Mendez, Andres R [ORNL; Cruz Silva, Eduardo [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio [ORNL; Romo Herrera, Jose M [ORNL; Charlier, Jean Christophe [Universite Catholique de Louvain; Lopez, Florentino [IPICyT

    2011-01-01

    The quantum transport properties of graphene nanoribbon networks are investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Focusing on systems that can be experimentally realized with existing techniques, both in-plane conductance in interconnected graphene nanoribbons and tunneling conductance in out-of-plane nanoribbon intersections were studied. The characteristics of the ab initio electronic transport through in-plane nanoribbon cross-points is found to be in agreement with results obtained with semiempirical approaches. Both simulations confirm the possibility of designing graphene nanoribbon-based networks capable of guiding electrons along desired and predetermined paths. In addition, some of these intersections exhibit different transmission probability for spin up and spin down electrons, suggesting the possible applications of such networks as spin filters. Furthermore, the electron transport properties of out-of-plane nanoribbon cross-points of realistic sizes are described using a combination of firstprinciples and tight-binding approaches. The stacking angle between individual sheets is found to play a central role in dictating the electronic transmission probability within the networks.

  7. Quantum Transport Calculations Using Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-01-01

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal ground state calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  8. Quantum transport calculations for quantum cascade laser structures

    Lee, S. C.; Wacker, A.

    2001-01-01

    We apply a quantum transport theory based on nonequilibrium Green's functions to quantum cascade laser (QCL) structures, treating simultaneously the transmission through the injector regions and the relaxation due to scattering in the active region. The quantum kinetic equations are solved self-consistently using self-energies for interface roughness and phonon scattering processes within the self-consistent Born approximation. In this way, we obtain the current density J, and the average ele...

  9. Time dependent quantum transport through Kondo correlated quantum dots

    Goker, Ali; Gedik, Elif

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review recent work about time dependent quantum transport through a quantum dot in Kondo regime. This represents a major step towards designing next generation transistors that are expected to replace current MOSFET's in a few years. We first discuss the effects of the density of states of gold contacts on the instantaneous conductance of an asymmetrically coupled quantum dot that is abruptly moved into Kondo regime via a gate voltage. Next, we investigate the effect of st...

  10. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures

    Kubis, Tillmann Christoph

    2009-11-15

    The main objective of this thesis is to theoretically predict the stationary charge and spin transport in mesoscopic semiconductor quantum devices in the presence of phonons and device imperfections. It is well known that the nonequilibrium Green's function method (NEGF) is a very general and all-inclusive scheme for the description of exactly this kind of transport problem. Although the NEGF formalism has been derived in the 1960's, textbooks about this formalism are still rare to find. Therefore, we introduce the NEGF formalism, its fundamental equations and approximations in the first part of this thesis. Thereby, we extract ideas of several seminal contributions on NEGF in literature and augment this by some minor derivations that are hard to find. Although the NEGF method has often been numerically implemented on transport problems, all current work in literature is based on a significant number of approximations with often unknown influence on the results and unknown validity limits. Therefore, we avoid most of the common approximations and implement in the second part of this thesis the NEGF formalism as exact as numerically feasible. For this purpose, we derive several new scattering self-energies and introduce new self-adaptive discretizations for the Green's functions and self-energies. The most important improvements of our NEGF implementation, however, affect the momentum and energy conservation during incoherent scattering, the Pauli blocking, the current conservation within and beyond the device and the reflectionless propagation through open device boundaries. Our uncommonly accurate implementation of the NEGF method allows us to analyze and assess most of the common approximations and to unveil numerical artifacts that have plagued previous approximate implementations in literature. Furthermore, we apply our numerical implementation of the NEGF method on the stationary electron transport in THz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and answer

  11. The ac quantum Hall resistance as an electrical impedance standard and its role in the SI

    Since 1990, the quantum Hall resistance measured with direct current (dc) has been established to represent and maintain the dc resistance unit and thereby has replaced the former derivation from calculated inductance and capacitance standards. Because of this success, it has been suggested to measure this quantum effect with alternating current (ac) and in this way to derive the units of resistance, capacitance and inductance consistently from the same quantum effect. In this paper, we recall the relations between these units, their role in the determination of the von Klitzing constant and the relations between the fundamental constants involved in the conventional and the quantum approach. Then, we review the first ac measurements of the quantum Hall resistance and show how the difficulties uncovered have been solved by relatively simple means. As a result, the measurement of the ac quantum Hall resistance has become as precise and reliable as its dc counterpart and much more accurate than any conventional impedance artefact. (paper)

  12. Crossover from quantum to classical transport

    Morr, Dirk K.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the crossover from quantum to classical transport has become of fundamental importance not only for technological applications due to the creation of sub-10-nm transistors - an important building block of our modern life - but also for elucidating the role played by quantum mechanics in the evolutionary fitness of biological complexes. This article provides a basic introduction into the nature of charge and energy transport in the quantum and classical regimes. It discusses the characteristic transport properties in both limits and demonstrates how they can be connected through the loss of quantum mechanical coherence. The salient features of the crossover physics are identified, and their importance in opening new transport regimes and in understanding efficient and robust energy transport in biological complexes are demonstrated.

  13. Quantum Transport Theory for Photonic Networks

    Lei, Chan U

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a quantum transport theory to describe photonic transport in photonic networks. The photonic networks concerned in the paper consist of all-optical circuits incorporating photonic bandgap waveguides and driven resonators. The photoncurrents flowing through waveguides are entirely determined from the exact master equation of the driven resonators. The master equation of the driven resonators is obtained by explicitly eliminating all the waveguide degrees of freedom while the back-reactions between resonators and waveguides are fully taken into account. The relations between the driven photonic dynamics and photoncurrents are obtained. The quantum dissipation and quantum noise effects in photonic transport are also fully addressed. As an illustration, the theory is applied to the transport phenomena of a driven nanocavity coupled to two waveguides in photonic crystals. The controllability of photonic transport through the driven resonator is demonstrated.

  14. On quantum hydrodynamic and quantum energy transport models

    Degond, Pierre; Gallego, Samy; Mehats, Florian

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we consider two recently derived models: the Quantum Hydrodynamic model (QHD) and the Quantum Energy Transport model (QET). We propose different equivalent formulations of these models and we use a commutator formula for stating new properties of the models. A gauge invariance lemma permits to simplify the QHD model for irrotational flows. We finish by considering the special case of a slowly varying temperature and we discuss possible approximations which will b...

  15. Spin-related transport phenomena in HgTe-based quantum well structures

    Within the scope of this thesis, spin related transport phenomena have been investigated in HgTe/Hg0.3Cd0.7Te quantum well structures. In our experiments, the existence of the quantum spin Hall (QSH) state was successfully demonstrated for the first time and the presented results provide clear evidence for the charge transport properties of the QSH state. Our experiments provide the first direct observation of the Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect in semiconductor structures. In conclusion, HgTe quantum well structures have proven to be an excellent template for studying spin-related transport phenomena: The QSH relies on the peculiar band structure of the material and the existence of both the spin Hall effect and the AC effect is a consequence of the substantial spin-orbit interaction. (orig.)

  16. Spin-related transport phenomena in HgTe-based quantum well structures

    Koenig, Markus

    2007-12-15

    Within the scope of this thesis, spin related transport phenomena have been investigated in HgTe/Hg{sub 0.3}Cd{sub 0.7}Te quantum well structures. In our experiments, the existence of the quantum spin Hall (QSH) state was successfully demonstrated for the first time and the presented results provide clear evidence for the charge transport properties of the QSH state. Our experiments provide the first direct observation of the Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect in semiconductor structures. In conclusion, HgTe quantum well structures have proven to be an excellent template for studying spin-related transport phenomena: The QSH relies on the peculiar band structure of the material and the existence of both the spin Hall effect and the AC effect is a consequence of the substantial spin-orbit interaction. (orig.)

  17. A quantum photonic dissipative transport theory

    Lei, Chan U.; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, a quantum transport theory for describing photonic dissipative transport dynamics in nanophotonics is developed. The nanophotonic devices concerned in this paper consist of on-chip all-optical integrated circuits incorporating photonic bandgap waveguides and driven resonators embedded in nanostructured photonic crystals. The photonic transport through waveguides is entirely determined from the exact master equation of the driven resonators, which is obtained by explicitly eliminating all the degrees of freedom of the waveguides (treated as reservoirs). Back-reactions from the reservoirs are fully taken into account. The relation between the driven photonic dynamics and photocurrents is obtained explicitly. The non-Markovian memory structure and quantum decoherence dynamics in photonic transport can then be fully addressed. As an illustration, the theory is utilized to study the transport dynamics of a photonic transistor consisting of a nanocavity coupled to two waveguides in photonic crystals. The controllability of photonic transport through the external driven field is demonstrated.

  18. Quantum transport of energy in controlled synthetic quantum magnets

    Bermudez, Alejandro; Schaetz, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a theoretical scheme that exploits laser cooling and phonon-mediated spin–spin interactions in crystals of trapped atomic ions to explore the transport of energy through a quantum magnet. We show how to implement an effective transport window to control the flow of energy through the magnet even in the absence of fermionic statistics for the carriers. This is achieved by shaping the density of states of the effective thermal reservoirs that arise from the interaction with the external bath of the modes of the electromagnetic field, and can be experimentally controlled by tuning the laser frequencies and intensities appropriately. The interplay of this transport window with the spin–spin interactions is exploited to build an analogue of the Coulomb-blockade effect in nano-scale electronic devices, and opens new possibilities to study quantum effects in energy transport.

  19. Dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behaviour of polyvinyl alcohol–HgSe quantum dot hybrid films

    Here we report a comparative study on the dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behaviour of pure polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and PVA–mercury selenide (HgSe) quantum dot hybrid films in the temperature range 298 K ⩽ T ⩽ 420 K and in the frequency range 100 Hz ⩽ f ⩽ 1 MHz. The prepared nanocomposite exhibits a larger dielectric constant as compared to the pure PVA. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constants were found to fit appreciably with the modified Cole–Cole equation, from which temperature-dependent values of the relaxation times, free charge carrier conductivity and space charge carrier conductivity were calculated. The relaxation time decreases with the quantum dot's inclusion in the PVA matrix and with an increase in temperature, whereas free charge carrier conductivity and space charge carrier conductivity increases with an increase in temperature. An increase in ac conductivity for the nanocomposites has also been observed, while the charge transport mechanism was found to follow the correlated barrier hopping model in both cases. An easy-path model with a suitable electrical equivalent circuit has been employed to analyse the temperature-dependent impedance spectra. The imaginary part of the complex electric modulus spectra exhibit an asymmetric nature and a non-Debye type of behaviour, which has been elucidated considering a generalized susceptibility function. The electric modulus spectra of the nanocomposite demonstrate a smaller amplitude and broader width, as compared to the pure PVA sample. (paper)

  20. Quantum transport in Sierpinski carpets

    van Veen, Edo; Yuan, Shengjun; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Polini, Marco; Tomadin, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Recent progress in the design and fabrication of artificial two-dimensional (2D) materials paves the way for the experimental realization of electron systems moving on complex geometries, such as plane fractals. In this work, we calculate the quantum conductance of a 2D electron gas roaming on a Sierpinski carpet (SC), i.e., a plane fractal with Hausdorff dimension intermediate between 1 and 2. We find that the fluctuations of the quantum conductance are a function of energy with a fractal graph, whose dimension can be chosen by changing the geometry of the SC. This behavior is independent of the underlying lattice geometry.

  1. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices

  2. Anomalous Thermal Transport in Quantum Wires

    Fazio, Rosario; Hekking, F. W. J.; Khmelnitskii, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    We study thermal transport in a one-dimensional quantum wire, connected to reservoirs. Despite of the absence of electron backscattering, interactions in the wire strongly influence thermal transport. Electrons propagate with unitary transmission through the wire and electric conductance is not affected. Energy, however, is carried by bosonic excitations (plasmons) which suffer from scattering even on scales much larger than the Fermi wavelength. If the electron density varies randomly, plasm...

  3. Correlated quantum transport of density wave electrons.

    Miller, J H; Wijesinghe, A I; Tang, Z; Guloy, A M

    2012-01-20

    Recently observed Aharonov-Bohm quantum interference of the period h/2e in charge density wave rings strongly suggests that correlated density wave electron transport is a cooperative quantum phenomenon. The picture discussed here posits that quantum solitons nucleate and transport current above a Coulomb blockade threshold field. We propose a field-dependent tunneling matrix element and use the Schrödinger equation, viewed as an emergent classical equation as in Feynman's treatment of Josephson tunneling, to compute the evolving macrostate amplitudes, finding excellent quantitative agreement with voltage oscillations and current-voltage characteristics in NbSe(3). A proposed phase diagram shows the conditions favoring soliton nucleation versus classical depinning. PMID:22400766

  4. Conformational Influence on Quantum Transport in Nanostructures

    Maul, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In the present thesis we have studied the interplay of conformational and electronic transport properties in metallic and organic nano-structures. Characterization of the influence of thermal, electrostatic or fabrication-induced structural rearrangement on the conductance characteristics gives new insights into the functionality of nano-scale systems, such as quantum point contacts, nano-wires and nano-particles.

  5. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    Jarillo-Herrero, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Electronic transport through nanostructures can be very different from trans- port in macroscopic conductors, especially at low temperatures. Carbon na- notubes are tiny cylinders made of carbon atoms. Their remarkable electronic and mechanical properties, together with their small size (a few nm in

  6. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This revie

  7. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growt

  8. The AC Stark, Stern-Gerlach, and Quantum Zeno Effects in Interferometric Qubit Readout

    Sidles, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the AC Stark, Stern-Gerlach, and Quantum Zeno effects as they are manifested during continuous interferometric measurement of a two-state quantum system (qubit). A simple yet realistic model of the interferometric measurement process is presented, and solved to all orders of perturbation theory in the absence of thermal noise. The statistical properties of the interferometric Stern-Gerlach effect are described in terms of a Fokker-Plank equation, and a closed-form expre...

  9. Kwant: a software package for quantum transport

    Kwant is a Python package for numerical quantum transport calculations. It aims to be a user-friendly, universal, and high-performance toolbox for the simulation of physical systems of any dimensionality and geometry that can be described by a tight-binding model. Kwant has been designed such that the natural concepts of the theory of quantum transport (lattices, symmetries, electrodes, orbital/spin/electron-hole degrees of freedom) are exposed in a simple and transparent way. Defining a new simulation setup is very similar to describing the corresponding mathematical model. Kwant offers direct support for calculations of transport properties (conductance, noise, scattering matrix), dispersion relations, modes, wave functions, various Green's functions, and out-of-equilibrium local quantities. Other computations involving tight-binding Hamiltonians can be implemented easily thanks to its extensible and modular nature. Kwant is free software available at http://kwant-project.org/. (paper)

  10. Exciton size and quantum transport in nanoplatelets

    Two-dimensional nanoplatelets (NPLs) are an exciting class of materials with promising optical and energy transport properties. The possibility of efficient energy transport between nanoplatelets raises questions regarding the nature of energy transfer in these thin, laterally extended systems. A challenge in understanding exciton transport is the uncertainty regarding the size of the exciton. Depending on the material and defects in the nanoplatelet, an exciton could plausibly extend over an entire plate or localize to a small region. The variation in possible exciton sizes raises the question how exciton size impacts the efficiency of transport between nanoplatelet structures. Here, we explore this issue using a quantum master equation approach. This method goes beyond the assumptions of Förster theory to allow for quantum mechanical effects that could increase energy transfer efficiency. The model is extremely flexible in describing different systems, allowing us to test the effect of varying the spatial extent of the exciton. We first discuss qualitative aspects of the relationship between exciton size and transport and then conduct simulations of exciton transport between NPLs for a range of exciton sizes and environmental conditions. Our results reveal that exciton size has a strong effect on energy transfer efficiency and suggest that manipulation of exciton size may be useful in designing NPLs for energy transport

  11. Quantum router based on ac control of qubit chains

    We study the routing of quantum information in qubit chains. This task is achieved by suitably chosen time-dependent local fields acting on the qubits. Employing the physics of coherent destruction of tunneling, we demonstrate that a driving-induced renormalization of the coupling between neighboring qubits provides the key for controlling the transduction of quantum information between permanently coupled qubits. We employ this idea for building a quantum router. Moreover, we discuss the experimental implementation with Penning traps and study the robustness of our protocol under realistic experimental conditions, such as fabrication uncertainties and decoherence.

  12. Quantum transport in a ring of quantum dots

    Sena Junior, Marcone I.; Macedo, Antonio M.C. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Quantum dots play a central role in the recent technological efforts to build efficient devices to storage, process and transmit information in the quantum regime [1]. One of the reasons for this interest is the relative simplicity with which its control parameters can be changed by experimentalists. Systems with one, two and even arrays of quantum dots have been intensively studied with respect to their efficiency in processing information carried by charge, spin and heat [1]. A particularly useful realization of a quantum dot is a ballistic electron cavity formed by electrostatic potentials in a two-dimensional electron gas. In the chaotic regime, the shape of the dot is statistically irrelevant and the ability to change its form via external gates can be used to generate members of an ensemble of identical systems. From a theoretical point of view, such quantum dots are ideal electron systems in which to study theoretical models combining phase-coherence, chaotic dynamics and Coulomb interactions. In this work, we use the Keldysh non-linear sigma model [2] with a counting field to study electron transport through a ring of four chaotic quantum dots pierced by an Aharonov-Bohm flux. This system is particularly well suited for studying ways to use the weak-localization effect to process quantum information. We derive the quantum circuit equations for this system from the saddle-point condition of the Keldysh action. The results are used to build the action of the corresponding supersymmetric (SUSY) non-linear sigma model. The connection with the random scattering matrix approach is then made via the color-flavor transformation. In the perturbative regime, where weak-localization effects appear, the Keldysh, SUSY and random scattering matrix approaches can be compared by means of independent analytical calculations. We conclude by pointing out the many advantages of our unified approach. [1] For a review, see Yu. V. Nazarov, and Ya. M. Blanter, Quantum

  13. Quantum transport in a ring of quantum dots

    Full text: Quantum dots play a central role in the recent technological efforts to build efficient devices to storage, process and transmit information in the quantum regime [1]. One of the reasons for this interest is the relative simplicity with which its control parameters can be changed by experimentalists. Systems with one, two and even arrays of quantum dots have been intensively studied with respect to their efficiency in processing information carried by charge, spin and heat [1]. A particularly useful realization of a quantum dot is a ballistic electron cavity formed by electrostatic potentials in a two-dimensional electron gas. In the chaotic regime, the shape of the dot is statistically irrelevant and the ability to change its form via external gates can be used to generate members of an ensemble of identical systems. From a theoretical point of view, such quantum dots are ideal electron systems in which to study theoretical models combining phase-coherence, chaotic dynamics and Coulomb interactions. In this work, we use the Keldysh non-linear sigma model [2] with a counting field to study electron transport through a ring of four chaotic quantum dots pierced by an Aharonov-Bohm flux. This system is particularly well suited for studying ways to use the weak-localization effect to process quantum information. We derive the quantum circuit equations for this system from the saddle-point condition of the Keldysh action. The results are used to build the action of the corresponding supersymmetric (SUSY) non-linear sigma model. The connection with the random scattering matrix approach is then made via the color-flavor transformation. In the perturbative regime, where weak-localization effects appear, the Keldysh, SUSY and random scattering matrix approaches can be compared by means of independent analytical calculations. We conclude by pointing out the many advantages of our unified approach. [1] For a review, see Yu. V. Nazarov, and Ya. M. Blanter, Quantum

  14. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth. The huge versatility of this material system (e.g. in size and materials) results in a wide range of potential applications in (opto-)electronics. During the last few years many important proofs...

  15. Complex study of transport AC loss in various 2G HTS racetrack coils

    Chen, Yiran, E-mail: yc315@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Zhang, Min; Chudy, Michal; Matsuda, Koichi; Coombs, Tim [University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Comparing transport AC losses of two types of 2G HTS racetrack coils. ► The magnetic substrate in the MAG RABITS coil is the main difference. ► Experimental data agree well with simulation results. ► The transport AC loss in the MAG RABITS coil is 36% higher than that in the IBAD coil. ► It is better to keep all the substrate non-magnetic. -- Abstract: HTS racetrack coils are becoming important elements of an emerging number of superconducting devices such as generators or motors. In these devices the issue of AC loss is crucial, as performance and cooling power are derived from this quantity. This paper presents a comparative study of transport AC loss in two different types of 2G HTS racetrack coils. In this study, both experimental measurements and computer simulation approaches were employed. All the experiments were performed using classical AC electrical method. The finite-element computer model was used to estimate electromagnetic properties and calculate transport AC loss. The main difference between the characterized coils is covered inside tape architectures. While one coil uses tape based on RABITS magnetic substrate, the second coil uses a non-magnetic tape. Ferromagnetic loss caused by a magnetic substrate is an important issue involved in the total AC loss. As a result, the coil with the magnetic substrate surprised with high AC loss and rather low performance.

  16. A scattering matrix approach to quantum pumping: beyond the small-AC-driving-amplitude limit

    In the adiabatic and weak-modulation quantum pump, net electron flow is driven from one reservoir to another by absorbing or emitting an energy quantum ħω from or to the reservoirs. This paper considers high-order dependence of the scattering matrix on the time. Non-sinusoidal behaviour of strong pumping is revealed. The relation between the pumped current and the ac driving amplitude varies from power of 2, 1 to 1/2 when stronger modulation is exerted. Open experimental observation can be interpreted by multi-energy-quantum-related processes. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  17. Quantum Transport in Strongly Correlated Systems

    Bohr, Dan

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade there has been a trend towards studying ever smaller devices. Improved experimental techniques have made new experiments possible, one class of which is electron transport through molecules and artificially manufactured structures like quantum dots. In this type of systems...... screening plays a much less significant role than in bulk systems due to the reduced size of the objects, therefore making it necessary to consider the importance of correlations between electrons. The work presented in this thesis deals with quantum transport through strongly correlated systems using the...... describes the leads in momentum-space. We benchmark each of these schemes against exact Greens function results for the conductance in the non-interacting limit, thus demonstrating the accuracy of the lead descriptions. We first use the DMRG implementations to calculate the conductance of an interacting...

  18. The AC Stark, Stern-Gerlach, and Quantum Zeno Effects in Interferometric Qubit Readout

    Sidles, J A

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the AC Stark, Stern-Gerlach, and Quantum Zeno effects as they are manifested during continuous interferometric measurement of a two-state quantum system (qubit). A simple yet realistic model of the interferometric measurement process is presented, and solved to all orders of perturbation theory in the absence of thermal noise. The statistical properties of the interferometric Stern-Gerlach effect are described in terms of a Fokker-Plank equation, and a closed-form expression for the Green's function of this equation is obtained. Thermal noise is added in the form of a externally-applied Langevin force, and the combined effects of thermal noise and measurement are considered. Optical Bloch equations are obtained which describe the AC Stark and Quantum Zeno effects. Spontaneous qubit transitions are shown to be observationally equivalent to transitions induced by external Langevin forces. The effects of delayed choice are discussed. Practical experiments involving trapped ions are suggest...

  19. Calculating Quantum Transports Using Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-01-01

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This new method is based on a method we developed previously, but with an essential change in solving the Schrodinger's equation. As a result of this change, the scattering states can be solved at any given energy. Compared to the previous method, the current method is faster and numerically more stable. The total computational time of the current method is similar to a conventional gr...

  20. Quantum transport in carbon-based nanostructures

    Nemec, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    The electronic structure and the quantum transport properties of graphene, carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons are studied using analytical and numerical tools. Special care is taken in considering fundamental questions of high experimental relevance and in relating the results to experiments. The main focus of the work is on numerical calculations based on the tight-binding description of electrons, also integrating the results of microscopic ab initio calculations a...

  1. Directed transport in coupled noisy Josephson junctions controlled via ac signals

    Machura, L.; Spiechowicz, J.; Luczka, J.

    2012-01-01

    Transport properties of two coupled Josephson junctions driven by ac currents and thermal fluctuations are studied with the purpose of determining dc voltage characteristics. It is a physical realization of directed transport induced by a non-biased zero averaged external signal. The ac current is applied either to (A) only one junction as a biharmonic current or (B) is split into two simple harmonic components and separately applied to respective junctions. We identify regimes where junction...

  2. Quantum Transport: The Link between Standard Approaches in Superlattices

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    Theories describing electrical transport in semiconductor superlattices can essentially be divided in three disjoint categories: (i) transport in a miniband; (ii) hopping between Wannier-Stark ladders; and (iii) sequential tunneling. We present a quantum transport model, based on nonequilibrium...

  3. The scaling of transport AC losses in Roebel cables with varying strand parameters

    A Roebel cable is a good candidate for low-voltage windings in a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) transformer because of its high current-carrying capability and low AC loss. Transport AC loss measurements were carried out in 1.8 m long 15/5 (fifteen 5 mm wide strands) and 15/4 Roebel cables. The results were compared with those in many Roebel cables composed of 2 mm wide Roebel strands. Comparison of the AC losses hinted that the intrinsic difference in normalized transport AC losses is due to differences in the g/w (ratio of the horizontal gap between the Roebel strands over the Roebel strand width) values. The intrinsic difference was confirmed by measuring transport AC loss in a series of horizontally arranged parallel conductor pairs with various g values. A method to scale transport AC losses in Roebel cables with varying strand parameters was developed. The scaling method will be useful for a rough assessment of AC loss in one-layer solenoid winding coils, such as in a HTS transformer. (papers)

  4. Effective equilibrium theory of nonequilibrium quantum transport

    The theoretical description of strongly correlated quantum systems out of equilibrium presents several challenges and a number of open questions persist. Here, we focus on nonlinear electronic transport through an interacting quantum dot maintained at finite bias using a concept introduced by Hershfield [S. Hershfield, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70 2134 (1993)] whereby one can express such nonequilibrium quantum impurity models in terms of the system's Lippmann-Schwinger operators. These scattering operators allow one to reformulate the nonequilibrium problem as an effective equilibrium problem associated with a modified Hamiltonian. In this paper, we provide a pedagogical analysis of the core concepts of the effective equilibrium theory. First, we demonstrate the equivalence between observables computed using the Schwinger-Keldysh framework and the effective equilibrium approach, and relate Green's functions in the two theoretical frameworks. Second, we expound some applications of this method in the context of interacting quantum impurity models. We introduce a novel framework to treat effects of interactions perturbatively while capturing the entire dependence on the bias voltage. For the sake of concreteness, we employ the Anderson model as a prototype for this scheme. Working at the particle-hole symmetric point, we investigate the fate of the Abrikosov-Suhl resonance as a function of bias voltage and magnetic field. - Highlights: → Reformulation of steady-state nonequilibrium quantum transport, following Hershfield. → Derivation of effective equilibrium density operator using the 'open-system' approach. → Equivalence with the Keldysh description and formulas relating the two approaches. → Novel framework to treat interactions perturbatively. → Application to nonequilibrium Anderson model and fate of Abrikosov-Suhl resonance.

  5. Quantum spin transport in semiconductor nanostructures

    In this work, we study and quantitatively predict the quantum spin Hall effect, the spin-orbit interaction induced intrinsic spin-Hall effect, spin-orbit induced magnetizations, and spin-polarized electric currents in nanostructured two-dimensional electron or hole gases with and without the presence of magnetic fields. We propose concrete device geometries for the generation, detection, and manipulation of spin polarization and spin-polarized currents. To this end a novel multi-band quantum transport theory, that we termed the multi-scattering Buettiker probe model, is developed. The method treats quantum interference and coherence in open quantum devices on the same footing as incoherent scattering and incorporates inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a gauge-invariant and nonperturbative manner. The spin-orbit interaction parameters that control effects such as band energy spin splittings, g-factors, and spin relaxations are calculated microscopically in terms of an atomistic relativistic tight-binding model. We calculate the transverse electron focusing in external magnetic and electric fields. We have performed detailed studies of the intrinsic spin-Hall effect and its inverse effect in various material systems and geometries. We find a geometry dependent threshold value for the spin-orbit interaction for the inverse intrinsic spin-Hall effect that cannot be met by n-type GaAs structures. We propose geometries that spin polarize electric current in zero magnetic field and analyze the out-of-plane spin polarization by all electrical means. We predict unexpectedly large spin-orbit induced spin-polarization effects in zero magnetic fields that are caused by resonant enhancements of the spin-orbit interaction in specially band engineered and geometrically designed p-type nanostructures. We propose a concrete realization of a spin transistor in HgTe quantum wells, that employs the helical edge channel in the quantum spin Hall effect.

  6. Quantum spin transport in semiconductor nanostructures

    Schindler, Christoph

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we study and quantitatively predict the quantum spin Hall effect, the spin-orbit interaction induced intrinsic spin-Hall effect, spin-orbit induced magnetizations, and spin-polarized electric currents in nanostructured two-dimensional electron or hole gases with and without the presence of magnetic fields. We propose concrete device geometries for the generation, detection, and manipulation of spin polarization and spin-polarized currents. To this end a novel multi-band quantum transport theory, that we termed the multi-scattering Buettiker probe model, is developed. The method treats quantum interference and coherence in open quantum devices on the same footing as incoherent scattering and incorporates inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a gauge-invariant and nonperturbative manner. The spin-orbit interaction parameters that control effects such as band energy spin splittings, g-factors, and spin relaxations are calculated microscopically in terms of an atomistic relativistic tight-binding model. We calculate the transverse electron focusing in external magnetic and electric fields. We have performed detailed studies of the intrinsic spin-Hall effect and its inverse effect in various material systems and geometries. We find a geometry dependent threshold value for the spin-orbit interaction for the inverse intrinsic spin-Hall effect that cannot be met by n-type GaAs structures. We propose geometries that spin polarize electric current in zero magnetic field and analyze the out-of-plane spin polarization by all electrical means. We predict unexpectedly large spin-orbit induced spin-polarization effects in zero magnetic fields that are caused by resonant enhancements of the spin-orbit interaction in specially band engineered and geometrically designed p-type nanostructures. We propose a concrete realization of a spin transistor in HgTe quantum wells, that employs the helical edge channel in the quantum spin Hall effect.

  7. Transport ac losses in Bi-2223 multifilamentary tapes - conductor materials aspect

    Transport ac losses in technical superconductors based on Bi-2223 tape material are influenced by many parameters. The major factors that define the ac performance of such conductors are the following: the size and number of filaments, their geometrical arrangement in the cross-section of the conductor, the twist pitch length, the resistivity of the matrix, the presence of oxide barriers around the filaments and deformation procedures such as sequential pressing or rolling followed by appropriate thermal treatment. In the present paper the above aspects are addressed from the viewpoint of the materials science of technical conductor design. Transport ac losses at power frequencies in different types of Bi-2223 conductor are presented and analysed. The results of conductor design analysis with respect to the coexistence of the superconductor with other materials in the conductor structure are presented. New concepts for minimization of the transport ac losses are discussed in detail. (author)

  8. Nonlocal edge state transport in the quantum spin Hall state

    Roth, Andreas; Bruene, Christoph; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W.; Maciejko, Joseph; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    We present direct experimental evidence for nonlocal transport in HgTe quantum wells in the quantum spin Hall regime, in the absence of any external magnetic field. The data conclusively show that the non-dissipative quantum transport occurs through edge channels, while the contacts lead to equilibration between the counter-propagating spin states at the edge. We show that the experimental data agree quantitatively with the theory of the quantum spin Hall effect.

  9. Quantum tunnelling of magnetization in Mn12-ac studied by 55Mn NMR

    Morello, A.; Bakharev, O. N.; Brom, H. B.; de Jongh, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    We present an ultra-low temperature study (down to T = 20 mK) of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) in the 55Mn nuclei of the molecular magnet Mn12-ac. The nuclear spins act as local probes for the electronic spin fluctuations, due to thermal excitations and to tunnelling events. In the quantum regime (below T = 0.75 K), the nuclear SLR becomes temperature-independent and is driven by fluctuations of the cluster's electronic spin due to the quantum tunnelling of magnetization in the gr...

  10. Quantum inductive circuits under ac and dc fields: Current manifestations of charge discreteness

    It is well known that the electrical current of a quantum inductive circuits with charge discreteness qe displays Bloch-like oscillations (frequency ωB=qeεd-bar ) under a dc external voltage (εd). Here we consider the effect of a superposed ac voltage in the circuit. Resonances are explicitly found. In the limit of small external frequency (ω-bar ωB), the electrical (one-period-averaged) current exist and has always the same sign. This gives us an experimental method to measure discrete charge effects in (quantum) nanometric circuits since the established current is depending on charge discreteness

  11. Scaling theory for anomalous semiclassical quantum transport

    Quantum transport through devices coupled to electron reservoirs can be described in terms of the full counting statistics (FCS) of charge transfer. Transport observables, such as conductance and shot-noise power are just cumulants of FCS and can be obtained from the sample’s average density of transmission eigenvalues, which in turn can be obtained from a finite element representation of the saddle-point equation of the Keldysh (or supersymmetric) nonlinear sigma model, known as quantum circuit theory. Normal universal metallic behavior in the semiclassical regime is controlled by the presence of a Fabry–Pérot singularity in the average density of transmission eigenvalues. We present general conditions for the suppression of Fabry–Pérot modes in the semiclassical regime in a sample of arbitrary shape, a disordered conductor or a network of ballistic quantum dots, which leads to an anomalous metallic phase. Through a double-scaling limit, we derive a scaling equation for anomalous metallic transport, in the form of a nonlinear differential equation, which generalizes the ballistic-diffusive scaling equation of a normal metal. The two-parameter stationary solution of our scaling equation generalizes Dorokhov’s universal single-parameter distribution of transmission eigenvalues. We provide a simple interpretation of the stationary solution using a thermodynamic analogy with a spin-glass system. As an application, we consider a system formed by a diffusive wire coupled via a barrier to normal-superconductor reservoirs. We observe anomalous reflectionless tunneling, when all perfectly transmitting channels are suppressed, which cannot be explained by the usual mechanism of disorder-induced opening of tunneling channels. (paper)

  12. Scaling theory for anomalous semiclassical quantum transport

    Sena-Junior, M. I.; Macêdo, A. M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum transport through devices coupled to electron reservoirs can be described in terms of the full counting statistics (FCS) of charge transfer. Transport observables, such as conductance and shot-noise power are just cumulants of FCS and can be obtained from the sample's average density of transmission eigenvalues, which in turn can be obtained from a finite element representation of the saddle-point equation of the Keldysh (or supersymmetric) nonlinear sigma model, known as quantum circuit theory. Normal universal metallic behavior in the semiclassical regime is controlled by the presence of a Fabry-Pérot singularity in the average density of transmission eigenvalues. We present general conditions for the suppression of Fabry-Pérot modes in the semiclassical regime in a sample of arbitrary shape, a disordered conductor or a network of ballistic quantum dots, which leads to an anomalous metallic phase. Through a double-scaling limit, we derive a scaling equation for anomalous metallic transport, in the form of a nonlinear differential equation, which generalizes the ballistic-diffusive scaling equation of a normal metal. The two-parameter stationary solution of our scaling equation generalizes Dorokhov's universal single-parameter distribution of transmission eigenvalues. We provide a simple interpretation of the stationary solution using a thermodynamic analogy with a spin-glass system. As an application, we consider a system formed by a diffusive wire coupled via a barrier to normal-superconductor reservoirs. We observe anomalous reflectionless tunneling, when all perfectly transmitting channels are suppressed, which cannot be explained by the usual mechanism of disorder-induced opening of tunneling channels.

  13. AC shot noise through a quantum dot in the Kondo regime

    Yang, Kai-Hua, E-mail: khybjut@yahoo.com.cn [College of Applied Sciences, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Wu, Yan-Ju; Chen, Yang [College of Applied Sciences, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2011-08-01

    The photon-assisted shot noise through a quantum dot in the Kondo regime is investigated by applying time-dependent canonical transformation and non-crossing approximation technique. A basic formula for the photon-assisted shot noise is obtained. The rich dependence of the shot noise on the external ac field and temperature is displayed. At low temperature and low frequencies, the differential shot noise exhibits staircase behavior. When the temperature increases, the steps are rounded. At elevated frequencies, the photon-assisted tunneling becomes more obvious. We have also found that the Fano factor is enhanced as the ac frequency is enhanced. -- Highlights: → The explicitly photon-assisted shot noise formula through strongly correlated quantum dot is obtained. → The time-dependent canonical transformation and non-crossing approximation technique. → The rich dependence of the shot noise on the external ac field and temperature is displayed. → The Fano factor is enhanced as the ac frequency is enhanced.

  14. Quasienergy spectrum and tunneling current in ac-driven triple quantum dot shuttles

    Villavicencio, J [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada (Mexico); Maldonado, I [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico); Cota, E [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada (Mexico); Platero, G, E-mail: villavics@uabc.edu.mx [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    The dynamics of electrons in ac-driven double quantum dots have been extensively analyzed by means of Floquet theory. In these systems, coherent destruction of tunneling has been shown to occur for certain ac field parameters. In this work we analyze, by means of Floquet theory, the electron dynamics of a triple quantum dot in series attached to electric contacts, where the central dot position oscillates. In particular, we analyze the quasienergy spectrum of this ac-driven nanoelectromechanical system as a function of the intensity and frequency of the ac field and of external dc voltages. For strong driving fields, we derive, by means of perturbation theory, analytical expressions for the quasienergies of the driven oscillator system. From this analysis, we discuss the conditions for coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) to occur as a function of detuning and field parameters. For zero detuning, and from the invariance of the Floquet Hamiltonian under a generalized parity transformation, we find analytical expressions describing the symmetry properties of the Fourier components of the Floquet states under such a transformation. By using these expressions, we show that in the vicinity of the CDT condition, the quasienergy spectrum exhibits exact crossings which can be characterized by the parity properties of the corresponding eigenvectors.

  15. Transport through multiply connected quantum wires

    Das, Sourin; Rao, Sumathi

    2003-01-01

    We study transport through multiply coupled carbon nano-tubes (quantum wires) and compute the conductances through the two wires as a function of the two gate voltages $g_1$ and $g_2$ controlling the chemical potential of the electrons in the two wires. We find that there is an {\\it equilibrium} cross-conductance, and we obtain its dependence on the temperature and length of the wires. The effective action of the model for the wires in the strong coupling (equivalently Coulomb interaction) li...

  16. Optimal Control Theory for Time-Dependent Quantum Transport

    Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Optical techniques have been employed to coherently control the quantum transport through nanojunctions. Conventional works on optical control of quantum transport usually applied a tailored electrical pulses to perform specific tasks. In this work, an opposite way is employed and a time-dependent driving field is searched to force the system behave in desired pattern. In order to achieve the goal, an optimal control theory for time-dependent quantum transport is developed. The theory provide...

  17. Quantum transport in superlattice and quantum dot structures

    Murphy, H M

    2000-01-01

    manifestation of oscillations in the current -voltage characteristics of superlattices in the Wannier-Stark transport regime when strong lateral confinement is provided due either to gaps in the folded phonon spectrum or phonon momentum meeting the condition for Bragg reflection. Current-voltage measurements are shown in this chapter for superlattice devices in the Wannier-Stark regime for a range of electric and magnetic fields (B//I). Many oscillations are clearly observed in the I(V) data presented, the possible origins of which are then fully explored. Moving away from superlattices, data involving tunnelling through quantum dots embedded in the barrier of a GaAs/AIAs/GaAs resonant tunnelling diode are presented in chapter 5. Quasi-hydrostatic pressure is used to tune tunnelling through the dots. These results lead to a new picture for the conduction band potential profile of this device, and give us important new information relating to devices incorporating self-assembled quantum dots. More importantly,...

  18. Controlling Quantum Transport with a Programmable Nanophotonic Processor

    Harris, Nicholas; Steinbrecher, Gregory; Mower, Jacob; Lihini, Yoav; Prabhu, Mihika; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Lloyd, Seth; Englund, Dirk

    Recent experimental and theoretical work has revealed emergent, counter-intuitive quantum transport effects in a range of physical medial including solid-state and biological systems. Photonic integrated circuits are promising platforms for studying such effects. A central goal in for photonic quantum transport simulators has been the ability to rapidly control all parameters of the transport problem. Here, we present a large-scale programmable nanophotonic processor composed of 56 Mach-Zehnder interferometers that enables control over modal couplings and differential phases between modes--enabling observations of Anderson localization, environment-assisted quantum transport, ballistic transport, and a number of intermediate quantum transport regimes. Rapid programmability enables tens of thousands of realizations of disordered and noisy systems. In addition, low loss makes this nanophotonic processor a promising platform for many-boson quantum simulation experiments.

  19. Quantum transport enhancement by time-reversal symmetry breaking

    Quantum mechanics still provides new unexpected effects when considering the transport of energy and information. Models of continuous time quantum walks, which implicitly use time-reversal symmetric Hamiltonians, have been intensely used to investigate the effectiveness of transport. Here we show how breaking time-reversal symmetry in this model can enable directional control, enhancement, and suppression of quantum transport. Examples ranging from exciton transport to complex networks are presented. This opens new prospects for more efficient methods to transport energy and information.

  20. Superconductivity in nanowires. Fabrication and quantum transport

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine. One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so is the investigation and understanding of these properties in the first place. A promising approach is to use carbon nanotubes as well as DNA structures as templates. Many fundamental theoretical questions are still unanswered, e.g. related to the role of quantum fluctuations. This work is tackling them and provides a detailed analysis of the transport properties of such ultrathin wires. It presents an account of theoretical models, charge transport experiments, and also conveys the latest experimental findings regarding fabrication, measurements, and theoretical analysis. In particular, it is the only available resource for the approach of using DNA and carbon nanotubes for nanowire fabrication.

  1. Plasmon assisted transport through disordered array of quantum wires

    Chudnovskiy, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    Phononless plasmon assisted thermally activated transport through a long disordered array of finite length quantum wires is investigated analytically. Generically strong electron plasmon interaction in quantum wires results in a qualitative change of the temperature dependence of thermally activated resistance in comparison to phonon assisted transport. At high temperatures, the thermally activated resistance is determined by the Luttinger liquid interaction parameter of the wires.

  2. Transport through Zero-Dimensional States in a Quantum Dot

    Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Wees, Bart J. van; Harmans, Kees J.P.M.; Williamson, John G.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the electron transport through zero-dimensional (0D) states. 0D states are formed when one-dimensional edge channels are confined in a quantum dot. The quantum dot is defined in a two-dimensional electron gas with a split gate technique. To allow electronic transport, connection to t

  3. Quantum Simulator for Transport Phenomena in Fluid Flows

    Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; I. L. Egusquiza; Succi, S; Solano, E.

    2015-01-01

    Transport phenomena still stand as one of the most challenging problems in computational physics. By exploiting the analogies between Dirac and lattice Boltzmann equations, we develop a quantum simulator based on pseudospin-boson quantum systems, which is suitable for encoding fluid dynamics transport phenomena within a lattice kinetic formalism. It is shown that both the streaming and collision processes of lattice Boltzmann dynamics can be implemented with controlled quantum operations, usi...

  4. Quantum Transport Simulations of Nanoscale Materials

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2016-01-07

    Nanoscale materials have many potential advantages because of their quantum confinement, cost and producibility by low-temperature chemical methods. Advancement of theoretical methods as well as the availability of modern high-performance supercomputers allow us to control and exploit their microscopic properties at the atomic scale, hence making it possible to design novel nanoscale molecular devices with interesting features (e.g switches, rectifiers, negative differential conductance, and high magnetoresistance). In this thesis, state-of-the-art theoretical calculations have been performed for the quantum transport properties of nano-structured materials within the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Nonequilibrium Green\\'s Function (NEGF) formalism. The switching behavior of a dithiolated phenylene-vinylene oligomer sandwiched between Au(111) electrodes is investigated. The molecule presents a configurational bistability, which can be exploited in constructing molecular memories, switches, and sensors. We find that protonation of the terminating thiol groups is at the origin of the change in conductance. H bonding at the thiol group weakens the S-Au bond, and thus lowers the conductance. Our results allow us to re-interpret the experimental data originally attributing the conductance reduction to H dissociation. Also examined is current-induced migration of atoms in nanoscale devices that plays an important role for device operation and breakdown. We studied the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes under finite bias. We demonstrate that current-induced forces within DFT are non-conservative, which so far has only been shown for model systems, and can lower migration barrier heights. Further, we investigated the quantum transport behavior of an experimentally observed diblock molecule by varying the amounts of phenyl (donor) and pyrimidinyl (acceptor) rings under finite bias. We show that a tandem configuration of

  5. Linear ac transport in graphene semiconducting nanosystem with normal-metal electrodes

    Ye, En-Jia; Sun, Yun-Lei; Lan, Jin; Shi, Yi-Jian

    2016-03-01

    Linear ac transport properties are investigated in a graphene semiconducting nanosystem, with the effect of normal-metal electrodes taken into account. We use a tight-binding approach and ac transport theory to study the dc conductance and ac emittance in normal-metal/graphene (NG) and normal-metal/graphene/normal-metal (NGN) systems with armchair-edge graphene. We find that the resonant and semiconducting behaviors in NG and NGN systems are closely related to the spatial-resolved local density of states. Furthermore, features of the size-dependent emittances in the NGN system are investigated. The results suggest a positive correlation between the width and capacitive response, and the capacitive response is robust as the size of the system increases proportionally.

  6. Temperature Dependence of Abnormal Fano Resonance in Photon-Assisted Transport Through a Side-Coupled Quantum Dot

    HU Yin; SONG Hong-Yan; DONG Zheng-Chao; WU Liu-Po; SHI Yao-Ming; ZHOU Shi-Ping

    2008-01-01

    We investigate transport through a perfect quantum wire with a side-coupled quantum dot under an ac find. Time-averaged complex conductance is formulated by using the nonequilibrium Green function (NGF) method. We find that the electron-photon interaction together with the quantum interference of Nectron wave function can lead to anti-resonance in the conductance, which is then useful for tuning coherence and phases of Nectrons. Meanwhile, we study the temperature dependence of the conductance. Interestingly, a peak-structure can be developed at the Fano resonance levels with increasing temperatures.

  7. Quantum Spin Transport in Mesoscopic Interferometer

    Zein W. A.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Spin-dependent conductance of ballistic mesoscopic interferometer is investigated. The quantum interferometer is in the form of ring, in which a quantum dot is embedded in one arm. This quantum dot is connected to one lead via tunnel barrier. Both Aharonov- Casher and Aharonov-Bohm e ects are studied. Our results confirm the interplay of spin-orbit coupling and quantum interference e ects in such confined quantum systems. This investigation is valuable for spintronics application, for example, quantum information processing.

  8. Numerical and theoretical evaluations of AC losses for single and infinite numbers of superconductor strips with direct and alternating transport currents in external AC magnetic field

    Kajikawa, K., E-mail: kajikawa@sc.kyushu-u.ac.j [Research Institute of Superconductor Science and Systems, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Funaki, K. [Research Institute of Superconductor Science and Systems, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 20-1 Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    AC losses in a superconductor strip are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method formulated with a current vector potential. The expressions of AC losses in an infinite slab that corresponds to a simple model of infinitely stacked strips are also derived theoretically. It is assumed that the voltage-current characteristics of the superconductors are represented by Bean's critical state model. The typical operation pattern of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil with direct and alternating transport currents in an external AC magnetic field is taken into account as the electromagnetic environment for both the single strip and the infinite slab. By using the obtained results of AC losses, the influences of the transport currents on the total losses are discussed quantitatively.

  9. Numerical and theoretical evaluations of AC losses for single and infinite numbers of superconductor strips with direct and alternating transport currents in external AC magnetic field

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    AC losses in a superconductor strip are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method formulated with a current vector potential. The expressions of AC losses in an infinite slab that corresponds to a simple model of infinitely stacked strips are also derived theoretically. It is assumed that the voltage-current characteristics of the superconductors are represented by Bean’s critical state model. The typical operation pattern of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil with direct and alternating transport currents in an external AC magnetic field is taken into account as the electromagnetic environment for both the single strip and the infinite slab. By using the obtained results of AC losses, the influences of the transport currents on the total losses are discussed quantitatively.

  10. Percolation assisted excitation transport in discrete-time quantum walks

    Štefaňák, M.; Novotný, J.; Jex, I.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent transport of excitations along chains of coupled quantum systems represents an interesting problem with a number of applications ranging from quantum optics to solar cell technology. A convenient tool for studying such processes are quantum walks. They allow us to determine all the process features in a quantitative way. We study the survival probability and the transport efficiency on a simple, highly symmetric graph represented by a ring. The propagation of excitation is modeled by a discrete-time (coined) quantum walk. For a two-state quantum walk, where the excitation (walker) has to leave its actual position to the neighboring sites, the survival probability decays exponentially and the transport efficiency is unity. The decay rate of the survival probability can be estimated using the leading eigenvalue of the evolution operator. However, if the excitation is allowed to stay at its present position, i.e. the propagation is modeled by a lazy quantum walk, then part of the wave-packet can be trapped in the vicinity of the origin and never reaches the sink. In such a case, the survival probability does not vanish and the excitation transport is not efficient. The dependency of the transport efficiency on the initial state is determined. Nevertheless, we show that for some lazy quantum walks dynamical, percolations of the ring eliminate the trapping effect and efficient excitation transport can be achieved.

  11. Limited Quantum Helium Transportation through Nano-channels by Quantum Fluctuation

    Ohba, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Helium at low temperatures has unique quantum properties such as superfluidity, which causes it to behave differently from a classical fluid. Despite our deep understanding of quantum mechanics, there are many open questions concerning the properties of quantum fluids in nanoscale systems. Herein, the quantum behavior of helium transportation through one-dimensional nanopores was evaluated by measuring the adsorption of quantum helium in the nanopores of single-walled carbon nanohorns and AlPO4-5 at 2–5 K. Quantum helium was transported unimpeded through nanopores larger than 0.7 nm in diameter, whereas quantum helium transportation was significantly restricted through 0.4-nm and 0.6-nm nanopores. Conversely, nitrogen molecules diffused through the 0.4-nm nanopores at 77 K. Therefore, quantum helium behaved as a fluid comprising atoms larger than 0.4–0.6 nm. This phenomenon was remarkable, considering that helium is the smallest existing element with a (classical) size of approximately 0.27 nm. This finding revealed the presence of significant quantum fluctuations. Quantum fluctuation determined the behaviors of quantum flux and is essential to understanding unique quantum behaviors in nanoscale systems. PMID:27363671

  12. Limited Quantum Helium Transportation through Nano-channels by Quantum Fluctuation.

    Ohba, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Helium at low temperatures has unique quantum properties such as superfluidity, which causes it to behave differently from a classical fluid. Despite our deep understanding of quantum mechanics, there are many open questions concerning the properties of quantum fluids in nanoscale systems. Herein, the quantum behavior of helium transportation through one-dimensional nanopores was evaluated by measuring the adsorption of quantum helium in the nanopores of single-walled carbon nanohorns and AlPO4-5 at 2-5 K. Quantum helium was transported unimpeded through nanopores larger than 0.7 nm in diameter, whereas quantum helium transportation was significantly restricted through 0.4-nm and 0.6-nm nanopores. Conversely, nitrogen molecules diffused through the 0.4-nm nanopores at 77 K. Therefore, quantum helium behaved as a fluid comprising atoms larger than 0.4-0.6 nm. This phenomenon was remarkable, considering that helium is the smallest existing element with a (classical) size of approximately 0.27 nm. This finding revealed the presence of significant quantum fluctuations. Quantum fluctuation determined the behaviors of quantum flux and is essential to understanding unique quantum behaviors in nanoscale systems. PMID:27363671

  13. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO

  14. Quantum transport through 3D Dirac materials

    Bismuth and its alloys provide a paradigm to realize three dimensional materials whose low-energy effective theory is given by Dirac equation in 3+1 dimensions. We study the quantum transport properties of three dimensional Dirac materials within the framework of Landauer–Büttiker formalism. Charge carriers in normal metal satisfying the Schrödinger equation, can be split into four-component with appropriate matching conditions at the boundary with the three dimensional Dirac material (3DDM). We calculate the conductance and the Fano factor of an interface separating 3DDM from a normal metal, as well as the conductance through a slab of 3DDM. Under certain circumstances the 3DDM appears transparent to electrons hitting the 3DDM. We find that electrons hitting the metal-3DDM interface from metallic side can enter 3DDM in a reversed spin state as soon as their angle of incidence deviates from the direction perpendicular to interface. However the presence of a second interface completely cancels this effect

  15. Quantum transport through 3D Dirac materials

    Salehi, M. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, S.A., E-mail: jafari@physics.sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for Complex Systems and Condensed Matter (CSCM), Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 1458889694 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Bismuth and its alloys provide a paradigm to realize three dimensional materials whose low-energy effective theory is given by Dirac equation in 3+1 dimensions. We study the quantum transport properties of three dimensional Dirac materials within the framework of Landauer–Büttiker formalism. Charge carriers in normal metal satisfying the Schrödinger equation, can be split into four-component with appropriate matching conditions at the boundary with the three dimensional Dirac material (3DDM). We calculate the conductance and the Fano factor of an interface separating 3DDM from a normal metal, as well as the conductance through a slab of 3DDM. Under certain circumstances the 3DDM appears transparent to electrons hitting the 3DDM. We find that electrons hitting the metal-3DDM interface from metallic side can enter 3DDM in a reversed spin state as soon as their angle of incidence deviates from the direction perpendicular to interface. However the presence of a second interface completely cancels this effect.

  16. Quantum transport through 3D Dirac materials

    Salehi, M.; Jafari, S. A.

    2015-08-01

    Bismuth and its alloys provide a paradigm to realize three dimensional materials whose low-energy effective theory is given by Dirac equation in 3+1 dimensions. We study the quantum transport properties of three dimensional Dirac materials within the framework of Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Charge carriers in normal metal satisfying the Schrödinger equation, can be split into four-component with appropriate matching conditions at the boundary with the three dimensional Dirac material (3DDM). We calculate the conductance and the Fano factor of an interface separating 3DDM from a normal metal, as well as the conductance through a slab of 3DDM. Under certain circumstances the 3DDM appears transparent to electrons hitting the 3DDM. We find that electrons hitting the metal-3DDM interface from metallic side can enter 3DDM in a reversed spin state as soon as their angle of incidence deviates from the direction perpendicular to interface. However the presence of a second interface completely cancels this effect.

  17. Quantum kinetics in transport and optics of semincionductors

    Haug, H

    2008-01-01

    Nanoscale miniaturization and femtosecond laser-pulse spectroscopy require a quantum mechanical description of the carrier kinetics that goes beyond the conventional Boltzmann theory. On these extremely short length and time scales the electrons behave like partially coherent waves. This monograph deals with quantum kinetics for transport in low-dimensional microstructures and for ultra-short laser pulse spectroscopy. The nonequilibrium Green function theory is described and used for the derivation of the quantum kinetic equations. Numerical methods for the solution of the retarded quantum kinetic equations are discussed and results are presented for high-field transport and for mesoscopic transport phenomena. Quantum beats, polarization decay, and non-Markovian behaviour are treated for femtosecond spectroscopy on a microscopic basis. Since the publishing of the first edition in 1996 the nonequilibrium Green function technique has been applied to a large number of new research topics, and the revised edition...

  18. Parallel transport quantum logic gates with trapped ions

    de Clercq, Ludwig; Marinelli, Matteo; Nadlinger, David; Oswald, Robin; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Kienzler, Daniel; Keitch, Ben; Home, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing will require combinations of gate operations and communication, with each applied in parallel to large numbers of quantum systems. These tasks are often performed sequentially, with gates implemented by pulsed fields and information transported either by moving the physical qubits or using photonic links. For trapped ions, an alternative approach is to implement quantum logic gates by transporting the ions through static laser beams, combining qubit operations with transport. This has significant advantages for scalability since the voltage waveforms required for transport can potentially be generated using micro-electronics integrated into the trap structure itself, while both optical and microwave control elements are significantly more bulky. Using a multi-zone ion trap, we demonstrate transport gates on a qubit encoded in the hyperfine structure of a beryllium ion. We show the ability to perform sequences of operations, and to perform parallel gates on two ions transported t...

  19. Nonequilibrium electron transport through quantum dots in the Kondo regime

    Wölfle, Peter; Paaske, Jens; Rosch, Achim; Kroha, Johann

    2005-01-01

    Electron transport at large bias voltage through quantum dots in the Kondo regime is described within the perturbative renormalization group extended to nonequilibrium. The conductance, local magnetization, dynamical spin susceptibility and local spectral function are calculated. We show how the ...

  20. Numerical Evidence for Robustness of Environment-Assisted Quantum Transport

    Shabani, A; Rabitz., H; Lloyd, S

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies show that decoherence process can enhance transport efficiency in quantum systems. This effect is known as environment-assisted quantum transport (ENAQT). The role of ENAQT in optimal quantum transport is well investigated, however, it is less known how robust ENAQT is with respect to variations in the system or its environment characteristic. Toward answering this question, we simulated excitonic energy transfer in Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) photosynthetic complex. We found that ENAQT is robust with respect to many relevant parameters of environmental interactions and Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian including reorganization energy, bath frequency cutoff, temperature, and initial excitations, dissipation rate, trapping rate, disorders, and dipole moments orientations. Our study suggests that the ENAQT phenomenon can be exploited in robust design of highly efficient quantum transport systems.

  1. Transport and AC loss properties of the repaired multifilamentary REBCO superconducting tapes

    Yamasaki, S.; Iwakuma, M.; Funaki, K.; Kato, J.; Chikumoto, T.; Tanabe, K.; Nakao, K.; Izumi, T.; Yamada, Y.; Shiohara, Y.; Saito, T.

    2010-11-01

    For near-future applications of REBa 2Cu 3O 7 (REBCO) coated conductors to electric power cables, transformers and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES), the long taped wires with high performance in the transport properties have been designed and fabricated. Moreover, in order to drastically reduce AC losses in perpendicular field configuration, advanced multifilament YBCO coated conductors (MFYCCs) fabricated with technique of a laser scribing process have been also developed. In the present study, from engineering viewpoints to utilize such advanced conductors, we evaluated the transport and AC loss properties of short MFYCCs with a repaired part or a joint by a diffusion joint technique with the saddle-shaped pickup coil method.

  2. Transport and AC loss properties of the repaired multifilamentary REBCO superconducting tapes

    Yamasaki, S. [Research Institute of Superconductor Science and Systems, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Iwakuma, M., E-mail: iwakuma@sc.kyushu-u.ac.j [Research Institute of Superconductor Science and Systems, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Funaki, K. [Research Institute of Superconductor Science and Systems, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kato, J.; Chikumoto, T.; Tanabe, K.; Nakao, K.; Izumi, T.; Yamada, Y.; Shiohara, Y. [International Superconductivity Technology Center, ISTEC, 1-10-13 Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Saito, T. [Fujikura Ltd., 1-5-1 Kiba, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    For near-future applications of REBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (REBCO) coated conductors to electric power cables, transformers and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES), the long taped wires with high performance in the transport properties have been designed and fabricated. Moreover, in order to drastically reduce AC losses in perpendicular field configuration, advanced multifilament YBCO coated conductors (MFYCCs) fabricated with technique of a laser scribing process have been also developed. In the present study, from engineering viewpoints to utilize such advanced conductors, we evaluated the transport and AC loss properties of short MFYCCs with a repaired part or a joint by a diffusion joint technique with the saddle-shaped pickup coil method.

  3. Time-resolved electron transport in quantum-dot systems

    In this thesis the time-resolved electron transport in quantum dot systems was studied. For this two different formalisms were presented: The nonequilibrium Green functions and the generalized quantum master equations. For both formalisms a propagation method for the numerical calculation of time-resolved expectation values, like the occupation and the electron current, was developed. For the demonstration of the propagation method two different question formulations were considered. On the one hand the stochastically driven resonant-level model was studied. On the other hand the pulse-induced transport through a double quantum dot was considered.

  4. Chaotic transport of particles in two-dimensional periodic potentials driven by ac forces

    Guantes, R.; Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2003-01-01

    The diffusive and directed transport of particles in a two-dimensional peridoic potential was studied. The model represents diffusion of atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces under an applied ac electric field in the low-temperature limit. The results show that the second dimension and the potential energy coupling play an important role on both diffusion and net currents, depending on the direction of the drive.

  5. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  6. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects. PMID:27324814

  7. Transport through quantum wells and superlattices on topological insulator surfaces.

    Song, J-T; Li, Y-X; Sun, Q-F

    2014-05-01

    We investigate electron transmission coefficients through quantum wells and quantum superlattices on topological insulator surfaces. The quantum well or superlattice is not constituted by general electronic potential barriers but by Fermi velocity barriers which originate in the different topological insulator surfaces. It is found that electron resonant modes can be renormalized by quantum wells and more clearly by quantum superlattices. The depth and width of a quantum well and superlattice, the incident angle of an electron, and the Fermi energy can be used to effectively tune the electron resonant modes. In particular, the number N of periodic structures that constitute a superlattice can further strengthen these regulating effects. These results suggest that a device could be developed to select and regulate electron propagation modes on topological insulator surfaces. Finally, we also study the conductance and the Fano factor through quantum wells and quantum superlattices. In contrast to what has been reported before, the suppression factors of 0.4 in the conductance and 0.85 in the Fano factor are observed in a quantum well, while the transport for a quantum superlattice shows strong oscillating behavior at low energy and reaches the same saturated values as in the case of a quantum well at sufficiently large energies. PMID:24759077

  8. Long-distance quantum transport dynamics in macromolecules

    Schneider, E.; Faccioli, P.

    2014-04-01

    Using renormalization group methods, we develop a rigorous coarse-grained representation of the dissipative dynamics of quantum excitations propagating inside open macromolecular systems. We show that, at very low spatial resolution, this quantum transport theory reduces to a modified Brownian process, in which quantum delocalization effects are accounted for by means of an effective term in the Onsager-Machlup functional. Using this formulation, we derive a simple analytic solution for the time-dependent probability of observing the quantum excitation at a given point in the macromolecule. This formula can be used to predict the migration of natural or charged quantum excitations in a variety of molecular systems, including biological and organic polymers, organic crystalline transistors, or photosynthetic complexes. For illustration purposes, we apply this method to investigate inelastic electronic hole transport in a long homo-DNA chain.

  9. AC transport current loss analysis for a face-to-face stack of superconducting tapes

    Yoo, Jaeun [Dept. of Physics, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Youm, Dojun [Dept. of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang Soo [Superconducting Materials Research Group, KERI, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    AC Losses for face to face stacks of four identical coated conductors (CCs) were numerically calculated using the H-formulation combined with the E-J power law and the Kim model. The motive sample was the face to face stack of four 2 mm-wide CC tapes with 2 μm thick superconducting layer of which the critical current density, J{sub c}, was 2.16 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} on IBAD-MgO template, which was suggested for the mitigation of ac loss as a round shaped wire by Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute. For the calculation the cross section of the stack was simply modeled as vertically aligned 4 rectangles of superconducting (SC) layers withE=E{sub o}(J(x,y,t)/J{sub c}(B)){sup n} in x-y plane where E{sub o} was 10{sup -6} V/cm, J{sub c} (B) was the field dependence of current density and n was 21. The field dependence of the critical current of the sample measured in four-probe method was employed for J{sub c} (B) in the equation. The model was implemented in the finite element method program by commercial software. The ac loss properties for the stacks were compared with those of single 4 cm-wide SC layers with the same critical current density or the same critical current. The constraint for the simulation was imposed in two different ways that the total current of the stack obtained by integrating J(x,y,t) over the cross sections was the same as that of the applied transport current: one is that one fourth of the external current was enforced to flow through each SC. In this case, the ac loss values for the stacks were lower than those of single wide SC layer. This mitigation of the loss is attributed to the reduction of the normal component of the magnetic field near the SC layers due to the strong expulsion of the magnetic field by the enforced transport current. On the contrary, for the other case of no such enforcement, the ac loss values were greater than those of single 4cm-wide SC layer and. In this case, the phase difference of the current flowing

  10. Quantum thermometry using the ac Stark shift within the Rabi model

    Higgins, Kieran D B; Gauger, Erik M

    2012-01-01

    A quantum two level system coupled to a harmonic oscillator represents a ubiquitous physical system. New experiments in circuit QED and nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) achieve unprecedented coupling strength at large detuning between qubit and oscillator, thus requiring a theoretical treatment beyond the Jaynes Cummings model. Here we present a new method for describing the qubit dynamics in this regime, based on an oscillator correlation function expansion of a non-Markovian master equation in the polaron frame. Our technique yields a new numerical method as well as a succinct approximate expression for the qubit dynamics. We obtain a new expression for the ac Stark shift and show that this enables practical and precise qubit thermometry of an oscillator.

  11. Transport of quantum states of periodically driven systems

    Breuer, H. P.; Dietz, K.; Holthaus, M.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the transport of quantum states on quasi-energy surfaces of periodically driven systems and establish their non-trivial structure. The latter is shown to be caused by diabatic transitions at lines of narrow avoided crossings. Some experimental consequences pertaining to adiabatic transport and Landau-Zener transitions among Floquet states are briefly sketched.

  12. Quantum coherence in ion channels: Resonances, Transport and Verification

    Vaziri, A

    2010-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that long-lived quantum coherence exists during excitation energy transport in photosynthesis. It is a valid question up to which length, time and mass scales quantum coherence may extend, how to one may detect this coherence and what if any role it plays for the dynamics of the system. Here we suggest that the selectivity filter of ion channels may exhibit quantum coherence which might be relevant for the process of ion selectivity and conduction. We show that quantum resonances could provide an alternative approch to ultrafast 2D spectroscopy to probe these quantum coherences. We demonstrate that the emergence of resonances in the conduction of ion channels that are modulated periodicallly by time dependent external electric fields can serve as signitures of quantum coherence in such a system. Assessments of experimental feasibility and specific paths towards the experimental realization of such experiments are presented. We show that this may be probed by direct 2-D spectroscop...

  13. Incoherent transport in clean quantum critical metals

    Davison, Richard A; Hartnoll, Sean A

    2015-01-01

    In a clean quantum critical metal, and in the absence of umklapp, most d.c. conductivities are formally infinite due to momentum conservation. However, there is a particular combination of the charge and heat currents which has a finite, universal conductivity. In this paper, we describe the physics of this conductivity $\\sigma_Q$ in quantum critical metals obtained by charge doping a strongly interacting conformal field theory. We show that it satisfies an Einstein relation and controls the diffusivity of a conserved charge in the metal. We compute $\\sigma_Q$ in a class of theories with holographic gravitational duals. Finally, we show how the temperature scaling of $\\sigma_Q$ depends on certain critical exponents characterizing the quantum critical metal. The holographic results are found to be reproduced by the scaling analysis, with the charge density operator becoming marginal in the emergent low energy quantum critical theory.

  14. Scattering matrix approach to non-stationary quantum transport

    Moskalets, Michael V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to introduce the basic elements of the scattering matrix approach to transport phenomena in dynamical quantum systems of non-interacting electrons. This approach admits a physically clear and transparent description of transport processes in dynamical mesoscopic systems promising basic elements of solid-state devices for quantum information processing. One of the key effects, the quantum pump effect, is considered in detail. In addition, the theory for a recently implemented new dynamical source - injecting electrons with time delay much larger than the electron coherence time - is offered. This theory provides a simple description of quantum circuits with such a single-particle source and shows in an unambiguous way that the tunability inherent to the dynamical systems leads to a number of unexpected but fundamental effects.

  15. Hidden symmetries enhance quantum transport in Light Harvesting systems

    Zech, Tobias; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    For more than 50 years we have known that photosynthetic systems harvest solar energy with almost unit {\\it quantum efficiency}. However, recent experimental evidence of {\\it quantum coherence} during the excitonic energy transport in photosynthetic organisms challenges our understanding of this fundamental biological function. Currently, and despite numerous efforts, the causal connection between coherence and efficiency is still a matter of debate. We show, through the study of extensive simulations of quantum coherent transport on networks, that three dimensional structures characterized by centro-symmetric Hamiltonians are statistically more efficient than random arrangements. Moreover, we demonstrate that the experimental data available for the electronic Hamiltonians of the Fenna-Mathew-Olson (FMO) complex of sulfur bacteria and of the crypophyte PC645 complex of marine algae are consistent with this strong correlation of centro-symmetry with quantum efficiency. These results show that what appears to b...

  16. Noise-enhanced quantum transport on a closed loop using quantum walks

    Chandrashekar, C. M.; Busch, Th.

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect of noise on the transport of a quantum state from a closed loop of $n-$sites with one of the sites as a sink. Using a discrete-time quantum walk dynamics, we demonstrate that the transport efficiency can be enhanced with noise when the number of sites in the loop is small and reduced when the number of sites in the loop grows. By using the concept of measurement induced disturbance we identify the regimes in which genuine quantum effects are responsible for the enhanced tr...

  17. Background charges and quantum effects in quantum dots transport spectroscopy

    Pierre M.; Hofheinz M.; Jehl X.; Sanquer M.; Molas G.; Vinet M.; Deleonibus S.

    2009-01-01

    We extend a simple model of a charge trap coupled to a single-electron box to energy ranges and parameters such that it gives new insights and predictions readily observable in many experimental systems. We show that a single background charge is enough to give lines of differential conductance in the stability diagram of the quantum dot, even within undistorted Coulomb diamonds. It also suppresses the current near degeneracy of the impurity charge, and yields negative differential lines far ...

  18. Charge transport through weakly open one dimensional quantum wires

    Kopnin, N. B.; Galperin, Y. M.; Vinokur, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    We consider resonant transmission through a finite-length quantum wire connected to leads via finite transparency junctions. The coherent electron transport is strongly modified by the Coulomb interaction. The low-temperature current-voltage ($IV$) curves show step-like dependence on the bias voltage determined by the distance between the quantum levels inside the conductor, the pattern being dependent on the ratio between the charging energy and level spacing. If the system is tuned close to...

  19. Spin and edge channel dependent transport through quantum dots

    We investigate the influence of spin polarized currents and non-equilibrated edge channels on the transport properties of a single quantum dot. Polarized currents are realized by the manual depletion of edge channels in high magnetic fields via a metallic top gate covering the source contact in the system. We observe a suppression and enhancement in the conductance of the quantum dot dependent on the edge channel configuration in the leads.

  20. Spin and edge channel dependent transport through quantum dots

    Ridder, T; Rogge, M C; Haug, R J [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: ridder@nano.uni-hannover.de

    2008-11-12

    We investigate the influence of spin polarized currents and non-equilibrated edge channels on the transport properties of a single quantum dot. Polarized currents are realized by the manual depletion of edge channels in high magnetic fields via a metallic top gate covering the source contact in the system. We observe a suppression and enhancement in the conductance of the quantum dot dependent on the edge channel configuration in the leads.

  1. Control of exciton transport using quantum interference

    Lusk, Mark T.; Stafford, Charles A.; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Carr, Lincoln D.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that quantum interference can be employed to create an exciton transistor. An applied potential gates the quasiparticle motion and also discriminates between quasiparticles of differing binding energy. When implemented within nanoscale assemblies, such control elements could mediate the flow of energy and information. Quantum interference can also be used to dissociate excitons as an alternative to using heterojunctions. A finite molecular setting is employed to exhibit the underlying discrete, two-particle, mesoscopic analog to Fano antiresonance. Selected entanglement measures are shown to distinguish regimes of behavior which cannot be resolved from population dynamics alone.

  2. Structure of Quantum Chaotic Wavefunctions Ergodicity, Localization, and Transport

    Kaplan, L

    1999-01-01

    We discuss recent developments in the study of quantum wavefunctions and transport in classically ergodic systems. Surprisingly, short-time classical dynamics leaves permanent imprints on long-time and stationary quantum behavior, which are absent from the long-time classical motion. These imprints can lead to quantum behavior on single-wavelength or single-channel scales which are very different from random matrix theory expectations. Robust and quantitative predictions are obtained using semiclassical methods. Applications to wavefunction intensity statistics and to resonances in open systems are discussed.

  3. Phonon affected transport through molecular quantum

    Loos, Jan; Koch, T.; Alvermann, A.; Bishop, A. R.; Fehske, H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 39 (2009), 395601/1-395601/18. ISSN 0953-8984 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : quantum dots * electron - phonon interaction * polarons Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.964, year: 2009

  4. DC and AC transport properties on La0.8Sr0.2MnO3

    Zhantao Wei; Xinsheng Yang; Li Lv; Min Zhang; Yong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoresistive sensor can be widely used in modern transportation field, such as the vehicle positioning and navigation system, vehicle detection system, and intelligent transportation system. In order to improve the efficiency of magnetoresistive sensor, we synthesized La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 polycrystalline bulks at different sintering temperatures and investigated their DC and AC transport properties in this work. As a result, all samples showed insulator-metal (I-M) phase transition, and the transition temperature (TI-M) shifted to higher temperature with the increase of sintering temperature. The TI-M measured at different AC frequencies was smaller than that measured at DC condition, which implied that the I-M phase transition was suppressed at AC frequencies. The resistivity mea-sured at high AC frequencies was larger than that measured at low AC frequencies, which could be attributed to the change of the magnetic penetration depth (d). However, the room-temperature AC-magnetoresistance (MR) at low frequencies was much larger than that at high frequencies and room-temperature DC-MR. These findings demon-strate that reducing the AC frequency is an effective way for enhancing the room-temperature MR, which can be used to promote the efficiency of magnetoresistive sensor.

  5. Analytical results in coherent quantum transport for periodic quantum dot

    Mardaani, Mohammad; Esfarjani, Keivan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we have calculated electron transport coefficient in ballistic regime through a periodic dot sandwiched between uniform leads. We have calculated the Green's function (GF), density of states (Dos) and the coherent transmission coefficient (conductance) fully analytically. The quasi gap, bound states energies, the energy and wire-length dependence of the GF and conductance for this system are also derived.

  6. Some analytic results in coherent quantum transport

    Mardaani, Mohammad; Esfarjani, Keivan

    2004-01-01

    A quantum wire of uniform cross section (but with eventual disorder) with three regions: dot, left lead, and right lead, is considered. Assuming that the same unitary transformation diagonalizes all unit cells of this wire, we propose a new formula for the calculation of the Greens function (GF) and the coherent transmission coefficient. This formula allows to calculate these quantitites much faster than the standard methods. In particular, the problem of a uniform dot (simple cubic uniform d...

  7. Quantum transport efficiency and Fourier's law

    Manzano, Daniel; Tiersch, Markus; Asadian, Ali; Briegel, Hans J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the steady-state energy transfer in a chain of coupled two-level systems connecting two thermal reservoirs. Through an analytic treatment we find that the energy current is independent of the system size, hence violating Fourier's law of heat conduction. The classical diffusive behavior in Fourier's law of heat conduction can be recovered by introducing decoherence to the quantum systems constituting the chain. Implications of these results on energy transfer in biological light ha...

  8. Theory of quantum transport at nanoscale an introduction

    Ryndyk, Dmitry A

    2016-01-01

    This book is an introduction to a rapidly developing field of modern theoretical physics – the theory of quantum transport at nanoscale. The theoretical methods considered in the book are in the basis of our understanding of charge, spin and heat transport in nanostructures and nanostructured materials and are widely used in nanoelectronics, molecular electronics, spin-dependent electronics (spintronics) and bio-electronics. The book is based on lectures for graduate and post-graduate students at the University of Regensburg and the Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden). The first part is devoted to the basic concepts of quantum transport: Landauer-Büttiker method and matrix Green function formalism for coherent transport, Tunneling (Transfer) Hamiltonian and master equation methods for tunneling, Coulomb blockade, vibrons and polarons. The results in this part are obtained as possible without sophisticated techniques, such as nonequilibrium Green functions, which are considered in detail in the...

  9. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots and Heat Transport in Molecules

    Kirsanskas, Gediminas

    Since the invention of the transistor in 1947 and the development of integrated circuits in the late 1950’s, there was a rapid progress in the development and miniaturization of the solid state devices and electronic circuit components. This miniaturization raises a question “How small do we have...... to make a device in order to get fundamentally new properties?” [1], or more concretely, when do the quantum effects become important. During the last 30 years, the innovations in fabrication and cooling techniques allowed to produce nanometer scale solid-state or single molecule-based devices...... in all three directions, which makes it effectively zero dimensional and corresponds to discrete electronic orbitals (levels) and excitation spectrum. This is analogous to the situation in atoms, where confinement potential replaces the potential of the nucleus, thus quantum dots are often referred...

  10. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    Rudge, Samuel; Kosov, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junc...

  11. Quantum Model of Energy Transport in Collagen Molecules

    XIAO Yi; LIN Xian-Zhe

    2001-01-01

    A semi-quantum model for energy transport in collagen molecules is presented. Soliton-like dynamics of this model is investigated numerically without and with the temperature effect taking into account. It is found that in both the cases energy can transport for a long distance along the collagen chain. This indicates that collagen molecules can be taken as a candidate for the acupuncture channel.

  12. Transport ac loss of elliptical thin strips with a power-law E(J) relation

    Jia, Chen-Xi; Chen, Du-Xing; Li, Shuo; Fang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    The transport ac loss Q of an elliptical thin strip of critical current I c with a power-law relation E\\propto {J}n is accurately computed as a function of current amplitude I m and frequency f. The resulting Q({I}m) is normalized to q({i}m) following the Norris critical-state formula, and converted to {q}*({i}m*) at a critical frequency f c based on a transport scaling law. Having a set of {q}*({i}m*) at several values of n as a base, a general expression of {q}*({i}m*,n) is obtained, which can be used to easily calculate q({i}m) for any practical purposes.

  13. Fabrication and AC transport losses for Ag-sheathed Bi-2223 tapes using rectangular deformation process

    The AC transport losses in self-field at 77 K have been investigated for the Ag-sheathed Bi-2223 multifilamentary tapes prepared by rectangular deformation process. The rectangular wires with 20 (5 x 4 arrangement) filaments and different aspect ratio of their cross-section were fabricated by two-axial rolling machine, and subsequently they were converted to the tape-form conductors by the one-axial flat rolling and heat treatments. The initial configurations of rectangular wires before applying the flat rolling affect the filament shape near the tape edge in the final tapes. Furthermore, transport loss behaviors for investigated tapes also depend on the initial configurations of rectangular wires, although the main contribution to the losses comes from the hysteresis loss of the superconductor. This may be caused by the difference in filament shape and lateral Jc distributions in the cross-section of each tape samples

  14. Charge transport and localization in atomically coherent quantum dot solids

    Whitham, Kevin; Yang, Jun; Savitzky, Benjamin H.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Wise, Frank; Hanrath, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxial attachment of quantum dots into ordered superlattices enables the synthesis of quasi-two-dimensional materials that theoretically exhibit features such as Dirac cones and topological states, and have major potential for unprecedented optoelectronic devices. Initial studies found that disorder in these structures causes localization of electrons within a few lattice constants, and highlight the critical need for precise structural characterization and systematic assessment of the effects of disorder on transport. Here we fabricated superlattices with the quantum dots registered to within a single atomic bond length (limited by the polydispersity of the quantum dot building blocks), but missing a fraction (20%) of the epitaxial connections. Calculations of the electronic structure including the measured disorder account for the electron localization inferred from transport measurements. The calculations also show that improvement of the epitaxial connections will lead to completely delocalized electrons and may enable the observation of the remarkable properties predicted for these materials.

  15. Nonlinearly-enhanced energy transport in many dimensional quantum chaos

    Brambila, D. S.

    2013-08-05

    By employing a nonlinear quantum kicked rotor model, we investigate the transport of energy in multidimensional quantum chaos. This problem has profound implications in many fields of science ranging from Anderson localization to time reversal of classical and quantum waves. We begin our analysis with a series of parallel numerical simulations, whose results show an unexpected and anomalous behavior. We tackle the problem by a fully analytical approach characterized by Lie groups and solitons theory, demonstrating the existence of a universal, nonlinearly-enhanced diffusion of the energy in the system, which is entirely sustained by soliton waves. Numerical simulations, performed with different models, show a perfect agreement with universal predictions. A realistic experiment is discussed in two dimensional dipolar Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BEC). Besides the obvious implications at the fundamental level, our results show that solitons can form the building block for the realization of new systems for the enhanced transport of matter.

  16. Number-resolved master equation approach to quantum measurement and quantum transport

    Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Landauer-Büttiker scattering theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function technique for mesoscopic transports, an alternative (and very useful) scheme is quantum master equation approach. In this article, we review the particle-number ( n)-resolved master equation ( n-ME) approach and its systematic applications in quantum measurement and quantum transport problems. The n-ME contains rich dynamical information, allowing efficient study of topics such as shot noise and full counting statistics analysis. Moreover, we also review a newly developed master equation approach (and its n-resolved version) under self-consistent Born approximation. The application potential of this new approach is critically examined via its ability to recover the exact results for noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltage and in presence of strong quantum interference, and the challenging non-equilibrium Kondo effect.

  17. Transport ac loss in a rectangular thin strip with power-law E(J) relation

    Li, Shuo [School of Electrical Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Chen, Du-Xing, E-mail: chendx3008@hotmail.com [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Fan, Yu; Fang, Jin [School of Electrical Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Transport ac loss in a thin strip with power-law E(J) is systematically computed. • The scaled results can be accurately used for strips with any critical current and frequency. • Experiments may be unambiguously compared with modeling results at a critical frequency. - Abstract: Transport ac losses of a rectangular thin strip obeying relation E/E{sub c}=(J/J{sub c}){sup n} with a fixed critical current I{sub c} and n=5,10,20,30, and 40 are accurately computed at a fixed frequency f as functions of the current amplitude I{sub m}. The results may be interpolated and scaled to those at any values of I{sub c},f, and 5⩽n⩽40. Normalized in the same way as that in Norris’ analytical formula derived from the critical-state model and converting f to a critical frequency f{sub c}, the modeling results may be better compared with the Norris formula and experimental data. A complete set of calculated modeling data are given with necessary formulas to be easily used by experimentalists in any particular case.

  18. Transport ac loss in a rectangular thin strip with power-law E(J) relation

    Highlights: • Transport ac loss in a thin strip with power-law E(J) is systematically computed. • The scaled results can be accurately used for strips with any critical current and frequency. • Experiments may be unambiguously compared with modeling results at a critical frequency. - Abstract: Transport ac losses of a rectangular thin strip obeying relation E/Ec=(J/Jc)n with a fixed critical current Ic and n=5,10,20,30, and 40 are accurately computed at a fixed frequency f as functions of the current amplitude Im. The results may be interpolated and scaled to those at any values of Ic,f, and 5⩽n⩽40. Normalized in the same way as that in Norris’ analytical formula derived from the critical-state model and converting f to a critical frequency fc, the modeling results may be better compared with the Norris formula and experimental data. A complete set of calculated modeling data are given with necessary formulas to be easily used by experimentalists in any particular case

  19. Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this summer school is to provide a set of extended and pedagogical lectures, on the major present-day topics in dynamical systems and statistical mechanics including applications. Some articles are dedicated to chaotic transport in plasma turbulence and to quantum chaos. This document gathers the summaries of some presentations.

  20. The Landauer-Büttiker formula and resonant quantum transport

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Jensen, Arne; Moldoveanu, Valeriu

    We give a short presentation of two recent results. The firrst one is a rigorous proof of the Landauer-Büttiker formula, and the second one concerns resonant quantum transport. The detailed results are in [2]. In the last section we present the results of some numerical computations on a model...

  1. Effects of spin-orbit coupling on quantum transport

    Bardarson, Jens Hjorleifur

    2008-01-01

    The effect of spin-orbit coupling on various quantum transport phenomena is considered. The main topics discussed are: * How spin-orbit coupling can induce shot noise through trajectory splitting. * How spin-orbit coupling can degrade electron-hole entanglement (created by a tunnel barrier) by mo

  2. The Landauer-Büttiker formula and resonant quantum transport

    Cornean, Horia; Jensen, Arne; Moldoveanu, Valeriu

    2006-01-01

    We give a short presentation of two recent results. The first one is a rigorous proof of the Landauer-Büttiker formula, and the second one concerns resonant quantum transport. The detailed results are in [2]. In the last section we present the results of som numerical computations on a model system...

  3. Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    The aim of this summer school is to provide a set of extended and pedagogical lectures, on the major present-day topics in dynamical systems and statistical mechanics including applications. Some articles are dedicated to chaotic transport in plasma turbulence and to quantum chaos. This document gathers the summaries of some presentations

  4. What is novel in quantum transport for mesoscopics?

    Mukunda P Das; Frederick Green

    2006-07-01

    The understanding of mesoscopic transport has now attained an ultimate simplicity. Indeed, orthodox quantum kinetics would seem to say little about mesoscopics that has not been revealed – nearly effortlessly – by more popular means. Such is far from the case, however. The fact that kinetic theory remains very much in charge is best appreciated through the physics of a quantum point contact. While discretization of its conductance is viewed as the exclusive result of coherent, single-electron-wave transmission, this does not begin to address the paramount feature of all metallic conduction: dissipation. A perfect quantum point contact still has finite resistance, so its ballistic carriers must dissipate the energy gained from the applied field. How do they manage that? The key is in standard many-body quantum theory, and its conservation principles.

  5. Efficient calculation of dissipative quantum transport properties in semiconductor nanostructures

    Greck, Peter

    2012-11-26

    We present a novel quantum transport method that follows the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) framework but side steps any self-consistent calculation of lesser self-energies by replacing them by a quasi-equilibrium expression. We termed this method the multi-scattering Buettiker-Probe (MSB) method. It generalizes the so-called Buettiker-Probe model but takes into account all relevant individual scattering mechanisms. It is orders of magnitude more efficient than a fully selfconsistent non-equilibrium Green's function calculation for realistic devices, yet accurately reproduces the results of the latter method as well as experimental data. This method is fairly easy to implement and opens the path towards realistic three-dimensional quantum transport calculations. In this work, we review the fundamentals of the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism for quantum transport calculations. Then, we introduce our novel MSB method after briefly reviewing the original Buettiker-Probe model. Finally, we compare the results of the MSB method to NEGF calculations as well as to experimental data. In particular, we calculate quantum transport properties of quantum cascade lasers in the terahertz (THz) and the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral domain. With a device optimization algorithm based upon the MSB method, we propose a novel THz quantum cascade laser design. It uses a two-well period with alternating barrier heights and complete carrier thermalization for the majority of the carriers within each period. We predict THz laser operation for temperatures up to 250 K implying a new temperature record.

  6. Effect of combining a DC bias current with an AC transport current on AC losses in a High Temperature Superconductor

    Dolez, Patricia; Ligneris, Benoit des; Aubin, Marcel; Zhu, When; Cave, Julian

    1998-01-01

    Creating complex flux configurations by superposing a dc current or magnetic field onto the ac current in a type II superconducting tape should lead to a variety of peculiar behaviors. An example is the appearance of the Clem valley, a minimum in the ac losses as a function of the dc bias amplitude, which has been theoretically studied by LeBlanc et al., in the continuation of Clem's calculations. These situations have been investigated by applying a dc current to a silver-gold sheathed Bi-22...

  7. Edge-state blockade of transport in quantum dot arrays

    Benito, Mónica; Niklas, Michael; Platero, Gloria; Kohler, Sigmund

    2016-03-01

    We propose a transport blockade mechanism in quantum dot arrays and conducting molecules based on an interplay of Coulomb repulsion and the formation of edge states. As a model we employ a dimer chain that exhibits a topological phase transition. The connection to a strongly biased electron source and drain enables transport. We show that the related emergence of edge states is manifest in the shot noise properties as it is accompanied by a crossover from bunched electron transport to a Poissonian process. For both regions we develop a scenario that can be captured by a rate equation. The resulting analytical expressions for the Fano factor agree well with the numerical solution of a full quantum master equation.

  8. Hydrodynamic transport in strongly coupled disordered quantum field theories

    Lucas, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We compute direct current (dc) thermoelectric transport coefficients in strongly coupled quantum field theories without long lived quasiparticles, at finite temperature and charge density, and disordered on long wavelengths compared to the length scale of local thermalization. Many previous transport computations in strongly coupled systems are interpretable hydrodynamically, despite formally going beyond the hydrodynamic regime. This includes momentum relaxation times previously derived by the memory matrix formalism, and non-perturbative holographic results; in the latter case, this is subject to some important subtleties. Our formalism may extend some memory matrix computations to higher orders in the perturbative disorder strength, as well as give valuable insight into non-perturbative regimes. Strongly coupled metals with quantum critical contributions to transport generically transition between coherent and incoherent metals as disorder strength is increased at fixed temperature, analogous to mean field...

  9. Charge transport through a semiconductor quantum dot-ring nanostructure

    Transport properties of a gated nanostructure depend crucially on the coupling of its states to the states of electrodes. In the case of a single quantum dot the coupling, for a given quantum state, is constant or can be slightly modified by additional gating. In this paper we consider a concentric dot–ring nanostructure (DRN) and show that its transport properties can be drastically modified due to the unique geometry. We calculate the dc current through a DRN in the Coulomb blockade regime and show that it can efficiently work as a single-electron transistor (SET) or a current rectifier. In both cases the transport characteristics strongly depend on the details of the confinement potential. The calculations are carried out for low and high bias regime, the latter being especially interesting in the context of current rectification due to fast relaxation processes. (paper)

  10. Quantum transport in molecular devices and graphene

    Heersche, H. B.

    2006-01-01

    As a result of progress in nanotechnology, smaller and smaller electronic circuits can be made. The stage of electrically contacting even a single molecule has now been reached. This stimulates both fundamental and applied research alike. Molecular electronics is hence a booming new field that draws a lot of attention. In this research project we have studied fundamental electrical transport properties of single molecules at low temperatures. In collaboration with chemists, a special kind of ...

  11. Observation of quantum interference in molecular charge transport

    Guedon, Constant M.; Valkenier, Hennie; Markussen, Troels;

    2012-01-01

    , phenomena such as giant magnetoresistance(5), Kondo effects(6) and conductance switching(7-11) have been observed in single molecules, and theorists have predicted that it should also be possible to observe quantum interference in molecular conductors(12-18), but until now all the evidence for such...... behaviour has been indirect. Here, we report the observation of destructive quantum interference in charge transport through two-terminal molecular junctions at room temperature. We studied five different rigid p-conjugated molecular wires, all of which form self-assembled monolayers on a gold surface, and...

  12. Quantum transport modelling of silicon nanobeams using heterogeneous computing scheme

    Harb, M.; Michaud-Rioux, V.; Zhu, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhang, L.; Guo, H.

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a powerful method for quantum transport calculations of nanowire/nanobeam structures with large cross sectional area. Our approach to quantum transport is based on Green's functions and tight-binding potentials. A linear algebraic formulation allows us to harness the massively parallel nature of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and our implementation is based on a heterogeneous parallel computing scheme with traditional processors and GPUs working together. Using our software tool, the electronic and quantum transport properties of silicon nanobeams with a realistic cross sectional area of ˜22.7 nm2 and a length of ˜81.5 nm—comprising 105 000 Si atoms and 24 000 passivating H atoms in the scattering region—are investigated. The method also allows us to perform significant averaging over impurity configurations—all possible configurations were considered in the case of single impurities. Finally, the effect of the position and number of vacancy defects on the transport properties was considered. It is found that the configurations with the vacancies lying closer to the local density of states (LDOS) maxima have lower transmission functions than the configurations with the vacancies located at LDOS minima or far away from LDOS maxima, suggesting both a qualitative method to tune or estimate optimal impurity configurations as well as a physical picture that accounts for device variability. Finally, we provide performance benchmarks for structures as large as ˜42.5 nm2 cross section and ˜81.5 nm length.

  13. Nanoscale and macroscopic electrical ac transport along conductive domain walls in lithium niobate single crystals

    The electrical impedance properties of UV-illuminated (λ = 310 nm) charged, conductive domain walls (CDWs) in 5 mol% magnesium-doped lithium niobate (LNO) single crystals are investigated on the nm-length scale using nanoimpedance microscopy (NIM) as well as by comparing the macroscopically measured complex impedance response between multi- and single-domain LNO samples. Similar to the case of dc conductivity, a higher conductivity of domain walls (DWs) compared to the bulk insulating matrix was observed. The contrast between DWs and bulk is most pronounced at lower frequencies (f < 200 Hz) due to the large bulk capacitance at higher frequencies. Moreover, the simultaneous application of both an ac and dc bias results in an increased real part of the ac DW current. Also, equivalent circuits accurately describing both the domain and CDW contributions were developed; as a result we are able to analyze and quantify the complex dielectric conductive behavior of both bulk and CDWs in LNO within the framework of the mixed conduction model. Hopping of excited charge carriers along the CDWs was identified as the dominant charge transport process. (paper)

  14. Physical and electrical models for interpreting AC and DC transport measurements in polymer solar cells

    McIntyre, Max; Tzolov, Marian; Cossel, Raquel; Peeler, Seth

    We have fabricated and studied bulk heterojunction solar cells using a mixture of the low bandgap material PCPDTBT and PCBM-C60. Our transport studies show that the devices in dark have good rectification and they respond to AC voltage as a simple RC circuit. The illumination causes an additional contribution to the impedance, which varies with the level of illumination. One proposed model is that photo-generated charges can become trapped in potential wells. These charges then follow a Debye relaxation process, which contributes to a varying dielectric constant. Another proposed model is based on a RC circuit model with two capacitors which can describe the varying capacitance behavior. The physical mechanism for this model is that photo-generated charges become accumulated at the interface between PCPDTBT and PCBM-C60 and form an additional layer of charge. We will show that our circuit models and their analogous physical models can predict the AC and DC responses of polymer solar cells.

  15. Spin-polarized quantum transport through an Aharonov-Bohm quantum-dot-ring

    Wang Jian-Ming; Wang Rui; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the quantum transport through an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) quantum-dot-ring with two dot-array arms described by a single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian is investigated in the presence of additional magnetic fields applied to the dot-array arms to produce spin flip of electrons. A far richer interference pattern than that in the charge transport alone is found. Besides the usual AB oscillation the tunable spin polarization of the current by the magnetic flux is a new observation and is seen to be particularly useful in technical applications. The spectrum of transmission probability is modulated by the quantum dot numbers on the up-arc and down-arc of the ring, which, however, does not affect the period of the AB oscillation.

  16. Parallel Transport Quantum Logic Gates with Trapped Ions.

    de Clercq, Ludwig E; Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Marinelli, Matteo; Nadlinger, David; Oswald, Robin; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Kienzler, Daniel; Keitch, Ben; Home, Jonathan P

    2016-02-26

    We demonstrate single-qubit operations by transporting a beryllium ion with a controlled velocity through a stationary laser beam. We use these to perform coherent sequences of quantum operations, and to perform parallel quantum logic gates on two ions in different processing zones of a multiplexed ion trap chip using a single recycled laser beam. For the latter, we demonstrate individually addressed single-qubit gates by local control of the speed of each ion. The fidelities we observe are consistent with operations performed using standard methods involving static ions and pulsed laser fields. This work therefore provides a path to scalable ion trap quantum computing with reduced requirements on the optical control complexity. PMID:26967401

  17. Fractional quantum mechanics on networks: Long-range dynamics and quantum transport.

    Riascos, A P; Mateos, José L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the quantum transport on networks with a temporal evolution governed by the fractional Schrödinger equation. We generalize the dynamics based on continuous-time quantum walks, with transitions to nearest neighbors on the network, to the fractional case that allows long-range displacements. By using the fractional Laplacian matrix of a network, we establish a formalism that combines a long-range dynamics with the quantum superposition of states; this general approach applies to any type of connected undirected networks, including regular, random, and complex networks, and can be implemented from the spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix. We study the fractional dynamics and its capacity to explore the network by means of the transition probability, the average probability of return, and global quantities that characterize the efficiency of this quantum process. As a particular case, we explore analytically these quantities for circulant networks such as rings, interacting cycles, and complete graphs. PMID:26651751

  18. Charge transport in strongly coupled quantum dot solids

    Kagan, Cherie R.; Murray, Christopher B.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of high-mobility, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot (QD) solids has triggered fundamental studies that map the evolution from carrier hopping through localized quantum-confined states to band-like charge transport in delocalized and hybridized states of strongly coupled QD solids, in analogy with the construction of solids from atoms. Increased coupling in QD solids has led to record-breaking performance in QD devices, such as electronic transistors and circuitry, optoelectronic light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices and photodetectors, and thermoelectric devices. Here, we review the advances in synthesis, assembly, ligand treatments and doping that have enabled high-mobility QD solids, as well as the experiments and theory that depict band-like transport in the QD solid state. We also present recent QD devices and discuss future prospects for QD materials and device design.

  19. Phase Coherent Charge Transport in Graphene Quantum Billiards

    Lau, Chun Ning

    2008-03-01

    As an emergent model system for condensed matter physics and a promising electronic material, graphene's electrical transport properties has become a subject of intense focus. Via low temperature transport spectroscopy on single and bi-layer graphene devices, we show that the minimum conductivity value is geometry dependent and approaches the theoretical value of 4e^2/πh only for wide and short graphene strips. Moreover, we observe periodic conductance oscillations with bias and gate voltages, arising from quantum interference of multiply-reflected waves of charges in graphene. When graphene is coupled to superconducting electrodes, we observe gate tunable supercurrent and sub-gap structures, which originate from multiple Andreev reflection at the graphene-superconductor interfaces. Our results demonstrate that graphene can act as a quantum billiard with a long phase coherence length. This work was supported in part by DOD/DMEA-H94003-06-2-0608.

  20. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-03-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy.

  1. Cooperative emission in transport setting through a quantum dot

    Schuetz, Martin J.A.; Kessler, Eric M.; Giedke, Geza; Cirac, Juan Ignacio [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    We theoretically show that intriguing features of coherent many-body physics can be observed in electron transport through a quantum dot (QD). In particular, we show that electron transport in the Pauli-blockade regime is coherently enhanced by hyperfine interaction (HF) with the nuclear spin ensemble in the QD. For an initially polarized nuclear system this leads to a strong current peak in close analogy with superradiant emission of photons from atomic ensembles. This effect could be observed with realistic experimental parameters and would provide clear evidence of coherent HF dynamics of nuclear spin ensembles in QDs.

  2. Stationary quantum coherence and transport in disordered networks

    We examine the excitation transport across quantum networks that are continuously driven by a constant and incoherent source. In particular we investigate the coherence properties of incoherently driven networks by employing recent tools from entanglement theory that enable a rigorous interpretation of coherence in the site basis. With these tools at hand we identify coherent delocalization of excitations over several sites to be a crucial prerequisite for highly efficient transport across networks driven by an incoherent source. These results are set into context with the latest discussion of the occurrence of coherence in molecular complexes that are driven by incoherent sun light. (paper)

  3. Quantum Interference Effects in Electronic Transport through Nanotube Contacts

    Buia, Calin; Buldum, Alper; Lu, Jian Ping

    2002-01-01

    Quantum interference has dramatic effects on electronic transport through nanotube contacts. In optimal configuration the intertube conductance can approach that of a perfect nanotube ($4e^2/h$). The maximum conductance increases rapidly with the contact length up to 10 nm, beyond which it exhibits long wavelength oscillations. This is attributed to the resonant cavity-like interference phenomena in the contact region. For two concentric nanotubes symmetry breaking reduces the maximum intertu...

  4. Quantum Spin Transport and Collective Magnetic Dynamics in Heterostructures

    Bender, Scott Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This thesis advances the theory of quantum and semiclassical transport in magnetic heterostructures. In the solid state, angular momentum can be carried by individual electrons and collective modes. The flow of angular momentum (a spin current), central to the operation of spintronic devices, is generated by the application of electric and magnetic fields and temperature gradients. In what follows, we explore the physics of such nonequilibrium spin currents in magnetic structures, involving a...

  5. Quantum transport through STM-lifted single PTCDA molecules

    Pump, Florian; Temirov, Ruslan; Neucheva, Olga; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, Stefan; Rohlfing, Michael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2008-01-01

    Using a scanning tunneling microscope we have measured the quantum conductance through a PTCDA molecule for different configurations of the tip-molecule-surface junction. A peculiar conductance resonance arises at the Fermi level for certain tip to surface distances. We have relaxed the molecular junction coordinates and calculated transport by means of the Landauer/Keldysh approach. The zero bias transmission calculated for fixed tip positions in lateral dimensions but different tip substrat...

  6. Effects of spin-orbit coupling on quantum transport

    Bardarson, Jens Hjorleifur

    2008-01-01

    The effect of spin-orbit coupling on various quantum transport phenomena is considered. The main topics discussed are: * How spin-orbit coupling can induce shot noise through trajectory splitting. * How spin-orbit coupling can degrade electron-hole entanglement (created by a tunnel barrier) by mode mixing. * Mesoscopic Spin Hall effect: longitudinal charge current leads to transverse spin currents in a chaotic electron cavity which has universal fluctuations around a zero mean. * How smooth d...

  7. Quantum isotope effects in gas transport through polymers

    A quantum mechanical model has been developed for the transport of very light and small gas molecules through polymers. The experimental results on isotope effects in diffusion, permeation, and solvation of H2 and D2 in polymer membranes made of polyethylene terephthalate, polyethylene, and polyvinylchloride can be interpreted by the model. Approximate information about the geometrical dimensions of the normal and activated energy state of polymers can be gained. (author)

  8. Quantum Transport Phenomena Of Two-Dimensional Mesoscopic Structures

    Szaszkó-Bogár Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The dissertation is strongly related to quantum theory of spin systems. Spintronics (or spin electronics) is a promising field that has a kind of multidisciplinary nature in solid state physics. The aim of the research in this rapidly developing field is the control and manipulation of spin degrees of freedom in various material samples. Spintronics concentrates on the basic physical principles underlying the generation of carrier spin-polarization, spin dynamics, and spin-polarized transport...

  9. Quantum effective potential, electron transport and conformons in biopolymers

    In the Kirchhoff model of a biopolymer, conformation dynamics can be described in terms of solitary waves, for certain special cross-section asymmetries. Applying this to the problem of electron transport, we show that the quantum effective potential arising due to the bends and twists of the polymer enables us to formalize and quantify the concept of a conformon that has been hypothesized in biology. Its connection to the soliton solution of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation emerges in a natural fashion

  10. Transport properties of mid-infrared colloidal quantum dot films

    Lhuillier, Emmanuel; Keuleyan, Sean; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The transport and thermal properties of HgTe colloidal quantum dot films with cut-off wavelengths in the mid-IR are investigated. The cut-off wavelength of this material can be tuned over the 3-5 \\mu m range, which makes it a promising alternative to existing high cost detectors. Post deposition processes such as ligand exchange and atomic layer deposition are investigated as a way to increase the carrier mobility.

  11. Dynamics of heat and mass transport in a quantum insulator

    Łącki, Mateusz; Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    The real-time evolution of two pieces of quantum insulators, initially at different temperatures, is studied when they are glued together. Specifically, each subsystem is taken as a Bose-Hubbard model in a Mott insulator state. The process of temperature equilibration via heat transfer is simulated in real time using the minimally entangled typical thermal states algorithm. The analytic theory based on quasiparticle transport is also given.

  12. Quantum transport in the cylindrical nanosize silicon-based MOSFET

    Balaban, S. N.; Pokatilov, E. P.; Fomin, V. M.; Gladilin, V. N.; Devreese, J. T.; Magnus, W.; W. Schoenmaker; Van Rossum, M.; Soree, B.

    2000-01-01

    A model is developed for a detailed investigation of the current flowing through a cylindrical nanosize MOSFET with a close gate electrode. The quantum mechanical features of the lateral charge transport are described by Wigner distribution function which is explicitly dealing with electron scattering due to acoustic phonons and acceptor impurities. A numerical simulation is carried out to obtain a set of I-V characteristics for various channel lengths. It is demonstrated that inclusion of th...

  13. Electronic transport through a quantum-dot molecule

    Coutinho, Renato Maximo; Souza, Fabricio Macedo de [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Nanociencia

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Electron transport through quantum dot (QD) systems has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically. Many fascinating phenomena have emerged, such as the periodic oscillations of linear conductance as a function of gate voltage [1], the characteristic I-V in the nonlinear transport regime and the Kondo effect observed in a system composed of a quantum dot coupled to leads [2]. In this work we study the electronic transport in a array of quantum dots coupled to each other and to two electron reservoirs. An external bias voltage is applied along the structure in order to drive the system out of equilibrium. In the present work we apply nonequilibrium Green function technique [3] to calculate current, transmission coefficient, shot-noise and Fano factor in a quantum-dot molecular array attached to a left and to a right lead [4,5]. In the presence of an external source-drain bias voltage, a charge current flows in the system, thus generating shot-noise. We pay particular attention on the relation between molecular geometry and the noise signal. We note that depending on the molecular configuration, the shot-noise can be suppressed to values further below the characteristic 0.5 observed in tunneling junctions. This indicates that the molecular configuration gives rise to an enhancement of the charge transport correlation. In particular, as the molecular sites becomes randomly distributed the transport correlation tends to increase, with Fano factors reaching values close to 0.4 . The present results provides an alternative way to figure out the molecular structure based on the shot-noise signature. References: [1] J.H.F. Scott-Thomas, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 (1989) 583. [2] M.Pustilnik, I.I. Glazman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 216601. [3] H. Haug, A.P. Jauho, Quantum Kinects in Transport and Optics of Semiconductors, Springer, Berlin, 1996. [4] Yu Liu, Yisong Zheng, Weijiang Gong, Tianquan Lu, Phys. Lett. A 360 (2006) 154-163. [5] W

  14. Quantum dynamics and entanglement in coherent transport of atomic population

    In this work we look at the quantum dynamics of the process known as either transport without transit, or coherent transfer of atomic population, of a Bose–Einstein condensate from one well of a lattice potential to another, non-adjacent well, without macroscopic occupation of the well between the two. This process has previously been analysed and in this work we extend those analyses by considering the effects of quantum statistics on the dynamics and entanglement properties of the condensate modes in the two relevant wells. In order to do this, we go beyond the mean-field analysis of the Gross–Pitaevskii type approach and utilize the phase-space stochastic methods so well known in quantum optics. In particular, we use the exact positive-P representation where it is suitable, and the approximate truncated Wigner representation otherwise. We find strong agreement between the results of these two methods, with the mean-field dynamics not depending on the initial quantum states of the trapped condensate. We find that the entanglement properties do depend strongly on the initial quantum states, with quantitatively different results found for coherent and Fock states. Comparison of the two methods gives us confidence that the truncated Wigner representation delivers accurate results for this system and is thus a useful method as the collisional nonlinearity increases and the positive-P results fail to converge. (paper)

  15. I-V curve of Bi-2223/Ag tapes in overload conditions determined from AC transport data

    The influence of dynamics on the dissipation at electrical charge transport in superconductors can be investigated by comparing the resistive part of AC transport loss with the prediction deduced from DC I-V curve. The complication is that in the AC regime a hysteretic loss is present, generating a voltage that is similar to that produced by the I-V curve. We present how the signal due to hysteresis loss can be eliminated from the total voltage measured with AC transport current, and the DC I-V curve deduced from its fundamental and higher harmonics can be constructed. The experiments were performed on two samples prepared from the same tape. The voltage was monitored using contact as well as contact-less method. Its harmonics (up to 7th) were decomposed to the parts that are out of phase and in phase with transport current, using a lock-in amplifier. The experiments were focused on the over critical current regime up to AC currents with amplitudes 3 times exceeding the tape critical current. We show how from these data the basic parameters characterising the I-V curve of the composite tape, i.e. its critical current, the slope and the normal state resistivity, can be determined

  16. Efficient method for the calculation of dissipative quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers.

    Greck, Peter; Birner, Stefan; Huber, Bernhard; Vogl, Peter

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel and very efficient method for calculating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). It follows the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) framework but sidesteps the calculation of lesser self-energies by replacing them by a quasi-equilibrium expression. This method generalizes the phenomenological Büttiker probe model by taking into account individual scattering mechanisms. It is orders of magnitude more efficient than a fully self-consistent NEGF calculation for realistic devices. We apply this method to a new THz QCL design which works up to 250 K - according to our calculations. PMID:25836876

  17. Quantum Transport from first principles, status, prospects and future directions

    Taylor, Jeremy

    2004-03-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in the measurement of quantum transport properties of nanoscale devices. From a theoretical/computational point of view, an important challenge is to understand the collected data so that the basic physics of nanoscale conduction can be established. This task requires the development of appropriate theoretical formalisms and associated modeling tools which are capable of making quantitative predictions without invoking phenomenological parameters. In the recent 5 years I have been involved in the development of a formalism within density functional theory, which allows for self-consistent modeling of quantum transport properties at the molecular scale under external bias and gate potentials. This formalism is based on a DFT analysis within the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) framework, and has been implemented in the McDcal, TranSIESTA and lately the TranSIESTAC software. With our latest developments, the complexity of quantum transport calculations approaches conventional electronic structure methods, and becomes a standard method for the computational science toolbox. In this talk I will review our most recent results on the comparison between theoretical calculated current-voltage characteristics and experimental measurements, including both atomic wires and molecular systems. An important issue here is the accuracy of both experimental and theoretical approaches and I will discuss how the theoretical limit within a certain model chemistry can be systematically approached. The examples also illustrate how theoretical modelling can give new insight into the underlying transport mechanisms, by reviling information on the scattering states and electron transmission channels.

  18. The quantum Goldilocks effect: on the convergence of timescales in quantum transport

    Lloyd, Seth; Shabani, Alireza; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    Excitonic transport in photosynthesis exhibits a wide range of time scales. Absorption and initial relaxation takes place over tens of femtoseconds. Excitonic lifetimes are on the order of a nanosecond. Hopping rates, energy differences between chromophores, reorganization energies, and decoherence rates correspond to time scales on the order of picoseconds. The functional nature of the divergence of time scales is easily understood: strong coupling to the electromagnetic field over a broad band of frequencies yields rapid absorption, while long excitonic lifetimes increase the amount of energy that makes its way to the reaction center to be converted to chemical energy. The convergence of the remaining time scales to the centerpoint of the overall temporal range is harder to understand. In this paper we argue that the convergence of timescales in photosynthesis can be understood as an example of the `quantum Goldilocks effect': natural selection tends to drive quantum systems to the degree of quantum coheren...

  19. Quantum Simulation via Filtered Hamiltonian Engineering: Application to Perfect Quantum Transport in Spin Networks

    Ajoy, Ashok; Cappellaro, Paola

    2013-05-01

    We propose a method for Hamiltonian engineering that requires no local control but only relies on collective qubit rotations and field gradients. The technique achieves a spatial modulation of the coupling strengths via a dynamical construction of a weighting function combined with a Bragg grating. As an example, we demonstrate how to generate the ideal Hamiltonian for perfect quantum information transport between two separated nodes of a large spin network. We engineer a spin chain with optimal couplings starting from a large spin network, such as one naturally occurring in crystals, while decoupling all unwanted interactions. For realistic experimental parameters, our method can be used to drive almost perfect quantum information transport at room temperature. The Hamiltonian engineering method can be made more robust under decoherence and coupling disorder by a novel apodization scheme. Thus, the method is quite general and can be used to engineer the Hamiltonian of many complex spin lattices with different topologies and interactions.

  20. Time-dependent density functional theory for quantum transport

    Zheng, Xiao; Mo, Yan; Koo, SiuKong; Tian, Heng; Yam, ChiYung; Yan, YiJing

    2010-01-01

    Based on our earlier works [Phys. Rev. B 75, 195127 (2007) & J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234703 (2008)], we propose a formally exact and numerically convenient approach to simulate time-dependent quantum transport from first-principles. The proposed approach combines time-dependent density functional theory with quantum dissipation theory, and results in a useful tool for studying transient dynamics of electronic systems. Within the proposed exact theoretical framework, we construct a number of practical schemes for simulating realistic systems such as nanoscopic electronic devices. Computational cost of each scheme is analyzed, with the expected level of accuracy discussed. As a demonstration, a simulation based on the adiabatic wide-band limit approximation scheme is carried out to characterize the transient current response of a carbon nanotube based electronic device under time-dependent external voltages.

  1. Photonic quantum transport in a nonlinear optical fiber

    Hafezi, Mohammad; Gritsev, Vladimir; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically study the transmission of few-photon quantum fields through a strongly nonlinear optical medium. We develop a general approach to investigate non-equilibrium quantum transport of bosonic fields through a finite-size nonlinear medium and apply it to a recently demonstrated experimental system where cold atoms are loaded in a hollow-core optical fiber. We show that when the interaction between photons is effectively repulsive, the system acts as a single-photon switch. In the case of attractive interaction, the system can exhibit either anti-bunching or bunching, associated with the resonant excitation of bound states of photons by the input field. These effects can be observed by probing statistics of photons transmitted through the nonlinear fiber.

  2. Photonic quantum transport in a nonlinear optical fiber

    Hafezi, M.; Chang, D. E.; Gritsev, V.; Demler, E. A.; Lukin, M. D.

    2011-06-01

    We theoretically study the transmission of few-photon quantum fields through a strongly nonlinear optical medium. We develop a general approach to investigate nonequilibrium quantum transport of bosonic fields through a finite-size nonlinear medium and apply it to a recently demonstrated experimental system where cold atoms are loaded in a hollow-core optical fiber. We show that when the interaction between photons is effectively repulsive, the system acts as a single-photon switch. In the case of attractive interaction, the system can exhibit either antibunching or bunching, associated with the resonant excitation of bound states of photons by the input field. These effects can be observed by probing statistics of photons transmitted through the nonlinear fiber.

  3. Spin-dependent thermoelectric transport through double quantum dots

    Wang Qiang; Xie Hai-Qing; Jiao Hu-Jun; Li Zhi-Jian; Nie Yi-Hang

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermoelectric transport through a double-quantum-dot system with spin-dependent interdot coupling and ferromagnetic electrodes by means of the non-equilibrium Green's function in the linear response regime.It is found that the thermoelectric coefficients are strongly dependent on the splitting of the interdot coupling,the relative magnetic configurations,and the spin polarization of leads.In particular,the thermoelectric efficiency can reach a considerable value in the parallel configuration when the effective interdot coupling and the tunnel coupling between the quantum dots and the leads for the spin-down electrons are small.Moreover,the thermoelectric efficiency increases with the intradot Coulomb interaction increasing and can reach very high values at appropriate temperatures.In the presence of the magnetic field,the spin accumulation in the leads strongly suppresses the thermoelectric efficiency,and a pure spin thermopower can be obtained.

  4. Non-Markovian dynamics of quantum systems: formalism, transport coefficients

    Full text: The generalized Linbland equations with non-stationary transport coefficients are derived from the Langevin equations for the case of nonlinear non-Markovian noise [1]. The equations of motion for the collective coordinates are consistent with the generalized quantum fluctuation dissipation relations. The microscopic justification of the Linbland axiomatic approach is performed. Explicit expressions for the time-dependent transport coefficients are presented for the case of FC- and RWA-oscillators and a general linear coupling in coordinate and in momentum between the collective subsystem and heat bath. The explicit equations for the correlation functions show that the Onsanger's regression hypothesis does not hold exactly for the non-Markovian equations of motion. However, under some conditions the regression of fluctuations goes to zero in the same manner as the average values. In the low and high temperature regimes we found that the dissipation leads to long-time tails in correlation functions in the RWA-oscillator. In the case of the FC-oscillator a non-exponential power-like decay of the correlation function in coordinate is only obtained only at the low temperature limit. The calculated results depend rather weakly on the memory time in many applications. The found transient times for diffusion coefficients Dpp(t), Dqp(t) and Dqq(t) are quite short. The value of classical diffusion coefficients in momentum underestimates the asymptotic value of quantum one Dpp(t), but the asymptotic values of classical σqqc and quantum σqq second moments are close due to the negativity of quantum mixed diffusion coefficient Dqp(t)

  5. Using the Chebychev expansion in quantum transport calculations

    Popescu, Bogdan; Rahman, Hasan; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich, E-mail: u.kleinekathoefer@jacobs-university.de [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-04-21

    Irradiation by laser pulses and a fluctuating surrounding liquid environment can, for example, lead to time-dependent effects in the transport through molecular junctions. From the theoretical point of view, time-dependent theories of quantum transport are still challenging. In one of these existing transport theories, the energy-dependent coupling between molecule and leads is decomposed into Lorentzian functions. This trick has successfully been combined with quantum master approaches, hierarchical formalisms, and non-equilibrium Green’s functions. The drawback of this approach is, however, its serious limitation to certain forms of the molecule-lead coupling and to higher temperatures. Tian and Chen [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 204114 (2012)] recently employed a Chebychev expansion to circumvent some of these latter problems. Here, we report on a similar approach also based on the Chebychev expansion but leading to a different set of coupled differential equations using the fact that a derivative of a zeroth-order Bessel function can again be given in terms of Bessel functions. Test calculations show the excellent numerical accuracy and stability of the presented formalism. The time span for which this Chebychev expansion scheme is valid without any restrictions on the form of the spectral density or temperature can be determined a priori.

  6. Transport, Charge Sensing, and Quantum Control in Si/SiGe Double Quantum Dots

    Wang, Ke; Koppinen, Panu; Dovzhenko, Yuliya; Petta, Jason

    2011-03-01

    Si/SiGe quantum dots hold great promise as ultra-coherent qubits. In comparison with the GaAs system, Si has a weaker hyperfine interaction due to the zero nuclear spin of 28 Si and smaller spin-orbit coupling due to its lighter atomic weight. However, the fabrication of highly controllable Si/SiGe quantum dots is complicated by valley degeneracy, the larger effective electron mass, and the difficulty of obtaining high quality samples. Here we develop a robust fabrication process for depletion mode Si/SiGe quantum dots, demonstrating high quality ohmic contacts and low-leakage Pd top gates. We report DC transport measurements as well as charge sensing in single and double quantum dots. The quantum dot gate electrode pattern allows a relatively high level of control over the confinement potential, tunneling rates, and electron occupation. Funded by the Sloan and Packard Foundations, NSF, and DARPA QuEST. We thank Jag Shah for logistical support.

  7. Quantum dot transport in soil, plants, and insects

    Environmental risk assessment of nanomaterials requires information not only on their toxicity to non-target organisms, but also on their potential exposure pathways. Here we report on the transport and fate of quantum dots (QDs) in the total environment: from soils, through their uptake into plants, to their passage through insects following ingestion. Our QDs are nanoparticles with an average particle size of 6.5 nm. Breakthrough curves obtained with CdTe/mercaptopropionic acid QDs applied to columns of top soil from a New Zealand organic apple orchard, a Hastings silt loam, showed there to be preferential flow through the soil's macropores. Yet the effluent recovery of QDs was just 60%, even after several pore volumes, indicating that about 40% of the influent QDs were filtered and retained by the soil column via some unknown exchange/adsorption/sequestration mechanism. Glycine-, mercaptosuccinic acid-, cysteine-, and amine-conjugated CdSe/ZnS QDs were visibly transported to a limited extent in the vasculature of ryegrass (Lolium perenne), onion (Allium cepa) and chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.) plants when cut stems were placed in aqueous QD solutions. However, they were not seen to be taken up at all by rooted whole plants of ryegrass, onion, or Arabidopsis thaliana placed in these solutions. Leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) larvae fed with these QDs for two or four days, showed fluorescence along the entire gut, in their frass (larval feces), and, at a lower intensity, in their haemolymph. Fluorescent QDs were also observed and elevated cadmium levels detected inside the bodies of adult moths that had been fed QDs as larvae. These results suggest that exposure scenarios for QDs in the total environment could be quite complex and variable in each environmental domain. - Research highlights: → Quantum dots are transported rapidly through soil but half were retained. → Intact roots of plants did not take up quantum dots. Excised plants did slightly.

  8. Quantum dot transport in soil, plants, and insects

    Al-Salim, Najeh [Industrial Research Ltd, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Barraclough, Emma; Burgess, Elisabeth [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 92169, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Clothier, Brent, E-mail: brent.clothier@plantandfood.co.nz [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 11600, Manawatu Mail Centre, Palmerston North 4442 (New Zealand); Deurer, Markus; Green, Steve [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 11600, Manawatu Mail Centre, Palmerston North 4442 (New Zealand); Malone, Louise [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 92169, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Weir, Graham [Industrial Research Ltd, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand)

    2011-08-01

    Environmental risk assessment of nanomaterials requires information not only on their toxicity to non-target organisms, but also on their potential exposure pathways. Here we report on the transport and fate of quantum dots (QDs) in the total environment: from soils, through their uptake into plants, to their passage through insects following ingestion. Our QDs are nanoparticles with an average particle size of 6.5 nm. Breakthrough curves obtained with CdTe/mercaptopropionic acid QDs applied to columns of top soil from a New Zealand organic apple orchard, a Hastings silt loam, showed there to be preferential flow through the soil's macropores. Yet the effluent recovery of QDs was just 60%, even after several pore volumes, indicating that about 40% of the influent QDs were filtered and retained by the soil column via some unknown exchange/adsorption/sequestration mechanism. Glycine-, mercaptosuccinic acid-, cysteine-, and amine-conjugated CdSe/ZnS QDs were visibly transported to a limited extent in the vasculature of ryegrass (Lolium perenne), onion (Allium cepa) and chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.) plants when cut stems were placed in aqueous QD solutions. However, they were not seen to be taken up at all by rooted whole plants of ryegrass, onion, or Arabidopsis thaliana placed in these solutions. Leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) larvae fed with these QDs for two or four days, showed fluorescence along the entire gut, in their frass (larval feces), and, at a lower intensity, in their haemolymph. Fluorescent QDs were also observed and elevated cadmium levels detected inside the bodies of adult moths that had been fed QDs as larvae. These results suggest that exposure scenarios for QDs in the total environment could be quite complex and variable in each environmental domain. - Research highlights: {yields} Quantum dots are transported rapidly through soil but half were retained. {yields} Intact roots of plants did not take up quantum dots. Excised plants

  9. Statistical theory of designed quantum transport across disordered networks.

    Walschaers, Mattia; Mulet, Roberto; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    We explain how centrosymmetry, together with a dominant doublet of energy eigenstates in the local density of states, can guarantee interference-assisted, strongly enhanced, strictly coherent quantum excitation transport between two predefined sites of a random network of two-level systems. Starting from a generalization of the chaos-assisted tunnelling mechanism, we formulate a random matrix theoretical framework for the analytical prediction of the transfer time distribution, of lower bounds of the transfer efficiency, and of the scaling behavior of characteristic statistical properties with the size of the network. We show that these analytical predictions compare well to numerical simulations, using Hamiltonians sampled from the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble. PMID:25974468

  10. Simplified Quantum Transport Theory for Finite Bias and Temperature

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Wu, Yuning; Pantelides, Sokrates

    We reformulate the Landauer-Buttiker formula for quantum transport by explicitly accounting for the energy and bias voltage dependence of the transmission probability. Under the assumption of a constant electric field, a simple formula for the differential conductance under a finite bias and at a finite temperature is derived that does not require a nonequilibrium self-consistent calculation. Calculation for the tunneling current through Au-Benzendithiol-Au molecular junction shows excellent agreement with the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method at zero temperature. Temperature dependent I-V curves for a number of devices are demonstrated. Supported by NSF Grant 1508898.

  11. Efficient wave-function matching approach for quantum transport calculations

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg; Hansen, Per Christian; Petersen, Dan Erik;

    2009-01-01

    The wave-function matching (WFM) technique has recently been developed for the calculation of electronic transport in quantum two-probe systems. In terms of efficiency it is comparable to the widely used Green's function approach. The WFM formalism presented so far requires the evaluation of all...... calculation. This approach makes it feasible to apply iterative techniques to efficiently determine the few required bulk modes, which allows for a significant reduction of the computational expense of the WFM method. We illustrate the efficiency of the method on a carbon nanotube field...

  12. Nonequilibrium transport at a dissipative quantum phase transition.

    Chung, Chung-Hou; Le Hur, Karyn; Vojta, Matthias; Wölfle, Peter

    2009-05-29

    We investigate the nonequilibrium transport near a quantum phase transition in a generic and relatively simple model, the dissipative resonant level model, that has many applications for nanosystems. We formulate a rigorous mapping and apply a controlled frequency-dependent renormalization group approach to compute the nonequilibrium current in the presence of a finite bias voltage V and a finite temperature T. For V-->0, we find that the conductance has its well-known equilibrium form, while it displays a distinct nonequilibrium profile at finite voltage. PMID:19519125

  13. Electron transport through a quantum dot assisted by cavity photons

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2013-01-01

    We investigate transient transport of electrons through a single-quantum-dot controlled by a plunger gate. The dot is embedded in a finite wire that is weakly coupled to leads and strongly coupled to a single cavity photon mode. A non-Markovian density-matrix formalism is employed to take into account the full electron-photon interaction in the transient regime. In the absence of a photon cavity, a resonant current peak can be found by tuning the plunger gate voltage to lift a many-body state...

  14. A Statistical Theory of Designed Quantum Transport Across Disordered Networks

    Walschaers, Mattia; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We explain how centrosymmetry, together with a dominant doublet in the local density of states, can guarantee interference-assisted, strongly enhanced, strictly coherent quantum excitation transport between two predefined sites of a random network of two-level systems. Starting from a generalisation of the chaos assisted tunnelling mechanism, we formulate a random matrix theoretical framework for the analytical prediction of the transfer time distribution, of lower bounds of the transfer efficiency, and of the scaling behaviour of characteristic statistical properties with the size of the network.

  15. Opto-electronic and quantum transport properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    Sabathil, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a novel and efficient method for the calculation of the ballistic transport properties of open semiconductor nanostructures connected to external reservoirs is presented. It is based on the Green's function formalism and reduces the effort to obtain the transmission and the carrier density to a single solution of a hermitian eigenvalue problem with dimensions proportional to the size of the decoupled device and the multiple inversion of a small matrix with dimensions proportional to the size of the contacts to the leads. Using this method, the 4-band GaAs hole transport through a 2-dimensional three-terminal T-junction device, and the resonant tunneling current through a 3-dimensional InAs quantum dot molecule embedded into an InP heterostructure have been calculated. The further extension of the method into a charge self-consistent scheme enables the efficient prediction of the IV-characteristics of highly doped nanoscale field effect transistors in the ballistic regime, including the influence of quasi bound states and the exchange-correlation interaction. Buettiker probes are used to emulate the effect of inelastic scattering on the current for simple 1D devices, systematically analyzing the dependence of the density of states and the resulting self-consistent potential on the scattering strength. The second major topic of this work is the modeling of the optical response of quantum confined neutral and charged excitons in single and coupled self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots. For this purpose the existing device simulator nextnano{sup 3} has been extended to incorporate particle-particle interactions within the means of density functional theory in local density approximation. In this way the exciton transition energies for neutral and charged excitons as a function of an externally applied electric field have been calculated, revealing a systematic reduction of the intrinsic dipole with the addition of extra holes to the exciton, a finding

  16. Electron transport through a quantum dot assisted by cavity photons

    We investigate transient transport of electrons through a single quantum dot controlled by a plunger gate. The dot is embedded in a finite wire with length Lx assumed to lie along the x-direction with a parabolic confinement in the y-direction. The quantum wire, originally with hard-wall confinement at its ends, ±Lx/2, is weakly coupled at t = 0 to left and right leads acting as external electron reservoirs. The central system, the dot and the finite wire, is strongly coupled to a single cavity photon mode. A non-Markovian density-matrix formalism is employed to take into account the full electron–photon interaction in the transient regime. In the absence of a photon cavity, a resonant current peak can be found by tuning the plunger-gate voltage to lift a many-body state of the system into the source–drain bias window. In the presence of an x-polarized photon field, additional side peaks can be found due to photon-assisted transport. By appropriately tuning the plunger-gate voltage, the electrons in the left lead are allowed to undergo coherent inelastic scattering to a two-photon state above the bias window if initially one photon was present in the cavity. However, this photon-assisted feature is suppressed in the case of a y-polarized photon field due to the anisotropy of our system caused by its geometry. (paper)

  17. Electron transport through a quantum dot assisted by cavity photons

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2013-11-01

    We investigate transient transport of electrons through a single quantum dot controlled by a plunger gate. The dot is embedded in a finite wire with length Lx assumed to lie along the x-direction with a parabolic confinement in the y-direction. The quantum wire, originally with hard-wall confinement at its ends, ±Lx/2, is weakly coupled at t = 0 to left and right leads acting as external electron reservoirs. The central system, the dot and the finite wire, is strongly coupled to a single cavity photon mode. A non-Markovian density-matrix formalism is employed to take into account the full electron-photon interaction in the transient regime. In the absence of a photon cavity, a resonant current peak can be found by tuning the plunger-gate voltage to lift a many-body state of the system into the source-drain bias window. In the presence of an x-polarized photon field, additional side peaks can be found due to photon-assisted transport. By appropriately tuning the plunger-gate voltage, the electrons in the left lead are allowed to undergo coherent inelastic scattering to a two-photon state above the bias window if initially one photon was present in the cavity. However, this photon-assisted feature is suppressed in the case of a y-polarized photon field due to the anisotropy of our system caused by its geometry.

  18. Fate and transport of some selected PhACs in a river receiving a high load of treated sewage

    Bendz, D.; Ginn, T. R.; Paxeus, N.

    2003-04-01

    Pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs) have lately been acknowledged to constitute a risk for humans and for the terrestrial and aquatic environment. Human and veterinary applications are the main sources of PhACs in the environment and the major pathway are excretion and discharge to the environment. Sewage treatment plants (STPs) play a crucial role for the introduction of the human PhACs in the environment through its removal efficiency and by separating these compounds into two exposure pathways associated with the aquatic and the solid (sludge) phase, respectively. Actually, STPs are recognized as being the main point discharge sources of human PhACs to the aquatic environment. In this study the fate and transport of a selected human PhACs belonging to different therapeutic classes (NSAIDs- non-steroidal antiinflamatory drugs, lipid regulators, antiepileptics, antibiotics and &beta-blockers) are investigated in a small river in the very south of Sweden receiving a high load of treated wastewater. In addition to the PhACs, triclosan (commonly used biocide) was included in this study. Water samples were taken of incoming and outgoing wastewater from the treatment plant, at the effluent in the river, and along the river up to 8 kilometers downstream were the river flows into the sea. After enrichment by solid-phase extraction the compounds were analyzed using GC-MS (methylated derivatives) or LC-MS/MS. In addition to the target compounds a screening analysis of the extracts revealed the presence of other wastewater related pollutants (caffeine, flame retardants, antioxidants). Several of the investigated substances demonstrate a surprising persistence in the aquatic environment. This emphasizes the need for a broader view on the concept of persistence by taking into account the recharge/loading rate in addition to removal mechanisms; transformation, volatility and physical sequestration by solids and the influence of different environmental media (Soil organic

  19. Quantum transport through a Coulomb blockaded quantum emitter coupled to a plasmonic dimer.

    Goker, A; Aksu, H

    2016-01-21

    We study the electron transmission through a Coulomb blockaded quantum emitter coupled to metal nanoparticles possessing plasmon resonances by employing the time-dependent non-crossing approximation. We find that the coupling of the nanoparticle plasmons with the excitons results in a significant enhancement of the conductance through the discrete state with higher energy beyond the unitarity limit while the other discrete state with lower energy remains Coulomb blockaded. We show that boosting the plasmon-exciton coupling well below the Kondo temperature increases the enhancement adding another quantum of counductance upon saturation. Finite bias and increasing emitter resonance energy tend to reduce this enhancement. We attribute these observations to the opening of an additional transport channel via the plasmon-exciton coupling. PMID:26686761

  20. Ab initio quantum transport calculations using plane waves

    Garcia-Lekue, A.; Vergniory, M. G.; Jiang, X. W.; Wang, L. W.

    2015-08-01

    We present an ab initio method to calculate elastic quantum transport at the nanoscale. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory using plane wave nonlocal pseudopotentials and the use of auxiliary periodic boundary conditions to obtain the scattering states. The method can be applied to any applied bias voltage and the charge density and potential profile can either be calculated self-consistently, or using an approximated self-consistent field (SCF) approach. Based on the scattering states one can straightforwardly calculate the transmission coefficients and the corresponding electronic current. The overall scheme allows us to obtain accurate and numerically stable solutions for the elastic transport, with a computational time similar to that of a ground state calculation. This method is particularly suitable for calculations of tunneling currents through vacuum, that some of the nonequilibrium Greens function (NEGF) approaches based on atomic basis sets might have difficulty to deal with. Several examples are provided using this method from electron tunneling, to molecular electronics, to electronic devices: (i) On a Au nanojunction, the tunneling current dependence on the electrode-electrode distance is investigated. (ii) The tunneling through field emission resonances (FERs) is studied via an accurate description of the surface vacuum states. (iii) Based on quantum transport calculations, we have designed a molecular conformational switch, which can turn on and off a molecular junction by applying a perpendicular electric field. (iv) Finally, we have used the method to simulate tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) based on two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), where we have studied the performance and scaling limits of such nanodevices and proposed atomic doping to enhance the transistor performance.

  1. Quantum transport in nanowire-based hybrid devices

    Guenel, Haci Yusuf

    2013-05-08

    We have studied the low-temperature transport properties of nanowires contacted by a normal metal as well as by superconducting electrodes. As a consequence of quantum coherence, we have demonstrated the electron interference effect in different aspects. The mesoscopic phase coherent transport properties were studied by contacting the semiconductor InAs and InSb nanowires with normal metal electrodes. Moreover, we explored the interaction of the microscopic quantum coherence of the nanowires with the macroscopic quantum coherence of the superconductors. In superconducting Nb contacted InAs nanowire junctions, we have investigated the effect of temperature, magnetic field and electric field on the supercurrent. Owing to relatively high critical temperature of superconducting Nb (T{sub c} ∝ 9 K), we have observed the supercurrent up to 4 K for highly doped nanowire-based junctions, while for low doped nanowire-based junctions a full control of the supercurrent was achieved. Due to low transversal dimension of the nanowires, we have found a monotonous decay of the critical current in magnetic field dependent measurements. The experimental results were analyzed within narrow junction model which has been developed recently. At high bias voltages, we have observed subharmonic energy gap structures as a consequence of multiple Andreev reflection. Some of the nanowires were etched, such that the superconducting Nb electrodes are connected to both ends of the nanowire rather than covering the surface of the nanowire. As a result of well defined nanowire-superconductor interfaces, we have examined quasiparticle interference effect in magnetotransport measurements. Furthermore, we have developed a new junction geometry, such that one of the superconducting Nb electrodes is replaced by a superconducting Al. Owing to the smaller critical magnetic field of superconducting Al (B{sub c} ∝ 15-50,mT), compared to superconducting Nb (B{sub c} ∝ 3 T), we were able to studied

  2. Kinesin-2 KIF3AC and KIF3AB Can Drive Long-Range Transport along Microtubules.

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Rank, Katherine C; Bensel, Brandon M; Taylor, Keenan C; Rayment, Ivan; Gilbert, Susan P

    2015-10-01

    Mammalian KIF3AC is classified as a heterotrimeric kinesin-2 that is best known for organelle transport in neurons, yet in vitro studies to characterize its single molecule behavior are lacking. The results presented show that a KIF3AC motor that includes the native helix α7 sequence for coiled-coil formation is highly processive with run lengths of ∼1.23 μm and matching those exhibited by conventional kinesin-1. This result was unexpected because KIF3AC exhibits the canonical kinesin-2 neck-linker sequence that has been reported to be responsible for shorter run lengths observed for another heterotrimeric kinesin-2, KIF3AB. However, KIF3AB with its native neck linker and helix α7 is also highly processive with run lengths of ∼1.62 μm and exceeding those of KIF3AC and kinesin-1. Loop L11, a component of the microtubule-motor interface and implicated in activating ADP release upon microtubule collision, is significantly extended in KIF3C as compared with other kinesins. A KIF3AC encoding a truncation in KIF3C loop L11 (KIF3ACΔL11) exhibited longer run lengths at ∼1.55 μm than wild-type KIF3AC and were more similar to KIF3AB run lengths, suggesting that L11 also contributes to tuning motor processivity. The steady-state ATPase results show that shortening L11 does not alter kcat, consistent with the observation that single molecule velocities are not affected by this truncation. However, shortening loop L11 of KIF3C significantly increases the microtubule affinity of KIF3ACΔL11, revealing another structural and mechanistic property that can modulate processivity. The results presented provide new, to our knowledge, insights to understand structure-function relationships governing processivity and a better understanding of the potential of KIF3AC for long-distance transport in neurons. PMID:26445448

  3. Quantum simulator of an open quantum system using superconducting qubits: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes

    Mostame, Sarah; Tsomokos, Dimitris I; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-01-01

    In the initial stage of photosynthesis, light-harvested energy is transferred with remarkably high efficiency to a reaction center, with the vibrational environment assisting the transport mechanism. It is of great interest to mimic this process with present-day technologies. Here we propose an analog quantum simulator of open system dynamics, where noise engineering of the environment has a central role. In particular, we propose the use of superconducting qubits for the simulation of exciton transport in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson protein, a prototypical photosynthetic complex. Our method allows for a single-molecule implementation and the investigation of energy transfer pathways as well as non-Markovian and spatiotemporal noise-correlation effects.

  4. Quantum Transport through a Triple Quantum Dot System in the Presence of Majorana Bound States

    Jiang, Zhao-Tan; Cao, Zhi-Yuan; Zhong, Cheng-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    We study the electron transport through a special quantum-dot (QD) structure composed of three QDs and two Majorana bound states (MBSs) using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. This QD-MBS ring structure includes two channels with the two coupled MBSs being Channel 1 and one QD being Channel 2, and three types of transport processes such as the electron transmission (ET), the Andreev reflection (AR), and the crossed Andreev reflection (CAR). By comparing the ET, AR, and CAR processes through Channels 1 and 2, we make a systematic study on the transport properties of the QD-MBS ring. It is shown that there appear two kinds of characteristic transport patterns for Channels 1 and 2, as well as the interplay between the two patterns. Of particular interest is that there exists an AR-assisted ET process in Channel 2, which is different from that in Channel 1. Thus a clear “X” pattern due to the ET and AR processes appears in the ET, AR, and CAR transmission coefficients. Moreover, we study how Channel 2 affects the three transport processes when Channel 1 is tuned in the ET and CAR regimes. It is shown that the transport properties of the ET, AR and CAR processes can be adjusted by tuning the energy level of the QD embedded in Channel 2. We believe this research should be a helpful reference for understanding the transport properties in the QD-MBS coupled systems. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11274040, and by the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University under Grant No. NCET-08-0044

  5. Spin-dependent quantum transport effects in Cu nanowires

    In this work we investigate quantum transport in Cu nanowires created by bringing macroscopic Cu wires into and out of contact under an applied magnetic field in air. Here we show that a 70% magneto-conductance effect can be seen in a Cu nanowire in a field of 2 mT at room temperature. We propose that this phenomenon is a consequence of spin filtering due to the adsorption of atmospheric oxygen modifying the electronic band structure and introducing spin-split conduction channels. This is a remarkable result since bulk Cu is not magnetic and it may provide a new perspective in the quest for spintronic devices. (letter to the editor)

  6. Spin Quantum Kinetics in Relaxation and Transport of Semiconductors

    Lee, Han-Chieh; Mou, Chung-Yu; Lyon, Stephen A.

    2007-03-01

    Generalized Kadanoff-Baym Equation (GKBE) with spin degree of freedom is firstly presented and its theoretical framework of applications, which aims to semiconductor quantum kinetics in femtosecond and nanometer scales, demonstrated. The GKBE was constructed by Green functions thermally averaging Pauli equation of motion with using Langreth theorem. As applied for relaxation, Kadanoff-Baym ansatz was made and carrier-carrier scattering (CCS) with random-phase approximation considered. The derivation can simulate an evolution of excited carriers spreading via CCS, buildup of magnetic field by Rashba effect and formation of spin relaxation, where energy non-conserving event and memory effect are figured out. For transport, retarded Green functions were retrieved from spin Dyson equation as an input for GKBE with the presence of electron-phonon (impurity) interaction. The part is useful for spin Hall effect in precisely estimating spin current and accumulation in nanostructures or ballistic regime.

  7. Spin transport properties in double quantum rings connected in series*

    Du Jian; Wang Suxin; Pan Jianghong

    2011-01-01

    A new model of metal/semiconductor/metal double-quantum-ring connected in series is proposed and the transport properties in this model are theoretically studied. The results imply that the transmission coefficient shows periodic variations with increasing semiconductor ring size. The effects of the magnetic field and Rashba spin-orbit interaction on the transmission coefficient for two kinds of spin state electrons are different. The number of the transmission coefficient peaks is related to the length ratio between the upper ann and the half circumference of the ring. In addition, the transmission coefficient shows oscillation behavior with enhanced external magnetic field, and the corresponding average value is related to the two leads' relative position.

  8. Two-band electron transport in a double quantum well

    Fletcher, R.; Tsaousidou, M.; Smith, T.; Coleridge, P. T.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Feng, Y.

    2005-04-01

    The carrier densities and mobilities have been measured for the first two populated subbands in a GaAs double quantum well (DQW) as a function of the top gate voltage Vg . The densities and quantum mobilities ( μiq , i=1,2 ) were obtained from the de Haas-Shubnikov oscillations. The transport mobilities (μit) were determined from the semiclassical low-field magnetoresistance with intersubband scattering taken into account. At 0.32K the experimental data on both μit and μiq , as a function of Vg , lie on two curves which cross at the resonance point as expected from theoretical considerations. At 1.09K and 4.2K the μit curves no longer cross at resonance, but show a gap. The reason for this is not known. The mobilities have been calculated in the low-temperature limit within the Boltzmann framework by assuming that they are limited by scattering due to ionized impurities located at the outside interfaces. The assumption of short-range scattering is justified by the relatively small value of the ratio μit/μiq that is measured in the present system. The theoretical values obtained for μit and μiq are in reasonable agreement with the experiment for all values of Vg examined. We have also calculated the resistivity and intersubband scattering rates of the DQW as a function of Vg and again find good agreement with measured values.

  9. Transport through Intrinsic Quantum Dots in Interacting Carbon Nanotubes

    Thorwart, Michael; Egger, Reinhold; Grifoni, Milena

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) constitute molecular wires with remarkable electronic properties. Due to the special nature of their electronic bands, SWNTs have been predicted to exhibit Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) rather than Fermi liquid behavior at low energy scales. We focus on the effects of electronic correlations, treated within a TLL model, in a SWNT containing two impurities defining a small island for electrons (i.e., a quantum dot). We present analytical and numerical results for the linear conductance, obtained from a master equation approach and dynamical quantum Monte Carlo simulations, respectively. The one dimensional character of transport is reflected in unconventional Coulomb blockade features for temperatures smaller than the level spacing in the dot. In this regime, TLL correlations among tunneling events require a generalization of the standard uncorrelated sequential tunneling picture for intermediate barrier transmission and strong interactions. In that case, correlated sequential tunneling processes can dominate, which lead to a different temperature dependence of the peak conductance. For sufficiently low temperatures, the simulations reveal a universal coherent resonant tunneling regime for arbitrary barrier transmission.

  10. Enhancement of transport properties of a Brownian particle due to quantum effects: Smoluchowski limit

    Graphical abstract: By invoking physically motivated coordinate transformation into quantum Smoluchowski equation, we have presented a transparent treatment for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient and current of a quantum Brownian particle. Substantial enhancement in the efficiency of the diffusive transport is envisaged due to the quantum correction effects. Highlights:: ► Transport of a quantum Brownian particle in a periodic potential has been addressed. ► Governing quantum Smoluchowski equation (QSE) includes state dependent diffusion. ► A coordinate transformation is used to recast QSE with constant diffusion. ► Transport properties increases in comparison to the corresponding classical result. ► This enhancement is purely a quantum effect. - Abstract: The transport property of a quantum Brownian particle that interacts strongly with a bath (in which a typical damping constant by far exceeds a characteristic frequency of the isolated system) under the influence of a tilted periodic potential has been studied by solving quantum Smoluchowski equation (QSE). By invoking physically motivated coordinate transformation into QSE, we have presented a transparent treatment for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient of a quantum Brownian particle and the current (the average stationary velocity). Substantial enhancement in the efficiency of the diffusive transport is envisaged due to the quantum correction effects only if the bath temperature hovers around an appropriate range of intermediate values. Our findings also confirm the results obtained in the classical cases.

  11. Enhancement of transport properties of a Brownian particle due to quantum effects: Smoluchowski limit

    Shit, Anindita [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Chattopadhyay, Sudip, E-mail: sudip_chattopadhyay@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray, E-mail: jprc_8@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Katwa College, Katwa, Burdwan 713130 (India)

    2012-03-13

    Graphical abstract: By invoking physically motivated coordinate transformation into quantum Smoluchowski equation, we have presented a transparent treatment for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient and current of a quantum Brownian particle. Substantial enhancement in the efficiency of the diffusive transport is envisaged due to the quantum correction effects. Highlights:: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport of a quantum Brownian particle in a periodic potential has been addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Governing quantum Smoluchowski equation (QSE) includes state dependent diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A coordinate transformation is used to recast QSE with constant diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport properties increases in comparison to the corresponding classical result. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This enhancement is purely a quantum effect. - Abstract: The transport property of a quantum Brownian particle that interacts strongly with a bath (in which a typical damping constant by far exceeds a characteristic frequency of the isolated system) under the influence of a tilted periodic potential has been studied by solving quantum Smoluchowski equation (QSE). By invoking physically motivated coordinate transformation into QSE, we have presented a transparent treatment for the determination of the effective diffusion coefficient of a quantum Brownian particle and the current (the average stationary velocity). Substantial enhancement in the efficiency of the diffusive transport is envisaged due to the quantum correction effects only if the bath temperature hovers around an appropriate range of intermediate values. Our findings also confirm the results obtained in the classical cases.

  12. Experimental control of transport resonances in a coherent quantum rocking ratchet

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The ratchet phenomenon is a means to get directed transport without net forces. Originally conceived to rectify stochastic motion and describe operational principles of biological motors, the ratchet effect can be used to achieve controllable coherent quantum transport. This transport is an ingredient of several perspective quantum devices including atomic chips. Here we examine coherent transport of ultra-cold atoms in a rocking quantum ratchet. This is realized by loading a rubidium atomic Bose-Einstein condensate into a periodic optical potential subjected to a biharmonic temporal drive. The achieved long-time coherence allows us to resolve resonance enhancement of the atom transport induced by avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum of the system. By tuning the strength of the temporal modulations, we observe a bifurcation of a single resonance into a doublet. Our measurements reveal the role of interactions among Floquet eigenstates for quantum ratchet transport.

  13. Experimental control of transport resonances in a coherent quantum rocking ratchet.

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ratchet phenomenon is a means to get directed transport without net forces. Originally conceived to rectify stochastic motion and describe operational principles of biological motors, the ratchet effect can be used to achieve controllable coherent quantum transport. This transport is an ingredient of several perspective quantum devices including atomic chips. Here we examine coherent transport of ultra-cold atoms in a rocking quantum ratchet. This is realized by loading a rubidium atomic Bose-Einstein condensate into a periodic optical potential subjected to a biharmonic temporal drive. The achieved long-time coherence allows us to resolve resonance enhancement of the atom transport induced by avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum of the system. By tuning the strength of the temporal modulations, we observe a bifurcation of a single resonance into a doublet. Our measurements reveal the role of interactions among Floquet eigenstates for quantum ratchet transport. PMID:26852803

  14. Quantum transport through anisotropic molecular magnets: Hubbard Green function approach

    We extend the Green function approach to quantum transport through an anisotropic molecular magnet system with the help of Hubbard operators. Based on the single molecular magnet model, we reformulate the large spin and the total Hamiltonian in the language of Hubbard operators and obtain analytical expressions of the retarded Green function in sequential tunneling and Kondo regimes. In addition to this, we show the connection of our method to the master equation method in sequential regime and discuss a simple isotropic case in Kondo regime, in which we find a three-peak Kondo structure, a feature characterizing the isotropic exchange interaction between the localized electron and large spin. -- Highlights: ► We study transport through single molecular magnets by Green function approach. ► Large spin is expressed by Hubbard operators. ► Analytical formulas for the retarded Green's function are derived in two regimes. ► The connection of our method to the master equation is discussed. ► We find a three-peak Kondo structure.

  15. Transport through a Strongly Correlated Quantum-Dot with Fano Interference

    Wu, B. H.; J. C. Cao; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2005-01-01

    We present the transport properties of a strongly correlated quantum dot attached to two leads with a side coupled non-interacting quantum dot. Transport properties are analyzed using the slave boson mean field theory which is reliable in the zero temperature and low bias regime. It is found that the transport properties are determined by the interplay of two fundamental physical phenomena,i.e. the Kondo effects and the Fano interference. The linear conductance will depart from the unitary li...

  16. Phonon-limited low-field mobility in silicon: Quantum transport vs. linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation

    We propose to check and validate the approximations made in dissipative quantum transport (QT) simulations solved in the Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalism by comparing them with the exact solution of the linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation (LB) in the stationary regime. For that purpose, we calculate the phonon-limited electron and hole mobility in bulk Si and ultra-scaled Si nanowires for different crystal orientations 〈100〉, 〈110〉, and 〈111〉. In both QT and LB simulations, we use the same sp3d5s* tight-binding model to describe the electron/hole properties and the same valence-force-field approach to account for the phonon properties. It is found that the QT simplifications work well for electrons, but are less accurate for holes, where a renormalization of the phonon scattering strength is proved useful to improve the results

  17. Phonon-limited low-field mobility in silicon: Quantum transport vs. linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation

    Rhyner, Reto; Luisier, Mathieu

    2013-12-01

    We propose to check and validate the approximations made in dissipative quantum transport (QT) simulations solved in the Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalism by comparing them with the exact solution of the linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation (LB) in the stationary regime. For that purpose, we calculate the phonon-limited electron and hole mobility in bulk Si and ultra-scaled Si nanowires for different crystal orientations ⟨100⟩, ⟨110⟩, and ⟨111⟩. In both QT and LB simulations, we use the same sp3d5s* tight-binding model to describe the electron/hole properties and the same valence-force-field approach to account for the phonon properties. It is found that the QT simplifications work well for electrons, but are less accurate for holes, where a renormalization of the phonon scattering strength is proved useful to improve the results.

  18. AC Transport Losses Calculation in a Bi-2223 Current Lead Using Thermal Coupling With an Analytical Formula

    Berger, Kévin; Lévêque, Jean; Netter, Denis; Douine, Bruno; Rezzoug, Abderrezak

    2005-01-01

    When a superconductor is fed with an alternating current, the temperature rise created by the losses tends to reduce the current carrying capacity. If the amplitude of the current exceeds the value of the critical current, then the losses become particularly high and the thermal heating considerable. In this paper, a numerical and an analytical model which allow to estimate AC transport losses are presented. These models, which use the expression of Ic(T) and n(T), are available for any appli...

  19. Tunable Hybrid Quantum Electrodynamics from Non-Linear Electron Transport

    Schiró, Marco; Hur, Karyn Le

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum electronics have allowed to engineer hybrid nano-devices comprising on chip a microwave electromagnetic resonator coupled to an artificial atom, a quantum dot. These systems realize novel platforms to explore non-equilibrium quantum impurity physics with light and matter. Coupling the quantum dot system to reservoir leads (source and drain) produces an electronic current as well as dissipation when applying a bias voltage across the system. Focusing on a standard mo...

  20. Quantum Transport Simulation of High-Power 4.6-μm Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Olafur Jonasson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a quantum transport simulation of a 4.6- μ m quantum cascade laser (QCL operating at high power near room temperature. The simulation is based on a rigorous density-matrix-based formalism, in which the evolution of the single-electron density matrix follows a Markovian master equation in the presence of applied electric field and relevant scattering mechanisms. We show that it is important to allow for both position-dependent effective mass and for effective lowering of very thin barriers in order to obtain the band structure and the current-field characteristics comparable to experiment. Our calculations agree well with experiments over a wide range of temperatures. We predict a room-temperature threshold field of 62 . 5 kV/cm and a characteristic temperature for threshold-current-density variation of T 0 = 199 K . We also calculate electronic in-plane distributions, which are far from thermal, and show that subband electron temperatures can be hundreds to thousands of degrees higher than the heat sink. Finally, we emphasize the role of coherent tunneling current by looking at the size of coherences, the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix. At the design lasing field, efficient injection manifests itself in a large injector/upper lasing level coherence, which underscores the insufficiency of semiclassical techniques to address injection in QCLs.

  1. Quench behavior of Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2/Ag tapes with AC and DC transport currents at different temperature

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Guomin; Yang, Hua; Li, Zhenming; Liu, Wei; Jing, Liwei; Yu, Hui; Liu, Guole

    2016-09-01

    In applications, superconducting wires may carry AC or DC transport current. Thus, it is important to understand the behavior of normal zone propagation in conductors and magnets under different current conditions in order to develop an effective quench protection system. In this paper, quench behavior of Ag sheathed Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2 (Sr-122 in the family of iron-based superconductor) tapes with AC and DC transport current is reported. The measurements are performed as a function of different temperature (20 K-30 K), varying transport current and operating frequency (50 Hz-250 Hz). The focus of the research is the minimum quench energy (MQE), the normal zone propagation velocity (NZPV) and the comparison of the related results with AC and DC transport current.

  2. Quantum dot transport in soil, plants, and insects.

    Al-Salim, Najeh; Barraclough, Emma; Burgess, Elisabeth; Clothier, Brent; Deurer, Markus; Green, Steve; Malone, Louise; Weir, Graham

    2011-08-01

    Environmental risk assessment of nanomaterials requires information not only on their toxicity to non-target organisms, but also on their potential exposure pathways. Here we report on the transport and fate of quantum dots (QDs) in the total environment: from soils, through their uptake into plants, to their passage through insects following ingestion. Our QDs are nanoparticles with an average particle size of 6.5 nm. Breakthrough curves obtained with CdTe/mercaptopropionic acid QDs applied to columns of top soil from a New Zealand organic apple orchard, a Hastings silt loam, showed there to be preferential flow through the soil's macropores. Yet the effluent recovery of QDs was just 60%, even after several pore volumes, indicating that about 40% of the influent QDs were filtered and retained by the soil column via some unknown exchange/adsorption/sequestration mechanism. Glycine-, mercaptosuccinic acid-, cysteine-, and amine-conjugated CdSe/ZnS QDs were visibly transported to a limited extent in the vasculature of ryegrass (Lolium perenne), onion (Allium cepa) and chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.) plants when cut stems were placed in aqueous QD solutions. However, they were not seen to be taken up at all by rooted whole plants of ryegrass, onion, or Arabidopsis thaliana placed in these solutions. Leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) larvae fed with these QDs for two or four days, showed fluorescence along the entire gut, in their frass (larval feces), and, at a lower intensity, in their haemolymph. Fluorescent QDs were also observed and elevated cadmium levels detected inside the bodies of adult moths that had been fed QDs as larvae. These results suggest that exposure scenarios for QDs in the total environment could be quite complex and variable in each environmental domain. PMID:21632093

  3. Contaminación acústica en el transporte sanitario urgente por carretera Acoustic contamination in urgent medical transportation by road

    Ballesteros, S.; S. Lorrio; Molina, I.; M. Áriz

    2012-01-01

    Fundamento. Determinar los niveles de exposición a ruido durante el transporte sanitario urgente por carretera y describir la percepción de deterioro de la función auditiva en los trabajadores del sector y el empleo de mecanismos de protección acústica. Metodología. Estudio observacional realizado en Bizkaia (España). Mediante dosimetrías sonométricas se registraron los valores instantáneos máximos de nivel sonoro (Lpico) y niveles continuos equivalentes (Leq) medidos en una ambulancia tipo d...

  4. Time-dependent quantum transport through an interacting quantum dot beyond sequential tunneling: second-order quantum rate equations

    A general theoretical formulation for the effect of a strong on-site Coulomb interaction on the time-dependent electron transport through a quantum dot under the influence of arbitrary time-varying bias voltages and/or external fields is presented, based on slave bosons and the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function (GF) techniques. To avoid the difficulties of computing double-time GFs, we generalize the propagation scheme recently developed by Croy and Saalmann to combine the auxiliary-mode expansion with the celebrated Lacroix's decoupling approximation in dealing with the second-order correlated GFs and then establish a closed set of coupled equations of motion, called second-order quantum rate equations (SOQREs), for an exact description of transient dynamics of electron correlated tunneling. We verify that the stationary solution of our SOQREs is able to correctly describe the Kondo effect on a qualitative level. Moreover, a comparison with other methods, such as the second-order von Neumann approach and Hubbard-I approximation, is performed. As illustrations, we investigate the transient current behaviors in response to a step voltage pulse and a harmonic driving voltage, and linear admittance as well, in the cotunneling regime. (paper)

  5. Quantum noise in ac-driven resonant-tunneling double barrier structures: Photon-assisted tunneling vs. electron anti-bunching

    Hammer, Jan; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We study the quantum noise of the electronic current in a double-barrier system with a single resonant level. In the framework of the Landauer formalism, we treat the double barrier as a quantum coherent scattering region that can exchange photons with a coupled electric field, e.g., a laser beam or a periodic ac bias voltage. As a consequence of the manifold parameters that are involved in this system, a complicated steplike structure arises in the nonsymmetrized current-current autocorrelat...

  6. Coherent electronic transport in a multimode quantum channel with Gaussian-type scatterers

    Bardarson, Jens Hjorleifur; Magnusdottir, Ingibjorg; Gudmundsdottir, Gudny; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2004-01-01

    Coherent electron transport through a quantum channel in the presence of a general extended scattering potential is investigated using a T-matrix Lippmann-Schwinger approach. The formalism is applied to a quantum wire with Gaussian type scattering potentials, which can be used to model a single impurity, a quantum dot or more complicated structures in the wire. The well known dips in the conductance in the presence of attractive impurities is reproduced. A resonant transmission peak in the co...

  7. Spin-Dependent Transport through the Finite Array of Quantum Dots: Spin Gun

    Avdonin, S. A.; Dmitrieva, L. A.; Yu. A. Kuperin; Sartan, V. V.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of spin-dependent transport of electrons through a finite array of quantum dots attached to 1D quantum wire (spin gun) for various semiconductor materials is studied. The Breit-Fermi term for spin-spin interaction in the effective Hamiltonian of the device is shown to result in a dependence of transmission coefficient on the spin orientation. The difference of transmission probabilities for singlet and triplet channels can reach few percent for a single quantum dot. For several qu...

  8. Edge-channel transport of dirac fermions in graphene quantum hall junctions

    Dirac fermions exhibit various characteristic transport phenomena in graphene. Particularly in high magnetic fields, the electronic states of Dirac fermions are quantized into Landau levels, and graphene shows a half-integer quantum Hall effect. Here, we discuss the edge-channel picture in graphene quantum Hall junctions and review experiments on the quantum Hall effect in graphene in-plane unipolar and bipolar junctions. (author)

  9. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Kwok, YanHo; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-09-01

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  10. Quantum spin transport through Aharonov-Bohm ring with a tangent magnetic field

    Li Zhi-Jian

    2005-01-01

    Quantum spin transport in a mesoscopic Aharonov-Bohm ring with two leads subject to a magnetic field with circular configuration is investigated by means of one-dimensional quantum waveguide theory. Within the framework magnetic flux or by the tangent magnetic field. In particular, the spin flips can be induced by hopping the AB magnetic flux or the tangent field.

  11. Coupled electron-phonon transport from molecular dynamics with quantum baths

    Lu, Jing Tao; Wang, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Based on generalized quantum Langevin equations for the tight-binding wavefunction amplitudes and lattice displacements, electron and phonon quantum transport are obtained exactly using molecular dynamics (MD) in the ballistic regime. The electron-phonon interactions can be handled with a quasi-c...

  12. Phononless thermally activated transport through a disordered array of quantum wires

    Chudnovskiy, A. L.

    2005-01-01

    Phononless plasmon assisted transport through a long disordered array of finite length quantum wires is investigated analytically. Two temperature regimes, the low- and the high-temperature ones, with qualitatively different temperature dependencies of thermally activated resistance are identified. The characteristics of plasmon assisted and phonon assisted transport mechanisms are compared. Generically strong electron-electron interaction in quantum wires results in a qualitative change of t...

  13. A hybrid classical-quantum transport model for the simulation of Carbon Nanotube transistors

    Jourdana, Clément; Pietra, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid classical-quantum approach to study the electron transport in strongly confined nanostructures. The device domain is made of an active zone (where quantum effects are strong) sandwiched between two electron reservoirs (where the transport is considered highly collisional). A one dimensional effective mass Schrödinger system is coupled with a drift-diffusion model, both taking into account the peculiarities due to the strong confinement and to the two dimensi...

  14. Transport phenomena in quantum wells and wires in presence of disorder and interactions

    Vettchinkina, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Present-day electronics employ circuits of smaller and smaller dimensions, and today the length scales are so small that the laws of physics which rule micro-cosmos, quantum mechanics, become directly important. This thesis reports on theoretical work on electron transport in different nanostructures. We have studied semiconductor quantum wells, layered materials where each layer can be only a few atomic layers thick, and transport in thin atomic wires. The layered materials have been stud...

  15. Scanning Gate Spectroscopy of transport across a Quantum Hall Nano-Island

    Martins, F.; Faniel, S.; Rosenow, B.; Pala, M. G.; Sellier, H.; S. Huant; L. Desplanque; Wallart, X; Bayot, V.; Hackens, B.

    2013-01-01

    We explore transport across an ultra-small Quantum Hall Island (QHI) formed by closed quan- tum Hall edge states and connected to propagating edge channels through tunnel barriers. Scanning gate microscopy and scanning gate spectroscopy are used to first localize and then study a single QHI near a quantum point contact. The presence of Coulomb diamonds in the spectroscopy con- firms that Coulomb blockade governs transport across the QHI. Varying the microscope tip bias as well as current bias...

  16. Time-resolved electron transport in quantum-dot systems; Zeitaufgeloester Elektronentransport in Quantendotsystemen

    Croy, Alexander

    2010-06-30

    In this thesis the time-resolved electron transport in quantum dot systems was studied. For this two different formalisms were presented: The nonequilibrium Green functions and the generalized quantum master equations. For both formalisms a propagation method for the numerical calculation of time-resolved expectation values, like the occupation and the electron current, was developed. For the demonstration of the propagation method two different question formulations were considered. On the one hand the stochastically driven resonant-level model was studied. On the other hand the pulse-induced transport through a double quantum dot was considered.

  17. Scanning gate spectroscopy of transport across a quantum Hall nano-island

    Martins, F.; Faniel, S.; Rosenow, B.; Pala, M. G.; Sellier, H.; Huant, S.; Desplanque, L.; Wallart, X.; Bayot, V.; Hackens, B.

    2013-01-01

    We explore transport across an ultra-small quantum Hall island (QHI) formed by closed quantum Hall edge states and connected to propagating edge channels through tunnel barriers. Scanning gate microscopy and scanning gate spectroscopy are used to first localize and then study a single QHI near a quantum point contact. The presence of Coulomb diamonds in the spectroscopy confirms that Coulomb blockade governs transport across the QHI. Varying the microscope tip bias as well as current bias across the device, we uncover the QHI discrete energy spectrum arising from electronic confinement and we extract estimates of the gradient of the confining potential and of the edge state velocity.

  18. Global coherence of quantum evolutions based on decoherent histories: Theory and application to photosynthetic quantum energy transport

    Allegra, Michele; Giorda, Paolo; Lloyd, Seth

    2016-04-01

    Assessing the role of interference in natural and artificial quantum dynamical processes is a crucial task in quantum information theory. To this aim, an appropriate formalism is provided by the decoherent histories framework. While this approach has been deeply explored from different theoretical perspectives, it still lacks of a comprehensive set of tools able to concisely quantify the amount of coherence developed by a given dynamics. In this paper, we introduce and test different measures of the (average) coherence present in dissipative (Markovian) quantum evolutions, at various time scales and for different levels of environmentally induced decoherence. In order to show the effectiveness of the introduced tools, we apply them to a paradigmatic quantum process where the role of coherence is being hotly debated: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes. To spot out the essential features that may determine the performance of the transport, we focus on a relevant trimeric subunit of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and we use a simplified (Haken-Strobl) model for the system-bath interaction. Our analysis illustrates how the high efficiency of environmentally assisted transport can be traced back to a quantum recoil avoiding effect on the exciton dynamics, that preserves and sustains the benefits of the initial fast quantum delocalization of the exciton over the network. Indeed, for intermediate levels of decoherence, the bath is seen to selectively kill the negative interference between different exciton pathways, while retaining the initial positive one. The concepts and tools here developed show how the decoherent histories approach can be used to quantify the relation between coherence and efficiency in quantum dynamical processes.

  19. Phonon-limited low-field mobility in silicon: Quantum transport vs. linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation

    Rhyner, Reto, E-mail: rhyner@iis.ee.ethz.ch; Luisier, Mathieu, E-mail: mluisier@iis.ee.ethz.ch [Integrated Systems Laboratory, ETH Zürich, Gloriastr. 35, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-12-14

    We propose to check and validate the approximations made in dissipative quantum transport (QT) simulations solved in the Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalism by comparing them with the exact solution of the linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation (LB) in the stationary regime. For that purpose, we calculate the phonon-limited electron and hole mobility in bulk Si and ultra-scaled Si nanowires for different crystal orientations 〈100〉, 〈110〉, and 〈111〉. In both QT and LB simulations, we use the same sp{sup 3}d{sup 5}s{sup *} tight-binding model to describe the electron/hole properties and the same valence-force-field approach to account for the phonon properties. It is found that the QT simplifications work well for electrons, but are less accurate for holes, where a renormalization of the phonon scattering strength is proved useful to improve the results.

  20. Quantum graphs as an effect tool for modeling of particle transport in discrete structures and networks

    Full text: Quantum graphs were introduced in physics more than X decades ago to describe electron transport in organic molecules. In mid eighties of the last century Schrodinger equation on graphs became subject of extensive study and boundary conditions, Green functions and the properties were treated comprehensively [1-3]. In nineties quantum graphs have been attractive topic in quantum chaos theory. However, on the practical viewpoint they can quite attractive for modelling of particle transport and quantum dynamics in discrete structures such as nanoscale networks, lattice structures, molecular wires etc. In this talk the introduction in quantum graphs are presented and prospects for their future practical applications are discussed. (author), References: [1] Tsampikos Kottos and Uzy Smilansky, Ann.Phys., 76, 274, (1999). [2] Sven Gnutzmann and Uzy Smilansky, Adv.Phys. 55, 527, (2006). [3] S. GnutzmannJ.P. Keating b, F. Piotet, Ann.Phys., 325, 2595, (2010).

  1. Cavity-photon-switched coherent transient transport in a double quantum waveguide

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf, E-mail: nra1@hi.is; Gudmundsson, Vidar, E-mail: vidar@raunvis.hi.is [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Tang, Chi-Shung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National United University, 1, Lienda, 36003 Miaoli, Taiwan (China); Manolescu, Andrei [School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS-101 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2014-12-21

    We study a cavity-photon-switched coherent electron transport in a symmetric double quantum waveguide. The waveguide system is weakly connected to two electron reservoirs, but strongly coupled to a single quantized photon cavity mode. A coupling window is placed between the waveguides to allow electron interference or inter-waveguide transport. The transient electron transport in the system is investigated using a quantum master equation. We present a cavity-photon tunable semiconductor quantum waveguide implementation of an inverter quantum gate, in which the output of the waveguide system may be selected via the selection of an appropriate photon number or “photon frequency” of the cavity. In addition, the importance of the photon polarization in the cavity, that is, either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of electron propagation in the waveguide system is demonstrated.

  2. Quantum Transport on Disordered and Noisy Networks: An Interplay of Structural Complexity and Uncertainty

    Walschaers, Mattia; Schlawin, Frank; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We discuss recent research on quantum transport in complex materials, from photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes to photonic circuits. We identify finite, disordered networks as the underlying backbone and as a versatile framework to gain insight into the specific potential of nontrivial quantum dynamical effects to characterize and control transport on complex structures. We discriminate authentic quantum properties from classical aspects of complexity and briefly address the impact of interactions, nonlinearities, and noise. We stress the relevance of what we call the nonasymptotic realm, physical situations in which neither the relevant time- and length-scales, the number of degrees of freedom, or constituents tend to very small or very large values, nor do global symmetries or disorder fully govern the dynamics. Although largely uncharted territory, we argue that novel, intriguing and nontrivial questions for experimental and theoretical work emerge, with the prospect of a unified understanding of complex quantum transport phenomena in diverse physical settings.

  3. Effect of wire arrangements on AC transport losses in cylindrical conductors composed of Ag-sheathed Bi2223 tapes

    The AC transport self-field losses at 77 K were investigated on the double-layer cylindrical conductors composed of Ag-sheathed Bi2223 tapes. The multifilamentary tapes as the strands are arranged in a parallel way on the cylindrical former with a diameter of 10.5 mm. The loss values are strongly influenced by the arrangements of tape strands in the conductors. The loss generation in conductors enhances with increasing of the separation between the layers and gap length between the adjacent tapes in the outer-layer. From the numerical calculations of the loss density distributions per-cycle in the conductors, it is suggested that the difference in loss values for each conductor is attributed to the magnetic flux distributions due to self-field and loss generations in tape strands, varying with the arrangement of tape strands in the conductors

  4. Ballistic transport through coupled T-shaped quantum wires

    Lin, Yuh-Kae; Lin, Kao-Chin; Chuu, Der-San

    2003-01-01

    The ballistic conductance of a coupled $T$-shaped semiconductor quantum wire (CTQW) are studied. Two types of CTQW are considered, one of which is a $\\Pi $-shaped quantum wire ($\\Pi $QW) which consists of two transverse wires on the same side of the main wire and the other a $\\Pi $-clone quantum wire ($\\Pi $CQW) which consists of two transverse wires on the opposite sides of the main wire. The mode matching method and Landauer-Buttiker theory are employed to study the energy dependence of the...

  5. Competition of static magnetic and dynamic photon forces in electronic transport through a quantum dot.

    Rauf Abdullah, Nzar; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2016-09-21

    We investigate theoretically the balance of the static magnetic and the dynamical photon forces in the electron transport through a quantum dot in a photon cavity with a single photon mode. The quantum dot system is connected to external leads and the total system is exposed to a static perpendicular magnetic field. We explore the transport characteristics through the system by tuning the ratio, [Formula: see text], between the photon energy, [Formula: see text], and the cyclotron energy, [Formula: see text]. Enhancement in the electron transport with increasing electron-photon coupling is observed when [Formula: see text]. In this case the photon field dominates and stretches the electron charge distribution in the quantum dot, extending it towards the contact area for the leads. Suppression in the electron transport is found when [Formula: see text], as the external magnetic field causes circular confinement of the charge density around the dot. PMID:27420809

  6. Quantum-based spectroscopy and efficient energy transport with biomolecules

    León Montiel, Roberto de Jesús

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the fields of quantum optics and biology have rarely shared a common path. In quantum optics, most of the concepts and techniques developed over the years stand for systems where only a few degrees of freedom are considered and, more importantly, where the systems under study are assumed to be completely isolated from their surrounding environment. This situation is far from what we can find in nature. Biological complexes are, by definition, warm, wet and noisy systems subjec...

  7. Nonlinear transport in coupled quantum dots: A stationary probability approach

    GONG JianPing; DUAN SuQing; YAN WeiXian; ZHAO XianGeng

    2009-01-01

    The stationary tunneling current and differential conductance of the coupled quantum dots system with split-gates are calculated by generalizing the Beenaker's linear response theory for the description of the Coulomb-blockade oscillations of the conductance in the single quantum dot. The calculation of the charging diagram in parallel through the double dot as function of the two side-gate voltages shows a remarkable agreement with the recent experimental results by Hatano et al. (Science, 2005, 309: 268-271)

  8. Flow diagram of the longitudinal and Hall conductivities in ac regime in the disordered graphene quantum Hall system

    We numerically study the behavior of σxy(ω) and σxx (ω) for graphene QHE system in the ac (frequency ω) domain. We interpret these conductivities with the dynamical scaling analysis. We also discuss the temperature flow of σxy(ω) — σxx(ω) diagram for graphene QHE system in the ac region.

  9. Non-Fermi liquid transport and 'universal' ratios in quantum Griffiths phases

    We use the semi-classical Boltzmann equation to investigate transport properties such as electrical resistivity, thermal resistivity, thermopower, and the Peltier coefficient of disordered metals close to an antiferromagnetic quantum phase transition. In the quantum Griffiths phase, the electrons are scattered by spin-fluctuations in the rare regions. This leads to singular temperature dependencies not just at the quantum critical point, but in the entire Griffiths phase. We show that the resulting non-universal power-laws in transport properties are controlled by the same Griffiths exponent λ which governs the thermodynamics. λ takes the value zero at the quantum critical point and increases throughout the Griffiths phase. We also study some of the 'universal' ratios commonly used to characterize Fermi-liquid behavior.

  10. An improved FEM model for computing transport AC loss in coils made of RABiTS YBCO coated conductors for electric machines

    AC loss can be a significant problem for any applications that utilize or produce an AC current or magnetic field, such as an electric machine. The authors investigate the electromagnetic properties of high temperature superconductors with a particular focus on the AC loss in superconducting coils made from YBCO coated conductors for use in an all-superconducting electric machine. This paper presents an improved 2D finite element model for the cross-section of such coils, based on the H formulation. The model is used to calculate the transport AC loss of a racetrack-shaped coil using constant and magnetic field-dependent critical current densities, and the inclusion and exclusion of a magnetic substrate, as found in RABiTS (rolling-assisted biaxially textured substrate) YBCO coated conductors. The coil model is based on the superconducting stator coils used in the University of Cambridge EPEC Superconductivity Group's all-superconducting permanent magnet synchronous motor design. To validate the modeling results, the transport AC loss of a stator coil is measured using an electrical method based on inductive compensation by means of a variable mutual inductance. Finally, the implications of the findings on the performance of the motor are discussed.

  11. An improved FEM model for computing transport AC loss in coils made of RABiTS YBCO coated conductors for electric machines

    Ainslie, Mark D; Yuan Weijia; Flack, Timothy J; Coombs, Timothy A [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Rodriguez-Zermeno, Victor M [Department of Mathematics, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby 2800 (Denmark); Hong Zhiyong, E-mail: mda36@cam.ac.uk [School of Electronic, Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2011-04-15

    AC loss can be a significant problem for any applications that utilize or produce an AC current or magnetic field, such as an electric machine. The authors investigate the electromagnetic properties of high temperature superconductors with a particular focus on the AC loss in superconducting coils made from YBCO coated conductors for use in an all-superconducting electric machine. This paper presents an improved 2D finite element model for the cross-section of such coils, based on the H formulation. The model is used to calculate the transport AC loss of a racetrack-shaped coil using constant and magnetic field-dependent critical current densities, and the inclusion and exclusion of a magnetic substrate, as found in RABiTS (rolling-assisted biaxially textured substrate) YBCO coated conductors. The coil model is based on the superconducting stator coils used in the University of Cambridge EPEC Superconductivity Group's all-superconducting permanent magnet synchronous motor design. To validate the modeling results, the transport AC loss of a stator coil is measured using an electrical method based on inductive compensation by means of a variable mutual inductance. Finally, the implications of the findings on the performance of the motor are discussed.

  12. Electric field geometries dominate quantum transport coupling in silicon nanoring

    Lee, Tsung-Han, E-mail: askaleeg@gmail.com, E-mail: sfhu.hu@gmail.com; Hu, Shu-Fen, E-mail: askaleeg@gmail.com, E-mail: sfhu.hu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-28

    Investigations on the relation between the geometries of silicon nanodevices and the quantum phenomenon they exhibit, such as the Aharonov–Bohm (AB) effect and the Coulomb blockade, were conducted. An arsenic doped silicon nanoring coupled with a nanowire by electron beam lithography was fabricated. At 1.47 K, Coulomb blockade oscillations were observed under modulation from the top gate voltage, and a periodic AB oscillation of ΔB = 0.178 T was estimated for a ring radius of 86 nm under a high sweeping magnetic field. Modulating the flat top gate and the pointed side gate was performed to cluster and separate the many electron quantum dots, which demonstrated that quantum confinement and interference effects coexisted in the doped silicon nanoring.

  13. Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian approach to quantum transport in disordered networks with sinks: validity and effectiveness

    Giusteri, Giulio G.; Mattiotti, Francesco; Celardo, G. Luca

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian approach in describing quantum transport in disordered tight-binding networks connected to external environments, acting as sinks. Usually, non-Hermitian terms are added, on a phenomenological basis, to such networks to summarize the effects of the coupling to the sinks. Here we consider a paradigmatic model of open quantum network for which we derive a non-Hermitian effective model, discussing its limit of validity by a comparison ...

  14. Theoretical and experimental results of electronic transport of spin quantum cross structure devices

    Kondo, Kenji; Kaiju, Hideo; Ishibashi, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed quantum cross structure (QCS) devices that consist of two metalthin films deposited on organic films with edge-to-edge configuration like crossed fins for switching devices. In this paper, we propose a spin quantum cross structure (SQCS) device, which is a QCS device consisting of two magnetic thin films. We show theoretical and experimental results of electronic transport characteristics regarding SQCS devices. The calculation of the I-Vcharacteristics has been per...

  15. QUANTUM DOT SINGLE MOLECULE TRACKING REVEALS A WIDE RANGE OF DIFFUSIVE MOTIONS OF MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS

    Crane, Jonathan M.; Haggie, Peter M.; Verkman, A S

    2009-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) provides information about the microscopic motions of individual particles in live cells. We applied SPT to study the diffusion of membrane transport proteins in cell plasma membranes in which individual proteins are labeled with quantum dots at engineered extracellular epitopes. Software was created to deduce particle diffusive modes from quantum dot trajectories. SPT of aquaporin (AQP) water channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFT...

  16. Carrier transport in THz quantum cascade lasers: Are Green's functions necessary?

    We have applied two different simulation models for the stationary carrier transport and optical gain analysis in resonant phonon depopulation THz Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs), based on the semiclassical ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) and fully quantum mechanical non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) method, respectively. We find in the incoherent regime near and above the threshold current a qualitative and quantitative agreement of both methods. Therefore, we show that THz-QCLs can be successfully optimized utilizing the numerically efficient EMC method.

  17. Electron transport across a quantum wire embedding a saw-tooth superlattice

    Chen Yuan-Ping; Yan Xiao-Hong; Lu Mao-Wang; Deng Yu-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By developing the recursive Green function method, the transport properties through a quantum wire embedding a finite-length saw-tooth superlattice are studied in the presence of magnetic field. The effects of magnetic modulation and the geometric structures of the superlattice on transmission coefficient are discussed. It is shown that resonant electron gas. The transmission spectrum can be tailored to match requirements through adjusting the size of saw-tooth quantum dot and field strength.

  18. Quantum Thermal Transport through Extremely Cold Dielectric Chains

    LIU Hui-Ping; YI Lin

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of Green's function theory out of equilibrium, a Landauer-Buttiker (LB) formula for thermal conductance is derived. A simplified model for describing extremely cold dielectric chains is proposed for the first time. Fhrther we apply the present LB formula for studying thermal conductance at low-lying modes, emerging in dielectric atom chains. We find that quantum thermal conductance undergoes an anomalous transition due to new quasiparticle excitations, resulting from nonlinear atom-atom interactions. This theoretical prediction is in excellent agreement with a high-accuracy measurement to thermal conductance quantum.

  19. Transport through an impurity tunnel coupled to a Si/SiGe quantum dot

    Foote, Ryan H., E-mail: rhfoote@wisc.edu; Ward, Daniel R.; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Savage, D. E.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A., E-mail: maeriksson@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Prance, J. R. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik [Center for Computing Research, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Saraiva, A. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-09-07

    Achieving controllable coupling of dopants in silicon is crucial for operating donor-based qubit devices, but it is difficult because of the small size of donor-bound electron wavefunctions. Here, we report the characterization of a quantum dot coupled to a localized electronic state and present evidence of controllable coupling between the quantum dot and the localized state. A set of measurements of transport through the device enable the determination that the most likely location of the localized state is consistent with a location in the quantum well near the edge of the quantum dot. Our results are consistent with a gate-voltage controllable tunnel coupling, which is an important building block for hybrid donor and gate-defined quantum dot devices.

  20. Transport through an impurity tunnel coupled to a Si/SiGe quantum dot

    Achieving controllable coupling of dopants in silicon is crucial for operating donor-based qubit devices, but it is difficult because of the small size of donor-bound electron wavefunctions. Here, we report the characterization of a quantum dot coupled to a localized electronic state and present evidence of controllable coupling between the quantum dot and the localized state. A set of measurements of transport through the device enable the determination that the most likely location of the localized state is consistent with a location in the quantum well near the edge of the quantum dot. Our results are consistent with a gate-voltage controllable tunnel coupling, which is an important building block for hybrid donor and gate-defined quantum dot devices

  1. Electron transport through an Aharonov-Bohm ring with a side-coupled quantum dot

    We present a theoretical description for electron transport through an Aharonov-Bohm ring with a quantum dot side-coupled to one arm. An analytic formula of conductance is derived which shows the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations. The quantum dot modulates electron transmission through the coupled arm, and thus affects the amplitude of the AB oscillations. Tuning the plunger gate of the quantum dot can induce the antiresonance, in which the transmission through the coupled arm is quenched and the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are suppressed completely. The temperature-dependence of the suppression of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations is discussed

  2. Families of Quasilocal Conservation Laws and Quantum Spin Transport

    Prosen, Tomaž; Ilievski, Enej

    2013-08-01

    For fundamental integrable quantum chains with deformed symmetries we outline a general procedure for defining a continuous family of quasilocal operators whose time derivative is supported near the two boundary sites only. The program is implemented for a spin 1/2 XXZ chain, resulting in improved rigorous estimates for the high temperature spin Drude weight.

  3. Spin-dependent transport through quantum-dot aharonov-bohm interferometers

    Hiltscher B.; Governale M.; Konig J

    2010-01-01

    We study the influence of spin polarization on the degree of coherence of electron transport through interacting quantum dots. To this end, we identify transport regimes in which the degree of coherence can be related to the visibility of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the current through a quantum-dot Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with one normal and one ferromagnetic lead. For these regimes, we calculate the visibility and, thus, the degree of coherence, as a function of the degree of spi...

  4. Inter-dot coupling effects on transport through correlated parallel coupled quantum dots

    Shyam Chand; G Rajput; K C Sharma; P K Ahluwalia

    2009-05-01

    Transport through symmetric parallel coupled quantum dot system has been studied, using non-equilibrium Green function formalism. The inter-dot tunnelling with on-dot and inter-dot Coulomb repulsion is included. The transmission coefficient and Landaur–Buttiker like current formula are shown in terms of internal states of quantum dots. The effect of inter-dot tunnelling on transport properties has been explored. Results, in intermediate inter-dot coupling regime show signatures of merger of two dots to form a single composite dot and in strong coupling regime the behaviour of the system resembles the two decoupled dots.

  5. Quantum transport of bosonic cold atoms in double-well optical lattices

    We numerically investigate, using the time evolving block decimation algorithm, the quantum transport of ultracold bosonic atoms in a double-well optical lattice through slow and periodic modulation of the lattice parameters (intra- and inter-well tunneling, chemical potential, etc.). The transport of atoms does not depend on the rate of change of the parameters (as along as the change is slow) and can distribute atoms in optical lattices at the quantized level without involving external forces. The transport of atoms depends on the atom filling in each double well and the interaction between atoms. In the strongly interacting region, the bosonic atoms share the same transport properties as noninteracting fermions with quantized transport at the half filling and no atom transport at the integer filling. In the weakly interacting region, the number of the transported atoms is proportional to the atom filling. We show the signature of the quantum transport from the momentum distribution of atoms that can be measured in the time-of-flight image. A semiclassical transport model is developed to explain the numerically observed transport of bosonic atoms in the noninteracting and strongly interacting limits. The scheme may serve as an quantized battery for atomtronics applications.

  6. Electron Transport Through a Quantum Wire with a Side-Coupled Quantum Dot:Fano Resonance

    熊永建; 贺舟波

    2004-01-01

    The Fano resonance of a quantum wire (QW) with a side-coupled quantum dot (QD) is investigated. The QD has multilevel and is in the Coulomb blockade regime. We show that there are two aspects in contribution to asymmetric Fano dip line shape of conductance: (1) the quantum interference between the resonant level and non-resonant levels, (2) the asymmetric electron occupation of levels in the two sides of a resonant level in the QD. The smearing of the asymmetry of the dip structure with the increasing temperature is partially attributed to fluctuation of electron state in the QD.

  7. Consistent behaviour of AC susceptibility and transport properties in magnetic superconductor RuSr{sub 2}GdCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}

    Ocko, M. E-mail: ocko@ifs.hr; Zivkovic, I.; Prester, M.; Drobac, Dj.; Ariosa, D.; Berger, H.; Pavuna, D

    2004-02-01

    We report on AC susceptibility, resistivity, thermopower and measurements of sintered magnetic superconductor RuSr{sub 2}GdCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The antiferromagnetic phase transition at 133 K is seen clearly in the AC susceptibility as well as in the derivative of resistivity and thermopower. Above the antiferromagnetic transition, we have found some new evidences of the similarity between HTC compounds and the magnetic superconductor. The onset of superconductivity is observed by both transport methods at 46 K, and an explanation why it is not seen in the AC susceptibility data is given. The end of the SC transition occurs at about 24 K in all measured properties. We discuss the steps of broad SC transition, especially the maximum in susceptibility at 34 K, and compare our results with related studies reported in the literature.

  8. Consistent behaviour of AC susceptibility and transport properties in magnetic superconductor RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8

    Očko, M.; Živkovic, I.; Prester, M.; Drobac, Dj.; Ariosa, D.; Berger, H.; Pavuna, D.

    2004-02-01

    We report on AC susceptibility, resistivity, thermopower and measurements of sintered magnetic superconductor RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8. The antiferromagnetic phase transition at 133 K is seen clearly in the AC susceptibility as well as in the derivative of resistivity and thermopower. Above the antiferromagnetic transition, we have found some new evidences of the similarity between HTC compounds and the magnetic superconductor. The onset of superconductivity is observed by both transport methods at 46 K, and an explanation why it is not seen in the AC susceptibility data is given. The end of the SC transition occurs at about 24 K in all measured properties. We discuss the steps of broad SC transition, especially the maximum in susceptibility at 34 K, and compare our results with related studies reported in the literature.

  9. Persistent quantum resonance transition in spin Hall transport

    Chen, Kuo-Chin; Lee, Hsin-Han; Chang, Ching-Ray

    2016-01-01

    We propose an H-shaped two-dimensional topological insulator (2DTI) as a persistent quantum resonance device. The helical edge states of 2DTI are robust against a nonmagnetic field. However, the helical edge states interfere with bound states created by a nonmagnetic impurity. Transmissions between leads shows two kinds of quantum resonance in this device, the Breit-Wigner resonance and a Fano-like resonance. These resonances can be realized in the device through modulating the on-site impurity potential. Resonances in 2DTI are persistent because the helical state has no backscattering that is protected by time-reversal-symmetry conservation. The finite-size effect in 2DTI leads to the phase transition between the Fano and the Breit-Wigner resonances through modulating the thickness of the 2DTI leads.

  10. Electrical transport near quantum criticality in low dimensional organic superconductors

    Shahbazi, M; Bourbonnais, C.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a theory of longitudinal resistivity in the normal phase of quasi-one-dimensional organic superconductors near the quantum critical point where antiferromagnetism borders with superconductivity under pressure. The linearized semi-classical Boltzmann equation is solved numerically, fed in by the half-filling electronic umklapp scattering vertex as derived from one-loop renormalization group calculations for the quasi-one-dimensional electron gas model. The momentum and temperature d...

  11. Curl flux, coherence, and population landscape of molecular systems: Nonequilibrium quantum steady state, energy (charge) transport, and thermodynamics

    Zhang, Zhedong

    2015-01-01

    We established a theoretical framework in terms of the curl flux, population landscape, and coherence for non-equilibrium quantum systems at steady state, through exploring the energy and charge transport in molecular processes. The curl quantum flux plays the key role in determining transport properties and the system reaches equilibrium when flux vanishes. The novel curl quantum flux reflects the degree of non-equilibriumness and the time-irreversibility. We found an analytical expression for the quantum flux and its relationship to the environmental pumping (non-equilibriumness quantified by the voltage away from the equilibrium) and the quantum tunneling. Furthermore, we investigated another quantum signature, the coherence, quantitatively measured by the non-zero off diagonal element of the density matrix. Besides the environment-assistance which can give dramatic enhancement of coherence and quantum flux with high voltage at a fixed tunneling strength, the quantum flux is promoted by the coherence in th...

  12. Majorana fermion modulated nonequilibrium transport through double quantum dots

    Nonequilibrium electronic transports through a double-QD-Majorana coupling system are studied with a purpose to extract the information to identify Majorana bound states (MBSs). It is found that MBSs can help form various transport processes, including the nonlocal crossed Andreev reflection, local resonant Andreev reflection, and cotunneling, depending on the relative position of two dot levels. These processes enrich the signature of average currents and noise correlations to probe the nature of MBSs. We further demonstrate the switching between the current peaks of crossed Andreev reflection and cotunneling, which is closely related to the nonlocal nature of Majorana fermions. We also propose effective physical pictures to understand these Majorana-assisted transports. - Highlights: • Majorana fermions are characterized in the signature of currents and noises. • Three types of tunneling mechanisms are realized separately. • The switching of crossed Andreev reflection and cotunneling is realized. • Concrete physical pictures are proposed to understand Majorana-assisted transports

  13. AC transport current loss analysis for anti-parallel current flow in face to face stacks of superconducting tapes

    In this study we investigated ac transport current losses in the face to face stack for the anti-parallel current flow, and compared the electromagnetic properties with those of the single SC tape as well as those of the same stack for the parallel current path. The gap between the SC tapes in the stack varied in order to verify the electromagnetic influence of the neighbors when current flows in opposite direction, and the model was implemented in the finite element method program by the commercial software, COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2a. Conclusively speaking, the loss was remarkably decreased for the anti-parallel current case, which is attributed the magnetic flux compensation between the SC layers due to the opposite direction of the current flows. As the gap between SC tapes was increased, the loss mitigation became less effective. Besides, the current density distribution is very flat cross the sample width for the narrower gap case, which is believed to be benefit for the power electric system. These results are all in good agreement with those predicted theoretically for an infinite bifilar stack.

  14. AC transport current loss analysis for anti-parallel current flow in face to face stacks of superconducting tapes

    Yoo, Ja Eun; Han, Young Hee; Kim, Hey Rim; Park, Byung Jun; Yang, Seong Eun; Kim, Hee Sun; Yu, Seung Duck; Park, Ki Jun [Future Technology Laboratory, KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    In this study we investigated ac transport current losses in the face to face stack for the anti-parallel current flow, and compared the electromagnetic properties with those of the single SC tape as well as those of the same stack for the parallel current path. The gap between the SC tapes in the stack varied in order to verify the electromagnetic influence of the neighbors when current flows in opposite direction, and the model was implemented in the finite element method program by the commercial software, COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2a. Conclusively speaking, the loss was remarkably decreased for the anti-parallel current case, which is attributed the magnetic flux compensation between the SC layers due to the opposite direction of the current flows. As the gap between SC tapes was increased, the loss mitigation became less effective. Besides, the current density distribution is very flat cross the sample width for the narrower gap case, which is believed to be benefit for the power electric system. These results are all in good agreement with those predicted theoretically for an infinite bifilar stack.

  15. SALUTE Application for Quantum Transport-New Grid Implementation Scheme

    SALUTE (Stochastic Algorithms for Ultra-fast Transport in semiconductors) is a grid application for simulation of ultra-fast electron transport in semiconductors where different Monte Carlo approaches are applied to the integral form of the generalized electron-phonon Wigner equation. Formally, the application consists of a number of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms for solving the considered sub-problems. In this paper we briefly describe SALUTE (scientific objectives, methods and results) and present its new grid implementation scheme. (Author)

  16. Semiclassical matrix model for quantum chaotic transport with time-reversal symmetry

    Novaes, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.novaes@gmail.com

    2015-10-15

    We show that the semiclassical approach to chaotic quantum transport in the presence of time-reversal symmetry can be described by a matrix model. In other words, we construct a matrix integral whose perturbative expansion satisfies the semiclassical diagrammatic rules for the calculation of transport statistics. One of the virtues of this approach is that it leads very naturally to the semiclassical derivation of universal predictions from random matrix theory.

  17. Photon-induced carrier transport in high efficiency midinfrared quantum cascade lasers

    Mátyás, Alpár; Lugli, Paolo; Jirauschek, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A midinfrared quantum cascade laser with high wall-plug efficiency is analyzed by means of an ensemble Monte Carlo method. Both the carrier transport and the cavity field dynamics are included in the simulation, offering a self-consistent approach for analyzing and optimizing the laser operation. It is shown that at low temperatures, photon emission and absorption can govern the carrier transport in such devices. Furthermore, we find that photon-induced scattering can strongly affect the kine...

  18. Landauer-type transport theory for interacting quantum wires: Application to carbon nanotube Y junctions

    Chen, S.; Trauzettel, B.; Egger, R.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a Landauer-like theory for nonlinear transport in networks of one-dimensional interacting quantum wires (Luttinger liquids). A concrete example of current experimental focus is given by carbon nanotube Y junctions. Our theory has three basic ingredients that allow to explicitly solve this transport problem: (i) radiative boundary conditions to describe the coupling to external leads, (ii) the Kirchhoff node rule describing charge conservation, and (iii) density matching conditions ...

  19. Landauer-Type Transport Theory for Interacting Quantum Wires: Application to Carbon Nanotube Y Junctions

    Chen, S.; Trauzettel, B.; Egger, R.

    2002-11-01

    We propose a Landauerlike theory for nonlinear transport in networks of one-dimensional interacting quantum wires (Luttinger liquids). A concrete example of current experimental focus is given by carbon nanotube Y junctions. Our theory has three basic ingredients that allow one to explicitly solve this transport problem: (i) radiative boundary conditions to describe the coupling to external leads, (ii) the Kirchhoff node rule describing charge conservation, and (iii) density matching conditions at every node.

  20. Coherent mesoscopic transport through a quantum-dot embedded carbon nanotube ring threaded with magnetic flux

    Zhao, HK; Wang, J.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the coherent mesoscopic transport through a quantum-dot (QD) embedded carbon nanotube ring (CNR) by employing the nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique. The Landauer–Büttiker-like formula is presented to calculate the differential conductance and current–voltage characteristics. Due to the interference of the electrons transporting in the two paths of CNR, the resultant conductivity of electron through the system is determined by the compound concrete structure ...

  1. Effects of guaifenesin, N-acetylcysteine, and ambroxol on MUC5AC and mucociliary transport in primary differentiated human tracheal-bronchial cells

    Seagrave JeanClare

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic intervention in the pathophysiology of airway mucus hypersecretion is clinically important. Several types of drugs are available with different possible modes of action. We examined the effects of guaifenesin (GGE, N-acetylcysteine (NAC and ambroxol (Amb on differentiated human airway epithelial cells stimulated with IL-13 to produce additional MUC5AC. Methods After IL-13 pre-treatment (3 days, the cultures were treated with GGE, NAC or Amb (10–300 μM in the continued presence of IL-13. Cellular and secreted MUC5AC, mucociliary transport rates (MTR, mucus rheology at several time points, and the antioxidant capacity of the drugs were assessed. Results IL-13 increased MUC5AC content (~25% and secretion (~2-fold and decreased MTR, but only slightly affected the G’ (elastic or G” (viscous moduli of the secretions. GGE significantly inhibited MUC5AC secretion and content in the IL-13-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50s at 24 hr ~100 and 150 μM, respectively. NAC or Amb were less effective. All drugs increased MTR and decreased G’ and G” relative to IL-13 alone. Cell viability was not affected and only NAC exhibited antioxidant capacity. Conclusions Thus, GGE effectively reduces cellular content and secretion of MUC5AC, increases MTR, and alters mucus rheology, and may therefore be useful in treating airway mucus hypersecretion and mucostasis in airway diseases.

  2. Introduction to quantum chromo transport theory for quark-gluon plasmas

    Upcoming heavy ion experiments at the AGS and SPS are aimed at producing and diagnosing a primordial form of matter, the quark-gluon plasma. In these lectures some recent developments on formulating a quantum transport theory for quark-gluon plasmas are introduced. 46 refs

  3. Nonlinear photon transport in a semiconductor waveguide-cavity system containing a single quantum dot

    Hughes, S

    2011-01-01

    The input/output characteristics of coherent photon transport through a semiconductor cavity system containing a single quantum dot is presented. The nonlinear quantum optics formalism uses a master equation approach and focuses on a waveguide-cavity system containing a semiconductor quantum dot; our general technique also applies to studying coherent reflection from a micropillar cavity. We investigate the effects of light propagation and show the need for quantized multiphoton effects for various dot-cavity systems, including weakly-coupled, intermediately-coupled, and strongly-coupled regimes. We demonstrate that for mean photon numbers much less than 0.1, the commonly adopted weak excitation (single quantum) approximation breaks down---even in the weak coupling regime. As a measure of the photon correlations, we compute the Fano factor and the error associated with making a semiclassical approximation. We also investigate the role of electron--acoustic-phonon scattering and show that phonon-mediated scatt...

  4. Simulation of interdigitated back-contact silicon heterojunction solar cells with quantum transport model

    Kamioka, Takefumi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Nakamura, Kyotaro; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    A simulation of interdigitated back-contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cells was performed using a quantum transport model to consider the quantum effect at the crystalline/amorphous (c/a) heterojunction interface. It was found that the impact of the quantum effect on the open-circuit voltage is comparable to that of the interface defect density at the c/a interface, indicating the importance of implementation of the quantum model. The optimal back-contact design was also discussed from the viewpoint of mass production, in which the design rule is relaxed. The degradation of the conversion efficiency by widening the gap between the p- and n-aSi:H layers can be compensated by improving passivation quality at the c/a interface.

  5. Nonequilibrium Transport through a Spinful Quantum Dot with Superconducting Leads

    Andersen, Brian Møller; Flensberg, Karsten; Koerting, Verena; Paaske, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonlinear cotunneling current through a spinful quantum dot contacted by two superconducting leads. Applying a general nonequilibrium Green function formalism to an effective Kondo model, we study the rich variation in the IV characteristics with varying asymmetry in the tunnel...... coupling to source and drain electrodes. The current is found to be carried, respectively, by multiple Andreev reflections in the symmetric limit, and by spin-induced Yu-Shiba-Rusinov bound states in the strongly asymmetric limit. The interplay between these two mechanisms leads to qualitatively different...

  6. Influence of shape on electron transport in ballistic quantum dots

    We have investigated the low-temperature (T=0.43--4.25 K) magnetotransport of quantum dots fabricated in the shape of an open circle and a circle having a central bar. The characteristic magnetic fields for both coherent backscattering and conductance fluctuations are strongly shape dependent: both are larger by a factor ≥3 in the device with the central bar. Comparison of large and small devices of nominally identical shape shows that characteristic trajectory areas are proportional to the device area

  7. Tuning Fano resonances by magnetic forces for electron transport through a quantum wire side coupled to a quantum ring

    Szafran, B.; Poniedziałek, M. R.

    2010-08-01

    We consider electron transport in a quantum wire with a side-coupled quantum ring in a two-dimensional model that accounts for a finite width of the channels. We use the finite difference technique to solve the scattering problem as well as to determine the ring-localized states of the energy continuum. The backscattering probability exhibits Fano peaks for magnetic fields for which a ring-localized states appear at the Fermi level. We find that the width of the Fano resonances changes at high magnetic field. The width is increased (decreased) for resonant states with current circulation that produce the magnetic dipole moment that is parallel (antiparallel) to the external magnetic field. We indicate that the opposite behavior of Fano resonances due to localized states with clockwise and counterclockwise currents results from the magnetic forces which change the strength of their coupling to the channel and modify the lifetime of localized states.

  8. Anisotropic behavior of quantum transport in graphene superlattices

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Cummings, Aron W.; Roche, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    multiple scattering phenomena can strongly depend on the transport measurement geometry. This eventually yields the coexistence of a ballistic waveguide and a highly resistive channel (Anderson insulator) in the same two-dimensional platform, evidenced by a sigma(yy)/sigma(xx) ratio varying over several...

  9. Conserving GW scheme for nonequilibrium quantum transport in molecular contacts

    Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Rubio, Angel

    2008-01-01

    We give a detailed presentation of our recent scheme to include correlation effects in molecular transport calculations using the nonequilibrium Keldysh formalism. The scheme is general and can be used with any quasiparticle self-energy, but for practical reasons, we mainly specialize to the so...

  10. Quantum Mechanical Study on Tunnelling and Ballistic Transport of Nanometer Si MOSFETs

    Using self-consistent calculations of million-atom Schrödinger-Poisson equations, we investigate the I–V characteristics of tunnelling and ballistic transport of nanometer metal oxide semiconductor held effect transistors (MOSFET) based on a full 3-D quantum mechanical simulation under nonequilibtium condition. Atomistic empirical pseudopotentials are used to describe the device Hamiltonian and the underlying bulk band structure. We find that the ballistic transport dominates the I–V characteristics, whereas the effects of tunnelling cannot be neglected with the maximal value up to 0.8 mA/μm when the channel length of MOSFET scales down to 25 nm. The effects of tunnelling transport lower the threshold voltage Vt. The ballistic current based on fully 3-D quantum mechanical simulation is relatively large and has small on-off ratio compared with results derived from the calculation methods of Luo et al

  11. Lorentz-covariant quantum transport and the origin of dark energy

    Bergstrom, Arne, E-mail: arne.bergstrom@physics.org [B and E Scientific Ltd, Seaford BN25 4PA (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-01

    A possible explanation for the enigma of dark energy, responsible for about 76% of the mass-energy of the universe, is obtained by requiring only that the rigorous continuity equation (the Boltzmann transport equation) for quanta propagating through space should have the form of a Lorentz-covariant and dispersion-free wave equation. This requirement implies (i) properties of space-time that an observer would describe as uniform expansion in agreement with Hubble's law and (ii) that the quantum transport behaves like in a multiplicative medium with multiplication factor {nu}=2. This inherent, essentially explosive multiplicity of vacuum, caused by the requirement of Lorentz covariance, is suggested as a potential origin of dark energy. In addition, it is shown (iii) that this requirement of Lorentz-covariant quantum transport leads to an apparent accelerated expansion of the universe.

  12. Dynamical signatures of molecular symmetries in nonequilibrium quantum transport.

    Thingna, Juzar; Manzano, Daniel; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-01-01

    Symmetries play a crucial role in ubiquitous systems found in Nature. In this work, we propose an elegant approach to detect symmetries by measuring quantum currents. Our detection scheme relies on initiating the system in an anti-symmetric initial condition, with respect to the symmetric sites, and using a probe that acts like a local noise. Depending on the position of the probe the currents exhibit unique signatures such as a quasi-stationary plateau indicating the presence of metastability and multi-exponential decays in case of multiple symmetries. The signatures are sensitive to the characteristics of the probe and vanish completely when the timescale of the coherent system dynamics is much longer than the timescale of the probe. These results are demonstrated using a 4-site model and an archetypal example of the para-benzene ring and are shown to be robust under a weak disorder. PMID:27311717

  13. Dynamical signatures of molecular symmetries in nonequilibrium quantum transport

    Thingna, Juzar; Manzano, Daniel; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-06-01

    Symmetries play a crucial role in ubiquitous systems found in Nature. In this work, we propose an elegant approach to detect symmetries by measuring quantum currents. Our detection scheme relies on initiating the system in an anti-symmetric initial condition, with respect to the symmetric sites, and using a probe that acts like a local noise. Depending on the position of the probe the currents exhibit unique signatures such as a quasi-stationary plateau indicating the presence of metastability and multi-exponential decays in case of multiple symmetries. The signatures are sensitive to the characteristics of the probe and vanish completely when the timescale of the coherent system dynamics is much longer than the timescale of the probe. These results are demonstrated using a 4-site model and an archetypal example of the para-benzene ring and are shown to be robust under a weak disorder.

  14. Transport across two interacting quantum dots: Bulk Kondo, Kondo box, and molecular regimes

    Costa Ribeiro, Laercio; Hamad, Ignacio; Chiappe, Guillermo; Victoriano Anda, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the transport properties of a double quantum dot device with both dots coupled to perfect conducting leads and to a finite chain of N noninteracting sites connecting both of them. The interdot chain strongly influences the transport across the system and the local density of states of the dots. We study the case of a small number of sites, so that Kondo box effects are present, varying the coupling between the dots and the chain. For odd N and small coupling between the interdot chain and the dots, a state with two coexisting Kondo regimes develops: the bulk Kondo due to the quantum dots connected to leads and the one produced by the screening of the quantum dot spins by the spin in the finite chain at the Fermi level. As the coupling to the interdot chain increases, there is a crossover to a molecular Kondo effect, due to the screening of the molecule (formed by the finite chain and the quantum dots) spin by the leads. For even N the two Kondo temperatures regime does not develop and the physics is dominated by the usual competition between Kondo and antiferromagnetism between the quantum dots. We acknowledge financial support from the Brazilian agencies FAPERJ and CNPq.

  15. Quantum Transport of Disordered Weyl Semimetals at the Nodal Point

    Sbierski, Björn; Pohl, Gregor; Bergholtz, Emil J.; Brouwer, Piet W.

    2014-07-01

    Weyl semimetals are paradigmatic topological gapless phases in three dimensions. We here address the effect of disorder on charge transport in Weyl semimetals. For a single Weyl node with energy at the degeneracy point and without interactions, theory predicts the existence of a critical disorder strength beyond which the density of states takes on a nonzero value. Predictions for the conductivity are divergent, however. In this work, we present a numerical study of transport properties for a disordered Weyl cone at zero energy. For weak disorder, our results are consistent with a renormalization group flow towards an attractive pseudoballistic fixed point with zero conductivity and a scale-independent conductance; for stronger disorder, diffusive behavior is reached. We identify the Fano factor as a signature that discriminates between these two regimes.

  16. Relativistic quantum transport coefficients for second-order viscous hydrodynamics

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Maksymiuk, Ewa; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We express the transport coefficients appearing in the second-order evolution equations for bulk viscous pressure and shear stress tensor using Bose-Einstein, Boltzmann, and Fermi-Dirac statistics for the equilibrium distribution function and Grad's 14-moment approximation as well as the method of Chapman-Enskog expansion for the non-equilibrium part. Specializing to the case of boost-invariant and transversally homogeneous longitudinal expansion of the viscous medium, we compare the results obtained using the above methods with those obtained from the exact solution of massive 0+1d Boltzmann equation in the relaxation-time approximation. We show that compared to the 14-moment approximation, the hydrodynamic transport coefficients obtained using the Chapman-Enskog method result in better agreement with the exact solution of the Boltzmann equation in relaxation-time approximation.

  17. Selective nanomanipulation of fluorescent polystyrene nano-beads and single quantum dots at gold nanostructures based on the AC-dielectrophoretic force

    Kim, Jinsik; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Lee, Sangyoup; Park, Jung Ho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2015-11-01

    We introduced the selective manipulation of polystyrene (PS) nano-beads and single quantum dots (QDs) at a gold nanostructure by using the AC-dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. Manipulation in three degrees of freedom (end-facet, side, and position-selective manipulation) was accomplished in gold nanostructures between microelectrodes. A 10 μm gap between the microelectrodes, which has a 100 nm-wide nanowire and 200 nm-wide vortex nanostructures at the inside of the gap, was fabricated, and nanostructures were not connected with the electrodes. We also performed theoretical calculations to verify the selective manipulation through the floating AC-DEP force. A sufficiently high gradient of the square of the electric field (∇|E|2, ~1019 V2 m-3) was accomplished and controlled for achieving a strong attaching force of nanoparticles using the gap between microelectrodes and nanostructures as well as the rotation of structures. Fluorescent PS nano-beads and QDs were attached at the designed end facet, side, and position of nanostructures with high selectivity. A single QD attachment was also realized at gold nanostructures, and the attached QDs were verified as single using optical ``blinking'' measurements.We introduced the selective manipulation of polystyrene (PS) nano-beads and single quantum dots (QDs) at a gold nanostructure by using the AC-dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. Manipulation in three degrees of freedom (end-facet, side, and position-selective manipulation) was accomplished in gold nanostructures between microelectrodes. A 10 μm gap between the microelectrodes, which has a 100 nm-wide nanowire and 200 nm-wide vortex nanostructures at the inside of the gap, was fabricated, and nanostructures were not connected with the electrodes. We also performed theoretical calculations to verify the selective manipulation through the floating AC-DEP force. A sufficiently high gradient of the square of the electric field (∇|E|2, ~1019 V2 m-3) was accomplished and

  18. Quantum graphs with mixed dynamics: the transport/diffusion case

    We introduce a class of partial differential equations on metric graphs associated with mixed evolution: on some edges we consider diffusion processes, and on others transport phenomena. This yields a system of equations with possibly nonlocal couplings at the boundary. We provide sufficient conditions for these to be governed by a contractive semigroup on a Hilbert space naturally associated with the system. We show that our setting is also adequate to discuss specific systems of diffusion equations with boundary delays. (paper)

  19. Quantum transport and geometric integration for molecular systems

    Odell, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Molecular electronics is envisioned as a possible next step in device miniaturization. It is usually taken to mean the design and manufacturing of electronic devices and applications where organic molecules work as the fundamental functioning unit. It involves the measurement and manipulation of electronic response and transport in molecules attached to conducting leads. Organic molecules have the advantages over conventional solid state electronics of inherent small sizes, endless chemical d...

  20. Quantum transport in boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond

    Mareš, Jiří J.; Hubík, Pavel; Krištofik, Jozef; Kindl, Dobroslav; Nesládek, Miloš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 7-8 (2008), s. 161-172. ISSN 0948-1907 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0525; GA AV ČR IAA1010404; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/06/0040 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond film * ballistic transport * superconductivity * Josephson’s effects Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2008

  1. Relativistic quantum transport coefficients for second-order viscous hydrodynamics

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Jaiswal, Amaresh; Maksymiuk, Ewa; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We express the transport coefficients appearing in the second-order evolution equations for bulk viscous pressure and shear stress tensor using Bose-Einstein, Boltzmann, and Fermi-Dirac statistics for the equilibrium distribution function and Grad's 14-moment approximation as well as the method of Chapman-Enskog expansion for the non-equilibrium part. Specializing to the case of transversally homogeneous and boost-invariant longitudinal expansion of the viscous medium, we compare the results ...

  2. Transport Through Andreev Bound States in a Graphene Quantum Dot

    Dirks, Travis; Hughes, Taylor L.; Lal, Siddhartha; Uchoa, Bruno; Chen, Yung-Fu; Chialvo, Cesar; Goldbart, Paul M.; Mason, Nadya

    2010-01-01

    Andreev reflection-where an electron in a normal metal backscatters off a superconductor into a hole-forms the basis of low energy transport through superconducting junctions. Andreev reflection in confined regions gives rise to discrete Andreev bound states (ABS), which can carry a supercurrent and have recently been proposed as the basis of qubits [1-3]. Although signatures of Andreev reflection and bound states in conductance have been widely reported [4], it has been difficult to directly...

  3. Coarse-grained quantum transport simulation for analyzing leakage-mobility antagonism in GNRFET

    Ito, Masakatsu; Sato, Shintaro; Yokoyama, Naoki; Joachim, Christian; Green Nanoelectronics Center Team; CEMES-CNRS and Mana Satellite Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Since it became clear that graphene transistors based on the classical MOSFET principle suffer from serious performance problems, researchers have explored new graphene device design using quantum transport simulations. A first-principle quantum transport simulation, however, still takes unaffordable computational cost to deal with a realistic size of graphene transistor (>104 atoms). This motivated us to import ESQC (elastic scattering quantum chemistry) technique from the research field of molecular electronics and to develop its coarse-grained version. To eliminate the atomic scale details, we reformulated ESQC technique using the continuum limit description of graphene charge carriers, which is given by the massless Dirac equation. Since the potential function in this Dirac equation is electrostatic potential distribution, it can be obtained from Poisson equation with the boundary conditions of gate voltages in a self-consistent manner. We are now applying this coarse-grained quantum transport simulation to GNRFETs (graphene nanoribbon field effect transistors) for resolving the mobility-leakage antagonism, where opening a bandgap in a graphene channel improves its switching ability but at the same time deteriorates the electron channel mobility.

  4. Coherent quantum transport in disordered systems: A unified polaron treatment of hopping and band-like transport

    Lee, Chee Kong [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Moix, Jeremy; Cao, Jianshu, E-mail: jianshu@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Quantum transport in disordered systems is studied using a polaron-based master equation. The polaron approach is capable of bridging the results from the coherent band-like transport regime governed by the Redfield equation to incoherent hopping transport in the classical regime. A non-monotonic dependence of the diffusion coefficient is observed both as a function of temperature and system-phonon coupling strength. In the band-like transport regime, the diffusion coefficient is shown to be linearly proportional to the system-phonon coupling strength and vanishes at zero coupling due to Anderson localization. In the opposite classical hopping regime, we correctly recover the dynamics described by the Fermi’s Golden Rule and establish that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient depends on the phonon bath relaxation time. In both the hopping and band-like transport regimes, it is demonstrated that at low temperature, the zero-point fluctuations of the bath lead to non-zero transport rates and hence a finite diffusion constant. Application to rubrene and other organic semiconductor materials shows a good agreement with experimental mobility data.

  5. Vibrational effects in charge transport through a molecular double quantum dot

    Sowa, Jakub K; Briggs, G Andrew D; Gauger, Erik M

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of molecular electronics has revealed the fundamental importance of the coupling between the electronic degrees of freedom and specific vibrational modes. Considering the examples of a molecular dimer and a carbon nanotube double quantum dot, we here theoretically investigate transport through a two-site system that is strongly coupled to a single vibrational mode. Using a quantum master equation approach, we demonstrate that, depending on the relative positions of the two dots, electron-phonon interactions can lead to negative differential conductance and suppression of the current through the system. We also discuss the experimental relevance of the presented results and possible implementations of the studied system.

  6. Quantum transport through two series Aharonov-Bohm interferometers with zero total magnetic flux

    Wang Jian-Ming; Wang Rui; Zhang Yong-Ping; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2007-01-01

    With the help of nonequilibrium Green's function technique, the electronic transport through series AharonovBohm (AB) interferometers is investigated. We obtain the AB interference pattern of the transition probability characterized by the algebraic sum φ and the difference θ of two magnetic fluxes, and particularly a general rule of AB oscillation period depending on the ratio of integer quantum numbers of the fluxes. A parity effect is observed, showing the asymmetric AB oscillations with respect to the even and odd quantum numbers of the total flux in antiparallel AB interferometers. It is also shown that the AB flux can shift the Fano resonance peaks of the transmission spectrum.

  7. Manifestation of quantum confinement in transport properties of ultrathin metallic films

    The influence of quantum size effect on the transport properties of ultrathin Cu and Fe films in the thickness range between 1 and 32 monolayers is studied by solving the linearized Boltzmann equation in the relaxation-time approximation using ab initio calculations within the framework of spin density functional theory. A strong manifestation of quantum confinement is found in the density of states. However, the plasma frequency shows a smooth or oscillating behavior for different film orientations. The results are in qualitative agreement to infrared-absorption experiments at Cu(111), Fe(001), and Fe(111) films

  8. Quantum transport in a curved one-dimensional quantum wire with spin-orbit interactions

    Zhang, Erhu; Zhang, ShengLi; Wang, Qi

    2010-01-01

    The one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian for a planar curvilinear quantum wire with arbitrary shape is proposed in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Single electron propagation through a device of two straight lines conjugated with an arc has been investigated and the analytic expressions of the reflection and transmission probabilities have been derived. The effects of the device geometry and the spin-orbit coupling strength $\\alpha$ on the reflection and transmission proba...

  9. Fluctuations in a kinetic transport model for quantum friction

    Bauerschmidt, Roland; de Roeck, Wojciech; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2014-07-01

    We study a linear Boltzmann equation describing the effective dynamics of a quantum particle moving through an ideal Bose gas at zero temperature. The particle emits sound waves into the Bose gas, a process causing it to slow down. This mechanism for friction is akin to one exhibited by a charged particle travelling through an optically dense medium at a speed larger than the speed of light and hence emitting Čerenkov radiation. We study the spatial trajectory of the Markov process corresponding to the Boltzmann equation and prove that this process converges to a multiple of Brownian motion after an exponential rescaling of time. We also show that the asymptotic position of the particle remains finite on average, but that its absolute value diverges logarithmically. Our unusual exponential rescaling of time is appropriate for a description of friction at zero temperature and is distinct from diffusive scaling appropriate at positive temperature. It is also shown that if random fluctuations of the particle position were neglected the latter would turn out to diverge.

  10. Electronic structure and quantum transport in controlled impurity systems

    Ryu, Hoon

    Due to a continuous device downscaling, a precise control of dopant placements has become a critical factor to determine device performances. Recent progresses in the Scanning Tunneling Microscope lithography control dopant positions within a few atomic layers and have led experimentalists to propose various prototypes of planar patterned densely phosphorous delta-doping silicon (Si:P) devices. Theoretical understanding of electronic properties in such systems based on a realistic modeling approach is critical for potential device designs. Si:P devices are studied with the atomistic tight-binding (TB) approach coupled to charge-potential self-consistent simulations. The dispersion of a 1/4 mono-layer (ML) doped Si:P doping plane is simulated and compared to the previous literatures to validate our methodology. Upon the methodological validation, dispersions of 1/4ML doped ultra-narrow nanowires (NWs) are studied to explain experimentally observed metallic properties. Predicted channel conductances agree well with measured values. Then, a single donor quantum dot device with Si:P NW leads, is modeled to confirm the experimentally realized device is indeed a single atom transistor. Predicted charging energy and gate-control over the channel ground state establish strong connections to the experimental results. Finally, the numerical practicality of the Contact Block Reduction (CBR) method in simulating electron resonance tunneling features, is examined using Si:P NWs as examples. Based on a proof of principles on small TB systems, we show the CBR method can be practical on supercomputing clusters, due a better scalability than the one observed from the Recursive Greens Function and Wavefunction algorithm.

  11. Quantum Phase Coherence in Mesoscopic Transport Devices with Two-Particle Interaction

    Wang, Zhimei; Guo, Xiaofang; Xue, Haibin; Xue, Naitao; Liang, J.-Q.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a new type of quantum phase coherence (QPC), which is generated by the two-body interaction. This conclusion is based on quantum master equation analysis for the full counting statistics of electron transport through two parallel quantum-dots with antiparallel magnetic fluxes in order to eliminate the Aharonov-Bohm interference of either single-particle or non-interacting two-particle wave functions. The interacting two-particle QPC is realized by the flux-dependent oscillation of the zero-frequency cumulants including the shot noise and skewness with a characteristic period. The accurately quantized peaks of cumulant spectrum may have technical applications to probe the two-body Coulomb interaction.

  12. Coulomb effects on the transport properties of quantum dots in strong magnetic field

    We investigate the transport properties of quantum dots placed in strong magnetic field using a quantum-mechanical approach based on the 2D tight-binding Hamiltonian with direct Coulomb interaction and the Landauer-Buettiker (LB) formalism. The electronic transmittance and the Hall resistance show Coulomb oscillations and also prove multiple addition processes. We identify this feature as the 'bunching' of electrons observed in recent experiments and give an elementary explanation in terms of spectral characteristics of the dot. The spatial distribution of the added electrons may distinguish between edge and bulk states and it has specific features for bunched electrons. The dependence of the charging energy on the number of electrons is discussed for strong magnetic field. The crossover from the tunneling to quantum Hall regime is analyzed in terms of dot-lead coupling. (author)

  13. Fragility of Nonlocal Edge-Mode Transport in the Quantum Spin Hall State

    Mani, Arjun; Benjamin, Colin

    2016-07-01

    Nonlocal currents and voltages are better at withstanding the deleterious effects of dephasing than local currents and voltages in nanoscale systems. This hypothesis is known to be true in quantum Hall setups. We test this hypothesis in a four-terminal quantum spin Hall setup wherein we compare the local resistance measurement with the nonlocal one. In addition to inelastic-scattering-induced dephasing, we also test the resilience of the resistance measurements in the aforesaid setups to disorder and spin-flip scattering. We find the axiom that nonlocal resistance is less affected by the detrimental effects of disorder and dephasing to be untrue, in general, for the quantum spin Hall case. This has important consequences since it is widely communicated that nonlocal transport through edge channels in topological insulators have potential applications in low-power information processing.

  14. Superexchange interaction enhancement of the quantum transport in a DNA-type molecule

    Wang Rui; Zhang Cun-Xi; Zhou Yun-Qing; Kong Ling-Min

    2011-01-01

    We use the transfer matrix method and the Green function technique to theoretically study the quantum tunnelling through a DNA-type molecule.Ferromagnetic electrodes are used to produce the spin-polarized transmission probability and therefore the spin current.The distance-dependent crossover comes from the topological variation from the onedimensional to the two-dimensional model transform as we switch on the interstrand coupling; a new base pair will present N - 1 extrachannels for the charge and spin as N being the total base pairs.This will restrain the decay of the transmission and improve the stability of the quantum transport.The spin and charge transfer through the DNA-type molecule is consistent with the quantum tunneling barrier.

  15. Coherent mesoscopic transport through a quantum-dot embedded carbon nanotube ring threaded with magnetic flux

    We have investigated the coherent mesoscopic transport through a quantum-dot (QD) embedded carbon nanotube ring (CNR) by employing the nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique. The Landauer-Buettiker-like formula is presented to calculate the differential conductance and current-voltage characteristics. Due to the interference of the electrons transporting in the two paths of CNR, the resultant conductivity of electron through the system is determined by the compound concrete structure of CNR-QD system. The tunneling current appears quantum behavior obviously in the small region of source-drain bias. The conductance is adjusted by the gate voltage Vg and the magnetic flux phi. The reversal resonance has been displayed versus the gate voltage, and it is symmetric about Vg for the type I CNR, but it is asymmetric for the type II CNR. The phase inverse oscillations are also presented for the different types of CNRs

  16. Contrasting influence of charged impurities on transport and gain in terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Grange, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Transport and gain properties of a resonant-phonon terahertz quantum cascade laser are calculated using nonequilibrium Green's functions. Impurity scattering is shown to be responsible for contrasting nonlinear effects in the transport and the gain properties. For typical doping concentrations, the current density is found to be weakly sensitive to the impurity scattering strength. In contrast, the calculated gain is found to be very sensitive to the impurity scattering strength. This difference is attributed to the strong momentum dependence of the long-range coupling to charged impurities. Small-momentum impurity scattering is shown to be responsible for an incoherent regime of resonant tunneling processes. These insights into the crucial role of impurity scattering open a route of improvement of terahertz quantum cascade lasers by engineering of the doping profile.

  17. Coherent mesoscopic transport through a quantum-dot embedded carbon nanotube ring threaded with magnetic flux

    Zhao, Hong-Kang; Wang, Jian

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the coherent mesoscopic transport through a quantum-dot (QD) embedded carbon nanotube ring (CNR) by employing the nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique. The Landauer-Büttiker-like formula is presented to calculate the differential conductance and current-voltage characteristics. Due to the interference of the electrons transporting in the two paths of CNR, the resultant conductivity of electron through the system is determined by the compound concrete structure of CNR-QD system. The tunneling current appears quantum behavior obviously in the small region of source-drain bias. The conductance is adjusted by the gate voltage Vg and the magnetic flux φ. The reversal resonance has been displayed versus the gate voltage, and it is symmetric about Vg for the type I CNR, but it is asymmetric for the type II CNR. The phase inverse oscillations are also presented for the different types of CNRs.

  18. Fano interferences in the transport properties of triple quantum dot T-shaped systems

    We consider the transport and the noise characteristic in the case of a triple quantum dots T-shaped system where two of the dots form a two-level system and the other works in a detector-like setup. Our theoretical results are obtained using the equation of motion method for the case of zero on-site Coulomb interaction in the detector dot. The transport trough the T-shaped system can be controlled by varying the coupling between the two-level system dots or the coupling between the detector dot and the exterior electrodes. The Fano dips in the system's conductance can be observe both for strong (fast detector) and weak coupling (slow detector) between the detector dot and the external electrodes. Due to stronger electronic correlations the noise in the case of a slow detector are much higher. This setup may be of interest for the practical realization of qubit states in quantum dots systems.

  19. Hysteresis losses in MgB2 superconductors exposed to combinations of low AC and high DC magnetic fields and transport currents

    Highlights: • A method for calculating hysteresis losses in the low AC – high DC magnetic field and transport current range has been shown. • The method can be used in the design of wind turbine generators for calculating the losses in the generator DC rotor. • First estimates indicate tolerable current ripple in the 0.1% range for a 4 T DC MgB2 generator rotor coil. - Abstract: MgB2 superconductors are considered for generator field coils for direct drive wind turbine generators. In such coils, the losses generated by AC magnetic fields may generate excessive local heating and add to the thermal load, which must be removed by the cooling system. These losses must be evaluated in the design of the generator to ensure a sufficient overall efficiency. A major loss component is the hysteresis losses in the superconductor itself. In the high DC – low AC current and magnetic field region experimental results still lack for MgB2 conductors. In this article we reason towards a simplified theoretical treatment of the hysteresis losses based on available models in the literature with the aim of setting the basis for estimation of the allowable magnetic fields and current ripples in superconducting generator coils intended for large wind turbine direct drive generators. The resulting equations use the DC in-field critical current, the geometry of the superconductor and the magnitude of the AC magnetic field component as parameters. This simplified approach can be valuable in the design of MgB2 DC coils in the 1–4 T range with low AC magnetic field and current ripples

  20. Room temperature ballistic transport in InSb quantum well nanodevices

    Gilbertson, A. M.; Kormányos, A.; Buckle, P. D.; Fearn, M.; Ashley, T.; Lambert, C. J.; Solin, S. A.; Cohen, L. F.

    2011-12-01

    We report the room temperature observation of significant ballistic electron transport in shallow etched four-terminal mesoscopic devices fabricated on an InSb/AlInSb quantum well (QW) heterostructure with a crucial partitioned growth-buffer scheme. Ballistic electron transport is evidenced by a negative bend resistance signature which is quite clearly observed at 295 K and at current densities in excess of 106 A/cm2. This demonstrates unequivocally that by using effective growth and processing strategies, room temperature ballistic effects can be exploited in InSb/AlInSb QWs at practical device dimensions.

  1. Temperature dependence of electron transport on a bound-to-continuum terahertz quantum cascade laser

    We investigate the temperature effects on electron transport in a bound-to-continuum terahertz quantum cascade laser using Monte Carlo simulation which includes electron–electron and electron–phonon scattering. The effects of carrier transport paths and mechanisms, especially for those related to laser levels, on the device's temperature performance are evaluated. The simulation shows that the parasitic leakage of carriers from the upper laser level and the thermal backfilling to the lower laser level is the main limiting factor for high-temperature operation. The calculations are in good agreement with experimental results

  2. Charge transport and memristive properties of graphene quantum dots embedded in poly(3-hexylthiophene) matrix

    We show that graphene quantum dots (GQD) embedded in a semiconducting poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymeric matrix act as charge trapping nanomaterials. In plane current-voltage (I-V) measurements of thin films realized from this nanocomposite deposited on gold interdigitated electrodes revealed that the GQD enhanced dramatically the hole transport. I-V characteristics exhibited a strong nonlinear behavior and a pinched hysteresis loop, a signature of a memristive response. The transport properties of this nanocomposite were explained in terms of a trap controlled space charge limited current mechanism.

  3. Improving charge transport property and energy transfer with carbon quantum dots in inverted polymer solar cells

    Liu, Chunyu; Chang, Kaiwen; Guo, Wenbin, E-mail: guowb@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: chenwy@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: dawei.yan@hotmail.com; Li, Hao; Shen, Liang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Chen, Weiyou, E-mail: guowb@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: chenwy@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: dawei.yan@hotmail.com [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Yan, Dawei, E-mail: guowb@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: chenwy@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: dawei.yan@hotmail.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-983, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-08-18

    Carbon quantum dots (Cdots) are synthesized by a simple method and introduced into active layer of polymer solar cells (PSCs). The performance of doped devices was apparently improved, and the highest power conversion efficiency of 7.05% was obtained, corresponding to a 28.2% enhancement compared with that of the contrast device. The charge transport properties, resistance, impedance, and transient absorption spectrum are systematically investigated to explore how the Cdots affect on PSCs performance. This study reveals the importance of Cdots in enhancing the efficiency of PSCs and gives insight into the mechanism of charge transport improvement.

  4. Quantum pumping in closed systems, adiabatic transport, and the Kubo formula

    Cohen, Doron

    2003-01-01

    Quantum pumping in closed systems is considered. We explain that the Kubo formula contains all the physically relevant ingredients for the calculation of the pumped charge ($Q$) within the framework of linear response theory. The relation to the common formulations of adiabatic transport and ``geometric magnetism" is clarified. We distinguish between adiabatic and dissipative contributions to $Q$. On the one hand we observe that adiabatic pumping does not have to be quantized. On the other ha...

  5. Spin-dependent quantum transport through an Aharonov–Bohm structure spin splitter

    Using the tight-binding model approximation, this paper investigates theoretically spin-dependent quantum transport through an Aharonov–Bohm (AB) interferometer. An external magnetic field is applied to produce the spin-polarization and spin current. The AB interferometer, acting as a spin splitter, separates the opposite spin polarization current. By adjusting the energy and the direction of the magnetic field, large spin-polarized current can be obtained. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  6. Spin-dependent quantum transport through an Aharonov-Bohm structure spin splitter

    Li Yu-Xian

    2008-01-01

    Using the tight-binding model approximation, this paper investigates theoretically spin-dependent quantum trans-port through an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometer. An external magnetic field is applied to produce the spin-polarization and spin current. The AB interferometer, acting as a spin splitter, separates the opposite spin polarization current. By adjusting the energy and the direction of the magnetic field, large spin-polarized current can be obtained.

  7. A density matrix model of transport and radiation in quantum cascade lasers

    A transport model for quantum cascade lasers based on density matrix formalism that incorporates the laser optical field is confronted with experiment. For a typical mid-infrared laser, very good agreement is found for both the current-voltage and current-optical power characteristics. Forcing thermal distribution with a unique temperature in all subbands was found to lead to an overestimate of electron heating in the injector. The model can then be used further to optimize and design new structures.

  8. Transport of Fluorescence through Highly Scattering Media: Corrections to the Determination of Quantum Yields

    Seely, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    The equations for transport of fluorescence, generated within a highly scattering medium, are solved within the boundary conditions of the Kubelka and Munk treatment. Expressions are derived in closed form for fluorescence fluxes emanating from the front and back surfaces of a highly scattering infinite slab, whether or not fluorescence is absorbed within the sample. An “apparent” quantum yield, calculated from observed intensities of fluorescence and of back-scattered light from the front su...

  9. Interaction effects in the transport of particles in nanowire quantum dots

    Kristinsdottir, Liney Halla

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between physical bodies constantly affect their properties. This thesis presents a theoretical study on the effects of interaction in few-body nanowire quantum dots. The focus is to a large extent on a phenomenon called Wigner localization, and how this, as well as other interaction effects, can be identified in an experiment by transport spectroscopy and by thermopower measurements. The physical systems considered are electrons in semiconductor nanowires and an ultracold gas...

  10. Type-controlled Nanodevices Based on Encapsulated Few-layer Black Phosphorus for Quantum Transport

    Long, Gen; Xu, Shuigang; Shen, Junying; Hou, Jianqiang; Wu, Zefei; Han, Tianyi; Lin, Jiangxiazi; Wong, Wing Ki; Cai, Yuan; Lortz, Rolf; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that encapsulation of atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheets is very effective for minimizing the interface impurities induced during fabrication of BP channel material for quantum transport nanodevices. Highly stable BP nanodevices with ultrahigh mobility and controllable types are realized through depositing appropriate metal electrodes after conducting a selective etching to the BP encapsulation structure. Chromium and titanium are sui...

  11. Transport in inhomogeneous quantum critical fluids and in the Dirac fluid in graphene

    Lucas, Andrew; Crossno, Jesse; Fong, Kin Chung; Kim, Philip; Sachdev, Subir

    2016-02-01

    We develop a general hydrodynamic framework for computing direct current, thermal, and electric transport in a strongly interacting finite-temperature quantum system near a Lorentz-invariant quantum critical point. Our framework is nonperturbative in the strength of long-wavelength fluctuations in the background-charge density of the electronic fluid and requires the rate of electron-electron scattering to be faster than the rate of electron-impurity scattering. We use this formalism to compute transport coefficients in the Dirac fluid in clean samples of graphene near the charge neutrality point, and find results insensitive to long-range Coulomb interactions. Numerical results are compared to recent experimental data on thermal and electrical conductivity in the Dirac fluid in graphene and a substantially improved quantitative agreement over existing hydrodynamic theories is found. We comment on the interplay between the Dirac fluid and acoustic and optical phonons, and qualitatively explain the experimentally observed effects. Our work paves the way for quantitative contact between experimentally realized condensed matter systems and the wide body of high-energy inspired theories on transport in interacting many-body quantum systems.

  12. Microscopic observation of carrier-transport dynamics in quantum-structure solar cells using a time-of-flight technique

    In this study, we propose a carrier time-of-flight technique to evaluate the carrier transport time across a quantum structure in an active region of solar cells. By observing the time-resolved photoluminescence signal with a quantum-well probe inserted under the quantum structure at forward bias, the carrier transport time can be efficiently determined at room temperature. The averaged drift velocity shows linear dependence on the internal field, allowing us to estimate the quantum structure as a quasi-bulk material with low effective mobility containing the information of carrier dynamics. We show that this direct and real-time observation is more sensitive to carrier transport than other conventional techniques, providing better insights into microscopic carrier transport dynamics to overcome a device design difficulty

  13. Microscopic observation of carrier-transport dynamics in quantum-structure solar cells using a time-of-flight technique

    Toprasertpong, Kasidit; Fujii, Hiromasa; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Kada, Tomoyuki; Asahi, Shigeo; Kita, Takashi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Wang, Yunpeng; Watanabe, Kentaroh [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

    2015-07-27

    In this study, we propose a carrier time-of-flight technique to evaluate the carrier transport time across a quantum structure in an active region of solar cells. By observing the time-resolved photoluminescence signal with a quantum-well probe inserted under the quantum structure at forward bias, the carrier transport time can be efficiently determined at room temperature. The averaged drift velocity shows linear dependence on the internal field, allowing us to estimate the quantum structure as a quasi-bulk material with low effective mobility containing the information of carrier dynamics. We show that this direct and real-time observation is more sensitive to carrier transport than other conventional techniques, providing better insights into microscopic carrier transport dynamics to overcome a device design difficulty.

  14. Quantum Thermodynamics in Strong Coupling: Heat Transport and Refrigeration

    Gil Katz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance characteristics of a heat rectifier and a heat pump are studied in a non-Markovian framework. The device is constructed from a molecule connected to a hot and cold reservoir. The heat baths are modelled using the stochastic surrogate Hamiltonian method. The molecule is modelled by an asymmetric double-well potential. Each well is semi-locally connected to a heat bath composed of spins. The dynamics are driven by a combined system–bath Hamiltonian. The temperature of the baths is regulated by a secondary spin bath composed of identical spins in thermal equilibrium. A random swap operation exchange spins between the primary and secondary baths. The combined system is studied in various system–bath coupling strengths. In all cases, the average heat current always flows from the hot towards the cold bath in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The asymmetry of the double well generates a rectifying effect, meaning that when the left and right baths are exchanged the heat current follows the hot-to-cold direction. The heat current is larger when the high frequency is coupled to the hot bath. Adding an external driving field can reverse the transport direction. Such a refrigeration effect is modelled by a periodic driving field in resonance with the frequency difference of the two potential wells. A minimal driving amplitude is required to overcome the heat leak effect. In the strong driving regime the cooling power is non-monotonic with the system–bath coupling.

  15. Sub-Doppler Spectra of Infrared Hyperfine Transitions of Nitric Oxide Using a Pulse Modulated Quantum Cascade Laser: Rapid Passage, Free Induction Decay and the AC Stark Effect

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Kelly, James F.; Blake, Thomas A.; Langford, Nigel

    2012-05-07

    Using a low power, rapid (nsec) pulse-modulated quantum cascade (QC) laser, collective coherent effects in the 5 {micro}m spectrum of nitric oxide have been demonstrated by the observation of sub-Doppler hyperfine splitting and also Autler-Townes splitting of Doppler broadened lines. For nitrous oxide, experiments and model calculations have demonstrated that two main effects occur with ulsemodulated (chirped) quantum cascade lasers: free induction decay signals, and signals induced by rapid passage during the laser chirp. In the open shell molecule, NO, in which both {Lambda}-doubling splitting and hyperfine structure occur, laser field-induced coupling between the hyperfine levels of the two {Lambda}-doublet components can induce a large AC Stark effect. This may be observed as sub-Doppler structure, field-induced splittings, or Autler-Townes splitting of a Doppler broadened line. These represent an extension of the types of behaviour observed in the closed shell molecule nitrous oxide, using the same apparatus, when probed with an 8 {micro}m QC laser.

  16. The quantum Hall effect under the influence of a top-gate and integrating AC lock-in measurements

    Kramer, Tobias; Heller, Eric J.; Parrott, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Low frequency AC-measurements are commonly used to determine the voltage and currents through mesoscopic devices. We calculate the effect of the alternating Hall voltage on the recorded time-averaged voltage in the presence of a top-gate covering a large part of the device. The gate is kept on a constant voltage, while the Hall voltage is recorded using an integrating alternating-current lock-in technique. The resulting Hall curves show inflection points at the arithmetic mean between two int...

  17. Contaminación acústica en el transporte sanitario urgente por carretera Acoustic contamination in urgent medical transportation by road

    S. Ballesteros

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento. Determinar los niveles de exposición a ruido durante el transporte sanitario urgente por carretera y describir la percepción de deterioro de la función auditiva en los trabajadores del sector y el empleo de mecanismos de protección acústica. Metodología. Estudio observacional realizado en Bizkaia (España. Mediante dosimetrías sonométricas se registraron los valores instantáneos máximos de nivel sonoro (Lpico y niveles continuos equivalentes (Leq medidos en una ambulancia tipo de la red de emergencias. Paralelamente, se realizó una encuesta sobre una muestra representativa compuesta por 127 trabajadores en la que se exploró la percepción subjetiva de pérdida de audición y posibles factores asociados, además de otras cuestiones de interés desde la perspectiva de la prevención de riesgos laborales. Resultados. Se registraron Lpico oscilantes entre 80 y 109 dBA en función de la ubicación. Los niveles Leq medios evaluados durante 10 asistencias, desde la activación hasta la llegada al incidente y durante el traslado al hospital fueron de 79,5 dBA y 74,3 dBA (pBackground. To determine levels of exposure to noise during urgent medical transportation by road and to describe the perception of hearing function impairment in workers and the use of hearing protection devices. Material and methods. An observational study was performed in Bizkaia (Spain. The instantaneous maximum noise levels (Lpeak and its continuous equivalents (Leq were recorded through sonometric dosimetries, measured in a "sample ambulance" of the emergency network. In parallel, a survey was conducted on a representative sample of 127 workers in which self-reported hearing loss and associated factors were explored, in addition to other issues of concern from the perspective of prevention of occupational hazards. Results. Lpeak oscillating between 80 and 109 dBA were recorded depending on the location. The average Leq levels measured over 10 emergency

  18. 高温超导YBCO薄膜中的传输交流损耗%TRANSPORT AC LOSSES IN THIN FILM OF YBCO

    赵玉峰; 何天虎; 冯旺军; 李世荣; 周又和

    2011-01-01

    基于Norris方程和Bean临界态模型,考虑薄膜超导体内的磁场和电流密度分布特性,通过解析求解的方法推导出薄膜超导体在传输外加电流时其内部的磁场和电流密度以及传输交流损耗的解析表达式,从定量的角度研究超导体截面几何形状对传输交流损耗的影响.结果表明薄膜超导体边缘处的剧烈变化的磁场和电流的分布以及无场区的电流承载能力是影响传输交流损耗的主要原因.%Based on Norris equations and Bean model, by considering the characteristics of magnetic field and current density in thin film, the magnetic field and current density in thin film are analytically derived, as well as the transport ac losses. The effect of the geometry of thin film on the transport ac losses is studied quantitatively. The results indicate that the dramatic change of magnetic field and current density at edge of thin film and the current capacity of the field-free region are the main reasons which affect the transport ac losses of thin film.

  19. Role of inter-tube coupling and quantum interference on electrical transport in carbon nanotube junctions

    Tripathy, Srijeet; Bhattacharyya, Tarun Kanti

    2016-09-01

    Due to excellent transport properties, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) show a lot of promise in sensor and interconnect technology. However, recent studies indicate that the conductance in CNT/CNT junctions are strongly affected by the morphology and orientation between the tubes. For proper utilization of such junctions in the development of CNT based technology, it is essential to study the electronic properties of such junctions. This work presents a theoretical study of the electrical transport properties of metallic Carbon nanotube homo-junctions. The study focuses on discerning the role of inter-tube interactions, quantum interference and scattering on the transport properties on junctions between identical tubes. The electronic structure and transport calculations are conducted with an Extended Hückel Theory-Non Equilibrium Green's Function based model. The calculations indicate conductance to be varying with a changing crossing angle, with maximum conductance corresponding to lattice registry, i.e. parallel configuration between the two tubes. Further calculations for such parallel configurations indicate onset of short and long range oscillations in conductance with respect to changing overlap length. These oscillations are attributed to inter-tube coupling effects owing to changing π orbital overlap, carrier scattering and quantum interference of the incident, transmitted and reflected waves at the inter-tube junction.

  20. Scale-estimation of quantum coherent energy transport in multiple-minima systems.

    Farrow, Tristan; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-01-01

    A generic and intuitive model for coherent energy transport in multiple minima systems coupled to a quantum mechanical bath is shown. Using a simple spin-boson system, we illustrate how a generic donor-acceptor system can be brought into resonance using a narrow band of vibrational modes, such that the transfer efficiency of an electron-hole pair (exciton) is made arbitrarily high. Coherent transport phenomena in nature are of renewed interest since the discovery that a photon captured by the light-harvesting complex (LHC) in photosynthetic organisms can be conveyed to a chemical reaction centre with near-perfect efficiency. Classical explanations of the transfer use stochastic diffusion to model the hopping motion of a photo-excited exciton. This accounts inadequately for the speed and efficiency of the energy transfer measured in a series of recent landmark experiments. Taking a quantum mechanical perspective can help capture the salient features of the efficient part of that transfer. To show the versatility of the model, we extend it to a multiple minima system comprising seven-sites, reminiscent of the widely studied Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex. We show that an idealised transport model for multiple minima coupled to a narrow-band phonon can transport energy with arbitrarily high efficiency. PMID:24980547

  1. Voltage-probe-position dependence and magnetic-flux contribution to the measured voltage in ac transport measurements: which measuring circuit determines the real losses?

    The voltage Vab measured between two voltage taps a and b during magnetic flux transport in a type-II superconductor carrying current I is the sum of two contributions, the line integral from a to b of the electric field along an arbitrary path Cs through the superconductor and a term proportional to the time rate of change of magnetic flux through the area bounded by the path Cs and the measuring circuit leads. When the current I(t) is oscillating with time t, the apparent ac loss (the time average of the product IVab) depends upon the measuring circuit used. Only when the measuring-circuit leads are brought out far from the surface does the apparent power dissipation approach the real (or true) ac loss associated with the length of sample probed. Calculations showing comparisons between the apparent and real ac losses in a flat strip of rectangular cross section will be presented, showing the behavior as a function of the measuring-circuit dimensions. Corresponding calculations also are presented for a sample of elliptical cross section

  2. Voltage-probe-position dependence and magnetic-flux contribution to the measured voltage in AC transport measurements: which measuring circuit determines the real losses?

    The voltage Vab measured between two voltage taps a and b during magnetic flux transport in a type-II superconductor carrying current I is the sum of two contributions, the line integral from a to b of the electric field along an arbitrary path Cs through the superconductor and a term proportional to the time rate of change of magnetic flux through the area bounded by the path Cs and the measuring circuit leads. When the current I(t) is oscillating with time t, the apparent AC loss (the time average of the product IVab) depends upon the measuring circuit used. Only when the measuring-circuit leads are brought out far from the surface does the apparent power dissipation approach the real (or true) AC loss associated with the length of sample probed. Calculations showing comparisons between the apparent and real AC losses in a flat strip of rectangular cross section will be presented, showing the behavior as a function of the measuring-circuit, dimensions. Corresponding calculations also are presented for a sample of elliptical cross section. (orig.)

  3. Room temperature spin transport in undoped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    We are reporting on our first observation of a micrometer-order electron spin transport in a (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (QW) at room temperature using a space- and time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. A 37-μm transport was observed within an electron spin lifetime of 1.2 ns at room temperature when using an in-plane electric field of 1.75 kV/cm. The spatio-temporal profiles of electron spins were well reproduced by the spin drift-diffusion equations coupled with the Poisson equation, supporting the validity of the measurement. The results suggest that (110) QWs are useful as a spin transport layer for semiconductor spintronic devices operating at room temperature

  4. Shot noise of the edge transport in the inverted band HgTe quantum wells

    Tikhonov, E. S.; Shovkun, D. V.; Khrapai, V. S.; Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the current noise in HgTe-based quantum wells with an inverted band structure in the regime of disordered edge transport. Consistent with previous experiments, the edge resistance strongly exceeds h/ e 2 and weakly depends on the temperature. The shot noise is well below the Poissonian value and characterized by the Fano factor with gate voltage and sample-to-sample variations in the range 0.1 < F < 0.3. Given the fact that our devices are shorter than the most pessimistic estimate of the ballistic dephasing length, these observations exclude the possibility of one-dimensional helical edge transport. Instead, we suggest that a disordered multi-mode conduction is responsible for the edge transport in our experiment.

  5. Transport anomalies and quantum criticality in electron-doped cuprate superconductors

    Zhang, Xu; Yu, Heshan; He, Ge; Hu, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Zhu, Beiyi; Jin, Kui

    2016-06-01

    Superconductivity research is like running a marathon. Three decades after the discovery of high-Tc cuprates, there have been mass data generated from transport measurements, which bring fruitful information. In this review, we give a brief summary of the intriguing phenomena reported in electron-doped cuprates from the aspect of electrical transport as well as the complementary thermal transport. We attempt to sort out common features of the electron-doped family, e.g. the strange metal, negative magnetoresistance, multiple sign reversals of Hall in mixed state, abnormal Nernst signal, complex quantum criticality. Most of them have been challenging the existing theories, nevertheless, a unified diagram certainly helps to approach the nature of electron-doped cuprates.

  6. Nonequilibrium spin transport through a diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dot system with noncollinear magnetization

    The spin-dependent transport through a diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dot (QD) which is coupled via magnetic tunnel junctions to two ferromagnetic leads is studied theoretically. A noncollinear system is considered, where the QD is magnetized at an arbitrary angle with respect to the leads’ magnetization. The tunneling current is calculated in the coherent regime via the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism, incorporating the electron–electron interaction in the QD. We provide the first analytical solution for the Green’s function of the noncollinear DMS quantum dot system, solved via the equation of motion method under Hartree–Fock approximation. The transport characteristics (charge and spin currents, and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR)) are evaluated for different voltage regimes. The interplay between spin-dependent tunneling and single-charge effects results in three distinct voltage regimes in the spin and charge current characteristics. The voltage range in which the QD is singly occupied corresponds to the maximum spin current and greatest sensitivity of the spin current to the QD magnetization orientation. The QD device also shows transport features suitable for sensor applications, i.e., a large charge current coupled with a high TMR ratio. - Highlights: ► The spin polarized transport through a diluted magnetic quantum dot is studied. ► The model is based on the Green’s function and the equation of motion method. The charge and spin currents and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) are investigated. ► The system is suitable for current-induced spin-transfer torque application. ► A large tunneling current and a high TMR are possible for sensor application.

  7. Transport in constricted quantum Hall systems: beyond the Kane-Fisher paradigm

    A simple model of edge transport in a constricted quantum Hall system with a lowered local fi lling factor is studied. The current backscattered from the constriction is explained from a matching of the properties of the edge-current excitations in the constriction (ν2) and bulk (ν1) regions. We develop a hydrodynamic theory for bosonic edge modes inspired by this model, stressing the importance of boundary conditions in elucidating the nature of current transport. By invoking a generalised quasiparticle-quasihole symmetry of the quantum Hall circuit system, we fi nd that a competition between two tunneling process determines the fate of the low-bias transmission conductance. A novel generalisation of the Kane-Fisher quantum impurity model is found, describing transitions from a weak-coupling theory at partial transmission to strong- coupling theories for perfect transmission and reflection as well as a new symmetry dictated fixed point. These results provide satisfactory explanations for recent experimental results at fi lling-factors of 1/3 and 1. (author)

  8. Dirac fermions in strong electric field and quantum transport in graphene

    Gavrilov, S P; Yokomizo, N

    2012-01-01

    Our previous results on the nonperturbative calculations of the mean current and of the energy-momentum tensor in QED with the T-constant electric field are generalized to arbitrary dimensions. The renormalized mean values are found; the vacuum polarization and particle creation contributions to these mean values are isolated in the large T-limit, the vacuum polarization contributions being related to the one-loop effective Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian. Peculiarities in odd dimensions are considered in detail. We adapt general results obtained in 2+1 dimensions to the conditions which are realized in the Dirac model for graphene. We study the quantum electronic and energy transport in the graphene at low carrier density and low temperatures when quantum interference effects are important. Our description of the quantum transport in the graphene is based on the so-called generalized Furry picture in QED where the strong external field is taken into account nonperturbatively; this approach is not restricted to a...

  9. Quantum yields of photosystem II electron transport and carbon dioxide fixation in C4 plants

    The quantum yields of non-cyclic electron transport from photosystem II (determined from chlorophyll a fluorescence) and carbon dioxide assimilation were measured in vivo in representative species of the three subgroups of C4 plants (NADP-malic enzyme, NAD-malic enzyme and PEP-carboxykinase) over a series of intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci) at both 21% and 2% O2. The CO2 assimilation rate was independent of O2 concentration over the entire range of Ci (up to 500 μbar) in all three C4 subgroups. The relationship of the quantum yield of PS II electron transport to the quantum yield of CO2 fixation is linear suggesting that photochemical use of energy absorbed by PS II is tightly linked to CO2 fixation in C4 plants. This relationship is nearly identical in all three subgroups and may allow estimates of photosynthetic rates of C4 plants based on measurements of PS II photochemical efficiency. It is suggested that in the C4 plants both the photoreduction of O2 and photorespiration are low, even at very limiting CO2 concentrations. 31 refs., 4 figs

  10. Spin-polarized current in double quantum dots

    Li Ai-Xian; Duan Su-Qing

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the transport through asymmetric double quantum dots with an inhomogeneous Zeeman splitting in the presence of crossed dc and ac magnetic fields.A strong spin-polarized current can be obtained by changing the dc magnetic field.It is mainly due to the resonant tunnelling.But for the ferromagnetic right electrode,the electron spin resonance also plays an important role in transport.We show that the double quantum dots with three-level mixing under crossed dc and ac magnetic fields can act not only as a bipolar spin filter but also as a spin inverter under suitable conditions.

  11. Nanoelectronics. Spin transport in the NEGF method and quantum spin Hall effect by «bottom-up» approach

    Yu.A. Kruglyak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spin transport with the NEGF method in the spinor representation, in particular, spin valve, rotating magnetic contacts, spin precession and rotating spins, Zeeman and Rashba spin Hamiltonians, quantum spin Hall effect, calculation the spin potential, and four-component description of transport are discussed in the frame of the «bottom – up» approach of modern nanoelectronics.

  12. Nanoelectronics. Spin transport in the NEGF method and quantum spin Hall effect by «bottom-up» approach

    Yu.A. Kruglyak; P.A. Kondratenko; Yu.М. Lopatkin

    2015-01-01

    Spin transport with the NEGF method in the spinor representation, in particular, spin valve, rotating magnetic contacts, spin precession and rotating spins, Zeeman and Rashba spin Hamiltonians, quantum spin Hall effect, calculation the spin potential, and four-component description of transport are discussed in the frame of the «bottom – up» approach of modern nanoelectronics.

  13. A study of transport suppression in an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs quantum dot single-electron transistor

    See, A. M.; Klochan, O.; Micolich, P.;

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of transport blockade features in a quantum dot single-electron transistor, based on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. We observe suppression of transport through the ground state of the dot, as well as negative differential conductance at finite source-drain bias. The...

  14. Type-controlled nanodevices based on encapsulated few-layer black phosphorus for quantum transport

    Long, Gen; Xu, Shuigang; Shen, Junying; Hou, Jianqiang; Wu, Zefei; Han, Tianyi; Lin, Jiangxiazi; Wong, Wing Ki; Cai, Yuan; Lortz, Rolf; Wang, Ning

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that encapsulation of atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheets is very effective for minimizing the interface impurities induced during fabrication of BP channel material for quantum transport nanodevices. Highly stable BP nanodevices with ultrahigh mobility and controllable types are realized through depositing appropriate metal electrodes after conducting a selective etching to the BP encapsulation structure. Chromium and titanium are suitable metal electrodes for BP channels to control the transition from a p-type unipolar property to ambipolar characteristic because of different work functions. Record-high mobilities of 6000 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and 8400 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 are respectively obtained for electrons and holes at cryogenic temperatures. High-mobility BP devices enable the investigation of quantum oscillations with an indistinguishable Zeeman effect in laboratory magnetic field.

  15. Fano effect dominance over Coulomb blockade in transport properties of parallel coupled quantum dot system

    Theoretical study of the Coulomb blockade effect on transport properties (Transmission Probability and I-V characteristics) for varied configuration of coupled quantum dot system has been studied by using Non Equilibrium Green Function(NEGF) formalism and Equation of Motion(EOM) method in the presence of magnetic flux. The self consistent approach and intra-dot Coulomb interaction is being taken into account. As the key parameters of the coupled quantum dot system such as dot-lead coupling, inter-dot tunneling and magnetic flux threading through the system can be tuned, the effect of asymmetry parameter and magnetic flux on this tuning is being explored in Coulomb blockade regime. The presence of the Coulomb blockade due to on-dot Coulomb interaction decreases the width of transmission peak at energy level ε + U and by adjusting the magnetic flux the swapping effect in the Fano peaks in asymmetric and symmetric parallel configuration sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect

  16. Theoretical modelling of electron transport in InAs/GaAs quantum dot superlattices

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Ikonic, Zoran; Savic, Ivana; Indjin, Dragan; Harrison, Paul [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    A theoretical model describing the electron transport in InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors, modelled as ideal quantum dot superlattices, is presented. The carrier wave functions and energy levels were evaluated using the strain dependent 8-band k.p Hamiltonian and used to calculate all intra- and inter-period transition rates due to interaction with phonons and electromagnetic radiation. The interaction with longitudinal acoustic phonons and electromagnetic radiation was treated perturbatively within the framework of Fermi's golden rule, while the interaction with longitudinal optical phonons was considered taking into account their strong coupling to electrons. The populations of energy levels were then found from a system of rate equations, and the electron current in the superlattice was subsequently extracted. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. A constricted quantum Hall system as a beam-splitter: understanding ballistic transport on the edge

    We study transport in a model of a quantum Hall edge system with a gate-voltage controlled constriction. A finite backscattered current at finite edge-bias is explained from a Landauer- Buttiker analysis as arising from the splitting of edge current caused by the difference in the filling fractions of the bulk (ν1) and constriction(ν2) quantum Hall fluid regions. We develop a hydrodynamic theory for bosonic edge modes inspired by this model. The constriction region splits the incident long-wavelength chiral edge density-wave excitations among the transmitting and reflecting edge states encircling it. These findings provide satisfactory explanations for several puzzling recent experimental results. These results are confirmed by computing various correlators and chiral linear conductances of the system. In this way, our results find excellent agreement with some of the recent puzzling experimental results for the cases of ν1 = 1/3, 1. (author)

  18. Quantum transport through a multi-quantum-dot-pair chain side-coupled with Majorana bound states

    Zhao-Tan, Jiang; Cheng-Cheng, Zhong

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the quantum transport properties through a special kind of quantum dot (QD) system composed of a serially coupled multi-QD-pair (multi-QDP) chain and side-coupled Majorana bound states (MBSs) by using the Green functions method, where the conductance can be classified into two kinds: the electron tunneling (ET) conductance and the Andreev reflection (AR) one. First we find that for the nonzero MBS-QDP coupling a sharp AR-induced zero-bias conductance peak with the height of e 2/h is present (or absent) when the MBS is coupled to the far left (or the other) QDP. Moreover, the MBS-QDP coupling can suppress the ET conductance and strengthen the AR one, and further split into two sub-peaks each of the total conductance peaks of the isolated multi-QDPs, indicating that the MBS will make obvious influences on the competition between the ET and AR processes. Then we find that the tunneling rate Γ L is able to affect the conductances of leads L and R in different ways, demonstrating that there exists a Γ L-related competition between the AR and ET processes. Finally we consider the effect of the inter-MBS coupling on the conductances of the multi-QDP chains and it is shown that the inter-MBS coupling will split the zero-bias conductance peak with the height of e 2/h into two sub-peaks. As the inter-MBS coupling becomes stronger, the two sub-peaks are pushed away from each other and simultaneously become lower, which is opposite to that of the single QDP chain where the two sub-peaks with the height of about e 2/2h become higher. Also, the decay of the conductance sub-peaks with the increase of the MBS-QDP coupling becomes slower as the number of the QDPs becomes larger. This research should be an important extension in studying the transport properties in the kind of QD systems coupled with the side MBSs, which is helpful for understanding the nature of the MBSs, as well as the MBS-related QD transport properties. Project supported by the National Natural

  19. Full counting statistics of renormalized dynamics in open quantum transport system

    Luo, JunYan, E-mail: jyluo@zust.edu.cn [School of Science, Zhejiang University of Science and Technology, Hangzhou, 310023 (China); Shen, Yu; He, Xiao-Ling [School of Science, Zhejiang University of Science and Technology, Hangzhou, 310023 (China); Li, Xin-Qi [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yan, YiJing [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2011-11-28

    The internal dynamics of a double quantum dot system is renormalized due to coupling respectively with transport electrodes and a dissipative heat bath. Their essential differences are identified unambiguously in the context of full counting statistics. The electrode coupling caused level detuning renormalization gives rise to a fast-to-slow transport mechanism, which is not resolved at all in the average current, but revealed uniquely by pronounced super-Poissonian shot noise and skewness. The heat bath coupling introduces an interdot coupling renormalization, which results in asymmetric Fano factor and an intriguing change of line shape in the skewness. -- Highlights: ► We study full counting statistics of electron transport through double quantum dots. ► Essential differences due to coupling to the electrodes and heat bath are identified. ► Level detuning induced by electrodes results in strongly enhanced shot noise and skewness. ► Interdot coupling renormalization due to heat bath leads to asymmetric noise and intriguing skewness.

  20. Structure and transport properties of Ge quantum dots in a SiO2 matrix

    Germanium (Ge) nanoparticles or quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a transparent dielectric matrix have properties radically different from the bulk semiconductor and present a great potential for application in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Due to quantum confinement properties, the optical bandgap of QD-based materials can be tuned by varying the nanoparticle size. These properties may be exploited for the fabrication of nanoscale electronic devices or advanced solar cells.In this work we explored structural and transport properties of QD based superstructures for advanced solar cells. Magnetron cosputtering was used for deposition and upon suitable thermal treatment a superstructure of QDs was formed. Transport properties were explored by I–V measurement in the dark together with a C–V characterization. The obtained results were modeled with the known transport mechanisms for QDs containing materials. A special emphasis is given to trap controlled space charge limited current and hopping conductivity mechanism.We have shown that in our samples a significant charge is stored in the SiO2 layers with embedded Ge QDs. That charge is predominantly stored into traps at or close to the Ge(QDs)/SiO2 interface. (paper)

  1. Critical comparison of electrode models in density functional theory based quantum transport calculations

    Jacob, D.; Palacios, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the performance of two different electrode models in quantum transport calculations based on density functional theory: parametrized Bethe lattices and quasi-one-dimensional wires or nanowires. A detailed account of implementation details in both the cases is given. From the systematic study of nanocontacts made of representative metallic elements, we can conclude that the parametrized electrode models represent an excellent compromise between computational cost and electronic structure definition as long as the aim is to compare with experiments where the precise atomic structure of the electrodes is not relevant or defined with precision. The results obtained using parametrized Bethe lattices are essentially similar to the ones obtained with quasi-one-dimensional electrodes for large enough cross-sections of these, adding a natural smearing to the transmission curves that mimics the true nature of polycrystalline electrodes. The latter are more demanding from the computational point of view, but present the advantage of expanding the range of applicability of transport calculations to situations where the electrodes have a well-defined atomic structure, as is the case for carbon nanotubes, graphene nanoribbons, or semiconducting nanowires. All the analysis is done with the help of codes developed by the authors which can be found in the quantum transport toolbox ALACANT and are publicly available.

  2. Quantum transport with long-range steps on Watts-Strogatz networks

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Xin-Jian

    2016-07-01

    We study transport dynamics of quantum systems with long-range steps on the Watts-Strogatz network (WSN) which is generated by rewiring links of the regular ring. First, we probe physical systems modeled by the discrete nonlinear schrödinger (DNLS) equation. Using the localized initial condition, we compute the time-averaged occupation probability of the initial site, which is related to the nonlinearity, the long-range steps and rewiring links. Self-trapping transitions occur at large (small) nonlinear parameters for coupling ɛ=-1 (1), as long-range interactions are intensified. The structure disorder induced by random rewiring, however, has dual effects for ɛ=-1 and inhibits the self-trapping behavior for ɛ=1. Second, we investigate continuous-time quantum walks (CTQW) on the regular ring ruled by the discrete linear schrödinger (DLS) equation. It is found that only the presence of the long-range steps does not affect the efficiency of the coherent exciton transport, while only the allowance of random rewiring enhances the partial localization. If both factors are considered simultaneously, localization is greatly strengthened, and the transport becomes worse.

  3. The Wigner Monte-Carlo method for nanoelectronic devices a particle description of quantum transport and decoherence

    Querlioz, Damien

    2013-01-01

    This book gives an overview of the quantum transport approaches for nanodevices and focuses on the Wigner formalism. It details the implementation of a particle-based Monte Carlo solution of the Wigner transport equation and how the technique is applied to typical devices exhibiting quantum phenomena, such as the resonant tunnelling diode, the ultra-short silicon MOSFET and the carbon nanotube transistor. In the final part, decoherence theory is used to explain the emergence of the semi-classical transport in nanodevices.

  4. Dirac fermions in strong electric field and quantum transport in graphene

    Gavrilov, S. P.; Gitman, D. M.; Yokomizo, N.

    2012-12-01

    Our previous results on the nonperturbative calculations of the mean current and of the energy-momentum tensor in QED with the T-constant electric field are generalized to arbitrary dimensions. The renormalized mean values are found, and the vacuum polarization contributions and particle creation contributions to these mean values are isolated in the large T limit; we also relate the vacuum polarization contributions to the one-loop effective Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian. Peculiarities in odd dimensions are considered in detail. We adapt general results obtained in 2+1 dimensions to the conditions which are realized in the Dirac model for graphene. We study the quantum electronic and energy transport in the graphene at low carrier density and low temperatures when quantum interference effects are important. Our description of the quantum transport in the graphene is based on the so-called generalized Furry picture in QED where the strong external field is taken into account nonperturbatively; this approach is not restricted to a semiclassical approximation for carriers and does not use any statistical assumptions inherent in the Boltzmann transport theory. In addition, we consider the evolution of the mean electromagnetic field in the graphene, taking into account the backreaction of the matter field to the applied external field. We find solutions of the corresponding Dirac-Maxwell set of equations and with their help we calculate the effective mean electromagnetic field and effective mean values of the current and the energy-momentum tensor. The nonlinear and linear I-V characteristics experimentally observed in both low- and high-mobility graphene samples are quite well explained in the framework of the proposed approach, their peculiarities being essentially due to the carrier creation from the vacuum by the applied electric field.

  5. Quantum transport in Dirac materials: Signatures of tilted and anisotropic Dirac and Weyl cones

    Trescher, Maximilian; Sbierski, Björn; Brouwer, Piet W.; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2015-03-01

    We calculate conductance and noise for quantum transport at the nodal point for arbitrarily tilted and anisotropic Dirac or Weyl cones. Tilted and anisotropic dispersions are generic in the absence of certain discrete symmetries, such as particle-hole and lattice point group symmetries. Whereas anisotropy affects the conductance g , but leaves the Fano factor F (the ratio of shot noise power and current) unchanged, a tilt affects both g and F . Since F is a universal number in many other situations, this finding is remarkable. We apply our general considerations to specific lattice models of strained graphene and a pyrochlore Weyl semimetal.

  6. An Approximate Framework for Quantum Transport Calculation with Model Order Reduction

    Chen, Quan; Yam, Chiyung; Zhang, Yu; Wong, Ngai; Chen, Guanhua

    2014-01-01

    A new approximate computational framework is proposed for computing the non-equilibrium charge density in the context of the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method for quantum mechanical transport problems. The framework consists of a new formulation, called the X-formulation, for single-energy density calculation based on the solution of sparse linear systems, and a projection-based nonlinear model order reduction (MOR) approach to address the large number of energy points required for large applied biases. The advantages of the new methods are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  7. Detection and correction of blinking bias in image correlation transport measurements of quantum dot tagged macromolecules

    Durisic, Nela; Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L; Hebert, Benedict; Lagerholm, B Christoffer; Grutter, Peter; Wiseman, Paul W

    2007-01-01

    model, but the transport coefficients can have significant systematic errors in the measurements due to blinking. Image correlation measurements of the diffusing QD samples measured at different laser excitation powers and analysis of computer simulated image time series verified that the effect we...... application of the image correlation methods for measurement of the diffusion coefficient of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins tagged with QDs as imaged on living fibroblasts Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Aug-15......Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are becoming widely used as fluorescent labels for biological applications. Here we demonstrate that fluorescence fluctuation analysis of their diffusional mobility using temporal image correlation spectroscopy is highly susceptible to systematic...

  8. Supporting data for 'Vortex detection and quantum transport in mesoscopic graphene Josephson-junction arrays'

    Richardson, C. L.; Edkins, S. D.; Berdiyorov, G. R.; Chua, C. J.; Griffiths, J. P.; Jones, G. A. C.; Buitelaar, M.R.; Narayan, V; Sfigakis, F.; Smith, C. G.; Covaci, L.; Connolly, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    The files listed below are raw experimental data from 'Vortex detection and quantum transport in mesoscopic graphene Josephson-junction arrays' by C. L. Richardson et al., to appear in Phys. Rev. B. The three-part files (filename, filenameHdr and filenameSD) are in tab-separated .txt format, produced by CryoMeas (written by C. J. B. Ford). Only a subset of the Fig. 6 dataset is included. 20130514-040 (device A, Fig. 2(a) and 3) 20130515-041 (device A, Fig. 2(a) and 3) 20130809-066 (...

  9. An approximate framework for quantum transport calculation with model order reduction

    A new approximate computational framework is proposed for computing the non-equilibrium charge density in the context of the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method for quantum mechanical transport problems. The framework consists of a new formulation, called the X-formulation, for single-energy density calculation based on the solution of sparse linear systems, and a projection-based nonlinear model order reduction (MOR) approach to address the large number of energy points required for large applied biases. The advantages of the new methods are confirmed by numerical experiments

  10. Adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with transport measurements

    An adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system at the cleaved InSb surfaces is investigated in magnetic fields up to 14 T using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy combined with transport measurements. We show that an enhanced Zeeman splitting in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations is explained by an exchange enhancement of spin splitting and potential disorder, both of which are obtained from the spatially averaged density of states (DOS). Moreover, the Altshuler–Aronov correlation gap is observed in the spatially averaged DOS at 0 T

  11. QUANTUM-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF PROTON TRANSPORT IN THE HYDROGEN-BONDED MOLECULAR SYSTEMS

    PANG XIAO-FENG; LI PING

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic equations of the proton transport along the hydrogen bonded molecular systems have been obtainedby using completely quantum-mechanical method to be based on new Hamiltonian and model we proposed. Somequantum-mechanical features of the proton-solitons have also been given in such a case. The alternate motion of twodefects resulting from proton transfer occurred in the systems can be explained by the results. The results obtainedshow that the proton-soliton has corpuscle feature and obey classical equations of motion, while the free soliton movesin uniform velocity along the hydrogen bonded chains.

  12. Quantum transport measurement of few-layer WTe2 field effect devices

    Chen, Jianhao; Liu, Xin; Tian, Shibing; Zhang, Chenglong; Jia, Shuang

    2015-03-01

    We have performed systematic quantum transport measurement on field effect devices fabricated from few-layer WTe2 single crystals. We found that the magnetoresistance of few-layer WTe2 could be very different from that of bulk samples, which may arise from the imbalance of electron and hole carriers in the samples. We shall discuss our findings in more details in light of recent progress in our experiment. This work is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11374021 and 11327406); by China Ministry of Science and Technology under Contract # 2014CB920900 and 2013CB921900; and by the Young 1000-Talent Program of China.

  13. A deterministic solver for a hybrid quantum-classical transport model in nanoMOSFETs

    We model a nanoMOSFET by a mesoscopic, time-dependent, coupled quantum-classical system based on a sub-band decomposition and a simple scattering operator. We first compute the sub-band decomposition and electrostatic force field described by a Schroedinger-Poisson coupled system solved by a Newton-Raphson iteration using the eigenvalue/eigenfunction decomposition. The transport in the classical direction for each sub-band modeled by semiclassical Boltzmann-type equations is solved by conservative semi-lagrangian characteristic-based methods. Numerical results are shown for both the thermodynamical equilibrium and time-dependent simulations in typical nowadays nanoMOSFETs.

  14. Electrons and holes in Si quantum well: a room-temperature transport and drag resistance study

    Prunnila, M.; Laakso, S. J.; Kivioja, J. M.; Ahopelto, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate carrier transport in a single 22 nm-thick double-gated Si quantum well device, which has independent contacts to electrons and holes. Conductance, Hall density and Hall mobility are mapped in a broad double-gate voltage window. When the gate voltage asymmetry is not too large only either electrons or holes occupy the Si well and the Hall mobility shows the fingerprints of volume inversion/accumulation. At strongly asymmetric double-gate voltage an electric field induced electro...

  15. Quantum transport through complex networks - from light-harvesting proteins to semiconductor devices

    Kreisbeck, Christoph

    2012-06-18

    Electron transport through small systems in semiconductor devices plays an essential role for many applications in micro-electronics. One focus of current research lies on establishing conceptually new devices based on ballistic transport in high mobility AlGaAs/AlGa samples. In the ballistic regime, the transport characteristics are determined by coherent interference effects. In order to guide experimentalists to an improved device design, the characterization and understanding of intrinsic device properties is crucial. We develop a time-dependent approach that allows us to simulate experimentally fabricated, complex devicegeometries with an extension of up to a few micrometers. Particularly, we explore the physical origin of unexpected effects that have been detected in recent experiments on transport through Aharonov-Bohm waveguide-interferometers. Such interferometers can be configured as detectors for transfer properties of embedded quantum systems. We demonstrate that a four-terminal waveguide-ring is a suitable setup for measuring the transmission phase of a harmonic quantum dot. Quantum effects are not restricted exclusively to artificial devices but have been found in biological systems as well. Pioneering experiments reveal quantum effects in light-harvesting complexes, the building blocks of photosynthesis. We discuss the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, which is a network of coupled bacteriochlorophylls. It acts as an energy wire in the photosynthetic apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. Recent experimental findings suggest that energy transfer takes place in the form of coherent wave-like motion, rather than through classical hopping from one bacteriochlorophyll to the next. However, the question of why and how coherent transfer emerges in light-harvesting complexes is still open. The challenge is to merge seemingly contradictory features that are observed in experiments on two-dimensional spectroscopy into a consistent theory. Here, we provide such a

  16. GaAs Quantum Dot Thermometry Using Direct Transport and Charge Sensing

    Maradan, D.; L. Casparis; Liu, T.-M.; Biesinger, D. E. F.; Scheller, C. P.; Zumbühl, D. M.; Zimmerman, J.; Gossard, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the electron temperature using gate defined quantum dots formed in a GaAs 2D electron gas in both direct transport and charge sensing mode. Decent agreement with the refrigerator temperature was observed over a broad range of temperatures down to 10 mK. Upon cooling nuclear demagnetization stages integrated into the sample wires below 1 mK, the device electron temperature saturates, remaining close to 10 mK. The extreme sensitivity of the thermometer to its environm...

  17. Quantum corrections to transport in graphene: a trajectory-based semiclassical analysis

    We review a calculation of the quantum corrections to electrical transport in graphene, using the trajectory-based semiclassical method. Compared to conventional metals, for graphene the semiclassical propagator contains an additional pseudospin structure that influences the results for weak localization, and interaction-induced effects, such as the Altshuler–Aronov correction and dephasing. Our results apply to a sample of graphene that is doped away from the Dirac point and subject to a smooth disorder potential, such that electrons follow classical trajectories. In such a system, the Ehrenfest time enters as an additional timescale. (paper)

  18. `Tight Binding' methods in quantum transport through molecules and small devices: From the coherent to the decoherent description

    Pastawski, Horacio M.; Medina, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the steady-state electronic transport in solid-state and molecular devices in the quantum regime. The decimation technique allows a comprehensive description of the electronic structure. Such a method is used, in conjunction with the generalizations of Landauer's tunneling formalism, to describe a wide range of transport regimes. We analize mesoscopic and semiclassical metallic transport, the metal-insulator transition, and the resonant tunneling regime. The effects of decoherence ...

  19. Tunable spin selective transport and quantum phase transition in parallel double dot system

    Xiong, Yong-Chen; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Luo, Shi-Jun; Yang, Jun-Tao

    2016-02-01

    We study theoretically the spin selective transport and the quantum phase transition (QPT) in a double dot device by means of the numerical renormalization group technique. When the gate voltage ε is in the Kondo regime and the interdot hopping t is large enough, a first order QPT between local spin singlet and Sz=1 of the triplet is observed as the magnetic field B increases. Beyond the Kondo regime, the QPTs depend closely on ε and t, and perfect spin filter is found, where the effect of spin filtering could easily be manipulated by tuning external parameters. We show that the interplay between the Zeeman effect and the antiferromagnetic interdot hopping, and occupancy switching are responsible for the QPT and the spin selective transport.

  20. Particle production and Boltzmann integral form of relativistic quantum transport theory

    The 3+3+1 dimensional relativistic quantum transport equation for the fermion matter field, combines the particle pair production with flow phenomena, which occur at very different time scale. A direct numerical treatment of dynamical situations is therefore practically impossible. The authors attempt a seperation of these two sectors by the method of prediagonalization of the integral equations. They exploit the structure of the resolvent of the transport equations: it contains two poles corresponding to the flow sector and two to the pair production sector. Their hope for practical applications is to treat matter flow as a classical phenomenon and to be able to obtain an integral term describing the pair production accurately

  1. Subgap resonant quasiparticle transport in normal-superconductor quantum dot devices

    Gramich, J.; Baumgartner, A.; Schönenberger, C.

    2016-04-01

    We report thermally activated transport resonances for biases below the superconducting energy gap in a carbon nanotube quantum dot (QD) device with a superconducting Pb and a normal metal contact. These resonances are due to the superconductor's finite quasi-particle population at elevated temperatures and can only be observed when the QD life-time broadening is considerably smaller than the gap. This condition is fulfilled in our QD devices with optimized Pd/Pb/In multi-layer contacts, which result in reproducibly large and "clean" superconducting transport gaps with a strong conductance suppression for subgap biases. We show that these gaps close monotonically with increasing magnetic field and temperature. The accurate description of the subgap resonances by a simple resonant tunneling model illustrates the ideal characteristics of the reported Pb contacts and gives an alternative access to the tunnel coupling strengths in a QD.

  2. Simulations of quantum transport in nanoscale systems: application to atomic gold and silver wires

    Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.; Brandbyge, Mads; Taylor, Jeremy Philip; Stokbro, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    We present a first-principles method for studying the electronic transport through nanoscale atomic systems under non-equilibrium conditions. The method is based on density functional theory, and allows the calculation of the response of the system to an applied finite potential difference. The...... potential drop profile and induced electronic current (and therefore the conductance) are obtained from first principles. The method takes into account the atomic structure of both the nanoscale structure and the semi-infinite electrodes through which the potential is applied. Non-equilibrium Green......'s function techniques are used to calculate the quantum conductance. Here we apply the method to the study of the electronic transport in wires of gold and silver with atomic thickness. We show the results of our calculations, and compare with some of the abundant experimental data on these systems....

  3. Basic concepts of quantum interference and electron transport in single-molecule electronics.

    Lambert, C J

    2015-02-21

    This tutorial outlines the basic theoretical concepts and tools which underpin the fundamentals of phase-coherent electron transport through single molecules. The key quantity of interest is the transmission coefficient T(E), which yields the electrical conductance, current-voltage relations, the thermopower S and the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of single-molecule devices. Since T(E) is strongly affected by quantum interference (QI), three manifestations of QI in single-molecules are discussed, namely Mach-Zehnder interferometry, Breit-Wigner resonances and Fano resonances. A simple MATLAB code is provided, which allows the novice reader to explore QI in multi-branched structures described by a tight-binding (Hückel) Hamiltonian. More generally, the strengths and limitations of materials-specific transport modelling based on density functional theory are discussed. PMID:25255961

  4. Thermal balance and quantum heat transport in nanostructures thermalized by local Langevin heat baths

    Sääskilahti, K.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J.

    2013-07-01

    Modeling of thermal transport in practical nanostructures requires making tradeoffs between the size of the system and the completeness of the model. We study quantum heat transfer in a self-consistent thermal bath setup consisting of two lead regions connected by a center region. Atoms both in the leads and in the center region are coupled to quantum Langevin heat baths that mimic the damping and dephasing of phonon waves by anharmonic scattering. This approach treats the leads and the center region on the same footing and thereby allows for a simple and physically transparent thermalization of the system, enabling also perfect acoustic matching between the leads and the center region. Increasing the strength of the coupling reduces the mean-free path of phonons and gradually shifts phonon transport from ballistic regime to diffusive regime. In the center region, the bath temperatures are determined self-consistently from the requirement of zero net energy exchange between the local heat bath and each atom. By solving the stochastic equations of motion in frequency space and averaging over noise using the general fluctuation-dissipation relation derived by Dhar and Roy [J. Stat. Phys.JSTPBS0022-471510.1007/s10955-006-9235-3 125, 801 (2006)], we derive the formula for thermal current, which contains the Caroli formula for phonon transmission function and reduces to the Landauer-Büttiker formula in the limit of vanishing coupling to local heat baths. We prove that the bath temperatures measure local kinetic energy and can, therefore, be interpreted as true atomic temperatures. In a setup where phonon reflections are eliminated, the Boltzmann transport equation under gray approximation with full phonon dispersion is shown to be equivalent to the self-consistent heat bath model. We also study thermal transport through two-dimensional constrictions in square lattice and graphene and discuss the differences between the exact solution and linear approximations.

  5. Enhancing light absorption within the carrier transport length in quantum junction solar cells.

    Fu, Yulan; Hara, Yukihiro; Miller, Christopher W; Lopez, Rene

    2015-09-10

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have attracted tremendous attention because of their tunable absorption spectrum window and potentially low processing cost. Recently reported quantum junction solar cells represent a promising approach to building a rectifying photovoltaic device that employs CQD layers on each side of the p-n junction. However, the ultimate efficiency of CQD solar cells is still highly limited by their high trap state density in both p- and n-type CQDs. By modeling photonic structures to enhance the light absorption within the carrier transport length and by ensuring that the carrier generation and collection efficiencies were both augmented, our work shows that overall device current density could be improved. We utilized a two-dimensional numerical model to calculate the characteristics of patterned CQD solar cells based on a simple grating structure. Our calculation predicts a short circuit current density as high as 31  mA/cm2, a value nearly 1.5 times larger than that of the conventional flat design, showing the great potential value of patterned quantum junction solar cells. PMID:26368966

  6. Controlled electrostatic assembly of quantum dots vis-à-vis their electronic coupling and transport gap.

    Ghosh, Batu; Pal, Amlan J

    2011-05-28

    We correlate the electronic coupling between quantum dots and the transport gap of nanoparticle-passivated Si substrates. We vary the length of the stabilizers of CdS nanoparticles, which in turn alters the particle-to-particle separation and hence the electronic coupling between them. We also control the electronic coupling using time-restricted electrostatic-assembly of quantum dots, using short periods of time so that an incomplete monolayer or a sub-monolayer of CdS forms. In such a sub-monolayer, the nanoparticles remain isolated from each other with a controllable particle-to-particle separation. From electronic absorption spectroscopy of multilayer films and atomic force microscopy of a monolayer, we evidenced sub-monolayer formation in the controlled electrostatic assembly process. We measure the current-voltage characteristics of nanoparticle-passivated substrates with a scanning tunnelling microscope; we show that the transport gap of nanoparticle-passivated substrates depends on the electronic coupling between CdS particles in the monolayer. PMID:21465033

  7. QUANTUM DOT SINGLE MOLECULE TRACKING REVEALS A WIDE RANGE OF DIFFUSIVE MOTIONS OF MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS.

    Crane, Jonathan M; Haggie, Peter M; Verkman, A S

    2009-03-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) provides information about the microscopic motions of individual particles in live cells. We applied SPT to study the diffusion of membrane transport proteins in cell plasma membranes in which individual proteins are labeled with quantum dots at engineered extracellular epitopes. Software was created to deduce particle diffusive modes from quantum dot trajectories. SPT of aquaporin (AQP) water channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels revealed several types of diffusion. AQP1 was freely mobile in cell membranes, showing rapid, Brownian-type diffusion. The full-length (M1) isoform of AQP4 also diffused rapidly, though the diffusion of a shorter (M23) isoform of AQP4 was highly restricted due to its supermolecular assembly in raft-like orthogonal arrays. CFTR mobility was also highly restricted, in a spring-like potential, due to its tethering to the actin cytoskeleton through PDZ-domain C-terminus interactions. The biological significance of regulated diffusion of membrane transport proteins is a subject of active investigation. PMID:24386532

  8. Quantum mechanical simulation of hole transport in p-type Si Schottky barrier MOSFETs.

    Choi, Wonchul; Shin, Mincheol

    2011-07-01

    A full quantum-mechanical simulation of p-type nanowire Schottky barrier metal oxide silicon field effect transistors (SB-MOSFETs) is performed by solving the three-dimensional Schrödinger and Poisson's equations self-consistently. The non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach is adopted to treat hole transport, especially quantum tunneling through SB. In this work, p-type nanowire SB-MOSFETs are simulated based on the 3-band k.p method, using the k.p parameters that were tuned by benchmarking against the tight-binding method with sp3s* orbitals. The device shows a strong dependence on the transport direction, due to the orientation-sensitive tunneling effective mass and the confinement energy. With regard to the subthreshold slope, the [110] and [111] oriented devices with long channel show better performance, but they are more vulnerable to the short channel effects than the [100] oriented device. The threshold voltage also shows a greater variation in the [110] and [111] oriented devices with the decrease of the channel length. PMID:22121621

  9. Scale-estimation of quantum coherent energy transport in multiple-minima systems

    Farrow, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    A generic and intuitive model for coherent energy transport in multiple minima systems coupled to a quantum mechanical bath is shown. Using a simple spin-boson system, we illustrate how a generic donor-acceptor system can be brought into resonance using a narrow band of vibrational modes, such that the transfer efficiency of an electron-hole pair (exciton) is made arbitrarily high. Coherent transport phenomena in nature are of renewed interest since the discovery that a photon captured by the light-harvesting complex (LHC) in photosynthetic organisms can be conveyed to a chemical reaction centre with near-perfect efficiency. Classical explanations of the transfer use stochastic diffusion to model the hopping motion of a photo-excited exciton. This accounts inadequately for the speed and efficiency of the energy transfer measured in a series of recent landmark experiments. Taking a quantum mechanical perspective can help capture the salient features of the efficient part of that transfer. To show the versatili...

  10. Measuring charge transport in nanopatterned PbS colloidal quantum dots using charge sensing

    Ray, Nirat; Staley, Neal E.; Wanger, Darcy D.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Kastner, Marc A.

    2014-03-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) can self-assemble from solution into close-packed arrays, where the motion of electrons is expected to be correlated due to long-range coulomb interactions. In order to study electron transport in these arrays, measurement of conductance around zero bias is required. Devices fabricated using CQDs, however, tend to be highly resistive (owing to large tunnel barriers from the organic ligands), and techniques to increase the conductance, such as annealing, often lead to large scale cracking. We nanopattern PbS CQDs, using electron beam lithography and a liftoff process, adjacent to a charge sensor. The patterning process helps to eliminate cracking, and improve packing of the dots. By performing a time resolved measurement of charge through the dots, using the sensor, we are able to measure conductance values as low as 10- 19 Ω - 1 with a voltage bias of just 100mV. Our technique also allows us to map out the current voltage characteristics, even at low temperatures where the current becomes immeasurably small. We present the first transport measurements, near zero bias, on nanopatterned PbS quantum dots.

  11. Phosphorene confined systems in magnetic field, quantum transport, and superradiance in the quasiflat band

    Ostahie, B.; Aldea, A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral and transport properties of electrons in confined phosphorene systems are investigated in a five hopping parameter tight-binding model, using analytical and numerical techniques. The main emphasis is on the properties of the topological edge states accommodated by the quasiflat band that characterizes the phosphorene energy spectrum. We show, in the particular case of phosphorene, how the breaking of the bipartite lattice structure gives rise to the electron-hole asymmetry of the energy spectrum. The properties of the topological edge states in the zigzag nanoribbons are analyzed under different aspects: degeneracy, localization, extension in the Brillouin zone, dispersion of the quasiflat band in magnetic field. The finite-size phosphorene plaquette exhibits a Hofstadter-type spectrum made up of two unequal butterflies separated by a gap, where a quasiflat band composed of zigzag edge states is located. The transport properties are investigated by simulating a four-lead Hall device (importantly, all leads are attached on the same zigzag side), and using the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. We find out that the chiral edge states due to the magnetic field yield quantum Hall plateaus, but the topological edge states in the gap do not support the quantum Hall effect and prove a dissipative behavior. By calculating the complex eigenenergies of the non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonian that describes the open system (plaquette+leads), we prove the superradiance effect in the energy range of the quasiflat band, with consequences for the density of states and electron transmission properties.

  12. Direct Imaging of Long-Range Exciton Transport in Quantum Dot Superlattices by Ultrafast Microscopy.

    Yoon, Seog Joon; Guo, Zhi; Dos Santos Claro, Paula C; Shevchenko, Elena V; Huang, Libai

    2016-07-26

    Long-range charge and exciton transport in quantum dot (QD) solids is a crucial challenge in utilizing QDs for optoelectronic applications. Here, we present a direct visualization of exciton diffusion in highly ordered CdSe QDs superlattices by mapping exciton population using ultrafast transient absorption microscopy. A temporal resolution of ∼200 fs and a spatial precision of ∼50 nm of this technique provide a direct assessment of the upper limit for exciton transport in QD solids. An exciton diffusion length of ∼125 nm has been visualized in the 3 ns experimental time window and an exciton diffusion coefficient of (2.5 ± 0.2) × 10(-2) cm(2) s(-1) has been measured for superlattices constructed from 3.6 nm CdSe QDs with center-to-center distance of 6.7 nm. The measured exciton diffusion constant is in good agreement with Förster resonance energy transfer theory. We have found that exciton diffusion is greatly enhanced in the superlattices over the disordered films with an order of magnitude higher diffusion coefficient, pointing toward the role of disorder in limiting transport. This study provides important understandings on energy transport mechanisms in both the spatial and temporal domains in QD solids. PMID:27387010

  13. Spin-resolved Andreev transport through double-quantum-dot Cooper pair splitters

    Trocha, Piotr; Weymann, Ireneusz

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the Andreev transport through double-quantum-dot Cooper pair splitters with ferromagnetic leads. The analysis is performed with the aid of the real-time diagrammatic technique in the sequential tunneling regime. We study the dependence of the Andreev current, the differential conductance, and the tunnel magnetoresistance on various parameters of the model in both the linear and nonlinear response regimes. In particular, we analyze the spin-resolved transport in the crossed Andreev reflection regime, where a blockade of the current occurs due to enhanced occupation of the triplet state. We show that in the triplet blockade, finite intradot correlations can lead to considerable leakage current due to direct Andreev reflection processes. Furthermore, we find additional regimes of current suppression resulting from enhanced occupation of singlet states, which decreases the rate of crossed Andreev reflection. We also study how the splitting of Andreev bound states, triggered by either dot level detuning, finite hopping between the dots, or finite magnetic field, affects the Andreev current. While in the first two cases the number of Andreev bound states is doubled, whereas transport properties are qualitatively similar, in the case of finite magnetic field further level splitting occurs, leading to a nontrivial behavior of spin-resolved transport characteristics, and especially that of tunneling magnetoresistance. Finally, we discuss the entanglement fidelity between split Cooper pair electrons and show that by tuning the device parameters, fidelity can reach unity.

  14. Advanced boundary condition method in quantum transport and its application in nanodevices

    He, Yu

    Modern semiconductor devices have reached critical dimensions in the sub-20nm range. During the last decade, quantum transport methods have become the standard approaches to model nanoscale devices. In quantum transport methods, Schrodinger equations are solved in the critical device channel with the contacts served as the open boundary conditions. Proper and efficient treatments of these boundary conditions are essential to provide accurate prediction of device performance. The open boundary conditions, which represent charge injection and extraction effects, are described by contact self-energies. All existing contact self-energy methods assume periodic and semiinfinite contacts, which are in stark contrast to realistic devices where the contacts often have complicated geometries or imperfections. On the other hand, confined structures such as quantum dots, nanowires, and ultra-thin bodies play an important role in nanodevice designs. In the tight binding models of these confined structures, the surfaces require appropriate boundary treatments to remove the dangling bonds. The existing boundary treatments fall into two categories. One is to explicitly include the passivation atoms in the device. This is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules due to the increasing rank of the Hamiltonian. The other is to implicitly incorporate passivation by altering the orbital energies of the dangling bonds with a passivation potential. This method only works for certain crystal structures and symmetries, and fails to distinguish different passivation scenarios, such as hydrogen and oxygen passivation. In this work, an efficient self-energy method applicable for arbitrary contact structures is developed. This method is based on an iterative algorithm which considers the explicit contact segments. The method is demonstrated on a graphene nanoribbon structure with trumpet shape contacts and a Si0.5Ge0.5 nanowire transistor with alloy disorder contacts. Furthermore

  15. Scaling law and general expression for transport ac loss of a rectangular thin strip with power-law E(J) relation

    Chen, Du-Xing; Li, Shuo; Fang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Transport ac loss Q of a superconducting rectangular thin strip obeying a power-law relation E∝Jn as a function of current amplitude Im may be, following Norris, expressed by normalized quantities as q(im). A scaling law is deduced that if Icf, Ic and f being the critical current and frequency, is multiplied by a positive constant C, then im and qm are multiplied by C 1 /(n - 1)and C 2 /(n - 1) , respectively. Based on this scaling law and the well-known Norris formula, the general function of q(im, n, f) is obtained graphically or analytically for any practical purpose, after accurate numerical computations on a set of q(im) at several values of n and a fixed value of f.

  16. Graphene frameworks promoted electron transport in quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Zhu, Yanyan; Meng, Xin; Cui, Huijuan; Jia, Suping; Dong, Jianhui; Zheng, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jianghong; Wang, Zhijian; Li, Li; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Zhenping

    2014-08-27

    Graphene frameworks (GFs) were incorporated into TiO2 photoanode as electron transport medium to improve the photovoltaic performance of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) for their excellent conductivity and isotropic framework structure that could permit rapid charge transport. Intensity modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results show that the electron transport time (τ(d)) of 1.5 wt % GFs/TiO2 electrode is one-fifth of that of the TiO2 electrode, and electron lifetime (τ(n)) and diffusion path length (Ln) are thrice those of the TiO2 electrode. Results also revealed that the GFs/TiO2 electrode has a shorter electron transport time (τ(d)), as well as longer electron lifetime (τ(n)) and diffusion path length (Ln), than conventional 2D graphene sheets/TiO2 electrode, thus indicating that GFs could promote rapid electron transfer in TiO2 photoanodes. Photocurrent-voltage curves demonstrated that when incorporating 1.5 wt % GFs into TiO2 photoanode, a maximum power conversion efficiency of 4.2% for QDSSCs could be achieved. This value was higher than that of TiO2 photoanode and 2D graphene sheets/TiO2 electrode. In addition, the reasons behind the sensitivity of photoelectric conversion efficiency to the graphene concentration in the TiO2 were also systematically investigated. Our results provide a basic understanding of how GFs can efficiently promote electron transport in TiO2-based solar cells. PMID:25075630

  17. Phase-coherent quantum transport in silicon nanowires based on Wigner transport equation: Comparison with the nonequilibrium-Green-function formalism

    Barraud, Sylvain

    2009-09-01

    Various theoretical formulations are proposed for investigating the carrier transport in nanoscale electronic devices. In this paper, a discrete formulation of the Wigner transport equation (WTE) for the self-consistent simulation of phase-coherent quantum transport in silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) devices is presented. The device is simulated using an effective-mass Hamiltonian within the mode-space approximation. The numerical scheme proposed in this work solves self-consistently three dimensional Poisson's equation, two dimensional Schrödinger's equation in each cross-sectional plane of the nanowire, and the steady-state one dimensional WTE for each conduction mode to handle the quantum transport along the channel. Details on numerical implementation of the Wigner function method are given, and the results are compared with those of the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method in the ballistic limit. The calculations of current-voltage electrical characteristics of surround-gated silicon nanowires are performed using both NEGF and WTE formulations. The good agreement observed between these approaches means that a direct solution of the WTE is an accurate simulation method for modeling the ballistic quantum transport in silicon nanowire MOSFETs.

  18. Spin effects in transport through triangular quantum dot molecule in different geometrical configurations

    Wrześniewski, Kacper; Weymann, Ireneusz

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the spin-resolved transport properties of a triangular quantum dot molecule weakly coupled to external ferromagnetic leads. The calculations are performed by using the real-time diagrammatic technique up to the second-order of perturbation theory, which enables a description of both the sequential and cotunneling processes. We study the behavior of the current and differential conductance in the parallel and antiparallel magnetic configurations, as well as the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) and the Fano factor in both the linear and nonlinear response regimes. It is shown that the transport characteristics depend greatly on how the system is connected to external leads. Two specific geometrical configurations of the device are considered—the mirror one, which possesses the reflection symmetry with respect to the current flow direction and the fork one, in which this symmetry is broken. In the case of first configuration we show that, depending on the bias and gate voltages, the system exhibits both enhanced TMR and super-Poissonian shot noise. On the other hand, when the system is in the second configuration, we predict a negative TMR and a negative differential conductance in certain transport regimes. The mechanisms leading to those effects are thoroughly discussed.

  19. Energy-scales convergence for optimal and robust quantum transport in photosynthetic complexes

    Mohseni, M. [Google Research, Venice, California 90291 (United States); Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shabani, A. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lloyd, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rabitz, H. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Underlying physical principles for the high efficiency of excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes are not fully understood. Notably, the degree of robustness of these systems for transporting energy is not known considering their realistic interactions with vibrational and radiative environments within the surrounding solvent and scaffold proteins. In this work, we employ an efficient technique to estimate energy transfer efficiency of such complex excitonic systems. We observe that the dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex leads to optimal and robust energy transport due to a convergence of energy scales among all important internal and external parameters. In particular, we show that the FMO energy transfer efficiency is optimum and stable with respect to important parameters of environmental interactions including reorganization energy λ, bath frequency cutoff γ, temperature T, and bath spatial correlations. We identify the ratio of k{sub B}λT/ℏγ⁢g as a single key parameter governing quantum transport efficiency, where g is the average excitonic energy gap.

  20. Energy-scales convergence for optimal and robust quantum transport in photosynthetic complexes

    Underlying physical principles for the high efficiency of excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes are not fully understood. Notably, the degree of robustness of these systems for transporting energy is not known considering their realistic interactions with vibrational and radiative environments within the surrounding solvent and scaffold proteins. In this work, we employ an efficient technique to estimate energy transfer efficiency of such complex excitonic systems. We observe that the dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex leads to optimal and robust energy transport due to a convergence of energy scales among all important internal and external parameters. In particular, we show that the FMO energy transfer efficiency is optimum and stable with respect to important parameters of environmental interactions including reorganization energy λ, bath frequency cutoff γ, temperature T, and bath spatial correlations. We identify the ratio of kBλT/ℏγ⁢g as a single key parameter governing quantum transport efficiency, where g is the average excitonic energy gap

  1. Current flow paths in deformed graphene: from quantum transport to classical trajectories in curved space

    Stegmann, Thomas; Szpak, Nikodem

    2016-05-01

    In this work we compare two fundamentally different approaches to the electronic transport in deformed graphene: (a) the condensed matter approach in which current flow paths are obtained by applying the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) method to the tight-binding model with local strain, (b) the general relativistic approach in which classical trajectories of relativistic point particles moving in a curved surface with a pseudo-magnetic field are calculated. The connection between the two is established in the long-wave limit via an effective Dirac Hamiltonian in curved space. Geometrical optics approximation, applied to focused current beams, allows us to directly compare the wave and the particle pictures. We obtain very good numerical agreement between the quantum and the classical approaches for a fairly wide set of parameters, improving with the increasing size of the system. The presented method offers an enormous reduction of complexity from irregular tight-binding Hamiltonians defined on large lattices to geometric language for curved continuous surfaces. It facilitates a comfortable and efficient tool for predicting electronic transport properties in graphene nanostructures with complicated geometries. Combination of the curvature and the pseudo-magnetic field paves the way to new interesting transport phenomena such as bending or focusing (lensing) of currents depending on the shape of the deformation. It can be applied in designing ultrasensitive sensors or in nanoelectronics.

  2. Anomalous Interlayer Transport of Quantum Hall Bilayers in the Strongly Josephson-Coupled Regime

    Zhang, Ding; Dietsche, Werner; von Klitzing, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    We investigate Josephson coupling in a closely spaced quantum Hall bilayer. Reduction of the interlayer barrier from the widely used values of 10-12 nm to the present one of 8 nm leads to qualitatively different interlayer transport properties. The breakdown of interlayer coherence can be spatially confined in regions that are smaller than the device size. Such a spatial inhomogeneity depends crucially on the Josephson-coupling strength and can be removed by adding an in-plane magnetic field of about 0.5 T. At higher in-plane fields, the interlayer tunneling I -V curve develops unexpected overshoot features. These results challenge current theoretical understanding and suggest that our bilayer system has entered a previously unexplored regime.

  3. Reprint of : Regular and singular Fermi liquid in triple quantum dots: Coherent transport studies

    Tooski, S. B.; Ramšak, A.; Bułka, B. R.

    2016-08-01

    A system of three coupled quantum dots in a triangular geometry (TQD) with electron-electron interaction and symmetrically coupled to two leads is analyzed with respect to the electron transport by means of the numerical renormalization group. Varying gate potentials this system exhibits extremely rich range of regimes with different many-electron states with various local spin orderings. It is demonstrated how the Luttinger phase changes in a controlled manner which then via the Friedel sum rule formula exactly reproduces the conductance through the TQD system. The analysis of the uncoupled TQD molecule from the leads gives a reliable qualitative understanding of various relevant regimes and an insight into the phase diagram with the regular Fermi liquid and singular-Fermi liquid phases.

  4. Calculation of electrical transport properties and electron entanglement in inhomogeneous quantum wires

    A A Shokri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the spin-dependent transport properties and electron entanglement in a mesoscopic system, which consists of two semi-infinite leads (as source and drain separated by a typical quantum wire with a given potential. The properties studied include current-voltage characteristic, electrical conductivity, Fano factor and shot noise, and concurrence. The calculations are based on the transfer matrix method within the effective mass approximation. Using the Landauer formalism and transmission coefficient, the dependence of the considered quantities on type of potential well, length and width of potential well, energy of transmitted electron, temperature and the voltage have been theoretically studied. Also, the effect of the above-mentioned factors has been investigated in the nanostructure. The application of the present results may be useful in designing spintronice devices.

  5. Magnetoelectronic transport of the two-dimensional electron gas in CdSe single quantum wells

    P K Ghosh; A Ghosal; D Chattopadhyay

    2009-02-01

    Hall mobility and magnetoresistance coefficient for the two-dimensional (2D) electron transport parallel to the heterojunction interfaces in a single quantum well of CdSe are calculated with a numerical iterative technique in the framework of Fermi–Dirac statistics. Lattice scatterings due to polar-mode longitudinal optic (LO) phonons, and acoustic phonons via deformation potential and piezoelectric couplings, are considered together with background and remote ionized impurity interactions. The parallel mode of piezoelectric scattering is found to contribute more than the perpendicular mode. We observe that the Hall mobility decreases with increasing temperature but increases with increasing channel width. The magnetoresistance coefficient is found to decrease with increasing temperature and increase with increasing magnetic field in the classical region.

  6. Two-Dimensional Dirac Fermions in a Topological Insulator: Transport in the Quantum Limit

    Analytis, J.G.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Geballe Lab /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; McDonald, R.D.; /Los Alamos; Riggs, S.C.; /Natl. High Mag. Field Lab.; Chu, J.-H.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Geballe Lab /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Boebinger, G.S.; /Natl. High Mag. Field Lab.; Fisher, I.R.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Geballe Lab /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    Pulsed magnetic fields of up to 55T are used to investigate the transport properties of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} in the extreme quantum limit. For samples with a bulk carrier density of n = 2.9 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, the lowest Landau level of the bulk 3D Fermi surface is reached by a field of 4T. For fields well beyond this limit, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations arising from quantization of the 2D surface state are observed, with the {nu} = 1 Landau level attained by a field of {approx} 35T. These measurements reveal the presence of additional oscillations which occur at fields corresponding to simple rational fractions of the integer Landau indices.

  7. Quantum Domains for Macroscopic Transport Effects in Nanostructures with Control Topology: Optics and e-Conductivity

    Antipov A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanostructures with different morphology have been obtained by us by methods of both direct laser modification (from cw to fs laser radiation of the target surface/thin films and laser evaporation of the target substance in liquid to produce the colloid systems, and then – to deposite substance on substrate from colloid, and also – by a single drop deposition technique. The analysis of induced nanostructures has been carried out by absorption spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The island conductivity is dominant for the nanocluster semiconductor systems induced by laser ablation technique, and electroresistance can dramatically decrease due to spontaneous selected multichannel/parallel electron transportation trajectories. A tunneling quantum coherent effect takes place for electron conductivity for the case.

  8. Coherent plasmon transport using a quantum dot coupled plasmonic nanocavity system

    The transport property of surface plasmon polariton in an Ag nanowire-polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-Ag film waveguide structure coupled with a quantum dot (QD) is investigated theoretically. By placing a two-level QD into the plasmonic Fabry–Perot (FP) nanocavity, which is formed by two distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) patterned in the PMMA layer, a sharp asymmetric Fano line shape can be obtained in the transmission spectrum. We analyze this phenomenon theoretically using the transfer matrix method. The line shape is very sharp, and the required frequency shift from the minimum to maximum transmission is quite small. This will have great potential applications in single-photon modulation and switching in integrated nanophotonic circuitry. (paper)

  9. Electron Transport of an Impurity Quantum Wire Under THz Electromagnetic Field Illumination

    LI Yuan; ZHOU Guang-Hui; XIAO Xian-Bo; CHENG Fang; LIAO Wen-Hu

    2004-01-01

    @@ We theoretically investigate the effect of a single finite-size attractive impurity on the electron transport of a semiconductor quantum wire under the influence of a terahertz electromagnetic field illumination. In the freeparticle framework, the time-dependent electronic states are obtained by introducing an unitary transformation,and the electronic transmission of the system is obtained by using the scattering matrix approach. In the case of the field frequency resonant with the lateral energy spacing of the two lowest levels, a step-like structure for the transmission probability versus the total electron energy is predicted. Furthermore, due to the interplay between the single impurity and the applied field, the transmission probability curve in the non-resonant case shows a structure of a resonance dip on the interference pattern background with certain parameters of the impurity.

  10. Quantum transport in III-V-semiconductor nanocolumns; Quantentransport in III-V-Halbleiternanosaeulen

    Wensorra, Jakob

    2009-03-20

    The goal of this work has been to investigate und understand the electronic transport properties of vertical GaAs/AlAs nanocolumn resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) and field effect transistors (RTTs) as well as of vertical InAs nanocolumn phase interference diodes. Besides the fabrication and electrical characterization of the devices, numerical calculations, simulations and quantum transport models represent the second important part of the work. GaAs/AlAs and InAs nanocolumns with lateral dimensions down to 30 nm have been processed by top-down approach. Room temperature DC electrical measurements on the nano-RTDs show a distinct negative differential resistance in the I-V characteristics for devices down to 30 nm lateral dimension. The miniaturization of the RTDs leads to the degradation of the transport properties, especially of the peak to valley current ratio (PVR), due to the increased surface scattering. Apart from the main current peak, new substructures can be observed in the I-V characteristics. These are shoulder like features for columns with diameters between 80 nm and 100 nm but become clear peaks when the column diameters are in the 55-75 nm range. For sub-65 nm column lateral dimensions, a strong increase of the PVR and a sharp single peak is observed. A local maximum of the PVR of 3 is reached for columns with 50 nm diameter. The sub-40 nm devices show only space charge limited currents in the I-V characteristics. This behavior can be shifted to smaller or larger diameters by increasing or reduction of the channel doping. For the smallest nanocolumns the lateral quantum confinement, caused by the low dimensionality of the system, leads to the formation of a 3D quantum-point-contact (QPC) in front of the DBQW structure. The quantization in this QPC depends on the column diameter and for a 50 nm column it exceeds the room temperature thermal broadening of the Fermi distribution function of about 25 meV. The measurements of the nano-RTTs indicate a

  11. Proton transport in barium stannate: classical, semi-classical and quantum regimes.

    Geneste, Grégory; Ottochian, Alistar; Hermet, Jessica; Dezanneau, Guilhem

    2015-07-15

    Density-functional theory calculations are performed to investigate proton transport in BaSnO3. Structural optimizations in the stable and saddle point configurations for transfer (hopping) and reorientation allow description of the high-temperature classical and semi-classical regimes, in which diffusion occurs by over-barrier motion. At lower temperature (typically below 300 K), we describe the thermally-assisted quantum regime, in which protonic motion is of quantum nature and occurs in "coincidence" configurations favored by thermal fluctuations of the surrounding atoms. Both the non-adiabatic and the adiabatic limits are examined. In the adiabatic limit, the protonic energy landscape in the coincidence configuration is very flat. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations of the proton in the coincidence potential reveal, in the transfer case, that the density of probability of H(+) has its maximum at the saddle point, because the zero-point energy exceeds the coincidence barrier. Arguments are given that support the adiabatic picture for the transfer mechanism. In the case of reorientation, the time scales for the existence of the coincidence and for protonic motion, as estimated from the time-energy uncertainty principle by using a simple one-dimensional model, are of the same order of magnitude, suggesting that the adiabatic limit is not reached. Protonic transfer and reorientation in this oxide are therefore governed by different mechanisms below room temperature. PMID:26126772

  12. Quantum transport of strongly interacting photons in a one-dimensional nonlinear waveguide

    Hafezi, Mohammad; Gritsev, Vladimir; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical technique for solving the quantum transport problem of a few photons through a one-dimensional, strongly nonlinear waveguide. We specifically consider the situation where the evolution of the optical field is governed by the quantum nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLSE). Although this kind of nonlinearity is quite general, we focus on a realistic implementation involving cold atoms loaded in a hollow-core optical fiber, where the atomic system provides a tunable nonlinearity that can be large even at a single-photon level. In particular, we show that when the interaction between photons is effectively repulsive, the transmission of multi-photon components of the field is suppressed. This leads to anti-bunching of the transmitted light and indicates that the system acts as a single-photon switch. On the other hand, in the case of attractive interaction, the system can exhibit either anti-bunching or bunching, which is in stark contrast to semiclassical calculations. We show that the ...

  13. Quantum transport of strongly interacting photons in a one-dimensional nonlinear waveguide

    Hafezi, Mohammad; Chang, Darrick E.; Gritsev, Vladimir; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical technique for solving the quantum transport problem of a few photons through a one-dimensional, strongly nonlinear waveguide. We specifically consider the situation where the evolution of the optical field is governed by the quantum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Although this kind of nonlinearity is quite general, we focus on a realistic implementation involving cold atoms loaded in a hollow-core optical fiber, where the atomic system provides a tunable nonlinearity that can be large even at a single-photon level. In particular, we show that when the interaction between photons is effectively repulsive, the transmission of multiphoton components of the field is suppressed. This leads to antibunching of the transmitted light and indicates that the system acts as a single-photon switch. On the other hand, in the case of attractive interaction, the system can exhibit either antibunching or bunching, which is in stark contrast to semiclassical calculations. We show that the bunching behavior is related to the resonant excitation of bound states of photons inside the system.

  14. Evidence for coherent transport in GaAs hole open quantum dots.

    Faniel, S.; Hackens, B.; Vlad, A.; Gustin, C.; Moldovan, L.; Melinte, S.; Bayot, V.; Shayegan, M.

    2006-03-01

    We report magnetotransport measurements in GaAs hole open quantum dots. Our samples were fabricated from a p-type GaAs quantum well with a density of 2.2 x10^15 m-2 and a mobility of 35 m^2/Vs. Two different dots were patterned using e-beam lithography and wet etching. A top gate was added in order to control the dots openings and the hole density. The measurements were performed down to 30 mK with the magnetic field applied perpendicular to the plane of the two- dimensional system. We observed large, reproducible conductance fluctuations associated with the coherent transport of holes inside the dots at lowest temperatures which vanish above 500 mK. From the variance of these fluctuations and from the Random Matrix Theory, we extracted the hole dephasing time τ. The temperature dependence of the calculated τ lies between a T-1 and T-2 behavior and exhibits a saturation at very low temperature which is similar with τ measured in 2D electron systems. B. Hackens et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 146802 (2005).

  15. Metallic transport near a quantum critical point in organic superconductors from a renormalized Boltzmann theory

    Shahbazi, Maryam; Bourbonnais, Claude

    2015-03-01

    The electrical and thermal transport properties of the normal state of quasi-1D superconductors like Bechgaard salts are investigated by combining the linearised Boltzmann equation and the renormalisation group (RG) method. The collision integral operator is calculated using the Umklapp scattering amplitudes obtained by the RG method yielding the electrical resistivity(ρ) and Seebeck coefficient(S). The power law dependence, ρ (T) ~Tα , for resistivity is obtained by changing the antinesting parameter t⊥' simulating the pressure distance from the quantum critical point (QCP) between spin-density-wave (SDW) and d-wave SC (SCd) in the phase diagram. The resistivity evolves from a linear component (α ~= 1) at the QCP towards a Fermi liquid component (α ~= 2) with increasing t⊥', which confirms an extended region of quantum criticality as a result of interference between SCd and SDW causing an anomalous growth of Umklapp scattering. Its anisotropy is also tied to the k⊥-dependence of hot/cold scattering regions along the Fermi surface. Similar calculations for the Seebeck coefficient show deviations from the usual linear temperature dependence and also a change of sign near a SDW instability.

  16. Quantum Transport Detected by Strong Proximity Interaction at a Graphene-WS2 van der Waals Interface.

    O'Farrell, E C T; Avsar, A; Tan, J Y; Eda, G; Özyilmaz, B

    2015-09-01

    Magnetotransport measurements demonstrate that graphene in a van der Waals heterostructure is a sensitive probe of quantum transport in an adjacent WS2 layer via strong Coulomb interactions. We observe a large low-field magnetoresistance (≫ e(2)/h) and a -ln T temperature dependence of the resistance. In-plane magnetic field resistance indicates the origin is orbital and nonclassical. We demonstrate a strong electron-hole asymmetry in the mobility and coherence length of graphene demonstrating the presence of localized Coulomb interactions with ionized donors in the WS2 substrate, which ultimately leads to screening as the Fermi level of graphene is tuned toward the conduction band of WS2. This leads us to conclude that graphene couples to quantum localization processes in WS2 via the Coulomb interaction and results in the observed signatures of quantum transport. Our results show that theoretical descriptions of the van der Waals interface should not ignore localized strong correlations. PMID:26258760

  17. Coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility and transport of quantum dot nanomaterials in the Vadose Zone

    To investigate the coupled effects of solution chemistry and vadose zone processes on the mobility of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, laboratory scale transport experiments were performed. The complex coupled effects of ionic strength, size of QD aggregates, surface tension, contact angle, infiltrat...

  18. Quantum transport in one-dimensional systems via a master equation approach: Numerics and an exact solution

    Marko Žnidarič

    2011-11-01

    We discuss recent findings about properties of quantum nonequilibrium steady states. In particular we focus on transport properties. It is shown that the time-dependent density matrix renormalization method can be used successfully to find a stationary solution of Lindblad master equation. Furthermore, for a specific model an exact solution is presented.

  19. Generalized nonequilibrium vertex correction method in coherent medium theory for quantum transport simulation of disordered nanoelectronics

    Yan, Jiawei; Ke, Youqi

    2016-07-01

    Electron transport properties of nanoelectronics can be significantly influenced by the inevitable and randomly distributed impurities/defects. For theoretical simulation of disordered nanoscale electronics, one is interested in both the configurationally averaged transport property and its statistical fluctuation that tells device-to-device variability induced by disorder. However, due to the lack of an effective method to do disorder averaging under the nonequilibrium condition, the important effects of disorders on electron transport remain largely unexplored or poorly understood. In this work, we report a general formalism of Green's function based nonequilibrium effective medium theory to calculate the disordered nanoelectronics. In this method, based on a generalized coherent potential approximation for the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function, we developed a generalized nonequilibrium vertex correction method to calculate the average of a two-Keldysh-Green's-function correlator. We obtain nine nonequilibrium vertex correction terms, as a complete family, to express the average of any two-Green's-function correlator and find they can be solved by a set of linear equations. As an important result, the averaged nonequilibrium density matrix, averaged current, disorder-induced current fluctuation, and averaged shot noise, which involve different two-Green's-function correlators, can all be derived and computed in an effective and unified way. To test the general applicability of this method, we applied it to compute the transmission coefficient and its fluctuation with a square-lattice tight-binding model and compared with the exact results and other previously proposed approximations. Our results show very good agreement with the exact results for a wide range of disorder concentrations and energies. In addition, to incorporate with density functional theory to realize first-principles quantum transport simulation, we have also derived a general form of

  20. Investigations of ion transport through nanoscale polymer membranes by fluorescence quenching of CdSe/CdS quantum dot/quantum rods

    Merkl, Jan-Philip; Wolter, Christopher; Flessau, Sandra; Schmidtke, Christian; Ostermann, Johannes; Feld, Artur; Mews, Alf; Weller, Horst

    2016-03-01

    Detailed steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements give deep insight into ion transport through nanometer thick diblock copolymer membranes, which were assembled as biocompatible shell material around CdSe/CdS quantum dot in quantum rods. We discuss the role of polymer chain length, intermolecular cross-linking and nanopore formation by analysing electron transfer processes from the photoexcited QDQRs to Cu(ii) ions, which accumulate in the polymer membrane. Fluorescence investigations on single particle level additionally allow identifying ensemble inhomogeneities.Detailed steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements give deep insight into ion transport through nanometer thick diblock copolymer membranes, which were assembled as biocompatible shell material around CdSe/CdS quantum dot in quantum rods. We discuss the role of polymer chain length, intermolecular cross-linking and nanopore formation by analysing electron transfer processes from the photoexcited QDQRs to Cu(ii) ions, which accumulate in the polymer membrane. Fluorescence investigations on single particle level additionally allow identifying ensemble inhomogeneities. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, particle characterization, data acquisition, widefield images, representative PL time traces, extracted stretched exponential factors, long term PL stability assessment at different pH values and in the presence of quenching Cu(ii) ions. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08318d

  1. Quantum

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  2. Epitactical growth and quantum transport investigations of PbTe nipi structures

    This thesis is about the growth, experiments and especially simulations of wide parabolic quantum wells (WPQW) made from PbTe in order to investigate the behavior of an electron gas in the intermediate range between two and three dimensions. The advantage of PbTe as host material for such structures is that it is not necessary to use remote doping to achieve sufficient mobilities for electrons in the n-channel. Therefore it is possible to fabricate very wide quantum wells (100 - 1000 nm), because the ionized donors avoid that the potential arches in the n-channel. The samples are made by Hot-Wall-Epitaxy at the institute using the n-i-p-i concept. By introducing appropriate precautions it was possible to increase the quality and the reproducibility of the samples. The PbTe WPQW's are doping superlattices, therefore the calculation of the potential and the Fermi energy are selfconsistent problems. It is not possible to get the right solutions with analytical methods, it can only be found by help of numerical calculations in a simulation program. For the interpretation of magneto transport experiments we develop a model for PbTe WPQW's, which is based on two electron-systems with different properties. It combines a bulk system, which is dissipative (ohmic) and an ideal edge-channel system, which is identical to the one for explaining the quantum Hall effect. These two different systems are formed by the valleys of the band structure because of the huge mass anisotropy. The valley with the bigger mass has a small subband splitting and therefore bulk properties. The three remaining valleys are degenerated and have a mass which is about 10 times smaller. Their subband splitting is higher and therefore it is possible for them to form an edge-channel system. This model is the basis for a second simulation program. With this program it is possible to simulate magneto transport measurements using the data from the first program. By the help of the model we get explanations

  3. Transport hysteresis in AlGaAs/GaAs double quantum well systems with InAs quantum dots

    We report on the charge storage effect of InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in the upper well of the AlGaAs/GaAs double quantum well structure. Zero field longitudinal resistivity and Hall resistance at weak magnetic fields exhibited a hysteresis effect during the sweeping of the gate voltage due to the accumulation of charges in the quantum dots. On reverse sweeping the gate voltage, the accumulated charges are prevented from being rapidly depleted due to the screening effect of the upper two-dimensional electron gas, which could significantly enhance the operation and reliability of QD-based non-volatile memory devices

  4. Curl flux, coherence, and population landscape of molecular systems: Nonequilibrium quantum steady state, energy (charge) transport, and thermodynamics

    We established a theoretical framework in terms of the curl flux, population landscape, and coherence for non-equilibrium quantum systems at steady state, through exploring the energy and charge transport in molecular processes. The curl quantum flux plays the key role in determining transport properties and the system reaches equilibrium when flux vanishes. The novel curl quantum flux reflects the degree of non-equilibriumness and the time-irreversibility. We found an analytical expression for the quantum flux and its relationship to the environmental pumping (non-equilibriumness quantified by the voltage away from the equilibrium) and the quantum tunneling. Furthermore, we investigated another quantum signature, the coherence, quantitatively measured by the non-zero off diagonal element of the density matrix. Populations of states give the probabilities of individual states and therefore quantify the population landscape. Both curl flux and coherence depend on steady state population landscape. Besides the environment-assistance which can give dramatic enhancement of coherence and quantum flux with high voltage at a fixed tunneling strength, the quantum flux is promoted by the coherence in the regime of small tunneling while reduced by the coherence in the regime of large tunneling, due to the non-monotonic relationship between the coherence and tunneling. This is in contrast to the previously found linear relationship. For the systems coupled to bosonic (photonic and phononic) reservoirs the flux is significantly promoted at large voltage while for fermionic (electronic) reservoirs the flux reaches a saturation after a significant enhancement at large voltage due to the Pauli exclusion principle. In view of the system as a quantum heat engine, we studied the non-equilibrium thermodynamics and established the analytical connections of curl quantum flux to the transport quantities such as energy (charge) transfer efficiency, chemical reaction efficiency, energy

  5. Electronic transport in the quantum spin Hall state due to the presence of adatoms in graphene

    Lima, Leandro; Lewenkopf, Caio

    Heavy adatoms, even at low concentrations, are predicted to turn a graphene sheet into a topological insulator with substantial gap. The adatoms mediate the spin-orbit coupling that is fundamental to the quantum spin Hall effect. The adatoms act as local spin-orbit scatterer inducing hopping processes between distant carbon atoms giving origin to transverse spin currents. Although there are effective models that describe spectral properties of such systems with great detail, quantitative theoretical work for the transport counterpart is still lacking. We developed a multiprobe recursive Green's function technique with spin resolution to analyze the transport properties for large geometries. We use an effective tight-binding Hamiltonian to describe the problem of adatoms randomly placed at the center of the honeycomb hexagons, which is the case for most transition metals. Our choice of current and voltage probes is favorable to experiments since it filters the contribution of only one spin orientation, leading to a quantized spin Hall conductance of e2 / h . We also discuss the electronic propagation in the system by imaging the local density of states and the electronic current densities. The authors acknowledge the Brazilian agencies CNPq, CAPES, FAPERJ and INCT de Nanoestruturas de Carbono for financial support.

  6. Generalized non-equilibrium vertex correction method in coherent medium theory for quantum transport simulation of disordered nanoelectronics

    Yan, Jiawei; Ke, Youqi

    In realistic nanoelectronics, disordered impurities/defects are inevitable and play important roles in electron transport. However, due to the lack of effective quantum transport method, the important effects of disorders remain poorly understood. Here, we report a generalized non-equilibrium vertex correction (NVC) method with coherent potential approximation to treat the disorder effects in quantum transport simulation. With this generalized NVC method, any averaged product of two single-particle Green's functions can be obtained by solving a set of simple linear equations. As a result, the averaged non-equilibrium density matrix and various important transport properties, including averaged current, disordered induced current fluctuation and the averaged shot noise, can all be efficiently computed in a unified scheme. Moreover, a generalized form of conditionally averaged non-equilibrium Green's function is derived to incorporate with density functional theory to enable first-principles simulation. We prove the non-equilibrium coherent potential equals the non-equilibrium vertex correction. Our approach provides a unified, efficient and self-consistent method for simulating non-equilibrium quantum transport through disorder nanoelectronics. Shanghaitech start-up fund.

  7. Thermoelectric efficiency of organometallic complex wires via quantum resonance effect and long-range electric transport property.

    Nakamura, Hisao; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Ishida, Takao; Asai, Yoshihiro

    2013-11-01

    Superior long-range electric transport has been observed in several organometallic wires. Here, we discuss the role of the metal center in the electric transport and examine the possibility of high thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) by controlling the quantum resonance effects. We examined a few metal center (and metal-free) terpyridine-based complexes by first-principles calculations and clarified the role of the metals in determining the transport properties. Quasi-resonant tunneling is mediated by organic compounds, and narrow overlapping resonance states are formed when d-electron metal centers are incorporated. Distinct length (L) and temperature (T) dependencies of thermopower from semiconductor materials or organic molecular junctions are presented in terms of atomistic calculations of ZT with and without considering the phonon thermal conductance. We present an alternative approach to obtain high ZT for molecular junctions by quantum effect. PMID:24102142

  8. Spin-polarization-dependent transport in a quantum dot array coupled with an Aharonov—Bohm ring

    In this paper the quantum transport in a dot-array coupled with an Aharonov—Bohm (AB) ring is investigated via single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian. It is shown that the output spin current is a periodic function of the magnetic flux in the quantum unit Φ0. The resonance positions of the total transmission probability do not depend on the size of the AB ring but the electronic spectrum. Moreover, the persistent currents in the AB ring is also spin-polarization dependent and different from the isolated AB ring where the persistent current is independent of spin polarization. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Fano antiresonance and Kondo resonance for electronic transport through a laterally coupled carbon-nanotube quantum-dot system

    Huo, Dong-Ming [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Physics

    2015-07-01

    We present nonequilibrium Green function calculations for electronic transport through a laterally coupled carbon-nanotube quantum-dot system. In this system, a one-dimensional double carbon nanotube quantum dot attached to polarised electrodes forms a main channel for electronic tunnelling. Each carbon nanotube quantum dot in the main channel couples to a dangling carbon nanotube quantum dot. Then, the conductance spectrum is calculated. The insulating band and resonance peak in this spectrum, due to Fano antiresonance and Kondo resonance, are discussed. The intradot electron's Coulomb interaction effect on the insulating band is also investigated. By controlling the coupling coefficient between the quantum dots, we can realise mutual transformation between Kondo resonance and Fano antiresonance at the Fermi level. The spin-orbit coupling and magnetic field's influence on the Kondo resonance peak are discussed in detail. Finally, spin magnetic moment and orbital magnetic moment of electrons in the quantum dot by applying parallel magnetic field are also predicted.

  10. Fano antiresonance and Kondo resonance for electronic transport through a laterally coupled carbon-nanotube quantum-dot system

    We present nonequilibrium Green function calculations for electronic transport through a laterally coupled carbon-nanotube quantum-dot system. In this system, a one-dimensional double carbon nanotube quantum dot attached to polarised electrodes forms a main channel for electronic tunnelling. Each carbon nanotube quantum dot in the main channel couples to a dangling carbon nanotube quantum dot. Then, the conductance spectrum is calculated. The insulating band and resonance peak in this spectrum, due to Fano antiresonance and Kondo resonance, are discussed. The intradot electron's Coulomb interaction effect on the insulating band is also investigated. By controlling the coupling coefficient between the quantum dots, we can realise mutual transformation between Kondo resonance and Fano antiresonance at the Fermi level. The spin-orbit coupling and magnetic field's influence on the Kondo resonance peak are discussed in detail. Finally, spin magnetic moment and orbital magnetic moment of electrons in the quantum dot by applying parallel magnetic field are also predicted.

  11. Theory of valley-dependent transport in graphene-based lateral quantum structures

    Chen, Feng-Wu; Chou, Mei-Yin; Chen, Yiing-Rei; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2016-08-01

    Modulation of electronic states in two-dimensional materials can be achieved by using in-plane variations of the band gap or the average potential in lateral quantum structures. In the atomic configurations with hexagonal symmetry, this approach makes it possible to tailor the valleytronic properties for potential device applications. In this work, we present a multiband theory to calculate the valley-dependent electron transport in graphene-based lateral quantum structures. As an example, we consider the structures with a single interface that exhibits an energy gap or potential discontinuity. The theoretical formalism proceeds within the tight-binding description, by first deriving the local bulk complex band structures in the regions of a constant gap or potential and, next, joining the local wave functions across the interface via a cell-averaged current operator to ensure the current continuity. The theory is applied to the study of electron reflection off and transmission through an interface. Both reflection and transmission are found to exhibit valley-contrast behavior that can be used to generate valley-polarized electron sources. The results vary with the type of interfaces, as well as between monolayer and bilayer graphene-based structures. In the monolayer case, the valley contrast originates from the band warping and only becomes sizable for incident carriers of high energy, whereas in AB-stacked bilayer graphene, the vertical interlayer coupling emerges as an additional important cause for valley contrast, and the favorable carrier energy is also found to be drastically lower. Our numerical results clearly demonstrate the propitious valleytronic properties of bilayer graphene structures.

  12. NATO Advanced Study Institute on International Summer School on Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    Collet, P; Métens, S; Neishtadt, A; Zaslavsky, G; Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    2005-01-01

    This book offers a modern updated review on the most important activities in today dynamical systems and statistical mechanics by some of the best experts in the domain. It gives a contemporary and pedagogical view on theories of classical and quantum chaos and complexity in hamiltonian and ergodic systems and their applications to anomalous transport in fluids, plasmas, oceans and atom-optic devices and to control of chaotic transport. The book is issued from lecture notes of the International Summer School on "Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems" held in Cargèse (Corsica) 18th to the 30th August 2003. It reflects the spirit of the School to provide lectures at the post-doctoral level on basic concepts and tools. The first part concerns ergodicity and mixing, complexity and entropy functions, SRB measures, fractal dimensions and bifurcations in hamiltonian systems. Then, models of dynamical evolutions of transport processes in classical and quantum systems have been largely expla...

  13. Time-dependent quantum many-body systems. Linear response, electronic transport, and reduced density matrices

    In part I of this work we present a double-pole approximation (DPA) to the response equations of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The double-pole approximation provides an exact description of systems with two strongly coupled excitations which are isolated from the rest of the spectrum. In contrast to the traditional single-pole approximation of TDDFT the DPA also yields corrections to the Kohn-Sham oscillator strengths. We also demonstrate how to invert the double-pole solution which allows us to predict matrix elements of the exchange-correlation kernel fxc from experimental input. We attempt some first steps towards a time-dependent generalization of reduced density matrix functional theory (RDMFT). In part II we derive equations of motion for natural orbitals and occupation numbers. Using the equation of motion for the occupation numbers we show that an adiabatic extension of presently known ground-state functionals of static RDMFT always leads to occupation numbers which are constant in time. From the stationary conditions of the equations of motion for the N-body correlations (correlated parts of the N-body matrices) we derive a new class of ground-state functionals which can be used in static RDMFT. Applications are presented for a one-dimensional model system where the time-dependent many-body Schroedinger equation can be propagated numerically. We use optimal control theory to find optimized laser pulses for transitions in a model for atomic Helium. From the numerically exact correlated wavefunction we extract the exact time evolution of natural orbitals and occupation numbers for (i) laser-driven Helium and (ii) electron-ion scattering. Part III of this work considers time-dependent quantum transport within TDDFT. We present an algorithm for the calculation of extended eigenstates of single-particle Hamiltonians which is especially tailored to a finite-difference discretization of the Schroedinger equation. We consider the propagation of

  14. Time-dependent quantum many-body systems. Linear response, electronic transport, and reduced density matrices

    Appel, H.

    2007-05-15

    In part I of this work we present a double-pole approximation (DPA) to the response equations of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The double-pole approximation provides an exact description of systems with two strongly coupled excitations which are isolated from the rest of the spectrum. In contrast to the traditional single-pole approximation of TDDFT the DPA also yields corrections to the Kohn-Sham oscillator strengths. We also demonstrate how to invert the double-pole solution which allows us to predict matrix elements of the exchange-correlation kernel f{sub xc} from experimental input. We attempt some first steps towards a time-dependent generalization of reduced density matrix functional theory (RDMFT). In part II we derive equations of motion for natural orbitals and occupation numbers. Using the equation of motion for the occupation numbers we show that an adiabatic extension of presently known ground-state functionals of static RDMFT always leads to occupation numbers which are constant in time. From the stationary conditions of the equations of motion for the N-body correlations (correlated parts of the N-body matrices) we derive a new class of ground-state functionals which can be used in static RDMFT. Applications are presented for a one-dimensional model system where the time-dependent many-body Schroedinger equation can be propagated numerically. We use optimal control theory to find optimized laser pulses for transitions in a model for atomic Helium. From the numerically exact correlated wavefunction we extract the exact time evolution of natural orbitals and occupation numbers for (i) laser-driven Helium and (ii) electron-ion scattering. Part III of this work considers time-dependent quantum transport within TDDFT. We present an algorithm for the calculation of extended eigenstates of single-particle Hamiltonians which is especially tailored to a finite-difference discretization of the Schroedinger equation. We consider the

  15. Dynamic thermoelectric and heat transport in mesoscopic capacitors

    Lim, Jong-Soo; López, Rosa; Sánchez, David

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the low-frequency response of charge and heat transport to oscillatory voltage and temperature shifts in mesoscopic capacitors. We obtain, within scattering theory, generic expressions for the quantum admittances up to second order in the ac frequencies in terms of electric, thermoelectric, and heat capacitances and relaxation resistances. Remarkably, we find that the thermocurrent can lead or lag the applied temperature depending on the gate voltage applied to a quantum RC circuit...

  16. Quantum statistical description of transport of the quasi-particles in optic fibers

    On the basis of BBGKY hierarchy of quantum kinetic equations the quasi-quantum analogue of the linearized wave equation for one, two quasi-particles in optic fiber is obtained. The method which enables to obtain the quasi-quantum analogue of wave equations for any number of quasi- particles in fiber is suggested. (author)

  17. Semiconductor quantum dots in polyelectrolyte polymers: multilayered self-assembly and charge transfer and transport processes

    Full text: Polyacrylate-capped Q-CdS were synthesized and self-assembled as multilayers in poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) on different surfaces by virtue of the Coulombic attraction between the negatively charged capping agent and the cationic polyelectrolyte polymer. TEM imaging and electron diffraction measurements revealed the growth of 3-4 nm size CdS quantum crystallites, having a zinc blende lattice structure. The layer-by-layer assembly of Q-CdS in the polymer by means of consecutive surface-charge reversal was characterized using UV-visible absorption, photoluminescence, FT-IR spectroscopy and ellipsometry; revealing the linear assembly of not more than a monolayer of nanoparticles per bilayer. Photo-induced charge transfer and transport processes at these nano structured photo electrodes were studied by photoelectrochemical means, revealing novel behavior markedly different from bulk solids. In these studies, either anodic or cathodic photocurrents were measured depending on the applied potential; a behavior attributed to the quantized properties of the nanoparticles. The potential at which the photocurrent reversed in direction was found to shift by-66 mV per pH unit, tracking the shift in the redox energies of water oxidation, oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution. Photocurrent transients were featured at the onsets of light and are attributed to surface-states mediated charge transfer. Charge transfer and transport processes at the Q-films are modeled, accounting for the bidirectional current flow and its dependence on the electrode potential, the Fermi levels of the redox couples and the nanoparticles surface

  18. Universal low-temperature Ohmic contacts for quantum transport in transition metal dichalcogenides

    Xu, Shuigang; Wu, Zefei; Lu, Huanhuan; Han, Yu; Long, Gen; Chen, Xiaolong; Han, Tianyi; Ye, Weiguang; Wu, Yingying; Lin, Jiangxiazi; Shen, Junying; Cai, Yuan; He, Yuheng; Zhang, Fan; Lortz, Rolf; Cheng, Chun; Wang, Ning

    2016-06-01

    Low carrier mobility and high electrical contact resistance are two major obstacles prohibiting explorations of quantum transport in TMDCs. Here, we demonstrate an effective method to establish low-temperature Ohmic contacts in boron nitride encapsulated TMDC devices based on selective etching and conventional electron-beam evaporation of metal electrodes. This method works for most extensively studied TMDCs in recent years, including MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2, WS2, and 2H-MoTe2. Low electrical contact resistance is achieved at 2 K. All of the few-layer TMDC devices studied show excellent performance with remarkably improved field-effect mobilities ranging from 2300 to 16 000 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, as verified by the high carrier mobilities extracted from Hall effect measurements. Moreover, both high-mobility n-type and p-type TMDC channels can be realized by simply using appropriate contact metals. Prominent Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations have been observed and investigated in these high-quality TMDC devices.

  19. Quantum ballistic transport by interacting two-electron states in quasi-one-dimensional channels

    For quantum ballistic transport of electrons through a short conduction channel, the role of Coulomb interaction may significantly modify the energy levels of two-electron states at low temperatures as the channel becomes wide. In this regime, the Coulomb effect on the two-electron states is calculated and found to lead to four split energy levels, including two anticrossing-level and two crossing-level states. Moreover, due to the interplay of anticrossing and crossing effects, our calculations reveal that the ground two-electron state will switch from one anticrossing state (strong confinement) to a crossing state (intermediate confinement) as the channel width gradually increases and then back to the original anticrossing state (weak confinement) as the channel width becomes larger than a threshold value. This switching behavior leaves a footprint in the ballistic conductance as well as in the diffusion thermoelectric power of electrons. Such a switching is related to the triple spin degeneracy as well as to the Coulomb repulsion in the central region of the channel, which separates two electrons away and pushes them to different channel edges. The conductance reoccurrence region expands from the weak to the intermediate confinement regime with increasing electron density

  20. Fingerprint of different spin-orbit terms for spin transport in HgTe quantum wells

    Rothe, D G; Reinthaler, R W; Liu, C-X; Hankiewicz, E M [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Molenkamp, L W [Physikalisches Institut (EP3), Universitaet Wuerzburg, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Zhang, S-C, E-mail: hankiewicz@physik.uni-wuerzburg.d [Department of Physics, McCullough Building, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4045 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Using k{center_dot}p theory, we derive an effective four-band model describing the physics of the typical two-dimensional topological insulator (HgTe/CdTe quantum well (QW)) in the presence of an out-of-plane (in the z-direction) inversion breaking potential and an in-plane potential. We find that up to third order in perturbation theory, only the inversion breaking potential generates new elements to the four-band Hamiltonian that are off-diagonal in spin space. When this new effective Hamiltonian is folded into an effective two-band model for the conduction (electron) or valence (heavy hole) bands, two competing terms appear: (i) a Rashba spin-orbit interaction originating from inversion breaking potential in the z-direction and (ii) an in-plane Pauli term as a consequence of the in-plane potential. Spin transport in the conduction band is further analysed within the Landauer-Buettiker formalism. We find that for asymmetrically doped HgTe QWs, the behaviour of the spin-Hall conductance is dominated by the Rashba term.

  1. Quantum ballistic transport by interacting two-electron states in quasi-one-dimensional channels

    Huang, Danhong [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard St SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Gumbs, Godfrey [Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard St SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Abranyos, Yonatan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Pepper, Michael; Kumar, Sanjeev [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    For quantum ballistic transport of electrons through a short conduction channel, the role of Coulomb interaction may significantly modify the energy levels of two-electron states at low temperatures as the channel becomes wide. In this regime, the Coulomb effect on the two-electron states is calculated and found to lead to four split energy levels, including two anticrossing-level and two crossing-level states. Moreover, due to the interplay of anticrossing and crossing effects, our calculations reveal that the ground two-electron state will switch from one anticrossing state (strong confinement) to a crossing state (intermediate confinement) as the channel width gradually increases and then back to the original anticrossing state (weak confinement) as the channel width becomes larger than a threshold value. This switching behavior leaves a footprint in the ballistic conductance as well as in the diffusion thermoelectric power of electrons. Such a switching is related to the triple spin degeneracy as well as to the Coulomb repulsion in the central region of the channel, which separates two electrons away and pushes them to different channel edges. The conductance reoccurrence region expands from the weak to the intermediate confinement regime with increasing electron density.

  2. Anisotropic quantum transport in a network of vertically aligned graphene sheets

    Novel anisotropic quantum transport was observed in a network of vertically aligned graphene sheets (VAGSs), which can be regarded as composed of plenty of quasi-parallel, nearly intrinsic, freestanding monolayers of graphene. When a magnetic field was perpendicular to most graphene sheets, magnetoresistance (MR) curves showed a weak localization (WL) effect at low field and a maximum value at a critical field ascribed to diffusive boundary scattering. While the magnetic field was parallel to the graphene sheets, the MR maximum disappeared and exhibited a transition from WL to weak antilocalization (WAL) with increasing temperature and magnetic field. Edges as atomically sharp defects are the main elastic and inelastic intervalley scattering sources, and inelastic scattering is ascribed to electron–electron intervalley scattering in the ballistic regime. This is the first time simultaneously observing WL, WAL and diffusive boundary scattering in such a macroscopic three-dimensional graphene system. These indicate the VAGS network is a robust platform for the study of the intrinsic physical properties of graphene. (paper)

  3. Effective bias and potentials in steady-state quantum transport: A NEGF reverse-engineering study

    Karlsson, Daniel; Verdozzi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Using non-equilibrium Green's functions combined with many-body perturbation theory, we have calculated steady-state densities and currents through short interacting chains subject to a finite electric bias. By using a steady-state reverse-engineering procedure, the effective potential and bias which reproduce such densities and currents in a non-interacting system have been determined. The role of the effective bias is characterised with the aid of the so-called exchange-correlation bias, recently introduced in a steady-state density-functional- theory formulation for partitioned systems. We find that the effective bias (or, equivalently, the exchange-correlation bias) depends strongly on the interaction strength and the length of the central (chain) region. Moreover, it is rather sensitive to the level of many-body approximation used. Our study shows the importance of the effective/exchange-correlation bias out of equilibrium, thereby offering hints on how to improve the description of density- functional-theory based approaches to quantum transport.

  4. Carrier transport in quantum dot quantum well microstructures of the self-assembled CdTe/CdS/ligand core-shell system

    Li, K. Y.; Shan, Q. S.; Zhu, R. P.; Yin, H.; Lin, Y. Y.; Wang, L. Q.

    2015-04-01

    The study on the quantum dot quantum well (QDQW) microstructure modified by choosing different ligands containing a sulfhydryl group is of significance because it enables one to regulate photoexcited free charge carriers' (FCCs') transport behaviours in high-quality CdTe/ligand QDs via a self-assembled way. The photoelectron characteristics of ligand-capped CdTe nanoparticles were probed by a combination of surface photovoltaic (SPV) and photoacoustic technologies, supplemented by a computer simulation method of the CASTEP module. The experiment reveals that the D-value ΔEWi obtained by the associated two parameters of the SPV spectroscopy was closely related to the quantum confinement energy in the self-assembled CdTe/CdS/ligand core-shell system. In the paper the D-value was termed the depth of QWs, which were buried in the space charge regions located in the graded-band-gap and on either side of the shell-CdS. Obvious resonance quantum tunnelling may occur in the energy band structure with deep QWs on using certain ligands, resulting in an extended diffusion length of the FCCs on illumination of the photon energy hν >= Eg, core-CdTe, and in a strong SPV response at a specific wavelength region. In addition, the carrier-longitudinal optical phonon interaction is the reciprocal of the carriers' lifetime. The d-frontier orbital in the graded-band-gap plays an important role in both the microstructure and the resonance quantum tunnelling of the QDQW system according to the CASTEP calculations.The study on the quantum dot quantum well (QDQW) microstructure modified by choosing different ligands containing a sulfhydryl group is of significance because it enables one to regulate photoexcited free charge carriers' (FCCs') transport behaviours in high-quality CdTe/ligand QDs via a self-assembled way. The photoelectron characteristics of ligand-capped CdTe nanoparticles were probed by a combination of surface photovoltaic (SPV) and photoacoustic technologies

  5. Hellmann-Feynman theorem and the definition of forces in quantum time-dependent and transport problems

    The conventional Hellmann-Feynman theorem for the definition of forces on nuclei is not directly applicable to quantum time-dependent and transport problems. We present a rigorous derivation of a general Hellmann-Feynman-like theorem that applies to all quantum mechanical systems and reduces to well-known results for ground-state problems. It provides a rigorous definition of forces in time-dependent and transport problems. Explicit forms of Pulay-like forces are derived and the conditions for them to be zero are identified. A practical scheme for ab initio calculations of current-induced forces is described and the study of the transfer of a Si atom between two electrodes is presented as an example. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  6. Minding one's P's and Q's: From the one loop effective action in quantum field theory to classical transport theory

    The one loop effective action in quantum field theory can be expressed as a quantum mechanical path integral over world lines, with internal symmetries represented by Grassmanian variables. In this paper, we develop a real time, many body, world line formalism for the one loop effective action. In particular, we study hot QCD and obtain the classical transport equations which, as Litim and Manuel have shown, reduce in the appropriate limit to the non-Abelian Boltzmann-Langevin equation first obtained by Boedeker. In the Vlasov limit, the classical kinetic equations are those that correspond to the hard thermal loop effective action. We also discuss the imaginary time world line formalism for a hot φ4 theory, and elucidate its relation to classical transport theory. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  7. Renormalized Linear Kinetic Theory as Derived from Quantum Field Theory --- a novel diagrammatic method for computing transport coefficients ---

    Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel diagrammatic method for computing transport coefficients in relativistic quantum field theory. Our method is based on a reformulation and extension of the diagrammatic method by Eliashberg given in the imaginary-time formalism to the relativistic quantum field theory. It is known that although transport coefficients are expressed as specific two-point functions via Kubo formula, naive perturbation theory based on loop expansions for computing the two-point functions breaks down owing to the so called pinch singularity, and hence resummation is required for getting a finite and sensible result. In our novel resummation method, we first identify diagrams with the pinch singularity and decompose the two-point function into a singular and a regular part diagrammatically, and then the diagrams with the singularity are resummed using a self-consistent equation or an integral equation. We confirm that the self-consistent equation in the leading order of the coupling constant gives a kinetic equati...

  8. Minding one's P's and Q's from the one loop effective action in quantum field theory to classical transport theory

    Jalilian-Marian, J; Venugopalan, R; Wirstam, J; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Jeon, Sangyong; Venugopalan, Raju; Wirstam, Jens

    2000-01-01

    The one loop effective action in quantum field theory can be expressed as a quantum mechanical path integral over world lines, with internal symmetries represented by Grassmanian variables. In this paper, we develop a real time, many body, world line formalism for the one loop effective action. In particular, we study hot QCD and obtain the classical transport equations which, as Litim and Manuel have shown, reduce in the appropriate limit to the non-Abelian Boltzmann-Langevin equation first obtained by Bödeker. In the Vlasov limit, the classical kinetic equations are those that correspond to the hard thermal loop effective action. We also discuss the imaginary time world line formalism for a hot $\\phi^4$ theory, and elucidate its relation to classical transport theory.

  9. Piezoelectric polarization and quantum size effects on the vertical transport in AlGaN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes

    H, Dakhlaoui; S, Almansour

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the electronic properties of resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) based on GaN-Al x Ga(1‑x)N double barriers are investigated by using the non-equilibrium Green functions formalism (NEG). These materials each present a wide conduction band discontinuity and a strong internal piezoelectric field, which greatly affect the electronic transport properties. The electronic density, the transmission coefficient, and the current–voltage characteristics are computed with considering the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations. The influence of the quantum size on the transmission coefficient is analyzed by varying GaN quantum well thickness, Al x Ga(1‑x)N width, and the aluminum concentration x Al. The results show that the transmission coefficient more strongly depends on the thickness of the quantum well than the barrier; it exhibits a series of resonant peaks and valleys as the quantum well width increases. In addition, it is found that the negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current–voltage (I–V) characteristic strongly depends on aluminum concentration x Al. It is shown that the peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) increases with x Al value decreasing. These findings open the door for developing vertical transport nitrides-based ISB devices such as THz lasers and detectors. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research of University of Dammam (Grant No. 2014137).

  10. Quantum transport of two-species Dirac fermions in dual-gated three-dimensional topological insulators

    Xu, Yang; Miotkowski, Ireneusz; Chen, Yong P.

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators are a novel class of quantum matter with a gapped insulating bulk, yet gapless spin-helical Dirac fermion conducting surface states. Here, we report local and non-local electrical and magneto transport measurements in dual-gated BiSbTeSe2 thin film topological insulator devices, with conduction dominated by the spatially separated top and bottom surfaces, each hosting a single species of Dirac fermions with independent gate control over the carrier type and density. We observe many intriguing quantum transport phenomena in such a fully tunable two-species topological Dirac gas, including a zero-magnetic-field minimum conductivity close to twice the conductance quantum at the double Dirac point, a series of ambipolar two-component half-integer Dirac quantum Hall states and an electron-hole total filling factor zero state (with a zero-Hall plateau), exhibiting dissipationless (chiral) and dissipative (non-chiral) edge conduction, respectively. Such a system paves the way to explore rich physics, ranging from topological magnetoelectric effects to exciton condensation. PMID:27142344

  11. Anti-bias voltage electron-Kondo transport in a quantum dot device driven by a graphene sheet

    We theoretically investigate the manipulation of electron-Kondo transport through a single-quantum dot (QD) two-electrode device by introducing a side-coupled graphene sheet. It is shown that with increase of coupling strength between the QD and the zero-potential graphene sheet, the anti-bias voltage capability of the QD–electrode Kondo resonance is improved obviously. This causes a high-conductance QD–electrode channel to be opened up for electron transport within a wide bias voltage range. Moreover, the conductance/current of the Kondo channel can be accurately controlled by adjusting the potential of the graphene sheet. These results may be useful for the observation of nonequilibrium Kondo effect and the design of high-conductance control device. - Highlights: • We propose a scheme to enhance the anti-bias voltage capability of the Kondo resonance in a quantum dot device. • A high-differential conductance electron channel is opened up in a quantum dot device by a graphene sheet. • A conductance/current regulating valve is realized in a quantum dot device by a graphene sheet

  12. Spin-Polarized Transport through the T-Shaped Double Quantum Dots with Fano-Kondo Interaction

    YANG Fu-Bin; WU Shao-Quan; SUN Wei-Li

    2007-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin-polarized transport properties of the T-shaped double quantum dots coupled to two ferromagnetic leads by the Anderson Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian is solved by means of the slave-boson mean-field theory. We calculate the density of states and the liner conductance in this system with both parallel and antiparallel lead-polarization alignments, and our results show that the transport properties of this system depend on both the tunnelling strength between the two dots and the spin-polarized strength p. This system is a possible candidate for spin valve transistors in the spintronics.

  13. Electron transport of a quantum wire containing a finite-size impurity under THz electromagnetic field illumination

    Zhou, Guanghui; Li, Yuan; Cheng, Fang; Liao, Wenfu

    2005-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron transport properties for a semiconductor quantum wire containing a single finite-size attractive impurity under an external terahertz electromagnetic field illumination in the ballistic limit. Within the effective mass free-electron approximation, the scattering matrix for the system has been formulated by means of a time-dependent mode matching method. Some interesting properties of the electron transmission for the system have been shown through a f...

  14. Structural fluctuations and quantum transport through DNA molecular wires: a combined molecular dynamics and model Hamiltonian approach

    Gutierrez, R.; Caetano, R.; Woiczikowski, P. B.; Kubar, T.; Elstner, M; Cuniberti, G.

    2009-01-01

    Charge transport through a short DNA oligomer (Dickerson dodecamer) in presence of structural fluctuations is investigated using a hybrid computational methodology based on a combination of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations with a model Hamiltonian approach. Based on a fragment orbital description, the DNA electronic structure can be coarse-grained in a very efficient way. The influence of dynamical fluctuations arising either fr...

  15. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    Ncube, Siphephile; Chimowa, George; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath, E-mail: Somnath.Bhattacharyya@wits.ac.za [Nano-Scale Transport Physics Laboratory, School of Physics and DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2014-07-14

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2–300 K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80–300 K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65 GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  16. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2–300 K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80–300 K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65 GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  17. Comparison of DC and AC Transport in 1.5-7.5 nm Oligophenylene Imine Molecular Wires across Two Junction Platforms: Eutectic Ga-In versus Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscope Junctions.

    Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Demissie, Abel T; Yuan, Li; Wang, Tao; Frisbie, C Daniel; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-06-15

    We have utilized DC and AC transport measurements to measure the resistance and capacitance of thin films of conjugated oligophenyleneimine (OPI) molecules ranging from 1.5 to 7.5 nm in length. These films were synthesized on Au surfaces utilizing the imine condensation chemistry between terephthalaldehyde and 1,4-benzenediamine. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy yielded molecular tilt angles of 33-43°. To probe DC and AC transport, we employed Au-S-OPI//GaOx/EGaIn junctions having contact areas of 9.6 × 10(2) μm(2) (10(9) nm(2)) and compared to previously reported DC results on the same OPI system obtained using Au-S-OPI//Au conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) junctions with 50 nm(2) areas. We found that intensive observables agreed very well across the two junction platforms. Specifically, the EGaIn-based junctions showed: (i) a crossover from tunneling to hopping transport at molecular lengths near 4 nm; (ii) activated transport for wires >4 nm in length with an activation energy of 0.245 ± 0.008 eV for OPI-7; (iii) exponential dependence of conductance with molecular length with a decay constant β = 2.84 ± 0.18 nm(-1) (DC) and 2.92 ± 0.13 nm(-1) (AC) in the tunneling regime, and an apparent β = 1.01 ± 0.08 nm(-1) (DC) and 0.99 ± 0.11 nm(-1) (AC) in the hopping regime; (iv) previously unreported dielectric constant of 4.3 ± 0.2 along the OPI wires. However, the absolute resistances of Au-S-OPI//GaOx/EGaIn junctions were approximately 100 times higher than the corresponding CP-AFM junctions due to differences in metal-molecule contact resistances between the two platforms. PMID:27172452

  18. Simultaneous distribution of AC and DC power

    Polese, Luigi Gentile

    2015-09-15

    A system and method for the transport and distribution of both AC (alternating current) power and DC (direct current) power over wiring infrastructure normally used for distributing AC power only, for example, residential and/or commercial buildings' electrical wires is disclosed and taught. The system and method permits the combining of AC and DC power sources and the simultaneous distribution of the resulting power over the same wiring. At the utilization site a complementary device permits the separation of the DC power from the AC power and their reconstruction, for use in conventional AC-only and DC-only devices.

  19. Acoustoconductance of quantum contacts

    Blencowe, M. P.; Shik, A. Y.

    1998-01-01

    We describe theoretically the acoustoconductance (AC) of quantum contacts. One characteristic of a contact which distinguishes it from a long, uniform wire is a strong, energy-dependent transmission probability. This has several consequences for AC. Electrons which are forward scattered by phonons can contribute to AC and, furthermore, AC can have positive sign (i.e. a conductance-increase under the influence of phonons). By contrast, for uniform wires only backscattered electrons contribute ...

  20. Quantum Statistical Mechanics

    Schieve, William C.; Horwitz, Lawrence P.

    2009-04-01

    1. Foundations of quantum statistical mechanics; 2. Elementary examples; 3. Quantum statistical master equation; 4. Quantum kinetic equations; 5. Quantum irreversibility; 6. Entropy and dissipation: the microscopic theory; 7. Global equilibrium: thermostatics and the microcanonical ensemble; 8. Bose-Einstein ideal gas condensation; 9. Scaling, renormalization and the Ising model; 10. Relativistic covariant statistical mechanics of many particles; 11. Quantum optics and damping; 12. Entanglements; 13. Quantum measurement and irreversibility; 14. Quantum Langevin equation: quantum Brownian motion; 15. Linear response: fluctuation and dissipation theorems; 16. Time dependent quantum Green's functions; 17. Decay scattering; 18. Quantum statistical mechanics, extended; 19. Quantum transport with tunneling and reservoir ballistic transport; 20. Black hole thermodynamics; Appendix; Index.

  1. Transport through an Anderson impurity: Current ringing, nonlinear magnetization, and a direct comparison of continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo and hierarchical quantum master equations

    Härtle, R.; Cohen, G.; Reichman, D. R.; Millis, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    We give a detailed comparison of the hierarchical quantum master equation (HQME) method to a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (CT-QMC) approach, assessing the usability of these numerically exact schemes as impurity solvers in practical nonequilibrium calculations. We review the main characteristics of the methods and discuss the scaling of the associated numerical effort. We substantiate our discussion with explicit numerical results for the nonequilibrium transport properties of a single-site Anderson impurity. The numerical effort of the HQME scheme scales linearly with the simulation time but increases (at worst exponentially) with decreasing temperature. In contrast, CT-QMC is less restricted by temperature at short times, but in general the cost of going to longer times is also exponential. After establishing the numerical exactness of the HQME scheme, we use it to elucidate the influence of different ways to induce transport through the impurity on the initial dynamics, discuss the phenomenon of coherent current oscillations, known as current ringing, and explain the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the steady-state magnetization as a result of competing broadening effects. We also elucidate the pronounced nonlinear magnetization dynamics, which appears on intermediate time scales in the presence of an asymmetric coupling to the electrodes.

  2. Electronic Conduction through Atomic Chains, Quantum Well and Quantum Wire

    Charge transport is dynamically and strongly linked with atomic structure, in nanostructures. We report our ab-initio calculations on electronic transport through atomic chains and the model calculations on electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates in presence of random impurity potential in a quantum well and in a quantum wire. We computed synthesis and ballistic transport through; (a) C and Si based atomic chains attached to metallic electrodes, (b) armchair (AC), zigzag (ZZ), mixed, rotated-AC and rotated-ZZ geometries of small molecules made of 2S, 6C and 4H atoms attaching to metallic electrodes, and (c) carbon atomic chain attached to graphene electrodes. Computed results show that synthesis of various atomic chains are practically possible and their transmission coefficients are nonzero for a wide energy range. The ab-initio calculations on electronic transport have been performed with the use of Landauer-type scattering formalism formulated in terms of Grben's functions in combination with ground-state DFT. The electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates have been calculated as function of excitation energy both at zero and finite temperatures for disordered 2D and 1D systems. Our model calculations suggest that electron scattering rates in a disordered system are mainly governed by effective dimensionality of a system, carrier concentration and dynamical screening effects.

  3. Spin-dependent coherent transport in a double quantum dot system

    Petrosyan, L. S.; Shahbazyan, T. V.

    2015-09-01

    We study spin-resolved resonant tunneling in a system of two quantum dots sandwiched between doped quantum wells. In the coherent (Dicke) regime, i.e., when quantum dot separation is smaller than the Fermi wavelength in a two-dimensional electron gas in quantum wells, application of an in-plane magnetic field leads to a pronounced spin-resolved structure of conductance peak line shape even for very small Zeeman splitting of the quantum dots' resonant levels. In the presence of electron-gas spin-orbit coupling, this spin-resolved structure is washed out due to Fermi surface deformation in the momentum space. We also show that Aharonov-Bohm flux penetrating the area enclosed by tunneling electron pathways completely destroys the conductance spin structure.

  4. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of charge transport in organic materials: Numerical benchmark of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model

    The electron-phonon coupling is critical in determining the intrinsic charge carrier and exciton transport properties in organic materials. In this study, we consider a Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model for molecular crystals, and perform numerical benchmark studies for different strategies of simulating the mixed quantum-classical dynamics. These methods, which differ in the selection of initial conditions and the representation used to solve the time evolution of the quantum carriers, are shown to yield similar equilibrium diffusion properties. A hybrid approach combining molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear motion and quantum-chemical calculations of the electronic Hamiltonian at each geometric configuration appears as an attractive strategy to model charge dynamics in large size systems ''on the fly,'' yet it relies on the assumption that the quantum carriers do not impact the nuclear dynamics. We find that such an approximation systematically results in overestimated charge-carrier mobilities, with the associated error being negligible when the room-temperature mobility exceeds ∼4.8 cm2/Vs (∼0.14 cm2/Vs) in one-dimensional (two-dimensional) crystals.

  5. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Tyszka, K. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Św. A. Boboli 8, 02-525 Warsaw (Poland); Moraru, D.; Samanta, A.; Mizuno, T.; Tabe, M., E-mail: romtabe@rie.shizuoka.ac.jp [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Jabłoński, R. [Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Św. A. Boboli 8, 02-525 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-06-28

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., “donor-atom” quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., “donor-cluster” quantum dots. The potential depth of these “donor-cluster” quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots.

  6. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., “donor-atom” quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., “donor-cluster” quantum dots. The potential depth of these “donor-cluster” quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots

  7. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Tyszka, K.; Moraru, D.; Samanta, A.; Mizuno, T.; Jabłoński, R.; Tabe, M.

    2015-06-01

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., "donor-atom" quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., "donor-cluster" quantum dots. The potential depth of these "donor-cluster" quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots.

  8. Bound states in the continuum and Fano antiresonance in electronic transport through a four-quantum-dot system

    We study the electronic transport through a four-quantum-dot (FQD) structure with a diamond-like shape through nonequilibrium Green's function theory. It is observed that the bound state in the continuum (BIC) appears in this multiple QDs system, and the position of the BIC in the total density of states (TDOS) spectrum is tightly determined by the strength of the electronic hopping between the upper QD and the lower one. As the symmetry in the energy levels in these two QDs is broken, the BIC is suppressed to a general conductance peak with a finite width, and meanwhile a Fano-type antiresonance with a zero point appears in the conductance spectrum. These results will develop our understanding of the BICs and their spintronic device applications of spin filter and quantum computing.

  9. In-plane electrical transport across cavity-quantum well system in Bose-Einstein condensate phase

    Xie, Ming; MacDonald, Allan

    Cavity polaritons are coupled states of quantum well excitons and vertical cavity photons which can undergo Bose-Einstein condensation under appropriate circumstances. The macroscopic condensate state can be described by two coupled order parameters - the coherent exciton field and the coherent photon field. When the dominant process for electron transfer between conduction and valence bands is by scattering off the photon condensate, electrical bias voltages can be used to control the condensate. We study the in-plane transport properties of electrical current through the cavity-quantum well system, and show how the coherent photon fields respond to the current flow. The possibility of tailoring light via electrical current and vice versa simultaneously might lead to interesting new applications.

  10. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide

  11. An entropic Quantum Drift-Diffusion model for electron transport in resonant tunneling diodes

    Degond, Pierre; Gallego, Samy; Méhats, Florian

    2007-01-01

    International audience We present an entropic Quantum Drift Diffusion model (eQDD) and show how it can be derived on a bounded domain as the diffusive approximation of the Quantum Liouville equation with a quantum BGK operator. Some links between this model and other existing models are exhibited, especially with the Density Gradient (DG) model and the Schrödinger-Poisson Drift Diffusion model (SPDD). Then a finite difference scheme is proposed to discretize the eQDD model coupled to the P...

  12. Metal–insulator transition in the quasi-one-dimensional transport of fractional quantum hall states

    We investigate edge state transmission in quantum point contacts (QPCs) in the fractional quantum-Hall regime, finding behavior reminiscent of a metal–insulator transition. The transition is suggested by an unusual behavior of the differential conductance in the fractional-quantum-Hall regime, and by the presence of a fixed point and universal scaling in the temperature dependence of the linear conductance. Noting that the 0.7 feature evolves continuously into a last fractional plateau at high magnetic fields, we suggest that this still unresolved feature may itself be viewed as a manifestation of a local, microscopic, metal–insulator transition. (fast track communication)

  13. Resonant electronic transport through a triple quantum-dot with Λ-type level structure under dual radiation fields

    Due to quantum interference, light can transmit through dense atomic media, a phenomenon known as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We propose that EIT is not limited to light transmission and there is an electronic analog where resonant transparency in charge transport in an opaque structure can be induced by electromagnetic radiation. A triple-quantum-dots system with Λ-type level structure is generally opaque due to the level in the center dot being significantly higher and therefore hopping from the left dot to the center dot is almost forbidden. We demonstrate that an electromagnetically induced electron transparency (EIET) in charge of transport can indeed occur in the Λ-type system. The direct evidence of EIET is that an electron can travel from the left dot to the right dot, while the center dot apparently becomes invisible. We analyze EIET and the related shot noise in both the zero and strong Coulomb blockade regimes. It is found that the EIET (position, height, and symmetry) can be tuned by several controllable parameters of the radiation fields, such as the Rabi frequencies and detuning frequencies. The result offers a transparency/opaque tuning technique in charge transport using interfering radiation fields

  14. Nonlinear transport in coupled quantum dots:A stationary probability approach

    2009-01-01

    The stationary tunneling current and differential conductance of the coupled quantum dots system with split-gates are calculated by generalizing the Beenaker’s linear response theory for the description of the Coulomb-blockade oscillations of the conductance in the single quantum dot.The calculation of the charging diagram in parallel through the double dot as function of the two side-gate voltages shows a remarkable agreement with the recent experimental results by Hatano et al.

  15. Finite-time full counting statistics and factorial cumulants for transport through a quantum dot with normal and superconducting leads

    We study the finite-time full counting statistics for subgap transport through a single-level quantum dot tunnel-coupled to one normal and one superconducting lead. In particular, we determine the factorial and the ordinary cumulants both for finite times and in the long-time limit. We find that the factorial cumulants violate the sign criterion, indicating a non-binomial distribution, even in absence of Coulomb repulsion due to the presence of superconducting correlations. At short times the cumulants exhibit oscillations which are a signature of the coherent transfer of Cooper pairs between the dot and the superconductor. (paper)

  16. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    Fang, Jingtian; Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ˜66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ˜2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  17. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    Fang, Jingtian, E-mail: jingtian.fang@utdallas.edu; Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ∼66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ∼2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  18. Textured Nanoporous Mo:BiVO4 Photoanodes with High Charge Transport and Charge Transfer Quantum Efficiencies for Oxygen Evolution

    Nair, Vineet; Perkins, Craig L.; Lin, Qiyin; Law, Matt

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a simple spin coating method to make high-quality nanoporous photoelectrodes of monoclinic BiVO4 and studied the ability of these electrodes to transport photogenerated carriers to oxidize sulfite and water. Samples containing molybdenum and featuring [001] out-of-plane crystallographic texture show a photocurrent and external quantum efficiency (EQE) for sulfite oxidation as high as 3.1 mA cm-2 and 60%, respectively, at 1.23 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode. By using an optical model of the electrode stack to accurately determine the fraction of electrode absorptance due to the BiVO4 active layer, we estimate that on average 70 +/- 5% of all photogenerated carriers escape recombination. A comparison of internal quantum efficiency as a function of film processing, illumination direction, and film thickness shows that electron transport is efficient and hole transport limits the photocurrent (hole diffusion length <40 nm). We find that Mo addition primarily improves electron transport and texturing mostly improves hole transport. Mo enhances electron transport by thinning the surface depletion layer or passivating traps and recombination centers at grain boundaries and interfaces, while improved hole transport in textured films may result from more efficient lateral hole extraction due to the texturing itself or the reduced density of deep gap states observed in photoemission measurements. Photoemission data also reveal that the films have bismuth-rich, vanadium- and oxygen-deficient surface layers, while ion scattering spectroscopy indicates a Bi-V-O surface termination. Without added catalysts, the plain BiVO4 electrodes oxidized water with an initial photocurrent and peak EQE of 1.7 mA cm-2 and 30%, respectively, which equates to a hole transfer efficiency to water of >64% at 1.23 V. The electrodes quickly photocorrode during water oxidation but show good stability during sulfite oxidation and indefinite stability in the dark. By improving

  19. Quantum noise and quantum communication

    Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2004-05-01

    We show how the probabilistic interpretation of quantum mechanics leads to unavoidable quantum noise, even for deterministic evolution of the quantum state. Far from being a nuisance, this consequent quantum randomness is at the heart of new concepts in technology. We discuss explicitly the quantum random number generator based on the partitition noise at the beam splitter. Another application of quantum noise is quantum cryptography, where the randomness of the detection event leads to the generation of a random cryptographic key at two locations without the necessity of transporting that key from A to B. Finally, we will show how quantum noise is an intrinsically important part of quantum teleportation, and we conclude with a brief discussion of the possibilities of free-space quantum communication.

  20. Optimal and robust energy transport in light-harvesting complexes: (II) A quantum interplay of multichromophoric geometries and environmental interactions

    Mohseni, Masoud; Lloyd, Seth; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    Today, the physical principles for the high efficiency of excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes are still not fully understood. Notably, the degree of robustness of these systems for transporting energy is not known considering their realistic interactions with vibrational and radiative environments within the surrounding solvent and scaffold proteins. In this work, we employ an efficient technique to simulate ultrafast quantum dynamics of such complex excitonic systems in their non-equilibrium environment in the non-perturbative and non-Markovian regimes. We demonstrate that the natural dynamics of the FMO complex leads to optimum and stable energy transport due to a convergence of energy/time scales among important internal and external parameters. In particular, we show that the FMO energy transfer efficiency is optimal and robust with respect to all the relevant parameters of environmental interactions and Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian including reorganization energy \\lambda, bath frequen...

  1. Vibrational excitons in ionophores: Experimental probes for quantum coherence-assisted ion transport and selectivity in ion channels

    Ganim, Ziad; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2011-01-01

    Despite a large body of work, the exact molecular details underlying ion-selectivity and transport in the potassium channel have not been fully laid to rest. One major reason has been the lack of experimental methods that can probe these mechanisms dynamically on their biologically relevant time scales. Recently it was suggested that quantum coherence and its interplay with thermal vibration might be involved in mediating ion-selectivity and transport. In this work we present an experimental strategy for using time resolved infrared spectroscopy to investigate these effects. We show the feasibility by demonstrating the IR absorption and Raman spectroscopic signatures of potassium binding model molecules that mimic the transient interactions of potassium with binding sites of the selectivity filter during ion conduction. In addition to guide our experiments on the real system we have performed molecular dynamic-based simulations of the FTIR and 2DIR spectra of the entire KcsA complex, which is the largest comp...

  2. Spin interference and the Fano effect in electron transport through a mesoscopic ring side-coupled with a quantum dot

    We investigate the electron transport through a mesoscopic ring side-coupled with a quantum dot (QD) in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interaction. It is shown that both the Fano resonance and the spin interference effects play important roles in the electron transport properties. As the QD level is around the Fermi energy, the total conductance shows a typical Fano resonance line shape. By applying an electrical gate voltage to the QD, the total transmission through the system can be strongly modulated. By threading the mesoscopic ring with a magnetic flux, the time-reversal symmetry of the system is broken, and a spin polarized current can be obtained even though the incident current is unpolarized.

  3. Nonequilibrium transport via spin-induced subgap states in superconductor/quantum dot/normal metal cotunnel junctions

    Koerting, V.; Andersen, B. M.; Flensberg, K.; Paaske, J.

    2010-12-01

    We study low-temperature transport through a Coulomb blockaded quantum dot (QD) contacted by a normal (N) and a superconducting (S) electrode. Within an effective cotunneling model the conduction electron self-energy is calculated to leading order in the cotunneling amplitudes and subsequently resummed to obtain the nonequilibrium T matrix, from which we obtain the nonlinear cotunneling conductance. For even-occupied dots the system can be conceived as an effective S/N-cotunnel junction with subgap transport mediated by Andreev reflections. The net spin of an odd-occupied dot, however, leads to the formation of subgap resonances inside the superconducting gap which give rise to a characteristic peak-dip structure in the differential conductance, as observed in recent experiments.

  4. Topological quantum-phase coherence in full counting statistics of transport electrons with two-body interaction

    The full counting statistics of electron transport through two parallel quantum dots with antiparallel magnetic fluxes is investigated as a probe to detect the topological quantum-phase coherence (TQPC), which results in the characteristic oscillation of the zero-frequency cumulants including the shot noise and skewness. We show explicitly the phase transition of cumulant spectrum-patterns induced by the topology change of electron path-loops while the pattern period, which depends only on the topology (or Chern number), is robust against the variation of Coulomb interaction and interdot coupling strengths. Most importantly we report for the first time on a new type of TQPC, which is generated by the two-particle interaction and does not exist in the single-particle wave function interference. Moreover, the accurately quantized peaks of Fano-factor spectrum, which characterize the super- and sub-Poissonian shot noises, are of fundamental importance in technical applications similar to the superconducting quantum interference device. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  5. Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion models for transport in semiconductor devices

    In this paper, we propose a unified framework for Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion (QCDD) models in nanoscale semiconductor device simulation. QCDD models are presented as a suitable generalization of the classical drift-diffusion (DD) system, each particular model being identified by the constitutive relation for the quantum-correction to the electric potential. We examine two special, and relevant, examples of QCDD models; the first one is the modified DD model named Schroedinger-Poisson-drift-diffusion, and the second one is the quantum-drift-diffusion (QDD) model. For the decoupled solution of the two models, we introduce a functional iteration technique that extends the classical Gummel algorithm widely used in the iterative solution of the DD system. We discuss the finite element discretization of the various differential subsystems, with special emphasis on their stability properties, and illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithms and models on the numerical simulation of nanoscale devices in two spatial dimensions

  6. An entropic quantum drift-diffusion model for electron transport in resonant tunneling diodes

    We present an entropic quantum drift-diffusion model (eQDD) and show how it can be derived on a bounded domain as the diffusive approximation of the Quantum Liouville equation with a quantum BGK operator. Some links between this model and other existing models are exhibited, especially with the density gradient (DG) model and the Schroedinger-Poisson drift-diffusion model (SPDD). Then a finite difference scheme is proposed to discretize the eQDD model coupled to the Poisson equation and we show how this scheme can be slightly modified to discretize the other models. Numerical results show that the properties listed for the eQDD model are checked, as well as the model captures important features concerning the modeling of a resonant tunneling diode. To finish, some comparisons between the models stated above are realized

  7. Electron transport through individual Ge self-assembled quantum dots on Si

    Chung, Hung-Chin; Chu, Wen-Huei; Liu, Chuan-Pu

    2006-08-01

    Electrical properties of self-assembled quantum dots have been the subject of intensive research due to quantum confinement. Here the authors report on the fabrication of Ge quantum dots (QDs) onto Si (100) by ultrahigh-vacuum ion beam sputtering and the electrical properties of individual QDs. Transmission electron microscopy images show that samples with completely incoherent or coherent semispherical islands can be produced under different ion energies. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with conductive atomic force microscopy at room temperature. exhibit linear behavior at low bias and nonlinear behavior at large bias from coherent islands, whereas the staircase structures are clearly observed in the I-V curve from incoherent islands, which are attributed to electron tunneling through the quantized energy levels of a single Ge QD.

  8. Role of thermal stress on the magnetophonon peak structure in the parallel transport of the GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells

    The magnetophonon resonance in parallel transport of two types multiple quantum wells was studied. The transverse magnetresonance was measured in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30 T (within temperature region from 77 to 340 K). A fine structure of magnetophonon resonance peaks which depends on temperature and does not depend on the type of multiple quantum wells, was observed. This effect could be attributed to two phenomena: contribution of barrier phonons and influence of thermostresses. (author)

  9. Nonequilibrium quantum dynamics and transport: from integrability to many-body localization

    Vasseur, Romain; Moore, Joel E.

    2016-06-01

    We review the non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body quantum systems after a quantum quench with spatial inhomogeneities, either in the Hamiltonian or in the initial state. We focus on integrable and many-body localized systems that fail to self-thermalize in isolation and for which the standard hydrodynamical picture breaks down. The emphasis is on universal dynamics, non-equilibrium steady states and new dynamical phases of matter, and on phase transitions far from thermal equilibrium. We describe how the infinite number of conservation laws of integrable and many-body localized systems lead to complex non-equilibrium states beyond the traditional dogma of statistical mechanics.

  10. Non-Equilibrium Electron Transport through a Double Quantum Dot System: Study of Two Exchange Coupled Quantum Dots in a 4-Terminal Geometry

    Koerting, Verena

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we study two exchange-coupled quantum dots with an emphasis on non-equilibrium physics. Assuming a single electron on each quantum dot, the double quantum dot system is characterized by an interplay between the Kondo spin coupling of the dots with the leads and the spin-exchange coupling between the dots. We find that a finite voltage on one quantum dot drives the other quantum dot out of equilibrium.

  11. ABC transporters affect the elimination and toxicity of CdTe quantum dots in liver and kidney cells.

    Chen, Mingli; Yin, Huancai; Bai, Pengli; Miao, Peng; Deng, Xudong; Xu, Yingxue; Hu, Jun; Yin, Jian

    2016-07-15

    This paper aimed to investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters on the efflux and the toxicity of nanoparticles in liver and kidney cells. In this study, we synthesized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) that were monodispersed and emitted green fluorescence (maximum peak at 530nm). Such QDs tended to accumulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2), human kidney cells 2 (HK-2), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and cause significant toxicity in all the three cell lines. Using specific inhibitors and inducers of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance associated proteins (Mrps), the cellular accumulation and subsequent toxicity of QDs in HepG2 and HK-2 cells were significantly affected, while only slight changes appeared in MDCK cells, corresponding well with the functional expressions of ABC transporters in cells. Moreover, treatment of QDs caused concentration- and time- dependent induction of ABC transporters in HepG2 and HK-2 cells, but such phenomenon was barely found in MDCK cells. Furthermore, the effects of CdTe QDs on ABC transporters were found to be greater than those of CdCl2 at equivalent concentrations of cadmium, indicating that the effects of QDs should be a combination of free Cd(2+) and specific properties of QDs. Overall, these results indicated a strong dependence between the functional expressions of ABC transporters and the efflux of QDs, which could be an important reason for the modulation of QDs toxicity by ABC transporters. PMID:27131644

  12. Transport anomalies and quantum criticality in electron-doped cuprate superconductors

    Zhang, Xu; Yu, Heshan; He, Ge; Hu, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Zhu, Beiyi; Jin, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Superconductivity research is like running a marathon. Three decades after the discovery of high-Tc cuprates, there have been mass data generated from transport measurements, which bring fruitful information. In this review, we give a brief summary of the intriguing phenomena reported in electron-doped cuprates from the aspect of electrical transport as well as the complementary thermal transport. We attempt to sort out common features of the electron-doped family, e.g. the strange metal, neg...

  13. Quantum size effects and transport properties in InSb thin films

    The oscillatory behaviour of the electrical conductivity in InSb thin films due to the occurrence of quantum size effects has been investigated as function of the film thickness and temperature. The results are in agreement with the current theoretical predictions. Some evidence is also given of a dependence on the thickness of the carrier concentration

  14. Transport through quantum dots: a combined DMRG and embedded-cluster approximation study

    The numerical analysis of strongly interacting nanostructures requires powerful techniques. Recently developed methods, such as the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group (tDMRG) approach or the embedded-cluster approximation (ECA), rely on the numerical solution of clusters of finite size. For the interpretation of numerical results, it is therefore crucial to understand finite-size effects in detail. In this work, we present a careful finite-size analysis for the examples of one quantum dot, as well as three serially connected quantum dots. Depending on odd-even effects, physically quite different results may emerge from clusters that do not differ much in their size. We provide a solution to a recent controversy over results obtained with ECA for three quantum dots. In particular, using the optimum clusters discussed in this paper, the parameter range in which ECA can reliably be applied is increased, as we show for the case of three quantum dots. As a practical procedure, we propose that a comparison of results for static quantities against those of quasi-exact methods, such as the ground-state density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method or exact diagonalization, serves to identify the optimum cluster type. In the examples studied here, we find that to observe signatures of the Kondo effect in finite systems, the best clusters involving dots and leads must have a total z-component of the spin equal to zero.

  15. Transport of Interacting Electrons through a Pair of Coupled Metallic Quantum Dots

    ZAIKIN, A.; Golubev, D.

    2004-01-01

    We derive a complete expression for the interaction correction to the $I-V$ curve of two connected in series metallic quantum dots. For strongly asymmetric dots in a wide range of parameters this interaction correction depends logarithmically on voltage and temperature.

  16. Inelastic Quantum Transport in Superlattices: Success and Failure of the Boltzmann Equation

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, Stephan;

    1999-01-01

    the whole held range from linear response to negative differential conductivity. The quantum results are compared with the respective results obtained from a Monte Carlo solution of the Boltzmann equation. Our analysis thus sets the limits of validity for the semiclassical theory in a nonlinear...

  17. Edge State Transport of Separately Contacted Bilayer Systems in the Fractional Quantum Hall Regime

    Yoshioka, Daijiro; Nomura, Kentaro

    1999-01-01

    Hall and diagonal resistances of bilayer fractional quantum Hall systems are discussed theoretically. The bilayers have electrodes attached separately to each layer. They are assumed to be coupled weakly by interlayer tunneling, while the interlayer Coulomb interaction is negligibly small. It is shown that source-drain voltage dependence of the resistances reflects the Luttinger liquid parameter of the edge state.

  18. 21 CFR 880.5500 - AC-powered patient lift.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered patient lift. 880.5500 Section 880.5500... Devices § 880.5500 AC-powered patient lift. (a) Identification. An AC-powered lift is an electrically powered device either fixed or mobile, used to lift and transport patients in the horizontal or...

  19. Self-Consistent Calculation on the Time-Dependent Electrons Transport Properties of a Quantum Wire

    J. Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Responses of a quantum wire (QW connected with wide reservoirs to time-dependent external voltages are investigated in self-consistent manner. Distributions of the internal potential and the induced charge density, capacitance, and conductance are calculated. Results indicate that these physical quantities depend strongly on the Fermi energy of systems and the frequency of external voltages. With the increase of the Fermi energy, capacitance and conductance show some resonant peaks due to the open of the next higher quantum channels and the oscillations related to the longitudinal resonant electron states. Frequency-dependent conductance shows two different responses to the external voltages, inductive-like and capacitive-like; and the peaks structure of capacitance is related to the plasmon-like excitation in mesoscopic conductor.

  20. Field and Density Dependence of Edge Magnetoplasmon Transport in a Quantum Hall System

    We investigate edge channel properties in integer quantum Hall regime through time-of-flight measurements of edge magnetoplasmons (EMPs). EMPs are injected by applying a voltage pulse to on Ohmic contact and detected by applying another voltage pulse to a quantum point contact. By controlling the time interval between the injection and detection pulses, the velocity of EMPs is determined. The width of edge channels calculated from the velocity of EMPs oscillates with filling factor: as the filling factor is decreased to an integer, the width increases almost by one order of magnitude from ∼ 0.3 to ∼ 3μm. Furthermore, we find that the width at a fixed filling factor increases with decreasing electron density in the bulk two-dimensional system.