WorldWideScience

Sample records for abundance ratio measurements

  1. On the Measurement of Elemental Abundance Ratios in Inner Galaxy H II Regions

    Simpson, Janet P.; Rubin, Robert H.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Although abundance gradients in the Milky Way Galaxy certainly exist, details remain uncertain, particularly in the inner Galaxy, where stars and H II regions in the Galactic plane are obscured optically. In this paper we revisit two previously studied, inner Galaxy H II regions: G333.6-0.2 and W43. We observed three new positions in G333.6-0.2 with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory and reobserved the central position with the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer in far-infrared lines of S++, N++, N+, and O++. We also added the N+ lines at 122 and 205 microns to the suite of lines measured in W43 by Simpson et al.. The measured electron densities range from approx. 40 to over 4000 per cu cm in a single HII region, indicating that abundance analyses must consider density variations, since the critical densities of the observed lines range from 40 to 9000 per cu cm. We propose a method to handle density variations and make new estimates of the S/H and N/H abundance ratios. We find that our sulfur abundance estimates for G333.6-0.2 and W43 agree with the S/H abundance ratios expected for the gradient previously reported by Simpson et al., with the S/H values revised to be smaller owing to changes in collisional excitation cross sections. The estimated N/H, S/H, and N/S ratios are the most reliable because of their small corrections for unseen ionization states (element and sulfur is a primary element in galactic chemical evolution calculations. We compute models of the two H II regions to estimate corrections for the other unseen ionization states. We find, with large uncertainties, that oxygen does not, have a high abundance, with the result that the N/O ratio is as high (approx. 0.35) as previously reported. The reasons for the uncertainty in the ionization corrections for oxygen are both the non-uniqueness of the H II region models and the sensitivity of these models to different input atomic data and stellar atmosphere models. We discuss these

  2. On the Measurement of Elemental Abundance Ratios in Inner Galaxy H II Regions

    Simpson, J P; Colgan, S W J; Erickson, E F; Haas, M R; Simpson, Janet P.; Rubin, Robert H.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Although variations in elemental abundance ratios in the Milky Way Galaxy certainly exist, details remain uncertain, particularly in the inner Galaxy, where stars and H II regions in the Galactic plane are obscured optically. In this paper we revisit two previously studied, inner Galaxy H II regions: G333.6-0.2 and W43. We observed three new positions in G333.6-0.2 with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory and reobserved the central position with the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer in far-infrared lines of S++, N++, N+, and O++. We also added the N+ lines at 122 and 205 micron to the suite of lines measured in W43 by Simpson et al. (1995). The measured electron densities range from ~40 to over 4000 cm-3 in a single H II region, indicating that abundance analyses must consider density variations, since the critical densities of the observed lines range from 40 to 9000 cm-3. We propose a method to handle density variations and make new estimates of the S/H and N/H abundance ratios. We find ...

  3. Discussion on the Key Factors of Abundance Ratios About Zn Isotope Measurement

    The application of Zn isotope analysis is well known in geochemistry and diet study. An inter-lab comparison of five samples with isotopic ratio covering from 0.02 to 15.00 was organized in order to develop measurement ability and keep consistency of the results of isotopic ratios measurement among the participants. Multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) were used. For MC-ICP-MS, blank-corrected and blank-no corrected results were submitted. For MC-TIMS, total evaporation method (TE) was applied to the samples while a certified reference material IRMM3702 was analyzed together. All the results showed that the uncertainties were 1.29%-0.03% for 64Zn/66Zn, and the uncertainty was obviously relative to isotopic abundances. The blank-corrected and blank-no corrected and the influence of blank and non-linear of K factor of mass discrimination for MC-ICP-MS were convinced of contributing to the unsatisfied uncertainties. (authors)

  4. Precision Chemical Abundance Measurements

    Yong, David; Grundahl, Frank; Meléndez, Jorge;

    2012-01-01

    This talk covers preliminary work in which we apply a strictly differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis to high quality UVES spectra of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We achieve extremely high precision in the measurement of relative abundance ratios. Our results indicate that the ob...

  5. Primordial Deuterium Abundance Measurements

    Levshakov, S A; Takahara, F; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Kegel, Wilhelm H.; Takahara, Fumio

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium abundances measured recently from QSO absorption-line systems lie in the range from 3 10^{-5} to 3 10^{-4}, which shed some questions on standard big bang theory. We show that this discordance may simply be an artifact caused by inadequate analysis ignoring spatial correlations in the velocity field in turbulent media. The generalized procedure (accounting for such correlations) is suggested to reconcile the D/H measurements. An example is presented based on two high-resolution observations of Q1009+2956 (low D/H) [1,2] and Q1718+4807 (high D/H) [8,9]. We show that both observations are compatible with D/H = 4.1 - 4.6 10^{-5}, and thus support SBBN. The estimated mean value = 4.4 10^{-5} corresponds to the baryon-to-photon ratio during SBBN eta = 4.4 10^{-10} which yields the present-day baryon density Omega_b h^2 = 0.015.

  6. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  7. An evaluation method of the neutron fluence and spectrum by measuring the change of isotopic abundance ratios of arbitrary pairs of nuclides on heavy irradiation

    An evaluation method of the neutron fluence and mean spectrum with which samples have been irradiated is proposed. The principle is based on measuring the change of the isotopic abundance ratios of arbitrary pairs of nuclides having different neutron absorption cross sections for both thermal and intermediate neutrons. Advantages of the method are as follows, although sensitivity is lower than that of the ordinary activation method in a short irradiation period. i) Any sample can be used irrespective of irradiation history. ii) Nuclides present as impurities in samples can be used as detectors. iii) Neutron fluences and mean spectra with which samples have been heavily irradiated can be measured with reasonable accuracy, thus making it possible to offer the direct information to radiation damage studies. The present study deals with the principle and applicability of the method. (author)

  8. Ion-microprobe measurements of Mg, Ca, Ti and Fe isotopic ratios and trace element abundance in hibonite-bearing inclusions in primitive meteorites

    This thesis reports the isotopic abundances of Mg, Ca, and Ti and rare earth element (REE) abundances in 19 hibonite-bearing inclusions from primative meteorites. The isotopic ratios of Fe were measured in one of the samples, Lance HH-1. These measurements were made by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (CAMECA IMS-3f). The novel hardware and software developments that made this work possible are described in detail. The samples were studied in thin section in order to investigate the relationship between the inclusions and their mineralogical environments. Inclusions from a number of different meteorites, specifically, Mighei, Murray, Murchison, Lance, Efremovka, Vigarano, Qingzhen, Dhajala, and Semarkona, were studied. The isotopes of Ca and Ti show large and correlated abundance anomalies in their most neutron-rich isotopes, 48Ca and 50Ti. The largest anomalies among the samples studied here are in the Murray inclusion MY-F6, with a 4.6% deficit in 48Ca and a 5.2% deficit in 50Ti, and Lance HH-1, with 3.3% and 6.0% deficits in 48Ca and 50Ti respectively. Correlated excesses of 48Ca and 50Ti, up to 2.4% and 1.4% respectively, are found in some other samples studied here. The fact that there is a correlation of isotopic anomalies in two different elements is clear evidence for a nucleosynthetic origin of these effects. Various possibilities for the origin of these isotopic anomalies are discussed and it is shown that a Cosmic Chemical Memory-like model of the incomplete mixing of dust grains from one or several supernovae is sufficient to explain the data. Magnesium isotopes show excesses of 26Mg, attributable to the in-situ decay of 26Al, in 7 of these inclusions

  9. The HCS+/CS abundance ratio in interstellar clouds

    The ion-molecule reactions and ion-electron recombination of HCS+ have been studied in a variety of laboratory experiments at room temperature. CS has a very large proton affinity so that many reactions can lead to HCS+, which is found to be unreactive with nearly all abundant interstellar molecules. In addition the dissociative recombination rate coefficient of HCS+ is the lowest the present authors have measured for a heavy polyatomic ion. New calculations of the rate coefficient for the H3+-CS reaction are also presented, and it is found that this increases by an order of magnitude as the temperature decreases from 300 to 10K. These theoretical data, together with the laboratory results are used to explain the high [HCS+]/[CS] ratio observed in TMC-1. (author)

  10. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    Approximate carbon abundances and 12C/13C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 μm. A low mean carbon abundance ([C/H]=-0.64±0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author)

  11. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    Lazaro, C. (Inst. de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain)); Lynas-Gray, A.E. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Clegg, R.E.S. (Royal Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge (UK)); Mountain, C.M.; Zadrozny, A. (Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK))

    1991-03-01

    Approximate carbon abundances and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 {mu}m. A low mean carbon abundance ((C/H)=-0.64+-0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author).

  12. New method of the 17 O + p reaction rate determination by means of the measurement of the partial widths of 18 F levels. Consequences on the oxygen isotopes abundance ratio of red giant stars

    The 17 O destruction by the CNO cycle in the 17 O (p, α) 14 N and 17 O(p, γ) 18 F reactions is studied. The consequences on the isotropic abundance ratio at the surface of some red giants and supergiants, with mass values about 2 and 15 of the solar mass, are discussed. The results of the energy measurements of the first level and above the threshold value of 17 O + p are reported, as well as the tranfer reaction formulation. The utilization of the new reaction ratio in the evolution and stellar nucleosynthesis is explained. The results are in good agreement with the most part of the observations performed

  13. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  14. Measurement of 13CO2/12CO2 abundance by nondispersive infrared heterodyne ratiometry as an alternative to gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    The authors report the performance of a prototype nondispersive infrared heterodyne ratiometer in the analysis of seven reference gas samples containing 3.0% CO2 in air, and isotopic enrichments from -85 to +329 δ per thousand vs. PDB as measured by gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The instrument response in volts-1 (V-1) varied from -0.51 to 1.22 over the range of -85 to +329 per thousand. A mean instrument response with a 0.0015 standard deviation (0.375 per thousand) required 110 s of signal averaging at a 1-s sampling rate. The calibration curve of instrument response vs. δ per thousand was linear over the entire range and had a slope of 0.003 89 +/- 0.000 03 (SD), an intercept of -0.168 +/- 0.005, and a standard error of 0.009. With this curve, 45 s of data acquisition at a mean instrument response of -0.280 V-1 attained a standard deviation of +/- 1.3 per thousand at -28.7 per thousand. Nondispersive infrared heterodyne ratiometry can analyze the 13C content of respiratory gas samples with acceptable accuracy and sensitivity for clinical studies

  15. Ion-molecule calculation of the abundance ratio of CCD to CCH in dense interstellar clouds

    Laboratory measurements and calculations have been performed to determine the abundance ratio of the deuterated ethynyl radical (CCD) to the normal radical (CCH) which can be achieved in dense interstellar clouds via isotopic fractionation in the C2H2(+) (HD)=C2HD(+)(H2) system of reactions. According to this limited treatment, the CCD/CCH abundance ratio which can be attained is in the range 0.02-0.03 for the Orion molecular cloud and 0.0l-0.02 for TMC-1. These ranges of numbers are in reasonable agreement with the observed values in Orion and TMC-1. However, the analysis of the CCD/CCH abundance ratio is complicated via the presence of competing fractionation mechanisms, especially in the low-temperature source TMC-1. 28 references

  16. A physicochemical study on isotope abundance ratio of lithium contained in a few minerals of pegmatite

    Lithium samples for mass spectrometric measurement were prepared from biotite, quartz, albite, and microcline which were separated each other from pegmatite in Naegi, Nakatsugawa, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. Lithium isotope abundance ratio (7Li/6Li) of the lithium samples were measured by mass spectrometry using surface ionization ion source. Significant difference has been found among the (7Li/6Li) values of biotite, quartz, albite, and microcline samples. The results have been briefly discussed from physicochemical and geological viewpoint. (author)

  17. The C/O abundance ratio in the planetary nebula IC 2501

    The detection by previous authors of a silicon carbide feature in the infrared spectrum of the planetary nebula IC 2501 suggests that the nebular envelope is carbon rich. IC 2501 has now been observed with the IUE satellite and these observations have been combined with optical measurements in order to analyse the physical conditions and abundances in the nebula. The derived value of the C/O abundance ratio is 1.2, a result which is insensitive to the adopted value of the electron temperature in the nebula. (author)

  18. Measurements of RI dispersion ratios

    In order to obtain the basic data for the design of unsealed-RI handling facilities, the dispersion ratios of RIs in the air under specific conditions were measured for those extensively used in Japan. The values should vary with the kinds of RI and their chemical forms. 25 ml of a sample solution in a 50 ml beaker was stirred with a magnetic stirrer at 300 - 400 rpm at room temperature with ventilation so that atmospheric wind velocity becomes 10 - 30 cm per sec. The dispersion ratios were obtained as the despersion per unit time (one hour). The large dispersion ratios were obtained in 3H, 14C, 35S, 75Se, 125I and 131I at 10-6 - 10-4 per hour. The detectable values were obtained in 32P, 75Se and sup(99m)Tc at 10-9 - 10-7 per hour. 22Na, 32P, 35S, 51Cr, 67Ga and 147Pm were scarcely detectable. The dispersion ratios of RIs differed largely with their chemical forms as well as the kinds. (J.P.N.)

  19. Determination of nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer emission lines

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    We have finished studying the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios for stars with different effective temperatures T(sub eff) and luminosities using transition layer emission lines and using spectra available in the IUE archives. The N/C abundance ratio determinations using transition layer emission lines are as accurate as the photospheric abundance determinations as found by comparison of results obtained by both methods for the same stars. Our measurements confirm photospheric abundance determinations in regions of the HR diagram where they can be obtained. Our studies have extended the temperature range to higher temperatures. They have shown the exact positions in the HR diagram where the mixing due to the outer convection zones reaches deep enough to bring nuclear processed material to the surface. This occurs at effective temperatures which are higher by delta log T(sub eff) approximately 0.04 or roughly 400 K than expected theoretically. Since the depth of the convection zone increases rapidly with decreasing T(sub eff) this may indicate considerable overshoot beyond the lower boundary of the convection zone. Our N/C abundance ratio determinations from transition layer emission lines have confirmed that the actual enrichment observed for some cool giants is larger than expected theoretically, again indicating a larger degree of mixing in several stars either from below or from above. For the supergiants it probably indicates overshoot above the convective core in the progenitor main sequence stars. For the more massive giants this may also be the case, though we did not find a correlation between delta log N/C and the absolute magnitudes, but these are rather uncertain. As byproducts of these studies we also found anomalies in Si/C and N/C abundance ratios for F giants which can be understood as the relict of surface abundance changes for their main sequence progenitors due to diffusion. This anomaly disappears for G giants, for which the depths of the

  20. Laser Spectroscopic Measurement of Helium Isotope Ratios

    Wang, L B; Holt, R J; Lu, Z T; O'Connor, T P; Sano, Y; Sturchio, N C

    2003-01-01

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of 3He/4He = 10^-7 - 10^-5. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable 3He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of 4He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3-sigma detection limit of 3He in helium is 4 x 10^-9. This demonstration required a 200 micro-L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  1. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of 3He/4He = 10-7--10-5. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable 3He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of 4He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3σ detection limit of 3He in helium is 4 x 10-9. This demonstration required a 200 μL STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  2. Revisited abundance diagnostics in quasars: Fe II/Mg II ratios

    Verner, E M; Verner, D A; Johansson, S; Gull, T R

    2003-01-01

    Both the Fe II UV emission in the 2000- 3000 A region [Fe II (UV)] and resonance emission line complex of Mg II at 2800 A are prominent features in quasar spectra. The observed Fe II UV/ Mg II emission ratios have been proposed as means to measure the buildup of the Fe abundance relative to that of the alpha-elements C, N, O, Ne and Mg as a function of redshift. The current observed ratios show large scatter and no obvious dependence on redshift. Thus, it remains unresolved whether a dependence on redshift exists and whether the observed Fe II UV/ Mg II ratios represent a real nucleosynthesis diagnostic. We have used our new 830-level model atom for Fe+ in photoionization calculations, reproducing the physical conditions in the broad line regions of quasars. This modeling reveals that interpretations of high values of Fe II UV/ Mg II are sensitive not only to Fe and Mg abundance, but also to other factors such as microturbulence, density, and properties of the radiation field. We find that the Fe II UV/ Mg II...

  3. Oxygen Abundance Measurements of SHIELD Galaxies

    Haurberg, Nathalie C; Cannon, John M; Marshall, Melissa V

    2015-01-01

    We have derived oxygen abundances for 8 galaxies from the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD survey is an ongoing study of very low-mass galaxies, with M$_{\\rm HI}$ between 10$^{6.5}$ and 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, that were detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. H$\\alpha$ images from the WIYN 3.5m telescope show that these 8 SHIELD galaxies each possess one or two active star-forming regions which were targeted with long-slit spectral observations using the Mayall 4m telescope at KPNO. We obtained a direct measurement of the electron temperature by detection of the weak [O III] $\\lambda$4363 line in 2 of the HII regions. Oxygen abundances for the other HII regions were estimated using a strong-line method. When the SHIELD galaxies are plotted on a B-band luminosity-metallicity diagram they appear to suggest a slightly shallower slope to the relationship than normally seen. However, that offset is systematically reduced when the near-infrared luminosity is used ins...

  4. On the origin of central abundances in the hot intra-cluster medium - I. Individual and average abundance ratios from XMM-Newton EPIC

    Mernier, François; Pinto, Ciro; Kaastra, Jelle S; Kosec, Peter; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Mao, Junjie; Werner, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is rich in metals, which are synthesized by supernovae (SNe) explosions and accumulate over time into the deep gravitational potential well of clusters of galaxies. Since most of the elements visible in X-rays are formed by type Ia (SNIa) and/or core-collapse (SNcc) supernovae, measuring their abundances gives us direct information on the nucleosynthesis products of billions of SNe since the epoch of the star formation peak (z ~ 2-3). In this study, we use the EPIC and RGS instruments onboard XMM-Newton to measure the abundances of 9 elements (O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe and Ni) from a sample of 44 nearby cool-core galaxy clusters, groups, and elliptical galaxies. We find that the Fe abundance shows a large scatter (~20-40%) over the sample, within 0.2$r_{500}$ and, especially, 0.05$r_{500}$. Unlike the absolute Fe abundance, the abundance ratios (X/Fe) are quite uniform over the considered temperature range (~0.6-8 keV), and with a limited scatter. In addition to a unprece...

  5. Early-type galaxy archeology: Ages, abundance ratios, and effective temperatures from full-spectrum fitting

    The stellar populations of galaxies hold vital clues to their formation histories. In this paper we present results based on modeling stacked spectra of early-type galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of velocity dispersion, σ, from 90 km s–1 to 300 km s–1. The spectra are of extremely high quality, with typical signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 Å–1, and a wavelength coverage of 4000 Å –8800 Å. Our population synthesis model includes variation in 16 elements from C to Ba, a two-component star formation history, the shift in effective temperature, Δ T eff, of the stars with respect to a solar metallicity isochrone, and the stellar initial mass function, among other parameters. In our approach we fit the full optical spectra rather than a select number of spectral indices and are able to, for the first time, measure the abundances of the elements V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni from the integrated light of distant galaxies. Our main results are as follows: (1) light-weighted stellar ages range from 6-12 Gyr from low to high σ; (2) [Fe/H] varies by less than 0.1 dex across the entire sample; (3) Mg closely tracks O, and both increase from ≈0.0 at low σ to ∼0.25 at high σ; Si and Ti show a shallower rise with σ, and Ca tracks Fe rather than O; (4) the iron peak elements V, Cr, Mn, and Ni track Fe, while Co tracks O, suggesting that Co forms primarily in massive stars; (5) C and N track O over the full sample and [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] exceed 0.2 at high σ; and (6) the variation in Δ T eff with total metallicity closely follows theoretical predictions based on stellar evolution theory. This last result is significant because it implies that we are robustly solving not only for the detailed abundance patterns but also the detailed temperature distributions (i.e., isochrones) of the stars in these galaxies. A variety of tests reveal that the systematic uncertainties in our measurements are probably 0.05 dex or less. Our derived [Mg/Fe] and [O

  6. Early-type galaxy archeology: Ages, abundance ratios, and effective temperatures from full-spectrum fitting

    Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Graves, Genevieve J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The stellar populations of galaxies hold vital clues to their formation histories. In this paper we present results based on modeling stacked spectra of early-type galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of velocity dispersion, σ, from 90 km s{sup –1} to 300 km s{sup –1}. The spectra are of extremely high quality, with typical signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 Å{sup –1}, and a wavelength coverage of 4000 Å –8800 Å. Our population synthesis model includes variation in 16 elements from C to Ba, a two-component star formation history, the shift in effective temperature, Δ T {sub eff}, of the stars with respect to a solar metallicity isochrone, and the stellar initial mass function, among other parameters. In our approach we fit the full optical spectra rather than a select number of spectral indices and are able to, for the first time, measure the abundances of the elements V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni from the integrated light of distant galaxies. Our main results are as follows: (1) light-weighted stellar ages range from 6-12 Gyr from low to high σ; (2) [Fe/H] varies by less than 0.1 dex across the entire sample; (3) Mg closely tracks O, and both increase from ≈0.0 at low σ to ∼0.25 at high σ; Si and Ti show a shallower rise with σ, and Ca tracks Fe rather than O; (4) the iron peak elements V, Cr, Mn, and Ni track Fe, while Co tracks O, suggesting that Co forms primarily in massive stars; (5) C and N track O over the full sample and [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] exceed 0.2 at high σ; and (6) the variation in Δ T {sub eff} with total metallicity closely follows theoretical predictions based on stellar evolution theory. This last result is significant because it implies that we are robustly solving not only for the detailed abundance patterns but also the detailed temperature distributions (i.e., isochrones) of the stars in these galaxies. A variety of tests reveal that the systematic uncertainties in our measurements are probably 0.05 dex or

  7. Central Elemental Abundance Ratios in the Perseus Cluster Resonant Scattering or SN Ia Enrichment?

    Dupke, R A; Dupke, Renato A.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    2001-01-01

    We have determined elemental abundance ratios in the core of the Perseus cluster for several elements. These ratios indicate a central dominance of SN Ia ejecta similar to that found for A496, A2199 and A3571 (Dupke & White 2000). Simultaneous analysis of ASCA spectra from SIS1, GIS 2&3 shows that the ratio of Ni to Fe abundances is ~ (3.4 +- 1.1) times Solar within the central 4'. This ratio is consistent with (and more precise than) that observed in other clusters whose central regions are dominated by SN Ia ejecta. Such a large Ni over-abundance is predicted by "Convective Deflagration" explosion models for SN Ia such as "W7" but is inconsistent with delayed detonation models. We note that with current instrumentation the NiK(alpha) line is confused with FeK(beta) and that the Ni over-abundance we observe has been interpreted by others as an anomalously large ratio of FeK(beta) to FeK(alpha) caused by resonant scattering in the FeK(alpha) line. We argue that a central enhancement of SN Ia ejecta an...

  8. Calibration of an elastic recoil setup for D/H-ratios close to natural abundance

    Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAM) in the Earth’s mantle contain trace amounts of hydrogen, as a result of the NAM’s ability to incorporate hydroxyl ions. The isotopic composition of these hydrogen reservoirs is for the Earth’s crust, well characterized. The knowledge of the isotopic composition of the Earth’s interior on the other hand is limited. It is believed that the hydrogen composition in the interior is isotopically heterogeneous and that there may exist several reservoirs of hydrogen, characterized by different deuterium/hydrogen-ratios. Characterization of these hydrogen reservoirs can provide valuable information about the mass transport of hydrogen during the evolution of the planet. In this work we present a variant of the proton–proton scattering technique with which we are capable of performing simultaneous measurements of deuterium and hydrogen. The method has been tested with a 2.9 MeV deuteron beam on a polyethylene standard, with D/H ratio close to the natural abundance, and on a thin sample of Muscovite with a hydrogen concentration of 4800 wt-ppm. This is followed by a discussion about limitations and capabilities of the technique

  9. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. DETAILED ABUNDANCE RATIOS AT LARGE RADIUS

    We study the radial dependence in stellar populations of 33 nearby early-type galaxies with central stellar velocity dispersions σ* ∼> 150 km s–1. We measure stellar population properties in composite spectra, and use ratios of these composites to highlight the largest spectral changes as a function of radius. Based on stellar population modeling, the typical star at 2Re is old (∼10 Gyr), relatively metal-poor ([Fe/H] ≈ –0.5), and α-enhanced ([Mg/Fe] ≈ 0.3). The stars were made rapidly at z ≈ 1.5-2 in shallow potential wells. Declining radial gradients in [C/Fe], which follow [Fe/H], also arise from rapid star formation timescales due to declining carbon yields from low-metallicity massive stars. In contrast, [N/Fe] remains high at large radius. Stars at large radius have different abundance ratio patterns from stars in the center of any present-day galaxy, but are similar to average Milky Way thick disk stars. Our observations are thus consistent with a picture in which the stellar outskirts are built up through minor mergers with disky galaxies whose star formation is truncated early (z ≈ 1.5-2)

  10. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

  11. High-precision mass spectrometric hydrogen isotope ratio measurements

    The analytical capabilities of mass spectrometric ion-current measurement systems are described on both a theoretical and a practical basis. From the theoretical standpoint, a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) model that evaluated the fundamental sources of noise present in ion-current measurement systems was developed. Use of this model accurately predicted the performance (precision) for ion-current ratio measurements made by two isotope ratio mass spectrometers, one designed for carbon isotopic measurements, and the other designed for hydrogen isotopic measurements. Isotope ratio measurements differ from current-ratio measurements in that the observed ion-current ratio must be corrected to reflect the ratio of the ion currents due to the isotopic species of interest, which, for hydrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry, are HD+ and H2+. Interfaces to these two ion currents are described in detail. To compensate for H3+ three measurement procedures, the two-standard calibration, the one-standard differential measurement with electronic H3+ compensation, and the two-standard differential measurement, are described. The one- and two-standard differential measurements were successfully used for measurement of isotopic abundances. Results of a collaborative investigation to validate the use of 18O in place of D as an isotopic label for total body water measurements are presented. In this research both 18O and D were administered simultaneously to several subjects. The weight of total body water of these subjects as measured by the dilution of D into the body water was in good agreement with the results of the 18O measurements. A brief description of the laboratory computer system is also given

  12. Determination of 235U isotope abundance by measuring selected pairs of fission products

    A new method to determine experimentally the isotopic abundance of uranium has been developed by measuring the ratios of selected fission product pairs. The relationship between the 235U abundance and the ratios of 14 MeV neutron-induced fission products, which are N(3892Sr)/N(44105Ru) and N(3892Sr)/N(53135I), have been obtained. The results of 4 test samples show that the relative deviations between the measured and the reference 235U abundances are less than ±3%.

  13. Elemental Abundance Ratios in Stars of the Outer Galactic Disk. IV. A New Sample of Open Clusters

    Yong, David; Friel, Eileen D

    2012-01-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be 18, Be 21, Be 22, Be 32, and PWM 4. For Be 18 and PWM 4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [alpha/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance ( 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (< 0.04 dex/Gyr). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/...

  14. C/O abundance ratios, iron depletions, and infrared dust features in Galactic planetary nebulae

    Delgado-Inglada, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    We study the dust present in 56 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) through their iron depletion factors, their C/O abundance ratios (in 51 objects), and the dust features that appear in their infrared spectra (for 33 objects). Our sample objects have deep optical spectra of good quality, and most of them also have ultraviolet observations. We use these observations to derive the iron abundances and the C/O abundance ratios in a homogeneous way for all the objects. We compile detections of infrared dust features from the literature and we analyze the available Spitzer/IRS spectra. Most of the PNe have C/O ratios below one and show crystalline silicates in their infrared spectra. The PNe with silicates have C/O < 1, with the exception of Cn 1-5. Most of the PNe with dust features related to C-rich environments (SiC or the 30 {\\mu}m feature usually associated to MgS) have C/O $\\gtrsim$ 0.8. PAHs are detected over the full range of C/O values, including 6 objects that also show silicates. Iron abundances are low...

  15. Boron abundances and isotopic ratios of olivine grains on Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft

    Fujiya, Wataru; Hoppe, Peter; Ott, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    We report the B abundances and isotopic ratios of two olivine grains from the S-type asteroid Itokawa sampled by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Olivine grains from the Dar al Gani (DaG) 989 LL6 chondrite were used as a reference. Since we analyzed polished thin sections in both cases, we expect the contribution from the solar wind B (rich in 10B) to be minimal because the solar wind was implanted only within very thin layers of the grain surface. The Itokawa and DaG 989 olivine grains have homogeneous B abundances (~400 ppb) and 11B/10B ratios compatible with the terrestrial standard and bulk chondrites. The observed homogeneous B abundances and isotopic ratios of the Itokawa olivine grains are likely the result of thermal metamorphism which occurred in the parent asteroid of Itokawa, which had a similar composition as LL chondrites. The chondritic B isotopic ratios of the Itokawa samples suggest that they contain little cosmogenic B (from cosmic-ray spallation reactions) rich in 10B. This observation is consistent with the short cosmic-ray exposure ages of Itokawa samples inferred from the small concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne. If other Itokawa samples have little cosmogenic B as well, the enrichment in 10B found previously on the surface of another Itokawa particle (as opposed to the bulk grain study here) may be attributed to implanted solar wind B.

  16. On-line analytical system developed for the ACEP to determine uranium concentration and uranium isotopic abundance ratio

    An on-line analytical system was developed to rapidly determine total uranium concentration and isotopic abundance ratio of 235U to 238U in a uranium solution which passes through a pipe in the chemical exchange uranium enrichment process. The isotopic abundance ratio is calculated by time with a computer using two analytical results, the determination of 235U and that of total uranium. A new method, in which the concentration of uranium could be quickly measured by detecting the absorption of γ-rays due to uranium, was investigated for the determination of uranium. The concentration of 235U was measured by the 185 keV of γ-rays obtained from the disintegration of 235U. The reproducibility of the isotopic abundance ratio analysis was improved less than 2% with relative standard deviation when more than 0.1 mol·dm-3 of natural uranium was analyzed. The analytical information on uranium can be obtained without any treatment in the enrichment equipment. (author)

  17. The HCN/HNC abundance ratio toward different evolutionary phases of massive star formation

    Jin, Mihwa; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kee-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Using the HCN and HNC J=1--0 line observations, the abundance ratio of HCN/HNC has been estimated for different evolutionary stages of massive star formation: Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), High-mass protostellar object (HMPOs), and Ultra-compact HII regions (UCHIIs). IRDCs were divided into `quiescent IRDC cores' and `active IRDC cores', depending on star formation activity. The HCN/HNC ratio is known to be higher at active and high temperature regions related to ongoing star formation, compa...

  18. HETEROGENEITY in 12CO/13CO ABUNDANCE RATIOS TOWARD SOLAR-TYPE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    Smith, RL; Pontoppidan, KM; Young, ED; Morris,, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.. This study reports an unusual heterogeneity in [12C16O]/[13C16O] abundance ratios of carbon monoxide observed in the gas phase toward seven ∼solar-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) and three dense foreground clouds in the nearby star-forming regions, Ophiuchus, Corona Australis, Orion, and Vela, and an isolated core, L43. Robust isotope ratios were derived using infrared absorption spectroscopy of the 4.7 μm fundamental and 2.3 ...

  19. Lunar Elemental Abundances from Gamma-Ray and Neutron Measurements

    Reedy, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.

    1999-01-01

    The determination of elemental abundances is one of the highest science objectives of most lunar missions. Such multi-element abundances, ratios, or maps should include results for elements that are diagnostic or important in lunar processes, including heat-producing elements (such as K and Th), important incompatible elements (Th and rare earth elements), H (for polar deposits and regolith maturity), and key variable elements in major lunar provinces (such as Fe and Ti in the maria). Both neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy can be used to infer elemental abundances; the two complement each other. These elemental abundances need to be determined with high accuracy and precision from measurements such as those made by the gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) and neutron spectrometers (NS) on Lunar Prospector. As presented here, a series of steps, computer codes, and nuclear databases are needed to properly convert the raw gamma-ray and neutron measurements into good elemental abundances, ratios, and/or maps. Lunar Prospector (LP) is the first planetary mission that has measured neutrons escaping from a planet other than the Earth. The neutron spectrometers on Lunar Prospector measured a wide range of neutron energies. The ability to measure neutrons with thermal (E return, being especially sensitive to both H (using epithermal neutrons) and thermal-neutron-absorbing elements. Neutrons are made in the lunar surface by the interaction of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with the atomic nuclei in the surface. Most neutrons are produced with energies above about 0.1 MeV. The flux of fast neutrons in and escaping from the Moon depends on es the intensity of the cosmic rays (which vary with solar activity) and the elemental composition of the surface. Variations in the elemental composition of the lunar surface can affect the flux of fast neutrons by about 25% , with Ti and Fe emitting more fast neutrons than light elements like O and Si. Most elements moderate neutrons to

  20. Measuring Poisson Ratios at Low Temperatures

    Boozon, R. S.; Shepic, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Simple extensometer ring measures bulges of specimens in compression. New method of measuring Poisson's ratio used on brittle ceramic materials at cryogenic temperatures. Extensometer ring encircles cylindrical specimen. Four strain gauges connected in fully active Wheatstone bridge self-temperature-compensating. Used at temperatures as low as liquid helium.

  1. Advances in optical water isotope ratio measurements

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometers routinely achieve impressive measurement precision and high throughput. In spite of this, a number of fundamental and practical problems are encountered. These are most notable in the case of water, arguably the most important molecule in the environment. Optical techniques to measure stable isotope ratios are able to address at least some of these issues; particularly, in relation to sample pretreatment and the difficulty of in-situ measurements. After discussing some general design criteria for infrared laser-based isotope ratio spectrometers, the case made above will be illustrated with a number of different instruments in applications from earthbound to the atmospheric: From laboratory based ice-core water isotope analyses to in-situ water isotope measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. (author)

  2. The HCN/HNC abundance ratio toward different evolutionary phases of massive star formation

    Jin, Mihwa; Kim, Kee-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Using the HCN and HNC J=1--0 line observations, the abundance ratio of HCN/HNC has been estimated for different evolutionary stages of massive star formation: Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), High-mass protostellar object (HMPOs), and Ultra-compact HII regions (UCHIIs). IRDCs were divided into `quiescent IRDC cores' and `active IRDC cores', depending on star formation activity. The HCN/HNC ratio is known to be higher at active and high temperature regions related to ongoing star formation, compared to cold and quiescent regions. Our observations toward 8 quiescent IRDC cores, 16 active IRDC cores, 23 HMPOs, and 31 UCHIIs show consistent results; the ratio is 0.97~($\\pm~0.10$), 2.65~($\\pm~0.88$), 4.17~($\\pm~1.03$) and 8.96~($\\pm~3.32$) in these respective evolutionary stages, increasing from quiescent IRDC cores to UCHIIs. The change of the HCN/HNC abundance ratio, therefore, seems directly associated with the evolutionary stages of star formation, which have different temperatures. One suggested explanation for ...

  3. Stellar population models of Lick indices with variable element abundance ratios

    Thomas, D; Bender, R; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia

    2003-01-01

    We provide the whole set of Lick indices from CN1 to TiO2 of Simple Stellar Population models with, for the first time, variable element abundance ratios, [alpha/Fe]=0.0, 0.3, 0.5, [alpha/Ca]=-0.1, 0.0, 0.2, 0.5, and [alpha/N]=-0.5, 0.0. The models cover ages between 1 and 15 Gyr, metallicities between 1/200 and 3.5 solar. Our models are free from the intrinsic alpha/Fe bias that was imposed by the Milky Way template stars up to now, hence they reflect well-defined alpha/Fe ratios at all metallicities. The models are calibrated with Milky Way globular clusters for which metallicities and alpha/Fe ratios are known from independent spectroscopy of individual stars. The metallicities that we derive from the Lick indices Mgb and Fe5270 are in excellent agreement with the metallicity scale by Zinn & West (1984), and we show that the latter provides total metallicity rather than iron abundance. We can reproduce the relatively strong CN-absorption features CN1 and CN2 of galactic globular clusters with models in...

  4. Measurement of the eta decay branching ratio

    Bargholtz, C; Bogoslawsky, D; Calén, H; Capellaro, F; Clement, H; Demirörs, L; Ekström, C; Fransson, K; Geren, L; Gustafsson, L; Höistad, Bo; Ivanov, G; Jacewicz, M; Jiganov, E; Johansson, T; Keleta, S; Koch, I; Kullander, Sven; Kupsc, A; Kuznetsov, A; Laukhin, I V; Lindberg, K; Marciniewski, P; Meier, R; Morosov, B; Oelert, W; Pauly, C; Pettersson, H; Petukhov, Yu P; Povtorejko, A; Ruber, Roger J M Y; Schönning, K; Scobel, W; Shafigullin, R; Shwartz, B; Skorodko, T Yu; Sopov, V; Stepaniak, J; Chernyshov, V; Tegnér, P E; Engblom, P T; Tikhomirov, V; Turowiecki, A; Wagner, G J; Wolke, M; Yamamoto, A; Zabierowski, J; Zartova, I; Zlomanczuk, Yu; Bargholtz, Chr.

    2007-01-01

    The reaction pd->3He eta at threshold was used to provide a clean source of eta mesons for decay studies with the WASA detector at CELSIUS. The branching ratio of the decay eta->pi+pi-e+e- is measured to be (4.6+/-1.4+/-0.5)x10^-4.

  5. An alternative explanation of the evolution of element abundance ratios during the history of the Galaxy

    It is well established that stellar element abundances show a variation of some ratios, such as oxygen to iron and calcium to iron, with the overall metallicity of the star. This has been ascribed to a time-delay effect due to the different mean lifetimes of the stars and binaries that give rise to Type II and Type I supernovae. We propose here that this identification may be premature, and that the observations could equally well be explained by a 'pseudo-secondary' behaviour in the nucleosynthesis of iron. (author)

  6. A Comparison of Stellar Elemental Abundance Techniques and Measurements

    Hinkel, Natalie R; Pagano, Michael D; Desch, Steven J; Anbar, Ariel D; Adibekyan, Vardan; Blanco-Cuaresma, Sergi; Carlberg, Joleen K; Mena, Elisa Delgado; Liu, Fan; Nordlander, Thomas; Sousa, Sergio G; Korn, Andreas; Gruyters, Pieter; Heiter, Ulrike; Jofre, Paula; Santos, Nuno C; Soubiran, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Stellar elemental abundances are important for understanding the fundamental properties of a star or stellar group, such as age and evolutionary history, as well as the composition of an orbiting planet. However, as abundance measurement techniques have progressed, there has been little standardization between individual methods and their comparisons. As a result, different stellar abundance procedures determine measurements that vary beyond quoted error for the same elements within the same stars (Hinkel et al. 2014). The purpose of this paper is to better understand the systematic variations between methods and offer recommendations for producing more accurate results in the future. We have invited a number of participants from around the world (Australia, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and USA) to calculate ten element abundances (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, Ni, Ba, and Eu) using the same stellar spectra for four stars (HD361, HD10700, HD121504, HD202206). Each group produced measurements for each of the sta...

  7. Ratio method of measuring W boson mass

    Guo, Feng [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in DØ experiment. Instead of extracting MW from the fitting of W → ev fast Monte Carlo simulations to W → ev data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W → ev data and Z → ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (MW/MZ). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W → ev and Z → ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb-1 DØ Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives MW = 80435 ± 43(stat) ± 26(sys) MeV.

  8. Ratio method of measuring $w$ boson mass

    Guo, Feng; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in D0 experiment. Instead of extracting M{sub W} from the fitting of W {yields} e{nu} fast Monte Carlo simulations to W {yields} e{nu} data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W {yields} e{nu} data and Z {yields} ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (M{sub W}/M{sub Z}). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb{sup -1} D0 Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives M{sub W} = 80435 {+-} 43(stat) {+-} 26(sys) MeV.

  9. Precision measures of the primordial abundance of deuterium

    Cooke, Ryan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Pettini, Max [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Jorgenson, Regina A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Murphy, Michael T. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Steidel, Charles C., E-mail: rcooke@ucolick.org [California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = –2.88) damped Lyα system at z {sub abs} = 3.06726 toward the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyα transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias) and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H){sub p} = (2.53 ± 0.04) × 10{sup –5}, corresponding to a universal baryon density 100 Ω{sub b,} {sub 0} h {sup 2} = 2.202 ± 0.046 for the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). By combining our measure of (D/H){sub p} with observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), we derive the effective number of light fermion species, N {sub eff} = 3.28 ± 0.28. We therefore rule out the existence of an additional (sterile) neutrino (i.e., N {sub eff} = 4.046) at 99.3% confidence (2.7σ), provided that the values of N {sub eff} and of the baryon-to-photon ratio (η{sub 10}) did not change between BBN and recombination. We also place a strong bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, independent of the {sup 4}He primordial mass fraction, Y {sub P}: ξ{sub D} = +0.05 ± 0.13 based only on the CMB+(D/H){sub p} observations. Combining this value of ξ{sub D} with the current best literature measure of Y {sub P}, we find a 2σ upper bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, |ξ| ≤ +0.062.

  10. Precision Measures of the Primordial Abundance of Deuterium

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Pettini, Max; Jorgenson, Regina A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.88) damped Lyα system at z abs = 3.06726 toward the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyα transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias) and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H)p = (2.53 ± 0.04) × 10-5, corresponding to a universal baryon density 100 Ωb, 0 h 2 = 2.202 ± 0.046 for the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). By combining our measure of (D/H)p with observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), we derive the effective number of light fermion species, N eff = 3.28 ± 0.28. We therefore rule out the existence of an additional (sterile) neutrino (i.e., N eff = 4.046) at 99.3% confidence (2.7σ), provided that the values of N eff and of the baryon-to-photon ratio (η10) did not change between BBN and recombination. We also place a strong bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, independent of the 4He primordial mass fraction, Y P: ξD = +0.05 ± 0.13 based only on the CMB+(D/H)p observations. Combining this value of ξD with the current best literature measure of Y P, we find a 2σ upper bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, |ξ| <= +0.062. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (VLT program IDs: 68.B-0115(A), 70.A-0425(C), 078.A-0185(A), 085.A-0109(A)), and at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of

  11. Effectiveness of leaded petrol phase-out in Tianjin, China based on the aerosol lead concentration and isotope abundance ratio

    The phase-out of leaded petrol has been a measure widely used to reduce atmospheric lead pollution. Since the 1980s, China began to promote unleaded petrol. In order to assess the effectiveness of the measure an isotope fingerprint technique was applied for aerosol samples in the city of Tianjin. After dilute acid leaching, the lead concentration and isotope abundance ratios were determined for 123 samples collected in Tianjin during eight years (1994-2001). The 206Pb / 207Pb ratio was lower in summer, when coal combustion emission was low and vehicle exhaust became more important, indicating that the 206Pb / 207Pb ratio of leaded petrol in Tianjin is lower than that of aerosol samples. The 206Pb / 207Pb ratio gradually increased from 1994 to 2001, a trend that suggests that the contribution from vehicle exhaust was diminishing. Overall, the measurements matched well with national statistical data of leaded and unleaded petrol production. After the nationwide switch to unleaded gasoline, comprehensive control measures are urgently needed to reduce air lead pollution in China, as aerosol lead reduced slightly but remains at a relatively high level

  12. Trek and ECCO: Abundance measurements of ultraheavy galactic cosmic rays

    Using the Trek detector, we have measured the abundances of the heaviest elements (with Z>70) in the galactic cosmic rays with sufficient charge resolution to resolve the even-Z elements. We find that the abundance of Pb compared to Pt is ∼3 times lower than the value expected from the most widely-held class of models of the origin of galactic cosmic ray nuclei, that is, origination in a partially ionized medium with solar-like composition. The low abundance of Pb is, however, consistent with the interstellar gas and dust model of Meyer, Drury and Ellison, and with a source enriched in r-process material, proposed by Binns et al. A high-resolution, high-statistics measurement of the abundances of the individual actinides would distinguish between these models. This is the goal of ECCO, the Extremely Heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer, which we plan to deploy on the International Space Station

  13. Abundance ratios of red giants in low mass ultra faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    François, P; Bonifacio, P; Bidin, C Moni; Geisler, D; Sbordone, L

    2015-01-01

    Low mass dwarf spheroidal galaxies are key objects for our understanding of the chemical evolution of the pristine Universe and the Local Group of galaxies. Abundance ratios in stars of these objects can be used to better understand their star formation and chemical evolution. We report on the analysis of a sample of 11 stars belonging to 5 different ultra faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UfDSph) based on X-Shooter spectra obtained at the VLT. Medium resolution spectra have been used to determine the detailed chemical composition of their atmosphere. We performed a standard 1D LTE analysis to compute the abundances. Considering all the stars as representative of the same population of low mass galaxies, we found that the [alpha/Fe] ratios vs [Fe/H] decreases as the metallicity of the star increases in a way similar to what is found for the population of stars belonging to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The main difference is that the solar [alpha/Fe] is reached at a much lower metallicity for the UfDSph than the ...

  14. Measurements of $\\Xi_c^{+}$ Branching Ratios

    Link, J M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; Dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Wahl, M; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Giammarchi, M; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernández, H; López, A M; Luiggi, E; Méndez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramírez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Nehring, M S; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2003-01-01

    Using data collected by the fixed target Fermilab experiment FOCUS, we measure the branching ratios of the Cabibbo favored decays $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+K^-\\pi^+$, $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+ \\bar{K}^{*}(892)^0$, and $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Lambda^0K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ relative to $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Xi^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ to be $0.91\\pm0.11\\pm0.04$, $0.78\\pm0.16\\pm0.06$, and $0.28\\pm0.06\\pm0.06$, respectively. We report the first observation of the Cabibbo suppressed decay $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+K^+K^-$ and we measure the branching ratio relative to $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+K^-\\pi^+$ to be $0.16\\pm0.06\\pm0.01$. We also set 90% confidence level upper limits for $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+ \\phi$ and $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Xi^*(1690)^0(\\Sigma^+ K^-) K^+$ relative to $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^+K^-\\pi^+$ to be 0.12 and 0.05, respectively. We find an indication of the decays $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Omega^-K^{+}\\pi^+$ and $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Sigma^{*}(1385)^+ \\bar{K}^0$ and set 90% confidence level upper limits for the branching ratios with respect to $\\Xi_c^+ \\to \\Xi^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ to be 0.12 a...

  15. Abundance Ratios in the Galactic Bulge and Super Metal-Rich Type II Nucle osynthesis

    Fulbright, J P; McWilliam, A; Fulbright, Jon P.; William, Andrew Mc

    2004-01-01

    We present abundance results from our Keck/HIRES observations of giants in the Galactic Bulge. We confirm that the metallicity distribution of giants in the low-reddening bulge field Baade's Window can be well-fit by a closed-box enrichment model. We also confirm previous observations that find enhanced [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe] and [Ca/Fe] for all bulge giants, including those at super-solar metallicities. However, we find that the [O/Fe] ratios of metal-rich bulge dwarfs decrease with increasing metallicity, contrary to what is expected if the enhancements of the other $\\alpha$-elements is due to Type II supernovae enrichment. We suggest that the decrease in oxygen production may be due to mass loss in the pre-supernova evolution of metal-rich progenitors.

  16. Heterogeneity in 12CO/13CO Abundance Ratios toward Solar-type Young Stellar Objects

    Smith, Rachel L.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Young, Edward D.; Morris, Mark R.

    2015-11-01

    This study reports an unusual heterogeneity in [12C16O]/[13C16O] abundance ratios of carbon monoxide observed in the gas phase toward seven ˜solar-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) and three dense foreground clouds in the nearby star-forming regions, Ophiuchus, Corona Australis, Orion, and Vela, and an isolated core, L43. Robust isotope ratios were derived using infrared absorption spectroscopy of the 4.7 μm fundamental and 2.3 μm overtone rovibrational bands of CO at very high spectral resolution (λ/Δλ ≈ 95,000), observed with the Cryogenic Infrared Echelle Spectrograph (CRIRES) on the Very Large Telescope. We find [12C16O]/[13C16O] values ranging from ˜85 to 165, significantly higher than those of the local interstellar medium (ISM) (˜65-69). These observations are evidence for isotopic heterogeneity in carbon reservoirs in solar-type YSO environments, and encourage the need for refined galactic chemical evolution models to explain the 12C/13C discrepancy between the solar system and local ISM. The oxygen isotope ratios are consistent with isotopologue-specific photodissociation by CO self-shielding toward the disks, VV CrA N and HL Tau, further substantiating models predicting CO self-shielding on disk surfaces. However, we find that CO self-shielding is an unlikely general explanation for the high [12C16O]/[13C16O] ratios observed in this study. Comparison of the solid CO against gas-phase [12C16O]/[13C16O] suggests that interactions between CO ice and gas reservoirs need to be further investigated as at least a partial explanation for the unusually high [12C16O]/[13C16O] observed.

  17. The Relationship of Solar Abundance Measurements to the Electron Temperature in a Polar Coronal Hole

    Doschek, G. A.; Laming, J. M.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss the behavior of the intensity of the Mg VI λ1191.64 spectral line relative to the intensity of the Ne VI λ1005.78 spectral line as a function of height above the limb in the solar north polar coronal hole. The intensities of Mg VI lines relative to Ne VI lines have been shown to be excellent indicators of element abundance variations due to the first ionization potential (FIP) effect. We find that the Mg VI/Ne VI intensity ratio increases with height above the limb by factors ranging from 1.7 to 4 over a height range extending from about 6" above the limb to 28" above the limb. We conclude that this intensity ratio increase is primarily due to an increase of electron temperature with height, rather than the result of an FIP effect, and therefore caution must be exercised in using any Mg VI/Ne VI line ratio as an abundance diagnostic above the limb in the polar holes. At 6" above the limb, the Mg VI/Ne VI line ratio indicates that the solar Mg/Ne abundance ratio is probably within a factor of 2 of the photospheric abundance ratio. The spectra we use were recorded by the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft.

  18. Extreme abundance ratios in the polluted atmosphere of the cool white dwarf NLTT 19868

    Kawka, Adela; Vennes, Stéphane

    2016-05-01

    We present an analysis of intermediate-dispersion spectra and photometric data of the newly identified cool, polluted white dwarf NLTT 19868. The spectra obtained with X-shooter on the Very Large Telescope-Melipal show strong lines of calcium, and several lines of magnesium, aluminium and iron. We use these spectra and the optical-to-near-infrared spectral energy distribution to constrain the atmospheric parameters of NLTT 19868. Our analysis shows that NLTT 19868 is iron poor with respect to aluminium and calcium. A comparison with other cool, polluted white dwarfs shows that the Fe to Ca abundance ratio (Fe/Ca) varies by up to approximately two orders of magnitudes over a narrow temperature range with NLTT 19868 at one extremum in the Fe/Ca ratio and, in contrast, NLTT 888 at the other extremum. The sample shows evidence of extreme diversity in the composition of the accreted material: in the case of NLTT 888, the inferred composition of the accreted matter is akin to iron-rich planetary core composition, while in the case of NLTT 19868 it is close to mantle composition depleted by subsequent chemical separation at the bottom of the convection zone.

  19. Extreme abundance ratios in the polluted atmosphere of the cool white dwarf NLTT19868

    Kawka, Adela

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of intermediate-dispersion spectra and photometric data of the newly identified cool, polluted white dwarf NLTT19868. The spectra obtained with X-shooter on the Very Large Telescope (VLT)-Melipal show strong lines of calcium, and several lines of magnesium, aluminium and iron. We use these spectra and the optical-to-near infrared spectral energy distribution to constrain the atmospheric parameters of NLTT19868. Our analysis shows that NLTT19868 is iron poor with respect to aluminium and calcium. A comparison with other cool, polluted white dwarfs shows that the Fe to Ca abundance ratio (Fe/Ca) varies by up to approximately two orders of magnitudes over a narrow temperature range with NLTT19868 at one extremum in the Fe/Ca ratio and, in contrast, NLTT888 at the other extremum. The sample shows evidence of extreme diversity in the composition of the accreted material: In the case of NLTT888, the inferred composition of the accreted matter is akin to iron-rich planetary core composition, w...

  20. Measurement scale in maximum entropy models of species abundance

    Frank, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The consistency of the species abundance distribution across diverse communities has attracted widespread attention. In this paper, I argue that the consistency of pattern arises because diverse ecological mechanisms share a common symmetry with regard to measurement scale. By symmetry, I mean that different ecological processes preserve the same measure of information and lose all other information in the aggregation of various perturbations. I frame these explanations of symmetry, measurement, and aggregation in terms of a recently developed extension to the theory of maximum entropy. I show that the natural measurement scale for the species abundance distribution is log-linear: the information in observations at small population sizes scales logarithmically and, as population size increases, the scaling of information grades from logarithmic to linear. Such log-linear scaling leads naturally to a gamma distribution for species abundance, which matches well with the observed patterns. Much of the variation between samples can be explained by the magnitude at which the measurement scale grades from logarithmic to linear. This measurement approach can be applied to the similar problem of allelic diversity in population genetics and to a wide variety of other patterns in biology. PMID:21265915

  1. Monte Carlo Method for Calculating Oxygen Abundances and Their Uncertainties from Strong-Line Flux Measurements

    Bianco, Federica B; Oh, Seung Man; Fierroz, David; Liu, Yuqian; Kewley, Lisa; Graur, Or

    2015-01-01

    We present the open-source Python code pyMCZ that determines oxygen abundance and its distribution from strong emission lines in the standard metallicity scales, based on the original IDL code of Kewley & Dopita (2002) with updates from Kewley & Ellison (2008), and expanded to include more recently developed scales. The standard strong-line diagnostics have been used to estimate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium through various emission line ratios in many areas of astrophysics, including galaxy evolution and supernova host galaxy studies. We introduce a Python implementation of these methods that, through Monte Carlo (MC) sampling, better characterizes the statistical reddening-corrected oxygen abundance confidence region. Given line flux measurements and their uncertainties, our code produces synthetic distributions for the oxygen abundance in up to 13 metallicity scales simultaneously, as well as for E(B-V), and estimates their median values and their 66% confidence regions. In additi...

  2. Spectroscopic Measurement of Neutral Particle Influx Ratio on EAST

    The spectra of HeI (587.6 nm), Hα (656.28 nm) and Dα (656.1 nm) of the helium discharges as well as the normal deuterium discharges have been measured with two optical spectroscopic multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The influx ratio of the sum of H and D to He spectral lines and the influx ratio of H to D are given. In this way the ratio of hydrogen/deuterium ion (S/XB)H/D to (S/XB)He as well as (S/XB)H/D is not very sensitive to the variation in the edge density and temperature. The low-density helium discharges are operated in order to reduce the recycling hydrogen fluxes; however, the effect is not obvious. The possible reason is that the number of helium discharges is not enough and the content of hydrogen in the wall is still very abundant, which is caused by frequent wall conditionings and the vacuum leakage. The H/(H+D) ratio decreases quickly after one lithium coating and reduces to less than 10% using several accumulated lithium wall conditioning. It is found that the deposited He atoms on the carbon wall will remain at a low level after several D2 discharges.

  3. Central enhancement of nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio in barred galaxies

    Florido, E; Perez, I; Perez-Montero, E; Coelho, P R T; Gadotti, D A

    2015-01-01

    Bar-induced gas inflows towards the galaxy centres are recognized as a key agent for the secular evolution of galaxies. One immediate consequence is the accumulation of gas in the centre of galaxies where it can form stars and alter the chemical and physical properties. We use a sample of nearby face--on disc galaxies with available SDSS spectra to study whether the properties of the ionised gas in the central parts (radii 10^10 M_sun) or galaxies with total stellar mass above ~ 10^10.8 M_sun. In conclusion, we find observational evidence that the presence of a galactic bar affects the central ionised gas properties of disc galaxies, where the most striking effect is an enhancement in the N/O abundance ratio, which can be qualitatively interpreted as due to a different origin or evolutionary processes for less and more massive bulges, with the gaseous phase of the former having currently a closer relation with bars.

  4. X-RAY PROPERTIES OF YOUNG EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES. II. ABUNDANCE RATIO IN THE HOT INTERSTELLAR MATTER

    Using Chandra X-ray observations of young, post-merger elliptical galaxies, we present X-ray characteristics of age-related observational results by comparing them with typical old elliptical galaxies in terms of metal abundances in the hot interstellar matter (ISM). While the absolute element abundances may be uncertain because of unknown systematic errors and partly because of the smaller amount of hot gas in young ellipticals, the relative abundance ratios (e.g., the α-element to Fe ratio, and most importantly the Si/Fe ratio) can be relatively well constrained. In two young elliptical galaxies (NGC 720 and NGC 3923) we find that the Si to Fe abundance ratio is super-solar (at a 99% significance level), in contrast to typical old elliptical galaxies where the Si to Fe abundance ratio is close to solar. Also, the O/Mg ratio is close to solar in the two young elliptical galaxies, as opposed to the sub-solar O/Mg ratio reported in old elliptical galaxies. Both features appear to be less significant outside the effective radius (roughly 30'' for the galaxies under study), consistent with the observations that confine to the centermost regions the signatures of recent star formation in elliptical galaxies. Observed differences between young and old elliptical galaxies can be explained by the additional contribution from SNe II ejecta in the former. In young elliptical galaxies, the later star formation associated with recent mergers would have a dual effect, resulting both in galaxy scale winds—and therefore smaller observed amounts of hot ISM—because of the additional SN II heating, and in different metal abundances, because of the additional SN II yields.

  5. Measuring β-diversity with species abundance data.

    Barwell, Louise J; Isaac, Nick J B; Kunin, William E

    2015-07-01

    Baselga R turn , βBaselga B-C turn and βsim measured purely species turnover and were independent of nestedness. Among the other metrics, sensitivity to nestedness varied >4-fold. Our results indicate large amounts of redundancy among existing β-diversity metrics, whilst the estimation of unseen shared and unshared species is lacking and should be addressed in the design of new abundance-based metrics. PMID:25732937

  6. Precision measures of the primordial abundance of deuterium

    Cooke, Ryan; Jorgenson, Regina A; Murphy, Michael T; Steidel, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.87) damped Lyman-alpha system at z_abs = 3.06726 towards the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyman alpha transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias), and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H)_p = (2.53 +/- 0.04) x 10^-5, corresponding to a Universal baryon density 100 Omega_b h^2 = 2.202 +/- 0.045 for the standard model of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. By combining our measure of (D/H)_p with observations of the cosmic microwave backg...

  7. Early-Type Galaxy Archeology: Ages, Abundance Ratios, and Effective Temperatures from Full-Spectrum Fitting

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    The stellar populations of galaxies hold vital clues to their formation histories. In this paper we present results based on modeling stacked spectra of early-type galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as a function of velocity dispersion, sigma, from 90 km/s to 300 km/s. The spectra are of extremely high quality, with typical S/N of 1000/A, and a wavelength coverage of 4000A-8800A. Our population synthesis model includes variation in 16 elements from C to Ba, the shift in effective temperature, Delta(Teff), of the stars with respect to a solar metallicity isochrone, amongst other parameters. In our approach we fit the full optical spectra rather than a select number of spectral indices and are able to, for the first time, measure the abundances of the elements V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni from the integrated light of distant galaxies. Our main results are as follows: 1) light-weighted stellar ages range from 6-12 Gyr from low to high sigma; 2) [Fe/H] varies by less than 0.1 dex across the entire s...

  8. Corrections to measurements of pion capture ratios

    The authors conclude that the electromagnetic corrections to the C/O pion capture ratios deduced from the summed intensities of pionic Balmer series are small, and much less than their experimental errors. The magnitude of the correction due to nuclear absorption depends on the initial angular momentum distribution which in turn depends on molecular structure. The dependence of the capture ratios on molecular structure has raised serious questions about the effect on dose calculations for pion radiotherapy and on the definition of tissue equivalence for pions. (U.K.)

  9. Airborne Measurements of Coarse Mode Aerosol Composition and Abundance

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brock, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Wilson, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse aerosol particles impact the earth's radiative balance by direct scattering and absorption of light and by promoting cloud formation. Modeling studies suggest that coarse mode mineral dust and sea salt aerosol are the dominant contributors to aerosol optical depth throughout much of the globe. Lab and field studies indicate that larger aerosol particles tend to be more efficient ice nuclei, and recent airborne measurements confirm the dominant role of mineral dust on cirrus cloud formation. However, our ability to simulate coarse mode particle abundance in large scale models is limited by a lack of validating measurements above the earth's surface. We present airborne measurements of coarse mode aerosol abundance and composition over several mid-latitude, sub-tropical, and tropical regions from the boundary layer to the stratosphere. In the free troposphere the coarse mode constitutes 10-50% of the total particulate mass over a wide range of environments. Above North America mineral dust typically dominates the coarse mode, but biomass burning particles and sea salt also contribute. In remote environments coarse mode aerosol mainly consists of internally mixed sulfate-organic particles. Both continental and marine convection can enhance coarse aerosol mass through direct lofting of primary particles and by secondary accumulation of aerosol material through cloud processing.

  10. Influence of Interstellar FUV Radiation on the Abundance Ratio of 13CO to C18O in L 1551

    Lin, Sheng-Jun; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Hara, Chihomi; Lai, Shih-Ping; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sugitani, Koji; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Tatei, Hidefumi; Akashi, Toshiya; Tsukagushi, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between the far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation and the abundance ratios between 13CO and C18O, we observed L 1551 in 12CO (J=1-0), 13CO (J=1-0) and C18O (J=1-0) using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope with an angular resolution of ~22" (corresponding to 0.017 pc at a distance of 160 pc). L 1551 is chosen because it is relatively isolated in Taurus-Auriga complex, providing an ideal environment for studying the variation of abundance ratio due to the penetration of the FUV photons. L 1551 is a young star-forming region containing at least 6 young protostars between Class I and Class III stages and a quiescent elongated starless core. The distribution of 12CO emission shows the outflows coming from 2 youngest protostars IRS5 and NE. The 13CO and C18O are detected throughout the whole region with enhancement around the outflows and depletion in the outflow cavities. To avoid the influence of outflows, we exclude the outflow regions for X(13CO)/X(C18O) abundance ratio calculation. X(13CO)/X(C18O) is found in the range of 3.2 -- 36.2 with a mean value of 7.6. Comparing to the extinction map derived from Herschel observations, we found that the abundance ratio reaches its maximum at low AV and decreases to typical solar system value of 5.5 within the starless core. The high X(13CO)/X(C18O) value at the low AV value in L 1551 is most likely due to the selective FUV photodissociation of C18O. This is in contrast with Orion-A region where its internal OB stars keep the abundance ratio at a high level greater than ~10.

  11. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry for isotopic abundance measurements

    Miller, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a relatively new laser-based technique for the determination of isotopic abundances. The resonance ionization process depends upon the stepwise absorption of photons from the laser, promoting atoms of the element of interest through progressively higher electronic states until an ion is formed. Sensitivity arises from the efficiency of the resonant absorption process when coupled with the power available from commercial laser sources. Selectivity derives naturally from the distinct electronic structure of different elements. This isobaric discrimination has provided the major impetus for development of the technique. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used for analysis of the isotopic abundances of the rare earth lutetium. Isobaric interferences from ytterbium severely effect the ability to measure small amounts of the neutron-deficient Lu isotopes by conventional mass spectrometric techniques. Resonance ionization for lutetium is performed using a continuous-wave laser operating at 452 nm, through a sequential two-photon process, with one photon exciting the intermediate resonance and the second photon causing ionization. Ion yields for microgram-sized quantities of lutetium lie between 10(6) and 10(7) ions per second, at overall ionization efficiencies approaching 10(-4). Discrimination factors against ytterbium greater than 10(6) have been measured. Resonance ionization for technetium is also being explored, again in response to an isobaric interference, molybdenum. Because of the relatively high ionization potential for Tc, three-photon, two-color RIMS processes are being developed.

  12. Solar wind carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances measured in the Earth's magnetosheath with AMPTE/CCE

    The solar wind number density ratios of C/sup 6+/+C/sup 5+/ and N/sup 7+/+N/sup 6+/+N/sup 5+/ relative to O/sup 8+/+O/sup 7+/+O/sup 6+/ have been measured for the first time using data from the Charge-Energy-Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft during four solar active periods from Sept. 19 to Nov. 1, 1984 when CCE traversed the subsolar magnetosheath of the compressed magnetosphere. We find the average values of the density ratios of C/O and N/O to be 0.43 +- 0.03 and 0.15 +- 0.06, respectively. These ratios, as well as our average He/sup 2+//O ratio of 43 +- 5 for these same time periods, are in excellent agreement with Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) abundance ratios as well as SEP-derived coronal abundances of these elements. Our solar wind C/O ratio is substantially below the generally accepted photospheric value of 0.60

  13. CNO abundances and carbon isotope ratios in evolved stars of the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960

    Tautvaisiene, Grazina; Bragaglia, Angela; Randich, Sofia; Zenoviene, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Our main aim is to determine carbon-to-nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios for evolved giants in the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960, which have turn-off masses of about 2 Msun, and to compare them with predictions of theoretical models. High-resolution spectra were analysed using a differential synthetic spectrum method. Abundances of carbon were derived using the C2 Swan (0,1) band heads at 5135 and 5635.5 A. The wavelength interval 7940-8130 A with strong CN features was analysed to determine nitrogen abundances and carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen abundances were determined from the [Oi] line at 6300 A. The mean values of the CNO abundances are [C/Fe]=-0.35+-0.06 (s.d.), [N/Fe]=0.28+-0.05, and [O/Fe]=-0.02+-0.10 in seven stars of NGC 2324; [C/Fe]=-0.26+-0.02, [N/Fe]=0.39+-0.04, and [O/Fe]=-0.11+-0.06 in six stars of NGC 2477; and [C/Fe]=-0.39+-0.04, [N/Fe]=0.32+-0.05, and [O/Fe]=-0.19+-0.06 in six stars of NGC 3960. The mean C/N ratio is equal to 0.92+-0.12, 0.91+-0.09, and 0.80+-0.13, resp...

  14. Investigation of Isotopic Abundance Ratio of Biofield Treated Phenol Derivatives Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Butylatedhydroxytoluene (BHT) and 4-methoxyphenol (4-MP) are phenol derivatives that are generally known for their antioxidant properties and depigmenting activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of BHT and 4-MP using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BHT and 4-MP samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control group remained untreated while the treated group was subjected to Mr. Trive...

  15. Abundance ratios of volatile vs. refractory elements in planet-harbouring stars: hints of pollution?

    Ecuvillon, A.; Israelian, G.; Santos, N. C.; Mayor, M.; Gilli, G.

    2005-01-01

    We present the [X/H] trends as function of the elemental condensation temperature Tc in 88 planet host stars and in a volume-limited comparison sample of 33 dwarfs without detected planetary companions. We gathered homogeneous abundance results for many volatile and refractory elements spanning a wide range of Tc, from a few dozens to several hundreds kelvin. We investigate possible anomalous trends of planet hosts with respect to comparison sample stars in order to detect evidence of possibl...

  16. Evaluation of the Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Biofield Energy Treated Resorcinol Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Technique

    Trivedi, Mahendra; Branton, Alice; Trivedi, Dahryn; Nayak, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotope ratio analysis is widely used in several scientific fields such as agricultural, food authenticity, biochemistry, metabolism, medical research, etc. Resorcinol is one of the most versatile chemicals used for the synthesis of several pharmaceuticals, dyes, polymers, organic compounds, etc. The current research work was designed to investigate the impact of the biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance ratios of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 17O/16O (P 18O/16O (P M+1/PM) and ...

  17. Predicted CALET Measurements of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Abundances

    Rauch, Brian

    2013-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET), comprised of main calorimeter telescope (CAL) and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM), is under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014. CAL consists of a Charge Detector (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an Imaging Calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (X0) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC) with 27 X0 of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of CAL are to measure electron energy spectra from 1GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1,000 TeV. In this paper we discuss the predicted abundance measurements CAL can make of rare ultra-heavy (UH) nuclei (30 IMC layers without requiring particle energy determination in the TASC in the portion of the ISS 51.6^o inclination orbit where the geomagnetic rigidity cutoffs are above minimum ionization in the scintillator. In 5-years CAL would collect 4-5 times the UH statistics of TIGER.

  18. Monte Carlo method for calculating oxygen abundances and their uncertainties from strong-line flux measurements

    Bianco, F. B.; Modjaz, M.; Oh, S. M.; Fierroz, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Kewley, L.; Graur, O.

    2016-07-01

    We present the open-source Python code pyMCZ that determines oxygen abundance and its distribution from strong emission lines in the standard metallicity calibrators, based on the original IDL code of Kewley and Dopita (2002) with updates from Kewley and Ellison (2008), and expanded to include more recently developed calibrators. The standard strong-line diagnostics have been used to estimate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium through various emission line ratios (referred to as indicators) in many areas of astrophysics, including galaxy evolution and supernova host galaxy studies. We introduce a Python implementation of these methods that, through Monte Carlo sampling, better characterizes the statistical oxygen abundance confidence region including the effect due to the propagation of observational uncertainties. These uncertainties are likely to dominate the error budget in the case of distant galaxies, hosts of cosmic explosions. Given line flux measurements and their uncertainties, our code produces synthetic distributions for the oxygen abundance in up to 15 metallicity calibrators simultaneously, as well as for E(B- V) , and estimates their median values and their 68% confidence regions. We provide the option of outputting the full Monte Carlo distributions, and their Kernel Density estimates. We test our code on emission line measurements from a sample of nearby supernova host galaxies (z https://github.com/nyusngroup/pyMCZ.

  19. Influence of Biofield Energy Treatment on Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Aniline Derivatives

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi; Alice Branton; Dahryn Trivedi; Gopal Nayak

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 15N/14N ≡ (PM+1)/PM in aniline; and (PM+1)/PM and 81Br/79Br ≡ (PM+2)/PM in 4-bromoaniline using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Aniline and 4-bromoaniline samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control part remained as untreated, while the treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment. The ...

  20. Positron ratio measurement with AMS-02

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a state of the art particle detector on the International Space Station (ISS). Equipped with a transition radiation detector (TRD) and an electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) AMS-02 is able to clearly distinguish positrons from the large background of protons in the cosmic rays. To optimize the proton rejection power of the TRD as many hits with a good estimation of the particles path length in the straw as possible are needed. A new tracking method has been used, which does not only use the particle path information provided by the tracker, but also uses the inefficiency of the single layers in the TRD. A missing signal in a layer of the detector adds additional high precision points of passage of the measured particle. These points help to correct the particle path for multiple scattering inside the TRD or small interactions in the material between TRD and Tracker. With this tracking method the path length estimation in the TRD straws is improved and therefore the proton rejection power is increased. This assures a positron spectrum with a high purity.

  1. Abundance ratios and IMF slope in the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC~1396 with MUSE

    Mentz, J J; Peletier, R F; Falcón-Barroso, J; Lisker, T; van de Ven, G; Loubser, S I; Hilker, M; Sánchez-Janssen, R; Napolitano, N; Cantiello, M; Capaccioli, M; Norris, M; Paolillo, M; Smith, R; Beasley, M A; Lyubenova, M; Munoz, R; Puzia, T

    2016-01-01

    Deep observations of the dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxy NGC 1396 (M$_V = -16.60$, Mass $\\sim 4\\times10^8$ M$_\\odot$), located in the Fornax cluster, have been performed with the VLT/ MUSE spectrograph in the wavelength region from $4750-9350$ \\AA{}. In this paper we present a stellar population analysis studying chemical abundances, the star formation history (SFH) and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) as a function of galacto-centric distance. Different, independent ways to analyse the stellar populations result in a luminosity-weighted age of $\\sim$ 6 Gyr and a metallicity [Fe/H]$\\sim$ $-0.4$, similar to other dEs of similar mass. We find unusually overabundant values of [Ca/Fe] $\\sim +0.1$, and under-abundant Sodium, with [Na/Fe] values around $-0.1$, while [Mg/Fe] is overabundant at all radii, increasing from $\\sim+0.1$ in the centre to $\\sim +0.2$ dex. We notice a significant metallicity and age gradient within this dwarf galaxy. To constrain the stellar IMF of NGC 1396, we find that the IMF of NGC 1...

  2. Evolution of N/O Abundance Ratios and Ionization Parameters from z~0 to 2 Investigated by the Direct Temperature Method

    Kojima, Takashi; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Harikane, Yuichi; Ono, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We present N/O abundance ratios, ionization parameters $q_{\\rm ion}$, and oxygen abundance O/H of eleven $z\\sim 2$ galaxies determined by the direct temperature $T_{\\rm e}$ method with [OIII] $\\lambda$4363 and OIII] $\\lambda$1665 lines, and investigate galaxy evolution from $z\\sim 0$ to $2$ in conjunction with $T_{\\rm e}$-method measurements of 208,529 SDSS galaxies and 9 green pea galaxies (GPs). We identify that three out of our eleven $z\\sim 2$ galaxies clearly fall beyond the local average of N/O-O/H and N/O-stellar mass ($M_{\\star}$) relations, while the rest of the $z\\sim 2$ galaxies have N/O ratios comparable with $z\\sim 0$ galaxies. The eleven $z\\sim 2$ galaxies place the upper limit of N/O ratio $\\log ({\\rm N/O})\\le -1.28$ on average, suggesting that the N/O ratio evolves, if any, by $<0.15$ dex. We find that two of our $z\\sim 2$ galaxies with the significant BPT offsets show both N/O ratio and $q_{\\rm ion}$ about 0.4-dex higher than the local average, while there exist $z\\sim 0$ green-pea galaxie...

  3. High-precision abundances of Sc, Mn, Cu, and Ba in solar twins. Trends of element ratios with stellar age

    Nissen, P E

    2016-01-01

    A previous study of correlations between element abundance ratios, [X/Fe], and ages of solar twin stars is extended to include Sc, Mn, Cu, and Ba. HARPS spectra with S/N > 600 are used to derive very precise (+/- 0.01 dex) differential abundances, and stellar ages with internal errors less than 1 Gyr are obtained by interpolation in the logg - Teff diagram between isochrones calculated with the Aarhus Stellar Evolution Code. For stars younger than 6 Gyr, [X/Fe] is tightly correlated with stellar age for all elements. For ages between 6 and 9 Gyr, the [X/Fe] - age correlations break down and the stars split up into two groups having respectively high and low [X/Fe] for the odd-Z elements. It is concluded that while stars in the solar neighborhood younger than about 6 Gyr were formed from interstellar gas with a smooth chemical evolution, older stars have originated from regions enriched by supernovae with different neutron excesses. Furthermore, the correlations between abundance ratios and stellar age suggest...

  4. Transition Region Abundance Measurements During Impulsive Heating Events

    Warren, Harry P; Doschek, George A; Feldman, Uri

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that elemental abundances vary in the solar atmosphere and that this variation is organized by first ionization potential (FIP). Previous studies have shown that in the solar corona low-FIP elements, such as Fe, Si, Mg, and Ca, are generally enriched relative to high-FIP elements, such as C, N, O, Ar, and Ne. In this paper we report on measurements of plasma composition made during impulsive heating events observed at transition region temperatures with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. During these events the intensities of O IV, V, and VI emission lines are enhanced relative to emission lines from Mg V, VI, and VII and Si VI and VII and indicate a composition close to that of the photosphere. Long-lived coronal fan structures, in contrast, show an enrichment of low-FIP elements. We conjecture that the plasma composition is an important signature of the coronal heating process, with impulsive heating leading to the evaporation of unfractionated material from...

  5. Transition Region Abundance Measurements During Impulsive Heating Events

    Warren, Harry P.; Brooks, David H.; Doschek, George A.; Feldman, Uri

    2016-06-01

    It is well established that elemental abundances vary in the solar atmosphere and that this variation is organized by first ionization potential (FIP). Previous studies have shown that in the solar corona, low-FIP elements such as Fe, Si, Mg, and Ca, are generally enriched relative to high-FIP elements such as C, N, O, Ar, and Ne. In this paper we report on measurements of plasma composition made during impulsive heating events observed at transition region temperatures with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. During these events the intensities of O iv, v, and vi emission lines are enhanced relative to emission lines from Mg v, vi, and vii and Si vi and vii, and indicate a composition close to that of the photosphere. Long-lived coronal fan structures, in contrast, show an enrichment of low-FIP elements. We conjecture that the plasma composition is an important signature of the coronal heating process, with impulsive heating leading to the evaporation of unfractionated material from the lower layers of the solar atmosphere and higher-frequency heating leading to long-lived structures and the accumulation of low-FIP elements in the corona.

  6. Temperature measurements from oxygen isotope ratios of fish otoliths.

    Devereux, I

    1967-03-31

    Measurements have shown that the temperature of a fish's habitat can be deduced from the Oxygen isotope ratio of its otoliths (ear bones). Isotope ratios Obtained from fossil otoliths indicate a water temperature which agrees wiht that found by isotope measurements on associated benthonic foraminifera. PMID:6020293

  7. Method for measuring the heavy stripped ion abundances of plasma

    A description is given of a system which uses a velocity filter and an energy filter in tandem to analyze the abundances and energy spreads of highly stripped ions. The system can also serve as a plasma diagnostic. (Auth.)

  8. Track etch radon ratios to soil uranium and a new uranium abundance estimate

    Equilibrium values of the radon content of soil gas are most precisely determined by the time-integrating Track Etch technique. This method, extensively used as a uranium exploration tool, detects radon gas with dielectric detectors that record alpha-particle emission from the gas. Integrated radon values, corrected to a standard exposure time of 30 days, are conveniently expressed as T, the number of alpha tracks per square millimeter of the solid-state track detector. Background calculations were made on 713 Track Etch surveys conducted on the five major continents. From this large data base, a mean worldwide background can be derived. At present the worldwide background mean is 19 T. In a number of surveys soil samples were taken from the B soil horizon of the Track Etch cup holes. These samples were then chemically analyzed for uranium concentration (ppM U3O8). Track Etch readings for each soil-analyzed hole were divided by ppM U3O8 to give a new statistic, T/ppM. The T/ppM numbers were then analyzed statistically and the background population derived as previously mentioned, together with the background mean. If this mean value of T/ppM is then combined with the mean worldwide background, an estimate of surficial abundance can be made

  9. 13C/12C natural abundance ratios as an indicator of changes in plant respiratory pathways

    Changes in metabolism which involve a shift in endogenous respiratory substrate can be detected from isotopic ratios of respired CO2. Various plant tissues including seedlings, flowers and storage tissues, which during development or in response to environmental stimulus experience a change in metabolism, have been examined. Respiratory CO2 was collected in a series of traps from a stream of CO2-free air. Biochemical fractions were combusted at 8000C and the CO2 recovered for analysis. Samples were then analyzed on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Due to large isotopic differences between lipid and carbohydrate fractions, change from one to the other as respiratory substrate can be detected. Storage starch in potato tuber seems not to be utilized for respiration until the stimulus for new growth is received. Similarly, the time of onset of lipid utilization in fatty seeds can be detected during germination. Flowering in the Araceae involves a great burst of carbohydrate-base respiration followed by a shift to lipid metabolism. The endogenous source of ethylene in peanuts and the extent of CO2 refixation during photorespiration has also been estimated by this technique

  10. The intrinsic abundance ratio and X-factor of CO isotopologues in L1551 shielded from FUV photodissociation

    Lin, Sheng-Jun; Hara, Chihomi; Lai, Shih-Ping; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sugitani, Koji; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Tatei, Hidefumi; Akashi, Toshiya; Higuchi, Aya E; Tsukagoshi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    L1551 is chosen because it is relatively isolated in the Taurus molecular cloud shielded from FUV photons, providing an ideal environment for studying the target properties. Our observations cover ~40'x40' with resolution ~30", which are the maps with highest spatial dynamical range to date. We derive the X(13CO)/X(C18O) value on the sub-parsec scales in the range of ~3-27 with a mean value of 8.0+-2.8. Comparing to the visual extinction map derived from the Herschel observations, we found that the abundance ratio reaches its maximum at low Av (i.e., Av ~ 1-4mag), and decreases to the typical solar system value of 5.5 inside L1551 MC. The high X(13CO)/X(C18O) value at the boundary of the cloud is most likely due to the selective FUV photodissociation of C18O. This is in contrast with Orion-A where its internal OB stars keep the abundance ratio at a high level greater than ~10. In addition, we explore the variation of the X-factor, because it is an uncertain but widely used quantity in extragalactic studies. W...

  11. Comparison of Three Methods of Measuring CA/C Ratios

    David A. Goss, OD, PhD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical determination of convergence accommodation to convergence (CA/C ratios may be useful for analysis of accommodation and vergence disorders, but there are no standard clinical methods of measurement of CA/C ratios. This study compared two potential clinical CA/C measurement methods to a laboratory procedure. Methods: CA/C ratios were measured for 19 young adult subjects using procedures in which accommodation was measured with the binocular cross cylinder (BCC test, Nott dynamic retinoscopy, and an eccentric photorefractor. Vergence was stimulated with prism, and the resultant change in accommodation was used to calculate CA/C ratios. Results: The mean CA/C ratios were 0.036 D/Δ with BCC and BI prism, -0.004 D/Δ with BCC and BO prism, 0.023 D/Δ with Nott retinoscopy and BI prism, 0.036 D/Δ with Nott retinoscopy and BO prism, and 0.115 D/Δ with eccentric photorefraction and BO prism. The differences between each pair of tests were statistically significant by paired t-test except for the comparison of the BCC BI prism CA/C ratio with the Nott BI prism CA/C ratio. The means and standard deviations of the paired differences were all high relative to the measurements themselves. Conclusion: The CA/C ratios obtained in the present study did not show good agreement with each other. The use of CA/C ratios in clinical analysis would therefore require further evaluation and standardization of measurement methods, establishment of norms, and development of analysis procedures in concert with AC/A ratios and other clinical findings.

  12. Measurements of K/Π ratio in cosmic radiation

    Measurements of k/Π ratio in cosmic radiation by its half lives and its fluxes, were carried out. The kaon flux was obtained using the Cherenkov detector, and for pion flux scintillation detectors were used. The final results of K/Π ratio ∼ 0.2 was obtained. (M.C.K.)

  13. Odds Ratio: Review about the Meaning of an Epidemiological Measure

    Aguiar, Pedro; Nunes, Baltazar

    2013-01-01

    [ENG] INTRODUCTION: It is very important to review the meaning of the Odds Ratio as a measure of effect and association, as well as, the bias of the Odds Ratio when it is assumed as a risk ratio or a prevalence ratio in the case of frequent disease or frequent health outcome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We simulated in a cohort of 200 individuals with 100 exposed and 100 non-exposed to a risk factor, a first setting of rare disease and a second setting of a more frequent disease. In both settin...

  14. Estimates of mantle thorium/uranium ratios from Th, U and Pb isotope abundances in basaltic melts

    The relationship between the abundances of Th, U and Pb isotopes in basalt melts and the [Th/U] ratio of their source is assessed. A simple melting model is used to show that whereas the activity ratio (230Th/232Th) in the initial melt before extraction is equal to the bulk source ratio, that in the extracted melt may be higher. The difference depends upon the rate of melting relative to the half-life of 230Th (73 ka). Only when the rate is fast compared to this half life will (230Th/232Th) in the extracted melt provide a correct estimate of [232Th/238U] in the source and therefore of its [Th/U] ratio. This is normally not the case for MORB, and a better estimate of source [Th/U] ratio is derived from [232Th/238U] ratio in the basalt, which does not depend upon the rate of melting. Available data for MORB glasses give a best estimate for their source [Th/U] = 2.58+ 0.06. This value is less than both that of the bulk Earth of 3.9±0.1, and of the source of plume basalts from Iceland and Hawaii, which are 3.3 and 3.2 respectively. These estimates contrast with the [232Th/238U] ratio required to produce the radiogenic {208Pb/206Pb} atomic ratio of MORB over 4.55 Ga. This averages 3.8 and is little different from the average derived from Pb-isotopes in plume basalts. These observations are most easily reconciled if Th, U and Pb are efficiently stripped from the mantle by melting and have a residence time there of ≤ 1 Ga. The [Th/U] ratio of 2.6 for the upper mantle requires melt fractions of ≤ 1% to be involved in transferrring U and Th from this region into the continents. Such melt fractions are present in subduction zones and in the source regions of continental alkali basalts. (author)

  15. Solar heavy element abundance: constraints from frequency separation ratios of low-degree p modes

    Chaplin, William J; Basu, Sarbani; Elsworth, Yvonne; New, Roger; Verner, Graham A

    2007-01-01

    We use very precise frequencies of low-degree solar-oscillation modes measured from 4752 days of data collected by the Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) to derive seismic information on the solar core. We compare these observations to results from a large Monte Carlo simulation of standard solar models, and use the results to constrain the mean molecular weight of the solar core, and the metallicity of the solar convection zone. We find that only a high value of solar metallicity is consistent with the seismic observations. We can determine the mean molecular weight of the solar core to a very high precision, and, dependent on the sequence of Monte Carlo models used, find that the average mean molecular weight in the inner 20% by radius of the Sun ranges from 0.7209 to 0.7231, with uncertainties of less than 0.5% on each value. Our lowest seismic estimate of solar metallicity is Z=0.0187 and our highest is Z=0.0239, with uncertainties in the range of 12--19%. Our results indicate that the discrepa...

  16. Absolute and Relative Isotope Abundances Measured by Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy

    Tucker, George Franklin

    The potential for measuring absolute and relative isotope abundances by high resolution spectroscopy with tunable diode lasers as sources was studied. In order to achieve the sensitivity necessary to determine the absolute abundances of molecules containing long-lived radionuclides such as ('14)C an ('129)I, a resonant spectrophone based on the photoacoustic effect was used for detection. For safety, NH(,3) was used as a sample with air as a buffer gas when characterizing the performance of the TDL-spectrophone system. Frequency modulation of the TDL was employed. The optimum operating pressure was found to be 6.6 kPa(50 Torr). Substitution of Kr as a buffer gas yielded a fourfold increase in signal. It is estimated that with currently available TDLs a photoacoustic spectrometer should be capable of detecting ('14)CO(,2) and CH('129)I at the levels present in nuclear reactor containment gases. An isotope shift of CH(,3)('129) I relative to CH(,3)('127)I in the (nu)(,6) band of (0.0135 (+OR-) 0.0006) cm('-1) was measured by TDL linear absorption spectroscopy. To perform relative isotope abundance measurements a TDL was tuned over two adjacent, but well-resolved, rotation -vibration absorption lines, one of each isotopic species, while the transmitted radiation was monitored with a HgCdTe detector. The P(26) line of the (nu)(,1) band of N(,2)('18)O at 1225.3671 cm('-1) and the P(63) line of the (nu)(,1) band of N(,2)('16)O at 1225.4879 cm('-1) were chosen, for their line strength ratio is inversely proportional to the ratio of their natural abundances, and thereby yielded approximately equal absorbance for each isotopic species. A double-beam, single-detector spectrometer with wavelength modulation to minimize the effects of laser power and cell temperature fluctuations, has been adapted for use with a TDL. After samples of known ('18)O enrichment were used to calibrate the spectrometer, the (delta)('18)O of tropospheric N(,2)O was measured to be (8.05 (+OR-) 0

  17. Measurement of the C/H ratio by neutrons

    A probe consisting of a Ra (α, n) Be neutron source and a boron-trifluoride-filled proportional counter were used for measuring the C/H ratio in hydrocarbons. The intensity of the thermal-neutron flux near the counter increases in proportion to the increase of the hydrogen concentration in the hydrocarbon surrounding the probe. The C/H ratio is found by measuring the density. The C/H ratio can be estimated as accurately by this method as by β-particle transmission. The errors resulting from the chemical nature of the hydrocarbon can be reduced to a minimum. The advantage of this method is that it renders possible an external measurement of the C/H ratio of hydrocarbons contained in steel vessels or thick steel piping by means of a portable apparatus. (author)

  18. Use of abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 for microbial source identification.

    Muniesa, Maite; Lucena, Francisco; Blanch, Anicet R; Payán, Andrey; Jofre, Juan

    2012-12-01

    Water contaminated with human faeces is a risk to human health and management of water bodies can be improved by determining the sources of faecal pollution. Field studies show that existing methods are insufficient and that different markers are required. This study proposes the combined use of two microbial indicators, the concentrations of which are presented as ratios. This provides a more reliable approach to identifying faecal sources as it avoids variation due to treatment or ageing of the contamination. Among other indicators, bacteriophages have been proposed as rapid and cheap indicators of faecal pollution. Samples analysed in this study were derived from wastewater treatment plants (raw sewage, secondary and tertiary effluents and raw sewage sludge) river water, seawater and animal related wastewater. The abundance ratios of faecal coliforms and Bacteroides phages, either strain RYC2056 (non-specific for faecal origin) or strain GA17 (specific for human pollution), and among somatic coliphages and phages infecting both Bacteroides strains, were evaluated. The results indicate that the ratio of somatic coliphages and phages infecting Bacteroides strain GA17, which is specific to human faecal sources, provides a robust method for discriminating samples, even those presenting different levels and ages of pollution, and allows samples polluted with human faeces to be distinguished from those containing animal faecal pollution. This method allows the generation of numerical data that can be further applied to numerical methods for faecal pollution discrimination. PMID:23039916

  19. Nondestructive measurement of the grid ratio using a single image

    The antiscatter grid is an essential part of modern radiographic systems. Since the introduction of the antiscatter grid, however, there have been few methods proposed for acceptance testing and verification of manufacturer-supplied grid specifications. The grid ratio (r) is an important parameter describing the antiscatter grid because it affects many other grid quality metrics, such as the contrast improvement ratio (K), primary transmission (Tp), and scatter transmission (Ts). Also, the grid ratio in large part determines the primary clinical use of the grid. To this end, the authors present a technique for the nondestructive measurement of the grid ratio of antiscatter grids. They derived an equation that can be used to calculate the grid ratio from a single off-focus flat field image by exploiting the relationship between grid cutoff and off-focus distance. The calculation can be performed by hand or with included analysis software. They calculated the grid ratios of several different grids throughout the institution, and afterward they destructively measured the grid ratio of a nominal r8 grid previously evaluated with the method. They also studied the sensitivity of the method to technical factors and choice of parameters. With one exception, the results for the grids found in the institution were in agreement with the manufacturer's specifications and international standards. The nondestructive evaluation of the r8 grid indicated a ratio of 7.3, while the destructive measurement indicated a ratio of 7.53±0.28. Repeated evaluations of the same grid yielded consistent results. The technique provides the medical physicist with a new tool for quantitative evaluation of the grid ratio, an important grid performance criterion. The method is robust and repeatable when appropriate choices of technical factors and other parameters are made.

  20. Cosmic ray abundance measurements with the CAKE balloon experiment

    Cecchini, S; Giacomelli, G; Manzoor, S; Medinaceli, E; Patrizii, L; Togo, V

    2005-01-01

    We present the results from the CAKE (Cosmic Abundance below Knee Energy) balloon experiment which uses nuclear track detectors. The final experiment goal is the determination of the charge spectrum of CR nuclei with Z $>$ 30 in the primary cosmic radiation. The detector, which has a geometric acceptance of $\\sim$ 1.7 m$^2$sr, was exposed in a trans-mediterranean stratospheric balloon flight. Calibrations of the detectors used (CR39 and Lexan), scanning strategies and algorithms for tracking particles in an automatic mode are presented. The present status of the results is discussed

  1. Prospects of ratio and differential ({\\delta}) ratio based measurement-models: a case study for IRMS evaluation

    Datta, B P

    2015-01-01

    The suitability of a mathematical-model Y = f({Xi}) in serving a purpose whatsoever (should be preset by the function f specific input-to-output variation-rates, i.e.) can be judged beforehand. We thus evaluate here the two apparently similar models: YA = fA(SRi,WRi) = (SRi/WRi) and: YD = fd(SRi,WRi) = ([SRi,WRi] - 1) = (YA - 1), with SRi and WRi representing certain measurable-variables (e.g. the sample S and the working-lab-reference W specific ith-isotopic-abundance-ratios, respectively, for a case as the isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS)). The idea is to ascertain whether fD should represent a better model than fA, specifically, for the well-known IRMS evaluation. The study clarifies that fA and fD should really represent different model-families. For example, the possible variation, eA, of an absolute estimate as the yA (and/ or the risk of running a machine on the basis of the measurement-model fA) should be dictated by the possible Ri-measurement-variations (u_S and u_W) only: eA = (u_S + u_W); i....

  2. Feasibility of Isotopic Measurements: Graphite Isotopic Ratio Method

    Wood, Thomas W.; Gerlach, David C.; Reid, Bruce D.; Morgan, W. C.

    2001-04-30

    This report addresses the feasibility of the laboratory measurements of isotopic ratios for selected trace constituents in irradiated nuclear-grade graphite, based on the results of a proof-of-principal experiment completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1994. The estimation of graphite fluence through measurement of isotopic ratio changes in the impurity elements in the nuclear-grade graphite is referred to as the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). Combined with reactor core and fuel information, GIRM measurements can be employed to estimate cumulative materials production in graphite moderated reactors. This report documents the laboratory procedures and results from the initial measurements of irradiated graphite samples. The irradiated graphite samples were obtained from the C Reactor (one of several production reactors at Hanford) and from the French G-2 Reactor located at Marcoule. Analysis of the irradiated graphite samples indicated that replicable measurements of isotope ratios could be obtained from the fluence sensitive elements of Ti, Ca, Sr, and Ba. While these impurity elements are present in the nuclear-grade graphite in very low concentrations, measurement precision was typically on the order of a few tenths of a percent to just over 1 percent. Replicability of the measurements was also very good with measured values differing by less than 0.5 percent. The overall results of this initial proof-of-principal experiment are sufficiently encouraging that a demonstration of GIRM on a reactor scale basis is planned for FY-95.

  3. A Sharpe-ratio-based measure for currencies

    Javier Prado-Dominguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Sharpe Ratio offers an excellent summary of the excess return required per unit of risk invested. This work presents an adaptation of the ex-ante Sharpe Ratio for currencies where we consider a random walk approach for the currency behavior and implied volatility as a proxy for market expectations of future realized volatility. The outcome of the proposed measure seems to gauge some information on the expected required return attached to the “peso problem”.

  4. Isomeric ratio measurements with the ILL LOHENGRIN spectrometer

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Litaize, O.; Serot, O.; Faust, H.; Bernard, D.; Blanc, A.; Köster, U.; Méplan, O.; Mutti, P.; Sage, C.

    2016-03-01

    The modelling of γ heating and neutron damage inside a nuclear reactor is essential to design the next generation of nuclear reactors. The determination of the fission fragment momentum is a key element to perform accurate calculations of the γ heating. One way to assess this information is to look at the isomeric ratio of different nuclei. According to the lifetime of the isomeric state, different experimental techniques were developed at the LOHENGRIN spectrometer. A focus on the measurement of isomeric ratios of 136I in neutron induced fission of 241Pu is presented. A discussion with the current assumptions used in the evaluation process for isomeric ratio is also shown.

  5. Precision measurement of cross sections by isomer ratio method

    A possibility of determining the cross sections of isomer states measuring the ratio of yields of ground and isomer states (or σm/σg cross section ratio) by γ spectroscopy methods is investigated. Isomer ratio (IR) for 185Re(γ, n)184mgRe, 181Ta(α, n)184mgRe, 82Se(γ, n)81mSe and 39K(γ, n)38mgK reactions are studied. The IR determination error makes up several per cents. 6 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Biomass carbon-14 ratio measured by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Measurement methods of a biomass carbon ratio in biomass products based on 14C-radiocarbon concentration have been reviewed. Determination of the biomass carbon ratio in biomass products is important to secure the reliance in the commercial market, because the 'biomass products' could contain products from petroleum. The biomass carbon ratio can be determined from percent Modern Carbon (pMC) using ASTM D6866 methods. The pMC value is calculated from the comparison between the 14C in sample and 14C in reference material. The 14C concentration in chemical products can be measured by liquid scintillation counter (LSC) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). LSC can be applicable to determine the biomass carbon ratio for liquid samples such as gasoline with bioethanol (E5 or E10). On the other hand, AMS can be used to determine the biomass carbon ratio for almost all kinds of organic and inorganic compounds such as starch, cellulose, ethanol, gasoline, or polymer composite with inorganic fillers. AMS can accept the gaseous and solid samples. The graphite derived from samples included in solid phase is measured by AMS. The biomass carbon of samples derived from wood were higher than 100% due to the effect of atomic bomb test in the atmosphere around 1950 which caused the artificial 14C injection. Exact calculation methods of the biomass carbon ratio from pMC will be required for the international standard (ISO standard). (author)

  7. Stable Isotope Ratio Measurement by NAA for Environmental Source Identification

    Gone, Jeckong; Olmez, Ilhan; Ames, Michael R.

    1999-06-06

    The purpose of applying neutron activation analysis to the study of isotopic ratios is to examine whether ratios could be measured that are difficult to determine by other means and that could be used to distinguish between materials from different types of sources. The NAA is a sensitive analytical method for many elements that are typically present in levels too low to measure by other techniques, and because NAA is based on nuclear rather than chemical or physical reactions, the analytical signals from the two isotopes are readily distinguishable.

  8. Stable Isotope Ratio Measurement by NAA for Environmental Source Identification

    The purpose of applying neutron activation analysis to the study of isotopic ratios is to examine whether ratios could be measured that are difficult to determine by other means and that could be used to distinguish between materials from different types of sources. The NAA is a sensitive analytical method for many elements that are typically present in levels too low to measure by other techniques, and because NAA is based on nuclear rather than chemical or physical reactions, the analytical signals from the two isotopes are readily distinguishable

  9. Measurement of Tau Branching Ratios to Five Charged Hadrons

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Evans, H G; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Stumpf, L; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1999-01-01

    The branching ratios of the decay of the tau lepton to five charged hadrons have been measured with the OPAL detector at LEP using data collected between 1991 and 1995 at e+e- centre-of-mass energies close to the Z resonance. The branching ratios are measured to be BR(tau- to 3h-2h+nutau) = 0.091+-0.014+-0.005% BR(tau- to 3h-2h+pi0nutau) = 0.027+-0.018+-0.007% where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  10. Concentrations and abundance ratios of long-chain alkenones and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in sinking particles south of Java

    Chen, Wenwen; Mohtadi, Mahyar; Schefuß, Enno; Mollenhauer, Gesine

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we obtained concentrations and abundance ratios of long-chain alkenones and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in a one-year time-series of sinking particles collected with a sediment trap moored from December 2001 to November 2002 at 2200 m water depth south of Java in the eastern Indian Ocean. We investigate the seasonality of alkenone and GDGT fluxes as well as the potential habitat depth of the Thaumarchaeota producing the GDGTs entrained in sinking particles. The alkenone flux shows a pronounced seasonality and ranges from 1 μg m-2 d-1 to 35 μg m-2 d-1. The highest alkenone flux is observed in late September during the Southeast monsoon, coincident with high total organic carbon fluxes as well as high net primary productivity. Flux-weighted mean temperature for the high flux period using the alkenone-based sea-surface temperature (SST) index U37K‧ is 26.7 °C, which is similar to satellite-derived Southeast (SE) monsoon SST (26.4 °C). The GDGT flux displays a weaker seasonality than that of the alkenones. It is elevated during the SE monsoon period compared to the Northwest (NW) monsoon and intermonsoon periods (approximately 2.5 times), which is probably related to seasonal variation of the abundance of Thaumarchaeota, or to enhanced export of GDGTs by aggregation with sinking phytoplankton detritus. Flux-weighted mean temperature inferred from the GDGT-based TEX86H index is 26.2 °C, which is 1.8 °C lower than mean annual (ma) SST but similar to SE monsoon SST. As the time series of TEX86H temperature estimates, however, does not record a strong seasonal amplitude, we infer that TEX86H reflects ma upper thermocline temperature at approximately 50 m water depth.

  11. The Proton Form Factor Ratio Measurements at Jefferson Lab

    Punjabi, Vina A. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Perdrisat, Charles F. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The ratio of the proton form factors, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp}, has been measured from Q{sup 2} of 0.5 GeV{sup 2} to 8.5 GeV{sup 2}, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The discovery that the proton form factor ratio measured in these experiments decreases approximately linearly with four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, for values above ~1 GeV{sup 2}, is one of the most significant results to come out of JLab. These results have had a large impact on progress in hadronic physics; and have required a significant rethinking of nucleon structure. The increasingly common use of the double-polarization technique to measure the nucleon form factors, in the last 15 years, has resulted in a dramatic improvement of the quality of all four nucleon electromagnetic form factors, G{sub Ep}, G{sub Mp}, G{sub En} and G{sub Mn}. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEP(V), to continue the ratio measurements to 12 GeV{sup 2}. A dedicated experimental setup, the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS), will be built for this purpose. It will be equipped with a focal plane polarimeter to measure the polarization of the recoil protons. The scattered electrons will be detected in an electromagnetic calorimeter. In this presentation, I will review the status of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors and discuss a number of theoretical approaches to describe nucleon form factors.

  12. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  13. Infrared spectroscopic measurements of the vertical column abundance of sulfur hexafluoride, SF6, from the ground

    Zander, R.; Demoulin, P.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    The solar observations involved in the present monitoring evaluation were made at two facilities, using Fourier-transform spectrometers achieving spectral resolutions of 0.005/cm and signal-to-rms noise ratios for individual scans from near 500 to near 1000. The monthly mean total vertical-column abundances of SF6 above both facilities are reported for time intervals from June 1986 to June 1990 and from March 1981 to June 1990. It is found that the vertical-column abundances increased at mean rates of 6.9 +/- 2.8 pct above one station and 6.6 +/- 7.2 pct above the other. Since all the results were retrieved using the same spectroscopic parameters and similar nonlinear least-squares curve-fitting algorithms validated through intercomparison exercises, the large error reported for the second station is attributed to a larger measurement uncertainty due to stronger H2O and C2O interferences, and a greater variability during each month.

  14. The Proton Form Factor Ratio Measurements at Jefferson Lab

    Punjabi, Vina

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of the proton form factors, GEp/GMp, has been measured from Q2 of 0.5 GeV2 to 8.5 GeV2, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The discovery that the proton form factor ratio measured in these experiments decreases approximately linearly with four-momentum transfer, Q2, for values above ? 1 GeV2, is one of the most significant results to come out of JLab. These results have had a large impact on progress in hadronic physics; and have required a significant rethinking of nucleon structure. The increasingly common use of the double-polarization technique to measure the nucleon form factors, in the last 15 years, has resulted in a dramatic improvement of the quality of all four nucleon electromagnetic form factors, GEp, GMp, GEn and GMn. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEP(V), to continue...

  15. A Measurement of the Tau Topological Branching Ratios

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Bellunato, T F; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bilenky, S M; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bol, J L; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Bracko, M; Branchini, P; Brenner, R A; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Chung, S H; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Croix, J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Davenport, M; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Geralis, T; Ghodbane, N; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hertz, O; Higón, E; Holmgren, Sven Olof; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kurowska, J; Lamsa, J; Laugier, J P; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Merle, E; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Morettini, P; Morton, G; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Nicolaidou, R; Niezurawski, P; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Nygren, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp-Baudot, I; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schwanda, C; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Sette, G; Shellard, R C; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tortosa, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Dam, P; Van den Boeck, W; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verdier, P; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zoller, P; Zumerle, G; Zupan, M

    2001-01-01

    Using data collected in the DELPHI detector at LEP-1, measurements of the inclusive tau branching ratios for decay modes containing one, three, or five charged particles have been performed, giving the following results: B_1 = B(\\tau^- -> (particle)^- \\geq 0pi^0 \\geq 0K^0 \

  16. Measurement of muon charge ratio with the Large Volume Detector

    Agafonova, N Yu; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Bertoni, R; Boyarkin, V V; Bressan, E; Bruno, G; Dadykin, V L; Dobrynina, E A; Enikeev, R I; Fulgione, W; Galeotti, P; Garbini, M; Ghia, P L; Giusti, P; Kemp, E; Malgin, A S; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Persiani, R; Pless, I A; Ryasny, V G; Ryazhskaya, O G; Saavedra, O; Sartorelli, G; Selvi, M; Trinchero, G C; Vigorito, C; Yakushev, V F; Zichichi, A

    2013-01-01

    The value of ${\\mu^+/\\mu^-}$ ratio for atmospheric muons has been measured with the Large Volume Detector, (LVD) at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy (minimal depth is 3000 m w.e.). To reach this depth muons should have an energy at the sea level higher than 1.3 TeV. The muon charge is determined studying the decay of stopping positive muons in the LVD iron structure and the decay of stopping positive and negative muons in scintillator. We obtain a ratio ${R = 1.26 \\pm 0.04(stat) \\pm 0.11(sys)}$.

  17. Uranium isotope ratio measurements using diode laser optogalvanic spectroscopy

    Conventional methods for measuring isotope ratios are seldom amenable to field use. In particular, thermal ionization mass spectrometry, while a very accurate and precise technique for measuring isotope ratios, requires instrumentation that is typically too cumbersome for field use. As an alternative to the use of conventional mass spectrometers, the authors have been pursuing glow discharge atomization coupled with high resolution optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) for quantification of uranium isotope ratios. This approach has been considered by others, but the authors have focussed on demountable discharge cells for practical ratio measurements. Further, the authors wish to make use of diode lasers for excitation. A field instrument does not require the accuracy and precision of a laboratory mass spectrometer, but must be sensitive to changes in sample isotopic composition, be free from interferences, and have sufficient precision for a decision to be made about the fate of the field sample; i.e., does the sample warrant further laboratory analysis? The technique ideally should require a minimum of sample preparation, and should at the same time be amenable to a variety of sample types. The glow discharge meets these requirements

  18. Abundance Ratios in Stars vs. Hot Gas in Elliptical Galaxies: the Chemical Evolution Modeller Point of View

    Pipino, A

    2009-01-01

    I will present predictions from chemical evolution model aimed at a self-consistent study of both optical (i.e. stellar) and X-ray (i.e.gas) properties of present-day elliptical galaxies. Detailed cooling and heating processes in the interstellar medium (ISM) are taken into and allow a reliable modelling of the SN-driven galactic wind. SNe Ia activity, in fact, may power a galactic wind lasting for a considerable amount of the galactic lifetime, even in the case for which the efficiency of energy transfer into the ISM per SN Ia event is less than unity. The model simultaneously reproduces the mass-metallicity, the colour-magnitude, the L_X - L_B and the L_X - T relations, as well as the observed trend of the [Mg/Fe] ratio as a function of sigma, by adopting the prescriptions of Pipino & Matteucci (2004) for the gas infall and star formation timescales. The "iron discrepancy", namely the too high predicted iron abundance in X-ray haloes of ellipticals compared to observations, can be solved by taking into ...

  19. Isomeric ratio measurements with the ILL LOHENGRIN spectrometer

    Chebboubi A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of γ heating and neutron damage inside a nuclear reactor is essential to design the next generation of nuclear reactors. The determination of the fission fragment momentum is a key element to perform accurate calculations of the γ heating. One way to assess this information is to look at the isomeric ratio of different nuclei. According to the lifetime of the isomeric state, different experimental techniques were developed at the LOHENGRIN spectrometer. A focus on the measurement of isomeric ratios of 136I in neutron induced fission of 241Pu is presented. A discussion with the current assumptions used in the evaluation process for isomeric ratio is also shown.

  20. Solar wind carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances measured in the earth's magnetosheath with AMPTE/CCE. [Charge Composition Explorer

    Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Wilken, B.; Stuedemann, W.

    1986-01-01

    The solar wind number density ratios of C(6+) + C(5+) and N(7+) + N(6+) + N(5+) relative to O(8+) + O(7+) + O(6+) have been measured for the first time using data from the Charge-Energy-Mass Spectrometer on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft during four solar active periods from Sept. 19 to Nov. 1, 1984 when CCE traversed the subsolar magnetosheath of the compressed magnetosphere. It is found that the average values of the density ratios of C/O and N/O to be 0.43 + or - 0.03 and 0.15 + or - 0.06, respectively. These ratios, as well as the average He(2+)/O ratio of 43 + or - 5 for these same time periods, are in excellent agreement with Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) abundance ratios as well as SEP-derived coronal abundances of these elements. The solar wind C/O ratio is substantially below the generally accepted photospheric value of 0.60.

  1. Measurement of the π+→e+ν branching ratio

    A measurement of the π+→e+ν branching ratio gives Rπeν=Γ(π→eν+π→eνγ)/Γ(π→μν +π→μνγ)=1.2265±0.0034(stat)±0.0044(sys)x10-4. This result is in agreement with standard model calculations and confirms the hypothesis of electron-muon universality at the 0.2% level

  2. Measurement of the pi→eν branching ratio

    A measurement of the π→eν branching ratio using a NaI(Tl) spectrometer yields a value GAMMA((π→eν)+(π→eνγ))/ GAMMA((π→μν)+(π→μνγ)) = (1. 218 +- 0.014) x 10-4. The result is consistent with expectations of the standard electroweak theory incorporating electron-muon universality

  3. Measurement of the Λ→n+γ branching ratio

    The branching ratio for the Λ weak radiative decay has been measured to be B(Λ→n+γ)/(Λ→anything) =[1.78±0.24(stat)±0.160.14(syst)]x10-3. A low-energy kaon beam was used to produce the Λ hyperons via the reaction K-+p→Λ+π0 at rest. Photons from the signal channel and π0 decay were detected with a NaI(Tl) array. The final spectrum contains 287 events after background subtraction, an order of magnitude more events than from the only previous measurement

  4. Measurement of Rl ratio by ALEPH experiment at LEP 1

    The work described by this thesis ranges among the high precision measurements at LEP. The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at energies near the mass of the gage Z boson were utilized. The accurate cross section measurements of e+e- → ff-bar allows extracting the parameters describing the resonance of Z as well as to make a very accurate verification of the Standard Model. One of these parameters, the ratio Rl, is defined by the ratio of the hadron and lepton widths of Z:RlΓhad/Γl. For the measurement of Rl, a global selection of di-lepton events without flavor discrimination (e, μ or τ) was developed. This selection allows tackling the problems raised by the migration of the events from one flavor to another, so that the systematic uncertainty of Rl arising from the lepton channel is reduced at 0.08% while the statistical uncertainty is 0.15%. The value obtained through the measurements of cross section is Rl = 20.735 ± 0.039. Given the Rl dependence on αs, through the corrections introduced by the strong interaction, the value of αs can be extracted from this measurement of Rl. One finds αs = 0.119 ± 0.007

  5. Total flash evaporation studies for uranium isotope ratio measurements

    Accurate isotopic ratio measurements on uranium samples are essential for nuclear material accounting, enrichment programs and for geochemical research applications. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry is widely followed for these measurements. Conventional measurement technique involving Faraday Cups demands larger samples and fractionation correction for the measured data when accurate data are required. Total evaporation or total flash evaporation technique (TFE) is reported to circumvent these difficulties. The technique consists of heating the sample to exhaustion while simultaneously acquiring intensities of all the isotopes at respective cups and then computing the isotope ratios from the summed up intensities. A brief account of literature on this technique is given in a recent paper. TFE studies were conducted by us on NBS -uranium standard solution (SRMU-010) and on a depleted uranium sample solution with an objective to explore the possibility of using a relatively small quantities in the range 300-350 ng, compared to 2 μg of uranium generally required for routine measurements using Faraday Cups. The methodology followed and the results obtained are presented in this paper

  6. Interlaboratory comparison for boron isotope ratio measurement with inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometer

    Boron isotope ratios were analyzed in seven domestic analytical labs for boric acid solutions with various compositions of boron isotope abundances, using an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (ICP-QMS). Five sample solutions with different isotope abundances of 10B were prepared in the range of 10 to 20 % by mixing two boric acid solutions containing natural B and enriched 11B, respectively. Then, the 10B isotope abundances of each sample were certified by analyzing with thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TI-MS) according to ASTM-C791-04. Results obtained from each lab have indicated good coincidences with TI-MS results. Also, the relative standard deviations of results with ICP-QMS of seven analytical labs were 0.11 to 0.81 %. The measurement precision for ICP-QMS would be sufficient in terms of practical use, while taking into consideration a valid requirement required for verifying a depletion of the 10B isotope abundance in the PWR coolant, while this is greater than a nominal analytical error (relative value : 0.22 %) for TI-MS shown in ASTM-C791-04. (author)

  7. Stratospheric NO and NO2 Abundances from ATMOS Solar-Occultation Measurements

    Newchurch, M. J.; Allen, M.; Gunson, M. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Collins, G. B.; Huston, K. H.; Abbas, M. M.; Abrams, M. C.; Chang, A. Y.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R. S.; Irion, F. W.; Lowenstein, M.; Manney, G. L.; Michelsen, H. A.; Podolske, J. R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    Using results from a time-dependent photochemical model to calculate the diurnal variation of NO and NO2, we have corrected Atmospheric Trace MOlecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) solar-occultation retrievals of the NO and NO2 abundances at 90' solar zenith angle. Neglecting to adjust for the rapid variation of these gases across the terminator results in potential errors in retrieved profiles of approximately 20% for NO2 and greater than 100% for NC at altitudes below 25 km. Sensitivity analysis indicates that knowledge of the local 03 and temperature profiles, rather than zonal mean or climatological conditions of these quantities, is required to obtain reliable retrievals of NO and NO2 in the lower stratosphere. Extremely inaccurate 03 or temperature values at 20 km can result in 50% errors in retrieved NO or NO2. Mixing ratios of NO in the mid-latitude, lower stratosphere measured by ATMOS during the November 1994 ATLAS-3 mission compare favorably with in situ ER-2 observations, providing strong corroboration of the reliability of the adjusted space-borne measurements.

  8. Further improvement in residual resistivity ratio measurement facility at RRCAT

    This paper presents further improvement in Residual Resistivity Ratio measurement (RRR) facility at RRCAT. This facility is meant to characterize and evaluate Niobium (Nb) used in manufacturing of Super-Conducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities. The new improved setup incorporates automated Data acquisition (DAQ), analysis and presentation system. The DAQ system has been designed using General Purpose Interface Bus (GPIB-IEEE 488.2). The real time communication protocol under the windows environment is implemented using National Instruments LabVIEW software platform. The paper also describes the RRR test set-up and the measurement procedure. The calibration of modified system was done by re-measuring the Nb samples tested at Fermi Lab, USA, and the test results are also presented. (author)

  9. The First Stellar Abundance Measurements in the Galactic Center the M Supergiant IRS 7

    Carr, J S; Balachandran, S C; Carr, John S.; Balachandran, Suchitra C.

    1999-01-01

    The first measurement of the photospheric abundances in a star at the Galactic Center are presented. A detailed abundance analysis of the Galactic Center M2 supergiant IRS 7 was carried out using high-resolution near-infrared echelle spectra. The Fe abundance for IRS 7 was found to be close to solar, [Fe/H] = -0.02 +/- 0.13, and nearly identical to the Fe abundances we obtained for the nearby M supergiants alpha Ori and VV Cep. Analysis of the first and second overtone lines of CO was used to derive an effective temperature of 3600 +/- 230 K, a microturbulent velocity of 3.0 +/- 0.3 km/s, and a carbon abundance log epsilon(C) = 7.78 +/- 0.13, or [C/H] = -0.77. In addition, we find a high depletion of 0.74 +/- 0.32 dex in O and an enhancement of 0.92 +/- 0.18 dex in N. These abundances are consistent with the dredge-up of CNO-cycle products but require deep mixing in excess of that predicted by standard models for red supergiants. In light of our measured solar Fe abundance for IRS 7, we discuss other indicato...

  10. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Individual Pollen Grains as a Proxy for C3- Versus C4-Grass Abundance in Paleorecords: A Validation Study

    Nelson, D. M.; Hu, F.; Pearson, A.

    2007-12-01

    C3 and C4 grasses have distinct influences on major biogeochemical processes and unique responses to important environmental controls. Difficulties in distinguishing between these two functional groups of grasses have hindered paleoecological studies of grass-dominated ecosystems. We recently developed a technique to analyze the stable carbon isotope composition of individual grass-pollen grains using a spooling- wire microcombustion device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (Nelson et al. 2007). This technique holds promise for improving C3 and C4 grass reconstructions. It requires ~90% fewer grains than typical methods and avoids assumptions associated with mixing models. However, our previous work was based on known C3 and C4 grasses from herbarium specimens and field collections and the technique had not been test using geological samples. To test the ability of this technique to reproduce the abundance of C3 and C4 grasses on the landscape, we measured δ13C values of >1500 individual grains of grass pollen isolated from the surface sediments of 10 North American lakes that span a large gradient of C3 and C4 grass abundance. Results indicate a strong positive correlation (r=0.94) between % C4-grass pollen (derived from classifying δ13C values from single grains as C3 and C4) and the literature-reported abundance of C4 grasses on the landscape. However, the measured % C4-grass pollen shows some deviation from the actual abundance at sites with high proportions of C4 grasses. This is likely caused by uncertainty in the magnitude, composition, and variability of the analytical blank associated with these measurements. Correcting for this deviation using regression analysis improves the estimation of the abundance of C4 grasses on the landscape. Comparison of the % C4-grass pollen with C/N and δ13C measurements of total organic matter in the same lake-sediment samples illustrates the distinct advantage of grass-pollen δ13C as a proxy for

  11. A New Method of Measuring 81Kr and 85Kr Abundances in Environmental Samples

    Du, X; Bailey, K; Lehmann, B E; Lorenzo, R; Lu, Z T; Müller, P; O'Connor, T P; Sturchio, N C; Young, L

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method for determining the 81Kr/Kr ratio in environmental samples based upon two measurements: the 85Kr/81Kr ratio measured by Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) and the 85Kr/Kr ratio measured by Low-Level Counting (LLC). This method can be used to determine the mean residence time of groundwater in the range of 10^5 - 10^6 a. It requires a sample of 100 micro-l STP of Kr extracted from approximately two tons of water. With modern atmospheric Kr samples, we demonstrate that the ratios measured by ATTA and LLC are directly proportional to each other within the measurement error of +/- 10%; we calibrate the 81Kr/Kr ratio of modern air measured using this method; and we show that the 81Kr/Kr ratios of samples extracted from air before and after the development of the nuclear industry are identical within the measurement error.

  12. Measuring the aspect ratio renormalization of anisotropic-lattice gluons

    Using tadpole-improved actions we investigate the consistency between different methods of measuring the aspect ratio renormalization of anisotropic-lattice gluons for bare aspect ratios χ0=4,6,10 and inverse lattice spacing in the range as-1=660--840 MeV. The tadpole corrections to the action, which are established self-consistently, are defined for two cases, mean link tadpoles in the Landau gauge and gauge invariant mean plaquette tadpoles. Parameters in the latter case exhibited no dependence on the spatial lattice size L, while in the former, parameters showed only a weak dependence on L easily extrapolated to L=∞. The renormalized anisotropy χR was measured using both the torelon dispersion relation and the sideways potential method. There is general agreement between these approaches, but there are discrepancies which are evidence for the presence of lattice artifact contributions. For the torelon these are estimated to be O(αSas2/R2), where R is the flux-tube radius. We also present some new data that suggest that rotational invariance is established more accurately for the mean-link action than the plaquette action

  13. Deriving Plasma Densities and Elemental Abundances from SERTS Differential Emission Measure Analysis

    Schmelz, J. T.; Kimble, J. A.; Saba, J. L. R.

    2012-01-01

    We use high-resolution spectral emission line data obtained by the SERTS instrument during three rocket flights to demonstrate a new approach for constraining electron densities of solar active region plasma.We apply differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting techniques to characterize the multithermal solar plasma producing the observed EUV spectra, with constraints on the high-temperature plasma from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope. In this iterative process, we compare line intensities predicted by an input source distribution to observed line intensities for multiple iron ion species, and search a broad range of densities to optimize chi-square simultaneously for the many available density-sensitive lines. This produces a density weighted by the DEM, which appears to be useful for characterizing the bulk of the emitting plasma over a significant range of temperature. This "DEM-weighted density" technique is complementary to the use of density-sensitive line ratios and less affected by uncertainties in atomic data and ionization fraction for any specific line. Once the DEM shape and the DEM-weighted density have been established from the iron lines, the relative elemental abundances can be determined for other lines in the spectrum. We have also identified spectral lines in the SERTS wavelength range that may be problematic

  14. Measurement of carbon-13:carbon-12 ratios by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry

    An approach to the measurement of 13C:12C ratios in isotopically enriched samples is described. The carbon in samples is converted into CO2 gas by either combustion of organic material or acidification of carbonate. The gas is then measured by FTIR spectrometry. When spectra are recorded at 0.25 cm-1 resolution the magnitude of the isotopic shift is such that the areas of 12C and 13C rotational lines of the ν3 vibrational band for CO2 can be measured and the isotopic composition determined by reference to a standard calibration graph. The relative standard deviation at natural abundance is 1.2%, which gives an absolute limit of detection of 0.026 atom-% 13C. Details of the decomposition procedures and a comparison of the results with those obtained by mass spectrometry are also presented. (author)

  15. Temperature measurement of ratio pyrometers of melting pool surfaces

    The errors in measurement employing quotient pyrometry are a function of the temperature and the effective wavelengths used. They are generated by the spectral emission coefficients of the surface of the test specimen and the spectral transmissivity of the media in the beam path. Temperature-independent deviations up to -300K have been found for various imaging lenses using calibrated tungsten strip lamps. The influence of metal vapors over the melt was determined by spectral photometric measurements over the surface of the melting charge. No selective behavior was found for cadmium, tin, indium, nickel, chromium, iron, titanium, manganese, silicon, and stainless steel (material No. 1.4550). Measurements of the freezing points of silicon, iron, manganese, nickel, and chromium were carried out to determine the influence of the spectral emission coefficients of the surfaces of the melting charges. The ratios of the emission coefficients for wavelengths of 500 and 580 nm were below unity for all these metals, i.e., the temperature values indicated were above the actual freezing points. Measurements on corium melts (55% steel, 35% UO2, 10% Zircaloy-2) under an oxidizing atmosphere were greatly influenced by bubbles on the surface of the melting charge and by burning phenomena of ejected particles. The error brought about by the spectral emission coefficient of the corium surface cannot be indicated

  16. High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of Hercules X-1 with the XMM-Newton RGS: CNO Element Abundance Measurements and Density Diagnostics of a Photoionized Plasma

    Jimenez-Garate, M. A.; Hailey, C. J.; Herder, J. W. den; Zane, S.; Ramsay, G

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1, an intermediate-mass X-ray binary, which was observed with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. We measure the elemental abundance ratios by use of spectral models, and we detect material processed through the CNO-cycle. The CNO abundances, and in particular the ratio N/O > 4.0 times solar, provide stringent constraints on the evolution of the binary system. The low and short-on flux states of Her X-1 exhibit narrow lin...

  17. Temperature Measurements in the Solar Transition Region Using N III Line Intensity Ratios

    Doron, R.; Doschek, G. A.; Laming, J. M.; Feldman, U.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    UV emission from B-like N and O ions a rather rare opportunity for recording spectral lines in a narrow wavelength range that can potentially be used to derive temperatures relevant to the solar transition region. In these ions, the line intensity ratios of the type (2s2p(sup 2) - 2p(sup 3)) / (2s(sup 2)2p - 2s2p(sup 2)) are very sensitive to the electron temperature. Additionally, the lines involving the ratios fall within a range of only - 12 A; in N III the lines fall in the 980 - 992 A range and in O IV in the 780 - 791 A range. In this work, we explore the use of these atomic systems, primarily in N III, for temperature diagnostics of the transition region by analyzing UV spectra obtained by the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer flown on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The N III temperature-sensitive line ratios are measured in more than 60 observations. Most of the measured ratios correspond to temperatures in the range 5.7x10(exp 4) - 6.7x10(exp 4) K. This range is considerably lower than the calculated temperature of maximum abundance of N III, which is approx. 7.6x10(exp 4) K. Detailed analysis of the spectra further indicates that the measured ratios are probably somewhat overestimated due to resonant scattering effects in the 2s(sup 2)2p - 2s2p(sup 2) lines and small blends in the 2s2p(sup 2) - 2p3 lines. Actual lower ratios would only increase the disagreement between the ionization balance calculations and present temperature measurements based on a collisional excitation model. In the case of the O IV spectra, we determined that due to the close proximity in wavelength of the weak line (2s2p(sup 2)-2p3 transitions) to a strong Ne VIII line, sufficiently accurate ratio measurements cannot be obtained. Subject headings: atomic data --- atomic processes --- Sun: transition region --- Sun: U V radiation --- techniques: spectroscopic

  18. Measuring Jupiter's water abundance by Juno: the link between interior and formation models

    Helled, Ravit; Lunine, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The JUNO mission to Jupiter is planned to measure the water abundance in Jupiter's atmosphere below the cloud layer. This measurement is important because it can be used to reveal valuable information on Jupiter's origin and its composition. In this paper we discuss the importance of this measurement, the challenges in its interpretation, and address how it can be connected to interior and formation models of Jupiter.

  19. Measuring Jupiter's water abundance by Juno: the link between interior and formation models

    Helled, Ravit; Lunine, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter is planned to measure the water abundance in Jupiter's atmosphere below the cloud layer. This measurement is important because it can be used to reveal valuable information on Jupiter's origin and its composition. In this paper, we discuss the importance of this measurement, the challenges in its interpretation, and address how it can be connected to interior and formation models of Jupiter.

  20. Measurement of plutonium and uranium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry

    The isotopic composition of plutonium and uranium is needed for purposes of sample confirmation, or for interpreting results from calorimeters or neutron-coincidence measurement instruments to determine nuclear material mass. The authors have developed measurement methods and computer codes utilizing high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry to measure the relative isotopic abundances of plutonium and uranium in various forms nondestructively. The computer codes, known as MGA and MGAU, have unique analysis methodologies that the authors briefly describe in this paper

  1. Measurement of plutonium and uranium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry

    Ruhter, W.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gunnink, R. [Gunnink (Ray), Fremont, CA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The isotopic composition of plutonium and uranium is needed for purposes of sample confirmation, or for interpreting results from calorimeters or neutron-coincidence measurement instruments to determine nuclear material mass. The authors have developed measurement methods and computer codes utilizing high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry to measure the relative isotopic abundances of plutonium and uranium in various forms nondestructively. The computer codes, known as MGA and MGAU, have unique analysis methodologies that the authors briefly describe in this paper.

  2. Measurement of the isotopic abundance of boron-10 by inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    This article describes the method for measuring the isotopic abundance of 10B in nuclear grade boron carbide using inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). The results of investigation revealed that both the integration time and the dwell time have a major influence on the reproducibility of ICP-QMS measurements. As a result of optimization of the measurement conditions, reproducibility below 0.2% relative standard deviation (RSD) (0.17% RSD maximum) was achieved. In addition, the measured value of the isotopic abundance of 10B for each sample well agreed with the values measured by the TIMS. Thus, the method described in the present investigation was very effective in the analysis of isotopic abundance of 10B in B4C or H3BO3. The results of this study suggest that ICP-QMS could be applied to the precise analysis of the isotopic abundance of 10B required in the field of nuclear applications. (author)

  3. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    Bridges, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly found in embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side (bevel) did produce up to 3 decibels more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side (slant) produced up to 2 decibels more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron (notch) produced up to 2decibels increase in the noise. Having internal walls (septae) within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed electric propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  4. Amendment of the Measurement of Low Abundance 236U by Mass Spectrometry

    The low abundance isotope 236U is easily disturbed by strong peak tails in the measurement of Mass Spectrometry. So, the measurement of 236U is amended with the Background Amendment (BGA) tail calibration method and the dynamic background method. BGA method was used to measure the signal at 235.5 and 236.5 mass number, these signal could be regarded as strong peak tails which was eliminated in the measurement data. When 236U abundance was low, BGA calibration method had good effect, the emendation to measurement reached 2.24%, the amended value was more close to nominal value, and the effect of dynamic background amendment method is not significant. (authors)

  5. 我国城市大气颗粒物的铅同位素丰度比%Lead Isotope Abundance Ratios of Urban Atmospheric Aerosols in China

    刘咸德; 李显芳; 李冰

    2004-01-01

    Determined with ICP-MS, new isotope abundance ratio data of lead for Beijing and Changdao aerosols was presented, in comparison with literature data for Chinese urban aerosols. 206Pb/207Pb ratio falls into a range from 1.13 to 1.18 for urban aerosols and less influenced by vehicle exhaust emission after phase-out of leaded petrol in 2000 in China. Major lead pollution sources may probably include coal combustion, oil combustion,re-suspended dust, metallurgical industry and use and production of cement.

  6. Abundance ratios in red-sequence galaxies over a wide mass range: The "X-planes'' for magnesium, calcium, carbon and nitrogen

    Smith, Russell J; Hudson, Michael J; Bridges, Terry J

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the abundance ratios of the light elements Mg, Ca, C and N, relative to Fe, for 147 red-sequence galaxies in the Coma cluster and the Shapley Supercluster. The sample covers a six-magnitude range in luminosity, from giant ellipticals to dwarfs at M^*+4. We exploit the wide mass range to investigate systematic trends in the abundance ratios Mg/Fe, Ca/Fe, C/Fe and N/Fe. We find that each of these ratios can be well modelled using two-parameter relations of the form [X/Fe] = a0 + a1 log sigma + a2 [Fe/H], where sigma is the velocity dispersion. Analysing these ``X-planes'' reveals new structure in the abundance patterns, beyond the traditional one-parameter (e.g. Mg/Fe-sigma) correlations. The X-planes for the alpha elements, Mg and Ca, indicate a positive correlation with velocity dispersion, and simultaneously an anti-correlation with Fe/H (i.e. a1>0 and a20 and a2~0). The explicit dependence of X/Fe on two parameters is evidence that at least two physical processes are at work in setting the abunda...

  7. Electron Density and Temperature Measurements, and Abundance Anomalies in the Solar Atmosphere

    Anita Mohan; Bhola N. Dwivedi; Enrico Landi

    2000-09-01

    Using spectra obtained from the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) spectrograph on the spacecraft SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), we investigate the height dependence of electron density, temperature and abundance anomalies in the solar atmosphere. In particular, we present the behaviour of the solar FIP effect (the abundance enhancement of elements with first ionization potential < 10 eV in the corona with respect to photospheric values) with height above an active region observed at the solar limb, with emphasis on the so-called transition region lines.

  8. Measurement of continuous distributions of ventilation-perfusion ratios - Theory

    Wagner, P. D.; Saltzman, H. A.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The resolution of the technique considered is sufficient to describe smooth distributions containing blood flow to unventilated regions (shunt), ventilation to unperfused regions (dead space), and up to three additional modes over the range of finite ventilation-perfusion ratios. In particular, areas whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are low can be separated from unventilated regions and those whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are high can similarly be distinguished from unperfused areas.

  9. Evaluation of Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Naphthalene Derivatives After Biofield Energy Treatment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi; Alice Branton; Dahryn Trivedi; Gopal Nayak

    2015-01-01

    Naphthalene and 2-naphthol are two naphthalene derivatives, which play important roles in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of 13C/12C or 2H/1H and 18O/16O in naphthalene and 2-naphthol using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Naphthalene and 2-naphthol samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control group remained as untreated, while the treated g...

  10. Isotope Abundances of Solar Coronal Material Derived from Solar Energetic Particle Measurements

    Mewaldt, R.A; Stone, E. C.

    1987-01-01

    Coronal isotopic abundances for the elements He, C, N, O, Ne, and Mg are derived from previously published measurements of the isotopic composition of solar energetic particles by first measuring, and then correcting for, the charge-to-mass-dependent fractionation due to solar flare acceleration and propagation processes. The resulting coronal composition generally agrees with that of other samples of solar system material, but the previously noted difference between the solar flare and solar...

  11. Single-step method for hydrogen isotope ratio measurement of water in porous media

    Turner, J.V.; Gailitis, V.

    1988-06-01

    The standard zinc reduction technique for stable hydrogen isotope analysis has been modified to a single-step method which enables rapid measurement of the deuterium to hydrogen (/sup 2/H//sup 1/H) ratio in water from porous media. The novel feature of the method is microdistillation of water from the porous medium within the zinc reduction tube. The need for such a technique arose from a requirement for /sup 2/H//sup 1/H ratio measurement on microliter quantities of water from unsaturated porous media. Conventional methods using reduction of water over zinc or uranium require free water which must be extracted from the porous medium by either immiscible fluid displacement, vacuum distillation, azeotropic distillation, or squeezing. Each of these methods is time-consuming, can present extraction difficulties at low water content, and may lead to isotope fractionation where phase changes occur during the extraction procedure. Because the technique presented here requires only 100-300 mg, of sample (5-30 mg of water, depending on water content) it has a wide application to experimental studies of water movement in porous media using water either artificially enriched in deuterium or of natural abundance. The authors have used the method successfully in field and laboratory experiments at both environmental and enriched concentrations of deuterium. The method is equally applicable to saturated porous media and also gives a measure of the water content of the sample.

  12. Nondestructive measurement of the grid ratio using a single image

    Pasciak, A. S.; Jones, A Kyle

    2009-01-01

    The antiscatter grid is an essential part of modern radiographic systems. Since the introduction of the antiscatter grid, however, there have been few methods proposed for acceptance testing and verification of manufacturer-supplied grid specifications. The grid ratio (r) is an important parameter describing the antiscatter grid because it affects many other grid quality metrics, such as the contrast improvement ratio (K), primary transmission (Tp), and scatter transmission (Ts). Also, the gr...

  13. Measuring the Mass-to-Light Ratio of Cluster Galaxies

    Natarajan, P.

    1996-12-01

    There is ample evidence from lensing for the clumping of dark matter on different scales within clusters, although the spatial extent of dark halos of cluster galaxies are yet to be constrained. The issue is of crucial importance as it addresses the key question of whether the mass to light ratio of galaxies is a function of the environment, and if it is indeed significantly different in the high density regions like cluster cores as opposed to the field. Weak shear maps of the outer regions of clusters have been successfully used to map the distribution of mass at large radii. However the typical smoothing lengths generally employed preclude the systematic study of the effects of galactic-scale substructure on the measured weak lensing signal. We present two new methods to study the effect of bright cluster galaxies on the cluster weak shear field - aperture averaging of the local shear and a maximum likelihood method to obtain limits on parameters that characterize galaxy halos. The composite lensing effect of a cluster is modeled by the superposition of mass clumps with different scales: a large-scale clump to describe the cluster and smaller scale ones for individual cluster galaxies. Working in the local frame of each perturber, the shear induced by the larger scale component can be efficiently subtracted, yielding the averaged shear field induced by the smaller-scale mass component. Cluster galaxy halos are modeled using simple scaling relations and the background high redshift population is modeled in consonance with observations from redshift surveys and lensing constraints. We demonstrate using simulations that these observed local weak-shear effects on galaxy scales within the cluster can be used to statistically constrain reliably the mean M/L of cluster members, and fiducial parameters like the halo size, velocity dispersion and hence mass of cluster galaxies. The results of the members, and fiducial parameters like the halo size and the velocity

  14. Accurate Measurement of the Relative Abundance of Different DNA Species in Complex DNA Mixtures

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription. PMID:22334570

  15. A measurement of the Panofsky ratio in 3He

    The nucleus 3He is one of the simplest nuclear systems; hence it is often used to study the complications introduced by the presence of additional nucleons on basic processes such as pion absorption on a free nucleon. 3He is the only nucleus for which both the pion charge exchange and radiative capture processes can occur at rest with reasonable probability. The ratio of these two processes is the well-known Panofsky ratio, P3 = ω(π-3He→π0T)/ω(π-+3He→γT). (orig./WL)

  16. THE SuperTIGER Instrument: Measurement of Elemental Abundances of Ultra-Heavy Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Binns, W. R.; Bose, R. G.; Braun, D. L.; Brandt, T. J.; Daniels, W. M.; DowKonnt, P. F.; Fitzsimmons, S. P.; Hahne, D. J.; Hams, T.; Israel, M. H.; Klemic, J.; Labrador, A. W.; Link, J. T.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; Moore, P.; Murphy, R. P.; Olevitch, M. A.; Rauch, B. F.; Sakai, K.; San Sebastian, F.; Sasaki, M.; Simburger, G. E.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Ward, J. E.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) instrument was developed to measure the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements from Ne-10 to Zr-40 with individual element resolution and the high statistics needed to test models of cosmic-ray origins. SuperTIGER also makes exploratory measurements of the abundances of elements with 40 measures the energy spectra of the more abundant elements for Z instrument is an enlarged and higher resolution version of the earlier TIGER instrument. It was designed to provide the largest geometric acceptance possible and to reach as high an altitude as possible, flying on a standard long-duration 1.11 million cu m balloon. SuperTIGER was launched from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on 2012 December 8, and made about 2.7 revolutions around the South Pole in 55 days of flight, returning data on over 50 x 10(exp 6) cosmic-ray nuclei with Z > or = 10, including approx.1300 with Z > 29 and approx.60 with Z > 49. Here, we describe the instrument, the methods of charge identification employed, the SuperTIGER balloon flight, and the instrument performance.

  17. The superTIGER instrument: Measurement of elemental abundances of ultra-heavy galactic cosmic rays

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) instrument was developed to measure the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements from 10Ne to 40Zr with individual element resolution and the high statistics needed to test models of cosmic-ray origins. SuperTIGER also makes exploratory measurements of the abundances of elements with 40 < Z ≤ 60 and measures the energy spectra of the more abundant elements for Z ≤ 30 from about 0.8 to 10 GeV/nucleon. This instrument is an enlarged and higher resolution version of the earlier TIGER instrument. It was designed to provide the largest geometric acceptance possible and to reach as high an altitude as possible, flying on a standard long-duration 1.11 million m3 balloon. SuperTIGER was launched from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on 2012 December 8, and made about 2.7 revolutions around the South Pole in 55 days of flight, returning data on over 50 × 106 cosmic-ray nuclei with Z ≥ 10, including ∼1300 with Z > 29 and ∼60 with Z > 49. Here, we describe the instrument, the methods of charge identification employed, the SuperTIGER balloon flight, and the instrument performance.

  18. The superTIGER instrument: Measurement of elemental abundances of ultra-heavy galactic cosmic rays

    Binns, W. R.; Bose, R. G.; Braun, D. L.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Israel, M. H.; Moore, P.; Murphy, R. P.; Olevitch, M. A.; Rauch, B. F. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Brandt, T. J.; Daniels, W. M.; Fitzsimmons, S. P.; Hahne, D. J.; Hams, T.; Link, J. T.; Mitchell, J. W.; Sakai, K. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Klemic, J.; Labrador, A. W.; Mewaldt, R. A., E-mail: wrb@wustl.edu [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2014-06-10

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) instrument was developed to measure the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements from {sub 10}Ne to {sub 40}Zr with individual element resolution and the high statistics needed to test models of cosmic-ray origins. SuperTIGER also makes exploratory measurements of the abundances of elements with 40 < Z ≤ 60 and measures the energy spectra of the more abundant elements for Z ≤ 30 from about 0.8 to 10 GeV/nucleon. This instrument is an enlarged and higher resolution version of the earlier TIGER instrument. It was designed to provide the largest geometric acceptance possible and to reach as high an altitude as possible, flying on a standard long-duration 1.11 million m{sup 3} balloon. SuperTIGER was launched from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on 2012 December 8, and made about 2.7 revolutions around the South Pole in 55 days of flight, returning data on over 50 × 10{sup 6} cosmic-ray nuclei with Z ≥ 10, including ∼1300 with Z > 29 and ∼60 with Z > 49. Here, we describe the instrument, the methods of charge identification employed, the SuperTIGER balloon flight, and the instrument performance.

  19. The Group Abundance Fraction: A statistically robust measure of particle composition and of spatial structure in images

    When two processes (A and B) are measured by counting instruments, we wish to present the results as an ''abundance'' along with an associated uncertainty. When the number of individual counts of either component is low, the usual ratio (A/B) is statistically ill-defined because there is a finite probability of zero counts in the denominator. However, the ''Group Abundance Fraction'' (F), e.g., A/(A+B), is a statistically robust parameter (under the condition that there must be at least one total count between A and B in order to constitute a measurement). We rigorously derive expectation values (over a conditional Poisson statistical ensemble) for and its standard deviation σF that are valid for all values of total counts greater than one. We then derive useful estimators for these ensemble expectation values in terms of simple algebraic functions of the actual observed accumulated counts. We also incorporate the practical effects of instrument response functions and background rates. The results are not restricted to particle species composition (or spectra), but are also applicable when A and B represent counts in adjacent ''pixels'' of spatial images formed by the particles

  20. Determination of site-specific carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Caer, V; Trierweiler, M; Martin, G J; Martin, M L

    1991-10-15

    Site-specific natural isotope fractionation of hydrogen studied by deuterium NMR (SNIF-NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful source of information on hydrogen pathways occurring in biosyntheses in natural conditions. The potential of the carbon counterpart of this method has been investigated and compared. Three typical molecular species, ethanol, acetic acid, and vanillin, have been considered. Taking into account the requirements of quantitative 13C NMR, appropriate experimental procedures have been defined and the repeatability and reproducibility of the isotope ratio determinations have been checked in different conditions. It is shown that the carbon version of the SNIF-NMR method is capable of detecting small differences in the carbon-13 content of the ethyl fragment of ethanols from different botanical or synthetic origins. These results are in agreement with mass spectrometry determinations of the overall carbon isotope ratios. Deviations with respect to a statistical distribution of 13C have been detected in the case of acetic acid and vanillin. However, since the method is very sensitive to several kinds of systematic error, only a relative significance can be attached at present to the internal parameters directly accessible. Isotope dilution experiments have also been carried out in order to check the consistency of the results. In the present state of experimental accuracy, the 13C NMR method is of more limited potential than 2H SNIF-NMR spectroscopy. However it may provide complementary information. Moreover it is particularly efficient for detecting and quantifying adulterations that aim to mimic the overall carbon-13 content of a natural compound by adding a selectivity enriched species to a less expensive substrate from a different origin. PMID:1759714

  1. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. I. THE SCULPTOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    We present measurements of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 388 radial velocity member stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph), a satellite of the Milky Way (MW). This is the largest sample of individual α element (Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti) abundance measurements in any single dSph. The measurements are made from Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrometer medium-resolution spectra (6400-9000 A, R ∼ 6500). Based on comparisons to published high-resolution (R ∼> 20,000) spectroscopic measurements, our measurements have uncertainties of σ[Fe/H] = 0.14 and σ[α/Fe] = 0.13. The Sculptor [Fe/H] distribution has a mean ([Fe/H]) = -1.58 and is asymmetric with a long, metal-poor tail, indicative of a history of extended star formation. Sculptor has a larger fraction of stars with [Fe/H] -1 in [Fe/H] and +0.013 ± 0.003 dex arcmin-1 in [α/Fe] out to 11 arcmin (275 pc). Together, these measurements cast Sculptor and possibly other surviving dSphs as representative of the dwarf galaxies from which the metal-poor tail of the Galactic halo formed.

  2. Determining the Local Abundance of Martian Methane and its 13-C/l2-C and D/H Isotopic Ratios for Comparison with Related Gas and Soil Analysis on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the origin of Martian methane will require numerous complementary measurements from both in situ and remote sensing investigations and laboratory work to correlate planetary surface geophysics with atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Three instruments (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Gas Chromatograph (GC) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS)) with sophisticated sample handling and processing capability make up the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical chemistry suite on NASA s 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Leveraging off the SAM sample and gas processing capability that includes methane enrichment, TLS has unprecedented sensitivity for measuring absolute methane (parts-per-trillion), water, and carbon dioxide abundances in both the Martian atmosphere and evolved from heated soil samples. In concert with a wide variety of associated trace gases (e.g. SO2, H2S, NH3, higher hydrocarbons, organics, etc.) and other isotope ratios measured by SAM, TLS will focus on determining the absolute abundances of methane, water and carbon dioxide, and their isotope ratios: 13C/12C and D/H in methane; 13C/12C and 18O/17O/16O in carbon dioxide; and 18O/17O/16O and D/H in water. Measurements near the MSL landing site will be correlated with satellite (Mars Express, Mars 2016) and ground-based observations.

  3. An high resolution FDIRC for the measurement of cosmic-ray isotopic abundances

    Marrocchesi, P. S.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Batkov, K.; Bigongiari, G.; Kim, M.Y.; Maestro, P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Measurements of the relative abundance of cosmic isotopes and of the energy dependence of their fluxes may clarify our present understanding on the confinement time of charged cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Experimental studies of these propagation clocks have been carried out by balloon and space missions at energies of a few 100 MeV/amu by means of detection techniques based on multiple dE/dx sampling, coupled with a measurement of the energy released in a thick absorber. At...

  4. A PRECISE WATER ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENT FOR THE HOT JUPITER WASP-43b

    The water abundance in a planetary atmosphere provides a key constraint on the planet's primordial origins because water ice is expected to play an important role in the core accretion model of planet formation. However, the water content of the solar system giant planets is not well known because water is sequestered in clouds deep in their atmospheres. By contrast, short-period exoplanets have such high temperatures that their atmospheres have water in the gas phase, making it possible to measure the water abundance for these objects. We present a precise determination of the water abundance in the atmosphere of the 2 M Jup short-period exoplanet WASP-43b based on thermal emission and transmission spectroscopy measurements obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the water content is consistent with the value expected in a solar composition gas at planetary temperatures (0.4-3.5 × solar at 1σ confidence). The metallicity of WASP-43b's atmosphere suggested by this result extends the trend observed in the solar system of lower metal enrichment for higher planet masses

  5. A PRECISE WATER ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENT FOR THE HOT JUPITER WASP-43b

    Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L.; Stevenson, Kevin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Désert, Jean-Michel [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute for Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Showman, Adam P.; Kataria, Tiffany [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ 85721 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); McCullough, Peter R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seager, Sara [Department of Physics, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Homeier, Derek, E-mail: laura.kreidberg@uchicago.edu [Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, UMR 5574, CNRS, Université de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2014-10-01

    The water abundance in a planetary atmosphere provides a key constraint on the planet's primordial origins because water ice is expected to play an important role in the core accretion model of planet formation. However, the water content of the solar system giant planets is not well known because water is sequestered in clouds deep in their atmospheres. By contrast, short-period exoplanets have such high temperatures that their atmospheres have water in the gas phase, making it possible to measure the water abundance for these objects. We present a precise determination of the water abundance in the atmosphere of the 2 M {sub Jup} short-period exoplanet WASP-43b based on thermal emission and transmission spectroscopy measurements obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the water content is consistent with the value expected in a solar composition gas at planetary temperatures (0.4-3.5 × solar at 1σ confidence). The metallicity of WASP-43b's atmosphere suggested by this result extends the trend observed in the solar system of lower metal enrichment for higher planet masses.

  6. Hydrogen and carbon abundances and isotopic ratios in apatite from alkaline intrusive complexes, with a focus on carbonatites

    Nadeau, S.L.; Epstein, S.; Stolper, E. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

    1999-06-01

    The authors report H and C contents and {delta}D and {delta}{sup 13}C values of apatites from 15 alkaline intrusive complexes ranging in age from 110 Ma to 2.6 Ga. Sampling focused on carbonatites, but included silicate rocks as well. Heating temperatures up to 1,500 C is needed to extract fully H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} from these apatites. Apatites from carbonatite-rich intrusive complexes contain 0.2--1.1 wt% H{sub 2}O and 0.05--0.70 wt% CO{sub 2}; apatites from two silicate-rich alkaline complexes with little or no carbonatite are generally poorer in both volatile components (0.1--0.2% H{sub 2}O and 0.01--0.11% CO{sub 2}). D/H ratios in apatites from these rocks are bimodally distributed. The authors suggest that the {delta}D values of group I apatites represent primitive, mantle-derived values and that the group II apatites crystallized from degassed magmas, resulting in lower H{sub 2}O contents and {delta}D values. In contrast to H{sub 2}O contents and {delta}D values, CO{sub 2} contents and {delta}{sup 13}C values of gas released at high temperatures from multiple aliquots of these apatite samples are variable. This suggests the presence of more than one C-bearing component in these apatites, one of which is proposed to be dissolved carbonate; the other could be associated with hydrocarbons.

  7. THE ABUNDANCE, ORTHO/PARA RATIO, AND DEUTERATION OF WATER IN THE HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 6334 I

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of 30 transitions of water isotopologues toward the high-mass star-forming region NGC 6334 I. The line profiles of H162O, H172O, H182O, and HDO show a complex pattern of emission and absorption components associated with the embedded hot cores, a lower-density envelope, two outflow components, and several foreground clouds, some associated with the NGC 6334 complex, others seen in projection against the strong continuum background of the source. Our analysis reveals an H2O ortho/para ratio of 3 ± 0.5 in the foreground clouds, as well as the outflow. The water abundance varies from ∼10–8 in the foreground clouds and the outer envelope to ∼10–6 in the hot core. The hot core abundance is two orders of magnitude below the chemical model predictions for dense, warm gas, but within the range of values found in other Herschel/HIFI studies of hot cores and hot corinos. This may be related to the relatively low gas and dust temperature (∼100 K), or time-dependent effects, resulting in a significant fraction of water molecules still locked up in dust grain mantles. The HDO/H2O ratio in NGC 6334 I, ∼2 × 10–4, is also relatively low, but within the range found in other high-mass star-forming regions.

  8. Covariances for measured activation and fission ratios data

    Methods which are routinely used in the determination of covariance matrices for both integral and differential activation and fission-ratios data acquired at the Argonne National Laboratory Fast-Neutron Generator Facility (FNG) are discussed. Special consideration is given to problems associated with the estimation of correlations between various identified sources of experimental error. Approximation methods which are commonly used to reduce the labor involved in this analysis to manageable levels are described. Results from some experiments which have been recently carried out in this laboratory are presented to illustrate these procedures. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  9. Deciphering the measured ratios of Iodine-131 to Cesium-137 at the Fukushima reactors

    Matsui, T

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the relative abundance of the radioactive isotopes Iodine-131 and Cesium-137 produced by nuclear fission in reactors and compare it with data taken at the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The ratio of radioactivities of these two isotopes can be used to obtain information about when the nuclear reactions terminated.

  10. Development of neutron measurement system for nd/nt fuel ratio measurement in ITER experiments

    The possibility of measurement of fuel ratio from the DT/DD reaction ratio with a neutron spectrometer in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor was studied. The results of neutron transport calculations using the Monte Carlo N-particle [MCNP, a general Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, version 4C, LA-13709, edited by J. F. Briesmeister, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2000] code system indicated the possibility of DD spectrum separation from the scattered/energy-degraded neutrons derived from DT neutrons by selection of the measurement location and collimator design. A time-of-flight spectrometer was used in this study. An experiment using DD and DT neutrons from an accelerator was conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Neutronics Source facility. Using a sophisticated circuit with three discriminators for the first detector, separation of DD and DT neutron components of the spectrum in the megahertz region was confirmed experimentally

  11. Isotopic abundance in the CN coma of comets: Ten years of measurements

    Schulz, R.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Hutsemékers, D.; Arpigny, C.; Cochran, A.; Zucconi, J.-M.; Stüwe, J. A.

    2008-11-01

    Over the past 10 years the isotopic ratios of carbon ( 12C/ 13C) and nitrogen ( 14N/ 15N) have been determined for a dozen comets, bright enough to allow obtaining the required measurements from the ground. The ratios were derived from high-resolution spectra of the CN coma measured in the B 2∑ +-X 2∑ + (0, 0) emission band around 387 nm. The observed comets belong to different dynamical classes, including dynamically new as well as long- and short-period comets from the Halley- and Jupiter-family. In some cases the comets could be observed at various heliocentric distances. All values determined for the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios were consistent within the error margin irrespective of the type of comet or the heliocentric distance at which it was observed. Our investigations resulted in average ratios of 12C/ 13C=91±21 and nitrogen 14N/ 15N=141±29. Whilst the value for the carbon isotopic ratio is in good agreement with the solar and terrestrial value of 89, the nitrogen isotopic ratio is very different from the telluric value of 272.

  12. The CO2 Abundance in Comets C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS), C/2012 K5 (LINEAR), and 290P/Jager as Measured with Spitzer

    McKay, Adam J; Cochran, Anita L; Bodewits, Dennis; DiSanti, Michael A; Russo, Neil Dello; Lisse, Carey M

    2015-01-01

    We present analysis of observations of CO2 and OI emission in three comets to measure the CO2 abundance and evaluate the possibility of employing observations of OI emission in comets as a proxy for CO2. We obtained NIR imaging sensitive to CO2 of comets C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS), C/2012 K5 (LINEAR), and 290P/Jager with the IRAC instrument on Spitzer. We acquired observations of OI emission in these comets with the ARCES echelle spectrometer mounted on the 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory and observations of OH with the Swift observatory (PanSTARRS) and with Keck HIRES (Jager). The CO2/H2O ratios derived from the Spitzer images are 12.6 +/- 1.3% (PanSTARRS), 28.9 +/- 3.6% (LINEAR), and 31.3 +/- 4.2% (Jager). These abundances are derived under the assumption that contamination from CO emission is negligible. The CO2 abundance for PanSTARRS is close to the average abundance measured in comets at similar heliocentric distance to date, while the abundances measured for LINEAR and Jager are significantl...

  13. Measurement of the K+ --> pi+ nu nu branching ratio

    Adler, S.; /Brookhaven; Anisimovsky, V.V.; /Moscow, INR; Aoki, M.; /TRIUMF; Ardebili, M.; /Princeton U.; Artamonov, A.V.; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Atiya, M.; /Brookhaven; Bassalleck, B.; /New Mexico U.; Bazarko, A.O.; /Princeton U.; Bhuyan, B.; /Brookhaven; Blackmore, E.W.; /TRIUMF; Bryman, D.A.; /British Columbia U. /Tsinghua U., Beijing /TRIUMF

    2008-03-01

    Experiment E949 at Brookhaven National Laboratory studied the rare decay K{sup +}-->pi{sup +} nu{ovr {nu}} and other processes with an exposure of 1.77 x 10{sup 12} k{sup +}'s. The data were analyzed using a blind analysis technique yielding one candidate event with an estimated background of 0.30 {+-} 0.03 events. Combining this result with the observation of two candidate events by the predecessor experiment E787 gave the branching ratio B(K{sup +}-->pi{sup +} nu{ovr {nu}}) = (1.47{sub -0.89}{sup +1.30}) x 10{sup -10}, consistent with the standard model prediction of (0.74 {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -10}. This is a more detailed report of results previously published [V.V. Anisimovsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 031801 (2004)].

  14. Measuring Long-Lived ^{13}C-Singlet State Lifetimes at Natural Abundance

    Claytor, Kevin E; Feng, Yesu; Warren, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Long-lived singlet states hold the potential to drastically extend the lifetime of hyperpolarization in molecular tracers for in-vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Such long lived hyperpolarization can be used for elucidation of fundamental metabolic pathways, early diagnosis, and optimization of clinical tests for new medication. All previous measurements of 13C singlet state lifetimes rely on costly and time consuming syntheses of 13C labeled compounds. Here we show that it is possible to determine 13C singlet state lifetimes by detecting the naturally abundant doubly-labeled species. This approach allows for rapid and low cost screening of potential molecular biomarkers bearing long-lived singlet states.

  15. The Abundance, Ortho/Para Ratio, and Deuteration of Water in the High-Mass Star Forming Region NGC 6334 I

    Emprechtinger, M; Rolffs, R; Schilke, P; Monje, R R; Comito, C; Ceccarelli, C; Neufeld, D A; van der Tak, F F S

    2012-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of 30 transitions of water isotopologues toward the high-mass star forming region NGC 6334 I. The line profiles of H_2^{16}O, H_2^{17}O, H_2^{18}O, and HDO show a complex pattern of emission and absorption components associated with the embedded hot cores, a lower-density envelope, two outflow components, and several foreground clouds, some associated with the NGC 6334 complex, others seen in projection against the strong continuum background of the source. Our analysis reveals an H2O ortho/para ratio of 3 +/- 0.5 in the foreground clouds, as well as the outflow. The water abundance varies from ~10^{-8} in the foreground clouds and the outer envelope to ~10^{-6} in the hot core. The hot core abundance is two orders of magnitude below the chemical model predictions for dense, warm gas, but within the range of values found in other Herschel/HIFI studies of hot cores and hot corinos. This may be related to the relatively low gas and dust temperature (~100 K), or time depende...

  16. {beta}-delayed neutron emission measurements around the third r-process abundance peak

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Cortes, G.; Calvino, F.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Riego, A. [INTE-DFEN, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B. [IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Algora, A. [IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain) and Inst. Nucl. Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Ameil, F.; Farinon, F.; Heil, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2013-06-10

    This contribution summarizes an experiment performed at GSI (Germany) in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126. The aim of this measurement is to provide the nuclear physics input of relevance for r-process model calculations, aiming at a better understanding of the third r-process abundance peak. Many exotic nuclei were measured around {sup 211}Hg and {sup 215}Tl. Final ion identification diagrams are given in this contribution. For most of them, we expect to derive halflives and and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities. The detectors used in this experiment were the Silicon IMplantation and Beta Absorber (SIMBA) detector, based on an array of highly segmented silicon detectors, and the BEta deLayEd Neutron (BELEN) detector, which consisted of 30 3He counters embedded in a polyethylene matrix.

  17. A Widely Tunable Infrared Laser Spectrometer for Measurements of Isotopic Ratios of Carbon Cycle Gases

    Joanne H. Shorter; J. Barry McManus; David D. Nelson; Charles E. Kolb; Mark S. Zahniser; Ray Bambha; Uwe Lehmann; Tomas Kulp; Stanley C. Tyler

    2005-01-31

    The atmospheric abundances of carbon dioxide and methane have increased dramatically during the industrial era. Measurements of the isotopic composition of these gases can provide a powerful tool for quantifying their sources and sinks. This report describes the development of a portable instrument for isotopic analysis CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} using tunable infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. This instrument combines novel optical design and signal processing methods with a widely tunable mid-infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) which will can access spectral regions for all the isotopes of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with a single instrument. The instrument design compensates for the large difference in concentration between major and minor isotopes by measuring them with path lengths which differ by a factor of 100 within the same multipass cell. During Phase I we demonstrated the basic optical design and signal processing by determining {sup 13}CO{sub 2} isotopic ratios with precisions as small as 0.2{per_thousand} using a conventional lead salt diode laser. During Phase II, the DFG laser source was coupled with the optical instrument and was demonstrated to detect {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4} ratios with a precision of 0.5{per_thousand} and an averaging time of 20 s using concentrated methane in air with a mixing ratio of 2700 ppm. Methods for concentrating ambient air for isotopic analysis using this technique have been evaluated. Extensions of this instrument to other species such as {sup 13}CO{sub 2}, C{sup 18}OO, and CH{sub 3}D are possible by substituting lasers at other wavelengths in the DFG source module. The immediate commercial application of this instrument will be to compete with existing mass spectrometric isotope instruments which are expensive, large and relatively slow. The novel infrared source developed in this project can be applied to the measurement of many other gas species and will have wide

  18. Measurement of B -> D_s K pi branching ratios

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Das, A; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hoedlmoser, H; Hokuue, T; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Joshi, N J; Kaga, M; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kajiwara, S; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumura, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Nishizawa, I; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Sarangi, T R; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stypula, J; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, M; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N

    2007-01-01

    We report a measurement of the exclusive $B^+$ meson decay to the final state $D_s^- K^+\\pi^+$ using $520 \\times 10^{6} B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected near the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance, with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. Using the $D_S^- \\to \\phi \\pi^-$ decay mode to reconstruct $D_s^-$ mesons, we obtain the branching fraction ${\\cal B}(B^+\\to D_s^-K^+\\pi^+)= (1.77^{+0.12}_{-0.12} {\\mathrm (stat)} \\pm 0.16 {\\mathrm (syst)} \\pm 0.23 {\\cal(B)})\\times 10^{-4}$. We also present preliminary results of a study of the two-body $D_sK$, $D_s\\pi$ and $K\\pi$ subsystems observed in this final state.

  19. THE ABUNDANCE, ORTHO/PARA RATIO, AND DEUTERATION OF WATER IN THE HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 6334 I

    Emprechtinger, M.; Lis, D. C.; Monje, R. R. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rolffs, R.; Schilke, P. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Comito, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ceccarelli, C. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble F-38041 (France); Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van der Tak, F. F. S., E-mail: dcl@caltech.edu [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research and Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of 30 transitions of water isotopologues toward the high-mass star-forming region NGC 6334 I. The line profiles of H{sup 16} {sub 2}O, H{sup 17} {sub 2}O, H{sup 18} {sub 2}O, and HDO show a complex pattern of emission and absorption components associated with the embedded hot cores, a lower-density envelope, two outflow components, and several foreground clouds, some associated with the NGC 6334 complex, others seen in projection against the strong continuum background of the source. Our analysis reveals an H{sub 2}O ortho/para ratio of 3 {+-} 0.5 in the foreground clouds, as well as the outflow. The water abundance varies from {approx}10{sup -8} in the foreground clouds and the outer envelope to {approx}10{sup -6} in the hot core. The hot core abundance is two orders of magnitude below the chemical model predictions for dense, warm gas, but within the range of values found in other Herschel/HIFI studies of hot cores and hot corinos. This may be related to the relatively low gas and dust temperature ({approx}100 K), or time-dependent effects, resulting in a significant fraction of water molecules still locked up in dust grain mantles. The HDO/H{sub 2}O ratio in NGC 6334 I, {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, is also relatively low, but within the range found in other high-mass star-forming regions.

  20. Predicted CALET measurements of ultra-heavy cosmic ray relative abundances

    Rauch, B. F.

    2014-05-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (X∘) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 X∘ of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the instrument are to measure electron energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1,000 TeV. In this paper we describe how the geomagnetic field at the 51.6° inclination orbit of the ISS can be used to allow CALET to measure the rare ultra-heavy (UH) cosmic ray (CR) abundances, which provide important clues for the CR source and acceleration mechanism. The CHD scintillator response is relatively insensitive to energy above minimum ionization, and the angle-dependent rigidity as a function of geomagnetic latitude can be exploited to discriminate particles above this energy threshold. Such events require corrections for trajectory in instrument that can be made with only the top 4 layers of the IMC, which allows for considerably greater geometric acceptance than for events that require passage through the TASC for energy determination. Using this approach CALET will be able to measure UH CR relative abundances over its expected mission with superior statistics to previous space instruments.

  1. Measurements of B Meson Lifetime Ratios with the LHCb Detector

    Luisier, Johan

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four main experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The LHCb detector is a one-arm spectrometer dedicated to precise measurements of the CP-violation and studies or rare b-hadron decays. The centre of mass energy and luminosity for a hadron collider) have both values never reached before. LHCb started data taking in November 2009. LHCb relies on excellent reconstruction and trigger efficiency, very good mass and proper time resolution, reliable particle identification systems to achieve the wanted precision on CP-violation parameters. These performances cannot be fulfilled without the detector to be calibrated. For instance, the Inner Tracker (IT) is readout by around a thousand chips, and the data are processed by 42 data acquisition cards, called TELL1. The Tracker Turicensis (TT) data are processed by 48 TELL1 boards. Each of these TELl1 boards has more than 18,000 parameters that need to be tuned in order to reduce the fake hits in the tracking systems. A hi...

  2. The prospect for fuel ion ratio measurements in ITER by collective Thomson scattering

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh;

    2012-01-01

    We show that collective Thomson scattering (CTS) holds the potential to become a new diagnostic principle for measurements of the fuel ion ratio, nT/nD, in ITER. Fuel ion ratio measurements will be important for plasma control and machine protection in ITER. Measurements of ion cyclotron structur...

  3. Measurements of periods, relative abundances and absolute yields of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission of {sup 237}Np

    Piksaikine, V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The experimental method for measurements of the delayed neutron yields and period is presented. The preliminary results of the total yield, relative abundances and periods are shown comparing with the previously reported values. (J.P.N.)

  4. Isotope abundance measurements. A key to an exotic problem solving: a review

    Since the paleotemperature measurements carried out by Urey and Epstein, early in the nineteen fifties, isotope abundance measurements have developed outside the boundary of research. They have become in the European Union an official method for food analysis. In France, customs employ them to find the origin of seized drugs. Frauds, such as 'chaptalization' (i.e. adding sugar to wine), are detected by isotope analysis. Disulfur monoxide, S2O, was discovered during the investigation of the mass spectrometer background when analysing sulphur dioxide isotope composition from masses 64 to 72. At the request of our meteorological bureau we investigated the formation and isotopic compositions of hailstones. It was possible to correlate deuterium contents to the formation temperature and to draw trajectories of hailstones within clouds where they grew. A growth model, NMR (Nief, Merlivat, Roth), was established. 18O and deuterium analysis were carried out on the same hailstone samples to validate this model, that implied equilibrium between vapour and condensed phases within hail forming clouds. Additional confirmation of some results could be found in tritium measurements. Also, the formation of deuterium by spallation had a further consequence: the study of this formation by reaction of the 'solar wind' on meteorites that can be used to measure the time spent by a meteorite within the solar system. We shall briefly discuss, among less frequent applications of isotope measurements, the losses of water, from closed or semi closed water pools, by evaporation and other causes. Such investigations have mainly been performed in arid countries. (author)

  5. Comparison of mass spectrometric methods (TE, MTE and conventional) for uranium isotope ratio measurements

    The isotope ratio measurement techniques - total evaporation (TE), modified total evaporation (MTE), and conventional - used for characterization measurements of certified reference materials by thermal ionization mass spectrometer instruments are compared. The advantages of each method, the fractionation profiles resulting from the measurement techniques, and factors affecting systematic components of bias in the isotope ratio measurements are discussed. The TE and MTE techniques yield major ratios and the conventional and MTE techniques yield minor ratios of comparable quality (in terms of precision and accuracy). (author)

  6. The prospect for fuel ion ratio measurements in ITER by collective Thomson scattering

    We show that collective Thomson scattering (CTS) holds the potential to become a new diagnostic principle for measurements of the fuel ion ratio, nT/nD, in ITER. Fuel ion ratio measurements will be important for plasma control and machine protection in ITER. Measurements of ion cyclotron structures in CTS spectra have been suggested as the basis for a new fuel ion ratio diagnostic which would be well suited for reactor environments and capable of providing spatially resolved measurements in the plasma core. Such measurements were demonstrated in recent experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak. Here we conduct a sensitivity study to investigate the potential measurement accuracy of a CTS fuel ion ratio diagnostic on ITER. The study identifies regions of parameter space in which CTS can be expected to provide useful information on plasma composition, and we find that a CTS fuel ion ratio diagnostic could meet the ITER measurement requirements for a standard ELMy H-mode discharge.

  7. On the Inference of the Cosmic Ray Ionization Rate $\\zeta$ from the HCO$^+$-to-DCO$^+$ Abundance Ratio: The Effect of Nuclear Spin

    Shingledecker, Christopher N; Gal, Romane Le; Oberg, Karin I; Hincelin, Ugo; Herbst, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The chemistry of dense interstellar regions was analyzed using a time-dependent gas-grain astrochemical simulation and a new chemical network that incorporates deuterated chemistry taking into account nuclear spin-states for the hydrogen chemistry and its deuterated isotopologues. With this new network, the utility of the [HCO$^+$]/[DCO$^+$] abundance ratio as a probe of the cosmic ray ionization rate has been reexamined, with special attention paid to the effect of the initial value of the molecular hydrogen ortho-to-para ratio (OPR). After discussing the use of the probe for cold cores, we then compare our results with previous theoretical and observational results for a molecular cloud close to the supernova remnant W51C, which is thought to have an enhanced cosmic ray ionization rate $\\zeta$ caused by the nearby $\\gamma$-ray source. In addition, we attempt to use our approach to estimate the cosmic ray ionization rate for L1174, a dense core with an embedded star. Beyond the previously known sensitivity o...

  8. Cyanoacetylene and its /sup 13/C species: Evidence against relative isotope fractionation and improved /sup 12/C//sup 13/C abundance ratios

    Wannier, P.G.; Linke, R.A.

    1978-12-15

    We use the J=9..-->..8 transitions of HCCCN and its /sup 13/C substituted species to obtain several results in Sgr B2 and Ori A. In Sgr B2 we test for relative isotope fractionation among the three carbon sites in HCCCN and find none to a level of +- 5%. We verify that HCCCN has low opacity in both sources and derive /sup 12/C//sup 13/C isotope ratios of 50 (Ori A) and 22 (Sgr B2), an indication of galactic evolution of this important ratio. That the Orion ''plateau'' feature is especially prominent in HCCCN indicates a surprisingly large polyatomic molecule abundance for this energetic source. Our spectra also yield information about other chemical species, including a new transition of NH/sub 2/CN, an improved frequency of U81505, and a new unidentified line U79220. In addition, sensitive upper limits for NH/sub 2/CN, CH/sub 2/CO, and HNO in the Orion ''spike'' source imply that this cloud is relatively deficient in these species.

  9. Consistency of NMR and mass spectrometry determinations of natural-abundance site-specific carbon isotope ratios. The case of glycerol.

    Zhang, B L; Trierweiler, M; Jouitteau, C; Martin, G J

    1999-07-01

    Quantitative determinations of natural-abundance carbon isotope ratios by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) have been optimized by appropriate selection of the experimental conditions and by signal analysis based on a dedicated algorithm. To check the consistency of the isotopic values obtained by NMR and mass spectrometry (IRMS) the same glycerol samples have been investigated by both techniques. To have access to site-specific isotope ratios by IRMS, the products have been degraded and transformed into two derivatives, one of which contains carbons 1 and 3 and the other carbon 2 of glycerol. The sensitivity of the isotopic parameters determined by IRMS to fractionation effects possibly occurring in the course of the chemical transformations has been investigated, and the repeatability and reproducibility of both analytical chains have been estimated. The good agreement observed between the two series of isotopic results supports the reliability of the two different approaches. SNIF-NMR is therefore a very attractive tool for routine determination, in a single nondestructive experiment, of the carbon isotope distribution in glycerol, and the method can be applied to other compounds. Using this method, the isotopic distributions have been compared for glycerol samples, obtained from plant or animal oils, extracted from fermented media, or prepared by chemical synthesis. Typical behaviors are characterized. PMID:21662780

  10. Development, optimisation, and application of ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios

    Stuerup, S

    2000-07-01

    The measurement of isotopic composition and isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples requires sensitive, precise, and accurate analytical techniques. The analytical techniques used are traditionally based on mass spectrometry, among these techniques is the ICP-SFMS technique, which became commercially available in the mid 1990s. This technique is characterised by high sensitivity, low background, and the ability to separate analyte signals from spectral interferences. These features are beneficial for the measurement of isotope ratios and enable the measurement of isotope ratios of elements, which it has not previously been possible to measure due to either spectral interferences or poor sensitivity. The overall purpose of the project was to investigate the potential of the single detector ICP-SFMS technique for the measurement of isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples. One part of the work has focused on the fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique with special emphasize on the features important to the measurement of isotope ratios, while another part has focused on the development, optimisation and application of specific methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of elements of nutritional interest and radionuclides. The fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique were investigated theoretically and experimentally by the measurement of isotope ratios applying different experimental conditions. It was demonstrated that isotope ratios could be measured reliably using ICP-SFMS by educated choice of acquisition parameters, scanning mode, mass discrimination correction, and by eliminating the influence of detector dead time. Applying the knowledge gained through the fundamental study, ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of calcium, zinc, molybdenum and iron in human samples and a method for the measurement of plutonium isotope ratios and ultratrace levels of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

  11. Development, optimisation, and application of ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios

    The measurement of isotopic composition and isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples requires sensitive, precise, and accurate analytical techniques. The analytical techniques used are traditionally based on mass spectrometry, among these techniques is the ICP-SFMS technique, which became commercially available in the mid 1990s. This technique is characterised by high sensitivity, low background, and the ability to separate analyte signals from spectral interferences. These features are beneficial for the measurement of isotope ratios and enable the measurement of isotope ratios of elements, which it has not previously been possible to measure due to either spectral interferences or poor sensitivity. The overall purpose of the project was to investigate the potential of the single detector ICP-SFMS technique for the measurement of isotope ratios in biological and environmental samples. One part of the work has focused on the fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique with special emphasize on the features important to the measurement of isotope ratios, while another part has focused on the development, optimisation and application of specific methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of elements of nutritional interest and radionuclides. The fundamental aspects of the ICP-SFMS technique were investigated theoretically and experimentally by the measurement of isotope ratios applying different experimental conditions. It was demonstrated that isotope ratios could be measured reliably using ICP-SFMS by educated choice of acquisition parameters, scanning mode, mass discrimination correction, and by eliminating the influence of detector dead time. Applying the knowledge gained through the fundamental study, ICP-SFMS methods for the measurement of isotope ratios of calcium, zinc, molybdenum and iron in human samples and a method for the measurement of plutonium isotope ratios and ultratrace levels of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

  12. Aerosols in the tropical and subtropical UT/LS: in-situ measurements of submicron particle abundance and volatility

    S. Borrmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Processes occurring in the tropical upper troposphere (UT, the Tropical Transition Layer (TTL, and the lower stratosphere (LS are of importance for the global climate, for stratospheric dynamics and air chemistry, and for their influence on the global distribution of water vapour, trace gases and aerosols. In this contribution we present aerosol and trace gas (in-situ measurements from the tropical UT/LS over Southern Brazil, Northern Australia, and West Africa. The instruments were operated on board of the Russian high altitude research aircraft M-55 "Geophysica" and the DLR Falcon-20 during the campaigns TROCCINOX (Araçatuba, Brazil, February 2005, SCOUT-O3 (Darwin, Australia, December 2005, and SCOUT-AMMA (Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, August 2006. The data cover submicron particle number densities and volatility from the COndensation PArticle counting System (COPAS, as well as relevant trace gases like N2O, ozone, and CO. We use these trace gas measurements to place the aerosol data into a broader atmospheric context. Also a juxtaposition of the submicron particle data with previous measurements over Costa Rica and other tropical locations between 1999 and 2007 (NASA DC-8 and NASA WB-57F is provided. The submicron particle number densities, as a function of altitude, were found to be remarkably constant in the tropical UT/LS altitude band for the two decades after 1987. Thus, a parameterisation suitable for models can be extracted from these measurements. Compared to the average levels in the period between 1987 and 2007 a slight increase of particle abundances was found for 2005/2006 at altitudes with potential temperatures, Θ, above 430 K. The origins of this increase are unknown except for increases measured during SCOUT-AMMA. Here the eruption of the Soufrière Hills volcano in the Caribbean caused elevated particle mixing ratios. The vertical profiles from Northern hemispheric mid-latitudes between 1999 and 2006 also are

  13. On line data acquisition and processing system for isotope abundance measurements using a spectrometer

    A system built using a TDC-312 computer for the automation of the Varian MAT CH-5 mass spectrometer for isotopic analysis is described. Salient feature of this automation is that software forms a major part of the system. A versatile computer program has been developed which can be used for the isotope abundance measurements of any element without interfering with the software of the system. The adjustment of ranges (gains) in between the peaks and updating of ranges, if required, is also performed by the computerised system. This has reduced the human intervention and the results are less prone to human error. Incidentally, this has also relieved the personnel of the strenuous manual work involved in the spectrum analysis. (auth.)

  14. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations

  15. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    Ali, Safdar, E-mail: safdaruetian@gmail.com; Shimizu, Erina [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University (Japan); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI) (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: n-nakamu@ils.uec.ac.jp [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations.

  16. MEASURING DETAILED CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES FROM CO-ADDED MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. I. TESTS USING MILKY WAY DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    The ability to measure metallicities and α-element abundances in individual red giant branch (RGB) stars using medium-resolution spectra (R ≈ 6000) is a valuable tool for deciphering the nature of Milky Way dwarf satellites and the history of the Galactic halo. Extending such studies to more distant systems like Andromeda is beyond the ability of the current generation of telescopes, but by co-adding the spectra of similar stars, we can attain the necessary signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to make detailed abundance measurements. In this paper, we present a method to determine metallicities and α-element abundances using the co-addition of medium-resolution spectra. We test the method of spectral co-addition using high-S/N spectra of more than 1300 RGB stars from Milky Way globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies obtained with the Keck II telescope/DEIMOS spectrograph. We group similar stars using photometric criteria and compare the weighted ensemble average abundances ([Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) of individual stars in each group with the measurements made on the corresponding co-added spectrum. We find a high level of agreement between the two methods, which permits us to apply this co-added spectra technique to more distant RGB stars, like stars in the M31 satellite galaxies. This paper outlines our spectral co-addition and abundance measurement methodology and describes the potential biases in making these measurements.

  17. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. III. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF MILKY WAY DWARF SATELLITE GALAXIES

    We present metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) for the central regions of eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way: Fornax, Leo I and II, Sculptor, Sextans, Draco, Canes Venatici I, and Ursa Minor. We use the published catalog of abundance measurements from the previous paper in this series. The measurements are based on spectral synthesis of iron absorption lines. For each MDF, we determine maximum likelihood fits for Leaky Box, Pre-Enriched, and Extra Gas (wherein the gas supply available for star formation increases before it decreases to zero) analytic models of chemical evolution. Although the models are too simplistic to describe any MDF in detail, a Leaky Box starting from zero metallicity gas fits none of the galaxies except Canes Venatici I well. The MDFs of some galaxies, particularly the more luminous ones, strongly prefer the Extra Gas Model to the other models. Only for Canes Venatici I does the Pre-Enriched Model fit significantly better than the Extra Gas Model. The best-fit effective yields of the less luminous half of our galaxy sample do not exceed 0.02 Zsun, indicating that gas outflow is important in the chemical evolution of the less luminous galaxies. We surmise that the ratio of the importance of gas infall to gas outflow increases with galaxy luminosity. Strong correlations of average [Fe/H] and metallicity spread with luminosity support this hypothesis.

  18. Use of fluidic oscillator to measure fuel-air ratios of combustion gases

    Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    A fluidic oscillator was investigated for use in measuring fuel-air ratios in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The oscillator was operated with dry exhaust gas from an experimental combustor burning ASTM A-1 fuel. Tests were conducted with fuel-air ratios between 0.015 and 0.031. Fuel-air ratios determined by oscillator frequency were within 0.001 of the values computed from separate flow measurements of the air and fuel.

  19. Measurement of the ratio of sea to valence quarks in the nucleon

    The ratio of sea to valence quarks for nucleons in tungsten has been measured for the fractional momentum range 0.04N+ and π- beams on a tungsten target. The results provide the most accurate determination to date of this ratio in the region xN2>20 GeV2, and are in good agreement with earlier measurements

  20. NLTE strontium abundance in a sample of extremely metal poor stars and the Sr/Ba ratio in the early Galaxy

    Andrievsky, S M; Korotin, S A; Francois, P; Spite, M; Bonifacio, P; Cayrel, R; Hill, V

    2011-01-01

    Heavy element abundances in extremely metal-poor stars provide strong constraints on the processes of forming these elements in the first stars. We attempt to determine precise abundances of strontium in a homogeneous sample of extremely metal-poor stars. The abundances of strontium in 54 very or extremely metal-poor stars, was redetermined by abandoning the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) hypothesis, and fitting non-LTE (NLTE) profiles to the observed spectral lines. The corrected Sr abundances and previously obtained NLTE Ba abundances are compared to the predictions of several hypothetical formation processes for the lighter neutron-capture elements. Our NLTE abundances confirm the previously determined huge scatter of the strontium abundance in low metallicity stars. This scatter is also found (and is even larger) at very low metallicities (i. e. early in the chemical evolution). The Sr abundance in the extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars is compatible with the main r-process involved in other processe...

  1. Radiographic measurement of the cardiothoracic ratio in pet macaques from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Schillaci, Michael A. [Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada)], E-mail: schillaci@utsc.utoronto.ca; Parish, Stephanie [Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada); Jones-Engel, Lisa [National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, 1705 N.E. Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The relative size of the heart, as measured by the cardiothoracic ratio, is often used as an index of ventricular hypertrophy-an important measure of myocardial pathophysiology in human primates. Despite its widespread use in human medicine, use of the cardiothoracic ratio in nonhuman primate veterinary medicine has been poorly documented. This report describes the results of our radiographic study of the cardiothoracic ratio in a sample of pet monkeys from Sulawesi, Indonesia. We assessed the effects of age and sex on cardiothoracic ratios, and compared our estimates with those presented in the literature for the Formosan macaque (Macaca cyclopis). Our results indicated a significant difference between the Sulawesi macaque species groupings in cardiothoracic ratios. Sex and age-related differences were not significant. Comparisons of cardiothoracic ratios with published ratios indicated similarity between M. cyclopis and Macaca nigra, but not between M. cyclopis and Macaca tonkeana.

  2. ISOTOPIC RATIOS IN TITAN's METHANE: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Temelso, B. [Dean' s Office, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen' s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Mandt, K. E. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Sherrill, C. D. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Drive NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (United States); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Flasar, F. M. [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere ({approx}6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of {approx}20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH{sub 4} collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D, and {sup 13}CH{sub 3}D. From these we compute estimates of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C = 86.5 {+-} 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 {+-} 0.33) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH{sub 4} + C{sub 2}H {yields} CH{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH{sub 4}), we find that the present-day {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C implies that the CH{sub 4} entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing. We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall

  3. The Hamburg/ESO R-process Enhanced Star survey (HERES) IX. Constraining pure r-process Ba/Eu abundance ratio from observations of r-II stars

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila

    2014-01-01

    The oldest stars born before the onset of the main s-process are expected to reveal a pure r-process Ba/Eu abundance ratio. We revised barium and europium abundances of selected very metal-poor (VMP) and strongly r-process enhanced (r-II) stars to evaluate an empirical r-process Ba/Eu ratio. Our calculations were based on non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Ba II and Eu II in the classical 1D MARCS model atmospheres. Homogeneous stellar abundances were determined from the Ba II subordinate and resonance lines by applying a common Ba isotope mixture. We used high-quality VLT/UVES spectra and observational material from the literature. For most investigated stars, NLTE leads to a lower Ba, but a higher Eu abundance. The resulting elemental ratio of the NLTE abundances amounts, on average, log(Ba/Eu) = 0.78+-0.06. This is a new constraint to pure r-process production of Ba and Eu. The obtained Ba/Eu abundance ratio of the r-II stars supports the corresponding Solar System r-process rati...

  4. Measurement of the Ratio of High Energy Neutron in the Pulse Nuclear Reactor

    MAO; Guo-shu; DING; You-qian; YANG; Lei; MA; Peng; YU; Zhen-hua

    2012-01-01

    <正>In the production of radioisotopes and neutron activation analysis, the fast neutron densities are very important to estimate the yields of the radioisotopes. In order to determine the fast neutron flux ratio, different foils are used to measure the thermal neutron flux and the fast neutron flux. In this paper 238U was used as only a monitor to measure the ratio of high energy neutron (>6 MeV). By measuring the

  5. Automatic isotope ratio measurements with a double collector magnetic mass spectrometer

    This paper describes a measuring procedure and the instrumentation of automatic measurements of isotope ratios with double collector magnetic mass spectrometers. This is essentially achieved by discriminating the desired peak plateau for ion current integration during the high voltage variation. The resolution is nearly uneffected by offset drifts of the electronic system. Prior to every isotope ratio measurement the offset values are determined, digitally stored, and finally compensated when the isotope ratio is calculated with an arithmetic unit. Several mass spectrometers have been compared on the basis of an uranium isotope analysis in a long time experiment. The developed system proved reliable and showed the same resolution as more sophisticated spectrometer systems. (orig.)

  6. Principles of fuel ion ratio measurements in fusion plasmas by collective Thomson scattering

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    signatures of ion cyclotron motion and ion Bernstein waves which appear for scattering geometries with resolved wave vectors near perpendicular to the magnetic field. We investigate the origin and properties of these features in CTS spectra and give estimates of their relative importance for fuel ion ratio......For certain scattering geometries collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements are sensitive to the composition of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. CTS therefore holds the potential to become a new diagnostic for measurements of the fuel ion ratio—i.e. the tritium to deuterium density...... ratio. Measurements of the fuel ion ratio will be important for plasma control and machine protection in future experiments with burning fusion plasmas. Here we examine the theoretical basis for fuel ion ratio measurements by CTS. We show that the sensitivity to plasma composition is enhanced by the...

  7. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy

  8. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    Chen, A. [Shenzhen College of International Education, 1st HuangGang Park St., Shenzhen, GuangDong (China); Luo, J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo, 332 Bonner Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260-1920 (United States); Wang, A. [Department of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Broadbent, C. [School of Engineering, Columbia University, 1130 Amsterdam Av., New York, NY 10027 (United States); Zhong, J. [Department of English, Dartmouth College, 6032 Sanborn House, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Dilmanian, F.A. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Neurology, and Radiology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Zafonte, F.; Zhong, Z. [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 743, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  9. Fat to Muscle Ratio Measurements with Dual Energy X Ray Absorbtiometry

    Chen, A; Broadbent, C; Zhong, J; Dilmanian, A; Zafonte, F; Zhong, Z

    2014-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  10. On alternative methods for measuring the radius and propagation ratio of axially symmetric laser beams

    Based on the developed efficient numerical methods for calculating the propagation of light beams, the alternative methods for measuring the beam radius and propagation ratio proposed in the international standard ISO 11146 are analysed. The specific calculations of the alternative beam propagation ratios Mi2 performed for a number of test beams with a complicated spatial structure showed that the correlation coefficients ci used in the international standard do not establish the universal one-to-one relation between the alternative propagation ratios Mi2 and invariant propagation ratios Mσ2 found by the method of moments. (laser beams)

  11. Measurements of the elastic electromagnetic form factor ratio μpGEp/GMp via polarization transfer

    We present measurements of the ratio of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors, μpGEp/GMp. The Jefferson Lab Hall A Focal Plane Polarimeter was used to determine the longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization in ep elastic scattering; the ratio of these polarization components is proportional to the ratio of the two form factors. These data reproduce the observation of Jones et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1398 (2000)], that the form factor ratio decreases significantly from unity above Q2 = 1 GeV2

  12. Measuring marine fish biodiversity: temporal changes in abundance, life history and demography

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Baum, Julia K.

    2005-01-01

    Patterns in marine fish biodiversity can be assessed by quantifying temporal variation in rate of population change, abundance, life history and demography concomitant with long-term reductions in abundance. Based on data for 177 populations (62 species) from four north-temperate oceanic regions (Northeast Atlantic and Pacific, Northwest Atlantic, North mid-Atlantic), 81% of the populations in decline prior to 1992 experienced reductions in their rate of loss thereafter; species whose rate of...

  13. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    Maas, Z G; Hinkle, K

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H$^{35}$Cl at 3.69851 $\\mu$m. The high resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m telescope. The average [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with --0.72$<$[Fe/H]$<$0.20 is [$^{35}$Cl/Fe]=(--0.10$\\pm$0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16$\\pm$0.15) dex. The [$^{35}$Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of $\\sim$0.35 dex above model predictions suggesting chemical evolution models are under producing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and \\ion{H}{2} regions. In one star where both H$^{35}$Cl a...

  14. The Oxygen Ratio: A Fuel-Independent Measure of Mixture Stoichiometry

    Mueller, C J; Musculus, M P; Pickett, L M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2003-12-19

    The pollutant-formation characteristics and other properties of a combustion reaction typically depend strongly on the proximity of the mixture to its stoichiometric condition, i.e., the ''mixture stoichiometry.'' A quantitative, widely applicable measure of this mixture property is therefore a critical independent variable in the study of combustion systems. Such a parameter enables the clear separation of mixture stoichiometry effects from other effects (e.g., fuel molecular structure, product temperature, diluent concentration, pressure). The parameter most often used to quantify mixture stoichiometry is the equivalence ratio. Unfortunately, the equivalence ratio fails to properly account for oxygen in oxygenates, i.e., compounds that have oxygen chemically bound within the fuel molecule. This manuscript introduces the oxygen ratio, a parameter that properly characterizes mixture stoichiometry for a broader class of reactants than does the equivalence ratio, including oxygenates. A detailed definition of the oxygen ratio is provided and used to show its relationship to the equivalence ratio. The definition is also used to quantify errors involved when the equivalence ratio is used as a measure of mixture stoichiometry with oxygenates. Proper usage of the oxygen ratio is discussed and the oxygen ratio is used to interpret results in a practical example.

  15. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio with the OPERA detector

    Agafonova, N; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Bagulya, A; Bertolin, A; Besnier, M; Bick, D; Boyarkin, V; Bozza, C; Brugière, T; Brugnera, R; Brunetti, G; Buontempo, S; Cazes, A; Chaussard, L; Chernyavsky, M; Chiarella, V; Chon-Sen, N; Chukanov, A; Cozzi, M; D'Amato, G; Corso, F Dal; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; D'eclais, Y; De Serio, M; Di Capua, F; Di Ferdinando, D; Di Giovanni, A; Di Marco, N; Dmitrievski, S; Dracos, M; Duchesneau, D; Dusini, S; Ebert, J; Egorov, O; Enikeev, R; Ereditato, A; Esposito, L S; Favier, J; Felici, G; Ferber, T; Fini, R; Frekers, D; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, C; Galkin, V I; Garfagnini, A; Giacomelli, G; Giorgini, M; Goellnitz, C; Goldberg, J; Golubkov, D; Goncharova, L; Gornushkin, Y; Grella, G; Grianti, F; Guler, M; Gustavino, C; Hagner, C; Hamada, K; Hara, T; Hierholzer, M; Hoshino, K; Ieva, M; Jakovcic, K; Jollet, C; Juget, F; Kazuyama, M; Kim, S H; Kimura, M; Klicek, B; Knuesel, J; Kodama, K; Komatsu, M; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; Kubota, H; Lazzaro, C; Lenkeit, J; Ljubicic, A; Longhin, A; Lutter, G; Malgin, A; Mandrioli, G; Marotta, A; Marteau, J; Matsuo, T; Matveev, V; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Meisel, F; Meregaglia, A; Migliozzi, P; Mikado, S; Miyamoto, S; Monacelli, P; Morishima, K; Moser, U; Muciaccia, M T; Naganawa, N; Naka, T; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Naumov, D; Nikitina, V; Niwa, K; Nonoyama, Y; Ogawa, S; Olchevski, A; Oldorf, C; Orlova, G; Osedlo, V; Paniccia, M; Paoloni, A; Park, B D; Park, I G; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Pilipenko, V; Pistillo, C; Policastro, G; Polukhina, N; Pozzato, M; Pretzl, K; Publichenko, P; Pupilli, F; Rescigno, R; Roganova, T; Rokujo, H; Romano, G; Rosa, G; Rostovtseva, I; Rubbia, A; Russo, A; Ryasny, V; Ryazhskaya, O; Sato, O; Sato, Y; Schembri, A; Parzefall, W Schmidt; Schroeder, H; Lavina, L Scotto; Sheshukov, A; Shibuya, H; Simone, S; Sioli, M; Sirignano, C; Sirri, G; Song, J S; Spinetti, M; Stanco, L; Starkov, N; Stipcevic, M; Strauss, T; Strolin, P; Takahashi, S; Tenti, M; Terranova, F; Tezuka, I; Tioukov, V; Tolun, P; Tran, T; Tufanli, S; Vilain, P; Vladimirov, M; Votano, L; Vuilleumier, J L; Wilquet, G; Wonsak, B; Yakushev, V; Yoon, C S; Yoshioka, T; Yoshida, J; Zaitsev, Y; Zemskova, S; Zghiche, A; Zimmermann, R

    2010-01-01

    The OPERA detector at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) was used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio in the TeV energy region. We analyzed 403069 atmospheric muons corresponding to 113.4 days of livetime during the 2008 CNGS run. We computed separately the muon charge ratio for single and for multiple muon events in order to select different energy regions of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to test the charge ratio dependence on the primary composition. The measured charge ratio values were corrected taking into account the charge-misidentification errors. Data have also been grouped in five bins of the "vertical surface energy". A fit to a simplified model of muon production in the atmosphere allowed the determination of the pion and kaon charge ratios weighted by the cosmic ray energy spectrum.

  16. Measurement of the initial conversion ratio in AQUILON and EDF 2 reactors

    In natural uranium fuelled reactors, it is important to know the initial conversion ratio, i.e. the ratio of uranium 238 absorption to uranium 235 destruction. The separation of absorption products from fission products is a difficult feature in the measurement of the conversion ratio. A physical method was chosen, the γγ coincidence technique which uses the properties of the decay scheme of neptunium 239 and allows the neptunium activity to be separated from the fission product activity, with some corrections. Detectors of natural uranium are used. The accuracy obtained in the measurements is of the order of 2%. (authors)

  17. D/H Isotope Ratio Measurements of Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds

    Meisehen, Thomas; Bühler, Fred; Koppmann, Ralf; Krebsbach, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of isotope ratios in atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) is a reliable method to allocate their sources, to estimate atmospheric residence times and investigate physical and chemical processes on various temporal and spatial scales. Most investigations yet focus on carbon isotope ratios. Certainly more detailed information can be gained by the ratio of deuterium (D) to hydrogen (H) in VOC, especially due to the high mass ratio. Combining measurements of carbon and hydrogen isotopes could lead to considerable improvement in our understanding of atmospheric processes. For this purpose we set up and thoroughly characterised a gas chromatograph pyrolysis isotope ratio mass spectrometer to measure the D/H ratio in atmospheric VOC. From a custom-made gas standard mixture VOC were adsorbed on Tenax®TA which has the advantage that CO2 is not preconcentrated when measuring ambient air samples. Our results show that the pyrolysis method has significant impact on the D/H ratios. A pyrolysis temperature of at least 1723 K and conditioning of the ceramic tube on a regular basis is essential to obtain reproducible D/H isotope ratios. For an independent comparison D/H ratios of the pure VOC used in the gas standard were determined using elemental analysis by Agroisolab (Jülich, Germany). Comparisons of 10 VOC show perfect agreement within the standard deviations of our measurements and the errors given by Agroisolab, e.g. for n-pentane, toluene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone and n-octane. A slight mean difference of 5.1 o was obtained for n-heptane while significant mean differences of 15.5 o and 20.3 o arose for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and isoprene, respectively. We further demonstrate the stability of our system and show that the sample preparation does not affect the isotope ratios. Moreover the applicability of our system to ambient air samples is demonstrated.

  18. Measurement of the underground atmospheric muon charge ratio using the MINOS Near Detector

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Block, G.J; Devenish, N. E.; Falk, E.; Hartnell, J.; Lefeuvre, G.; et al, ...

    2010-01-01

    The magnetized MINOS Near Detector, at a depth of 225 meters of water equivalent (mwe), is used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio. The ratio of observed positive to negative atmospheric muon rates, using 301 days of data, is measured to be 1.266+/-0.001(stat.)+0.015/-0.014(syst.). This measurement is consistent with previous results from other shallow underground detectors, and is 0.108+/-0.019(stat. + syst.) lower than the measurement at the functionally identical MINOS Far Detect...

  19. Measurement of the super-allowed branching ratio of $^{10}$C

    We propose to measure the supper-allowed branching ratio of $^{10}$C, the lightest of all nuclei decaying by a 0$^+ - 0^+$ transition. The light nuclei have a much stronger impact on limits of physics beyond the standard model than heavier nuclei. We propose a measurement which should reach a precision similar to the two latest measurements, however, with a different method employing a precisely efficiency calibrated germanium detector. As no method exists to greatly improve on previous results, the branching ratio has to be measured with independent methods.

  20. Application of an atmospheric-pressure ion source to the measurement of isotope ratios at trace levels in solution by mass spectroscopy

    Atmospheric-pressure ionisation sources have previously been reported for the molecular analysis of organic liquids and vapours. For elemental analysis, a new technique has been described, plasma sampling mass analysis (PSMA), permitting direct mass spectrometry of aqueous solutions. A description is given of the application of the method to isotope-ratio measurements and relative abundances for lead- and strontium-bearing minerals. (U.K.)

  1. 同位素丰度绝对测量及相对原子质量测定中的不确定度评估%Uncertainty Analysis of Absolute Measurement of Isotopic Abundances and Relative Atomic Mass

    周涛; 王同兴

    2005-01-01

    The sources of uncertainty of relative atomic mass include measurement errors and isotopic fractionation of terrestrial samples. Measurement errors are composed of measurements of atomic masses and isotopic abundances, the later includes uncertainty of correction factor K and isotopic ratios of natural samples. Through differential of seven factors to gain their propagation factors, the uncertainty of correction factors K can be calculated. With the same differential calculation, the uncertainty of relative atomic mass can be obtained.

  2. Accurate Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave velocity and empirical Poisson's ratio

    Li, Mingxia; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a method for Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave speed. The error in Poisson's ratio has weak influence on the measurement of Young's modulus based on Rayleigh wave speed, and Poisson's ratio minimally varies in a certain material; thus, we can accurately estimate Young's modulus with surface wave speed and a rough Poisson's ratio. We numerically analysed three methods using Rayleigh, longitudinal, and transversal wave speed, respectively, and the error in Poisson's ratio shows the least influence on the result in the method involving Rayleigh wave speed. An experiment was performed and has proved the feasibility of this method. Device for speed measuring could be small, and no sample pretreatment is needed. Hence, developing a portable instrument based on this method is possible. This method makes a good compromise between usability and precision.

  3. Size-based hydroacoustic measures of within-season fish abundance in a boreal freshwater ecosystem.

    Riley A Pollom

    Full Text Available Eleven sequential size-based hydroacoustic surveys conducted with a 200 kHz split-beam transducer during the summers of 2011 and 2012 were used to quantify seasonal declines in fish abundance in a boreal reservoir in Manitoba, Canada. Fish densities were sufficiently low to enable single target resolution and tracking. Target strengths converted to log2-based size-classes indicated that smaller fish were consistently more abundant than larger fish by a factor of approximately 3 for each halving of length. For all size classes, in both years, abundance (natural log declined linearly over the summer at rates that varied from -0.067 x day(-1 for the smallest fish to -0.016 x day(-1 for the largest (R2 = 0.24-0.97. Inter-annual comparisons of size-based abundance suggested that for larger fish (>16 cm, mean winter decline rates were an order of magnitude lower (-0.001 x day(-1 and overall survival higher (71% than in the main summer fishing season (mean loss rate -0.038 x day(-1; survival 33%. We conclude that size-based acoustic survey methods have the potential to assess within-season fish abundance dynamics, and may prove useful in long-term monitoring of productivity and hence management of boreal aquatic ecosystems.

  4. BrO/SO2 molar ratios from scanning DOAS measurements in the NOVAC network

    Lübcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Garzón, G.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2014-06-01

    The molar ratio of BrO to SO2 is, like other halogen/sulfur ratios, a possible precursor for dynamic changes in the shallow part of a volcanic system. While the predictive significance of the BrO/SO2 ratio has not been well constrained yet, it has the major advantage that this ratio can be readily measured using the remote-sensing technique differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) in the UV. While BrO/SO2 ratios have been measured during several short-term field campaigns, this article presents an algorithm that can be used to obtain long-term time series of BrO/SO2 ratios from the scanning DOAS instruments of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) or comparable networks. Parameters of the DOAS retrieval of both trace gases are given. The influence of co-adding spectra on the retrieval error and influences of radiative transfer will be investigated. Difficulties in the evaluation of spectroscopic data from monitoring instruments in volcanic environments and possible solutions are discussed. The new algorithm is demonstrated by evaluating data from the NOVAC scanning DOAS systems at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia, encompassing almost 4 years of measurements between November 2009 and end of June 2013. This data set shows variations of the BrO/SO2 ratio several weeks prior to the eruption on 30 June 2012.

  5. High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of Hercules X-1 with the XMM-Newton RGS CNO Element Abundance Measurements and Density Diagnostics of a Photoionized Plasma

    Jiménez-Garate, M A; Den Herder, J W A; Zane, S; Ramsay, G

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1, an intermediate-mass X-ray binary, which was observed with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. We measure the elemental abundance ratios by use of spectral models, and we detect material processed through the CNO-cycle. The CNO abundances, and in particular the ratio N/O > 4.0 times solar, provide stringent constraints on the evolution of the binary system. The low and short-on flux states of Her X-1 exhibit narrow line emission from C VI, N VI, N VII, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X ions. The spectra show signatures of photoionization. We measure the electron temperature, quantify photoexcitation in the He alpha lines, and set limits on the location and density of the gas. The recombination lines may originate in the accretion disk atmosphere and corona, or on the X-ray illuminated face of the mass donor (HZ Her). The spectral variation over the course of the 35 d period provides additional evidence for the precession of the disk. Duri...

  6. Response to Disturbance and Abundance of Final State: a Measure for Complexity?

    SHEN Dan; WANG Wen-Xiu; JIANG Yu-Mei; HE Yue; HE Da-Ren

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new definition of complexity. The definition shows that when a system evolves to a final state via a transient state, its complexity depends on the abundance of both the final state and transient state. The abundance of the transient state may be described by the diversity of the response to disturbance. We hope that this definition can describe a clear boundary between simple systems and complex systems by showing that all the simple systems have zero complexity, and all the complex systems have positive complexity. Some examples of the complexity calculations are presented, which supports our hope.

  7. Measurement of a Cosmographic Distance Ratio with Galaxy and CMB Lensing

    Miyatake, Hironao; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anže; Spergel, David N; Sherwin, Blake; van Engelen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We measure the gravitational lensing shear signal around dark matter halos hosting CMASS galaxies using light sources at $z\\sim 1$ (background galaxies) and at the surface of last scattering at $z\\sim 1100$ (the cosmic microwave background). The galaxy shear measurement uses data from the CFHTLenS survey, and the microwave background shear measurement uses data from the Planck satellite. The ratio of shears from these cross-correlations provides a purely geometric distance measurement across the longest possible cosmological lever arm. This is because the matter distribution around the halos, including uncertainties in galaxy bias and systematic errors such as miscentering, cancels in the ratio exactly. We measure this distance ratio in three different redshift slices of the CMASS sample, and combine them to obtain a $15\\%$ measurement of the distance ratio, $r=0.344 \\pm 0.052$ at an effective redshift of $z=0.54$. This is consistent with the predicted ratio from the Planck best-fit $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology of ...

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for on-line engine equivalence ratio measurements.

    Ferioli, Francesco; Puzinauskas, Paulius V; Buckley, Steven G

    2003-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to measure the equivalence ratio of a spark-ignited engine in a laboratory setting. Spectral features of C (711.3 nm), O (776.6 nm), N (746.3 and 743.8 nm), and CN (broad emission 707-734 nm) were used to quantify the equivalence ratio over a range from phi = 0.8 to phi = 1.2. The C/N and C/O peak ratios were found to be successful measurement metrics, compared with a standard exhaust gas oxygen analyzer, for averaged measurements. Some variation in the measurements was observed as a function of engine load. Single-shot data based on a CN/air peak ratio were evaluated using a separate calibration from averaged measurements, and the average of the single-shot data was found to agree well with the exhaust gas oxygen analyzer. The scatter in the single-shot data was substantially higher at lower equivalence ratios. The measurements including the CN peak were slightly sensitive to load, possibly due to pressure changes in the sample as the load increases, or possibly due to changes in the particle size distribution in the gas stream. PMID:14611051

  9. Measurement fo the mean semi-muonic branching ratio of B hadrons produced at PETRA

    Bartel, W.; Becker, L.; Cords, D.; Felst, R.; Haidt, D.; Knies, G.; Krehbiel, H.; Meinke, R.; Naroska, B.; Olsson, J.; Schmidt, D.; Steffen, P.; Laurikainen, P.; Magnussen, N.; Schmidt, D.; Dietrich, G.; Hagemann, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Kado, H.; Kawagoe, K.; Kleinwort, C.; Kuhlen, M.; Petersen, A.; Ramcke, R.; Schneekloth, U.; Weber, G.; Ambrus, K.; Bethke, S.; Dieckmann, A.; Elsen, E.; Heintze, J.; Hellenbrand, K.H.; Komamiya, S.; Krogh, J. von, Lennert, P.; Matsumura, H.; Rieseberg, H.; Spitzer, J.; Wagner, A.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Nye, J.; Allison, J.; Baines, J.; Ball, A.H.; Barlow, R.J.; Chrin, J.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Greenshaw, T.; Hill, P.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Stephens, K.; Warming, P.; Glasser, R.G.; Skard, J.A.J.; Wagner, S.R.; Zorn, G.T.; Cartwright, S.L.; Clarke, D.; Marshall, R.; Middleton, R.P.; Kawamoto, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Yamada, S.; JADE Collaboration.

    1985-11-21

    A measurement has been made of the mean semi-muonic branching ratio for the decay of b-flavoured hadrons produced in e e annihilation events at PETRA. The result, (11.4+-1.8+-2.5)%, agrees well with other recent measurements and is consistent with the predictions of the spectator model with QCD and non-spectator corrections. (orig.).

  10. New Measurement of the π → eν branching ratio

    A new measurement of the π → eν branching ratio yields GAMMA(π→eν + π→eνγ) / GAMMA(π→μν + π→γνμ) = (1.218 +- 0.014) x 10-4. The measured value is in good agreement with the standard model prediction incorporating electron-muon universality

  11. New measurement of the π→eν branching ratio

    A new measurement of the π→eν branching ratio yields GAMMA(π→eν+π→eνγ)/GAMMA(π→μν+π→μν γ) = (1.218 +- 0.014) x 10/sup -4./ The measured value is in good agreement with the standard-model prediction incorporating electron-muon universality

  12. Measurement of the super-allowed branching ratio of 22Mg

    We propose to measure the super-allowed branching ratio and the half-life of $^{22}$Mg, one of the least well measured 0+$\\rightarrow$ 0+ transitions of the 14 nuclei used to determine V$_{ud}$ and to test the unitarity of the CKM matrix. We propose measurements which should allow to significantly improve the precision on the super-allowed branching ratio employing a precisely efficiency calibrated germanium detector and on the half-life. As no method exists to greatly (e.g. an order of magnitude) improve on previous results, the branching ratio and the half-life have to be measured with independent methods and in independent experiments several times.

  13. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A.M.; Tumasyan, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Eroe, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Hammer, J.; Haensel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hoermann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der OeAW, Wien (Austria)

    2010-08-23

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766{+-}0.0032(stat.){+-}0.0032(syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  14. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766±0.0032(stat.)±0.0032(syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  15. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766 \\pm 0.0032(stat.) \\pm 0.0032 (syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  16. Seasonal dynamics of the copepod community in a tropical monsoonal estuary and the role of sex ratio in their abundance pattern

    Vineetha, G.; Madhu, N.V.; Kusum, K.K.; Sooria, P.M.

    As salinity is considered the prime “ecological master factor” governing the zooplankton distribution and abundance in estuaries, a spatio-temporal interactive approach was followed to assess whether the responses of the estuarine copepod community...

  17. The Impact of Diffuse Ionized Gas on Emission-line Ratios and Gas Metallicity Measurements

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of galaxies observed by MaNGA, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impact the measurements of emission line ratios, hence the gas-phase metallicity measurements and the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams. We demonstrate that emission line surface brightness (SB) is a reasonably good proxy to separate HII regions from regions dominated by diffuse ionized gas. For spatially-adjacent regions or regions at the same radius, many line ratios change systematically with emission line surface brightness, reflecting a gradual increase of dominance by DIG towards low SB. DIG could significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradient. Because DIG tend to have a higher temperature than HII regions, at fixed metallicity DIG displays lower [NII]/[OII] ratios. DIG also show lower [OIII]/[OII] ratios than HII regions, due to extended partially-ionized regions that enhance all low-ionization lines ([NII], [SII], [OII], [OI]). The contamination by DIG is responsible for a substantial portion of the scatter in metallicity measurements. At different surface brightness, line ratios and line ratio gradients can differ systematically. As DIG fraction could change with radius, it can affect the metallicity gradient measurements in systematic ways. The three commonly used strong-line metallicity indicators, R23, [NII]/[OII], O3N2, are all affected in different ways. To make robust metallicity gradient measurements, one has to properly isolate HII regions and correct for DIG contamination. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves HII regions towards composite or LINER-like regions.

  18. Measurement of stopping power ratios for 60 MeV positive or negative pions.

    Nordin, J A; Henkelman, R M

    1979-07-01

    Pion stopping power ratios are essential parameters for pion radiotherapy treatment planning. The validity of scaling proton stopping powers to pions is called into question since the pion mass is intermediate between the electron and proton masses. Direct measurements of stopping power ratios with respect to water were made for 60 MeV pions of both charges in Teflon, Plexiglas, nylon, paraffin, gelatine, tissue-equivalent plastic (Shonka A150), graphite, aluminium, steel and copper. Corrections for multiple scattering and energy dependence of the stopping power are applied. Measured stopping power ratios at an accuracy of 0.6% are in agreement to within the limits of experimental error with stopping power ratios calculated from the Bethe-Bloch equation using elemental I-values and Bragg additivity. PMID:112597

  19. Activity ratio measurement and burnup analysis for high burnup PWR fuels

    Applying burnup credit to spent fuel transportation and storage system is beneficial. To take burnup credit to criticality safety design for a spent fuel transportation cask and storage rack, the burnup of target fuel assembly based on core management data must be confirmed by experimental methods. Activity ratio method, in which measured the ratio of the activity of a nuclide to that of another, is one of the ways to confirm burnup history. However, there is no public data of gamma-ray spectrum from high burnup fuels and validation of depletion calculation codes is not sufficient in the evaluation of the burnup or nuclide inventories. In this study, applicability evaluation of activity ratio method was carried out for high burnup fuel samples taken from PWR lead use assembly. In the gamma-ray measurement experiments, energy spectrum was taken in the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), and 134Cs/137Cs and 154Eu/137Cs activity ratio were obtained. With the MVP-BURN code, the activity ratios were calculated by depletion calculation tracing the operation history. As a result, 134Cs/137Cs and 154Eu/137Cs activity ratios for UO2 fuel samples show good agreements and the activity ratio method has good applicability to high burnup fuels. 154Eu/134Cs activity ratio for Gd2O3+UO2 fuels also shows good agreements between calculation results and experimental results as well as the activity ratio for UO2 fuels. It also becomes clear that it is necessary to pay attention to not only burnup but also axial burnup distribution history when confirming the burnup of UO2+Gd2O3 fuel with 134Cs/137Cs activity ratios. (author)

  20. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  1. A Comparison of ACE Measurements of Galactic Cosmic-Ray Abundances and Energy Spectra for Two Successive Solar Minima

    J. Lavé; Binns, W. R.; Cummings, A. C.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R.A; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    Using current solar minimum measurements from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we report the observed elemental abundances and energy spectra for C, O, Si, and Fe in the energy range of ~50-500MeV/nucleon. These measurements are compared to prior CRIS observations for the 1997-98 solar minimum period, when the solar magnetic field was of the opposite polarity. By April 2009, the current solar minimum intensities for each of the ...

  2. Estimation of (n,f) cross sections by measuring reaction probability ratios

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections on unstable nuclei are inherently difficult to measure due to target activity and the low intensity of neutron beams. In an alternative approach, named the 'surrogate' technique, one measures the decay probability of the same compound nucleus produced using a stable beam on a stable target to estimate the neutron-induced reaction cross section. As an extension of the surrogate method, in this paper we introduce a new technique of measuring the fission probabilities of two different compound nuclei as a ratio, which has the advantage of removing most of the systematic uncertainties. This method was benchmarked in this report by measuring the probability of deuteron-induced fission events in coincidence with protons, and forming the ratio P[236U(d,pf)]/P[238U(d,pf)], which serves as a surrogate for the known cross section ratio of 236U(n,f)/238U(n,f). In addition, the P[238U(d,d'f)]/P[236U(d,d'f)] ratio as a surrogate for the 237U(n,f)/235U(n,f) cross section ratio was measured for the first time in an unprecedented range of excitation energies

  3. Estimation of (n,f) Cross-Sections by Measuring Reaction Probability Ratios

    Neutron-induced reaction cross-sections on unstable nuclei are inherently difficult to measure due to target activity and the low intensity of neutron beams. In an alternative approach, named the 'surrogate' technique, one measures the decay probability of the same compound nucleus produced using a stable beam on a stable target to estimate the neutron-induced reaction cross-section. As an extension of the surrogate method, in this paper they introduce a new technique of measuring the fission probabilities of two different compound nuclei as a ratio, which has the advantage of removing most of the systematic uncertainties. This method was benchmarked in this report by measuring the probability of deuteron-induced fission events in coincidence with protons, and forming the ratio P(236U(d,pf))/P(238U(d,pf)), which serves as a surrogate for the known cross-section ratio of 236U(n,f)/238U(n,f). IN addition, the P(238U(d,d(prime)f))/P(236U(d,d(prime)f)) ratio as a surrogate for the 237U(n,f)/235U(n,f) cross-section ratio was measured for the first time in an unprecedented range of excitation energies.

  4. Climatology of the aerosol extinction to backscatter ratio from sun photometric measurements

    Baldasano Recio, José María; Pedrós, Roberto; Estallés, Víctor; Sicard, Michaël; Gómez Amo, Jose Luis; Utrillas, Maria Pilar; Martínez Lozano, José Antonio; Rocadenbosch Burillo, Francisco; Pérez, C.

    2010-01-01

    The elastic lidar equation contains two unknown atmospheric parameters, namely, the particulate optical extinction and backscatter coefficients, which are related through the lidar ratio (i.e., the particulate-extinction-to-backscatter ratio). So far, independent inversion of the lidar signal has been carried out by means of Raman lidars (usually limited to nighttime measurements), high-spectral-resolution lidars, or scanning elastic lidars under the assumption of a homog...

  5. Measurement of FRET Efficiency and Ratio of Donor to Acceptor Concentration in Living Cells

    Chen, Huanmian; Puhl, Henry L.; Koushik, Srinagesh V.; Steven S Vogel; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency and the relative concentration of donor and acceptor fluorophores in living cells using the three-filter cube approach requires the determination of two constants: 1), the ratio of sensitized acceptor emission to donor fluorescence quenching (G factor) and 2), the ratio of donor/acceptor fluorescence intensity for equimolar concentrations in the absence of FRET (k factor). We have developed a method to determine G and k t...

  6. Three-Signal Method for Accurate Measurements of Depolarization Ratio with Lidar

    Reichardt, Jens; Baumgart, Rudolf; McGee, Thomsa J.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the determination of atmospheric depolarization-ratio profiles from three elastic-backscatter lidar signals with different sensitivity to the state of polarization of the backscattered light. The three-signal method is insensitive to experimental errors and does not require calibration of the measurement, which could cause large systematic uncertainties of the results, as is the case in the lidar technique conventionally used for the observation of depolarization ratios.

  7. Improved isotope ratio measurement performance in liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry by removing excess oxygen.

    Hettmann, Elena; Brand, Willi A; Gleixner, Gerd

    2007-01-01

    A low dead volume oxygen scrubbing system was introduced in a commercially available liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) interface to enhance the analytical capability of the system. In the LC/IRMS interface carbon from organic samples is converted into CO(2) inside the mobile phase by wet chemical oxidation using peroxodisulfate (Na(2)S(2)O(8)). After passing the hot reaction zone, surplus oxygen (O(2)) remains dissolved in the liquid phase. Both CO(2) and O(2) diffuse through a transfer membrane into the helium carrier and are transferred to the mass spectrometer. The presence of O(2) in the ion source may have detrimental effects on measurement accuracy and precision as well as on filament lifetime. As a remedy, a new on-line O(2)-removing device has been incorporated into the system. The new O(2) scrubber consists of two parallel hot copper reduction reactors (0.8 mm i.d., active length 120 mm) and a switch-over valve between them. One reactor is regenerated using He/H(2) while the other is actively scavenging O(2) from the gas stream. The capacity of each reduction reactor, expressed as usage time, is between 40 and 50 min. This is sufficient for a single LC run for sugars and organic acids. A further increase of the reduction capacity is accompanied by a peak broadening of about 100%. After switching to a freshly reduced reactor the oxygen background and the delta(13)C values of the reference gas need up to 500 s to stabilize. For repeated injections the delta(13)C values of sucrose remain constant (+/-0.1 per thousand) for about 3000 s. The long-term stability for measurements of sucrose was 0.11 per thousand without the reduction oven and improved slightly to 0.08 per thousand with the reduction oven. The filament lifetime improved by more than 600%, thereby improving the long-term system stability and analytical efficiency. In addition the costs per analysis were reduced considerably. PMID:18041012

  8. In Situ Measurements of the NO2/NO Ratio for Testing Atmospheric Photochemical Models

    Jaegle, L.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Fahey, D. W.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R. S.; Proffitt, M. H.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Salawitch, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of NO2, NO, O3, ClO, pressure and temperature have been made for the first time, presenting a unique opportunity to test our current understanding of the photochemistry of the lower stratosphere. Data were collected from several flights of the ER-2 aircraft at mid-latitudes in May 1993 during NASA's Stratospheric Photochemistry, Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE). The daytime ratio of NO2/NO remains fairly constant at 19 km with a typical value of 0.68 and standard deviation of +/- 0.17. The ratio observations are compared with simple steady-state calculations based on laboratory-measured reaction rates and modeled NO2 photolysis rates. At each measurement point the daytime NO2/NO with its measurement uncertainty overlap the results of steady-state calculations and associated uncertainty. However, over all the ER-2 flights examined, the model systematically overestimates the ratio by 40% on average. Possible sources of error are examined in both model and measurements. It is shown that more accurate laboratory determinations of the NO + O3 reaction rate and of the NO2 cross-sections in the 200-220 K temperature range characteristic of the lower stratosphere would allow for a more robust test of our knowledge of NO(x) photochemistry by reducing significant sources of uncertainties in the interpretation of stratospheric measurements. The present measurements are compared with earlier observations of the ratio at higher altitudes.

  9. An approach for measuring the 129I/127I ratio in fish samples

    Kusuno, Haruka; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Toshi; Miyairi, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2015-10-01

    The 129I/127I ratio in marine fish samples was measured employing accelerator mass spectrometry. The measurement was successful because of the low experimental background of 129I. Pyrohydrolysis was applied to extract iodine from fish samples. The experimental background of pyrohydrolysis was checked carefully and evaluated as 104-105 atoms 129I/combustion. The methodology employed in the present study thus required only 0.05-0.2 g of dried fish samples. The methodology was then applied to obtain the 129I/127I ratio of marine fish samples collected from the Western Pacific Ocean as (0.63-1.2) × 10-10. These values were similar to the ratio for the surface seawater collected at the same station, 0.4 × 10-10. The 129I/127I ratio of IAEA-414, which was a mix of fish from the Irish Sea and the North Sea, was also measured and determined as 1.82 × 10-7. Consequently, fish from the Western Pacific Ocean and the North Sea were distinguished by their 129I/127I ratios. The 129I/127I ratio is thus a direct indicator of the area of habitat of fish.

  10. Measuring distance ratios with CMB-galaxy lensing cross-correlations

    We propose a method for cosmographic measurements by combining gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with cosmic shear surveys. We cross-correlate the galaxy counts in the lens plane with two different source planes: the CMB at z∼1100 and galaxies at an intermediate redshift. The ratio of the galaxy count/CMB lensing cross-correlation to the galaxy count/galaxy lensing cross-correlation is shown to be a purely geometric quantity, depending only on the distribution function of the source galaxies. By combining Planck, the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the ratio can be measured to ∼4% accuracy, whereas a future polarization-based experiment like CMBPOL can make a more precise (∼1%) measurement. For cosmological models where the curvature and the equation of state parameter are allowed to vary, the direction of degeneracy defined by the measurement of this ratio is different from that traced out by baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Combining this method with the stacked cluster mass reconstruction cosmography technique as proposed by Hu, Holz, and Vale (2007), the uncertainty in the ratio can be further reduced, improving the constraints on cosmological parameters. We also study the implications of the lensing-ratio measurement for early dark energy models, in the context of the parametrization proposed by Doran and Robbers (2006). For models which are degenerate with respect to the CMB, we find both baryon acoustic oscillation and lensing-ratio measurements to be insensitive to the early component of the dark energy density.

  11. Assessing agreement between measurements recorded on a ratio scale in sports medicine and sports science.

    Nevill, A M; Atkinson, G.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The consensus of opinion suggests that when assessing measurement agreement, the most appropriate statistic to report is the "95% limits of agreement". The precise form that this interval takes depends on whether a positive relation exists between the differences in measurement methods (errors) and the size of the measurements--that is, heteroscedastic errors. If a positive and significant relation exists, the recommended procedure is to report "the ratio limits of agreement" using...

  12. Measurement of the K?2/K?1 ratio in heliumlike krypton

    Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kelley, R; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Smith, A J; Thorn, D B

    2008-08-25

    We report the measurement of the K{beta}{sub 2}/K{beta}{sub 1} ratio of He-like krypton using the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The energy of these lines are about 15 keV, which is twice as high as the energy of such lines measured before. A comparison with theoretical predictions shows poor agreement, concerning the trend uncovered earlier where the measured result is considerably larger than predicted.

  13. Measurement of the Multiple-Muon Charge Ratio in the MINOS Far Detector

    Adamson, P; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Carroll, T J; Castromonte, C M; Chen, R; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; de Rijck, S; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Flanagan, W; Frohne, M V; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Germani, S; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Sher, S Moed; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Pfuzner, M; Phan, D D; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sail, P; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Todd, J; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2016-01-01

    The charge ratio, $R_\\mu = N_{\\mu^+}/N_{\\mu^-}$, for cosmogenic multiple-muon events observed at an under- ground depth of 2070 mwe has been measured using the magnetized MINOS Far Detector. The multiple-muon events, recorded nearly continuously from August 2003 until April 2012, comprise two independent data sets imaged with opposite magnetic field polarities, the comparison of which allows the systematic uncertainties of the measurement to be minimized. The multiple-muon charge ratio is determined to be $R_\\mu = 1.104 \\pm 0.006 {\\rm \\,(stat.)} ^{+0.009}_{-0.010} {\\rm \\,(syst.)} $. This measurement complements previous determinations of single-muon and multiple-muon charge ratios at underground sites and serves to constrain models of cosmic ray interactions at TeV energies.

  14. Development and evaluation of an alpha spectrometer for precise measurement of activity ratio of plutonium

    In reprocessing plants, alpha spectrometry is used for the determination of plutonium concentration by isotope dilution alpha spectrometry. 238Pu content and for isotope correlations to calculate the specific activity and isotope composition of plutonium. All these studies involve the use of an alpha spectrometer to measure the activity ratio of 238Pu/(239Pu+240Pu) precisely. Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division (TPPED) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay, India has recently developed an alpha spectrometer, performance evaluation of which has been carried out by employing it to determine the activity ratio measurements of plutonium. Comparison of its performance with a commercially available system demonstrates that the indigenously developed instrument does provide acceptable levels of precision and accuracy for the activity ratio measurements of plutonium. (author)

  15. Absolute measurement of the isotopic ratio of a water sample with very low deuterium content

    The presence of H3+ ions which are indistinguishable from HD+ ions presents the principal difficulty encountered in the measurement of isotopic ratios of water samples with very low deuterium contents using a mass spectrometer. Thus, when the sample contains no deuterium, the mass spectrometer does not indicate zero. By producing, in situ, from the sample to be measured, water vapor with an isotopic ratio very close to zero using a small distilling column, this difficulty is overcome. This column, its operating parameters, as well as the way in which the measurements are made are described. An arrangement is employed in which the isotopic ratios can be measured with a sensitivity better than 0.01 x 10-6. The method is applied to the determination of the isotopic ratios of three low deuterium content water samples. The results obtained permit one to assign to the sample with the lowest deuterium content an absolute value equal to 1.71 ± 0.03 ppm. This water sample is a primary standard from which is determined the isotopic ratio of a natural water sample which serves as the laboratory standard. (author)

  16. NASA CONNECT: Measurement, Ratios and Graphing: 3,2,1 Crash!

    2000-01-01

    'Measurement, Ratios and Graphing: 3..2..1..Crash!' is the first of five programs in the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT season. NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. In this program, students will observe NASA engineers using measurement, ratios and graphs to make predictions and draw conclusions during their extreme tests. NASA CONNECT is free to educators! Visit our web site and register http://connect.larc.nasa.gov

  17. Measurement of the semi-leptonic branching ratio and the baryonic contribution in b quark disintegrations

    The b quark semi-leptonic branching ratios are measured using the hadronic events containing one or two leptons. 950 000 Z0 hadronic disintegrations were obtained in the DELPHI experiment during 1991-1992. Thus one of the elements of the CKM matrix may be determined. Using information contained in hadron jets with two opposite-sign leptons, the cascade ratios of the beauty hadron semi-leptonic disintegrations are evaluated. The baryon production rate in beauty events is analyzed, and the charmed Lambda baryon production cross-section is measured. 93 figs., 23 tabs., 75 refs

  18. On the accuracy of gamma spectrometric isotope ratio measurements of uranium

    Ramebäck, H.; Lagerkvist, P.; Holmgren, S.; Jonsson, S.; Sandström, B.; Tovedal, A.; Vesterlund, A.; Vidmar, T.; Kastlander, J.

    2016-04-01

    The isotopic composition of uranium was measured using high resolution gamma spectrometry. Two acid solutions and two samples in the form of UO2 pellets were measured. The measurements were done in close geometries, i.e. directly on the endcap of the high purity germanium detector (HPGe). Applying no corrections for count losses due to true coincidence summing (TCS) resulted in up to about 40% deviation in the abundance of 235U from the results obtained with mass spectrometry. However, after correction for TCS, excellent agreement was achieved between the results obtained using two different measurement methods, or a certified value. Moreover, after corrections, the fitted relative response curves correlated excellently with simulated responses, for the different geometries, of the HPGe detector.

  19. Clinical evaluation of the measurement of hepatosplenic volume ratio by computed tomography

    The liver and spleen ratio (S/L ratio) was estimated with X-ray computed tomography. Clinical usefulness of S/L ratio was evaluated by comparison with other liver functions (retention rate of ICG, total bilirubin, serum albumin, and cholinesterase activity) in 42 hepatocellular carcinoma patients with liver cirrhosis. The correlation between S/L ratio and retention rate of ICG, total bilirubin, serum albumin or cholinesterase activity was good (r=0.870, r=0.719, r=-0.691, or r=0.606, respectively p<0.001). Positive correlation was observed between S/L ratio and retention rate of ICG or total bilirubin. Negative correlation was observed between S/L ratio and serum albumin or cholinesterase activity. In conclusion, the measurement of S/L ratio on computed tomography was considered to be useful as an evaluation for the degree of severity in liver cirrhosis by considering both effective hepatic blood flow and portal hypertension. (author)

  20. Absolute measurements of total peroxy nitrate mixing ratios by thermal dissociation blue diode laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Paul, Dipayan; Osthoff, Hans D

    2010-08-01

    Peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs) have long been recognized as important trace gas constituents of the troposphere. Here, we describe a blue diode laser thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer for rapid and absolute measurements of total peroxyacyl nitrate (SigmaPAN) abundances at ambient concentration levels. The PANs are thermally dissociated and detected as NO2, whose mixing ratios are quantified by optical absorption at 405 nm relative to a reference channel kept at ambient temperature. The effective NO2 absorption cross-section at the diode laser emission wavelength was measured to be 6.1 x 10(-19) cm2 molecule(-1), in excellent agreement with a prediction based on a projection of a high-resolution literature absorption spectrum onto the laser line width. The performance, i.e., accuracy and precision of measurement and matrix effects, of the new 405 nm thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer was evaluated and compared to that of a 532 nm thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer using laboratory-generated air samples. The new 405 nm spectrometer was considerably more sensitive and compact than the previously constructed version. The key advantage of laser thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy is that the measurement can be considered absolute and does not need to rely on external calibration. PMID:20698583

  1. Monitoring great ape and elephant abundance at large spatial scales: measuring effectiveness of a conservation landscape.

    Stokes, Emma J; Strindberg, Samantha; Bakabana, Parfait C; Elkan, Paul W; Iyenguet, Fortuné C; Madzoké, Bola; Malanda, Guy Aimé F; Mowawa, Brice S; Moukoumbou, Calixte; Ouakabadio, Franck K; Rainey, Hugo J

    2010-01-01

    Protected areas are fundamental to biodiversity conservation, but there is growing recognition of the need to extend beyond protected areas to meet the ecological requirements of species at larger scales. Landscape-scale conservation requires an evaluation of management impact on biodiversity under different land-use strategies; this is challenging and there exist few empirical studies. In a conservation landscape in northern Republic of Congo we demonstrate the application of a large-scale monitoring program designed to evaluate the impact of conservation interventions on three globally threatened species: western gorillas, chimpanzees and forest elephants, under three land-use types: integral protection, commercial logging, and community-based natural resource management. We applied distance-sampling methods to examine species abundance across different land-use types under varying degrees of management and human disturbance. We found no clear trends in abundance between land-use types. However, units with interventions designed to reduce poaching and protect habitats--irrespective of land-use type--harboured all three species at consistently higher abundance than a neighbouring logging concession undergoing no wildlife management. We applied Generalized-Additive Models to evaluate a priori predictions of species response to different landscape processes. Our results indicate that, given adequate protection from poaching, elephants and gorillas can profit from herbaceous vegetation in recently logged forests and maintain access to ecologically important resources located outside of protected areas. However, proximity to the single integrally protected area in the landscape maintained an overriding positive influence on elephant abundance, and logging roads--even subject to anti-poaching controls--were exploited by elephant poachers and had a major negative influence on elephant distribution. Chimpanzees show a clear preference for unlogged or more mature forests

  2. Monitoring great ape and elephant abundance at large spatial scales: measuring effectiveness of a conservation landscape.

    Emma J Stokes

    Full Text Available Protected areas are fundamental to biodiversity conservation, but there is growing recognition of the need to extend beyond protected areas to meet the ecological requirements of species at larger scales. Landscape-scale conservation requires an evaluation of management impact on biodiversity under different land-use strategies; this is challenging and there exist few empirical studies. In a conservation landscape in northern Republic of Congo we demonstrate the application of a large-scale monitoring program designed to evaluate the impact of conservation interventions on three globally threatened species: western gorillas, chimpanzees and forest elephants, under three land-use types: integral protection, commercial logging, and community-based natural resource management. We applied distance-sampling methods to examine species abundance across different land-use types under varying degrees of management and human disturbance. We found no clear trends in abundance between land-use types. However, units with interventions designed to reduce poaching and protect habitats--irrespective of land-use type--harboured all three species at consistently higher abundance than a neighbouring logging concession undergoing no wildlife management. We applied Generalized-Additive Models to evaluate a priori predictions of species response to different landscape processes. Our results indicate that, given adequate protection from poaching, elephants and gorillas can profit from herbaceous vegetation in recently logged forests and maintain access to ecologically important resources located outside of protected areas. However, proximity to the single integrally protected area in the landscape maintained an overriding positive influence on elephant abundance, and logging roads--even subject to anti-poaching controls--were exploited by elephant poachers and had a major negative influence on elephant distribution. Chimpanzees show a clear preference for unlogged or

  3. Measurement of isotope ratios on transient signals by MC-ICP-MS

    Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements are an important task in many applications such as isotope-dilution mass spectrometry, bioavailability studies, or the determination of isotope variations in geological or nuclear samples. The technique of MC-ICP-MS has attracted much attention because it permits the precise measurement of isotope compositions for a wide range of elements combined with excellent detection limits due to high ionisation efficiencies. However, the results are based mainly on measurements using continuous sample introduction. In the present study the determination of isotope ratios on various transient signals with a time duration of 30 to 60 s has been achieved by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography to a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. In order to investigate the origin of ratio drifts across the transient signals for this hyphenated technique, measurements with the same standard solutions were also carried out using a flow-injection device for sample introduction. As a result of this application it could be concluded that the main source of the bias in the measured isotope ratios is within the ICP-MS instead of fractionation effects on the chromatographic column material. Preliminary studies on short transient signals of gaseous samples (dry plasma) showed a reverse fractionation effect compared with wet plasma conditions (flow injection and HPLC). (orig.)

  4. Laser-mass spectrometric studies on measurement of isotopic ratios Sm and Nd

    Measurements of isotopic ratio is important in many areas of research such as nuclear technology, geochemistry etc. However, depending on the nature of application of such data, the required accuracy and precision will also vary. For instance, in geochemistry, with subnanogram foraminifera samples, one needs to measure the ratio to within a very small variation (± 50‰) compared to natural isotopic composition. Whereas, in the boron enrichment plant (20-90 atom %), the accuracy needed is about ± 1 atom %. In the former case, one needs to make measurements using an expensive instruments such as a magnetic sector mass spectrometer coupled with a suitable ionization method. For the latter application, one can use less expensive instruments such as, quadrupole mass filer (QMF) or time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) etc. In the present work the effect of pulse width of Nd-YAG laser on the measurement of isotopic ratio of Sm and Nd is studied using an in-house developed Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometer (LIMS) facility. The picosecond Cps) laser seems to provide better data compared to nanosecond (ns) laser. This LIMS method is a relatively simple method to measure the isotope ratios to within ± 1%. (author)

  5. Multi-Element Abundance Measurements from Medium-Resolution Spectra. II. Catalog of Stars in Milky Way Dwarf Satellite Galaxies

    Kirby, Evan N; Simon, Joshua D; Geha, Marla C; Rockosi, Constance M; Sneden, Christopher; Cohen, Judith G; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Majewski, Steven R; Siegel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We present a catalog of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 2961 red giant stars that are likely members of eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW): Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I, Sextans, Leo II, Canes Venatici I, Ursa Minor, and Draco. For the purposes of validating our measurements, we also observed 445 red giants in MW globular clusters and 21 field red giants in the MW halo. The measurements are based on Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectroscopy combined with spectral synthesis. We estimate uncertainties in [Fe/H] by quantifying the dispersion of [Fe/H] measurements in a sample of stars in monometallic globular clusters. We estimate uncertainties in Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances by comparing our medium-resolution spectroscopic measurements to high-resolution spectroscopic abundances of the same stars. For this purpose, our DEIMOS sample included 132 red giants with published high-resolution spectroscopy in globular clusters, the MW halo field, and dwarf galaxies. The standard deviations of the ...

  6. Hydrogen Atom Collision Processes in Cool Stellar Atmospheres: Effects on Spectral Line Strengths and Measured Chemical Abundances in Old Stars

    The precise measurement of the chemical composition of stars is a fundamental problem relevant to many areas of astrophysics. State-of-the-art approaches attempt to unite accurate descriptions of microphysics, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation and 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In this paper I review progress in understanding inelastic collisions of hydrogen atoms with other species and their influence on spectral line formation and derived abundances in stellar atmospheres. These collisions are a major source of uncertainty in non-LTE modelling of spectral lines and abundance determinations, especially for old, metal-poor stars, which are unique tracers of the early evolution of our galaxy. Full quantum scattering calculations of direct excitation processes X(nl) + H ↔ X(n'l') + H and charge transfer processes X(nl) + H ↔ X+ + H− have been done for Li, Na and Mg [1,2,3] based on detailed quantum chemical data, e.g. [4]. Rate coefficients have been calculated and applied to non-LTE modelling of spectral lines in stellar atmospheres [5,6,7,8,9]. In all cases we find that charge transfer processes from the first excited S-state are very important, and the processes affect measured abundances for Li, Na and Mg in some stars by as much as 60%. Effects vary with stellar parameters (e.g. temperature, luminosity, metal content) and so these processes are important not only for accurate absolute abundances, but also for relative abundances among dissimilar stars.

  7. Measurement of the SS-OS Dijet cross-section ratio

    The authors present a measurement of the same-side to opposite side dijet cross section ratio in p bar p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV, using approximately 19 pb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab during the 1992-93 run of the Fermilab Tevatron. They show that; for large pseudorapidities and small transverse energies, this ratio is sensitive to the gluon distribution at small x. They compare the measured values of the ratio with the theoretical predictions, smeared to incorporate detector effects, for a variety of parton distributions. Overall, They find very good agreement between the data and the predictions for a wide range of jet energies and pseudorapidities. At low transverse energies, there are some minor discrepancies between the data and the predictions that could arise from the effects of a more singular gluon distribution

  8. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio with the OPERA detector

    The OPERA detector at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) was used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio Rμ=Nμ+/Nμ- in the TeV energy region. We analyzed 403069 atmospheric muons corresponding to 113.4 days of lifetime during the 2008 CNGS run. We computed separately the muon charge ratio for single and for multiple muon events in order to select different energy regions of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to test the Rμ dependence on the primary composition. The measured Rμ values were corrected taking into account the charge-misidentification errors. Data have also been grouped in five bins of the ''vertical surface energy'' Eμ cos θ. A fit to a simplified model of muon production in the atmosphere allowed the determination of the pion and kaon charge ratios weighted by the cosmic ray energy spectrum. (orig.)

  9. New measurements of EC/β+ ratios and comparison with theory

    The electron-capture to positron-decay ratios, EC/β+, and K-capture to positron ratios, K/β+, were measured using X- and γ-ray detectors of high energy resolution and a NaI(Tl) well-type detector of high detection efficiency. Single and coincidence counting was performed. The following results were obtained for allowed transitions: in 22Na, EC/β+=0.112(7), in 52Mn, EC/β+=2.27(7), in 65Zn, K/β+=30.7(11). For a nonunique first-forbidden transition in the decay of 151Tb with an allowed spectrum shape we measured EC/β+=95.6(52). The experimental ratios were all found to agree with the corresponding recalculated values for allowed transitions. (orig.)

  10. A study of isotope ratio measurement by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    The measurement of isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has the benefits of ionising all metallic elements, simplifying sample preparation and reducing analysis time, when compared with thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS). However, the use of ICP-MS in isotopic ratio studies has been somewhat restricted by its failure to offer the precision and accuracy required by a variety of applications. The precision achievable by ICP-MS, typically 0.2 to 0.3% RSD, for isotopic ratios, has generally been regarded as being primarily limited by instrumental instability. An investigation of the sources of instrumental noise in ICP-MS has been undertaken, utilising noise spectral analysis as a diagnostic aid. Study of parametric variation upon noise production has identified the methods by which modulation of the ion signal occurs. Noise spectral analysis has allowed an understanding of the limitations imposed upon measurement precision by the various contributing noise sources to be established. (author)

  11. Statistical Analysis of Interferometric Measurements of Axis Ratios for Classical Be Stars

    Cyr, Richard P; Tycner, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a novel method to estimate the effective opening angle of CBe star disks from projected axis ratio measurements, obtained by interferometry using Bayesian statistics. A Monte Carlo scheme was used to generate a large set of theoretical axis ratios from disk models using different distributions of disk densities and opening angles. These theoretical samples were then compared to observational samples, using a two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, to determine which theoretical distribution best reproduces the observations. The results suggest that the observed ratio distributions in the K-, H-, and N-band can best be explained by the presence of thin disks, with opening half-angles of the order of 0.15$^{\\circ}$ to 4.0$^{\\circ}$. Results for measurements over the H$\\alpha$ line point toward slightly thicker disks, 3.7$^{\\circ}$ to 14$^{\\circ}$, which is consistent with a flaring disk predicted by the viscous disk model.

  12. Mass Accuracy and Isotopic Abundance Measurements for HR-MS Instrumentation: Capabilities for Non-Targeted Analyses

    Knolhoff, Ann M.; Callahan, John H.; Croley, Timothy R.

    2014-07-01

    The development of automated non-targeted workflows for small molecule analyses is highly desirable in many areas of research and diagnostics. Sufficient mass and chromatographic resolution is necessary for the detectability of compounds and subsequent componentization and interpretation of ions. The mass accuracy and relative isotopic abundance are critical in correct molecular formulae generation for unknown compounds. While high-resolution instrumentation provides accurate mass information, sample complexity can greatly influence data quality and the measurement of compounds of interest. Two high-resolution instruments, an Orbitrap and a Q-TOF, were evaluated for mass accuracy and relative isotopic abundance with various concentrations of a standard mixture in four complex sample matrices. The overall average ± standard deviation of the mass accuracy was 1.06 ± 0.76 ppm and 1.62 ± 1.88 ppm for the Orbitrap and the Q-TOF, respectively; however, individual measurements were ± 5 ppm for the Orbitrap and greater than 10 ppm for the Q-TOF. Relative isotopic abundance measurements for A + 1 were within 5% of the theoretical value if the intensity of the monoisotopic peak was greater than 1E7 for the Orbitrap and 1E5 for the Q-TOF, where an increase in error is observed with a decrease in intensity. Furthermore, complicating factors were found in the data that would impact automated data analysis strategies, including coeluting species that interfere with detectability and relative isotopic abundance measurements. The implications of these findings will be discussed with an emphasis on reasonable expectations from these instruments, guidelines for experimental workflows, data analysis considerations, and software design for non-targeted analyses.

  13. High-sensitivity measurement of 3He-4He isotopic ratios for ultracold neutron experiments

    Mumm, H. P.; Huber, M. G.; Bauder, W.; Abrams, N.; Deibel, C. M.; Huffer, C. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Schelhammer, K. W.; Janssens, R.; Jiang, C. L.; Scott, R. H.; Pardo, R. C.; Rehm, K. E.; Vondrasek, R.; Swank, C. M.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.; Paul, M.; Yang, L.

    2016-06-01

    Research efforts ranging from studies of solid helium to searches for a neutron electric dipole moment require isotopically purified helium with a ratio of 3He to 4He at levels below that which can be measured using traditional mass spectroscopy techniques. We demonstrate an approach to such a measurement using accelerator mass spectroscopy, reaching the 10-14 level of sensitivity, several orders of magnitude more sensitive than other techniques. Measurements of 3He/4He in samples relevant to the measurement of the neutron lifetime indicate the need for substantial corrections. We also argue that there is a clear path forward to sensitivity increases of at least another order of magnitude.

  14. Long- Term Stability Study of Isotope Ratio Measurements Uranium and Thorium by Quadrupole Icp Mass Spectrometry

    Precise isotope ratio measurements of long-lived actinides at trace concentration levels are requite for the characterization of environmental samples (e.g. evidence and extent of 236U contaminate from radioactive waste; geological samples for dating, using the U-Pb method), and radioactive waste material

  15. Measurements of vector boson with associated jet production and ratios with ATLAS

    Owen, Rhys Edward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurement results for vector boson + Jet production cross sections and ratios are presented, including results from both 7 TeV and 13 TeV centre of mass energies. The data is also compared with predictions from MC generators in preparation for Run 2 analyses.

  16. A measurement of the neutron to 199Hg magnetic moment ratio

    S. Afach

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The neutron gyromagnetic ratio has been measured relative to that of the 199Hg atom with an uncertainty of 0.8 ppm. We employed an apparatus where ultracold neutrons and mercury atoms are stored in the same volume and report the result γn/γHg=3.8424574(30.

  17. Measurement of the η->π+π-e+e- decay branching ratio

    The reaction pd->He3η at threshold was used to provide a clean source of η mesons for decay studies with the WASA detector at CELSIUS. The branching ratio of the decay η->π+π-e+e- is measured to be (4.3+/-1.3+/-0.4)x10-4

  18. Development of a System to Measure Recrystallization Ratio of Plate Steel Using Laser-Based Ultrasonics

    In this study, a material property measurement system of plate steel using laser-based ultrasonics has been developed. The system consists of pulsed Nd:YAG laser for ultrasonic generation, CW single frequency laser and Fabry-Perot interferometer for ultrasonic detection. The system generates and detects shear waves and precisely calculates anisotropy parameter values of shear wave velocities of test samples. At first, the relationship between anisotropy parameter and recrystallization ratio was investigated in the laboratory experiments. Quenching the test samples just after the ultrasonic measurement, recrystallization ratio values were measured by the conventional microscopic method. According to the experimental results, the anisotropy parameter values showed a good correlation with actual recrystallization ratio values. To evaluate the applicability of the system to real steel production line, the system was installed in hot rolling pilot plant of plate steel. As the results, it was demonstrated that the system could measure the recrystallization ratio using the anisotropy parameter values of shear wave velocities, even in the environment of hot rolling pilot plant

  19. A quantitative evaluation of spurious results in the infrared spectroscopic measurement of CO2 isotope ratios

    The possible generation of spurious results, arising from the application of infrared spectroscopic techniques to the measurement of carbon isotope ratios in breath, due to coincident absorption bands has been re-examined. An earlier investigation, which approached the problem qualitatively, fulfilled its aspirations in providing an unambiguous assurance that 13C16O2/12C16O2 ratios can be confidently measured for isotopic breath tests using instruments based on infrared absorption. Although this conclusion still stands, subsequent quantitative investigation has revealed an important exception that necessitates a strict adherence to sample collection protocol. The results show that concentrations and decay rates of the coincident breath trace compounds acetonitrile and carbon monoxide, found in the breath sample of a heavy smoker, can produce spurious results. Hence, findings from this investigation justify the concern that breath trace compounds present a risk to the accurate measurement of carbon isotope ratios in breath when using broadband, non-dispersive, ground state absorption infrared spectroscopy. It provides recommendations on the length of smoking abstention required to avoid generation of spurious results and also reaffirms, through quantitative argument, the validity of using infrared absorption spectroscopy to measure CO2 isotope ratios in breath. (author)

  20. A measurement of the neutron to 199Hg magnetic moment ratio

    Afach, S; Ban, G; Bison, G; Bodek, K; Burghoff, M; Chowdhuri, Z; Daum, M; Fertl, M; Franke, B; Geltenbort, P; Green, K; van der Grinten, M G D; Grujic, Z; Harris, P G; Heil, W; Hélaine, V; Henneck, R; Horras, M; Iaydjiev, P; Ivanov, S N; Kasprzak, M; Kermaïdic, Y; Kirch, K; Knecht, A; Koch, H -C; Krempel, J; Kuźniak, M; Lauss, B; Lefort, T; Lemière, Y; Mtchedlishvili, A; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Pendlebury, J M; Perkowski, M; Pierre, E; Piegsa, F M; Pignol, G; Prashanth, P N; Quéméner, G; Rebreyend, D; Ries, D; Roccia, S; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Schnabel, A; Severijns, N; Shiers, D; Smith, K F; Voigt, J; Weis, A

    2014-01-01

    The neutron gyromagnetic ratio has been measured relative to that of the 199Hg atom with an uncertainty of 0.8 ppm. We employed an apparatus where ultracold neutrons and mercury atoms are stored in the same volume and report the result $\\gamma_{\\rm n}/\\gamma_{\\rm Hg} = 3.8424574(30)$.

  1. The measurement and interpretation of Ne VII spectral line intensity ratios

    Results are presented for the measurement, using the branching ratios calibration method, of the spectral intensities of Ne VII lines emitted from a theta-pinch plasma whose electron temperature and density have been found by laser scattering and alternate techniques. (author)

  2. High-precision branching-ratio measurement for the superallowed β+ emitter 74Rb

    Dunlop, R.; Ball, G. C.; Leslie, J. R.; Svensson, C. E.; Towner, I. S.; Andreoiu, C.; Chagnon-Lessard, S.; Chester, A.; Cross, D. S.; Finlay, P.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Garrett, P. E.; Glister, J.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Leach, K. G.; Rand, E. T.; Starosta, K.; Tardiff, E. R.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S. J.; Wong, J.; Yates, S. W.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2013-10-01

    A high-precision branching-ratio measurement for the superallowed β+ decay of 74Rb was performed at the TRIUMF Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) radioactive ion-beam facility. The scintillating electron-positron tagging array (SCEPTAR), composed of 10 thin plastic scintillators, was used to detect the emitted β particles; the 8π spectrometer, an array of 20 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors, was used for detecting γ rays that were emitted following Gamow-Teller and nonanalog Fermi β+ decays of 74Rb; and the Pentagonal Array of Conversion Electron Spectrometers (PACES), an array of 5 Si(Li) detectors, was employed for measuring β-delayed conversion electrons. Twenty-three excited states were identified in 74Kr following 8.241(4)×108 detected 74Rb β decays. A total of 58 γ-ray and electron transitions were placed in the decay scheme, allowing the superallowed branching ratio to be determined as B0=99.545(31)%. Combined with previous half-life and Q-value measurements, the superallowed branching ratio measured in this work leads to a superallowed ft value of 3082.8(65) s. Comparisons between this superallowed ft value and the world-average-corrected Ft¯ value, as well as the nonanalog Fermi branching ratios determined in this work, provide guidance for theoretical models of the isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections in this mass region.

  3. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ18O and δ2H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ18O and δ2H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source

  4. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Cordea, D. V.; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V.; Mihaiu, M.

    2013-11-01

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ18O and δ2H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ18O and δ2H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

  5. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in milk samples from a farm placed in the mountains of Transylvania

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A.; Puscas, R.; Radu, S.; Mirel, V. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordea, D. V.; Mihaiu, M. [University of Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Calea Manastur, 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Product origin is of great importance for consumers especially because its association in consumer's perception with food quality, freedom from disease or pollution. Stable isotope ratio analysis is a powerful technique in food authenticity and traceability control which has been introduced within the European wine industry to ensure authenticity of wine provenance and to detect adulteration. Isotopic ratios measurements have also been successfully to other food commodities like: fruit juices, honey and dairy foods. The δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H content in milk water reflects the isotope composition of the ground water drunk by animals. Seasonal effects are also very important: in summer, milk water contains higher δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H values due to the fresh plants that are ate by animals. Relative carbon stable isotope abundances in total milk reflect the isotopic composition of the diet fed to the dairy cows. In this study the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of 15 milk samples coming from a unit placed in the mountains of Transylvania was investigated. The distribution of the obtained isotopic values was than discussed taking into account that all the animals were feed with the same type of forage and consumed water was taken from the same source.

  6. Measurement of competitive balance in professional team sports using the Normalized Concentration Ratio

    Vasileios Manasis; Vassiliki Avgerinou; Ioannis Ntzoufras; J. James Reade

    2011-01-01

    Competitive balance is an important concept in professional team sports; its measurement is, therefore, a critical issue. One of the most widely used indices, which was introduced for the estimation of seasonal competitive balance is the Concentration Ratio, which is a relatively simple index and measures the extent to which a league is dominated by a particular number of teams. However, it is shown that both the total number of league teams and the number of dominant teams under examination ...

  7. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at TeV energies with MINOS

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D.S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Barr, G.; /Fermilab /University Coll. London /Rutherford /Minnesota U. /Indiana U. /Sussex U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Argonne /Caltech /LLNL, Livermore /Oxford U.

    2007-05-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 m.w.e. in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be N{sub {mu}}+/N{sub {mu}}-=1.374{+-}0.004(stat)-0.010{sup +0.012}(sys). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the 2 standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3-1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitative model shows that the rise is consistent with an increasing contribution of kaon decays to the muon charge ratio.

  8. Measurements of [O I] λ 6300/Hα Intensity Ratios in Four H II Regions

    Hausen, N. R.; Reynolds, R. J.; Haffner, L. M.; Tufte, S. L.

    2000-05-01

    Reynolds et al. (1998, ApJ, 494, L99) measured the [O I] λ 6300/Hα line intensity ratio for the O star H II region NGC 7000 and found it to be almost ten times lower than the [O I]/Hα ratios of three directions which sampled the warm ionized medium. In order to investigate whether the [O I]/Hα ratios of other discrete H II regions are similar to that of NGC 7000, the Wisconsin Hα Mapper (WHAM) facility has now been used to measure [O I]/Hα intensity ratios for four additional H II regions surrounding O stars. These regions are S252 (observation coordinates l = 190.1o, b = +0.6o), S261 (194.1o, --1.9o), S27 (6.3o, +23.6o), and S264 (195.1o, --12.0o). The [O I]/Hα ratios for these four regions range from approximately 0.001 to 0.005. This is consistent with the NGC 7000 result of [O I]/Hα = 0.0033, and hence indicates a large, systematic difference between the [O I]/Hα ratios in bright H II regions in the vicinity of O stars and the ratios in the diffuse ionized component of the interstellar medium. This difference implies either a significantly lower hydrogen ionization fraction n(H+)/n(Ho) or higher electron temperature in the diffuse ionized gas compared to the O star H II regions. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation through grant AST 96-19424.

  9. The abundance of ice nuclei during airborne measurements over Germany and the Caribbean

    Danielczok, A..; Bingemer, H.; Curtius, J.; DeMott, P. J.

    2012-04-01

    The tropospheric abundance of ice nuclei (IN) acting at -8 to -18 °C in the deposition and condensation nucleation modes was investigated during series of research flights on board a Learjet over northern Germany in June 2011 and on board of the NSF/NCAR C-130 during the ICE IN CLOUDS EXPERIMENT - TROPICAL (ICE-T) over the Caribbean in July 2011. Ice nuclei were collected from the air by electrostatic precipitation of aerosol onto silicon substrates. Samples were subsequently analyzed in the laboratory by the isothermal static vapor diffusion chamber FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice Nuclei Deposition FreezinG Experiment). IN abundance in the free and upper troposphere varied between < 1 and 50 IN L-1 in the upper troposphere over Germany, and between < 1 to 40 IN L-1 in the lower and middle troposphere in the Caribbean. A few dust layers were encountered. The results will be presented and discussed in the light of trajectory analysis and other supporting information.

  10. The probability distribution functions of emission line flux measurements and their ratios

    Wesson, R.; Stock, D. J.; Scicluna, P.

    2016-04-01

    Many physical parameters in astrophysics are derived using the ratios of two observed quantities. If the relative uncertainties on measurements are small enough, uncertainties can be propagated analytically using simplifying assumptions, but for large normally distributed uncertainties, the probability distribution of the ratio become skewed, with a modal value offset from that expected in Gaussian uncertainty propagation. Furthermore, the most likely value of a ratio A/B is not equal to the reciprocal of the most likely value of B/A. The effect is most pronounced when the uncertainty on the denominator is larger than that on the numerator. We show that this effect is seen in an analysis of 12,126 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The intrinsically fixed ratio of the [O III] lines at 4959 and 5007Å is conventionally expressed as the ratio of the stronger line to the weaker line. Thus, the uncertainty on the denominator is larger, and non-Gaussian probability distributions result. By taking this effect into account, we derive an improved estimate of the intrinsic 5007/4959 ratio. We obtain a value of 3.012±0.008, which is slightly but statistically significantly higher than the theoretical value of 2.98. We further investigate the suggestion that fluxes measured from emission lines at low signal to noise are strongly biased upwards. We were unable to detect this effect in the SDSS line flux measurements, and we could not reproduce the results of Rola and Pelat who first described this bias. We suggest that the magnitude of this effect may depend strongly on the specific fitting algorithm used.

  11. The probability distribution functions of emission line flux measurements and their ratios

    Wesson, R.; Stock, D. J.; Scicluna, P.

    2016-07-01

    Many physical parameters in astrophysics are derived using the ratios of two observed quantities. If the relative uncertainties on measurements are small enough, uncertainties can be propagated analytically using simplifying assumptions, but for large normally distributed uncertainties, the probability distribution of the ratio become skewed, with a modal value offset from that expected in Gaussian uncertainty propagation. Furthermore, the most likely value of a ratio A/B is not equal to the reciprocal of the most likely value of B/A. The effect is most pronounced when the uncertainty on the denominator is larger than that on the numerator. We show that this effect is seen in an analysis of 12 126 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The intrinsically fixed ratio of the [O III] lines at 4959 and 5007 Å is conventionally expressed as the ratio of the stronger line to the weaker line. Thus, the uncertainty on the denominator is larger, and non-Gaussian probability distributions result. By taking this effect into account, we derive an improved estimate of the intrinsic 5007/4959 ratio. We obtain a value of 3.012 ± 0.008, which is slightly but statistically significantly higher than the theoretical value of 2.98. We further investigate the suggestion that fluxes measured from emission lines in noisy spectra are strongly biased upwards. We were unable to detect this effect in the SDSS line flux measurements, and we could not reproduce the results of Rola and Pelat who first described this bias. We suggest that the magnitude of this effect may depend strongly on the specific fitting algorithm used.

  12. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. II. CATALOG OF STARS IN MILKY WAY DWARF SATELLITE GALAXIES

    We present a catalog of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 2961 stars in eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW): Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I, Sextans, Leo II, Canes Venatici I, Ursa Minor, and Draco. For the purposes of validating our measurements, we also observed 445 red giants in MW globular clusters and 21 field red giants in the MW halo. The measurements are based on Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectroscopy (MRS) combined with spectral synthesis. We estimate uncertainties in [Fe/H] by quantifying the dispersion of [Fe/H] measurements in a sample of stars in monometallic globular clusters (GCs). We estimate uncertainties in Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances by comparing to high-resolution spectroscopic abundances of the same stars. For this purpose, a sample of 132 stars with published high-resolution spectroscopy in GCs, the MW halo field, and dwarf galaxies has been observed with MRS. The standard deviations of the differences in [Fe/H] and ([α/Fe]) (the average of [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) between the two samples is 0.15 and 0.16, respectively. This catalog represents the largest sample of multi-element abundances in dwarf galaxies to date. The next papers in this series draw conclusions on the chemical evolution, gas dynamics, and star formation histories from the catalog presented here. The wide range of dwarf galaxy luminosity reveals the dependence of dwarf galaxy chemical evolution on galaxy stellar mass.

  13. Measurement of lime/silica ratio in concrete using PGNAA technique

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-12-01

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique has been used to determine lime/silica ratio in concrete samples using an accelerator-based PGNAA facility. The ratio was determined from the measured yield of 6.42 MeV prompt {gamma}-rays of calcium and 4.93 MeV {gamma}-rays of silicon from the six concrete samples. The experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the two. The study has demonstrated successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of the concrete samples.

  14. Measurement of lime/silica ratio in concrete using PGNAA technique

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique has been used to determine lime/silica ratio in concrete samples using an accelerator-based PGNAA facility. The ratio was determined from the measured yield of 6.42 MeV prompt γ-rays of calcium and 4.93 MeV γ-rays of silicon from the six concrete samples. The experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the two. The study has demonstrated successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of the concrete samples

  15. Measurement of lime/silica ratio in concrete using PGNAA technique

    Naqvi, A. A.; Nagadi, M. M.; Al-Amoudi, O. S. B.

    2005-12-01

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique has been used to determine lime/silica ratio in concrete samples using an accelerator-based PGNAA facility. The ratio was determined from the measured yield of 6.42 MeV prompt γ-rays of calcium and 4.93 MeV γ-rays of silicon from the six concrete samples. The experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the two. The study has demonstrated successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of the concrete samples.

  16. Iterative Precision Measurement of Branching Ratios Applied to 5P states in 88Sr+

    Zhang, Helena; Low, Guang Hao; Rines, Richard; Stuart, Jules; Wu, Tailin; Chuang, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method for measuring the branching ratios of dipole transitions of trapped atomic ions by performing nested sequences of population inversions. This scheme is broadly applicable and does not use ultrafast pulsed or narrow linewidth lasers. It is simple to perform and insensitive to experimental variables such as laser and magnetic field noise as well as ion heating. To demonstrate its effectiveness, we make the most accurate measurements thus far of the branching ratios of both 5P1/2 and 5P3/2 states in 88Sr+ with sub-1% uncertainties. We measure 17.175(27) for the branching ratio of 5P1/2-5S1/2, 15.845(71) for 5P3/2-5S1/2, and 0.05609(21) for 5P3/2-4D5/2, ten- fold and thirty-fold improvements in precision for 5P1/2 and 5P3/2 branching ratios respectively over the best previous experimental values.

  17. Model-measurement comparison of functional group abundance in α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol formation

    Ruggeri, Giulia; Bernhard, Fabian A.; Henderson, Barron H.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene photooxidation under different NOx regimes is simulated using the Master Chemical Mechanism v3.2 (MCM) coupled with an absorptive gas-particle partitioning module. Vapor pressures for individual compounds are estimated with the SIMPOL.1 group contribution model for determining apportionment of reaction products to each phase. We apply chemoinformatic tools to harvest functional group (FG) composition from the simulations and estimate their contributions to the overall oxygen to carbon ratio. Furthermore, we compare FG abundances in simulated SOA to measurements of FGs reported in previous chamber studies using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. These simulations qualitatively capture the dynamics of FG composition of SOA formed from both α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene in low-NOx conditions, especially in the first hours after start of photooxidation. Higher discrepancies are found after several hours of simulation; the nature of these discrepancies indicates sources of uncertainty or types of reactions in the condensed or gas phase missing from current model implementation. Higher discrepancies are found in the case of α-pinene photooxidation under different NOx concentration regimes, which are reasoned through the domination by a few polyfunctional compounds that disproportionately impact the simulated FG abundance in the aerosol phase. This manuscript illustrates the usefulness of FG analysis to complement existing methods for model-measurement evaluation.

  18. Evaluating two experimental approaches for measuring ecosystem carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio

    Masiello, C. A.; Gallagher, M. E.; Randerson, J. T.; Deco, R. M.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2008-09-01

    Degree of oxidation of organic carbon (Cox) is a fundamental property of the carbon cycle, reflecting the synthesis and decomposition of natural organic matter. Cox is also related to ecosystem oxidative ratio (OR), the molar ratio of O2 to CO2 fluxes associated with net ecosystem exchange (NEE). Here we compare two methods for measuring Cox and OR: (1) %C, %H, %N, and %O elemental analysis, and (2) heat of combustion (ΔHc) measured by means of bomb calorimetry coupled with %C elemental analysis (hereafter referred to as calorimetry). Compared with %C, %N, %H, and %O elemental analysis, calorimetry generates Cox and OR data more rapidly and cheaply. However, calorimetric measurements yield less accurate Cox and OR data. We additionally report Cox and OR data for a pair of biomass standards and a suite of biomass samples. The OR values we measured in these samples were less variable than OR data reported in the literature (generated by simultaneous measurement of ecosystem O2 and CO2 gas mixing ratios). Our biomass OR values had a mean of 1.03 and range of 0.99-1.06. These estimates are lower than the OR value of 1.10 that is often used to partition uptake of fossil fuel CO2 between the ocean and the terrestrial biosphere.

  19. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2009-12-01

    A high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio µpGEp/GMp in the range Q2 = 0.3–0.7 GeV2/c2 was performed using recoil polarimetry in Jefferson Lab Hall A. In this low Q2 range, previous data from LEDEX [5] along with many fits and calculations [2, 3, 4] indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. In this new measurement, with 80% polarized electron beam for 24 days, we are able to achieve <1% statistical uncertainty. Preliminary results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, indicating a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the improved form factor measurements also have implications for DVCS, determinations of the proton Zemach radius and strangeness form factors through parity violation experiments.

  20. Studies on treatment methods of the safeguards swipe samples for uranium isotope ratio measurement

    In the environmental sampling and analyses for safeguards, an accurate isotope ratio of uranium at trace levels is required for detection of undeclared nuclear activities. Currently, swipe (smear) samples are being taken by IAEA from nuclear facilities. The amount of uranium collected on the cotton swipe is expected to be in the wide range including the order of nano-gram or less. In order to measure the isotope ratios by ICP-MS, we have studied sample preparation procedures for the trace amount of uranium. Elements causing spectroscopic and non-spectroscopic interferences in ICP-MS measurement were sufficiently removed by anion-exchange of hydrochloric acid media. The uranium contamination introduced throughout the process the sample preparation was below 10 pg uranium per sample. The applicability of the treatment process for uranium isotope measurement up to 100 pico-grams was proposed. (author)

  1. Measurement of the cosmic ray muon charge ratio with the OPERA detector

    Mauri, N

    2010-01-01

    The OPERA detector at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) was used to measure the cosmic ray muon charge ratio Rμ = Nμ+/Nμ− in the TeV energy region. We analyzed 403069 cosmic ray muons corresponding to 113.4 days of livetime during the 2008 CNGS run. We computed separately the muon charge ratio for single and for multiple muon events in order to select different energy regions of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to test the Rμ dependence on the primary composition. Rμ is also shown as a function of the Òvertical surface energyÓ Eμ cos !. A Þt to a simpliÞed model of muon pro- duction in atmosphere allowed the determination of the pion and kaon charge ratios weighted by the cosmic ray energy spectrum.

  2. Boundary Layer CO2 mixing ratio measurements by an airborne pulsed IPDA lidar

    Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Since the primary signature of CO2 fluxes at the surface occurs in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), remote sensing measurements of CO2 that can resolve the CO2 absorption in the PBL separate from the total column are more sensitive to fluxes than those that can only measure a total column. The NASA Goddard CO2 sounder is a pulsed, range-resolved lidar that samples multiple (presently 30) wavelengths across the 1572.335 nm CO2 absorption line. The range resolution and line shape measurement enable CO2 mixing ratio measurements to be made in two or more altitude layers including the PBL via lidar cloud-slicing and multi-layer retrievals techniques. The pulsed lidar approach allows range-resolved backscatter of scattering from ground and cloud tops. Post flight data analysis can be used split the vertical CO2 column into layers (lidar cloud-slicing) and solve for the CO2 mixing ratio in each layer. We have demonstrated lidar cloud slicing with lidar measurements from a flight over Iowa, USA in August 2011 during the corn-growing season, remotely measuring a ≈15 ppm drawdown in the PBL CO2. We will present results using an improved lidar cloud slicing retrieval algorithm as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign. The CO2 absorption line is also more pressure broadened at lower altitudes. Analyzing the line shape also allows solving for some vertical resolution in the CO2 distribution. By allowing the retrieval process to independently vary the column concentrations in two or more altitude layers, one can perform a best-fit retrieval to obtain the CO2 mixing ratios in each of the layers. Analysis of airborne lidar measurements (in 2011) over Iowa, USA and Four Corners, New Mexico, USA show that for altitudes above 8 km, the CO2 sounder can detect and measure enhanced or diminished CO2 mixing ratios in the PBL even in the absence of clouds. We will present these results as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming

  3. Evaluation of the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport from rate measurements.

    Reynafarje, B; Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1976-12-10

    The mitochondrial H+/site ratio (i.e. the number of protons ejected per pair of electrons traversing each of the energy-conserving sites of the respiratory chain) has been evaluated employing a new experimental approach. In this method the rates of oxygen uptake and H+ ejection were measured simultaneously during the initial period of respiration evoked by addition of succinate to aerobic, rotenone-inhibited, de-energized mitochondria. Either K+, in the presence of valinomycin, or Ca2+, was used as mobile cation to dissipate the membrane potential and allow quantitative H+ ejection into the medium. The H+/site ratio observed with this method in the absence of precautions to inhibit the uptake of phosphate was close to 2.0, in agreement with values obtained using the oxygen pulse technique (Mitchell, P. and Moyle, J. (1967) Biochem. J. 105, 1147-1162). However, when phosphate movements were eliminated either by inhibition of the phosphate-hydroxide antiporter with N-ethylamaleimide or by depleting the mitochondria of their endogenous phosphate content, H+/site ratios close to 4.0 were consistently observed. This ratio was independent of the concentration of succinate, of mitochondrial protein, of pH between 6 and 8, and of ionic composition of the medium, provided that sufficient K+ (plus valinomycin) or Ca2+ were present. Specific inhibitors of the hydrolysis of endogenous ATP or transport of other ions (adenine nucleotides, tricarboxylates, HCO3-, etc.) were shown not to affect the observed H+/site ratio. Furthermore, the replacement of succinate by alpha-glycerol phosphate, a substrate which is oxidized on the outer surface of the inner membrane and thus does not need to enter the matrix, gave the same H+/site ratios as did succinate. It is concluded that the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport, when phosphate movements are eliminated, may be close to 4.0. PMID:12164

  4. Simulation and Measurement of Neuroelectrodes' Characteristics with Integrated High Aspect Ratio Nano Structures

    Christoph Nick

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving the interface between electrodes and neurons has been the focus of research for the last decade. Neuroelectrodes should show small geometrical surface area and low impedance for measuring and high charge injection capacities for stimulation. Increasing the electrochemically active surface area by using nanoporous electrode material or by integrating nanostructures onto planar electrodes is a common approach to improve this interface. In this paper a simulation approach for neuro electrodes' characteristics with integrated high aspect ratio nano structures based on a point-contact-model is presented. The results are compared with experimental findings conducted with real nanostructured microelectrodes. In particular, effects of carbon nanotubes and gold nanowires integrated onto microelectrodes are described. Simulated and measured impedance properties are presented and its effects onto the transfer function between the neural membrane potential and the amplifier output signal are studied based on the point-contact-model. Simulations show, in good agreement with experimental results, that electrode impedances can be dramatically reduced by the integration of high aspect ratio nanostructures such as gold nanowires and carbon nanotubes. This lowers thermal noise and improves the signal-to-noise ratio for measuring electrodes. It also may increase the adhesion of cells to the substrate and thus increase measurable signal amplitudes.

  5. The probability distribution functions of emission line flux measurements and their ratios

    Wesson, R; Scicluna, P

    2016-01-01

    Many physical parameters in astrophysics are derived using the ratios of two observed quantities. If the relative uncertainties on measurements are small enough, uncertainties can be propagated analytically using simplifying assumptions, but for large normally distributed uncertainties, the probability distribution of the ratio become skewed, with a modal value offset from that expected in Gaussian uncertainty propagation. Furthermore, the most likely value of a ratio A/B is not equal to the reciprocal of the most likely value of B/A. The effect is most pronounced when the uncertainty on the denominator is larger than that on the numerator. We show that this effect is seen in an analysis of 12,126 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The intrinsically fixed ratio of the [O III] lines at 4959 and 5007 ${\\AA}$ is conventionally expressed as the ratio of the stronger line to the weaker line. Thus, the uncertainty on the denominator is larger, and non-Gaussian probability distributions result. By taking thi...

  6. Basic study of water-cement ratio evaluation for fresh mortar using an ultrasonic measurement technique

    The objective of this research is for the basic study of ultrasonic evaluation method for the determination of the water-cement-ratio (W/C) in fresh concrete at the early age of hardening. Water-cement ratio is a important parameter to evaluate the strength of concrete for concrete construction. Using an ultrasonic pulse measurement technique, wave velocity and frequency variations depend on the age of concrete during hardening process could be evaluated. As a sample test, fresh mortar of water-cement ratio of 40 %, 50% and 60 % was poured into cylindrical plastic mould form (φ100 mm x 50 mm). For an ultrasonic pulse wave transmission technique, two wide band ultrasonic transducers were set on the top and bottom surface of mortar, and start measuring from 10 minutes after pouring water until 60 minutes of 5 minutes of intervals. As a result, it was confirmed that wave velocity and center frequency were changed with the age of mortar depends on the water-cement ratio. (author)

  7. Measurement of the Atmospheric Muon Charge Ratio at TeV Energies with MINOS

    Adamson, P; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Avvakumov, S; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barish, B; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Beall, E; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bergfeld, T; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, B; Bock, G J; Böhm, J; Böhnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Border, P M; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Bungau, C; Cabrera, A; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Culling, A J; De Jong, J K; De Santo, A; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Drakoulakos, D; Durkin, T; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk-Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Fields, T H; Ford, R; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Giurgiu, G A; Godley, A; Gogos, J; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hartouni, E P; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Hylen, J; Indurthy, D; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jenner, L; Jensen, D; Joffe-Minor, T; Kafka, T; Kang, H J; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Lebedev, A; Lee, R; Ling, J; Liu, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Milburn, R H; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mislivec, A; Miyagawa, P S; Moore, C D; Morfin, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Osiecki, T; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlovic, Z; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Ping, H; Piteira, R; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahman, D; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Reyna, D E; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Saakyan, R; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Semenov, V K; Seun, S M; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smirnitsky, V; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Symes, P A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Velissaris, C; Verebryusov, V; Viren, B; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Wu, Q K; Yang, T; Yumiceva, F X; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2007-01-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 meters-water-equivalent in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be 1.374 +/- 0.004 (stat.) +0.012 -0.010(sys.). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the two standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3 -- 1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitativ...

  8. Isotope ratio measurement of individual fine particles containing nuclear materials in safeguards environmental samples

    Isotope ratio measurement for individual particles containing uranium in swipe samples taken at nuclear facilities is a powerful tool to verify the absence of undeclared nuclear activities. In order to develop the analysis technique, we have investigated a series of methods: particle recovery from the swipe sample, particle screening and isotope ratio analysis for individual particles. An aspiration method as a new approach for particle recovery was introduced and found to be more suitable for subsequent SIMS analysis than conventional methods (adhesion, ultrasoneration and plasma ashing). For the particle screening, we applied total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) to the estimation of the amount of nuclear materials in the sample. Here, a molybdenum X-ray beam was used for the excitation. The result showed that the detection limit of uranium was about 20 pg when silicon was used as the sample carrier material. The value was improved by five orders of magnitude compared with that by conventional X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The isotope ratio measurement for individual particles was performed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with microprobe mode. The particle was irradiated with a primary ion beam of O2+ of 15 keV and 30 nA. As the result, the 235U/238U ratio was determined with the relative standard deviation within 2.0% for the particle with a diameter of 1 μm. (author)

  9. Strain ratio measurement of femoral cartilage by real-time elastosonography: preliminary results

    Ipek, Ali; Unal, Ozlem; Kartal, Merve Gulbiz; Arslan, Halil [Yildirim Beyazit University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Isik, Cetin; Bozkurt, Murat [Yildirim Beyazit University, Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate strain ratio measurement of femoral cartilage using real-time elastosonography. Twenty-five patients with femoral cartilage pathology on MRI (study group) were prospectively compared with 25 subjects with normal findings on MRI (control group) using real-time elastosonography. Strain ratio measurements of pathologic and normal cartilage were performed and compared, both within the study group and between the two groups. Elastosonography colour-scale coding showed a colour change from blue to red in pathologic cartilage and only blue colour-coding in normal cartilage. In the study group, the median strain ratio was higher in pathologic cartilage areas compared to normal areas (median, 1.49 [interquartile range, 0.80-2.53] vs. median, 0.01 [interquartile range, 0.01-0.01], p < 0.001, respectively). The median strain ratio of the control group was 0.01 (interquartile range, 0.01-0.01), and there was no significant difference compared to normal areas of the study group. There was, however, a significant difference between the control group cartilage and pathologic cartilage of the study group (p < 0.001). Elastosonography may be an effective, easily accessible, and relatively simple tool to demonstrate pathologic cartilage and to differentiate it from normal cartilage in the absence of advanced imaging facility such as MRI. (orig.)

  10. The measurement method of 13C/12C ratio from wine

    Full text: A laboratory procedure for the analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio of ethanol derived from wine by distillation has been applied to the study the isotopic fractionation induced by the isotope effects of distillation. For distillation process, an experimental model has been established to describe and explain the observed fractionation phenomena. It is shown that reproducible results can be obtained when appropriate analytical conditions are used. Moreover, the ability of ethanol to act as a reliable indicator of the 13C/12C ratio of wine is demonstrated. The procedure used in this study to isolate the ethanol from wine for the subsequent Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) measurement was adapted from the SNIF-NMR method AOAC 995.17. The efficiency of the water removal by high-yield distillation was of 96% followed by residual water trapping. Several distillation experiments were performed with an original distillation column, using commercial absolute ethanol. The distillations were stopped at different yields of ethanol extraction. Isotope ratios of carbon in the distillate and of oxygen in the distillation residue were measured by IRMS. (author)

  11. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  12. A first attempt to measure 92Nb/93Nb ratios with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Guozhu, He; Ming, He; Zuying, Zhou; Zhenyu, Li; Kejun, Dong; Shaoyong, Wu; Shilong, Liu; Xiongjun, Chen; Qiwen, Fan; Chaoli, Li; Xianwen, He; Heng, Li; Shan, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) method for the measurement of the long-lived radionuclide 92Nb has been established at the HI-13 Tandem Accelerator of the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). Niobium powder mixed with PbF2 by a ratio of 1:2 (in mass) was used as the cathode material. Atomic anions of Nb- were extracted from a Cs-beam sputter source. The terminal voltage of the tandem accelerator was 8.5 MV. Nb13+ ions were selected after terminal foil stripping. A multi-anode gas ionization chamber was used for the particle detection. The total suppression factor of the two major interfering isobars, 92Zr and 92Mo, was about 103. A detection limit of about 10-11 was achieved for 92Nb/93Nb ratio measurements on a blank sample.

  13. Actinides ultra traces detection and isotopic ratio measurements by mass spectrometry

    We present the mass spectrometry techniques used in the frame of the environmental monitoring of the centres of CEA, and non proliferation programmes, for the detection of ultra-traces of actinides (U and Pu), and for measurement of the corresponding isotopic ratios. They are plasma source (ICP-MS), thermo-ionization (TIMS), and secondary ions (SINS) mass spectrometry techniques. As the analyzed samples contain only tiny amounts of nuclear materials, from the femto-gram (10-15 g) to the pico-gram (10-12 g) range, these instruments must present excellent performances in terms of sensitivity and precision on isotopic ratio measurements. We describe the methodological and instrumental developments carried out on the spectrometers to obtain instrumental detection limits below the femto-gram. (authors)

  14. An OPAL measurement of the τ- → e-/-bareντ Branching Ratio

    The branching ratio for the decay τ- → e-/-bareντ has been measured using data collected by the OPAL experiment at LEP. In total 33073 τ- → e-/-bareντ candidates were identified from a sample of 186197 selected τ decays, giving a branching ratio of Be (17.81 ± 0.09 (stat) ± 0.06 (syst))%. This result is combined with other electroweak measurements to test e - μ and μ - τ universality in charged-current weak interactions at the level of 0.5%. Additionally, a value of the strong coupling constant αs (m2τ) has been extracted from Be and evolved to the Zo mass scale to give αs (m2Z) = 0.1204 ± 0.0011 (exp)+0.0021-0.0019 (theory)

  15. Platinum stable isotope ratio measurements by double-spike multiple collector ICPMS

    Creech, J.; Baker, J.; Handler, M.;

    2013-01-01

    as the parts per million difference in Pt/PtPt ratios (μPt). Repeated measurements of the IRMM-010 Pt standard in two different laboratories, consuming ca. 40-85 ng of Pt, show that a long-term external reproducibility for μPt of ≤40 ppm (2 sd; equivalent to ≤10 ppm u, where u is the unified atomic.......29% and Pt = 7.308%) results in a redefined Pt atomic weight of 195.08395 ± 0.00068. Using our technique we have measured small, reproducible and statistically significant offsets in Pt stable isotope ratios between different Pt element standards and the IRMM-010 standard, which potentially indicates that...

  16. Generalized weighted ratio method for accurate turbidity measurement over a wide range.

    Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Ping; Song, Hong; Guo, Yilu; Zhan, Shuyue; Huang, Hui; Wang, Hangzhou; Tao, Bangyi; Mu, Quanquan; Xu, Jing; Li, Dejun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-14

    Turbidity measurement is important for water quality assessment, food safety, medicine, ocean monitoring, etc. In this paper, a method that accurately estimates the turbidity over a wide range is proposed, where the turbidity of the sample is represented as a weighted ratio of the scattered light intensities at a series of angles. An improvement in the accuracy is achieved by expanding the structure of the ratio function, thus adding more flexibility to the turbidity-intensity fitting. Experiments have been carried out with an 850 nm laser and a power meter fixed on a turntable to measure the light intensity at different angles. The results show that the relative estimation error of the proposed method is 0.58% on average for a four-angle intensity combination for all test samples with a turbidity ranging from 160 NTU to 4000 NTU. PMID:26699060

  17. Direct measurement of the γHe / γXe ratio at ultralow magnetic field

    Fan, Isaac; Knappe-Grüneberg, Silvia; Voigt, Jens; Kilian, Wolfgang; Burghoff, Martin; Stollfuss, Detlef; Schnabel, Allard; Wübbeler, Gerd; Bodner, Olha; Elster, Clemens; Seifert, Frank; Trahms, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    A co-located 3He and 129Xe nuclear spin free precession measurement at sub-μT magnetic field was carried out in a magnetically shielded environment. The uncorrected quotient of the gyromagnetic ratios between neutral 3He and 129Xe atoms is determined to be 2.754 082 81(07), accounting for only statistical error. Our measurement shows that this ratio has a stability of 1.4×10-5/ √τ, demonstrating the ability to reach the current precision limit of the quotient in a 10000 s of averaging time τ. This precision is enough for the next-generation EDM search in neutral 129Xe atoms based on a similar comagnetometer scheme.

  18. Validation of measurements of ventilation-to-perfusion ratio inequality in the lung from expired gas

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J B.; West, John B.; Reed, James W.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of the gas in a single expirate has long been used to estimate the degree of ventilation-perfusion (Va/Q) inequality in the lung. To further validate this estimate, we examined three measures of Va/Q inhomogeneity calculated from a single full exhalation in nine anesthetized mongrel dogs under control conditions and after exposure to aerosolized methacholine. These measurements were then compared with arterial blood gases and with measurements of Va/Q inhomogeneity obtained using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. The slope of the instantaneous respiratory exchange ratio (R slope) vs. expired volume was poorly correlated with independent measures, probably because of the curvilinear nature of the relationship due to continuing gas exchange. When R was converted to the intrabreath Va/Q (iV/Q), the best index was the slope of iV/Q vs. volume over phase III (iV/Q slope). This was strongly correlated with independent measures, especially those relating to inhomogeneity of perfusion. The correlations for iV/Q slope and R slope considerably improved when only the first half of phase III was considered. We conclude that a useful noninvasive measurement of Va/Q inhomogeneity can be derived from the intrabreath respiratory exchange ratio.

  19. New Measurements of the D+ to K* mu nu Form Factor Ratios

    Link, J M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Ramírez, J E; Segoni, I; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Zallo, A; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Park, K S; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chang, K H; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Cerutti, A; Boschini, M; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Giammarchi, M; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernández, H; López, A M; Méndez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Xiong, W; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2002-01-01

    Using a large sample of D+ to K- pi+ mu+ nu decays collected by the FOCUS photoproduction experiment at Fermilab, we present new measurements of two semileptonic form factor ratios: rv and r2. We find rv = 1.504 \\pm 0.057 \\pm 0.039 and r2 = 0.875 \\pm 0.049 \\pm 0.064. Our form factor results include the effects of the s-wave interference discussed in a previous paper.

  20. Research Progress of Series of Uranium Isotope Ratios Measured by AMS

    LIN; De-yu; WANG; Chen; HUANG; Guo-rui; DONG; Ke-jun; HE; Ming; RUAN; Xiang-dong; WU; Shao-yong; ZHAO; Yong-gang; LI; Li-li; DOU; Liang; XIE; Lin-bo; WANG; Xiao-bo; YANG; Xu-ran; WANG; Xiao-ming; LAN; Xiao-xi; JIANG; Shan

    2012-01-01

    <正>The nuclear safeguards system which is used to monitor compliance with the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty relies to a significant degree on the analysis of environmental samples. Undeclared nuclear activities can be detected through determination of the isotopic ratios of uranium and plutonium in such samples. It is necessary to be able to measure the full suite of uranium isotopes (234U,

  1. Measurement of the D semileptonic branching ratio in e+e- annihilation at the psi'' (3770)

    We have observed the psi'' resonance in the cross section for e+e- → hadrons at E/sub c.m./ = 3770 +- 0.6 MeV, of total width GAMMA = 24 +- 5 MeV and partial width to electron pairs GAMMA/sub ee/ = 180 +- 60 eV. The cross section for hadronic events which contain anomalous electron provides both unambiguous evidence of D semileptonic decays and a branching ratio measurements of (11 +- 2) %

  2. Fuel ion ratio measurements in reactor relevant neutral beam heated fusion plasmas.

    Hellesen, C; Eriksson, J; Conroy, S; Ericsson, G; Skiba, M; Weiszflog, M

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method to derive n(t)/n(d) using the ratio of the thermonuclear neutron emission to the beam-target neutron emission. We apply it to neutron spectroscopy data from the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer taken during the deuterium tritium experiment at JET. n(t)/n(d)-values obtained using neutron spectroscopy are in qualitative agreement with those from other diagnostics measuring the isotopic composition of the exhaust in the divertor. PMID:23130799

  3. Tooth-size discrepancy and Bolton's ratios: the reproducibility and speed of two methods of measurement

    Othman, S. A.; Harradine, N. W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine and compare the reproducibility and speed of two methods of performing Bolton's tooth-size analysis. DESIGN: Analysis of randomly selected clinical sample. SETTING: Bristol Dental Hospital, University of Bristol, United Kingdom. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pre-treatment study casts of 150 patients were selected randomly from 1100 consecutively treated Caucasian orthodontic patients. Bolton tooth-size discrepancies and ratios were measured using two methods; one method emplo...

  4. Measurements of the gas temperature and iron abundance distribution in the Coma Cluster

    The medium energy X-ray detectors onboard the EXOSAT Observatory have been used to determine the gas temperature at several positions in the Coma Cluster of galaxies. Evidence is found at greater than 95 percent confidence for a higher temperature in the center of the cluster than in a position approximately 45 arcmin off-center. No difference in iron abundance is observed between the center and off-center regions and the equilibrium model for the distribution of elements in the Coma Cluster of Abramopoulos, Chanan, and Ku can be rejected with greater than 99.5 percent confidence, in favor of a model with more uniform composition. A phenomenological model is presented of the Coma Cluster, which is consistent with the data presented here, as well as the imaging data from the Einstein Observatory and the Tenma X-ray spectrum. The model has a central isothermal region of temperature about 9 keV extending to about 25 arcmin (about 1 Mpc). Beyond this radius the temperature falls as a polytrope with index about 1.6. 36 references

  5. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. IV. ALPHA ELEMENT DISTRIBUTIONS IN MILKY WAY SATELLITE GALAXIES

    We derive the star formation histories of eight dwarf spheroidal (dSph) Milky Way satellite galaxies from their alpha element abundance patterns. Nearly 3000 stars from our previously published catalog comprise our data set. The average [α/Fe] ratios for all dSphs follow roughly the same path with increasing [Fe/H]. We do not observe the predicted knees in the [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] diagram, corresponding to the metallicity at which Type Ia supernovae begin to explode. Instead, we find that Type Ia supernova ejecta contribute to the abundances of all but the most metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -2.5) stars. We have also developed a chemical evolution model that tracks the star formation rate, Types II and Ia supernova explosions, and supernova feedback. Without metal enhancement in the supernova blowout, massive amounts of gas loss define the history of all dSphs except Fornax, the most luminous in our sample. All six of the best-fit model parameters correlate with dSph luminosity but not with velocity dispersion, half-light radius, or Galactocentric distance.

  6. Plutonium isotopic abundance measurements on CBNM NRM 271 analyzed with the FRAM and MGA codes

    Friar, R.J.; Sampson, T.E.

    1992-05-01

    We report results of gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of the isotopic distributions of plutonium in the reference-material set CBNM NRM 271 as analyzed by the FRAM and MGA plutonium isotopic codes. We acquired high-quality spectral data under measurement conditions approximating field-use conditions recommended by the code developers. Bias and precision results from these measurements are presented for both codes. Both codes performed very well for these measurements. These standards have proven to be very useful for testing the Los Alamos FRAM code in the high-burnup region where well-characterized materials have been unavailable at Los Alamos.

  7. Measuring real-ear signal-to-noise ratio: application to directional hearing aids.

    Bell, Steven L; Creeke, Sarah A; Lutman, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    Due to individual characteristics such as head size, earmould type, and earmould venting, the directional benefit that an individual will obtain from a hearing aid cannot be predicted from average data. It is therefore desirable to measure real ear directional benefit. This paper demonstrates a method to measure real ear hearing aid directivity based on a general approach to measure the broadband output signal-to-noise ratio of a hearing aid. Errors arising from non-linearity were tested in simulation and found to be low for typical hearing aid compression ratios. Next, the efficacy of the method to estimate directional benefit was demonstrated on KEMAR. Finally the variability of directional benefit was explored in real-ears. Significant differences in signal-to-noise ratio between directional and omnidirectional microphone settings were demonstrated at most azimuths. Articulation-Index-weighted directional benefit varied by more than 7 dB across ears at some azimuths. Such individual variation in directional benefit has implications when fitting hearing aids: it should not be assumed that all users will receive similar directional benefit from the same hearing aid. PMID:20151932

  8. Measurement of the ratio of hydrogen to deuterium at the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign

    The control of the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is one of the very important issues for ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating as well as the plasma wall interaction in the tokamak. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium during the tokamak shot was deduced from the emission spectroscopy measurements during the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign. Graphite tiles were used for the plasma facing components (PFCs) at KSTAR and its surface area exposed to the plasma was about 11 m2. The data showed that it remained as high as around 50% during the campaign period because graphite tiles were exposed to the air for about two months and the hydrogen contents at the tiles are not fully pumped out due to the lack of baking on the PFC in the 2009 campaign. The validation of the spectroscopy method was checked by using the Zeeman effects and the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is compared with results from the residual gas analysis. During the tokamak shot, the ratio is low below 10% initially and saturated after around 1 s. When there is a hydrogen injection to the vessel via ion cyclotron wall conditioning and the boronization process where the carbone is used, the ratio of the hydrogen to the deuterium is increased by up to 100% and it recovers to around 50% after one day of operation. However it does not decrease below 50% at the end of the experimental campaign. It was found that the full baking on the PFC (with a high temperature and sufficient vacuum pumping) is required for the ratio control which guarantees the efficient ICRF heating at the KSTAR 2010 experimental campaign.

  9. New Measurements of the Ds to Phi mu nu Form Factor Ratios

    Link, J M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Machado, A A; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; Dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; Jacobs, J; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Stenson, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Giammarchi, M; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Lopes-Pegna, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernández, H; López, A M; Méndez, H; Paris, A; Ramírez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Luiggi, E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2004-01-01

    Using a large sample of Ds to Phi mu nu decays collected by the FOCUS photoproduction experiment at Fermilab, we present new measurements of two semileptonic form factor ratios: rV and r2. We find rV = 1.549 \\pm 0.250 \\pm 0.145 and r2 = 0.713 \\pm 0.202 \\pm 0.266. These values are consistent with the rV and r2 form factors measured for the process D+ to K*bar mu nu.

  10. Optimising neutron polarizers--measuring the flipping ratio and related quantities

    Goossens, D J

    2002-01-01

    The continuing development of gaseous spin polarized sup 3 He transmission filters for use as neutron polarizers makes the choice of optimum thickness for these filters an important consideration. The 'quality factors' derived for the optimisation of transmission filters for particular measurements are general to all neutron polarizers. In this work optimisation conditions for neutron polarizers are derived and discussed for the family of studies related to measuring the flipping ratio from samples. The application of the optimisation conditions to sup 3 He transmission filters and other types of neutron polarizers is discussed. Absolute comparisons are made between the effectiveness of different types of polarizers for this sort of work.

  11. Skeletal Calcium/Phosphorus Ratio Measuring Techniques and Results. I. Microscopy and Microtomography

    Vassilios Kyriazis; Margaret Tzaphlidou

    2004-01-01

    An approach to the problem of bone disorders is the measurement of the skeleton’'s static and dynamic strength, an estimate of which is bone mineral density. A decrease in the latter may be due to a decrease in either Ca or P, or to dissimilar decreases in both. Consequently, the determination of the Ca/P ratio may provide a sensitive measure of bone mineral changes and may add to our understanding of the changes occurring in bone diseases. This paper reviews techniques such as transmission e...

  12. New retrieval algorithm for the HDO/H2O ratio from SCIAMACHY measurements

    Weigel, Katja; Reuter, Max; Schneising, Oliver; Noel, Stefan; Burrows, John P.

    2013-04-01

    Water vapor isotope ratios are important as temperature proxies and provide information about the hydrological cycle. Global satellite measurements of the HDO/H2O ratio (δD) can improve our understanding of the corresponding processes and are also valuable to asses the quality of models. Measurements from the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) on-board Envisat allow to retrieve δD using nadir measurements in the shortwave-infrared wavelength region. Measurements in this wavelength range are sensitive down to the earth surface. The BESD (Bremen Optimal Estimation differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS)) retrieval algorithm developed for CO2 was adopted to retrieve δD using a micro-window ranging from 2354.23 nm to 2374.25 nm. Measurements are available from 2002 to 2012 but this wavelength range is effected by several instrumental issues. Here, we present results of the δD retrieval and investigate the possible length of the time series. The quality and stability of the retrieved data set is assessed.

  13. Sm Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    Lawler, J E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2005-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 212 odd-parity levels of Sm II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier-transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for more than 900 lines of Sm II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Sm II transition probabilities using modern methods. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Sm abundance, log epsilon = 1.00 +/- 0.03, from 26 lines. The spectra of three very metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich stars also have been analyzed, employing between 55 and 72 Sm II lines per star. The abundance ratios of Sm relative to other rare earth elements in these stars are in agreement, and are consistent with ratios expected from rapid neutron-capture nucleosynthesis (the r-process).

  14. Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) Measurements of LHC Superconducting NbTi Cable Strands

    Charifoulline, Z

    2006-01-01

    The Rutherford-type superconducting NbTi cables of the LHC accelerator are currently manufactured by six industrial companies. As a part of the acceptance tests, the Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of superconducting strands is systematically measured on virgin strands to qualify the strands before cabling and on extracted strands to qualify the cables and to check the final heat treatment (controlled oxidation to control interstrand resistance). More than 12000 samples of virgin and extracted strands have been measured during last five years. Results show good correlation with the measurements done by the companies and reflect well the technological process of cable production (strand annealing, cabling, cable heat treatment). This paper presents a description of the RRR-test station and the measurement procedure, the summary of the results over all suppliers and finally the correlation between RRR-values of the cables and the magnets.

  15. Particle image velocimetry correlation signal-to-noise ratio metrics and measurement uncertainty quantification

    Xue, Zhenyu; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-01-01

    In particle image velocimetry (PIV) the measurement signal is contained in the recorded intensity of the particle image pattern superimposed on a variety of noise sources. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) strength governs the resulting PIV cross correlation and ultimately the accuracy and uncertainty of the resulting PIV measurement. Hence we posit that correlation SNR metrics calculated from the correlation plane can be used to quantify the quality of the correlation and the resulting uncertainty of an individual measurement. In this paper we present a framework for evaluating the correlation SNR using a set of different metrics, which in turn are used to develop models for uncertainty estimation. The SNR metrics and corresponding models presented herein are expanded to be applicable to both standard and filtered correlations. In addition, the notion of a valid measurement is redefined with respect to the correlation peak width in order to be consistent with uncertainty quantification principles and distinct ...

  16. Meteoritic influence on sodium and potassium abundance in the lunar exosphere measured by LADEE

    Szalay, Jamey R.; Horányi, Mihály; Colaprete, Anthony; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2016-06-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) orbited the Moon for approximately 6 months, taking data with the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX), Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrometer (UVS), and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS). Here we compare coincident LDEX measurements of meteoritic influx to exospheric column densities of Na and K derived by UVS. We report a strong correlation of exospheric potassium and meteoroid ejecta during the Geminids meteoroid shower, exhibiting a much stronger response than sodium. With the exception of the Geminids, we find a weak correlation between the sporadic meteoroid influx as measured by LDEX and exospheric density as measured by UVS.

  17. Selection of noise power ratio spectrum models for electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant

    Coakley, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    In the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant based on Johnson noise thermometry, the ratio of the power spectral densities of thermal noise across a resistor and pseudo-random noise synthetically generated by a quantum-accurate voltage-noise source varies with frequency due to mismatch between transmission lines. We model this ratio spectrum as an even polynomial function of frequency. For any given frequency range, defined by the maximum frequency $f_{max}$, we select the optimal polynomial ratio spectrum model with a cross-validation method and estimate the conditional uncertainty of the constant term in the ratio spectrum model in a way that accounts for both random and systematic effects associated with imperfect knowledge of the model with a resampling method. We select $f_{max}$ by minimizing this conditional uncertainty. Since many values of $f_{max}$ yield conditional uncertainties close to the observed minimum value on a frequency grid, we quantify an additional component of uncertainty as...

  18. Evaluation of TASTEX task H: measurement of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry

    Gunnink, R.; Prindle, A.L.; Asakura, Y.; Masui, J.; Ishiguro, N.; Kawasaki, A.; Kataoka, S.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes a computer-based gamma spectrometer system that was developed for measuring isotopic and total plutonium concentrations in nitric acid solutions. The system was installed at the Tokai reprocessing plant where it is undergoing testing and evaluation as part of the Tokai Advanced Safeguards Exercise (TASTEX). Objectives of TASTEX Task H, High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometer for Plutonium Isotopic Analysis, the methods and equipment used, the installation and calibration of the system, and the measurements obtained from several reprocessing campaigns are discussed and described. In general, we find that measurements for gamma spectroscopy agree well with those of mass spectrometry and of other chemical analysis. The system measures both freshly processed plutonium from the product accountability tank and aged plutonium solutions from storage tanks. 14 figures, 15 tables.

  19. An iterative calculation to derive extinction-to-backscatter ratio based on lidar measurements

    The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is an important parameter for understanding the radiative impact of aerosols. AOT based on lidar measurements is often limited by its finite detection range. In this paper, we have reported a method of fitting and iterative calculation to derive the extinction profile of background aerosols from 0 to 30 km at 532 nm, which is virtually the AOT of the entire atmosphere. The mean extinction derived from this method at the ground level tallies with visibility measurement and it is also consistent with the sun-photometer data, within experimental error. These data have been further treated to study the dust cases. For most of the cases, transmission losses were determined to estimate the extinction as well as lidar ratio. The result of the analysis shows that for background aerosols, a mean lidar ratio of 47±15 sr was found. For dust layers, a mean lidar ratio of 44±19 sr and an optical thickness of 0.53±0.49 were determined at 532 nm

  20. Measurement of the TeV atmospheric muon charge ratio with the complete OPERA data set

    Agafonova, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bender, D.; Bertolin, A.; Bozza, C.; Brugnera, R.; Buonaura, A.; Buontempo, S.; Büttner, B.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chukanov, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; De Serio, M.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Ereditato, A.; Fini, R. A.; Fukuda, T.; Galati, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Giacomelli, G.; Göllnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Guler, M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hollnagel, A.; Hosseini, B.; Ishida, H.; Ishiguro, K.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kawada, J.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Lauria, A.; Lenkeit, J.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Loverre, P.; Malgin, A.; Malenica, M.; Mandrioli, G.; Matsuo, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meregaglia, A.; Mikado, S.; Monacelli, P.; Montesi, M. C.; Morishima, K.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Niwa, K.; Ogawa, S.; Okateva, N.; Olshevsky, A.; Omura, T.; Ozaki, K.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B. D.; Park, I. G.; Pasqualini, L.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pessard, H.; Pistillo, C.; Podgrudkov, D.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Roda, M.; Rokujo, H.; Roganova, T.; Rosa, G.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Schembri, A.; Shakiryanova, I.; Shchedrina, T.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shiraishi, T.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stellacci, S. M.; Stipcevic, M.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tioukov, V.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J. L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yoon, C. S.; Zemskova, S.; Zghiche, A.

    2014-07-01

    The OPERA detector, designed to search for oscillations in the CNGS beam, is located in the underground Gran Sasso laboratory, a privileged location to study TeV-scale cosmic rays. For the analysis here presented, the detector was used to measure the atmospheric muon charge ratio in the TeV region. OPERA collected charge-separated cosmic ray data between 2008 and 2012. More than 3 million atmospheric muon events were detected and reconstructed, among which about 110000 multiple muon bundles. The charge ratio was measured separately for single and for multiple muon events. The analysis exploited the inversion of the magnet polarity which was performed on purpose during the 2012 Run. The combination of the two data sets with opposite magnet polarities allowed minimizing systematic uncertainties and reaching an accurate determination of the muon charge ratio. Data were fitted to obtain relevant parameters on the composition of primary cosmic rays and the associated kaon production in the forward fragmentation region. In the surface energy range 1-20 TeV investigated by OPERA, is well described by a parametric model including only pion and kaon contributions to the muon flux, showing no significant contribution of the prompt component. The energy independence supports the validity of Feynman scaling in the fragmentation region up to TeV/nucleon primary energy.

  1. Measurement of transparency ratios for protons from short-range correlated pairs

    Hen, O; Shneor, R; Piasetzky, E; Weinstein, L B; Brooks, W K; Beck, S May-Tal; Gilad, S

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear transparency, Tp(A), is a measure of the average probability for a struck proton to escape the nucleus without significant re-interaction. Previously, nuclear transparencies were extructed for quasi-elastic A(e,e'p) knockout of protons with momentum below the Fermi momentum, where the spectral functions are well known. In this paper we extract a novel observable, the transparency ratio, Tp(A)/T_p(12C), for knockout of high-missing-momentum protons from the breakup of short range correlated pairs (2N-SRC) in Al, Fe and Pb nuclei relative to C. The ratios were measured at momentum transfer Q^2 > 1.5 (GeV/c)^2 and x_B > 1.2 where the reaction is expected to be dominated by electron scattering from 2N-SRC. The transparency ratios of the knocked-out protons coming from 2N-SRC breakup are 20 - 30% lower than those of previous results for low missing momentum. They agree with Glauber calculations and agree with renormalization of the previously published transparencies as proposed by recent theoretical inves...

  2. A method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from the spectra of the LAMOST survey

    Li, Ji; Han, Chen; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Shi, Jian-Rong; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Ci, Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei; Cao, Zi-Huang

    2016-07-01

    The [α/Fe] ratios in stars are good tracers to probe the formation history of stellar populations and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The spectroscopic survey of LAMOST provides a good opportunity to determine [α/Fe] of millions of stars in the Galaxy. We present a method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from LAMOST spectra using the template-matching technique of the LSP3 pipeline. We use three test samples of stars selected from the ELODIE and MILES libraries, as well as the LEGUE survey to validate our method. Based on the test results, we conclude that our method is valid for measuring [α/Fe] from low-resolution spectra acquired by the LAMOST survey. Within the range of the stellar parameters T eff = [5000, 7500] K, log g = [1.0, 5.0] dex and [Fe/H]= [-1.5, +0.5] dex, our [α/Fe] measurements are consistent with values derived from high-resolution spectra, and the accuracy of our [α/Fe] measurements from LAMOST spectra is better than 0.1 dex with spectral signal-to-noise higher than 20.

  3. On reactivity of metallic zinc used for preparation of samples for hydrogen isotope ratio measurement

    As the reagent which is suitable to the reduction of water to hydrogen for preparing the samples for hydrogen isotope ratio measurement, the supply of the zinc of BDH Co. which has been widely used so far was stopped, consequently, for the purpose of searching for its substitute, several kinds of metallic zinc were obtained, and their reactivity was examined. As the criteria of the reactivity, the points that the experimental setup used so far can be used and that the accuracy of measurement and efficiency similar to those of heretofore can be obtained were selected, then, it was found that the zinc made by Bio Geochemical Laboratory, Indiana University, and the powder zinc on the market satisfied the criteria. In order to measure hydrogen isotope ratio within the measurement error of ±1%, it is necessary to maintain the quantities of zinc and water to be used and reaction temperature constant, to prepare the standard sample and an unknown sample under the same conditions, and to do the mass analysis as quickly as possible. The researches carried out so far, the reactivity test on various kinds of zinc and so on are reported. The optimum reaction conditions are shown. (K.I.)

  4. The Posterior Distribution of the Likelihood Ratio as a Measure of Evidence

    Smith, I.; Ferrari, A.

    2011-03-01

    This paper deals with simple versus composite hypothesis testing under Bayesian and frequentist settings. The Posterior distribution of the Likelihood Ratio (PLR) concept is proposed in [1] for significance testing. The PLR is shown to be equal to 1 minus the p-value in a simple case. The PLR is used in [2] in order to calibrate p-values, Fractional Bayes Factors (FBF) and others. Dempster's equivalence result is slightly extended by adding a nuisance parameter in the test. On the other hand, in [3] the p-values and the posterior probability of the null hypothesis Pr(H0|x) (seen as a Bayesian measure of evidence against the null hypothesis) are shown to be irreconcilable. Actually, as emphasized in [4], Pr(H0|x) is a measure of accuracy of a test, not a measure of evidence in a formal sense because it does not involve the likelihood ratio. The PLR may give such a measure of evidence and be related to a natural p-value. In this presentation, in a classical invariance framework the PLR with inner threshold 1 will be shown to be equal to 1 minus a p-value where the test statistics is the likelihood, weighted by a term that accounts for some volume distorsion effect. Other analytical properties of the PLR will be proved in more general settings. The minimum of its support is equal to the Generalized Likelihood Ratio if H0 is nested in H1 and its moments are directly related to the (F)BF for a proper prior. Its relation to credible domains is also studied. Practical issues will also be considered. The PLR can be implemented using a simple Monte Carlo Markov Chain and will be applied to extrasolar planet detection using direct imaging.

  5. Measurement of the branching ratio for beta-delayed alpha decay of 16N

    Refsgaard, J; Dijck, E A; Fynbo, H O U; Lund, M V; Portela, M N; Raabe, R; Randisi, G; Renzi, F; Sambi, S; Sytema, A; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2015-01-01

    While the 12C(a,g)16O reaction plays a central role in nuclear astrophysics, the cross section at energies relevant to hydrostatic helium burning is too small to be directly measured in the laboratory. The beta-delayed alpha spectrum of 16N can be used to constrain the extrapolation of the E1 component of the S-factor; however, with this approach the resulting S-factor becomes strongly correlated with the assumed beta-alpha branching ratio. We have remeasured the beta-alpha branching ratio by implanting 16N ions in a segmented Si detector and counting the number of beta-alpha decays relative to the number of implantations. Our result, 1.49(5)e-5, represents a 25% increase compared to the accepted value and implies an increase of 14% in the extrapolated S-factor.

  6. Comparison of infrared and mass-spectrometric measurements of carbon-13/carbon-12 ratios

    The delta13C values of 20 breath samples and 10 tank-CO2 samples (delta13C values ranged from -31.3 to +148.9per mille vs PDB) and the CO2 concentrations of three breath samples and 10 tank-CO2 samples were measured with a commercial prototype of a diode-laser i.r. spectrophotometer, MAT I. The results were compared with those obtained by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography. Precisions (ssub(x), n=10) of 0.2per mille and 0.6% were calculated for 13C/12C ratios and CO2 concentrations, respectively, using the MAT I system. (author)

  7. Measurement of the nuclear multiplicity ratio for Ks0 hadronization at CLAS

    The influence of cold nuclear matter on lepto-production of hadrons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is measured using the CLAS detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab and a 5.014 GeV electron beam. We report the Ks0 multiplicity ratios for targets of C, Fe, and Pb relative to deuterium as a function of the fractional virtual photon energy z transferred to the Ks0 and the transverse momentum squared pT2 of the Ks0. We find that the multiplicity ratios for Ks0 are reduced in the nuclear medium at high z and low pT2, with a trend for the Ks0 transverse momentum to be broadened in the nucleus for large pT2.

  8. Abundances in galaxies

    Standard (or mildly inhomogeneous) Big Bang nucleosynthesis theory is well confirmed by abundance measurements of light elements up to 7Li and the resulting upper limit to the number of neutrino families confirmed in accelerator experiments. Extreme inhomogeneous models with a closure density in form of baryons seem to be ruled out and there is no evidence for a cosmic 'floor' to 9Be or heavier elements predicted in some versions of those models. Galaxies show a correlation between luminous mass and abundance of carbon and heavier elements, usually attributed to escape of hot gas from shallow potential wells. Uncertainties include the role of dark matter and biparametric behaviour of ellipticals. Spirals have radial gradients which may arise from a variety of causes. In our own Galaxy one can distinguish three stellar populations - disk, halo and bulge - characterised by differing metallicity distribution functions. Differential abundance effects are found among different elements in stars as a function of metallicity and presumably age, notably in the ratio of oxygen and α-particle elements to iron. These may eventually be exploitable to set a time scale for the formation of the halo, bulge and disk. (orig.)

  9. Measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl concentration in near critical equivalence ratio premixed ethylene flame

    Inbody, Michael Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The testing and development of existing global and detailed chemical kinetic models for soot formation requires measurements of soot and radical concentrations in flames. A clearer understanding of soot particle inception relies upon the evaluation and refinement of these models in comparison with such measurements. We present measurements of soot formation and hydroxyl (OH) concentration in sequences of flat premixed atmospheric-pressure C2H4/O2/N2 flames and 80-torr C2H4/O2 flames for a unique range of equivalence ratios bracketting the critical equivalence ratio (phi(sub c)) and extending to more heavily sooting conditions. Soot volume fraction and number density profiles are measured using a laser scattering-extinction apparatus capable of resolving a 0.1 percent absorption. Hydroxyl number density profiles are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) with broadband detection. Temperature profiles are obtained from Rayleigh scattering measurements. The relative volume fraction and number density profiles of the richer sooting flames exhibit the expected trends in soot formation. In near-phi(sub c) visibility sooting flames, particle scattering and extinction are not detected, but an LIF signal due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) can be detected upon excitation with an argon-ion laser. A linear correlation between the argon-ion LIF and the soot volume fraction implies a common mechanistic source for the growth of PAH's and soot particles. The peak OH number density in both the atmospheric and 80-torr flames declines with increasing equivalence ratio, but the profile shape remains unchanged in the transition to sooting, implying that the primary reaction pathways for OH remain unchanged over this transition. Chemical kinetic modeling is demonstrated by comparing predictions using two current reaction mechanisms with the atmospheric flame data. The measured and predicted OH number density profiles show good agreement. The predicted benzene

  10. 238U self-indication ratio measurement in the resonance region

    An accurate representation of the 238U cross-section structures in the resonance region is required to compute the resonance self-shielded effective cross sections used in the calculation of thermal and fast-reactor performance parameters. Several authors have demonstrated the usefulness of self-indication and average transmission measurements to investigate the resonance structure of the 238U cross sections. This paper compares measured self-indication ratios with calculations based on ENDF/B-V, in the resolved energy range from 100 eV to 4 keV. In that energy range the ENDF/B-V evaluation is chiefly based on high resolution transmission measurements. The immediate purpose of the comparison presented is not to generate a new set of improved resonance parameters but to provide an additional test of the adequacy of the ENDF/B-V representation for the calculation of resonance self-shielding

  11. Measurement of the branching ratio of the Z0 into heavy quarks

    Abe, K; Adam, I; Akimoto, H; Aston, D; Baird, K G; Baltay, C; Band, H R; Barklow, T L; Bauer, J M; Bellodi, G; Berger, R; Blaylock, G; Bogart, J R; Bower, G R; Brau, J E; Breidenbach, M; Bugg, W M; Burke, D; Burnett, T H; Burrows, P N; Calcaterra, A; Cassell, R; Chou, A; Cohn, H O; Coller, J A; Convery, M R; Cook, V; Cowan, R F; Crawford, G; Damerell, C J S; Daoudi, M; De Groot, N; De Sangro, R; Dong, D N; Doser, Michael; Dubois, R; Erofeeva, I; Eschenburg, V; Etzion, E; Fahey, S; Falciai, D; Fernández, J P; Flood, K; Frey, R; Hart, E L; Hasuko, K; Hertzbach, S S; Huffer, M E; Huynh, X; Iwasaki, M; Jackson, D J; Jacques, P; Jaros, J A; Jiang, Z Y; Johnson, A S; Johnson, J R; Kajikawa, R; Kalelkar, M; Kang, H J; Kofler, R R; Kroeger, R S; Langston, M; Leith, D W G S; Lia, V; Lin, C; Mancinelli, G; Manly, S; Mantovani, G C; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; McKemey, A K; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Moore, T B; Morii, M; Müller, D; Murzin, V; Narita, S; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Nesom, G; Oishi, N; Onoprienko, D; Osborne, L S; Panvini, R S; Park, C H; Peruzzi, I; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Plano, R J; Prepost, R; Prescott, C Y; Ratcliff, B N; Reidy, J; Reinertsen, P L; Rochester, L S; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Saxton, O H; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Shapiro, G; Sinev, N B; Snyder, J A; Stängle, H; Stahl, A; Stamer, P; Steiner, H; Su, D; Suekane, F; Sugiyama, A; Suzuki, A; Swartz, M; Taylor, F E; Thom, J; Torrence, E; Usher, T; Vavra, J; Verdier, R; Wagner, D L; Waite, A P; Walston, S; Weidemann, A W; Weiss, E R; Whitaker, J S; Williams, S H; Willocq, S; Wilson, R J; Wisniewski, W J; Wittlin, J L; Woods, M; Wright, T R; Yamamoto, R K; Yashima, J; Yellin, S J; Young, C C; Yuta, H

    2005-01-01

    We measure the hadronic branching ratios of the Z0 boson into heavy quarks: Rb=Gamma(Z0->bb)/Gamma(Z0->hadrons) and Rc=Gamma(Z0->cc/Gamma(Z0->hadrons) using a multi-tag technique. The measurement was performed using about 400,000 hadronic Z0 events recorded in the SLD experiment at SLAC between 1996 and 1998. The small and stable SLC beam spot and the CCD-based vertex detector were used to reconstruct bottom and charm hadron decay vertices with high efficiency and purity, which enables us to measure most efficiencies from data. We obtain, Rb=0.21610 +- 0.00098(stat.) +- 0.00073(syst.) -+ 0.00012(Rc) and, Rc= 0.1745 +- 0.0031(stat.) +- 0.0020(syst.) -+ 0.0006(Rb)

  12. Online stable carbon isotope ratio measurement in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol in water by high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    A suitable analysis condition was determined for high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC-IRMS) while making sequential measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios of δ13C in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol dissolved in water. For this online column separation method, organic reagents are not applicable due to carbon contamination; thus, water and KH2PO4 at low concentrations were tested as mobile phase in combination with a HyPURITY AQUASTARTM column. Formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol were separated when 2 mM KH2PO4 aqueous solution was used. Under the determined analysis condition for HPLC-IRMS, carbon concentrations could be measured quantitatively as well as carbon isotope ratio when carbon concentration was higher than 0.4 mM L for each chemical

  13. Speed of sound measurements and the methane abundance in Titan's atmosphere

    Hagermann, A.; Rosenberg, P. D.; Towner, M. C.; Garry, J. R. C.; Svedhem, H.; Leese, M. R.; Hathi, B.; Lorenz, R. D.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2007-08-01

    Aboard the Huygens probe, which descended through Titan's atmosphere in January 2005, was the Surface Science Package (SSP), a set of 9 sensors, including a speed-of-sound sensor. We present the first detailed description of the SSP speed of sound measurements and report constraints on the methane content in Titan's lower atmosphere based on these measurements. After a careful calibration and subsequent Bayesian analysis, our measurements yield a most likely methane fraction in Titan's lower atmosphere of approximately 2% at 10 km, increasing to 3.5% at lower altitudes, based on a binary composition. Our data show that any large scale variation of methane within the lower 11 km of Titan's atmosphere is unlikely. Within experimental and theoretical uncertainties, our results are compatible with earlier estimates obtained from the GCMS experiment [Niemann, H.B., Atreya, S.K., Bauer, S.J., Carignan, G.R., Demick, J.E., Frost, R.L., Gautier, D., Haberman, J.A., Harpold, D.N., Hunten, D.M., Israel, G., Lunine, J.I., Kasprzak, W.T., Owen, T.C., Paulkovich, M., Raulin, F., Raaen, E., Way, S.H., 2005. Nature 438 (7069), 779-784].

  14. Accuracy of delta 18O isotope ratio measurements on the same sample by continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    The doubly labeled water method is considered the reference method to measure energy expenditure. Conventional mass spectrometry requires a separate aliquot of the same sample to be prepared and analyzed separately. With continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, the same sample could be analy...

  15. The rotational excitation of HCN and HNC by He: New insights on the HCN/HNC abundance ratio in molecular clouds

    Sarrasin, E; Wernli, M; Faure, A; Cernicharo, J; Lique, F

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of molecular emission from interstellar clouds requires the calculation of rates for excitation by collisions with the most abundant species. The present paper focuses on the calculation of rate coefficients for rotational excitation of the HCN and HNC molecules in their ground vibrational state in collision with He. The calculations are based on new two-dimensional potential energy surfaces obtained from highly correlated \\textit{ab initio} calculations. Calculations of pure rotational (de)excitation cross sections of HCN and HNC by He were performed using the essentially exact close-coupling method. Cross sections for transitions among the 8 first rotational levels of HCN and HNC were calculated for kinetic energies up to 1000 cm$^{-1}$. These cross sections were used to determine collisional rate constants for temperatures ranging from 5 K to 100 K. A propensity for even $\\Delta j$ transitions is observed in the case of HCN--He collisions whereas a propensity for odd $\\Delta j$ transitions is obse...

  16. Using Schumann Resonance Measurements for Constraining the Water Abundance on the Giant Planets - Implications for the Solar System Formation

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Hamelin, Michel; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Freudenreich, Henry; Beghin, Christian; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bromund, Kenneth; Grard, Rejean; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Steven; Rowland, Douglas; Sentman, Davis; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Yair, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    The formation and evolution of the Solar System is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the Solar System is therefore important to understand not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new, remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  17. USING SCHUMANN RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS FOR CONSTRAINING THE WATER ABUNDANCE ON THE GIANT PLANETS—IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SOLAR SYSTEM'S FORMATION

    The formation and evolution of the solar system is closely related to the abundance of volatiles, namely water, ammonia, and methane in the protoplanetary disk. Accurate measurement of volatiles in the solar system is therefore important for understanding not only the nebular hypothesis and origin of life but also planetary cosmogony as a whole. In this work, we propose a new remote sensing technique to infer the outer planets' water content by measuring Tremendously and Extremely Low Frequency (TLF-ELF) electromagnetic wave characteristics (Schumann resonances) excited by lightning in their gaseous envelopes. Schumann resonance detection can be potentially used for constraining the uncertainty of volatiles of the giant planets, mainly Uranus and Neptune, because such TLF-ELF wave signatures are closely related to the electric conductivity profile and water content.

  18. Measurement of the K X-ray intensity ratios in muonic hydrogen at low gas densities

    Measurements of the K X-ray transitions of muonic hydrogen (μ-p and μ-d) were performed at H2 or D2 gas pressures between 17 and 533 hPa (T∼293 K). The intensity ratios Kα/Ktotal and Kβ/Ktotal depend on the gas density because the strength of excited state collisional interactions increases at higher densities. The data are compared with the results of a cascade calculation. They are sensitive to the collisional Stark mixing rates at the main quantum levels n=4,.., 8. (orig.)

  19. Observer variation in measurements of waist-hip ratio and the abdominal sagittal diameter

    Rasmussen, M H; Andersen, T; Breum, Leif; Hilsted, J; Gøtzsche, P C

    1993-01-01

    In an out-patient weight loss study of 63 patients (54 female, 9 male), 53 completed a 16 week treatment with a low calorie diet and a 9 g/day fibre supplement. In these 53 patients, the average weight loss was 8.3 kg (s.e.m. 0.8). Waist-hip ratio (WHR) and abdominal sagittal diameter (SagD) were...... were 0.0% for WHR and 0.4% for SagD. It is concluded that there is no need to use several observers or repeated measurements of waist, hip and SagD in clinical anti-obesity trials....

  20. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio at high momentum transfer

    Andrew Puckett

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon that describe the effect of its internal quark structure on the cross section and spin observables in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Double-polarization experiments have become the preferred technique to measure the proton and neutron electric form factors at high momentum transfers. The recently completed GEp-III experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility used the recoil polarization method to extend the knowledge of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM to Q2 = 8.5 GeV2. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the experiment.

  1. Improved Measurement of the π→eν Branching Ratio.

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Aoki, M; Blecher, M; Britton, D I; Bryman, D A; Vom Bruch, D; Chen, S; Comfort, J; Ding, M; Doria, L; Cuen-Rochin, S; Gumplinger, P; Hussein, A; Igarashi, Y; Ito, S; Kettell, S H; Kurchaninov, L; Littenberg, L S; Malbrunot, C; Mischke, R E; Numao, T; Protopopescu, D; Sher, A; Sullivan, T; Vavilov, D; Yamada, K

    2015-08-14

    A new measurement of the branching ratio R_{e/μ}=Γ(π^{+}→e^{+}ν+π^{+}→e^{+}νγ)/Γ(π^{+}→μ^{+}ν+π^{+}→μ^{+}νγ) resulted in R_{e/μ}^{exp}=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)]×10^{-4}. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%. PMID:26317713

  2. Measurements of neutron fluxes and cadmium ratio at equilibrium core in JRR-3M

    Construction and characteristics tests of JRR-3M (Modified JRR-3) had been completed on October 1990, and the reactor reached to equilibrium core in July 1991. Measurements of neutron flux and cadmium ratio in Hydraulic irradiation facility (HR) and Pneumatic irradiation facility (PN) at 20 MW reactor power were carried out for the equilibrium core from May to August 1991 and for the latest core in April 1993. The results at the equilibrium core and the latest core are described in this paper. (author)

  3. Hf Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    Lawler, J E; Labby, Z E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements, accurate to about +/- 5 percent, are reported for 41 odd-parity levels of Hf II. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 150 lines of Hf II. Approximately half of these new transition probabilities overlap with recent independent measurements using a similar approach. The two sets of measurements are found to be in good agreement for measurements in common. Our new laboratory data are applied to refine the hafnium photospheric solar abundance and to determine hafnium abundances in 10 metal-poor giant stars with enhanced r-process abundances. For the Sun we derive log epsilon (Hf) = 0.88 +/- 0.08 from four lines; the uncertainty is dominated by the weakness of the lines and their blending by other spectral features. Within the uncertainties of our analysis, the r-process-rich stars possess constant Hf/La and Hf/Eu abundance ratios, log epsilon (Hf...

  4. Gd Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    Den Hartog, E A; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 49 even-parity and 14 odd-parity levels of Gd II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 611 lines of Gd II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Gd II transition probabilities and the first using a high performance Fourier transform spectrometer. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Gd abundance, log epsilon = 1.11 +/- 0.03. Revised Gd abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars CS 22892-052, BD+17 3248, and HD 115444. The resulting Gd/Eu abundance ratios are in very good agreement with the solar-system r-process ratio. We have employed the increasingly accurate stellar abundance determinations, resulting in large part from the more precise laboratory atomic data, to predict directly the Solar System r-process elemental...

  5. WormGender - Open-Source Software for Automatic Caenorhabditis elegans Sex Ratio Measurement.

    Marta K Labocha

    Full Text Available Fast and quantitative analysis of animal phenotypes is one of the major challenges of current biology. Here we report the WormGender open-source software, which is designed for accurate quantification of sex ratio in Caenorhabditis elegans. The software functions include, i automatic recognition and counting of adult hermaphrodites and males, ii a manual inspection feature that enables manual correction of errors, and iii flexibility to use new training images to optimize the software for different imaging conditions. We evaluated the performance of our software by comparing manual and automated assessment of sex ratio. Our data showed that the WormGender software provided overall accurate sex ratio measurements. We further demonstrated the usage of WormGender by quantifying the high incidence of male (him phenotype in 27 mutant strains. Mutants of nine genes (brc-1, C30G12.6, cep-1, coh-3, him-3, him-5, him-8, skr-1, unc-86 showed significant him phenotype. The WormGender is written in Java and can be installed and run on both Windows and Mac platforms. The source code is freely available together with a user manual and sample data at http://www.QuantWorm.org/. The source code and sample data are also available at http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1541248.

  6. Measurement of the Charge Ratio of Cosmic Muons using CMS Data

    Aldaya, M

    2008-01-01

    We have performed the measurement of the cosmic ray muon charge ratio, as a function of the muon momentum, using data collected by the CMS experiment, exploiting the capabilities of the muon barrel drift tube (DT) chambers. The cosmic muon charge ratio is defined as the ratio of the number of positive- to negative-charge muons. Cosmic ray muons result from the interaction of high-energy cosmic-ray particles (mainly protons and nuclei), entering the upper layers of the atmosphere, with air nuclei. Since these collisions favour positive meson production, there is an asymmetry in the charge composition and more positive muons are expected. The data samples were collected at the \\textit{Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge} (MTCC). While the MTCC itself was a crucial milestone in the CMS detector construction, not having physics studies among its primary goals, it provided the first opportunity to obtain physics results and test the full analysis chain using real data in CMS before the LHC startup, together with a co...

  7. Ice clouds and Asian dust studied with lidar measurements of particle extinction-to-backscatter ratio, particle depolarization, and water-vapor mixing ratio over Tsukuba.

    Sakai, Tetsu; Nagai, Tomohiro; Nakazato, Masahisa; Mano, Yuzo; Matsumura, Takatsugu

    2003-12-20

    The tropospheric particle extinction-to-backscatter ratio, the depolarization ratio, and the water-vapor mixing ratio were measured by use of a Raman lidar and a polarization lidar during the Asian dust seasons in 2001 and 2002 in Tsukuba, Japan. The apparent (not corrected for multiple-scattering effects) extinction-to-backscatter ratios (Sp) showed a dependence on the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) obtained from the lidar-derived water-vapor mixing ratio and radiosonde-derived temperature; they were mostly higher than 30 sr in dry air (RHice or = 100%), where the apparent extinction coefficients were larger than 0.036 km(-1). Both regions showed mean particle depolarization ratios of 20%-22%. Comparisons with theoretical calculations and the previous experiments suggest that the observed dependence of Sp on RHice is attributed to the difference in the predominant particles: nonspherical aerosols (mainly the Asian dust) in dry air and cloud particles in ice-supersaturated air. PMID:14717284

  8. The stability of H/V spectral ratios from noise measurements in Armutlu Peninsula (Turkey)

    Livaoǧlu, Hamdullah; Irmak, T. Serkan; Caka, Deniz; Yavuz, Evrim; Lühr, B. G.; Woith, H.; Tunç, B.; Baris, S.

    2016-04-01

    The horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (H/V) method has been successfully using in order to estimate the fundamental resonance frequency of the sedimentary cover, its thickness and amplification factor since at least 3 decades. There are numerous studies have been carried out on the stability of the H/V spectral ratios. Almost all studies showed that fundamental frequency is stable even measurements are repeated at different times. From this point of view, the results will show us an approach whether the stations are suitable for accurate estimate of earthquake studies and engineering purposes or not. Also we want to see if any effects of the amplification factor changing on the seismograms for Armutlu Seismic Network (ARNET) even though seismic stations are established far away from cultural noise and located on hard rock sites. It has been selected one hour recorded data of all stations during the most stationary times. The amplification and resonant frequency variations of H/V ratio were calculated to investigate temporal stability in time. There is a total harmony in fundamental frequencies values and H/V spectral ratio values in time-lagged periods. Some stations shows secondary minor peaks in high frequency band due to a shallow formation effect or cultural noises around. In the east side of the area ILYS station shows amplitude peak in lower fundamental frequency band from expected. This could compose a high amplification in lower frequencies and so that yield less reliable results in local earthquakes studies. By the experimental results from ambient noise analysis, it could be worked up for relocation of one station.

  9. Arctic phytoplankton and zooplankton abundance, temperature and salinity measurements collected from multiple platforms from 1903-02-22 to 1970-09-30 (NODC Accession 0069178)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Arctic phytoplankton and zooplankton abundance, temperature and salinity measurements collected from multiple platforms from 1903-02-22 to 1970-09-30 by Zoological...

  10. Optimising neutron polarizers--measuring the flipping ratio and related quantities

    Goossens, D.J.; Cussen, L.D. E-mail: lcu@ansto.gov.au

    2002-04-01

    The continuing development of gaseous spin polarized {sup 3}He transmission filters for use as neutron polarizers makes the choice of optimum thickness for these filters an important consideration. The 'quality factors' derived for the optimisation of transmission filters for particular measurements are general to all neutron polarizers. In this work optimisation conditions for neutron polarizers are derived and discussed for the family of studies related to measuring the flipping ratio from samples. The application of the optimisation conditions to {sup 3}He transmission filters and other types of neutron polarizers is discussed. Absolute comparisons are made between the effectiveness of different types of polarizers for this sort of work.

  11. A quick and robust method for measurement of signal-to-noise ratio in MRI

    A novel method is proposed for the measurement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the purpose of quality assurance (QA) in MRI. A boxcar filtering technique is applied which allows estimation of signal and noise from a single image. The method has been used to estimate SNR in a large set of images acquired in a consistent manner using various scanner models, coils and phantoms. Performance is evaluated by comparison with the double-image subtraction technique incorporating temporal instability correction. The limits of agreement between the techniques are comparable to typical variability in daily SNR, and significantly superior to the performance of other single-image methods published to date. Single-image methods are preferable as they halve the image acquisition time of the recommended double-image approach. Major inaccuracies are identified in methods of SNR measurement currently used for QA in MRI. (paper)

  12. Correlation techniques for the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio in measurements with stochastic processes

    Reddy, V R; Reddy, T G; Reddy, P Y; Reddy, K R

    2003-01-01

    An AC modulation technique is described to convert stochastic signal variations into an amplitude variation and its retrieval through Fourier analysis. It is shown that this AC detection of signals of stochastic processes when processed through auto- and cross-correlation techniques improve the signal-to-noise ratio; the correlation techniques serve a similar purpose of frequency and phase filtering as that of phase-sensitive detection. A few model calculations applied to nuclear spectroscopy measurements such as Angular Correlations, Mossbauer spectroscopy and Pulse Height Analysis reveal considerable improvement in the sensitivity of signal detection. Experimental implementation of the technique is presented in terms of amplitude variations of harmonics representing the derivatives of normal spectra. Improved detection sensitivity to spectral variations is shown to be significant. These correlation techniques are general and can be made applicable to all the fields of particle counting where measurements ar...

  13. Prospects for measuring the Bs0-anti Bs0 mixing ratio χs

    We review and update results bearing on the phenomena of particle-antiparticle mixing in the neutral beauty meson sector. Our main focus is on the mixing ratio xs, defined as xs = (ΔM)/Γ, relevant for B0s-anti B0s mixing. We present theoretical estimates of this quantity in the standard model and find that xs=0(10), which makes time-dependent oscillation measurements mandatory. We also discuss estimates of xs in a number of extensions of the standard model, some of which admit smaller values of xs. Present and future experimental facilities where such measurements can be undertaken are reviewed on a case to case basis. These include the high luminosity LEP option, asymmetric threshold B-factories, the ep-collider HERA, and hadron colliders, such as the Fermilab Tevatron, LHC and SSC. (orig.)

  14. Detection of chloronium and measurement of the 35Cl/37Cl isotopic ratio at z=0.89 toward PKS1830-211

    Muller, S; Guelin, M; Henkel, C; Combes, F; Gerin, M; Aalto, S; Beelen, A; Darling, J; Horellou, C; Martin, S; Menten, K M; Dinh-V-Trung,; Zwaan, M A

    2014-01-01

    We report the first extragalactic detection of chloronium (H2Cl+), in the z=0.89 absorber in front of the lensed blazar PKS1830-211. The ion is detected through its 1_11-0_00 line along two independent lines of sight toward the North-East and South-West images of the blazar. The relative abundance of H2Cl+ is significantly higher (by a factor ~7) in the NE line of sight, which has a lower H2/H fraction, indicating that H2Cl+ preferably traces the diffuse gas component. From the ratio of the H2^35Cl+ and H2^37Cl+ absorptions toward the SW image, we measure a 35Cl/37Cl isotopic ratio of 3.1 (-0.2; +0.3) at z=0.89, similar to that observed in the Galaxy and the solar system.

  15. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system

  16. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    Liu, Jinzhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling, E-mail: linling@tju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin, People' s Republic of China, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Detecting Techniques and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Qiao, Xiaoyan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Shanxi University, Shanxi (China); Wang, Mengjun [School of Information Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Weibo [Institute of Acupuncture and Moxibustion China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-05-15

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  17. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    Liu, Jinzhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2014-05-01

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  18. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system.

    Liu, Jinzhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2014-05-01

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system. PMID:24880419

  19. Magnetisation transfer ratio measurement in the cervical spinal cord: a preliminary study in multiple sclerosis

    MRI readily detects the lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional MRI sequences do not, however, permit distinction between the various pathological characteristics (oedema, demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis) of lesions in MS. Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging may be more specific in distinguishing the pathologies responsible for disability in MS, namely demyelination and axonal loss, and therefore may have a potential role in monitoring treatment. We have applied MT imaging to the cervical spinal cord to see if it is feasible to measure MT ratios (MTR) in this region where pathological changes may result in considerable disability. We studied 12 patients with MS and 12 age- and sex-matched normal controls using a sagittal T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequence with and without an MT pulse. The median value for cervical cord mean MTR measurement in normal controls was 19.30 % units (interquartile range 19.05-19.55), whereas values were significantly lower in MS patients (median = 17.95 % units, interquartile range 17.25-19.00, P 0.0004). There was a low intrarater variability for repeated mean MTR measurements. We conclude that it is possible to measure MTR in the cervical spinal cord, that a significant reduction occurs in patients with MS, and that there may be a role for this measure in future MS treatment trials. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Lithium Abundance of Metal-poor Stars

    Hua-Wei Zhang; Gang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra have been obtained for 32 metal-poor stars. The equivalent widths of Li λ6708A were measured and the lithium abundances were derived. The average lithium abundance of 21 stars on the lithium plateau is 2.33±0.02 dex. The Lithium plateau exhibits a marginal trend along metallicity, dA(Li)/d[Fe/H] = 0.12±0.06, and no clear trend with the effective temperature. The trend indicates that the abundance of lithium plateau may not be primordial and that a part of the lithium was produced in Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE).

  1. Depolarization Ratio of Clouds Measured by Multiple-Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Makino, Toshiyuki; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Jin, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    We have developed the Multiple Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar (MFMSPL) system for the study of optically thick low-level clouds. It has 8 telescopes; 4 telescopes for parallel channels and another 4 for perpendicular channels. The MFMSPL is the first lidar system that can measure depolarization ratio for optically thick clouds where multiple scattering is dominant. Field of view of each channel was 10mrad and was mounted with different angles ranging from 0 mrad (vertical) to 30mrad. And footprint size from the total FOV was achieved to be close to that of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar at the altitude of 1km in order to reproduce similar degree of multiple scattering effects as observed from space. The MFMSPL has started observations since June 2014 and has been continuously operated at National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) in Tsukuba, Japan. Observations proved expected performance such that measured depolarization ratio was comparable to the one observed by CALIPSO lidar.

  2. Determination of integrated neutron flux by the measurement of the isotopic ratios of cadmium and gadolinium

    In this work, the possibility of the indirect determination of the integrated neutron flux, through the change of isotopic ratios of cadmium and gadolinium was investigated. The samples of cadmium we/e gadolinium were irradiated in the IEA-Rl reactor. These elements were chosen because they have high thermal neutron absorption cross section which permit the change in the isotopic composition during a short irradiation time to be measured accurately. The isotopic ratios were measured with a thermionic mass spectrometer the silica-gel technique and arrangement with single filament were used for the cadmium analysis, where as the oxi - reduction technique and arrangement with double filaments were used for gadolinium analysis. The mass fractionation effects for cadmium and gadolinium were corrected respectively by the exponential and potential expansion of the isotopic fractionation factor per atomic mass unit. The flux values supplied by the Centro de Operacao e Utilizacao do Reator de Pesquisas do IPEN were extrapolated. These values and the integrated flux values obtained experimentally were compared. (author)

  3. Measuring ion velocity distribution functions through high-aspect ratio holes in inductively coupled plasmas

    Cunge, G.; Darnon, M.; Dubois, J.; Bezard, P.; Mourey, O.; Petit-Etienne, C.; Vallier, L.; Despiau-Pujo, E.; Sadeghi, N.

    2016-02-01

    Several issues associated with plasma etching of high aspect ratio structures originate from the ions' bombardment of the sidewalls of the feature. The off normal angle incident ions are primarily due to their temperature at the sheath edge and possibly to charging effects. We have measured the ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) at the wafer surface in an industrial inductively coupled plasma reactor by using multigrid retarding field analyzers (RFA) in front of which we place 400 μm thick capillary plates with holes of 25, 50, and 100 μm diameters. The RFA then probes IVDF at the exit of the holes with Aspect Ratios (AR) of 16, 8, and 4, respectively. The results show that the ion flux dramatically drops with the increase in AR. By comparing the measured IVDF with an analytical model, we concluded that the ion temperature is 0.27 eV in our plasma conditions. The charging effects are also observed and are shown to significantly reduce the ion energy at the bottom of the feature but only with a "minor" effect on the ion flux and the shape of the IVDF.

  4. Skeletal Calcium/Phosphorus Ratio Measuring Techniques and Results. I. Microscopy and Microtomography

    Vassilios Kyriazis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to the problem of bone disorders is the measurement of the skeleton’'s static and dynamic strength, an estimate of which is bone mineral density. A decrease in the latter may be due to a decrease in either Ca or P, or to dissimilar decreases in both. Consequently, the determination of the Ca/P ratio may provide a sensitive measure of bone mineral changes and may add to our understanding of the changes occurring in bone diseases. This paper reviews techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM and micro-computed tomography (μu-CT, which have been developed for the in vitro assessment of the Ca,P content and the skeletal Ca/P ratio. Their main aspects are presented, as much as results regarding the referred values. The presentation of other in vitro or in vivo techniques, such as instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA or X-ray absorptiometry accordingly, would be the issue of another article. The authors argue that the choice of the best technique relies on its cost ad ease of applicability, its reliability, and precision.

  5. Iridium abundance measurements across bio-event horizons in the fossil record

    Orth, C.J.; Attrep, M. Jr.; Quintana, L.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Geochemical measurements have been performed on thousands of rock samples collected across bio-event horizons using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) for about 40 common and trace elements and radiochemical isolation procedures for Ir. On selected samples, Os, Pt and Au were also radiochemically determined. These studies have encompassed the time interval from the Precambrian-Cambrian transition to the Late Eocene impact (microspherule) horizons. Our early work strengthened the Alvarez impact hypothesis by finding the Ir (PGE) anomaly at the K-T boundary in continental sedimentary sequences. In collaborations with paleontologists, weak to moderately string Ir anomalies have been discovered at the Frasnian-Famennian boundary in Australia, in the Early Mississippian of Oklahoma, at the Mississipian-Pennsylvanian boundary of Oklahoma and Texas, and in the Late Cenomanian throughout the western interior of North America and on the south coast of England to date. We have found no compelling evidence for an impact related cause for these anomalies although PGE impact signatures in the two Late Cenomanian anomalies could be masked by the strong terrestrial mafic to ultramafic overprint. Thus far, our evidence for extinction events older than the terminal Cretaceous does not support recent hypotheses which suggest that impacts from cyclic swarms of comets in the inner Solar system were responsible for the periodic mass extinctions. 50 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Preliminary Figures of Merit for Isotope Ratio Measurements: The Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Ionization Source Coupled to an Orbitrap Mass Analyzer

    Hoegg, Edward D.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Owing to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for Orbitrap analyzers are well-documented, no detailed evaluations of the IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LS-APGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of Orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the Orbitrap sampling interface, high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases, the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (abundance species. The results suggest that the LS-APGD is a promising candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the Orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision IRs.

  7. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to ...

  8. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  9. Particle image velocimetry correlation signal-to-noise ratio metrics and measurement uncertainty quantification

    In particle image velocimetry (PIV) the measurement signal is contained in the recorded intensity of the particle image pattern superimposed on a variety of noise sources. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) strength governs the resulting PIV cross correlation and ultimately the accuracy and uncertainty of the resulting PIV measurement. Hence we posit that correlation SNR metrics calculated from the correlation plane can be used to quantify the quality of the correlation and the resulting uncertainty of an individual measurement. In this paper we extend the original work by Charonko and Vlachos and present a framework for evaluating the correlation SNR using a set of different metrics, which in turn are used to develop models for uncertainty estimation. Several corrections have been applied in this work. The SNR metrics and corresponding models presented herein are expanded to be applicable to both standard and filtered correlations by applying a subtraction of the minimum correlation value to remove the effect of the background image noise. In addition, the notion of a ‘valid’ measurement is redefined with respect to the correlation peak width in order to be consistent with uncertainty quantification principles and distinct from an ‘outlier’ measurement. Finally the type and significance of the error distribution function is investigated. These advancements lead to more robust and reliable uncertainty estimation models compared with the original work by Charonko and Vlachos. The models are tested against both synthetic benchmark data as well as experimental measurements. In this work, U68.5 uncertainties are estimated at the 68.5% confidence level while U95 uncertainties are estimated at 95% confidence level. For all cases the resulting calculated coverage factors approximate the expected theoretical confidence intervals, thus demonstrating the applicability of these new models for estimation of uncertainty for individual PIV measurements. (paper)

  10. Measurements of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios by SIRA 10 mass spectrometer and some problems of their quality assurance

    Full text: Hydrogen and oxygen are two chemical elements that combined between them forms the water molecules. Hydrogen has two stable isotopes 1H and 2H, with abundance, respectively, 99.985 % and 0.015 %, while the oxygen has three stable isotopes 16O, 17O, 18O with the abundance, respectively, 99.756 %, 0.039 %, 0.205 %. Hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes, in our laboratory, are used in the hydrology and hydrogeology studies. The 'δ' values of hydrogen and oxygen of water samples are expressed in per mille with respect to SMOW, while, for carbon is expressed in per mille with respect to PDB. The isotopic compositions of these elements are measured using the SIRA 10 mass spectrometer, which is similar with the Nier mass spectrometer. SIRA 10 mass spectrometer, destined for the measurements of the isotopic ratios of the light elements, is equipped with double inlet system and with three collectors system (for the oxygen, carbon, nitrogen etc. isotopes) and double collector system for the hydrogen isotopes. The vacuum 10-9 torr is realized by the two oil diffusion pumps. The gas samples (H2, CO2, etc.) are admitted to the ion source of the mass spectrometer, where are transformed into positive ions by the electron impact. The magnetic field is normal to the path of the ions and is realized by a permanent magnet. The quality assurance of the 'δ' determination dependent from the preparation of the gas samples and from the measurements of the isotopic ratios. Stable isotopes hydrogen of the water samples are measured through the hydrogen gas which is gained from the water by the reduction reaction with metallic Zinc in a separate line, in vacuum conditions and high temperature. The reduction process of the water was occurred not normally because in the inside of the glass balloons seems water droplets. The different experiments of the changes the water quantity, Zinc quantity, dimensions of the metallic Zinc and the temperature of the reduction reaction didn

  11. Improved Techniques for Low-Flux Measurement of Prompt Neutron Lifetime, Conversion Ratio and Fast Spectra

    Various statistical methods for the measurement of the ratio of prompt neutron lifetime to delayed fraction have been used in the zero-power reactor programme. One method was originated here, i.e. analysis of reactor noise with a bandpass filter, and others such as the measurement of the frequency of delayed coincidences among counter pulses as a function of delay time and the measurement of the relative variance of time integrals of the neutron flux as a function of integrating time have been refined. The areas of most advantageous application of the various methods have been studied. Attention has also been given to the interpretation of the results of these measurements, and it has been shown that interpretation based on a simple kinetics model is applicable to a wide range of practical cases. Several improvements in our original activation method for the low flux determination of the ratio of production to destruction of fissile material are described. These include the application of very sensitive radiochemical techniques as a confirming procedure; correction for extraneous counts, utilizing foils of different enrichments for the contribution of fission of the fertile material to the fission- product activity and foils exposed to different spectra for fission-related counts in the capture determination; and the use of coincidence counting for the detection of Np239 decay. Obtaining a value for conversion ratio from the activation data requires a knowledge of the ratio of captures to fissions in the fuel, α. No accurate experimental method now exists for the measurement of this quantity in a low flux reactor, but several methods which might make feasible such a determination are being explored. Three of the more promising techniques are outlined. Efforts to develop a small fast neutron spectrometer of good stability, resolution and sensitivity for in-pile measurements of neutron spectra in the energy region of tens and hundreds of kilovolts have been

  12. [Ultima ratio of the applied security measures in placing perpetrators in a psychiatric hospital].

    Hajdukiewicz, Danuta

    2006-01-01

    The meaning of articles on the main security measures concerned with placing the convict in a closed psychiatric unit is studied. Articles 93 & 94 section 1 of the penal code limit their application only as final measures--the ultima ratio. Art. 93 of the penal code pertains to the perpetrator of illegal actions in connection to their psychiatric illness, mental retardation, alcohol or other related substance addiction, along with a risk of the crime being committed once again, only when it will prevent the person from repeating the crime. The issues that need be considered are the following: psychic state of the perpetrator along with prediction of the risk of him repeating the act, but the liability evaluation and the degree of probability do not play any vital role. This is probably due to the fact that the measure described in art. 96 of the penal code has a limited time span (it cannot be any shorter than 3 months and longer than 2 years) and what is more; it can be applied instead of the punishment. Art. 94 section 1 of the penal code requires very precise evaluation of the risk of repetition in each case of a non-liable perpetrator guilty of conducting crime of serious social damage. This measure is not limited in time span, because it depends on the psychic state of the person under its influence. Henceforth it is considered as more restrictive. PMID:17068937

  13. Measuring Methane Emissions from Industrial and Waste Processing Sites Using the Dual Tracer Flux Ratio Method

    Herndon, S.; Floerchinger, C.; Roscioli, J. R.; Yacovitch, T.; Franklin, J. P.; Shorter, J. H.; Kolb, C. E.; Subramanian, R.; Robinson, A. L.; Molina, L. T.; Allen, D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to directly quantify facility scale methane emissions during recent multi-state measurement campaigns we have deployed novel tracer release emission characterization approaches to investigate a wide variety of facility types. The development and application of a dual tracer flux ratio methodology will be discussed. Using known release rates of two (or more) inert tracer species, downwind methane plume measurements can be used to quantify and evaluate the uncertainty in known releases and unknown emissions of methane. Results from experiments designed to challenge the experimental methodology will be presented, which determined that for downwind sampling distances in excess of ~200 m, the dual tracer release method is quite robust (emission rate error) under many atmospheric conditions and landscape variations. At downwind distances less than ~200 m, the assumption of equivalent dispersion between spatially separated release points can break down. For some facilities, this can be used to distinguish and estimate the magnitude of methane emissions taking place at different spatial points within the facility. Measured emissions for selected facilities will be presented and, where possible, the accurate quantification of the episodic releases during specific activities, as well as continuous fugitive emissions are identified and will be discussed . Collaboration with on-site operators allows these measurements to inform the design and implementation of effective mitigation strategies.

  14. Amphibious hearing in ringed seals (Pusa hispida): underwater audiograms, aerial audiograms and critical ratio measurements.

    Sills, Jillian M; Southall, Brandon L; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2015-07-01

    Ringed seals (Pusa hispida) are semi-aquatic marine mammals with a circumpolar Arctic distribution. In this study, we investigate the amphibious hearing capabilities of ringed seals to provide auditory profiles for this species across the full range of hearing. Using psychophysical methods with two trained ringed seals, detection thresholds for narrowband signals were measured under quiet, carefully controlled environmental conditions to generate aerial and underwater audiograms. Masked underwater thresholds were measured in the presence of octave-band noise to determine critical ratios. Results indicate that ringed seals possess hearing abilities comparable to those of spotted seals (Phoca largha) and harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), and considerably better than previously reported for ringed and harp seals. Best sensitivity was 49 dB re. 1 µPa (12.8 kHz) in water, and -12 dB re. 20 µPa (4.5 kHz) in air, rivaling the acute hearing abilities of some fully aquatic and terrestrial species in their respective media. Critical ratio measurements ranged from 14 dB at 0.1 kHz to 31 dB at 25.6 kHz, suggesting that ringed seals--like other true seals--can efficiently extract signals from background noise across a broad range of frequencies. The work described herein extends similar research on amphibious hearing in spotted seals recently published by the authors. These parallel studies enhance our knowledge of the auditory capabilities of ice-living seals, and inform effective management strategies for these and related species in a rapidly changing Arctic environment. PMID:25987727

  15. Precision measurement of the ratio of the Λb0 to B¯0 lifetimes

    The LHCb measurement of the lifetime ratio of the Λb0 baryon to the B¯0 meson is updated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb−1 collected using 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The decay modes used are Λb0→J/ψpK− and B¯0→J/ψπ+K−, where the π+K− mass is consistent with that of the K¯⁎0(892) meson. The lifetime ratio is determined with unprecedented precision to be 0.974±0.006±0.004, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with original theoretical predictions based on the heavy quark expansion. Using the current world average of the B¯0 lifetime, the Λb0 lifetime is found to be 1.479±0.009±0.010 ps

  16. Monitoring the ratio of leaf carbon to nitrogen in winter wheat with hyperspectral measurements

    Xu, Xin-gang; Yang, Xiao-dong; Gu, Xiao-he; Yang, Hao; Feng, Hai-kuan; Yang, Gui-jun; Song, Xiao-yu

    2015-10-01

    In crop leaves the ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C/N), defined as ratio of LCC (leaf carbon concentration) to LNC (leaf nitrogen concentration), is a good indicator that can synthetically evaluate the balance of carbon and nitrogen, nutrient status in crop plants. Hence it is very important how to monitor changes of leaf C/N effectively and in real time for nutrient diagnosis and growing management of crops in fields. In consideration of the close relationships between chlorophyll, nitrogen (N) and C/N, some typical indices aimed at N estimation were tested to estimate leaf C/N in winter wheat as well as several indices aimed chlorophyll evaluation. The multi-temporal hyperspectral data from the flag-leaf, anthesis, filling, and milk-ripe stages were obtained to calculate these selected spectral indices for evaluating C/N in winter wheat. The results showed that some tested indices such as MCARI/OSAVI2, MTCI and Rep-Le had the better performance of estimating C/N. In addition, GRA (gray relational analysis) and Branch-and-Bound method were also used along with spectral indices sensitive to C/N for improving the accuracy of monitoring C/N in winter wheat, and obtained the better results with R2 of 0.74, RMSE of 0.991. It indicates that monitoring of leaf C/N in winter wheat with hyperspectral reflectance measurements appears very potential.

  17. Precision measurement of the ratio of the $\\Lambda^0_b$ to $\\overline{B}^0$ lifetimes

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Caponio, Francesco; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bonis, Isabelle; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dorosz, Piotr; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Esen, Sevda; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Hafkenscheid, Tom; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Wallaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Ian; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Muryn, Bogdan; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pavel-Nicorescu, Carmen; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Roberts, Douglas; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teodorescu, Eliza; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Webber, Adam Dane; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiechczynski, Jaroslaw; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb measurement of the lifetime ratio of the $\\Lambda^0_b$ to the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson is updated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected using 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The decay modes used are $\\overline{\\Lambda}^0_b \\to J/\\psi p K^-$ and $\\overline{B}^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ K^-$, where the $\\pi^+K^-$ mass is consistent with that of the $\\overline{K}^{*0}(892)$ meson. The lifetime ratio is determined with unprecedented precision to be $0.974\\pm0.006\\pm0.004$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with original theoretical predictions based on the heavy quark expansion. Using the current world average of the $\\overline{B}^0$ lifetime, the $\\Lambda^0_b$ lifetime is found to be $1.479 \\pm 0.009 \\pm 0.010$ ps.

  18. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  19. Regional ventilation-perfusion ratio in chronic lung diseases measured with krypton-81m

    We measured regional ventilation-perfusion ratio (V radical/Q radical) by continuous inhalation of Kr-81 m and also continuous injection of Kr-81 m. The V radical/Q radical distribution can be divided four types. Type I is the normal pattern and V radical/Q radical value is the highest at apex. Type II has the highest V radical/Q radical value not at the apex but one third lower from the apex and the V radical/Q radical value gradually decreases towards the base. In type III V radical/Q radical has no gradient from the apex to the base. In type IV V radical/Q radical of the base higher than that of the apex. Most pulmonary emphysema show type I, most chronic bronchitis show type II and many interstitial pneumonia denote type IV. The ratio between the area in which the V radical/Q radical value was lower than 0.75, and the area of total lung (% 0.75) correlated with PaO2 (r = 0.59 p < 0.01). Coefficiency of variation (COV) of V radical/Q radical was larger in pulmonary emphysema and in interstitial pneumonia than in normal lung and COV of V radical/Q radical was the largest in chronic bronchitis. (author)

  20. On the Core Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Ratio and Temperature Measurements in DEMO

    Kiptily, V G

    2014-01-01

    Comparing with ITER, the experimental fusion machine under constraction, the next step test fusion power plant, DEMO will be characterized by very long pulse/steady-state operation and much higher plasma volume and fusion power. The substantially increased level of neutron and gamma fluxes will require reducing the physical access to the plant. It means some conventional diagnostics for the fusion plasma control will be not suitable in DEMO. Development of diagnostics along with the machine design is a primary task for the test plant. The deuterium- tritium fuel ratio and temperature are among important parameters, which should be under control. In this letter a novel technique for the core fuel ratio and temperature diagnostics is proposed. It is based on measurements and comparison of the rates T(p,{\\gamma})4He and D(T,{\\gamma})5He nuclear reactions that take place in the hot deuterium-tritium plasma. Based on detection of high energy gamma-rays, this diagnostic is robust, efficient and does not require dir...

  1. Can stable isotope ratios provide for community-wide measures of trophic structure?

    Layman, Craig A; Arrington, D Albrey; Montaña, Carmen G; Post, David M

    2007-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios (typically of carbon and nitrogen) provide one representation of an organism's trophic niche and are widely used to examine aspects of food web structure. Yet stable isotopes have not been applied to quantitatively characterize community-wide aspects of trophic structure (i.e., at the level of an entire food web). We propose quantitative metrics that can be used to this end, drawing on similar approaches from ecomorphology research. For example, the convex hull area occupied by species in delta13C-delta15N niche space is a representation of the total extent of trophic diversity within a food web, whereas mean nearest neighbor distance among all species pairs is a measure of species packing within trophic niche space. To facilitate discussion of opportunities and limitations of the metrics, we provide empirical and conceptual examples drawn from Bahamian tidal creek food webs. These examples illustrate how this methodology can be used to quantify trophic diversity and trophic redundancy in food webs, as well as to link individual species to characteristics of the food web in which they are embedded. Building from extensive applications of stable isotope ratios by ecologists, the community-wide metrics may provide a new perspective on food web structure, function, and dynamics. PMID:17489452

  2. Re-measured uranium branching ratios and their impact on removing biases from MGAU analyses

    Lanier, R G; Ruhter, W D; Wang, T F

    1999-09-17

    Biases in MGAU analyses first observed in FSU Gosatomnadzor inspection and subsequently identified in more detail by measurements at the Moscow Kurchatov Institute have forced a new look at the code's analysis assumptions. We have used uranium gamma-ray calibration standards from the National Bureau of Standards and standards from the New Brunswick Laboratory to investigate MGAU analysis biases. The 200g uranium standards which cover the uranium enrichments ranging from 0.3% to 93% were used to collect more than 500 gamma-ray spectra for this study. The experimental arrangement used a LEPS Ge detector with various source-detector configurations and absorbers. Two independent versions of the MGAU code, which we currently employ in our laboratory, confirm the biases noted in a developing variety of FSU inspection results and in the careful Kurchatov study. In this paper, we will discuss the MGAU methodology and use 250 spectra at a fixed geometry without absorbers to obtain new branching ratios for the critical 100-keV region gamma rays. We show that modifying the branching ratios removes a significant component of the observed biases.

  3. Optimized Chemical Separation and Measurement by TE TIMS Using Carburized Filaments for Uranium Isotope Ratio Measurements Applied to Plutonium Chronometry.

    Sturm, Monika; Richter, Stephan; Aregbe, Yetunde; Wellum, Roger; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-06-21

    An optimized method is described for U/Pu separation and subsequent measurement of the amount contents of uranium isotopes by total evaporation (TE) TIMS with a double filament setup combined with filament carburization for age determination of plutonium samples. The use of carburized filaments improved the signal behavior for total evaporation TIMS measurements of uranium. Elevated uranium ion formation by passive heating during rhenium signal optimization at the start of the total evaporation measurement procedure was found to be a result from byproducts of the separation procedure deposited on the filament. This was avoided using carburized filaments. Hence, loss of sample before the actual TE data acquisition was prevented, and automated measurement sequences could be accomplished. Furthermore, separation of residual plutonium in the separated uranium fraction was achieved directly on the filament by use of the carburized filaments. Although the analytical approach was originally tailored to achieve reliable results only for the (238)Pu/(234)U, (239)Pu/(235)U, and (240)Pu/(236)U chronometers, the optimization of the procedure additionally allowed the use of the (242)Pu/(238)U isotope amount ratio as a highly sensitive indicator for residual uranium present in the sample, which is not of radiogenic origin. The sample preparation method described in this article has been successfully applied for the age determination of CRM NBS 947 and other sulfate and oxide plutonium samples. PMID:27240571

  4. First observation of the decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ and measurement of its branching ratio.

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D

    2008-01-18

    We report the observation of the exclusive decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ at the 7.5 standard deviation level using 355 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We measure the relative branching ratio B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)/B(B0-->D-Ds+)=1.44(-0.44)(+0.48). Using the world average value for B(B0-->D-Ds+), we find B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)=(9.4(-4.2)(+4.4))x10(-3). This provides a lower bound DeltaGammasCP/Gammas>or=2B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)>1.2x10(-2) at 95% C.L. PMID:18232856

  5. A new strain gage method for measuring the contractile strain ratio of Zircaloy tubing

    An improved strain gage method for determining the contractile strain ratio (CSR) of Zircaloy tubing was developed. The new method consists of a number of load-unload cyclings at approximately 0.2% plastic strain interval. With this method the CSR of Zircaloy-4 tubing could be determined accurately because it was possible to separate the plastic strains from the elastic strain involvement. The CSR values determined by use of the new method were in good agreement with those calculated from conventional post-test manual measurements. The CSR of the tubing was found to decrease with the amount of deformation during testing because of uneven plastic flow in the gage section. A new technique of inscribing gage marks by use of a YAG laser is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Precision measurement of the ratio Mw/Mz at the CERN bar pp collider

    In the 1988 and 1989 runs of the CERN SPS bar pp collider, large numbers of W → eve and Z → e+e- decays were collected by UA2. Subsamples of these events have been selected to determine individual boson masses, MW and MZ, for which systematic errors in energy scale are expected to be identical. As a result, a precise value for the ratio MW/MZ is obtained. This is used to determine sin2ΘW, and it is combined with the recent, very precise measurements of MZ at e+e- colliders to extract a precise value for MW. In this paper the results are discussed within the context of the standard model

  7. Measurement of the Branching Ratio Lambda_c+ -> p pi+ pi-

    Lopez-Hinojosa, Guillermo; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-03-01

    The confirmation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is reported. All data analyzed are from SELEX, a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that took data during 1996 and 1997, mainly with a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratio of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to the Cabibbo-favored mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured to be: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.103 {+-} 0.022.

  8. Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of X-ray imaging scintillators determined by luminescence measurements

    Cavouras, D; Kanellopoulos, M; Nomicos, C D; Panayiotakis, G S

    1999-01-01

    A new method for studying the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of X-ray imaging scintillators was developed. SNR was expressed in terms of the X-ray luminescence efficiency (XLE) the X-ray to emitted light conversion efficiency and the mean light photon energy. Laboratory prepared Gd sub 2 O sub 2 S:Tb, La sub 2 O sub 2 S:Tb and Y sub 2 O sub 2 S:Tb scintillator screens were tested and best results were obtained for the 80 mg/cm sup 2 Gd sub 2 O sub 2 S:Tb screen. The method proposed allows for scintillator comparison on the basis of XLE and wavelength measurements.

  9. Measurement of lactate extraction ratio by centrifugal analyzer to assess myocardial ischemia.

    Townsend, R M; Gotelli, G; Weingartner, D; Marton, L J

    1977-01-01

    The measurement of blood lactate to determine myocardial lactate extraction ratio requires a high degree of within-run precision, since small changes between arterial and coronary sinus lactate may occur. These changes in man may take place at lactate levels in the normal range, 5-18 mg/dl (0.56-2.00 mmol/l). The authors have developed a method for blood lactate determination utilizing commercially available reagents in a centrifugal analyzer (Centrifichem). Within-run precision in the low normal range, 5.4 mg/dl (0.60 mmol/l), showed a coefficient of variation of 7%. Precision extends to 50 mg/dl (5.55 mmol/l), and agreement with blood lactate values obtained with the Dupont ACA is good. PMID:831458

  10. Basic study of cold fusion. 2. Development of the measurement system of deuterium loading ratio in palladium cathode

    A measurement system of deuterium loading ratio in the palladium cathode, which is one of the most important factors for cold fusion phenomena, especially excess heat generation, has been introduced to the simultaneous measurement device of heat, neutron and gamma-ray of heavy water electrolysis that had been developed. Pressure of the gas phase in the closed electrolysis cell and electro-conductivity of the palladium cathode were measured to calculate the deuterium loading ratio. The measured ratio by means of each method is adequate compared with the reported results, and turned out to reach approximately 0.87. Simultaneous and continuous measurement of deuterium loading ratio with heat and neutron made reproduction of the situation of cold fusion phenomena and precision measurement of the heat generation possible. (author)

  11. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    King, C W, E-mail: careyking@mail.utexas.edu [Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1100, Austin, TX 78712-0254 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. $/Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  12. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. $/Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  13. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    King, C. W.

    2010-10-01

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. /Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  14. O/M ratio measurement in pure and mixed oxide fuels - where are we now?

    The scale-down in the US and Russian nuclear weapons stockpiles has produced a surplus of weapons grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The incorporation into mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) is one of the currently favored routes for surplus weapons-grade plutonium. The use of MOX as a nuclear reactor fuel is well established, particularly in Europe and Japan but not in the US. The primary purpose of this investigation was to evaluate existing analytical techniques for their applicability to O/M (oxygen-to-metal ratio) measurements of MOX derived from excess weapons plutonium. The second objective of this investigation was to bring up-to-date the literature on O/M measurement methods, which has not been undertaken in over 20 years. There are several classification schemes that can be used to organize O/M measurement methods. The most popular schemes are based on (a) whether the analysis is performed in solution (wet chemical) or on solid material (dry), and (b) whether the concentration of major constituents are analyzed directly (direct) or are inferred (indirect). Solid state coulometric titration is currently used extensively in studies of phase equilibria, defect chemistry, thermochemical measurement of oxides, including ferrites. Regardless of which indirect method is used (solid state coulometric titration or thermogravimetry), a primary, direct method will also be required for the establishment of the MO2 reference state, determination of method bias, and periodic calibration. It was recommended that the following direct method be adapted for this purpose: oxygen measurement by inert gas fusion/carbon reduction, and total U, Pu by controlled potential coulometry. In a table are listed the experimental values of accuracy for about 30 O/M methods. (A.C.)

  15. Field Evaluation of Polymer Capacitive Humidity Sensors for Bowen Ratio Energy Balance Flux Measurements

    Michael J. Savage

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of reliable, reasonably accurate and relatively inexpensive estimates of sensible heat and latent energy fluxes was investigated using a commercial combination thin-film polymer capacitive relative humidity and adjacent temperature sensor instrument. Long-term and unattended water vapour pressure profile difference measurements using low-power combination instruments were compared with those from a cooled dewpoint mirror hygrometer, the latter often used with Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB systems. An error analysis, based on instrument relative humidity and temperature errors, was applied for various capacitive humidity instrument models. The main disadvantage of a combination capacitive humidity instrument is that two measurements, relative humidity and temperature, are required for estimation of water vapour pressure as opposed to one for a dewpoint hygrometer. In a laboratory experiment using an automated procedure, water vapour pressure differences generated using a reference dewpoint generator were measured using a commercial model (Dew-10 dewpoint hygrometer and a combination capacitive humidity instrument. The laboratory measurement comparisons showed that, potentially, an inexpensive model combination capacitive humidity instrument (CS500 or HMP50, or for improved results a slightly more expensive model (HMP35C or HMP45C, could substitute for the more expensive dewpoint hygrometer. In a field study, in a mesic grassland, the water vapour pressure measurement noise for the combination capacitive humidity instruments was greater than that for the dewpoint hygrometer. The average water vapour pressure profile difference measured using a HMP45C was highly correlated with that from a dewpoint hygrometer with a slope less than unity. Water vapour pressure measurements using the capacitive humidity instruments were not as accurate, compared to those obtained using a dewpoint hygrometer, but the resolution magnitudes for the

  16. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    M. R. Canagaratna

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C, hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C, organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC, and carbon oxidation state (OSC for a vastly expanded laboratory dataset of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard dataset, the "Aiken-Explicit" method (Aiken et al., 2008, which uses experimentally measured ion intensities at all ions to determine elemental ratios, reproduces known molecular O : C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors and 12% respectively. The more commonly used "Aiken-Ambient" method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions, reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28% and 14% of known values. These values are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMS-vacuum ultraviolet (VUV ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 °C. Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 °C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method reduces the systematic biases and reproduces O : C (H : C ratios of individual oxidized standards within 28% (13

  17. Laser Anemometer Measurements of the Flow Field in a 4:1 Pressure Ratio Centrifugal Impeller

    Skoch, G. J.; Prahst, P. S.; Wernet, M. P.; Wood, J. R.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    A laser-doppler anemometer was used to obtain flow-field velocity measurements in a 4:1 pressure ratio, 4.54 kg/s (10 lbm/s), centrifugal impeller, with splitter blades and backsweep, which was configured with a vaneless diffuser. Measured through-flow velocities are reported for ten quasi-orthogonal survey planes at locations ranging from 1% to 99% of main blade chord. Measured through-flow velocities are compared to those predicted by a 3-D viscous steady flow analysis (Dawes) code. The measurements show the development and progression through the impeller and vaneless diffuser of a through-flow velocity deficit which results from the tip clearance flow and accumulation of low momentum fluid centrifuged from the blade and hub surfaces. Flow traces from the CFD analysis show the origin of this deficit which begins to grow in the inlet region of the impeller where it is first detected near the suction surface side of the passage. It then moves toward the pressure side of the channel, due to the movement of tip clearance flow across the impeller passage, where it is cut by the splitter blade leading edge. As blade loading increases toward the rear of the channel the deficit region is driven back toward the suction surface by the cross-passage pressure gradient. There is no evidence of a large wake region that might result from flow separation and the impeller efficiency is relatively high. The flow field in this impeller is quite similar to that documented previously by NASA Lewis in a large low-speed backswept impeller.

  18. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  19. Regional CO2 fluxes inferred from mixing ratio measurements: estimates from flask air samples in central Kansas, USA

    Lai, Chun-Ta; Schauer, Andrew J.; Owensby, Clenton; Ham, Hay M.; Helliker, Brent; Tans, Pieter P.; Ehleringer, James R

    2011-01-01

    We estimated regional fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) using mixing ratios measured in a tallgrass prairie in central Kansas, USA over 3 yr (2002–2004). Glass flasks were used to collect whole air samples in the midafternoon for determining CO2 mixing ratios and their carbon isotopic composition. Regional CO2 fluxes were calculated assuming atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) approaches an equilibrium state on a monthly basis. CO2 mixing ratios derived from the marine boundary layer data were used...

  20. Measurement of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O at nanomolar amounts using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS)

    Patel, A; Downie, S.; Webster, E.; Hopkins, D.W.; Rennie, M.J. [Univ. of Dundee (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-01

    We are currently developing methods using Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) in conjunction with a thermal desorption purification unit to measure nanomolar levels of C0{sub 2} and N{sub 2}0. Samples of the pure gases diluted in He/air and transferred to septum capped Exetainers (Labco) provided a simple means to investigate the technique. We analyzed C0{sub 2} at natural abundance in the concentration range 50 to 5 nmoles and N{sub 2}0 at two concentrations between 25 and 5 nmoles. The technique was then used to measure C0{sub 2} (natural abundance and {sup 13}C-labeled) generated from the ninhydrin reaction. The results are summarized in a table; values are expressed in delta {sup 13}C notation relative to Pee Dee Belemnite. The data show that, provided care is taken to minimize or eliminate sources of contamination (air leaks, etc.), CF-IRMS coupled with a thermal desorption unit permits measurement of {sup 13}C enrichment in much smaller amounts of isolated amino acids than has been possible until now. The new methodology, including thermal desorption, should allow stable-isotope investigations on much smaller samples than are possible with other currently available techniques-while maintaining high precision.

  1. Improved environmental and forensics measurements using multiple ion counters in isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    A new detector system designed for isotope ratio mass spectrometers provides improved precision on measurements of samples with very low amounts (-11 g) of analyte. An array of continuous dynode electron multipliers has been installed on a new ThermoFinnigan MAT Triton thermal ionization mass spectrometer acquired by the New Brunswick Laboratory. These ion counters are modifications of miniaturized, commercially available continuous dynode electron multipliers. They can be readily installed to replace individual Faraday cups in a multidetector mass spectrometer or bundled together and located along the detector plane with a set of Faraday cups. On the New Brunswick Laboratory mass spectrometer, nine Faraday cups, one conventional discrete dynode electron multiplier and seven miniaturized ion counters were installed. The size of the miniaturized ion counters is identical to the standard Faraday cups, and thus the ion counters can be aligned with unit mass spacing for the measurement of high mass elements such as uranium and plutonium. Six of the small ion counters were bundled together and positioned on the low mass side of the Low 4 Faraday cup. One additional ion counter was positioned on the high mass side of the Low 4 Faraday cup. This arrangement allows simultaneous measurement of either all uranium (including 233U) or plutonium (including 244Pu) isotopes, also a combination of the two, and allows the measurement of larger 238U intensities on the Faraday cup, if needed. Compensation for small mass dispersion differences at unit mass spacing of uranium, plutonium or other actinides with slightly different masses is readily achieved by the use of a mass dispersion zoom lens. The advantage of multiple ion counting is the simultaneous collection of isotopes. It overcomes many of the problems such as transient signal variation in sample emission and ionization, which would significantly reduce the attainable precision of a single collector measurement. For a given

  2. Measurement of Pi-K Ratios from the NuMI Target

    Seun, Sin Man; /Harvard U.

    2007-07-01

    Interactions of protons (p) with the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) target are used to create the neutrino beam for the MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) Experiment. Using the MIPP (Main Injector Particle Production) experimental apparatus, the production of charged pions and kaons in p+NuMI interactions is studied. The data come from a sample of 2 x 10{sup 6} events obtained by MIPP using the 120 GeV/c proton beam from the Main Injector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, USA. Pions and kaons are identified by measurement in a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Presented are measurements of {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +}, K{sup -}/K{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}/K{sup +} and {pi}{sup -}/K{sup -} production ratios in the momentum range p{sub T} < 2 GeV/c transversely and 20 GeV/c < p{sub z} < 90 GeV/c longitudinally. Also provided are detailed comparisons of the MIPP NuMI data with the MIPP Thin Carbon data, the MIPP Monte Carlo simulation and the current MINOS models in the relevant momentum ranges.

  3. Shock tube measurements of the branching ratios of propene + OH -> products

    Khaled, Fathi

    2014-07-25

    Absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radical with propene (C3H6) and five deutrated isotopes, propene-1-d1 (CDHCHCH3), propene-1,1-d2 (CD2CHCH3), propene-2-d1 (CH2CDCH3), propene-3,3,3-d3 (CH2CHCD3), and propene-d6 (C3D6), were measured in a shock tube behind reflected shock conditions over the temperature range of 812 K – 1460 K and pressures near 1 atm. The reaction progress was followed by monitoring OH radical near 306.7 nm using UV laser absorption. The first experimental measurements for the branching ratio of the title reaction are reported and compared with theoretical calculations. The allylic H atom abstraction of propene by OH radicals was found to be the most dominant reaction pathway followed by propen-1-yl and propen-2-yl channels over the entire temperature range of this study which is in line with theoretical predictions. Arrhenius parameters for various site-specific rate coefficients are provided for kinetic modeling.

  4. Measurement and study on signal-to-noise ratio of a spaceborne camera

    Chen, Yuheng; Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Shen, Weimin

    2011-11-01

    The developed spaceborne camera is an exclusive functional load of a micro satellite. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reflects its radiance response and is the parameter that directly associates with the quality of its acquired images. The SNR determination task of the spaceborne camera mainly consists of two parts: As is reported before firstly the spatial environment is simulated and the atmosphere transmission mode is built with MODTRAN to calculate and predict the SNR of the speceborne camera under aerial working condition. In this paper, the in-lab measuring experiment is carried out to measure the theoretical imaging performance of the camera before its aerial use. An integrating sphere is utilized to supply well-proportioned illumination, and a number of images are acquired by the spaceborne camera under different luminance conditions. The images are processed in use of certain algorithm and a special filter to extract the noise. The SNRs corresponding to different illumination conditions are calculated so that full-scale radiance response feature of the camera can be gained. The dynamic range is another parameter that characterizes the imaging capacity of a camera. The relationship between dynamic range and SNR of a camera is to be explored in this paper. Different dynamic configurations are set and the SNRs of different dynamic range configurations are tested, which experimentally reveals the dynamic range's influence on SNR.

  5. Multi-Element Abundance Measurements from Medium-Resolution Spectra. III. Metallicity Distributions of Milky Way Dwarf Satellite Galaxies

    Kirby, Evan N; Simon, Joshua D; Cohen, Judith G; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2010-01-01

    We present metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) for the central regions of eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way: Fornax, Leo I and II, Sculptor, Sextans, Draco, Canes Venatici I, and Ursa Minor. We use the published catalog of abundance measurements from the previous paper in this series. The measurements are based on spectral synthesis of iron absorption lines. For each MDF, we determine maximum likelihood fits for Leaky Box, Pre-Enriched, and Extra Gas (wherein the gas supply available for star formation increases before it decreases to zero) analytic models of chemical evolution. Although the models are too simplistic to describe any MDF in detail, a Leaky Box starting from zero metallicity gas fits none of the galaxies except Canes Venatici I well. The MDFs of some galaxies, particularly the more luminous ones, strongly prefer the Extra Gas Model to the other models. Only for Canes Venatici I does the Pre-Enriched Model fit significantly better than the Extra Gas Model. The best-fit effect...

  6. Solar System Abundances of the Elements

    Lodders, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Representative abundances of the chemical elements for use as a solar abundance standard in astronomical and planetary studies are summarized. Updated abundance tables for solar system abundances based on meteorites and photospheric measurements are presented.

  7. Signal Processing for the Measurement of the Deuterium/Hydrogen Ratio in the Local Interstellar Medium

    Diego Francisco Rodríguez Moreno

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on a comprehensive signal processing procedure for very low signal levels for the measurement of neutral deuterium in the local interstellar medium from a spacecraft in Earth orbit. The deuterium measurements were performed with the IBEX-Lo camera on NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX satellite. Our analysis technique for these data consists of creating a mass relation in three-dimensional time of flight space to accurately determine the position of the predicted D events, to precisely model the tail of the H events in the region where the H tail events are near the expected D events, and then to separate the H tail from the observations to extract the very faint D signal. This interstellar D signal, which is expected to be a few counts per year, is extracted from a strong terrestrial background signal, consisting of sputter products from the sensor’s conversion surface. As reference we accurately measure the terrestrial D/H ratio in these sputtered products and then discriminate this terrestrial background source. During the three years of the mission time when the deuterium signal was visible to IBEX, the observation geometry and orbit allowed for a total observation time of 115.3 days. Because of the spinning of the spacecraft and the stepping through eight energy channels the actual observing time of the interstellar wind was only 1.44 days. With the optimised data analysis we found three counts that could be attributed to interstellar deuterium. These results update our earlier work.

  8. Accuracy of Linear Depolarisation Ratios in Clean Air Ranges Measured with POLIS-6 at 355 and 532 NM

    Freudenthaler Volker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear depolarization ratios in clean air ranges were measured with POLIS-6 at 355 and 532 nm. The mean deviation from the theoretical values, including the rotational Raman lines within the filter bandwidths, amounts to 0.0005 at 355 nm and to 0.0012 at 532 nm. The mean uncertainty of the measured linear depolarization ratio of clean air is about 0.0005 at 355 nm and about 0.0006 at 532 nm.

  9. Precision measurement of the branching ratio K+→π+π0/K+→μ+νμ

    A measurement of the branching ratio K+→π+π0/K+→μ+νμ was made using stopped kaons from p bar p annihilations at rest and a magnetic spectrometer to measure the momenta of the charged decay product to the 1% to 1.5% level. The determination is based on 45 500 events passing final data cuts. The resulting ratio is 0.3329±0.0047 (statistical) ±0.0010 (systematic)

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in-cylinder equivalence ratio measurements in laser-ignited natural gas engines.

    Joshi, Sachin; Olsen, Daniel B; Dumitrescu, Cosmin; Puzinauskas, Paulius V; Yalin, Azer P

    2009-05-01

    In this contribution we present the first demonstration of simultaneous use of laser sparks for engine ignition and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements of in-cylinder equivalence ratios. A 1064 nm neodynium yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam is used with an optical spark plug to ignite a single cylinder natural gas engine. The optical emission from the combustion initiating laser spark is collected through the optical spark plug and cycle-by-cycle spectra are analyzed for H(alpha)(656 nm), O(777 nm), and N(742 nm, 744 nm, and 746 nm) neutral atomic lines. The line area ratios of H(alpha)/O(777), H(alpha)/N(746), and H(alpha)/N(tot) (where N(tot) is the sum of areas of the aforementioned N lines) are correlated with equivalence ratios measured by a wide band universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor. Experiments are performed for input laser energy levels of 21 mJ and 26 mJ, compression ratios of 9 and 11, and equivalence ratios between 0.6 and 0.95. The results show a linear correlation (R(2) > 0.99) of line intensity ratio with equivalence ratio, thereby suggesting an engine diagnostic method for cylinder resolved equivalence ratio measurements. PMID:19470212

  11. Measurements of water vapor D/H ratios from Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and implications for subtropical humidity dynamics

    Galewsky, Joseph; Strong, Mel; Sharp, Zachary D.

    2007-11-01

    Water vapor D/H ratios were measured from samples collected on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, in July 2006, and provide new constraints on the processes that control subtropical humidity. D/H ratios ranged from -88‰ at sea level to -321‰ on the summit of Mauna Kea, with sharply decreased D/H ratios above the trade inversion. A simple Rayleigh distillation model underpredicts the observed clear-sky D/H ratios by as much as 160‰ at the summit. A model that accounts for large-scale condensation, fractionation, mixing, and transport of water vapor, but ignores more detailed microphysical processes, is able to reproduce the first-order characteristics of the clear-sky free troposphere relative humidity and D/H ratios. These results are consistent with remote sensing studies of subtropical D/H ratios and suggest that subtropical clear-sky water vapor isotopologues may be relatively insensitive to microphysical processes.

  12. Measurement of the lifetime ratio τ(B+)/τ(B0)

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II the ratio of semileptonic branching ratios of B+ and B0 mesons has been determined by comparing the yields of anti D0, D-, and D*(2010)- mesons in semileptonic B decays. We derive the lifetime ratio τ(B+)/τ(B0)=1.00±0.23±0.14. (orig.)

  13. Are All Measures of International Reserves Created Equal? An Empirical Comparison of International Reserve Ratios

    Cheung, Yin-Wong; Yuk-Pang Wong, Clement

    2008-01-01

    Using available annual data of 174 economies since 1957, we examine the similarities and differences of seven international reserve ratios. While individual international reserve ratios display substantial variations across economies, they are associated with an economy?s characteristics including geographic location, income level, stage of development, degree of indebtedness, and exchange rate regime. The association pattern varies across time and type of international reserve ratios. Intere...

  14. Financial Ratios as Performance Measure: A Comparison of IFRS and Nigerian GAAP

    Zayyad Abdul-Baki; Ahmad Bukola Uthman; Mubaraq Sanni

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of IFRS adoption on the performance evaluation of a case firm using some financial ratios selected from four major categories of financial ratios. The study was conducted through comparison of the ratios that were computed from IFRS based financial statements and Nigerian GAAP based financial statements. A One-Sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test was conducted to test for data normality. Mann-Whitney U test was employed in testing whether significant difference exists...

  15. Measurement system analysis (MSA) of the isotopic ratio for uranium isotope enrichment process control

    Currently, one of the stages in nuclear fuel cycle development is the process of uranium isotope enrichment, which will provide the amount of low enriched uranium for the nuclear fuel production to supply 100% Angra 1 and 20% Angra 2 demands. Determination of isotopic ration n(235U)/n(238U) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6 - used as process gas) is essential in order to control of enrichment process of isotopic separation by gaseous centrifugation cascades. The uranium hexafluoride process is performed by gas continuous feeding in separation unit which uses the centrifuge force principle, establishing a density gradient in a gas containing components of different molecular weights. The elemental separation effect occurs in a single ultracentrifuge that results in a partial separation of the feed in two fractions: an enriched on (product) and another depleted (waste) in the desired isotope (235UF6). Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB) has used quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) by electron impact (EI) to perform isotopic ratio n(235U)/n(238U) analysis in the process. The decision of adjustments and change te input variables are based on the results presented in these analysis. A study of stability, bias and linearity determination has been performed in order to evaluate the applied method, variations and systematic errors in the measurement system. The software used to analyze the techniques above was the Minitab 15. (author)

  16. Self-to-other ratios measured in an opera chorus in performance

    Ternström, Sten; Cabrera, Densil; Davis, Pamela

    2005-12-01

    Four volunteer members of the chorus of Opera Australia, representing four different voice categories, wore binaural pairs of wireless microphones during a penultimate dress rehearsal on the Opera Theater stage of the Sydney Opera House. From the recordings, data were obtained on sound levels and on the self-to-other ratios (SORs). The sound levels were comparable to those found in loud music in chamber choir performance. The average SOR ranged from +10 to +15 dB. Compared to chamber choirs in other types of room, the SOR values were high. On a separate occasion, the stage support parameters ST1 (early reflections) and ST2 (late reflections) were measured over the whole stage area. ST1 was about -16 dB, which is typical for opera stages, and -20 dB for ST2, which is unusually low. It is concluded that the SOR in the opera chorus depends mostly on choir formation, which is highly variable, and that an opera chorus artist generally can hear his or her own voice very well, but little of the others and of the orchestra. This was confirmed by informal listening to the recordings.

  17. Measurement of the optimum surround ratio inducing the highest perceived image contrast

    Baek, Ye Seul; Kim, Youn Jin; Kim, Hong-Suk; Park, Seung-Ok

    2010-10-01

    Much research has shown that perceived image contrast increases as the surround luminance increases, but a number of recent studies reported opposite trends under higher surround luminance levels. We measured the change in perceived image contrast under a wide range of surround luminance levels covering from dark up to 2087 cd/m2. A large-area illuminator was used to illuminate the surround. It consists of 23 dimmable fluorescent lamps and a diffuser. Its maximum luminance is 2087 cd/m2 and could be adjusted to six lower levels. A set of paired comparison experiments was conducted to compare the perception of image contrast under seven different surround luminance levels. The results showed that the perceived image contrast varies with surround luminance and the maximum perceived image contrast is found near a surround ratio (SR) of 1. As SR increases from 0 to 1, the z score is increased, which can be fully expected by the Bartleson and Breneman effect. However, it is drastically decreased in the region of SR > 1; thus, the perceived image contrast is eventually decreased.

  18. Application of a widely tunable near-infrared laser instrument for stable isotope ratio measurements

    Full text: In this paper, we report on the development and the application of a widely tunable near-infrared laser spectrometer for trace gas and isotope analysis. The spectrometer was based on fiber-coupled continuous-wave (cw) Telecom external cavity laser (ECDL, Tunics Plus) that is continuously tunable from 1500 to 1640 nm (C and L band) with an output power up to 3 mW and a tuning resolution of 0.001 nm (∼ 4 x 10-3 cm-1). The effective laser linewidth is less than 1 MHz. A multipass cell (New Focus - model 5612) in Herriott configuration with an optical path of 100 m was used to enhance the detection sensitivity. The developed instrument has been used for isotopic composition analysis in woodbased combustion emission and in human breath. In a wood-based combustion, the measured 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 emission is found to be (1.1011 ± 0.0040) % for the full burn operation regime. The corresponding value relative to PDB standard is (-20.17 ± 3.53) %o that is in good agreement with the typical value of (-25 ± 2) %o for wood. (author)

  19. Alternatives to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the measurement of deuterium content of body water

    The measurement of breast milk intake using the isotope dilution techniques is now well established. The methodology involves the administration of a bolus of tracer followed by observation of the kinetics of its passage though the system. For example in the popular 'dose to the mother' method a dose of labeled water is administered to the mother, and over the following days samples of body fluids are taken and the concentration of tracer determined in order to establish the rate of loss of tracer from her body. Likewise samples are taken from the breast fed infant in order to determine the rates of tracer intake and subsequent loss. Deuterium is the tracer of choice for these experiments since it is non-radioactive, and therefore suitable for use in these vulnerable subject groups, and also because of its relative cheapness. Conventionally isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been used for the determination of the amount of deuterium in the body fluids. However this methodology is expensive (an instrument might typically cost US$ 150,000), and it requires a considerable amount of dedicated technical expertise for its operation. Consequently such instrumentation is not widely available, and this has limited the number and scope of studies using this technique. Recently there have been reports of possible alternative technologies for the determination of deuterium in body water which appear attractive because of the wider general availability of the equipment required. It is the purpose of this report to assess these reported methods for their suitability for breast milk intake measurements

  20. Measurement of $B_s^0 \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ Branching Ratios

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-04-01

    The decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}s are reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. All decay modes are observed with a significance of more than 10 {sigma}, and we measure the B{sub s}{sup 0} production rate times B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching ratios relative to the normalization mode B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}d{sup -} to be 0.183 {+-} 0.021 {+-} 0.017 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, 0.424 {+-} 0.046 {+-} 0.035 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {+-}} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}, 0.654 {+-} 0.072 {+-} 0.065 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *+} D{sub s}{sup *-}, and 1.261 {+-} 0.095 {+-} 0.112 for the inclusive decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. These results are the most precise single measurements to date and provide important constraints for indirect searches for non-standard model physics in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  1. Measurement and Study of Lidar Ratio by Using a Raman Lidar in Central China

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Wei; Mao, Feiyue; Pan, Zengxin; Liu, Boming

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively evaluated particle lidar ratios (i.e., particle extinction to backscatter ratio) at 532 nm over Wuhan in Central China by using a Raman lidar from July 2013 to May 2015. We utilized the Raman lidar data to obtain homogeneous aerosol lidar ratios near the surface through the Raman method during no-rain nights. The lidar ratios were approximately 57 ± 7 sr, 50 ± 5 sr, and 22 ± 4 sr under the three cases with obviously different pollution levels. The haze layer below 1.8 km has a large particle extinction coefficient (from 5.4e-4 m−1 to 1.6e-4 m−1) and particle backscatter coefficient (between 1.1e-05 m−1sr−1 and 1.7e-06 m−1sr−1) in the heavily polluted case. Furthermore, the particle lidar ratios varied according to season, especially between winter (57 ± 13 sr) and summer (33 ± 10 sr). The seasonal variation in lidar ratios at Wuhan suggests that the East Asian monsoon significantly affects the primary aerosol types and aerosol optical properties in this region. The relationships between particle lidar ratios and wind indicate that large lidar ratio values correspond well with weak winds and strong northerly winds, whereas significantly low lidar ratio values are associated with prevailing southwesterly and southerly wind. PMID:27213414

  2. Measurement and Study of Lidar Ratio by Using a Raman Lidar in Central China.

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Wei; Mao, Feiyue; Pan, Zengxin; Liu, Boming

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively evaluated particle lidar ratios (i.e., particle extinction to backscatter ratio) at 532 nm over Wuhan in Central China by using a Raman lidar from July 2013 to May 2015. We utilized the Raman lidar data to obtain homogeneous aerosol lidar ratios near the surface through the Raman method during no-rain nights. The lidar ratios were approximately 57 ± 7 sr, 50 ± 5 sr, and 22 ± 4 sr under the three cases with obviously different pollution levels. The haze layer below 1.8 km has a large particle extinction coefficient (from 5.4e-4 m(-1) to 1.6e-4 m(-1)) and particle backscatter coefficient (between 1.1e-05 m(-1)sr(-1) and 1.7e-06 m(-1)sr(-1)) in the heavily polluted case. Furthermore, the particle lidar ratios varied according to season, especially between winter (57 ± 13 sr) and summer (33 ± 10 sr). The seasonal variation in lidar ratios at Wuhan suggests that the East Asian monsoon significantly affects the primary aerosol types and aerosol optical properties in this region. The relationships between particle lidar ratios and wind indicate that large lidar ratio values correspond well with weak winds and strong northerly winds, whereas significantly low lidar ratio values are associated with prevailing southwesterly and southerly wind. PMID:27213414

  3. Abundance Constraints and Direct Redshift Measurement of the Diffuse X-ray Emission from a Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    Hashimoto, Y; Böhringer, H; Fabian, A C; Hasinger, G; Mainieri, V; Brunner, H; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Barcons, Xavier; Boehringer, Hans; Fabian, Andrew C.; Hasinger, Guenther; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Brunner, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    We report on the XMM-Newton (XMM) observation of RXJ1053.7+5735, one of the most distant X-ray selected clusters of galaxies, which also shows an unusual double-lobed X-ray morphology, indicative of a possible equal-mass cluster merger. The cluster was discovered during the ROSAT deep pointings in the direction of the Lockman Hole. All XMM Lockman Hole observations (PV, AO-1 & AO-2 phases) with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) were combined for the analysis, totaling exposure times ~ 648 ks, 738 ks, and 758 ks for pn, MOS1, and MOS2, respectively. With this 'deep' dataset, we could detect the Fe K line and obtain a strong constraint on cluster metallicity, which is difficult to achieve for clusters at z > 1. The best-fit abundance is 0.46 +0.11/-0.07 times the solar value. The Fe line emission also allows us to directly estimate the redshift of diffuse gas, with a value z = 1.14 +0.01/-0.01. This is one of the first clusters whose X-ray redshift is directly measured prior to the secure knowledge ...

  4. High Redshift Intergalactic C IV Abundance Measurements from the Near-Infrared Spectra of Two z~6 QSOs

    Simcoe, R A

    2006-01-01

    New measurements of the z~6 intergalactic CIV abundance are presented, using moderate resolution IR spectra of two QSOs taken with GNIRS on Gemini South. These data were systematically searched for high redshift CIV absorption lines, using objective selection criteria. Comprehensive tests were performed to quantify sample incompleteness, as well as the rate of false positive CIV identifications. The trend of constant $\\Omega_{CIV}(z)$ observed at z~2-5 appears to continue to z~6, the highest observed redshift. The CIV sample is also consistent with the redshift-invariant form of the CIV column density distribution reported by Songaila (2001) at lower redshift, although with fairly large uncertainties due to a smaller sample size and noisier infrared data. The constant value of $\\Omega_{CIV}$ does not necessarily imply that the IGM was infused with an early metallicity ``floor,'' but the presence of early CIV does indicate that heavy-element enrichment began < 1 Gyr after the Big Bang. The lack of a decline...

  5. How can a cost/benefit ratio be optimized for an output measurement program of external photon radiotherapy beams?

    We estimated cost/benefit ratios for different quality control programs of radiation output measurements of medical linear accelerators. The cost/benefit ratios of quality control (QC) programs (a combination of output measurement time interval and measurement action levels) were defined as workload divided by achievable dose accuracy. Dose accuracy was assumed to be inversely proportional to the 99% confidence limit of shifts of total treatment doses and workload as inversely proportional to the output measurement time interval. Our previously reported method was used to estimate the distribution of shifts of total treatment doses due to changes in accelerator radiation output (Gy/MU). The confidence limits of dose shifts were estimated for different QC programs and for different levels of output measurement reproducibility. Output shifts used in the estimations had previously been observed for four linear accelerators over 5 years. We observed that the cost/benefit ratio increases remarkably when the output measurement time interval is less than 1 month. The ratio depends strongly on the action levels and reproducibility of the QC measurements. Improvement of these factors optimizes the cost/benefit ratio by a factor of several times. The most cost-effective output measurement time interval to achieve 99% confidence limits of ±2, ±2.5 or ±3% for dose shifts ranged from 0.25 month to as much as 6 months depending on the factors given above and the intended accuracy level. It is several times more cost effective to increase dose accuracy by lowering the action levels of the QC measurements and by attempting to improve their reproducibility than by simply shortening the time interval of the output measurements. Methods improving utilization and interpretation of the results of the QC measurements play a key role in further optimization of cost/benefit ratios in dosimetric QC.

  6. A SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ASSAY TO MEASURE RUBISCO ACTIVASE ACTIVATION ACTIVITY UNDER VARYING ATP:ADP RATIOS

    The ratio of ATP to ADP in the stroma is an important regulatory mechanism for controlling the activation state of Rubisco via Rubisco activase (activase). Understanding the response of activase to a varying ATP:ADP ratio should reveal insights into the regulation of photosynthesis. However, the cur...

  7. Measurement of the 3d→2p resonance to intercombination line-intensity ratio in neonlike Fe XVII

    Measurements of the 3d→2p resonance and intercombination lines were made on the PLT tokamak for the neonlike ions Fe XVII, Ge XXIII, and Se XXV at several electron temperatures. The observed ratios agree with measurements of the ratios of the electron-impact excitation cross sections measured at the Livermore EBIT-II electron beam ion trap indicating that the effects of indirect excitation processes active in a plasma environment are minor for this line pair. However, the measured ratios are significantly smaller than theoretical predictions of their relative oscillator strengths or electron-impact excitation rates, illustrating the need to use laboratory measurements to calibrate this line pair at the level necessary for spectral diagnostics

  8. Measurement of the 3d{yields}2p resonance to intercombination line-intensity ratio in neonlike Fe XVII

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Thorn, D. B.

    2001-09-01

    Measurements of the 3d{yields}2p resonance and intercombination lines were made on the PLT tokamak for the neonlike ions Fe XVII, Ge XXIII, and Se XXV at several electron temperatures. The observed ratios agree with measurements of the ratios of the electron-impact excitation cross sections measured at the Livermore EBIT-II electron beam ion trap indicating that the effects of indirect excitation processes active in a plasma environment are minor for this line pair. However, the measured ratios are significantly smaller than theoretical predictions of their relative oscillator strengths or electron-impact excitation rates, illustrating the need to use laboratory measurements to calibrate this line pair at the level necessary for spectral diagnostics.

  9. On the cross-sensitivity between water vapor mixing ratio and stable isotope measurements of in-situ analyzers

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing amount of water vapor stable isotope data collected using in-situ instrumentation. A number of papers have characterized the performance of these in-situ analyzers and suggested methods for calibrating raw measurements. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic measurements on the mixing ratio has been shown to be a major uncertainty and a variety of techniques have been suggested to characterize this inaccuracy. However, most of these are based on relating isotopic ratios to water vapor mixing ratios from in-situ analyzers when the mixing ratio is varied and the isotopic composition kept constant. An additional correction for the span of the isotopic ratio scale is then applied by measuring different isotopic standards. Here we argue that the water vapor cross-sensitivity arises from different instrument responses (span and offset) of the parent H2O isotope and the heavier isotopes, rather than spectral overlap that could cause a true variation in the isotopic ratio with mixing ratio. This is especially relevant for commercial laser optical instruments where absorption lines are well resolved. Thus, the cross-sensitivity determined using more conventional techniques is dependent on the isotopic ratio of the standard used for the characterization, although errors are expected to be small. Consequently, the cross-sensitivity should be determined by characterizing the span and zero offset of each isotope mixing ratio. In fact, this technique makes the span correction for the isotopic ratio redundant. In this work we model the impact of changes in the span and offset of the heavy and light isotopes and illustrate the impact on the cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor. This clearly shows the importance of determining the zero offset for the two isotopes. The cross-sensitivity of the isotopic ratios on water vapor is then characterized by determining the instrument response for the individual isotopes for a

  10. Site-selective nitrogen isotopic ratio measurement of nitrous oxide using a TE-cooled CW-RT-QCL based spectrometer.

    Li, Jingsong; Zhang, Lizhu; Yu, Benli

    2014-12-10

    The feasibility of laser spectroscopic isotopic composition measurements of atmospheric N2O was demonstrated, although making them useful will require further improvements. The system relies on a thermoelectrically (TE) cooled continuous-wave (CW) room temperature (RT) quantum cascade laser source emitting wavelength of around 4.6μm, where strong fundamental absorption bands occur for the considered specie and its isotopomers. The analysis technique is based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection and the combination of long-path absorption cell. Primary laboratory tests have been performed to estimate the achievable detection limits and the signal reproducibility levels in view of possible measurements of (15)N/(14)N and (18)O/(16)O isotope ratios. The experiment results showed that the site-selective (15)N/(14)N ratio can be measured with a precision of 3‰ with 90s averaging time using natural-abundance N2O sample of 12.7ppm. PMID:24973790

  11. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy of stable isotopic tracers - Detection and measurement of relative abundance of isotopic carbon monoxide

    A molecular absorption system using a tunable diode laser and a dual path length sample cell for stable isotopic tracer analysis has been developed. The high spectral resolution and power density of the laser allow real-time simultaneous detection of different isotopes with great specificity. And, the matched absorption path length cell simplifies signal processing and improves the accuracy in quantitative measurement by maintaining the same signal to noise ratio for vastly different isotopic concentrations. The principle and operation of the system are described using isotopic oxygen analysis in carbon monoxide as an illustrative example. The method is applicable to any sample that is or can be converted into an infrared active gas. 8 refs.; 4 figs

  12. Magnetization transfer ratio measurements of the brain in children with tuberous sclerosis complex

    Magnetization transfer contrast and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in brain are mainly related to the presence of myelin. Neuropathological studies of brain lesions in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) have demonstrated disordered myelin sheaths. To evaluate the MTR of the brain in children with TSC and to compare with that in controls. Four patients (aged 0.41-8.4 years, mean 2.5 years) with TSC and four age- and sex-matched controls were evaluated with classic MR sequences and with a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence without and with magnetization transfer pre-pulse. The MTR was calculated as: (SI0-SIm)/SI0 x 100%, where SIm refers to signal intensity from an image acquired with a magnetization transfer pre-pulse and SI0 the signal intensity from the image acquired without a magnetization transfer pre-pulse. The MTR values of cortical tubers (44.1±4.1), of subependymal nodules (51.6±4.8) and of white matter lesions (52.4±1.8) were significantly lower than those of cortex (58.7±3.53), of basal ganglia (caudate nucleus 58.2±2.8, putamen 59.6±2.5, thalamus 61.3±2.4) and of white matter (64.2±2.5) in controls (P<0.001). The MTR of normal-appearing white matter (61.2±3.0) in patients was lower than that of white matter in controls (P<0.01). The MTR of cortex and basal ganglia in patients was not significantly different from that in controls. MTR measurements not only provide semiquantitative information for TSC lesions but also reveal more extensive disease. (orig.)

  13. Magnetization transfer ratio measurements of the brain in children with tuberous sclerosis complex

    Zikou, Anastasia; Ioannidou, Maria-Christina; Astrakas, Loukas; Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Tzoufi, Meropi [University of Ioannina, Child Health Department, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2005-11-01

    Magnetization transfer contrast and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in brain are mainly related to the presence of myelin. Neuropathological studies of brain lesions in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) have demonstrated disordered myelin sheaths. To evaluate the MTR of the brain in children with TSC and to compare with that in controls. Four patients (aged 0.41-8.4 years, mean 2.5 years) with TSC and four age- and sex-matched controls were evaluated with classic MR sequences and with a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence without and with magnetization transfer pre-pulse. The MTR was calculated as: (SI{sub 0}-SI{sub m})/SI{sub 0} x 100%, where SI{sub m} refers to signal intensity from an image acquired with a magnetization transfer pre-pulse and SI{sub 0} the signal intensity from the image acquired without a magnetization transfer pre-pulse. The MTR values of cortical tubers (44.1{+-}4.1), of subependymal nodules (51.6{+-}4.8) and of white matter lesions (52.4{+-}1.8) were significantly lower than those of cortex (58.7{+-}3.53), of basal ganglia (caudate nucleus 58.2{+-}2.8, putamen 59.6{+-}2.5, thalamus 61.3{+-}2.4) and of white matter (64.2{+-}2.5) in controls (P<0.001). The MTR of normal-appearing white matter (61.2{+-}3.0) in patients was lower than that of white matter in controls (P<0.01). The MTR of cortex and basal ganglia in patients was not significantly different from that in controls. MTR measurements not only provide semiquantitative information for TSC lesions but also reveal more extensive disease. (orig.)

  14. Preliminary Figures of Merit for Isotope Ratio Measurements: The Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Ionization Source Coupled to an Orbitrap Mass Analyzer

    Hoegg, Edward D.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Owing to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for Orbitrap analyzers are well-documented, no detailed evaluations of the IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LS-APGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of Orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the Orbitrap sampling interface, high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases, the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (<0.1% isotope fractions). In the best case, IR precision on the order of 0.1% RSD can be achieved, with values of 1%-3% RSD observed for low-abundance species. The results suggest that the LS-APGD is a promising candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the Orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision IRs.

  15. Preliminary Figures of Merit for Isotope Ratio Measurements: The Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma Ionization Source Coupled to an Orbitrap Mass Analyzer

    Hoegg, Edward D.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Owing to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for Orbitrap analyzers are well-documented, no detailed evaluations of the IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LS-APGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of Orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the Orbitrap sampling interface, high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases, the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (<0.1% isotope fractions). In the best case, IR precision on the order of 0.1% RSD can be achieved, with values of 1%-3% RSD observed for low-abundance species. The results suggest that the LS-APGD is a promising candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the Orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision IRs.

  16. Dependence of the measured 38Ar/36Ar ratio on the total Ar amount and its implications

    The sensitivity of a mass spectrometer for different isotopes of an element usually is not the same and causes a systematic difference between measured and actual isotopic ratios and is defined as mass discrimination. In noble gas mass spectrometry, the correction factor for mass discrimination can be calculated using a reference gas (air in most cases) with known isotopic composition. The mass discrimination factor (mdf) is defined as the ratio of true isotopic ratio to the measured isotopic ratio. Usually, mdf values, determined using argon in air as standard, are nearly constant for a given element over long periods of time. Both mass discrimination and sensitivity remain the same over a certain range of total pressure in the mass spectrometer, during the measurement of a given gas. For the case of Xe, Kr and Ne, in general, the total gas pressure in the mass spectrometer during the analysis of a sample gas falls within this range and consequently, a fixed value of sensitivity and mdf are used. But in the case of argon and particularly in certain cases (like in ureilites), this may not be true as we deal with samples having a wide range of 40Ar/36Ar ratios (10-3 to 104). It was noticed that the values for 38Ar/36Ar in ureilites (having 40Ar/36Ar 40Ar/36Ar = 295.5. This was the motivation for investigating the pressure effect on the measured ratio of 38Ar/36Ar

  17. Reducing and correcting for contamination of ecosystem water stable isotopes measured by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy.

    Schmidt, Markus; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Lett, Céline; Biron, Philippe; Richard, Patricia; Bariac, Thierry; Seibt, Ulli

    2012-01-30

    Concern exists about the suitability of laser spectroscopic instruments for the measurement of the (18)O/(16)O and (2)H/(1)H values of liquid samples other than pure water. It is possible to derive erroneous isotope values due to optical interference by certain organic compounds, including some commonly present in ecosystem-derived samples such as leaf or soil waters. Here we investigated the reliability of wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) (18)O/(16)O and (2)H/(1)H measurements from a range of ecosystem-derived waters, through comparison with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We tested the residual of the spectral fit S(r) calculated by the CRDS instrument as a means to quantify the difference between the CRDS and IRMS δ-values. There was very good overall agreement between the CRDS and IRMS values for both isotopes, but differences of up to 2.3‰ (δ(18)O values) and 23‰ (δ(2)H values) were observed in leaf water extracts from Citrus limon and Alnus cordata. The S(r) statistic successfully detected contaminated samples. Treatment of Citrus leaf water with activated charcoal reduced, but did not eliminate, δ(2)H(CRDS) - δ(2)H(IRMS) linearly for the tested range of 0-20% charcoal. The effect of distillation temperature on the degree of contamination was large, particularly for δ(2)H values but variable, resulting in positive, negative or no correlation with distillation temperature. S(r) and δ(CRDS) - δ(IRMS) were highly correlated, in particular for δ(2)H values, across the range of samples that we tested, indicating the potential to use this relationship to correct the δ-values of contaminated plant water extracts. We also examined the sensitivity of the CRDS system to changes in the temperature of its operating environment. We found that temperature changes ≥4 °C for δ(18)O values and ≥10 °C for δ(2)H values resulted in errors larger than the CRDS precision for the respective isotopes and advise the use of such

  18. High-precision half-life and branching-ratio measurements for superallowed Fermi β+ emitters at TRIUMF – ISAC

    Laffoley A. T.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A program of high-precision half-life and branching-ratio measurements for superallowed Fermi β emitters is being carried out at TRIUMF’s Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. Recent half-life measurements for the superallowed decays of 14O, 18Ne, and 26Alm, as well as branching-ratio measurements for 26Alm and 74Rb are reported. These results provide demanding tests of the Standard Model and the theoretical isospin symmetry breaking (ISB corrections in superallowed Fermi β decays.

  19. Measures of effect size for chi-squared and likelihood-ratio goodness-of-fit tests.

    Johnston, Janis E; Berry, Kenneth J; Mielke, Paul W

    2006-10-01

    A fundamental shift in editorial policy for psychological journals was initiated when the fourth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (1994) placed emphasis on reporting measures of effect size. This paper presents measures of effect size for the chi-squared and the likelihood-ratio goodness-of-fit statistic tests. PMID:17165404

  20. High-Precision Instrumentation for CO2 Isotope Ratio Measurements Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Knowing atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 ratios precisely is important to understanding biogenic and anthroprogenic sources and sinks for carbon. Currently available field...

  1. Measurements of [O I] λ6300/Hα Line Intensity Ratios for Four O Star H II Regions

    Hausen, N. R.; Reynolds, R. J.; Haffner, L. M.

    2002-12-01

    We have used the Wisconsin Hα Mapper facility to measure the [O I] λ6300/Hα line intensity ratios for four O star H II regions: S27 (observation coordinates l=6.3d,b=+23.6d), S252 (l=190.1d,b=+0.6d), S261 (l=194.1d,b=-1.9d), and S264 (l=195.1d,b=-12.0d). We find that the ratios range from 0.0015 to 0.0053. These results are roughly a factor of 10 lower than measured [O I]/Hα ratios in directions that sample the warm ionized component of the interstellar medium. This difference implies a significantly lower hydrogen ionization ratio n(H+)/n(H0) or higher electron temperature in the diffuse ionized gas compared with that in the bright discrete O star H II regions.

  2. One-Dimensional-Ratio Measures of Atrophy Progression in Multiple Sclerosis as Evaluated by Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Background: For decades, normalized one-dimensional (1D) measures have been used in the evaluation of brain atrophy. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the use of normalized linear measures over longitudinal follow-up remains insufficiently documented. Purpose: To evaluate the association between different regional atrophy measures and disability in MS patients over four decades in a longitudinal cross-sectional study. Material and Methods: 37 consecutively selected MS patients were included. At baseline, patients had a range of disease duration (1-33 years) and age (24-65 years). Each patient was followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a mean of 9.25 years (range 7.3-10 years). Four 1D measures were applied at three time points on axial 5-mm T1-weighted images. Three clinical MS subgroups were represented: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and primary progressive MS (PPMS). Results: There were significant changes in all 1D ratios during follow-up. The Evans ratio (ER) and the bifrontal ratio (BFR) were associated with the development of disability. Changes of ER and BFR reflected more aggressive disease progression, as expressed by MS severity score (MSSS). Conclusion: All four normalized ratios showed uniform atrophy progression, suggesting a consistent rate of atrophy over long-term disease duration independent of MS course. Disability status correlated with 1D measures, suggesting that serial evaluation of Evans and bifrontal ratios might contribute to the radiological evaluation of MS patients

  3. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Saharan Dust Layers Derived from In-Situ Measurements and CALIPSO Overflights During NAMMA

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Ismail, Syed; Powell, Kathleen A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter (Sa) ratios of dust using airborne in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, and CALIPSO observations during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA). The NAMMA field experiment was conducted from Sal, Cape Verde during Aug-Sept 2006. Using CALIPSO measurements of the attenuated backscatter of lofted Saharan dust layers, we apply the transmittance technique to estimate dust Sa ratios at 532 nm and a 2-color method to determine the corresponding 1064 nm Sa. Using this method, we found dust Sa ratios of 39.8 plus or minus 1.4 sr and 51.8 plus or minus 3.6 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Secondly, Sa ratios at both wavelengths is independently calculated using size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 and estimates of Saharan dust complex refractive indices applied in a T-Matrix scheme. We found Sa ratios of 39.1 plus or minus 3.5 sr and 50.0 plus or minus 4 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, using the T-Matrix calculations applied to measured size spectra. Finally, in situ measurements of the total scattering (550 nm) and absorption coefficients (532 nm) are used to generate an extinction profile that is used to constrain the CALIPSO 532 nm extinction profile.

  4. Measurement of the ratio of total and differential cross sections on neutrons and protons for charged-current neutrino events

    Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Romano, F.; Belusevic, R.; Colley, D. C.; Jones, G. T.; O'Neale, S.; Sewell, S. J.; Votruba, M. F.; Bertrand, D.; Moreels, J.; Sacton, J.; Vander Velde-Wilquet, C.; Van Doninck, W.; Wilquet, G.; Brisson, V.; Francois, T.; Petiau, P.; Cooper, A. M.; Guy, J. G.; Michette, A. G.; Tyndel, M.; Venus, W.; Alitti, J.; Baton, J. P.; Gerbier, G.; Iori, M.; Kochowski, C.; Neveu, M.; Azemoon, T.; Bartley, J. H.; Bullock, F. W.; Davis, D. H.; Jones, T. W.; Parker, M. A.; BEBC TST Neutrino Collaboration

    1981-06-01

    Charged-current neutrino interactions have been analysed in a sample of pictures from BEBC equipped with a TST. Using a method independent of both the neutrino flux and nuclear interaction corrections, the ratio R= σn/ σp has been measured. The result is R=1.98±0.19 for the ratio of total cross sections. Bjorken x distributions for proton and neutron targets and for u and d quarks are compared.

  5. Low Q^2 measurements of the proton form factor ratio $mu_p G_E / G_M$

    Ron, G; Glister, J; Lee, B; Allada, K; Armstrong, W; Arrington, J; Beck, A; Benmokhtar, F; Berman, B L; Boeglin, W; Brash, E; Camsonne, A; Calarco, J; Chen, J P; Choi, S; Chudakov, E; Coman, L; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; Dumas, J; Dutta, C; Feuerbach, R; Freyberger, A; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilman, R; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Hyde, C E; Ibrahim, H; Ilieva, Y; de Jager, C W; Jiang, X; Jones, M; Kelleher, A; Khrosinkova, E; Kuchina, E; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Markowitz, P; Beck, S May-Tal; McCullough, E; Meziane, M; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Norum, B E; Oh, Y; Olson, M; Paolone, M; Paschke, K; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Pomatsalyuk, R; Pomerantz, I; Puckett, A; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Ransome, R; Reyhan, M; Roche, J; Rousseau, Y; Saha, A; Sarty, A J; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shneor, R; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Song, J; Sparks, R; Subedi, R; Strauch, S; Urciuoli, G M; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Zhu, X

    2011-01-01

    We present an updated extraction of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio, mu_p G_E/G_M, at low Q^2. The form factors are sensitive to the spatial distribution of the proton, and precise measurements can be used to constrain models of the proton. An improved selection of the elastic events and reduced background contributions yielded a small systematic reduction in the ratio mu_p G_E/G_M compared to the original analysis.

  6. Uncertainties achievable for uranium isotope-amount ratios. Estimates based on the precision and accuracy of recent characterization measurements

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) recently characterized by the NBL for isotope-amount ratios are: (i) CRM 112-A, Uranium (normal) Metal Assay and Isotopic Standard, (ii) CRM 115, Uranium (depleted) Metal Assay and Isotopic Standard, and (iii) CRM 116-A, Uranium (enriched) Metal Assay and Isotopic Standard. NBL also completed re-characterization of the isotope-amount ratios in CRM 125-A, Uranium (UO2) Pellet Assay, Isotopic, and Radio-chronometric Standard. Three different TIMS analytical techniques were employed for the characterization analyses. The total evaporation technique was used for the major isotope-amount ratio measurement, the modified total evaporation technique was used for both the major and minor isotope-amount ratios, and minor isotope-amount ratios were also measured using a Conventional technique. Uncertainties for the characterization studies were calculated from the combined TIMS data sets following the ISO Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement. The uncertainty components for the isotope-amount ratio values are discussed. (author)

  7. Measurements of water vapor isotope ratios with wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy technology: new insights and important caveats for deuterium excess measurements in tropical areas in comparison with isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    Tremoy, Guillaume; Vimeux, Françoise; Cattani, Olivier; Mayaki, Salla; Souley, Ide; Favreau, Guillaume

    2011-12-15

    The new infrared laser spectroscopic techniques enable us to measure the isotopic composition (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) of atmospheric water vapor. With the objective of monitoring the isotopic composition of tropical water vapor (West Africa, South America), and to discuss deuterium excess variability (d=δ(2)H - 8δ(18)O) with an accuracy similar to measurements arising from isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), we have conducted a number of tests and calibrations using a wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technique. We focus in this paper on four main aspects regarding (1) the tubing material, (2) the humidity calibration of the instrument, (3) the water vapor concentration effects on δ, and (4) the isotopic calibration of the instrument. First, we show that Synflex tubing strongly affects δ(2)H measurements and thus leads to unusable d values. Second, we show that the mixing ratio as measured by WS-CRDS has to be calibrated versus atmospheric mixing ratio measurements and we also suggest possible non-linear effects over the whole mixing ratio range (~2 to 20 g/kg). Third, we show that significant non-linear effects are induced by water vapor concentration variations on δ measurements, especially for mixing ratios lower than ~5 g/kg. This effect induces a 5 to 10‰ error in deuterium excess and is instrument-dependent. Finally, we show that an isotopic calibration (comparison between measured and true values of isotopic water standards) is needed to avoid errors on deuterium excess that can attain ~10‰. PMID:22095494

  8. Optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio of a beam-deflection measurement with interferometric weak values

    The amplification obtained using weak values is quantified through a detailed investigation of the signal-to-noise ratio for an optical beam-deflection measurement. We show that for a given deflection, input power and beam radius, the use of interferometric weak values allows one to obtain the optimum signal-to-noise ratio using a coherent beam. This method has the advantage of reduced technical noise and allows for the use of detectors with a low saturation intensity. We report on an experiment which improves the signal-to-noise ratio for a beam-deflection measurement by a factor of 54 when compared to a measurement using the same beam size and a quantum-limited detector.

  9. Measurement of the fully leptonic cross section and the W's branching ratios in the ALEPH experiment at LEP2

    This thesis works is part of the precision tests done at LEP2. The W± boson pairs are produced through e+e- collisions. The fully leptonic final states (lν-bar l-barν) correspond to 10.5 % of the disintegrations. This channel is added to the hadronic and semi-leptonic channels, allowing a constraint on the Standard Model. Data recorded between 1996 and 1998 by the ALEPH detector are used to select the lν-bar l-barν final states, characterised by two energetic coplanar charged leptons and large transverse missing momentum. The fully leptonic cross-sections are determined in view of the measurement of the W's branching ratios. Contrary to the TEVATRON's measurements, the branching ratios are determined without universality constraint on W couplings. Presently, LEP obtains the best precision on the measurement of the W's branching ratios. No deviation was observed with respect to the Standard Model predictions. (author)

  10. Measurement of the Urinary Lactate/ Creatinine Ratio for Early Diagnosis of the Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Newborns

    Nahid Ghotbi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a major cause of permanent neurological disabilities. Perinatal asphyxia may induce neonatal mortality after birth or neurological impairment among survivors. There are no reliable methods for identifying infants at risk for this disorder.Methods:We measured the ratio of lactate/creatinine (L/C in urine by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy within 6 and 24 hours after birth in 50 normal infants and 50 infants with asphyxia who developed hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The study was performed from September 2006 to May 2007. For statistical analysis, the SPSS software was used. Group comparisons were performed with chi-square and t-test(1,5.Findings:L/C ratio was 3.3+ 2 among asphyxiated neonates in the first six hours after birth which was 11 folds greater than in normal neonates (0.3+ 0.08, P=0.0001. This ratio decreased to 1.5�0.55 for asphyxiated cases in the first 24 hours after birth, which was 5 folds greater than in control group (P=0.0001. Asphyxiated neonates were subdivided into Group A with mild asphyxia and L/C ratio 2.5�0.5; Group B with moderate asphyxia and L/C ratio 4.2�1.5; and Group C with severe asphyxia and L/C ratio 3.4�3.3. The severity of asphyxia correlated with the greater L/C ratio among our cases and was significant (P=0.0007. The sensitivity and specificity of L/C ratio in cut off point of 0.48, was 96.1% and 100% respectively.Conclusion:Measurement of the urinary L/C ratio soon after birth maybe a promising tool to identify asphyxiated neonates and also to predict the severity of asphyxia.

  11. Stable isotope ratios of atmospheric CO_{2} and CH_{4} over Siberia measured at ZOTTO

    Timokhina, Anastasiya; Prokushkin, Anatily; Lavric, Jost; Heimann, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The boreal and arctic zones of Siberia housing the large amounts of carbon stored in the living biomass of forests and wetlands, as well as in soils and specifically permafrost, play a crucial role in earth's global carbon cycle. The long-term studies of greenhouse gases (GHG) concentrations are important instruments to analyze the response of these systems to climate warming. In parallel to GHG observations, the measurements of their stable isotopic composition can provide useful information for distinguishing contribution of individual GHG source to their atmospheric variations, since each source has its own isotopic signature. In this study we report first results of laboratory analyses of the CO2 and CH4 concentrations, the stable isotope ratio of δ13C-CO2, δ18O-CO2, δ13C-CH4, δD-CH4 measured in one-liter glass flasks which were obtained from 301 height of ZOTTO (Zotino Tall Tower Observatory, near 60° N, 90° E, about 20 km west of the Yenisei River) during 2008 - 2013 and 2010 - 2013 for stable isotope composition of CO2 and CH4. The magnitudes of δ13C-CO2 and δ18O-CO2 in a seasonal cycle are -1.4±0.1‰ (-7.6 - -9.0‰) and -2.2±0.2‰ (-0.1 - -2.3‰), respectively. The δ13C-CO2 seasonal pattern opposes the CO2 concentrations, with a gradual enrichment in heavy isotope occurring during May - July, reflecting its discrimination in photosynthesis, and further depletion in August - September as photosynthetic activity decreases comparatively to ecosystem respiration. Relationship between the CO2 concentrations and respective δ13C-CO2 (Keeling plot) reveals isotopic source signature for growing season (May - September) -27.3±1.4‰ and -30.4±2.5‰ for winter (January - March). The behavior of δ18O-CO2 associated with both high photosynthetic rate in the June (enrichment of atmospheric CO2 by 18O as consequence of CO2 equilibrium with "heavy" leaf water) and respiratory activity of forest floor in June - October (depletion of respired CO2 by 18O

  12. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at TeV energies with the MINOS detector

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D. J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, JR; Falk Harris, E; Harris, P.G.; Hartnell, J.; Symes, P. A.; et al, ...

    2007-01-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 meters-water-equivalent in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be 1.374 +/- 0.004 (...

  13. Measurements of the Poisson ratio and fragility of glass-forming liquids

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Olsen, Niels Boye

    Recently much attention has been given to models and phenomenology of glass-forming liquids that correlates fast and slow degrees of freedom . In particular the Poisson ratio has been correlated with fragility. We present data on shear - and bulk modulus obtained by the techniques of the piezoele...... piezoelectric transducers PBG and PSG on a number of glass-forming liquids. Hereby the Poisson ratio can be found. Furthermore the PSG also gives the temperature dependence of shear viscosity and thereby the fragility. The validity of the conjectured relation is discussed...

  14. A measurement of the branching ratio Σ+→rhoγ/Σ+→rhoπ0

    In an experiment performed in the CERN SPS hyperon beam a value for the branching ratio, Σ+→rhoγ/Σ+→rhoπ0 of (2.46 sub(-0.35)sup(+0.30))x10-3, has been obtained corresponding to a branching ratio Σ+→rhoγ/Σ+→ all of (1.27 sub(-0.18)sup(+0.16))x10-3. This result is discussed in the context of present understanding of hyperon radiative decays. (author)

  15. Possible method to measure the ratio of proton form factors in processes with proton spin transmission

    Galynsky, M V; Bystritskiy, Yu M

    2008-01-01

    The ratio of squared of electric and magnetic form-factor of proton is shown to be proportional to the ratio of flip and non-flip cross section of elastic electron polarized proton scattering. Spin-flip (non-spin-flip) cross section correspond to the case when polarization of recoil proton antiparallel (parallel) to the polarization of initial proton when polarization of initial proton is parallel to tree momentum scattered proton. A similar arguments are valid for radiative ep-scattering as well as for the crossed process pair photo-production on the polarized proton in Bethe-Heitler kinematics.

  16. Measurements of selected psi (3684) branching ratios from a study of secondary lepton pairs

    We determine the ratio of the partial decay width for psi (3684) →μ+μ- to that for the cascade decay psi (3684) →psi (3095)+X to be (1.4plus-or-minus0.3) % and, by direct observation of associated charged particles and γ rays, find the ratio of the partial decay width for psi (3684) →psi (3095)+π0π0 to that for psi (3684) →psi (3095)+π+π- to be 0.64plus-or-minus0.15

  17. Measurements of the top quark branching ratios into channels with leptons and quarks with the ATLAS detector

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Childers, John Taylor; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saimpert, Matthias; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions using events with an isolated lepton (muon or electron) and a $\\tau$ lepton decaying to hadrons ($\\tau_{\\mathrm{had}}$) is reported. Measurements of the branching ratios of top quark decays into leptons and jets using events with $t \\overline{t}$ (top antitop) pairs are also reported. Events were recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The collected data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 ${\\mathrm{fb}}^{-1}$. The inclusive cross section measured using events with an isolated lepton and a $\\tau_{\\mathrm{had}}$ is $\\sigma_{t\\bar{t}} = 183\\pm 9 (stat.) \\pm 23 (syst.) \\pm 3 (lumi.) \\mathrm{pb.}$ The measured top quark branching ratios agree with the Standard Model predictions within the measurement uncertainties of a few percent.

  18. Radiolabel ratio method for measuring pulmonary clearance of intratracheal bacterial challenges

    Calculation of bacterial clearance is a fundamental step in any study of in situ lung antibacterial defenses. A method is described whereby about 85% of a radiolabeled bacterial inoculum was consistently introduced into the bronchopulmonary tree of a mouse by the intratracheal route. Mice were then killed 1 and 4 hours later; their lungs were removed aseptically and homogenized, and viable bacteria and radiolabel counts were determined. Radiolabel counts fell slowly, and more than 80% of the original radiolabel was still present in homogenized lung samples from animals sacrificed 4 hours after challenge. Bacteria/isotope ratios for the bacterial inoculum and homogenized lung samples from animals sacrificed immediately after challenge were very similar. Bacterial clearance values were the same whether computed from bacterial counts alone or according to a radiolabel ratio method whereby the change in the bacteria/isotope ratio in ground lung aliquots was divided by a similar ratio from bacteria used to inoculate animals. Some contamination resulted from oral streptococci being swept into the bronchopulmonary free during the aspiration process. This contamination was not a problem when penicillin was incorporated into the agar and penicillin-resistant strains were used for the bacterial challenges

  19. Calibration of 44Sc isomer ratio measurements for heavy ion reactions

    The isomer ratio for the states 6+/2+ was determined in the 29Si(18O, p2n) reaction at 30 to 80 MeV. Experimental and calculated values are plotted as a function of the rms angular momentum of the fissioning system. 2 figures

  20. A Novel Frequency Measurement Method Suitable for a Large Frequency Ratio Condition

    ZHOU Wei; XUAN Zong-Qiang; YU Jian-Guo; WANG Hai; ZHOU Hui; LI Zhi-Qi

    2004-01-01

    @@ As for the obstacles to direct comparison between superhigh and lower frequencies, we accomplish the accurate comparison between low and microwave frequencies with the 105 ratios of the operating frequencies on the basis of phase comparison between the signals whose frequencies are related by an arbitrary integer. This method is simple and accurate, and will be widely used as a special frequency comparison approach.

  1. Measurement of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of human hair using optical techniques

    Hu, Zhenxing; Li, Gaosheng; Xie, Huimin; Hua, Tao; Chen, Pengwan; Huang, Fenglei

    2010-03-01

    Human hair is a complex nanocomposite fiber whose physical appearance and mechanical strength are governed by a variety of factors like ethnicity, cleaning, grooming, chemical treatments and environment. Characterization of mechanical properties of hair is essential to develop better cosmetic products and advance biological and cosmetic science. Hence the behavior of hair under tension is of interest to beauty care science. Human hair fibers experience tensile forces as they are groomed and styled. Previous researches about tensile testing of human hair were seemingly focused on the longitudinal direction, such as elastic modulus, yield strength, breaking strength and strain at break after different treatment. In this research, experiment of evaluating the mechanical properties of human hair, such as Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, was designed and conducted. The principle of the experimental instrument was presented. The system of testing instrument to evaluate the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio was introduced. The range of Poisson's ratio of the hair from the identical person was evaluated. Experiments were conducted for testing the mechanical properties after acid, aqueous alkali and neutral solution treatment of human hair. Explanation of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio was conducted base on these results of experiments. These results can be useful to hair treatment and cosmetic product.

  2. Inter-comparison of stratospheric O3 and NO2 abundances retrieved from balloon borne direct sun observations and Envisat/SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    A. Butz; H. Bösch; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chipperfield, M.; Dorf, M.; G. Dufour; Grunow, K.; Jeseck, P.; Kühl, S.; Payan, S.; Pepin, I.; Pukite, J.; Rozanov, A.(CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université and CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille, France); Savigny, C.; Sioris, C.

    2006-01-01

    Stratospheric O3 and NO2 abundances measured by different remote sensing instruments are inter-compared: (1) Line-of-sight absorptions and vertical profiles inferred from solar spectra in the ultra-violet (UV), visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges measured by the LPMA/DOAS (Limb Profile Monitor of the Atmosphere/Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) balloon payload during balloon ascent/descent and solar occultation are examined with respect to interna...

  3. A Comparison of ACE/CRIS Measurements of Galactic Cosmic-Ray Abundances and Energy Spectra for Two Successive Solar Minima

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Cummings, A. C.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R.A; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    Using current solar minimum measurements from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we report the observed elemental abundances and energy spectra for C, 0, Si, and Fe in the energy range of ~50-500 MeV/nucleon. These measurements are compared to prior CRIS observations for the 1997-98 solar minimum period, when the solar magnetic field was of the opposite polarity. By April 2009, the current solar minimum intens...

  4. Recent measurements of 234U/238U isotope ratio in spring waters from the Hadzici area.

    Vidic, Alfred; Ilić, Zorana; Benedik, Ljudmila

    2013-06-01

    The Hadzici area has become interesting for investigation since depleted uranium ammunition had been employed in 1995 during the NATO air strike campaign in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The purpose of this study is to determine uranium concentration and (234)U/(238)U activity ratio in the spring waters of this area and to investigate their relationship, as well as spatial variations. The spring water samples were taken at 18 sites in total. For the determination of uranium radioisotopes, radiochemical separation procedure followed by alpha-particle spectrometry was applied. Uranium concentration in analyzed waters range from 0.15 to 1.12 μg/L. Spring waters from carbonate based sediments have a lower uranium concentration of between 0.15 and 0.43 μg/L, in comparison to waters sampled within sandstone-based sediments ranging from 0.53 to 1.12 μg/L. Dissolved uranium shows significant spatial variability and correlation with bedrock type confirmed by Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. The majority of the analyzed waters have a (234)U/(238)U activity ratio ranging from 1.02 to 1.90, of which half of the results range between 1.02 and 1.16. No apparent depleted uranium (DU) contamination was observed, as (234)U/(238)U activity ratio is dependent on geochemical conditions in the environment. Even though the tested spring waters demonstrate significant variability in uranium concentration, (234)U/(238)U activity ratio and (234)U excess, waters with similar uranium isotopic signatures are observable within the region. The guidelines on the spatial redistribution of dissolved uranium (corresponding to (238)U mass concentration), along with (234)U/(238)U activity ratios were provided by the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) method. Waters having similar isotopic signature have been delineated. PMID:23410592

  5. Measurement of the numu Charged Current pi+ to Quasi-Elastic Cross Section Ratio on Mineral Oil in a 0.8 GeV Neutrino Beam

    Linden, Steven K.; /Yale U.

    2011-01-01

    Charged current single pion production (CC{pi}{sup +}) and charged current quasi-elastic scattering (CCQE) are the most abundant interaction types for neutrinos at energies around 1 GeV, a region of great interest to oscillation experiments. The cross-sections for these processes, however, are not well understood in this energy range. This dissertation presents a measurement of the ratio of CC{pi}{sup +} to CCQE cross-sections for muon neutrinos on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}) in the MiniBooNE experiment. The measurement is presented here both with and without corrections for hadronic re-interactions in the target nucleus and is given as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeV < E{sub {nu}} < 2.4 GeV. With more than 46,000 CC{pi}{sup +} events collected in MiniBooNE, and with a fractional uncertainty of roughly 11% in the region of highest statistics, this measurement represents a dramatic improvement in statistics and precision over previous CC{pi}{sup +} and CCQE measurements.

  6. Pupil to limbus ratio: Introducing a simple objective measure using two-box method for measuring early anisocoria and progress of pupillary change in the ICU

    Deb Kumar Mojumder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Measurement of static pupillary size in the ICU is of importance in cases of acutely expanding intracranial mass lesions. The inaccuracies with subjective assessment of pupillary size by medical personnel preclude its use in emergent neurological situations. Objective: To determine if the ratio of pupil to limbus diameter (PLD ratio measured by a two-box method is a reliable measure of pupil size for detecting early anisocoria and measuring pupillary changes. Materials and Methods: The PLD ratio was defined as the ratio of the pupillary diameter measured at a para-horizontal axial plane with the limbus diameter measured at the same or parallel axial plane. A two-box method was used to estimate the diameters of imaged pupils. Eyes were imaged using an iPhone 4S cellphone camera. Background illumination was measured and kept constant. The pupils of a 78-year-old woman, who presented with a large intra-axial parenchymal hemorrhage, were imaged. The patient had left pupillary miosis in dark but not in bright light. After presenting this case along with the images of the pupillary examination, a group of 21 medical staff were asked several questions on the pupillary examination. Reliability of PLD ratio were assessed via standard error of mean (S.E.M of PLD ratios for 3 different subjects each imaged under constant illumination and fixation but from different angles to the optical axis. Results: Analysis of questionnaire data together with PLD ratios revealed that ~ 14% and 10% of participants could estimate the pupillary size in darkness and bright light respectively but none were simultaneously accurate indicating that subjective assessment of pupillary size was unreliable. The approach towards a systematic pupillary examination was inconsistent among the participants. The PLD ratio was found to be a reliable measure of pupillary size with standard error of mean below 0.1 mm for the three subjects tested. Conclusion: Static pupillary

  7. A measurement of the ψ' to J/ψ production ratio in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions

    Ratios of the ψ' over the J/ψ production cross sections in the dilepton channel for C, Ti and W targets have been measured in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. The ψ' and J/ψ states were reconstructed in both the μ+μ- and the e+e- decay modes. The measurements covered the kinematic range -0.35≤xF≤0.1 with transverse momentum pT≤4.5 GeV/c. The ψ' to J/ψ production ratio is almost constant in the covered xF range and shows a slow increase with pT. The angular dependence of the ratio has been used to measure the difference of the ψ' and J/ψ polarization. All results for the muon and electron decay channels are in good agreement: their ratio, averaged over all events, is Rψ'(μ)/Rψ'(e)=1.00±0.08±0.04. This result constitutes a new, direct experimental constraint on the double ratio of branching fractions, (B'(μ).B(e))/(B(μ).B'(e)), of ψ'' and J/ψ in the two channels. (orig.)

  8. A Measurement of the Psi' to J/psi Production Ratio in 920 GeV Proton-Nucleus Interactions

    Abt, I; Agari, M; Albrecht, H; Aleksandrov, A; Amaral, V S; Amorim, A; Aplin, S J; Aushev, V; Bagaturia, Yu S; Balagura, V; Bargiotti, M; Barsukova, O; Bastos, J; Batista, J; Bauer, C; Bauer, T S; Belkov, A; Belotelov, I; Bertin, A; Bobchenko, B M; Böcker, M; Bogatyrev, A; Böhm, G; Brauer, M; Bruinsma, M; Bruschi, M; Buchholz, P; Buran, T; Carvalho, J; Conde, P; Cruse, C; Dam, M; Danielsen, K M; Danilov, M; De Castro, S; Deppe, H; Dong, X; Dreis, H B; Egorytchev, V; Ehret, K; Eisele, F; Emeliyanov, D; Essenov, S; Fabbri, L; Faccioli, P; Feuerstack-Raible, M; Flammer, J; Fominykh, B A; Funcke, M; Garrido, L; Gellrich, A; Giacobbe, B; Glass, J; Goloubkov, D; Golubkov, Y; Golutvin, A; Golutvin, I A; Gorbounov, I; Gorisek, A; Gouchtchine, O; Goulart, D C; Gradl, S; Gradl, W; Grimaldi, F; Groth-Jensen, J; Guilitsky, Yu; Hansen, J D; Hernández, J M; Hofmann, W; Hohlmann, M; Hott, T; Hulsbergen, W; Husemann, U; Igonkina, O; Ispiryan, M; Jagla, T; Jiang, C; Kapitza, H; Karabekyan, S; Karpenko, N; Keller, S; Kessler, J; Khasanov, F; Kiryushin, Yu T; Kisel, I; Klinkby, E; Knöpfle, K T; Kolanoski, H; Korpar, S; Krauss, C; Kreuzer, P; Krizan, P; Krücker, D; Kupper, S; Kvaratskheliia, T; Lanyov, A; Lau, K; Lewendel, B; Lohse, T; Lomonosov, B; Männer, R; Mankel, R; Masciocchi, S; Massa, I; Matchikhilian, I; Medin, G; Medinnis, M; Mevius, M; Michetti, A; Mikhailov, Yu; Mizuk, R; Muresan, R; Zur Nedden, M; Negodaev, M; Nörenberg, M; Nowak, S; Núñez-Pardo de Vera, M T; Ouchrif, M; Ould-Saada, F; Padilla, C; Peralta, D; Pernack, R; Pestotnik, R; Petersen, B A; Piccinini, M; Pleier, M A; Poli, M; Popov, V; Pose, D; Prystupa, S; Pugatch, V; Pylypchenko, Y; Pyrlik, J; Reeves, K; Ressing, D; Rick, H; Riu, I; Robmann, P; Rostovtseva, I; Rybnikov, V; Sánchez, F; Sbrizzi, A; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schreiner, A; Schröder, H; Schwanke, U; Schwartz, A J; Schwarz, A S; Schwenninger, B; Schwingenheuer, B; Sciacca, F; Semprini-Cesari, N; Shuvalov, S; Silva, L; Sozuer, L; Solunin, S; Somov, A; Somov, S; Spengler, J; Spighi, R; Spiridonov, A A; Stanovnik, A; Staric, M; Stegmann, C; Subramanian, H S; Symalla, M; Tikhomirov, I; Titov, M; Tsakov, I; Uwer, U; Van Eldik, C; Vasilev, Yu; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Vukotic, I; Wahlberg, H; Walenta, Albert H; Walter, M; Wang, J J; Wegener, D; Werthenbach, U; Wolters, H; Wurth, R; Wurz, A; Zaitsev, Yu; Zavertyaev, M V; Zeuner, T; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Z; Zimmermann, R; Zivko, T; Zoccoli, A

    2007-01-01

    Ratios of the Psi' over the J/psi production cross sections in the dilepton channel for C, Ti and W targets have been measured in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. The Psi' and J/psi states were reconstructed in both the mu+mu- and the e+e- decay modes. The measurements covered the kinematic range -0.35 < x_F < 0.1 with transverse momentum p_T < 4.5 GeV/c. The Psi' to J/psi production ratio is almost constant in the covered x_F range and shows a slow increase with p_T. The angular dependence of the ratio has been used to measure the difference of the Psi' and J/psi polarization. All results for the muon and electron decay channels are in good agreement: their ratio, averaged over all events, is R_psi'(mu)/R_psi'(e)=1.00+-0.08+-0.04. This result constitutes a new, direct experimental constraint on the double ratio of branching fractions, (B'(mu)*B(e))/(B(mu)*B'(e)), of Psi' and J/psi in the two channels.

  9. Laser Velocimeter Measurements in the Pump of an Automotive Torque Converter Part I – Effect of Speed Ratio

    Steven B. Ainley

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A torque converter was tested at four turbine/pump rotational speed ratios (0.200, 0.400, 0.600, and 0.800 all with a constant pump rotational speed in order to determine the effect of speed ratio on the torque converter pump flow field. Laser velocimetry was used to measure three components of velocity within the pump and a shaft encoder was employed to record the instantaneous pump angular position. Shaft encoder information was correlated with measured velocities to develop flow field blade-to-blade profiles and vector plots. Measurements were obtained in both the pump mid- and exit planes for all four speed ratios. Results showed large separation regions and jet/wake flows throughout the pump. The midplane flow was found to have strong counter-clockwise secondary components and the exit plane flow had strong clockwise secondary components. Mass flows were calculated from the velocity data and were found to decrease as the speed ratio was increased. Also, the vorticity and slip factors were calculated from the experimental data and are included. The mid-plane slip factors compare favorably to those for conventional centrifugal pumps but less slip was present in the exit plane than the mid-plane. Neither the slip factor nor the vorticity were seen to be strongly affected by the speed ratio. Finally, the torque core-to-shell and blade-to-blade torque distributions are presented for both planes.

  10. Construct validity of the walk ratio as a measure of gait control in people with multiple sclerosis without mobility aids.

    Kalron, Alon

    2016-06-01

    Ambulatory limitations are a key component of disability in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Various tools are employed to assess walking performance in PwMS; however, no ideal measure has as yet been attained. In this situation, a walk ratio might be more advantageous compared with other gait measures. The walk ratio, a simple index for describing temporal and spatial co-ordination, denotes the relationship between step length and cadence during walking. Hence, the primary objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the walk ratio and measures of other theoretically related constructs. The walk ratio was studied using the GAITRite™ system (CIR Systems, Inc. Havertown, USA). The study group included 229 PwMS (143 women) and a mean disease duration of 5.8 (SD=7.1) years. The walk ratio score of the total sample was 5.3 (SD=0.8). Significant differences based on the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores (F=11.616, Pmobility aids. PMID:27264412

  11. A new method to measure bowen ratios using high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles

    T. Euser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bowen ratio surface energy balance method is a relatively simple method to determine the latent heat flux and the actual land surface evaporation. Despite its simplicity, the Bowen ratio method is generally considered to be unreliable due to the use of two-level sensors that are installed by default in operational Bowen ratio systems. In this paper we present the concept of a new measurement methodology to estimate the Bowen ratio from high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles. A short field experiment with Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS in a fibre optic cable having 13 levels was undertaken. A dry and a wetted section of a fibre optic cable were suspended on a 6 m high tower installed over a sugar beet trial near Pietermaritzburg (South Africa. Using the DTS cable as a psychrometer, a near continuous observation of vapour pressure and temperature at 0.20 m intervals was established. These data allows the computation of the Bowen ratio with a high precision. By linking the Bowen ratio to net radiation and soil heat flux, the daytime latent heat flux was estimated. The latent heat flux derived from DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS showed consistent agreement (correlation coefficients between 0.97 and 0.98 with results derived from eddy covariance, surface layer scintillometer and surface renewal techniques. The latent heat from BR-DTS overestimated the latent heat derived with the eddy covariance by 4% and the latent heat derived with the surface layer scintillometer by 8%. Through this research, a new window is opened to engage on simplified, inexpensive and easy to interpret in situ measurement techniques for measuring evaporation.

  12. Measurement of sulfur isotope ratios in micrometer-sized samples by NanoSIMS

    Sulfur isotope ratios of atmospheric aerosol particles can provide detailed information with regard to the origin and the transport of sulfur in the environment. The new Cameca NanoSIMS 50 ion microprobe technique permits analysis of individual aerosol particles with volumes down to 0.5 μm3 and a precision for δ34S of 3-10 per mille (2σ). This technique will set new standards in the analysis of isotope ratios in atmospheric aerosol. For the first time it is possible to directly compare chemical and isotopic composition of individual aerosol particles, identify internal and external mixtures and investigate reactions of anthropogenic gases with natural aerosol such as sea salt and mineral dust

  13. Performance measurement and management with financial ratios: the BASF SE case

    Schönbohm, Avo

    2013-01-01

    This teaching note provides an overview and a technical introduction to the mechanics of financial statement and ratio analysis, and offers an outlook into related areas. The BASF SE financial data 2011 are analyzed to illustrate the techniques of financial performance analysis and discusses action levers to enhance the performance of a business. This teaching note is especially written for undergraduate students in Management Accounting. However, it might serve well as an introduction to str...

  14. A measurement of the ratio of the nucleon structure function in copper and deuterium

    Results are presented on the ratios of the nucleon structure function in copper to deuterium from two separate experiments. The data confirm that the nucleon structure function, F2, is different for bound nucleons than for the quasi-free ones in the deuteron. The redistribution in the fraction of the nucleon's momentum carried by quarks is investigated and it is found that the data are compatible with no integral loss of quark momenta due to nuclear effects. (orig.)

  15. Improved measurement of the K+->pi+nu(nu)over-bar branching ratio

    Anisimovsky, V. V.; Artamonov, A. V.; Bassalleck, B.; Bhuyan, B.; Blackmore, E. W.; Bryman, D. A.; Chen, S.; Chiang, I. H.; Christidi, I. A.; Cooper, P.S.; Diwan, M. V.; Frank, J. S.; T. Fujiwara; Hu, J; Ivashkin, A. P.

    2004-01-01

    An additional event near the upper kinematic limit for K+-->pi(+)nu(nu) over bar has been observed by experiment E949 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Combining previously reported and new data, the branching ratio is B(K+-->pi(+)nu(nu) over bar)=(1.47(-0.89)(+1.30))x10(-10) based on three events observed in the pion momentum region 211

  16. Isomeric ratio measurements for the radiative neutron capture 176Lu(n,γ) at DANCE

    Denis-Petit, D.; Roig, O.; Méot, V.; Jandel, M.; Vieira, D. J.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    The isomeric ratio for the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n,γ) on the Jπ= 5/2-, 761.7 keV, T1/2=32.8 ns level of 177mLu, has been determined in the neutron energy range 8.5 eV-100 keV for the first time using the DANCE array at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  17. Sulfur isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICPMS of boon or bane?

    Full text: The variation of the isotopic composition of sulfur is influenced by biological and anthropogenic activities. Thus it proved to be a suitable tracer in provenance studies of food and beverages. Nonetheless, mass bias and interferences hamper the accurate and precise determination of the isotopic composition. Different ICPMS instruments were investigated for their potential to assess sulfur isotope ratios for food provenance studies, and were applied to a variety of food matrices. (author)

  18. Measurement of the natural variation of 13C/12C isotope ratio in organic samples

    The isotopic ratio analysis for 13C/12C by mass spectrometry using a 'Working standard' allows the study of 13C natural variation in organic material, with a total analytical error of less than 0,2%. Equations were derived in order to determine 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios related to the 'working standard' CENA-std and to the international standard PDB. Isotope ratio values obtained with samples prepared in two different combustion apparatus were compared; also the values obtained preparing samples by acid decomposition of carbonaceous materials were compared with the values obtained in different international laboratories. Utilizing the methodology proposed, several leaves collected at different heights of different vegetal species, found 'inside' and 'outside' of the Ducke Forest Reserve, located in the Amazon region, are analysed. It is found that the 13C natural variation depends upon metabolic process and environmental factors, both being factors which may be qualified as parcial influences on the CO2 cycle in the forest. (author)

  19. Measurement of the ratios of deep inelastic muon-nucleus cross sections on various nuclei compared to deuterium

    Results are presented on the ratios of the deep inelastic muon-nucleus cross sections for carbon, copper and tin nuclei to those measured on deuterium. The data confirm that the structure functions of the nucleon measured in nuclei are different from those measured on quasi-free nucleons in deuterium. The kinematic range of the data is such that (Q2) ≅ 5 GeV2 at χ ≅ 0.03, increasing to (Q2) ≅ 35 GeV2 for χ ≅ 0.65. The measured cross section ratios are less than unity for χ 2 (≅ 5 GeV2) indicating that such shadowing is of partonic origin. (orig.)

  20. Measurements of $W$/$Z$ vector bosons with associated jet production and ratios of cross sections with ATLAS

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00390165; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurement results for vector boson with associated jet production cross sections and cross section ratios are presented, including results from both 7 and 13 TeV centre of mass energies. The data is also compared with predictions from Monte Carlo generators in preparation for Run 2 analyses.