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Sample records for abundance evince ontogenetic

  1. Stochastic ontogenetic growth model

    West, B. J.; West, D.

    2012-02-01

    An ontogenetic growth model (OGM) for a thermodynamically closed system is generalized to satisfy both the first and second law of thermodynamics. The hypothesized stochastic ontogenetic growth model (SOGM) is shown to entail the interspecies allometry relation by explicitly averaging the basal metabolic rate and the total body mass over the steady-state probability density for the total body mass (TBM). This is the first derivation of the interspecies metabolic allometric relation from a dynamical model and the asymptotic steady-state distribution of the TBM is fit to data and shown to be inverse power law.

  2. Ontogenetic pattern change in amphibians: the case of Salamandra corsica

    Wouter Beukema

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ontogenetic, post-metamorphic pattern development is a rarely studied topic in amphibian science. As there are indications that the pattern of Salamandra corsica might expand over time, digital image analyses were applied in order to measure several phenotypical variables which were related to the snout vent length. Results show a significant increase of patches which change to irregular shapes while SVL increases. Digital image analysis is identified as a suitable tool to explore pattern shape and change in general, while the documented pattern development in S. corsica might be one of the first quantified cases of post-metamorphic ontogenetic pattern change in amphibians.

  3. Morphological, ontogenetic and molecular characterization of Scutellospora reticulata (Glomeromycota)

    De Souza, F.A.; Declerck, S.; Smit, E.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Scutellospora reticulata (CNPAB11) was characterized using morphological, ontogenetic and molecular approaches. Spore ontogenesis was studied using Ri T-DNA transformed carrot roots and observations were compared with those published for eight other, pot-cultur

  4. Ontogenetic variation in the body stoichiometry of two fish species.

    Boros, Gergely; Sály, Péter; Vanni, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    One of the central questions of ecological stoichiometry theory is to what extent animal species maintain constant elemental composition in their bodies. Although several recent studies demonstrate intraspecific variation in animal elemental composition, relatively little is known about ontogenetic changes in vertebrates, especially during early life stages. We studied the intraspecific and interspecific ontogenetic variation in the body stoichiometry of two fish species in two different orders; fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), reared under controlled laboratory conditions. During ontogeny, we measured the chemical composition of fish bodies, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca), and ribonucleic acid (RNA) contents. We found that N and RNA contents were relatively high in early life stages and declined substantially during development. In contrast, body C and C:N ratios were relatively low in embryos, post-embryos and larvae, and increased remarkably thereafter. Concentrations and ratios of some elements (e.g., Ca, P, Ca:P) did not exhibit consistent ontogenetic trends, but fluctuated dynamically between consecutive developmental stages in both species. Specific growth rates correlated significantly with RNA contents in both species. Analyses of the relative importance of different P pools at each developmental stage revealed that RNA was a considerable P pool in post-embryos, while bone-associated P was the dominant body P pool in later stages. Our results suggest that the elemental composition of fish bodies changes considerably during ontogeny. Each ontogenetic stage has its own stoichiometric signature, but the timing, magnitude and direction of ontogenetic changes can vary substantially between taxa. PMID:25999048

  5. Ecological interactions in dinosaur communities: influences of small offspring and complex ontogenetic life histories.

    Codron, Daryl; Carbone, Chris; Clauss, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Because egg-laying meant that even the largest dinosaurs gave birth to very small offspring, they had to pass through multiple ontogenetic life stages to adulthood. Dinosaurs' successors as the dominant terrestrial vertebrate life form, the mammals, give birth to live young, and have much larger offspring and less complex ontogenetic histories. The larger number of juveniles in dinosaur as compared to mammal ecosystems represents both a greater diversity of food available to predators, and competitors for similar-sized individuals of sympatric species. Models of population abundances across different-sized species of dinosaurs and mammals, based on simulated ecological life tables, are employed to investigate how differences in predation and competition pressure influenced dinosaur communities. Higher small- to medium-sized prey availability leads to a normal body mass-species richness (M-S) distribution of carnivorous dinosaurs (as found in the theropod fossil record), in contrast to the right-skewed M-S distribution of carnivorous mammals (as found living members of the order Carnivora). Higher levels of interspecific competition leads to a left-skewed M-S distribution in herbivorous dinosaurs (as found in sauropods and ornithopods), in contrast to the normal M-S distribution of large herbivorous mammals. Thus, our models suggest that differences in reproductive strategy, and consequently ontogeny, explain observed differences in community structure between dinosaur and mammal faunas. Models also show that the largest dinosaurian predators could have subsisted on similar-sized prey by including younger life stages of the largest herbivore species, but that large predators likely avoided prey much smaller than themselves because, despite predicted higher abundances of smaller than larger-bodied prey, contributions of small prey to biomass intake would be insufficient to satisfy meat requirements. A lack of large carnivores feeding on small prey exists in mammals

  6. Ecological interactions in dinosaur communities: influences of small offspring and complex ontogenetic life histories.

    Daryl Codron

    Full Text Available Because egg-laying meant that even the largest dinosaurs gave birth to very small offspring, they had to pass through multiple ontogenetic life stages to adulthood. Dinosaurs' successors as the dominant terrestrial vertebrate life form, the mammals, give birth to live young, and have much larger offspring and less complex ontogenetic histories. The larger number of juveniles in dinosaur as compared to mammal ecosystems represents both a greater diversity of food available to predators, and competitors for similar-sized individuals of sympatric species. Models of population abundances across different-sized species of dinosaurs and mammals, based on simulated ecological life tables, are employed to investigate how differences in predation and competition pressure influenced dinosaur communities. Higher small- to medium-sized prey availability leads to a normal body mass-species richness (M-S distribution of carnivorous dinosaurs (as found in the theropod fossil record, in contrast to the right-skewed M-S distribution of carnivorous mammals (as found living members of the order Carnivora. Higher levels of interspecific competition leads to a left-skewed M-S distribution in herbivorous dinosaurs (as found in sauropods and ornithopods, in contrast to the normal M-S distribution of large herbivorous mammals. Thus, our models suggest that differences in reproductive strategy, and consequently ontogeny, explain observed differences in community structure between dinosaur and mammal faunas. Models also show that the largest dinosaurian predators could have subsisted on similar-sized prey by including younger life stages of the largest herbivore species, but that large predators likely avoided prey much smaller than themselves because, despite predicted higher abundances of smaller than larger-bodied prey, contributions of small prey to biomass intake would be insufficient to satisfy meat requirements. A lack of large carnivores feeding on small prey

  7. Ontogenetic Habitat Shifts of Juvenile Bear Lake Sculpin

    Ruzycki, J.; Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A.

    1999-01-01

    Bear lake sculpin Cottus extensus exhibit ontogenetic habitat shifts during their initial year of life. Distribution and habitat switching was measured with bimonthly bottom-trawl surveys repeated throughout the summer. Patterns of daily growth increments on otoliths were used to measure the history of habitat residence, individual size at the time of the habitat switch, and habitat-specific growth rates. Laboratory experiments and known-age fish confirmed daily increment formation of otolith...

  8. Ontogenetic Habitat Shift of Juvenile Bear Lake Sculpin (Cottus extensus)

    Ruzycki, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Bear Lake sculpin (Cottus extensus) exhibited an ontogenetic habitat shift during their first year of life. Soon after hatching in the littoral zone, the fry swam to the surface where they dispersed throughout the lake. Most juveniles that initially settled in the profundal zone returned to the littoral zone during their first summer. Patterns in the daily growth increments of otoliths confirmed the history of habitat residence and the individual size at the habitat switch. We used this habit...

  9. Marine reserve design theory for species with ontogenetic migration.

    White, J Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Models for marine reserve design have been developed primarily with 'reef fish' life histories in mind: sedentary adults in patches connected by larval dispersal. However, many fished species undertake ontogenetic migrations, such as from nursery grounds to adult spawning habitats, and current theory does not fully address the range of reserve options posed by that situation. I modelled a generic species with ontogenetic migration to investigate the possible benefits of reserves under three alternative scenarios. First, the fishery targets adult habitat, and reserves can sustain yields under high exploitation, unless habitat patches are well connected. Second, the fishery targets the nursery, and reserves are highly effective, regardless of connectivity patterns. Third, the fishery targets both habitats, and reserves only succeed if paired on adjacent, well-connected nursery and adult patches. In all cases, reserves can buffer populations against overexploitation but would not enhance fishery yield beyond that achievable by management without reserves. These results summarize the general situations in which management using reserves could be useful for ontogenetically migrating species, and the type of connectivity data needed to inform reserve design. PMID:25631225

  10. Ontogenetic shifts in functional morphology of dragonfly legs (Odonata: Anisoptera).

    Leipelt, Klaus Guido; Suhling, Frank; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2010-12-01

    Anisopteran leg functions change dramatically from the final larval stadium to the adult. Larvae use legs mainly for locomotion, walking, climbing, clinging, or burrowing. Adults use them for foraging and grasping mates, for perching, clinging to the vegetation, and for repelling rivals. In order to estimate the ontogenetic shift in the leg construction from the larva to the adult, this study quantitatively compared lengths of fore, mid, and hind legs and the relationships between three leg segments, femur, tibia, and tarsus, in larval and adult Anisoptera of the families Gomphidae, Aeshnidae, Cordulegastridae, Corduliidae, and Libellulidae, represented by two species each. We found that leg segment length ratio as well as ontogenetic shift in length ratios was different between families, but rather similar within the families. While little ontogenetic shift occurred in Aeshnidae, there were some modifications in Corduliidae and Libellulidae. The severest shift occurred in Gomphidae and Cordulegastridae, both having burrowing larvae. These two families form a cluster, which is in contrast to their taxonomic relationship within the Anisoptera. Cluster analysis implies that the function of larval legs is primarily responsible for grouping, whereas adult behavior or the taxonomic relationships do not explain the grouping. This result supports the previous hypothesis about the convergent functional shift of leg characters in the dragonfly ontogenesis. PMID:21036021

  11. Seasonal and spatial ontogenetic movements of Gerreidae in a Brazilian tropical estuarine ecocline and its application for nursery habitat conservation.

    Ramos, J A A; Barletta, M; Dantas, D V; Costa, M F

    2016-07-01

    The density and biomass of different ontogenetic phases (juvenile, sub-adult and adult) of the two most important sympatric Gerreidae species in the Goiana Estuary, north-east Brazil, are described in order to determine the patterns of estuarine habitat use and to identify nursery grounds. Eugerres brasilianus and Eucinostomus melanopterus were the most abundant gerreids in the main channel and adjacent estuarine beach habitats. Eugerres brasilianus is abundant in the main channel, whereas E. melanopterus is most common in the beach habitats. Significant interaction in density and biomass of juvenile and sub-adult size classes of E. brasilianus was found between season and area. In addition, E. brasilianus adults and E. melanopterus sub-adults differed significantly in density and biomass between areas of the estuary. Both the upper estuary, during the late dry season, and the middle estuary, during the early rainy season, functioned as nursery habitats for E. brasilianus. During the early rainy season and dry season, the beaches were a nursery for the E. melanopterus. The concentration of these ontogenetic phases was mainly related to the dissolved oxygen and salinity gradients of the estuary, which drive not only gerreid movement between estuarine habitats but also moves the habitats. This study reinforces the importance of conserving the habitats of the Goiana Estuary so that species such as gerreids can complete their life cycle in the face of pressure from anthropogenic activities, such as mangrove forest deforestation, overfishing, fish contamination by plastic ingestion and domestic effluent disposal. PMID:26887637

  12. Ontogenetic specialism in predators with multiple niche shifts prevents predator population recovery and establishment

    van, Leeuwen, M.; Huss, M.; Gårdmark, A.; Roos,, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ontogenetic niche shifts on community structure and dynamics are underexplored, despite the occurrence of such shifts in the majority of animal species. We studied the form of niche shifts in a predator that exhibits multiple ontogenetic niche shifts, and analyzed how this life history complexity affects the size-structured predator-prey dynamics in the system. The predator represents either an ontogenetic generalist, exhibiting a partial shift to predation (in which case an al...

  13. Ontogenetic Shape Change in the Chicken Brain: Implications for Paleontology.

    Soichiro Kawabe

    Full Text Available Paleontologists have investigated brain morphology of extinct birds with little information on post-hatching changes in avian brain morphology. Without the knowledge of ontogenesis, assessing brain morphology in fossil taxa could lead to misinterpretation of the phylogeny or neurosensory development of extinct species. Hence, it is imperative to determine how avian brain morphology changes during post-hatching growth. In this study, chicken brain shape was compared at various developmental stages using three-dimensional (3D geometric morphometric analysis and the growth rate of brain regions was evaluated to explore post-hatching morphological changes. Microscopic MRI (μMRI was used to acquire in vivo data from living and post-mortem chicken brains. The telencephalon rotates caudoventrally during growth. This change in shape leads to a relative caudodorsal rotation of the cerebellum and myelencephalon. In addition, all brain regions elongate rostrocaudally and this leads to a more slender brain shape. The growth rates of each brain region were constant and the slopes from the growth formula were parallel. The dominant pattern of ontogenetic shape change corresponded with interspecific shape changes due to increasing brain size. That is, the interspecific and ontogenetic changes in brain shape due to increased size have similar patterns. Although the shape of the brain and each brain region changed considerably, the volume ratio of each brain region did not change. This suggests that the brain can change its shape after completing functional differentiation of the brain regions. Moreover, these results show that consideration of ontogenetic changes in brain shape is necessary for an accurate assessment of brain morphology in paleontological studies.

  14. Ontogenetic scaling of fish metabolism in the mouse-to-elephant mass magnitude range

    Moran, Damian; Wells, R.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Intraspecific or ontogenetic analyses of mass-metabolism relationships do not often conform to the same allometric correlations as those seen in interspecific analyses. A commonly cited reason for this discrepancy is that ontogenetic studies examine smaller mass ranges than interspecific studies,...

  15. Ontogenetic specialism in predators with multiple niche shifts prevents predator population recovery and establishment

    A. van Leeuwen; M. Huss; A. Gårdmark; A.M. de Roos

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ontogenetic niche shifts on community structure and dynamics are underexplored, despite the occurrence of such shifts in the majority of animal species. We studied the form of niche shifts in a predator that exhibits multiple ontogenetic niche shifts, and analyzed how this life histor

  16. Ontogenetic change in the lipid and fatty acid composition of scleractinian coral larvae

    Figueiredo, J.; Baird, A. H.; Cohen, M. F.; Flot, J.-F.; Kamiki, T.; Meziane, T.; Tsuchiya, M.; Yamasaki, H.

    2012-06-01

    Some scleractinian coral larvae have an extraordinary capacity to delay metamorphosis, and this is reflected in the large geographic range of many species. Coral eggs typically contain a high proportion of wax esters, which have been hypothesized to provide a source of energy for long-distance dispersal. To better understand the role of lipids in the dispersal of broadcast spawning coral larvae, ontogenetic changes in the lipid and fatty acid composition of Goniastrea retiformis were measured from the eggs until larvae were 30 days old. Egg biomass was 78.8 ± 0.5% lipids, 86.3 ± 0.2% of which were wax esters, 9.3 ± 0.0% polar lipids, 4.1 ± 0.2% sterols, and 0.3 ± 0.1% triacylglycerols. The biomass of wax esters declined significantly through time, while polar lipids, sterols and triacylglycerols remained relatively constant, suggesting that wax esters are the prime source of energy for development. The most prevalent fatty acid in the eggs was palmitic acid, a marker of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium, highlighting the importance of symbiosis in coral reproductive ecology. The proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids declined through time, suggesting that they are essential for larval development. Interestingly, triacylglycerols are only abundant in the propagules that contain Symbiodinium, suggesting important differences in the energetic of dispersal among species with vertical and horizontal transmission of symbionts.

  17. Ontogenetic changes in responses to settlement cues by Anemonefish

    Dixson, D. L.; Munday, P. L.; Pratchett, M.; Jones, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    Population connectivity for most marine species is dictated by dispersal during the pelagic larval stage. Although reef fish larvae are known to display behavioral adaptations that influence settlement site selection, little is known about the development of behavioral preferences throughout the larval phase. Whether larvae are attracted to the same sensory cues throughout their larval phase, or exhibit distinct ontogenetic shifts in sensory preference is unknown. Here, we demonstrate an ontogenetic shift in olfactory cue preferences for two species of anemonefish, a process that could aid in understanding both patterns of dispersal and settlement. Aquarium-bred naïve Amphiprion percula and A. melanopus larvae were tested for olfactory preference of relevant reef-associated chemical cues throughout the 11-day pelagic larval stage. Age posthatching had a significant effect on the preference for olfactory cues from host anemones and live corals for both species. Preferences of olfactory cues from tropical plants of A. percula, increased by approximately ninefold between hatching and settlement, with A. percula larvae showing a fivefold increase in preference for the olfactory cue produced by the grass species. Larval age had no effect on the olfactory preference for untreated seawater over the swamp-based tree Melaleuca nervosa, which was always avoided compared with blank seawater. These results indicate that reef fish larvae are capable of utilizing olfactory cues early in the larval stage and may be predisposed to disperse away from reefs, with innate olfactory preferences drawing newly hatched larvae into the pelagic environment. Toward the end of the larval phase, larvae become attracted to the olfactory cues of appropriate habitats, which may assist them in identification of and navigation toward suitable settlement sites.

  18. The Ontogenetically Variable Trophic Niche of a Praying Mantid Revealed by Stable Isotope Analysis.

    Hurd, Lawrence E; Dehart, Pieter A P; Taylor, Joseph M; Campbell, Meredith C; Shearer, Megan M

    2015-04-01

    Praying mantids have been shown to exert strong influences on arthropod community composition. However, they may not occupy the same trophic level throughout their lives. Trophic shifting over a life cycle could explain the documented variation in results from field studies, but specific interactions of predators within food webs have been difficult to determine simply by comparing control and treatment assemblages in field experiments. We examined the trophic position of the Chinese praying mantid, Tenodera aridifolia sinensis (Saussure), using stable isotope analysis (SIA). We measured the δ(13)C and δ(15)N of field-collected arthropods, and of laboratory groups of mantids fed known diets of these arthropods chosen from the most abundant trophic guilds: herbivores (sap feeders and plant chewers), and carnivores. We also collected mantids from the field over a growing season and compared their SIA values to those of the laboratory groups. Both δ(13)C and δ(15)N of mantids fed carnivorous prey (spiders or other mantids) were higher than those fed herbivores (grasshoppers). SIA values from field-collected mantids were highly variable, and indicated that they did not take prey from trophic guilds in proportion to their abundances, i.e., were not frequency-dependent predators. Further, δ(15)N decreased from a high at egg hatch to a low at the third instar as early nymphs fed mainly on lower trophic levels, and increased steadily thereafter as they shifted to feeding on higher levels. We suggest that the community impact of generalist predators can be strongly influenced by ontogenetic shifts in diet. PMID:26313177

  19. Comparative vs ontogenetic paradigms for tests of the intrinsic mutagenesis hypothesis of aging

    Sacher, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper examines certain aspects of the biology of longevity and aging that bear on the role of DNA in the ontogenetic aging process, and on the genetic basis for the differences of longevity among mammal species. (PCS)

  20. Ecological interactions in dinosaur communities: Influences of small offspring and complex ontogenetic life histories

    Daryl Codron; Chris Carbone; Marcus Clauss

    2013-01-01

    Because egg-laying meant that even the largest dinosaurs gave birth to very small offspring, they had to pass through multiple ontogenetic life stages to adulthood. Dinosaurs' successors as the dominant terrestrial vertebrate life form, the mammals, give birth to live young, and have much larger offspring and less complex ontogenetic histories. The larger number of juveniles in dinosaur as compared to mammal ecosystems represents both a greater diversity of food available to predators, and co...

  1. The adaptive significance of ontogenetic colour change in a tropical python

    Wilson, David; Heinsohn, Robert; Endler, John A

    2006-01-01

    Ontogenetic colour change is typically associated with changes in size, vulnerability or habitat, but assessment of its functional significance requires quantification of the colour signals from the receivers' perspective. The tropical python, Morelia viridis, is an ideal species to establish the functional significance of ontogenetic colour change. Neonates hatch either yellow or red and both the morphs change to green with age. Here, we show that colour change from red or yellow to green pr...

  2. Stable isotope analysis of vertebrae reveals ontogenetic changes in habitat in an endothermic pelagic shark

    Carlisle, Aaron B.; Goldman, Kenneth J.; Litvin, Steven Y.; Madigan, Daniel J; Bigman, Jennifer S.; Alan M Swithenbank; Kline, Thomas C.; Barbara A. Block

    2015-01-01

    Ontogenetic changes in habitat are driven by shifting life-history requirements and play an important role in population dynamics. However, large portions of the life history of many pelagic species are still poorly understood or unknown. We used a novel combination of stable isotope analysis of vertebral annuli, Bayesian mixing models, isoscapes and electronic tag data to reconstruct ontogenetic patterns of habitat and resource use in a pelagic apex predator, the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis...

  3. Individual variation in ontogenetic niche shifts in habitat use and movement patterns of a large estuarine predator (Carcharhinus leucas).

    Matich, Philip; Heithaus, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Ontogenetic niche shifts are common among animals, yet most studies only investigate niche shifts at the population level, which may overlook considerable differences among individuals in the timing and dynamics of these shifts. Such divergent behaviors within size-/age-classes have important implications for the roles a population-and specific age-classes-play in their respective ecosystem(s). Using acoustic telemetry, we tracked the movements of juvenile bull sharks in the Shark River Estuary of Everglades National Park, Florida, and found that sharks increased their use of marine microhabitats with age to take advantage of more abundant resources, but continued to use freshwater and estuarine microhabitats as refuges from marine predators. Within this population-level ontogenetic niche shift, however, movement patterns varied among individual sharks, with 47 % of sharks exhibiting condition-dependent habitat use and 53 % appearing risk-averse regardless of body condition. Among sharks older than age 0, fifty percent made regular movements between adjacent regions of the estuary, while the other half made less predictable movements that often featured long-term residence in specific regions. Individual differences were apparently shaped by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including individual responses to food-risk trade-offs and body condition. These differences appear to develop early in the lives of bull sharks, and persist throughout their residencies in nursery habitats. The widespread occurrence of intraspecific variation in behavior among mobile taxa suggests it is important in shaping population dynamics of at least some species, and elucidating the contexts and timing in which it develops and persists is important for understanding its role within communities. PMID:25669454

  4. Digestive enzymatic activity during ontogenetic development in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Guerrera, Maria Cristina; De Pasquale, Francesca; Muglia, Ugo; Caruso, Gabriella

    2015-12-01

    Despite the growing importance of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an experimental model in biomedical research, some aspect of physiological and related morphological age dependent changes in digestive system during larval development are still unknown. In this paper, a biochemical and morphological study of the digestive tract of zebrafish was undertaken to record the functional changes occurring in this species during its ontogenetic development, particularly from 24 hr to 47 days post fertilization (dpf). Endo- and exo-proteases, as well as α-amylase enzymes, were quantified in zebrafish larvae before first feeding (7 dpf). The most morphologically significant events during the ontogenesis of the gut occurred between 3 dpf (mouth opening) and 7 dpf (end of exocrine pancreas differentiation). The presence of a wide range of digestive enzymes, already active at earlier zebrafish larval stages, closely related with the omnivorous diet of this species. Increasing enzyme activities were found with increasing age, probably in relation with intestinal mucosa folding and consequent absorption surface increase. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 699-706, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26477613

  5. Ontogenetic trajectories of chimpanzee social play: similarities with humans.

    Cordoni, Giada; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Social play, a widespread phenomenon in mammals, is a multifunctional behavior, which can have many different roles according to species, sex, age, relationship quality between playmates, group membership, context, and habitat. Play joins and cuts across a variety of disciplines leading directly to inquiries relating to individual developmental changes and species adaptation, thus the importance of comparative studies appears evident. Here, we aim at proposing a possible ontogenetic pathway of chimpanzee play (Pan troglodytes) and contrast our data with those of human play. Chimpanzee play shows a number of changes from infancy to juvenility. Particularly, solitary and social play follows different developmental trajectories. While solitary play peaks in infancy, social play does not show any quantitative variation between infancy and juvenility but shows a strong qualitative variation in complexity, asymmetry, and playmate choice. Like laughter in humans, the playful expressions in chimpanzees (at the different age phases) seem to have a role in advertising cooperative dispositions and intentions thus increasing the likelihood of engaging in solid social relationships. In conclusion, in chimpanzees, as in humans, both play behavior and the signals that accompany play serve multiple functions according to the different age phases. PMID:22110630

  6. Ontogenetic trajectories of chimpanzee social play: similarities with humans.

    Giada Cordoni

    Full Text Available Social play, a widespread phenomenon in mammals, is a multifunctional behavior, which can have many different roles according to species, sex, age, relationship quality between playmates, group membership, context, and habitat. Play joins and cuts across a variety of disciplines leading directly to inquiries relating to individual developmental changes and species adaptation, thus the importance of comparative studies appears evident. Here, we aim at proposing a possible ontogenetic pathway of chimpanzee play (Pan troglodytes and contrast our data with those of human play. Chimpanzee play shows a number of changes from infancy to juvenility. Particularly, solitary and social play follows different developmental trajectories. While solitary play peaks in infancy, social play does not show any quantitative variation between infancy and juvenility but shows a strong qualitative variation in complexity, asymmetry, and playmate choice. Like laughter in humans, the playful expressions in chimpanzees (at the different age phases seem to have a role in advertising cooperative dispositions and intentions thus increasing the likelihood of engaging in solid social relationships. In conclusion, in chimpanzees, as in humans, both play behavior and the signals that accompany play serve multiple functions according to the different age phases.

  7. Hitting the moving target: modelling ontogenetic shifts with stable isotopes reveals the importance of isotopic turnover.

    Hertz, Eric; Trudel, Marc; El-Sabaawi, Rana; Tucker, Strahan; Dower, John F; Beacham, Terry D; Edwards, Andrew M; Mazumder, Asit

    2016-05-01

    Ontogenetic niche shifts are widely prevalent in nature and are important in shaping the structure and dynamics of ecosystems. Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool to assess these shifts, with δ(15) N providing a measure of trophic level and δ(13) C a measure of energy source. Previous applications of stable isotopes to study ontogenetic niche shifts have not considered the appreciable time lag between diet and consumer tissue associated with isotopic turnover. These time lags introduce significant complexity into field studies of ontogenetic niche shifts. Juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from freshwater to marine ecosystems and shift their diet from feeding primarily on invertebrates to feeding primarily on fish. This dual ontogenetic habitat and diet shift, in addition to the long time lag associated with isotopic turnover, suggests that there is potential for a disconnect between the prey sources that juvenile salmon are consuming, and the inferred prey sources from stable isotopes. We developed a model that considered ontogenetic niche shifts and time lags associated with isotopic turnover, and compared this 'ontogeny' model to one that considered only isotopic turnover. We used a Bayesian framework to explicitly account for parameter uncertainty. Data showed overwhelming support for the ontogeny model relative to the isotopic turnover model. Estimated variables from best model fits indicate that the ontogeny model predicts a much greater reliance on fish prey than does the stomach content data. Overall, we found that this method of quantifying ontogenetic niche shifts effectively accounted for both isotopic turnover and ontogenetic diet shifts; a finding that could be widely applicable to a variety of systems. PMID:26880007

  8. FOOD HABITS AND ONTOGENETIC CHANGES IN THE DIET OF WHITEFISH LARVAE IN LAKE ANNECY

    ANNEVILLE O.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenetic changes in the diet of whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus larvae were investigated during three consecutive years in a deep peri-alpine lake. Identification of the feeding habits of larvae in relation to their larval stage was performed using a PCA% in order to take into account the individual variability in larval diet. Although whitefish larvae are planktivorous, the present study points out ontogenetic changes in diet. While young larval stages are opportunistic feeders on small copepods, older stages feed preferentially on Daphnia sp.. Strong inter-annual variability has been observed in the dietary overlap between the successive larval stages. We show that the density and availability of the potential prey will affect the dynamics of the ontogenetic changes in the diet. Furthermore, it could probably alter the intra-specific competition between larval stages.

  9. [Diabetes mellitus in elderly: comorbid characteristics of patients with different ontogenetic forms of the disease].

    Odin, V I; Belikova, T V; Shustov, S B; Pushkova, E S; Emanuél', V L

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes in elderly is the interdisciplinary problem of diabetology and gerontology. Unlike adults the specific feature of these patients is comorbidities. On the other hand well known is the influence both age and aging on clinical sings of diabetes. The aim of the study was to investigate prevalence and structure comorbid chronic diseases in elderly patients with different ontogenetic forms of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). We examined 169 elderly women with clinical diagnosis "DM2" (mean age--69.8 yrs., mean BMI--29.5 kg/m2, mean HbA1c--7.03%). The stratification was made by ontogenetic stage of diabetes onset and there were five ontogenetic forms of DM2: menstrual (Ms), early-postmenopausal (EPM), late-postmenopausal (LPM), early-involutional (EI) and late-involutional (LI). Anthropometrical, biochemical and immunochemical assays (HbA1c) were made by standard methods. Gognitive index (CGI) and affective index (AFI) were calculated by SCAG scale as mentalmnestic and affective disturbances accordingly. Comorbid index (CI) was calculated as a sum of concomitant diseases. The most comorbid serious was the early-postmenopausal group (CI--6.04 +/- 0.5), mainly by hypertension (92%) coronary heart disease (80%) and osteoarthritis (80%). The lightest comorbid status was in the late-involutional group (CI--4.5 +/- 0.3), with the minimum of gastroenterological diseases (39.5%), kidney diseases (26.3%), thyroid disorders (23.7%) and exclusively the group had valid negative relationship between age and CI (r = -0.550, p = 0.000). As a whole in the elderly diabetic cohort the magnitude of CI correlated positively with BMI (r = +0.344, p = 0.000), frequency of family diabetes (r = +0.204, p = 0.009), AFI (r = +0.161, p = 0.040), menarche (r = +0.175, p = 0.025) and no significantly with CGI (p > 0.05). Thus early ontogenetic forms of DM2 had more comorbidities, especially those with onset DM2 during first 5 years after menopause. And on the contrary, the latest ontogenetic

  10. Ontogenetic development of cardiac tolerance to oxygen deprivation – possible mechanisms

    Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Ošťádalová, Ivana; Kolář, František; Charvátová, Zuzana; Netuka, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, Suppl.2 (2009), S1-S12. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hypoxia/ ischemia * cardiac tolerance * ontogenetic development Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  11. Shape shifting predicts ontogenetic changes in metabolic scaling in diverse aquatic invertebrates

    Glazier, Douglas S.; Hirst, Andrew G.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-01-01

    metabolic scaling that deviate from 3/4-power scaling predicted by general models. Here, we show that in diverse aquatic invertebrates, ontogenetic shifts in the scaling of routine metabolic rate from near isometry (bR = scaling exponent approx. 1) to negative allometry (bR < 1), or the reverse, are...

  12. Incorporating an ontogenetic perspective into evolutionary theory of sexual size dimorphism.

    Chou, Chun-Chia; Iwasa, Yoh; Nakazawa, Takefumi

    2016-02-01

    Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) describes divergent body sizes of adult males and females. While SSD has traditionally been explained by sexual and fecundity selection, recent advances in physiology and developmental biology emphasize that SSD would occur proximately because of sexual differences in ontogenetic growth trajectories (i.e., growth rate and duration). Notably, these ontogenetic traits are subject to energetic or time constraints and thus traded off with fitness components (e.g., survival and reproduction). To elucidate the importance of such ontogenetic trade-offs in the evolution of SSD, we developed a new theoretical framework by extending quantitative genetic models for the evolution of sexual dimorphism in which we reinterpret the trait as body size and reformulate sex-specific fitness in size-dependent manners. More specifically, we assume that higher growth rate or longer growth duration leads to larger body size and higher reproductive success but incurs the cost of lower survivorship or shorter reproduction period. We illustrate how two sexes would optimize ontogenetic growth trajectories in sex-specific ways and exhibit divergent body sizes. The present framework provides new insights into the evolutionary theory of SSD and predictions for empirical testing. PMID:26768067

  13. Ontogenetic Change in the Auditory Conditioned Stimulus Pathway for Eyeblink Conditioning

    Freeman, John H.; Campolattaro, Matthew M.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments examined the neural mechanisms underlying the ontogenetic emergence of auditory eyeblink conditioning. Previous studies found that the medial auditory thalamus is necessary for eyeblink conditioning with an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) in adult rats. In experiment 1, stimulation of the medial auditory thalamus was used as a…

  14. Ontogenetic development of energy-supplying enzymes in rat and guinea-pig heart

    Bass, A.; Stejskalová, M.; Stieglerová, Andrea; Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Šamánek, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2001), s. 237-245. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1659; GA MŠk LN00A069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : heart * ontogenetic development * energy metabolism Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.027, year: 2001

  15. Stable isotope analysis of vertebrae reveals ontogenetic changes in habitat in an endothermic pelagic shark.

    Carlisle, Aaron B; Goldman, Kenneth J; Litvin, Steven Y; Madigan, Daniel J; Bigman, Jennifer S; Swithenbank, Alan M; Kline, Thomas C; Block, Barbara A

    2015-01-22

    Ontogenetic changes in habitat are driven by shifting life-history requirements and play an important role in population dynamics. However, large portions of the life history of many pelagic species are still poorly understood or unknown. We used a novel combination of stable isotope analysis of vertebral annuli, Bayesian mixing models, isoscapes and electronic tag data to reconstruct ontogenetic patterns of habitat and resource use in a pelagic apex predator, the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis). Results identified the North Pacific Transition Zone as the major nursery area for salmon sharks and revealed an ontogenetic shift around the age of maturity from oceanic to increased use of neritic habitats. The nursery habitat may reflect trade-offs between prey availability, predation pressure and thermal constraints on juvenile endothermic sharks. The ontogenetic shift in habitat coincided with a reduction of isotopic niche, possibly reflecting specialization upon particular prey or habitats. Using tagging data to inform Bayesian isotopic mixing models revealed that adult sharks primarily use neritic habitats of Alaska yet receive a trophic subsidy from oceanic habitats. Integrating the multiple methods used here provides a powerful approach to retrospectively study the ecology and life history of migratory species throughout their ontogeny. PMID:25621332

  16. Ontogenetic patterns of concentration indicate lagoon nurseries are essential to common grunts stocks in a Puerto Rican bay

    Burke, John Selden; Kenworthy, W. Judson; Wood, Lisa L.

    2009-03-01

    Estimates of abundance and size of three commercially exploited grunt species indicate ontogenetic changes in habitat utilization concentrate their juveniles within the lagoon of the Bay of La Parguera, Puerto Rico. Eleven biotopes, defined by four benthic structures (reef, mangrove, vegetation beds and unconsolidated sediments) and three geographic zones (inner lagoon, outer lagoon and bank shelf) were sampled randomly by visual surveys. French, bluestriped and white grunt ( Haemulon flavolineatum, Haemulon sciurus and Haemulon plumeri) were common in the bay and appeared to exhibit similar life history patterns of cross-shelf migration and habitat selection. Recently settled grunts were dispersed over vegetated and unconsolidated soft-bottom sediments of the bay. The juvenile stage occurred in highest densities in shallow lagoon biotopes among the submerged prop-roots of mangrove stands and on inshore reefs. Length data indicates that grunts migrate offshore to adult habitat via increasingly deep reefs. Indices of biotope nursery function based on standing stock estimates of juveniles identified three biotopes, all within the inner lagoon as essential habitat for juveniles of 5-10 cm length interval. This concentration of juveniles within biotopes of the lagoon could represent a bottleneck to recruitment for grunt stocks. Evidence that quantity and quality of lagoon nurseries may limit recruitment indicates that these areas represent a key component of a marine protected area designed to restore fisheries within the bay.

  17. Barley metallothioneins differ in ontogenetic pattern and response to metals

    Schiller, Michaela; Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Pedas, Pai;

    2014-01-01

    pollination. However, among the MT grain transcripts MT2c was the most abundant, whereas MT4 was the least abundant. Excess Cu up-regulated three out of the six MTs expressed in leaves of young barley plants. In contrast, most MTs were down-regulated by excess Zn or Cd. Zn starvation led to up-regulation of......, the root-specific gene MT1b1 was 1000-fold up-regulated. Immunolocalizations provided the first evidence for accumulation of MT1a and MT2a proteins in planta, with correlation to transcript levels. In developing grains, MT2a and MT4 expression increased 4- and 300-fold over a 28-day-period after...... MT1a, whereas Cu starvation up-regulated MT2a, which has two copper-responsive elements in the promoter. Arabidopsis lines constitutively overexpressing barley MT2a showed increased sensitivity to excess Cd and Zn but no Cu-induced response. We suggest that barley MTs are differentially involved in...

  18. Are ontogenetic shifts in foliar structure and resource acquisition spatially conditioned in tank-bromeliads ?

    Petit, M; Céréghino, R.; Carrias, J. F.; Corbara, B.; Dézerald, O.; Petitclerc, F.; Dejean, A; Leroy, Céline

    2014-01-01

    The phenotypic plasticity of plants has been explored as a function of either ontogeny (apparent plasticity) or environment (adaptive plasticity), although few studies have analyzed these factors together. In the present study, we take advantage of the dispersal of Aechmea mertensii bromeliads by Camponotus femoratus or Pachycondyla goeldii ants in shaded and sunny environments, respectively, to quantify ontogenetic changes in morphological, foliar, and functional traits, and to analyze ontog...

  19. Ontogenetic pattern change in amphibians: the case of Salamandra corsica

    Wouter Beukema

    2011-01-01

    Ontogenetic, post-metamorphic pattern development is a rarely studied topic in amphibian science. As there are indications that the pattern of Salamandra corsica might expand over time, digital image analyses were applied in order to measure several phenotypical variables which were related to the snout vent length. Results show a significant increase of patches which change to irregular shapes while SVL increases. Digital image analysis is identified as a suitable tool to explore pattern sha...

  20. The influence of ontogenetic dietary fluctuations on zebrafish size and swimming performance

    ChrisMarks; FranciscoB.-G.Moore

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic flexibility is critical in determining fitness. As conditions change during ontogeny, continued responsiveness is necessary to meet the demands of the environment. Studies have shown that subsequent ontogenetic periods of development can interact with one another and shape developmental outcomes. The role genetic variation within populations plays in shaping these outcomes remains unclear. Four full-sib families of zebrafish Danio rerio were raised under for dietary regimes: high f...

  1. The dynamics of cysteine proteinase activity in brain structures of irrigated rat descendants during ontogenetic development

    Чорна, Валентина Іванівна; Лянна, Ольга Леонідівна

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate the kind of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L activity dependency in brain structures of irradiated rat descendants during ontogenetic development. It was shown that fractional x-ray radiation (25 cGy) of the female rats induced different changes of cathepsin L activity levels and their redistribution in brain structures of female rats’ descendants during postnatal development with the advantages of nonsedimentational activity that had maximum at the 6th da...

  2. Ontogenetic functional diversity: size structure of a keystone predator drives functioning of a complex ecosystem.

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Rasmussen, Nick L

    2013-05-01

    A central challenge in community ecology is to understand the connection between biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems. While traditional approaches have largely focused on species-level diversity, increasing evidence indicates that there exists substantial ecological diversity among individuals within species. By far, the largest source of this intraspecific diversity stems from variation among individuals in ontogenetic stage and size. Although such ontogenetic shifts are ubiquitous in natural communities, whether and how they scale up to influence the structure and functioning of complex ecosystems is largely unknown. Here we take an experimental approach to examine the consequences of ontogenetic niche shifts for the structure of communities and ecosystem processes. In particular we experimentally manipulated the stage structure in a keystone predator, larvae of the dragonfly Anax junius, in complex experimental pond communities to test whether changes in the population stage or size structure of a keystone species scale up to alter community structure and ecosystem processes, and how functional differences scale with relative differences in size among stages. We found that the functional role of A. junius was stage-specific. Altering what stages were present in a pond led to concurrent changes in community structure, primary producer biomass (periphyton and phytoplankton), and ultimately altered ecosystem processes (respiration and net primary productivity), indicating a strong, but stage-specific, trophic cascade. Interestingly, the stage-specific effects did not simply scale with size or biomass of the predator, but instead indicated clear ontogenetic niche shifts in ecological interactions. Thus, functional differences among stages within a keystone species scaled up to alter the functioning of entire ecosystems. Therefore, our results indicate that the classical approach of assuming an average functional role of a species can be misleading because

  3. Astaxanthin, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin esters in the copepod Acartia bifilosa (Copepoda, Calanoida) during ontogenetic development

    Maria £otocka; Ewa Styczynska-Jurewicz

    2001-01-01

    The contents of astaxanthin, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin esters were studied in natural populations of the copepod Acartia bifilosa from the Pomeranian Bay and Gulf of Gdansk in the southern Baltic Sea. Samples dominated by any one of three developmental groups: (1) nauplii, (2) copepodids I-III and (3) copepodids IV-V and adults of Acartia bifilosa were analysed by means of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). As ontogenetic development progressed, significant changes occurre...

  4. Evidence of Niche Partitioning under Ontogenetic Influences among Three Morphologically Similar Siluriformes in Small Subtropical Streams

    Karine Orlandi Bonato; Clarice Bernhardt Fialho

    2014-01-01

    Ontogenetic influences in patterns of niche breadth and feeding overlap were investigated in three species of Siluriformes (Heptapterus sp., Rhamdia quelen and Trichomycterus poikilos) aiming at understanding the species coexistence. Samplings were conducted bimonthly by electrofishing technique from June/2012 to June/2013 in ten streams of the northwestern state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The stomach contents of 1,948 individuals were analyzed by volumetric method, with 59 food items iden...

  5. Ontogenetic conflicts and rank reversals in two Mediterranean oak species: Implications for coexistence

    Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio Manuel; Rodríguez Urbieta, Itzíar; Zavala, Miguel A.; Marañón, Teodoro

    2012-01-01

    In heterogeneous environments, species segregate spatially in response to selective abiotic and biotic filters occurring throughout plant ontogeny. Ontogenetic conflicts in recruitment may lead to spatially discordant patterns of regeneration among microhabitats with different plant cover. In addition, species differing in seed size may be subjected to opposing ecological and evolutionary pressures throughout the life cycle of the plant. We used a multi-stage demographic approach aimed at cha...

  6. Ontogenetic changes of lipofuscin-like pigments in the rat heart

    Wilhelm, Jiří; Ošťádalová, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, Suppl.1 (2012), S173-S179. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : rat heart * ontogenetic development * lipofuscin-like pigments (LFP) * reactive oxygen species (ROS) * gender difference * right/left ventricle ratio Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  7. The floral scales in Hellmuthia (Cyperaceae, Cyperoideae) and Paramapania (Cyperaceae, Mapanioideae): An ontogenetic study

    VRIJDAGHS, A; GOETGHEBEUR, P.; SMETS, E.; Muasya, A

    2006-01-01

    Background and Aims In 1976 the monotypic genus Hellmuthia was placed in the Hypolytreae s.l., but was subsequently ascribed to the Mapanioideae, tribe Chrysitricheae, mainly because of the presence in Hellmuthia of two lateral, mapanioid-like floral scales with ciliated keels, the anatomy of the nutlet, the embryo and the inflorescence. Recently, based on cladistic analyses and supported by pollen ontogenetic evidence, Hellmuthia was transferred to a Cyperaceae, tribe Cypereae, clade mainly ...

  8. Population divergence in the ontogenetic trajectories of foliar terpenes of a Eucalyptus species

    Borzak, Christina L.; Potts, Brad M; Davies, Noel W.; O’Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The development of plant secondary metabolites during early life stages can have significant ecological and evolutionary implications for plant–herbivore interactions. Foliar terpenes influence a broad range of ecological interactions, including plant defence, and their expression may be influenced by ontogenetic and genetic factors. This study investigates the role of these factors in the expression of foliar terpene compounds in Eucalyptus globulus seedlings.

  9. Chicken-sized oviraptorid dinosaurs from central China and their ontogenetic implications

    Lü, Junchang; Currie, Philip J.; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xingliao; Pu, Hanyong; Jia, Songhai

    2013-02-01

    Oviraptorids are a group of specialized non-avian theropod dinosaurs that were generally one to 8 m in body length. New specimens of baby oviraptorids from the Late Cretaceous of Henan Province are some of the smallest individuals known. They include diagnostic characters such as the relative position of the antorbital fenestra and the external naris, distinct opening in the premaxilla anteroventral to the external naris, antorbital fossa partly bordered by premaxilla posterodorsally, lacrimal process of premaxilla does not contact the anterodorsal process of the lacrimal, parietal almost as long as frontal; in dorsal view, posterior margin forms a straight line between the postzygapophyses in each of the fourth and fifth cervicals; femur longer than ilium. They also elucidate the ontogenetic processes of oviraptorids, including fusion of cranial elements and changes in relative body proportions. Hind limb proportions are constant in oviraptorids, regardless of absolute body size or ontogenetic stage. This suggests a sedentary lifestyle that did not involve the pursuit of similar-sized prey. The functional implications for bite force and therefore dietary preferences are better understood through the study of such small animals. The comparison of the measurements of 115 skeletons indicates that oviraptorids maintain their hind limb proportions regardless of ontogenetic stage or absolute size, which is a pattern seen more commonly in herbivores than in carnivores. This may weakly support the hypothesis that oviraptorids are herbivores rather than active carnivores.

  10. Ontogenetic shift in response to prey-derived chemical cues in prairie rattlesnakes Crotalus viridis viridis

    Anthony J. SAVIOLA, David CHISZAR, Stephen P. MACKESSY

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Snakes often have specialized diets that undergo a shift from one prey type to another depending on the life stage of the snake. Crotalus viridis viridis (prairie rattlesnake takes different prey at different life stages, and neonates typically prey on ectotherms, while adults feed almost entirely on small endotherms. We hypothesized that elevated rates of tongue flicking to chemical stimuli should correlate with particular prey consumed, and that this response shifts from one prey type to another as individuals age. To examine if an ontogenetic shift in response to chemical cues occurred, we recorded the rate of tongue flicking for 25 neonate, 20 subadult, and 20 adult (average SVL = 280.9, 552, 789.5 mm, respectively wild-caught C. v. viridis to chemical stimuli presented on a cotton-tipped applicator; water-soluble cues from two ectotherms (prairie lizard, Sceloporus undulatus, and house gecko, Hemidactylus frenatus, two endotherms (deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus and lab mouse, Mus musculus, and water controls were used. Neonates tongue flicked significantly more to chemical cues of their common prey, S. undulatus, than to all other chemical cues; however, the response to this lizard’s chemical cues decreased in adult rattlesnakes. Subadults tongue flicked with a higher rate of tongue flicking to both S. undulatus and P. maniculatus than to all other treatments, and adults tongue flicked significantly more to P. maniculatus than to all other chemical cues. In addition, all three sub-classes demonstrated a greater response for natural prey chemical cues over chemical stimuli of prey not encountered in the wild (M. musculus and H. frenatus. This shift in chemosensory response correlated with the previously described ontogenetic shifts in C. v. viridis diet. Because many vipers show a similar ontogenetic shift in diet and venom composition, we suggest that this shift in prey cue discrimination is likely a general phenomenon among viperid

  11. Ontogenetic niche shifts in three Vaccinium species on a sub-alpine mountain side

    Auffret, A.G.; Meineri, E.; Bruun, Hans Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    . uliginosum and V. vitis-idaea on a mountain slope in northern Sweden in relation to current adult occurrence. Methods: We combined a seed-sowing experiment in seven community types with adult occurrence observations and species distribution mapping. Results: Emergence of V. myrtillus and V. vitis......-idaea seedlings was significantly related to community type, while V. uliginosum was indifferent, but exhibited the highest average emergence. Adult occurrence was related to community, and ontogenetic niche shifts were observed for all three study species. V. myrtillus was shown to have the highest potential...

  12. Ontogenetic mechanisms underlying sexual size dimorphism in Urodele amphibians: An across-species approach

    Lixia ZHANG; Xin LU

    2013-01-01

    Why do two sexes of the same species differ in body size holds a long-standing question of evolutionary biology.While many across-species comparisons have focused on ultimate causes behind sexual size dimorphism (SSD),only have a few been directed toward elucidating its ontogenetic basis.Urodeles are an amphibian group in which the direction and degree of SSD vary greatly among species.Using demographic data yielded by skeletochronology for 33 urodele species,the current study reveals a positive across-species correlation between SSD and the sex difference in mean age of adult animals,and the latter increases with the corresponding difference in age at maturity; annual growth rate does not differ between the sexes.We conclude that extended longevities in one sex,which is mediated by delayed maturation,would allow it to grow for longer and get larger,with growth rate making a weak contribution to body size.The sex-specific divergence in ontogenetic trajectory might be explained by potentially high growth costs of reproduction to females in association with stronger fecundity selection,and to males that are expected to experience stronger sexual selection [Current Zoology 59 (1):142-150,2013].

  13. Revisiting a model of ontogenetic growth: estimating model parameters from theory and data.

    Moses, Melanie E; Hou, Chen; Woodruff, William H; West, Geoffrey B; Nekola, Jeffery C; Zuo, Wenyun; Brown, James H

    2008-05-01

    The ontogenetic growth model (OGM) of West et al. provides a general description of how metabolic energy is allocated between production of new biomass and maintenance of existing biomass during ontogeny. Here, we reexamine the OGM, make some minor modifications and corrections, and further evaluate its ability to account for empirical variation on rates of metabolism and biomass in vertebrates both during ontogeny and across species of varying adult body size. We show that the updated version of the model is internally consistent and is consistent with other predictions of metabolic scaling theory and empirical data. The OGM predicts not only the near universal sigmoidal form of growth curves but also the M(1/4) scaling of the characteristic times of ontogenetic stages in addition to the curvilinear decline in growth efficiency described by Brody. Additionally, the OGM relates the M(3/4) scaling across adults of different species to the scaling of metabolic rate across ontogeny within species. In providing a simple, quantitative description of how energy is allocated to growth, the OGM calls attention to unexplained variation, unanswered questions, and opportunities for future research. PMID:18419571

  14. Use of mutation induction to alter the ontogenetic pattern of crop plants

    Examples of the mutant cultivars with altered flowering or maturity time are given, and the induced mutants with altered developmental patterns are reviewed. It is pointed out that the adjustment of the time of maturity (earliness or lateness) without lowering the highly desirable traits of a variety such as yield and quality is obtainable by induced mutation techniques. Earlier harvest and the shorter duration from sowing to harvest generally leads to lower yield, but this may be tolerated if better quality is achieved, if crops escape hazardous stress conditions or pathogen attack, and if the subsequent crops gain in yield. Some examples in barley, wheat, rice, leguminous plants, oil seed and fiber crops, sugar cane, fruits and ornamentals are reviewed, and it is emphasized that the whole life history of plants has relevance for their productivity, and that the careful examination of ontogenetic pattern is necessary to breed desirable varieties. (Kaihara, S.)

  15. Ontogenetic niche shifts in three Vaccinium species on a sub-alpine mountain side

    Auffret, Alistair G.; Meineri, Eric; Bruun, Hans Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Climate warming in arctic and alpine regions is expected to result in the altitudinal migration of plant species, but current predictions neglect differences between species' regeneration niche and established niche. Aims: To examine potential recruitment of Vaccinium myrtillus, V. ul...... recruitment in habitats at altitudes above its current populations. Conclusions: The potential for migration exists, but incongruence between regenerative and established niches presents a challenge for colonisers, as well as for plant migration modelling......Background: Climate warming in arctic and alpine regions is expected to result in the altitudinal migration of plant species, but current predictions neglect differences between species' regeneration niche and established niche. Aims: To examine potential recruitment of Vaccinium myrtillus, V......-idaea seedlings was significantly related to community type, while V. uliginosum was indifferent, but exhibited the highest average emergence. Adult occurrence was related to community, and ontogenetic niche shifts were observed for all three study species. V. myrtillus was shown to have the highest potential...

  16. Ontogenetic scaling patterns and functional anatomy of the pelvic limb musculature in emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae

    Luis P. Lamas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae are exclusively terrestrial, bipedal and cursorial ratites with some similar biomechanical characteristics to humans. Their growth rates are impressive, as their body mass increases eighty-fold from hatching to adulthood whilst maintaining the same mode of locomotion throughout life. These ontogenetic characteristics stimulate biomechanical questions about the strategies that allow emus to cope with their rapid growth and locomotion, which can be partly addressed via scaling (allometric analysis of morphology. In this study we have collected pelvic limb anatomical data (muscle architecture, tendon length, tendon mass and bone lengths and calculated muscle physiological cross sectional area (PCSA and average tendon cross sectional area from emus across three ontogenetic stages (n = 17, body masses from 3.6 to 42 kg. The data were analysed by reduced major axis regression to determine how these biomechanically relevant aspects of morphology scaled with body mass. Muscle mass and PCSA showed a marked trend towards positive allometry (26 and 27 out of 34 muscles respectively and fascicle length showed a more mixed scaling pattern. The long tendons of the main digital flexors scaled with positive allometry for all characteristics whilst other tendons demonstrated a less clear scaling pattern. Finally, the two longer bones of the limb (tibiotarsus and tarsometatarsus also exhibited positive allometry for length, and two others (femur and first phalanx of digit III had trends towards isometry. These results indicate that emus experience a relative increase in their muscle force-generating capacities, as well as potentially increasing the force-sustaining capacities of their tendons, as they grow. Furthermore, we have clarified anatomical descriptions and provided illustrations of the pelvic limb muscle–tendon units in emus.

  17. Ontogenetically-regulated male sterility in tissue culture - induced and spontaneous sorghum mutants

    Elkonin L.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Variability of male fertility expression in the AS-1 line, a somaclonal variant obtained from tissue culture of CMS-plant, and in the progeny of revenant '124-1' obtained from fertile tiller, which developed on CMS-plant transferred from the field to the greenhouse, was investigated. Both revertants were characterized by similar expression of male fertility during plant ontogenesis: the panicle on the main tiller was almost completely sterile whereas formation of fertile pollen grains and seed set were observed on the panicles of the shoot tillers. A clear basipetal gradient of male fertility was manifested on all panicles: the base had significantly higher per cent of fertile pollen grains in comparison with the middle part, while in the top the anthers were either absent or had few sterile pollen grains. Such an ontogenetically-regulated restoration of male fertility was controlled by nuclear genes and could be transferred through the pollen in crosses with progenitor CMS-line. Growing of AS-1 plants in the growth chambers simultaneously under a long (16/8 and a short (12/12 daylength conditions demonstrated that differences of fertility level in different tillers was not caused by change of photoperiod during plant ontogenesis and functioning of photoperiod-sensitive fertility restoring gene. Whereas, the ontogenetically-regulated expression of male fertility in both revenants was temperature-dependent and was clearly manifested under relatively cool conditions during 2-week period before the beginning of anthesis of the first panicle (average daily temperature 21°C. The increase of the average daily temperature by 2-3 С resulted in sharp increase of male fertility level. Possibility of using AS-1 line in a new "two-line system" of hybrid seed production, which require only two lines (sterile mutant and fertility restorer, is discussed.

  18. Ontogenetic shifts in plant-plant interactions in a rare cycad within angiosperm communities.

    Álvarez-Yépiz, Juan C; Búrquez, Alberto; Dovčiak, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Gymnosperms and angiosperms can co-occur within the same habitats but key plant traits are thought to give angiosperms an evolutionary competitive advantage in many ecological settings. We studied ontogenetic changes in competitive and facilitative interactions between a rare gymnosperm (Dioon sonorense, our target species) and different plant and abiotic neighbours (conspecific-cycads, heterospecific-angiosperms, or abiotic-rocks) from 2007 to 2010 in an arid environment of northwestern Mexico. We monitored survival and growth of seedlings, juveniles, and adults of the cycad Dioon sonorense to evaluate how cycad survival and relative height growth rate (RHGR) responded to intra- and interspecific competition, canopy openness, and nearest neighbour. We tested spatial associations among D. sonorense life stages and angiosperm species and measured ontogenetic shifts in cycad shade tolerance. Canopy openness decreased cycad survival while intraspecific competition decreased survival and RHGR during early ontogeny. Seedling survival was higher in association with rocks and heterospecific neighbours where intraspecific competition was lower. Shade tolerance decreased with cycad ontogeny reflecting the spatial association of advanced stages with more open canopies. Interspecific facilitation during early ontogeny of our target species may promote its persistence in spite of increasing interspecific competition in later stages. We provide empirical support to the long-standing assumption that marginal rocky habitats serve as refugia from angiosperm competition for slow-growing gymnosperms such as cycads. The lack of knowledge of plant-plant interactions in rare or endangered species may hinder developing efficient conservation strategies (e.g. managing for sustained canopy cover), especially under the ongoing land use and climatic changes. PMID:24652529

  19. Vertical movement patterns and ontogenetic niche expansion in the tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier.

    André S Afonso

    Full Text Available Sharks are top predators in many marine ecosystems and can impact community dynamics, yet many shark populations are undergoing severe declines primarily due to overfishing. Obtaining species-specific knowledge on shark spatial ecology is important to implement adequate management strategies for the effective conservation of these taxa. This is particularly relevant concerning highly-mobile species that use wide home ranges comprising coastal and oceanic habitats, such as tiger sharks, Galeocerdo cuvier. We deployed satellite tags in 20 juvenile tiger sharks off northeastern Brazil to assess the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on depth and temperature usage. Sharks were tracked for a total of 1184 d and used waters up to 1112 m in depth. The minimum temperature recorded equaled 4°C. All sharks had a clear preference for surface (< 5 m waters but variability in depth usage was observed as some sharks used mostly shallow (< 60 m waters whereas others made frequent incursions into greater depths. A diel behavioral shift was detected, with sharks spending considerably more time in surface (< 10 m waters during the night. Moreover, a clear ontogenetic expansion in the vertical range of tiger shark habitat was observed, with generalized linear models estimating a ~4-fold increase in maximum diving depth from 150- to 300-cm size-classes. The time spent in the upper 5 m of the water column did not vary ontogenetically but shark size was the most important factor explaining the utilization of deeper water layers. Young-of-the-year tiger sharks seem to associate with shallow, neritic habitats but they progressively move into deeper oceanic habitats as they grow larger. Such an early plasticity in habitat use could endow tiger sharks with access to previously unavailable prey, thus contributing to a wider ecological niche.

  20. Scaling of feeding biomechanics in the horn shark Heterodontus francisci: ontogenetic constraints on durophagy.

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Huber, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    Organismal performance changes over ontogeny as the musculoskeletal systems underlying animal behavior grow in relative size and shape. As performance is a determinant of feeding ecology, ontogenetic changes in the former can influence the latter. The horn shark Heterodontus francisci consumes hard-shelled benthic invertebrates, which may be problematic for younger animals with lower performance capacities. Scaling of feeding biomechanics was investigated in H. francisci (n=16, 19-59cm standard length (SL)) to determine the biomechanical basis of allometric changes in feeding performance and whether this performance capacity constrains hard-prey consumption over ontogeny. Positive allometry of anterior (8-163N) and posterior (15-382N) theoretical bite force was attributed to positive allometry of cross-sectional area in two jaw adducting muscles and mechanical advantage at the posterior bite point (0.79-1.26). Mechanical advantage for anterior biting scaled isometrically (0.52). Fracture forces for purple sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus consumed by H. francisci ranged from 24 to 430N. Comparison of these fracture forces to the bite force of H. francisci suggests that H. francisci is unable to consume hard prey early in its life history, but can consume the majority of S. purpuratus by the time it reaches maximum size. Despite this constraint, positive allometry of biting performance appears to facilitate an earlier entry into the durophagous niche than would an isometric ontogenetic trajectory. The posterior gape of H. francisci is significantly smaller than the urchins capable of being crushed by its posterior bite force. Thus, the high posterior bite forces of H. francisci cannot be fully utilized while consuming prey of similar toughness and size to S. purpuratus, and its potential trophic niche is primarily determined by anterior biting capacity. PMID:19428230

  1. Evidence of niche partitioning under ontogenetic influences among three morphologically similar siluriformes in small subtropical streams.

    Karine Orlandi Bonato

    Full Text Available Ontogenetic influences in patterns of niche breadth and feeding overlap were investigated in three species of Siluriformes (Heptapterus sp., Rhamdia quelen and Trichomycterus poikilos aiming at understanding the species coexistence. Samplings were conducted bimonthly by electrofishing technique from June/2012 to June/2013 in ten streams of the northwestern state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The stomach contents of 1,948 individuals were analyzed by volumetric method, with 59 food items identified. In general Heptapterus sp. consumed a high proportion of Aegla sp., terrestrial plant remains and Megaloptera; R. quelen consumed fish, and Oligochaeta, followed by Aegla sp.; while the diet of T. poikilos was based on Simuliidae, Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera. Specie segregation was observed in the NMDS. Through PERMANOVA analysis feeding differences among species, and between a combination of species plus size classes were observed. IndVal showed which items were indicators of these differences. Niche breadth values were high for all species. The niche breadth values were low only for the larger size of R. quelen and Heptapterus sp. while T. poikilos values were more similar. Overall the species were a low feeding overlap values. The higher frequency of high feeding overlap was observed for interaction between Heptapterus sp. and T. poikilos. The null model confirmed the niche partitioning between the species. The higher frequency of high and intermediate feeding overlap values were reported to smaller size classes. The null model showed resource sharing between the species/size class. Therefore, overall species showed a resource partitioning because of the use of occasional items. However, these species share resources mainly in the early ontogenetic stages until the emphasized change of morphological characteristics leading to trophic niche expansion and the apparent segregation observed.

  2. Evidence of niche partitioning under ontogenetic influences among three morphologically similar siluriformes in small subtropical streams.

    Bonato, Karine Orlandi; Fialho, Clarice Bernhardt

    2014-01-01

    Ontogenetic influences in patterns of niche breadth and feeding overlap were investigated in three species of Siluriformes (Heptapterus sp., Rhamdia quelen and Trichomycterus poikilos) aiming at understanding the species coexistence. Samplings were conducted bimonthly by electrofishing technique from June/2012 to June/2013 in ten streams of the northwestern state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The stomach contents of 1,948 individuals were analyzed by volumetric method, with 59 food items identified. In general Heptapterus sp. consumed a high proportion of Aegla sp., terrestrial plant remains and Megaloptera; R. quelen consumed fish, and Oligochaeta, followed by Aegla sp.; while the diet of T. poikilos was based on Simuliidae, Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera. Specie segregation was observed in the NMDS. Through PERMANOVA analysis feeding differences among species, and between a combination of species plus size classes were observed. IndVal showed which items were indicators of these differences. Niche breadth values were high for all species. The niche breadth values were low only for the larger size of R. quelen and Heptapterus sp. while T. poikilos values were more similar. Overall the species were a low feeding overlap values. The higher frequency of high feeding overlap was observed for interaction between Heptapterus sp. and T. poikilos. The null model confirmed the niche partitioning between the species. The higher frequency of high and intermediate feeding overlap values were reported to smaller size classes. The null model showed resource sharing between the species/size class. Therefore, overall species showed a resource partitioning because of the use of occasional items. However, these species share resources mainly in the early ontogenetic stages until the emphasized change of morphological characteristics leading to trophic niche expansion and the apparent segregation observed. PMID:25340614

  3. The Effect of Negative Air Ionization Exposure on Ontogenetic Development of Chicken

    Valeria LAZA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the benefic effects of negative air ions (NAI quoted in the literature until the end of the 20th century were obtained with high doses of NAI, but at these doses a phased action was noted: favorable at the beginning, then unfavorable on extended exposures. In Romania, experimental studies on animal or human subjects were made mostly with moderate doses of air ions, close to those in the nature, and the duration of ionization was limited. In order to clear out some methodological issues regarding the air ionization use, we proposed to make a stepped set of investigations, on the hen egg submitted to incubation.The first goal of our study follows to evaluate the role of NAI on the development of the chicken embryo, in average concentration, but with extended exposure. The second goal is to detect the effects of negative air ionization in high doses on the incubated eggs, as well as to accentuate the periods of chicken eggs’ ontogenetic development periods, when air ionization acts stronger, or with more benefits.In the first experiment, the eggs were submitted to moderate air ionization day and night (in continuous application, during all the incubation period (21days. In the second experiment the eggs were ionized with high doses of negative air ions, in different period of ontogenetic development.Continuous ionization (day and night with moderate doses of NAI, during entire period of eggs incubation (21 days, supports the idea of phased action of air ions in moderate doses: favorable at the beginning and unfavorable later, if the exposure to air ions is extended. The application of higher doses of air ions appeared to be positive in the eggs development and hatching, but only if the exposure was made in the second half of incubation, after the chicken development was finished.

  4. Ontogenetic changes in limb bone structural proportions in mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei).

    Ruff, Christopher B; Burgess, M Loring; Bromage, Timothy G; Mudakikwa, Antoine; McFarlin, Shannon C

    2013-12-01

    Behavioral studies indicate that adult mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei) are the most terrestrial of all nonhuman hominoids, but that infant mountain gorillas are much more arboreal. Here we examine ontogenetic changes in diaphyseal strength and length of the femur, tibia, humerus, radius, and ulna in 30 Virunga mountain gorillas, including 18 immature specimens and 12 adults. Comparisons are also made with 14 adult western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), which are known to be more arboreal than adult mountain gorillas. Infant mountain gorillas have significantly stronger forelimbs relative to hind limbs than older juveniles and adults, but are nonsignificantly different from western lowland gorilla adults. The change in inter-limb strength proportions is abrupt at about two years of age, corresponding to the documented transition to committed terrestrial quadrupedalism in mountain gorillas. The one exception is the ulna, which shows a gradual increase in strength relative to the radius and other long bones during development, possibly corresponding to the gradual adoption of stereotypical fully pronated knuckle-walking in older juvenile gorillas. Inter-limb bone length proportions show a contrasting developmental pattern, with hind limb/forelimb length declining rapidly from birth to five months of age, and then showing no consistent change through adulthood. The very early change in length proportions, prior to significant independent locomotion, may be related to the need for relatively long forelimbs for climbing in a large-bodied hominoid. Virunga mountain gorilla older juveniles and adults have equal or longer forelimb relative to hind limb bones than western lowland adults. These findings indicate that both ontogenetically and among closely related species of Gorilla, long bone strength proportions better reflect actual locomotor behavior than bone length proportions. PMID:24129040

  5. Mangroves Enhance Reef Fish Abundance at the Caribbean Regional Scale.

    Joseph E Serafy

    Full Text Available Several studies conducted at the scale of islands, or small sections of continental coastlines, have suggested that mangrove habitats serve to enhance fish abundances on coral reefs, mainly by providing nursery grounds for several ontogenetically-migrating species. However, evidence of such enhancement at a regional scale has not been reported, and recently, some researchers have questioned the mangrove-reef subsidy effect. In the present study, using two different regression approaches, we pursued two questions related to mangrove-reef connectivity at the Caribbean regional scale: (1 Are reef fish abundances limited by mangrove forest area?; and (2 Are mean reef fish abundances proportional to mangrove forest area after taking human population density and latitude into account? Specifically, we tested for Caribbean-wide mangrove forest area effects on the abundances of 12 reef fishes that have been previously characterized as "mangrove-dependent". Analyzed were data from an ongoing, long-term (20-year citizen-scientist fish monitoring program; coastal human population censuses; and several wetland forest information sources. Quantile regression results supported the notion that mangrove forest area limits the abundance of eight of the 12 fishes examined. Linear mixed-effects regression results, which considered potential human (fishing and habitat degradation and latitudinal influences, suggested that average reef fish densities of at least six of the 12 focal fishes were directly proportional to mangrove forest area. Recent work questioning the mangrove-reef fish subsidy effect likely reflects a failure to: (1 focus analyses on species that use mangroves as nurseries, (2 consider more than the mean fish abundance response to mangrove forest extent; and/or (3 quantitatively account for potentially confounding human impacts, such as fishing pressure and habitat degradation. Our study is the first to demonstrate at a large regional scale (i

  6. Precision Chemical Abundance Measurements

    Yong, David; Grundahl, Frank; Meléndez, Jorge;

    2012-01-01

    This talk covers preliminary work in which we apply a strictly differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis to high quality UVES spectra of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We achieve extremely high precision in the measurement of relative abundance ratios. Our results indicate that the ob...

  7. Maximum abundant isotopes correlation

    The neutron excess of the most abundant isotopes of the element shows an overall linear dependence upon the neutron number for nuclei between neutron closed shells. This maximum abundant isotopes correlation supports the arguments for a common history of the elements during nucleosynthesis. (Auth.)

  8. Prolixus (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae) newly recorded from New Zealand: A new species from Cyperaceae and its ontogenetic patterns in chaetotaxy.

    Xu, Yun; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The genus Prolixus (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) was represented by two species from Australian sedges prior to this study. A new species, Prolixus meyerae sp. nov., is here described and illustrated from leaves of Gahnia (Cyperaceae) in Auckland, New Zealand. In this paper, we present the ontogenetic additions in idiosomal and leg chaetotaxy from larva to adult. A key to world species of Prolixus is also proposed. PMID:25543721

  9. USING OF MSC WITH DIFFERENT ONTOGENETIC MATURITY FOR CORRECTION OF CHRONIC FIBROSING LIVER DAMAGE

    M. Y. Shagidulin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the effectiveness of MSC with different degree of ontogenetic maturity (MSC bone marrow – MSC BM and MSC umbilical cord – MSC UC on regenerative processes in injured liver. Methods. In 4 groups of experiments on Wistar rats (n = 80 with a model of fibrotic toxic liver damage (FLD it was studied the effect of MSCs with different degree of ontogenetic maturity on recovery processes at the regeneration of damaged liver: 1 gr. – Control, 2 gr. and 3 gr. introduction of MSC BM, included in Sphero®GEL-long in doses of 2.5 ×106 and 5.0 x 106 cells, respectively, and 4 gr. – introduction of MSC UC in the form of cell-spheroids (8–10 × 105 cells. The cells were injected into the damaged liver in 7 days after the end of FDL-modeling. The effect of cell therapy was studied during 180 days. The effectiveness of corrective therapy was evaluated by the results of functional and morphological investigations of livers (histological control of parenchymal and nonparenchy- mal liver tissue. Results. MSC BM in both doses and MSC UC contributed to a more rapid normalization of liver enzyme indices compared with the control (1 gr., but the differences in the rate of recovery of disturbed enzymatic liver functions between groups 2, 3 and 4 – were absent. In 90 days after the cell application it was determined a more pronounced recovery activity of cells in groups 3 and 4; in 180 days the more pronounced activation of recovery processes was observed in group 3; but in group 4 the sclerotic processes were more pro- nounced in this period. Conclusion. For the induction of recovery processes in damage liver it is advisable not to use the MSC UC, but to use MSC BM in the Sphero®GEL, because MSC BM exert not only local but also systemic immune-regulatory effect, increasing the pool of T-reg. cells, which are additional carriers of regenera- tion information in organism. 

  10. Methods of Foliar Surface Determination along the Ontogenetic Cycle on Apple Trees

    Valerian BALAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining the evolution of foliar surface in different types of annual branches of apple using different methods of foliar surface determination. The investigations were carried out in the intensive orchard of Didactic Experimental Station Criuleni, Moldavia. The observations were made on the cultivar Golden Delicious grafted on an M4 rootstock, and planted at 5 x 3 m distances, along the main four periods of ontogenetic cycle (growth, growth and fructification, fructification and growth, fructification. The trees were formed by the free growing palmette type. The leaf surface area was determined for all trees considered through measuring and numbering. In order to determine the dimension of the foliar surface, all types of annual shoots were measured. In addition, the quantity of leaves on the annual shoots and on the spurs was determined. Using the existing data, the leaf surface area for tree and area unit was calculated. Leaf area in the trees, during ontogenesis, was 3.26-29.9 m/tree, respectively 2.1-10.92 m/tree on the shoots and 1.16-23.7 m/tree on the spurs, spears and old spur systems.

  11. Ontogenetic ritualization of primate gesture as a case study in dyadic brain modeling.

    Gasser, Brad; Cartmill, Erica A; Arbib, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces dyadic brain modeling - the simultaneous, computational modeling of the brains of two interacting agents - to explore ways in which our understanding of macaque brain circuitry can ground new models of brain mechanisms involved in ape interaction. Specifically, we assess a range of data on gestural communication of great apes as the basis for developing an account of the interactions of two primates engaged in ontogenetic ritualization, a proposed learning mechanism through which a functional action may become a communicative gesture over repeated interactions between two individuals (the 'dyad'). The integration of behavioral, neural, and computational data in dyadic (or, more generally, social) brain modeling has broad application to comparative and evolutionary questions, particularly for the evolutionary origins of cognition and language in the human lineage. We relate this work to the neuroinformatics challenges of integrating and sharing data to support collaboration between primatologists, neuroscientists and modelers that will help speed the emergence of what may be called comparative neuro-primatology. PMID:23608958

  12. Life in the slow lane revisited: ontogenetic separation between chimpanzees and humans.

    Walker, Robert; Hill, Kim; Burger, Oskar; Hurtado, A Magdalena

    2006-04-01

    This study investigates the evolution of human growth by analyzing differences in body mass growth trajectories among three populations: the Ache of eastern Paraguay, the US (NHANES, 1999-2000), and captive chimpanzees. The relative growth statistic "A" from the mammalian growth law is allowed to vary with age and proves useful for comparing growth across different ages, populations, and species. We demonstrate ontogenetic separation between chimpanzees and humans, and show that interspecific differences are robust to variable environmental conditions. The human pattern of slow growth during the lengthened period from weaning to the beginning of the adolescent growth spurt is found among the Ache (low energy availability and high disease load) and also in the US (high energy availability and low disease load). The human growth pattern contrasts with that of the chimpanzee, where absolute growth rates and relative "A" values are faster and less prolonged. We suggest that selection has acted to decrease human growth rates to allow more time for increased cognitive development with lower body-maintenance costs. PMID:16345067

  13. Natal departure timing from spatially varying environments is dependent of individual ontogenetic status

    Cucherousset, Julien; Paillisson, Jean-Marc; Roussel, Jean-Marc

    2013-08-01

    Natal departure timing represents one of the first crucial decisions for juveniles born in spatially varying environments that ultimately disappear, but our knowledge on its determinants is limited. The present study aimed at understanding the determinants of juvenile natal departure by releasing individually tagged juvenile pike ( Esox lucius L.) with variable body size and trophic position in a temporary flooded grassland. Specifically, we investigated whether natal departure depends on individual competitive status (`competition hypothesis'), physiological tolerance to environmental conditions (`physiological hypothesis') or individual trophic position and the spatial heterogeneity of trophic resources (`trophic hypothesis'). The results indicated that departure timing was negatively correlated with body size at release, showing that the dominance status among competing individuals was not the main trigger of juvenile departure. A positive correlation between departure timing and individual body size at departure was observed, suggesting that inter-individual variability in physiological tolerance did not explain departure patterns. While individual growth performances were similar irrespective of the timing of natal departure, stable isotope analyses revealed that juveniles with higher trophic position departed significantly earlier than individuals with lower trophic position. Therefore, the trade-off driving the use of spatially varying environments was most likely dependent upon the benefits associated with energetic returns than the costs associated with inter-individual competition or physiological stress. This result highlighted how ontogeny, and particularly ontogenetic niche shift, can play a central role in juvenile's decision to depart from natal habitats in a predatory species.

  14. Large ontogenetic declines in intra-crown leaf area index in two temperate deciduous tree species.

    Nock, C A; Caspersen, J P; Thomas, S C

    2008-03-01

    The widespread occurrence of age-related changes in leaf morphology and allocation suggests that the leaf area index of individual trees (intra-crown LAI) may decline late in ontogeny. We used direct, within-canopy measurements to quantify the LAI of canopy trees with exposed crowns of two temperate deciduous species. Intra-crown LAI declined from approximately 7 to 4 in Acer saccharum, and from approximately 9.5 to 6.5 in Betula alleghaniensis, as tree size increased (from 15 to 72 cm diameter at breast height [dbh]). For A. saccharum, age (which varied from 30 to 160 years) was a significantly better predictor of LAI decline than dbh. We also modeled the effect of ontogenetic declines in LAI on understory light availability and found that light transmission increases significantly as canopy trees grow and mature. Our results thus suggest that gradual declines in LAI with tree age may play an important and overlooked role in contributing to the heterogeneity of sub-canopy light regimes in mature forests. PMID:18459337

  15. Ontogenetic Development of the Derived Olfactory System of the Mantellid Frog Mantidactylus betsileanus.

    Nowack, Christine; Vences, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    The nasal cavity of Mantidactylus betsileanus, a frog of the Madagascar-Comoroan endemic family Mantellidae, is characterized by a unique internal architecture. Unlike the state commonly observed in anurans, the two discernible olfactory subsystems of M. betsileanus (the main olfactory organ and the vomeronasal organ) are anatomically separated from each other, suggesting an enhanced functional differentiation. Here we evaluate the ontogenetic formation of this extraordinary anatomical state based on a histological study of a developmental series of M. betsileanus. The olfactory system of premetamorphic tadpoles, and most of its changes during metamorphosis, resembles that of other anurans. At the end of metamorphosis however, a growing obstruction of the passage between main olfactory organ and vomeronasal organ takes place, leading to the deviant morphological state previously described for adults. The late appearance of this atypical anatomical feature in the course of ontogeny agrees with the phylogenetic hypothesis of the observed obstruction representing a derived state for these frogs. From a functional point of view, the apparent autonomy of the vomeronasal organ is possibly linked to the presence of clade-specific femoral glands that are known to produce pheromones and that likewise are fully expressed in adults only. Anat Rec, 299:943-950, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27084295

  16. Ontogenetic variations in flush development are indicative of low temperature tolerance in Hevea brasiliensis clones

    K.K. Vinod

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Para rubber (Hevea brasiliensis trees are naturally adapted to the Amazonian tropical climate. In India rubber trees are traditionally cultivated in the warm humid tropics of the south. Northeast India is a non-traditional area for rubber cultivation. A major limiting factor on tree growth in the northeast region is stress due to low temperature. Being a deciduous tree, rubber trees exhibit annual natural defoliation prior to the winter season, and ensuing new leaf growth usually coincides with the low temperature period. Flushing behaviour of trees during this period provides an opportunity to assess their winter hardiness. A study was carried out on five clones, RRIM 600, SCATC 93/114, GT 1, PB 5/51 and Haiken 1, to evaluate phenological behaviour of leaf growth during the period of low temperature stress. Trees were monitored for expansion of leaf area, internode length, petiole length and development of chlorophyll. Wide variation was observed among these clones for all the traits. SCATC 93/114 was better adapted for low temperaturestress as this clone was found to have faster expansion of leaf area and better chlorophyll development, followed by Haiken 1. PB 5/51 was found to show poor performance during low temperature. Haiken 1 and PB 5/51 also exhibited better relative growth rate during winter months confirming their low temperature tolerance. Ontogenetic variations in leaf development are good indicators of assessing inherent cold tolerance in Hevea clones.

  17. Ontogenetic variations in flush development are indicative of low temperature tolerance in Hevea brasiliensis clones

    K.K. Vinod

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Para rubber (Hevea brasiliensis trees are naturally adapted to the Amazonian tropical climate. In India rubber trees are traditionally cultivated in the warm humid tropics of the south. Northeast India is a non-traditional area for rubber cultivation. A major limiting factor on tree growth in the northeast region is stress due to low temperature. Being a deciduous tree, rubber trees exhibit annual natural defoliation prior to the winter season, and ensuing new leaf growth usually coincides with the low temperature period. Flushing behaviour of trees during this period provides an opportunity to assess their winter hardiness. A study was carried out on five clones, RRIM 600, SCATC 93/114, GT 1, PB 5/51 and Haiken 1, to evaluate phenological behaviour of leaf growth during the period of low temperature stress. Trees were monitored for expansion of leaf area, internode length, petiole length and development of chlorophyll. Wide variation was observed among these clones for all the traits. SCATC 93/114 was better adapted for low temperature stress as this clone was found to have faster expansion of leaf area and better chlorophyll development, followed by Haiken 1. PB 5/51 was found to show poor performance during low temperature. Haiken 1 and PB 5/51 also exhibited better relative growth rate during winter months confirming their low temperature tolerance. Ontogenetic variations in leaf development are good indicators of assessing inherent cold tolerance in Hevea clones.

  18. Vertical movement patterns and ontogenetic niche expansion in the tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier.

    Afonso, André S; Hazin, Fábio H V

    2015-01-01

    Sharks are top predators in many marine ecosystems and can impact community dynamics, yet many shark populations are undergoing severe declines primarily due to overfishing. Obtaining species-specific knowledge on shark spatial ecology is important to implement adequate management strategies for the effective conservation of these taxa. This is particularly relevant concerning highly-mobile species that use wide home ranges comprising coastal and oceanic habitats, such as tiger sharks, Galeocerdo cuvier. We deployed satellite tags in 20 juvenile tiger sharks off northeastern Brazil to assess the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on depth and temperature usage. Sharks were tracked for a total of 1184 d and used waters up to 1112 m in depth. The minimum temperature recorded equaled 4°C. All sharks had a clear preference for surface (sharks used mostly shallow (sharks spending considerably more time in surface (shark habitat was observed, with generalized linear models estimating a ~4-fold increase in maximum diving depth from 150- to 300-cm size-classes. The time spent in the upper 5 m of the water column did not vary ontogenetically but shark size was the most important factor explaining the utilization of deeper water layers. Young-of-the-year tiger sharks seem to associate with shallow, neritic habitats but they progressively move into deeper oceanic habitats as they grow larger. Such an early plasticity in habitat use could endow tiger sharks with access to previously unavailable prey, thus contributing to a wider ecological niche. PMID:25629732

  19. Feeding habits and ontogenetic diet shifts of Bombay duck, Harpadon nehereus

    Zhang, Bo; Jin, Xianshi

    2014-05-01

    Based on two bottom trawl surveys conducted in autumn 2000 and 2001, a total of 1106 stomach samples of Bombay duck Harpadon nehereus between 23-278 mm fork length were collected and analyzed. The results show that Bombay duck prey items consisted of 11 groups or 32 species, of which Apogon lineatus, Leptochela gracilis, Acetes chinensis, and Euphausia pacifi ca were the dominant prey species. Ontogenetic variations were found in feeding habits and feeding activity of Bombay duck. Feeding activity was highest in fish smaller than 50 mm, lowest in fish between 50 and 99 mm, and then increased with increasing size thereafter. As Bombay duck size increased, fish prey increased in importance, whereas euphausiids and decapods decreased in importance. Different trophic guilds were observed in feeding habits across the examined size range. Bombay duck smaller than 50 mm were zooplanktivores, mainly feeding on zooplankton and fish larva; those between 50 and 149 mm were generalist predators, mainly feeding on pelagic shrimps, demersal shrimps and fishes; and those larger than 150 mm were piscivores, mainly feeding on fishes.

  20. Ontogenetic Microhabitat Shifts in the Bullhead, Cottus gobio L.,in a Fast Flowing Stream

    Legalle, Milène; Mastrorillo, Sylvain; Santoul, Frédéric; Céréghino, Régis

    2005-06-01

    We investigated differences in microhabitat preference curves for bullheads, Cottus gobio L., of different size-classes during low flow periods, and evaluated the influence of such differences on habitat use through Weighted Usable Area (WUA) predictions in relation to river flow in a piedmont stream in Southwest France. Water depth, current velocity, and substratum composition were used to calculate proportional use values for each size-class (SC), and to quantify size-specific microhabitat preferences. Bullhead used non-cohesive and coarse mineral particles (pebbles, cobbles, boulders), but there was a spatial segregation of individuals from different size classes (SC1-SC4). Smaller bullhead (SC1, total length 60 mm), the latter occurring below (or under) the largest particles, where current velocity is weakened and sand accumulates. SC1 bullhead had a more restricted range for each habitat descriptors, and were thus likely to require a more specific habitat type than other bullhead. The maximum WUA values and the related preferred discharges (0.15-0.75 m3 s-1) depended on the considered size-class. Our results suggest that ontogenetic niche shifts may play a role in the structure and dynamics of populations, by adjusting species' requirements to the spatial and temporal dynamics of environmental conditions, including abiotic and biotic conditions.

  1. DESCRIPTION OF AN EARLY ONTOGENETIC EVOLUTIONARY STEP IN LEPIDORBITOIDES (LEPIDORBITOIDES BISAMBERGENSIS ASYMMETRICA, EARLY MAASTRICHTIAN (CENTRAL TURKEY

    ERCAN ÖZCAN

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Lepidorbitoides bisambergensis is characterised by having a ‘quadriserial’ embryo without any chamberlet directly arising from the deuteroconch and is a very diagnostic and common species in Lower Maastrichtian flysch successions in Anatolia. Some populations of this species present an early ontogenetic morphologic feature which is characterised by distinctly asymmetric early chamber arrangement recognised in the horizontal sections. This asymmetry is mainly caused by the pronounced difference in the size of auxiliary chamberlets which rest on both, protoconch and deuteroconch and also enhanced by the development of unequal number of chamberlets in the series arising from these auxiliary chamberlets on the protoconchal side. These asymmetric specimens are commonly identified in stratigraphic horizons below the symmetric ones after the introduction of a new auxiliary chamberlet and progressively replaced by symmetric ones in the younger populations. Asymmetric "quadriserial" specimens representing the early phylogenetic stage of L. bisambergensis described in the stratigraphic horizons corresponding to G. havanensis and G. aegyptiaca (? zones are thought to deserve a particular taxonomic status and are attributed to Lepidorbitoides bisambergensis asymmetrica Özcan & Özkan-Altiner, 1999a. 

  2. Are tree ontogenetic structure and allometric relationship independent of vegetation formation type? A case study with Cordia oncocalyx in the Brazilian caatinga

    Silveira, Andréa P.; Martins, Fernando R.; Araújo, Francisca S.

    2012-08-01

    In temperate and tropical rainforests, ontogenetic structure and allometry during tree ontogeny are often associated with light gradients. Light is not considered a limiting resource in deciduous thorny woodland (DTW), but establishment and growth occur during a short rainy period, when the canopy is fully leaved and light in the understory may be modified. Our aim was to investigate whether the light gradient in DTW and the biomechanical limitations of tree growth would be enough to produce an ontogenetic structure and allometric growth similar to rainforest canopy trees. We investigated the ontogenetic stages and diameter-height relationship of Cordia oncocalyx (Boraginaceae), a dominant canopy tree of the DTW of semiarid northeastern Brazil. We tagged, measured and classified the ontogenetic stages of 2.895 individuals in a 1 ha area (5°6'58.1″S and 40°52'19.4″W). In the rainy season only 4.7% of the light falling on the canopy reached the ground. Initial ontogenetic stages, mainly infant (50.9%) and seedling (42.1%), were predominant in the population, with the remaining 7% distributed among juvenile, immature, virginile and reproductive. The ontogenetic structure was similar to that of rainforest tree species, but the population formed both permanent seed and infant banks in response to long dry periods and erratic rainy spells. Like many other Boraginaceae tree species in tropical rainforests, C. oncocalyx has a Prévost architectural model, but allometric growth was quite different from rainforest trees. C. oncocalyx invested slightly more in diameter at first, then in height and finally invested greatly in diameter and attained an asymptotic height. The continued high investment in diameter growth at late stages and the asymptotic height point to low tree density and more frequent xylem embolism as the main drivers of tree allometric shape in DTW. This indicates that tree ontogenetic structure and allometric relationships depend on vegetation

  3. Orion A helium abundance

    The 22.4-GHz (H,He)66-alpha and 36.5-GHz (H,He)56-alpha radio recombination lines have been observed at several Jaffe-Pankonin positions in the central part of the Orion A source. The measured relative abundance of ionized helium increases with distance, averaging 11.6 percent at peripheral points. The observed behavior is interpreted by a blister-type model nebula, which implies that Orion A has a true He abundance of 12 percent, is moving with a radial velocity of 5 km/sec, and is expanding. 18 references

  4. Ontogenetic allometry, heterochrony, and interspecific differences in the skull of African apes, using tridimensional Procrustes analysis.

    Berge, Christine; Penin, Xavier

    2004-06-01

    Ontogenetic studies of African ape skulls lead to an analysis of morphological differences in terms of allometry, heterochrony, and sexual dimorphism. The use of geometric morphometrics allows us 1) to define size and shape variations as independent factors (an essential but seldom respected condition for heterochrony), and 2) to calculate in percentage of shape changes and to graphically represent the parts of shape variation which are related to various biological phenomena: common allometry, intraspecific allometry, and allometric and nonallometric shape discrimination. Three tridimensional Procrustes analyses and the calculation of multivariate allometries, discriminant functions, and statistical tests are used to compare the skulls of 50 Pan troglodytes, and 50 Gorilla gorilla of different dental stages. The results both complement and modify classical results obtained from similar material but with different methods. Size and Scaling in Primate Morphology, New York: Plenum, p. 175-205). As previously described by Shea, the common growth allometric pattern is very important (64% of total shape variation). It corresponds to a larger increase of facial volume than of neurocranial volume, a more obliquely oriented foramen magnum, and a noticeable reshaping of the nuchal region (higher inion). However, the heterochronic interpretation based on common allometry is rather different from Shea. Gorillas differ from chimpanzees not only with a larger magnitude of allometric change (rate peramorphosis), as is classically said, but also grow more in size than in shape (size acceleration). In other words, for a similar stage of growth, gorillas have the size and shape corresponding to older chimpanzees, and for a similar shape, gorillas have a larger size than chimpanzees. In contrast, sexual dimorphism actually corresponds to allometric changes only, as classically demonstrated (time hypermorphosis). Sexual dimorphism is here significant in adult gorillas alone, and

  5. Astaxanthin, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin esters in the copepod Acartia bifilosa (Copepoda, Calanoida during ontogenetic development

    Maria £otocka

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The contents of astaxanthin, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin esters were studied in natural populations of the copepod Acartia bifilosa from the Pomeranian Bay and Gulf of Gdansk in the southern Baltic Sea. Samples dominated by any one of three developmental groups: (1 nauplii, (2 copepodids I-III and (3 copepodids IV-V and adults of Acartia bifilosa were analysed by means of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. As ontogenetic development progressed, significant changes occurred in the proportion of particular pigments in the total pigment pool of the various developmental groups. Astaxanthin and canthaxanthin occurred in all the groups, the former being clearly dominant. However, an increasing percentage of astaxanthin esters was recorded in the copepodids I-III, and even more in the copepodids IV-V and adults group. Most probably, astaxanthin is the main pigment active in copepod lipid metabolism. Carotenoid pigments in copepods very likely act as efficient free-electron quenchers and may be involved as antioxidants in rapid lipid metabolism. The exogenously feeding stages (late nauplii and copepodids transform plant carotenoids taken from food and are evidently capable of metabolising astaxanthin by esterification and further degradation. It is emphasised that, according to literature data, astaxanthin esters may have an even higher quenching ability. It is suggested that crustacean carotenoid pigments, with their electron donor-acceptor abilities, may replace oxygen in peroxidation processes connected with lipid metabolism. The consequences of such a physiological role of astaxanthin for present-day estimations of energy balances in zooplankton communities are mentioned.

  6. Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid profile of starry flounder Platichthys stellatus

    Song, Zhidong; Wang, Jiying; Qiao, Hongjin; Li, Peiyu; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid (AA) profile of starry flounder, Platichthys stellatus, were investigated and limiting amino acids were estimated compared with the essential AA profile between larvae and live food to clarify starry flounder larval nutritional requirements. Larvae were collected at the egg stage and 0, 2, 4, 7, 12, 17, 24 days after hatching (DAH) for analysis. Larvae grew from 1.91 mm at hatching to 12.13 mm at 24 DAH. Trypsin and chymotrypsin activities changed slightly by 4 DAH and then increased significantly 4 DAH. Pepsin activity increased sharply beginning 17 DAH. Lipase activity increased significantly 4 DAH and increased progressively with larval growth. Amylase activity was also detected in newly hatched larvae and increased 7 DAH followed by a gradual decrease. High free amino acid (FAA) content was detected in starry flounder eggs (110.72 mg/g dry weight). Total FAA content dropped to 43.29 mg/g in 4-DAH larvae and then decreased gradually to 13.74 mg/g in 24-DAH larvae. Most FAAs (except lysine and methionine) decreased >50% in 4-DAH larvae compared with those in eggs and then decreased to the lowest values in 24-DAH larvae. Changes in the protein amino acid (PAA) profile were much milder than those observed for FAAs. Most PAAs increased gradually during larval development, except lysine and phenylalanine. The percentages of free threonine, valine, isoleucine, and leucine decreased until the end of the trial, whereas the protein forms of these four AAs followed the opposite trend. A comparison of the essential AA composition of live food (rotifers, Artemia nauplii, and Artemia metanauplii) and larvae suggested that methionine was potentially the first limiting AA. These results may help develop starry flounder larviculture methods by solving the AA imbalance in live food. Moreover, the increased digestive enzyme activities indicate the possibility of introducing artificial compound feed.

  7. Ontogenetic changes in radiation use efficiency of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) crops

    Radiation use efficiency (ϵ) values for sunflower were derived using data from periodic determinations of crop aerial or total (aerial + root) biomass and radiation interception in two experiments conducted at Junin and Buenos Aires, Argentina. Analysis showed that three distinct phases, each characterized by a different value of ϵ, could be distinquished. The phases were establishment (0–47 days after emergence (dae)), rapid growth (47 dae-anthesis) and postanthesis (anthesis-physiologcial maturity). The crops had reached the bud-visible stage and intercepted at least 85% of incident radiation by 47 dae. Efficiency values based on aerial biomass were highest during the rapid growth (ϵrg = 2.4 ± 0.22 g/MJ PAR) phase and lower during the establishment (ϵe = 1.01 ± 0.25 g/MJ PAR) and postanthesis (ϵpa = 1.3 ± 0.15 g/MJ PAR) phases. The differences between ϵpa and ϵrg are attributed to the increased respiration load, high synthesis costs of the oil-rich grains and leaf senescence during grain filling. The value of ϵe was less than of ϵrg even when efficiencies were calculated on the basis of total crop biomass (i.e. including root biomass). Hence, ontogenetic changes in partitioning of biomass between the root and aerial organs do not seem to be the cause of the changes in the value of ϵ. No variations in photosynthetic capacity with leaf position could be found, and it is concluded that the most likely reason for the lower values of ϵe lies in saturation of canopy photosynthesis at less than full sunlight while crop cover is incomplete. (author)

  8. Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid profile of starry flounder Platichthys stellatus

    Song, Zhidong; Wang, Jiying; Qiao, Hongjin; Li, Peiyu; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid (AA) profile of starry flounder, Platichthys stellatus, were investigated and limiting amino acids were estimated compared with the essential AA profile between larvae and live food to clarify starry flounder larval nutritional requirements. Larvae were collected at the egg stage and 0, 2, 4, 7, 12, 17, 24 days after hatching (DAH) for analysis. Larvae grew from 1.91 mm at hatching to 12.13 mm at 24 DAH. Trypsin and chymotrypsin activities changed slightly by 4 DAH and then increased significantly 4 DAH. Pepsin activity increased sharply beginning 17 DAH. Lipase activity increased significantly 4 DAH and increased progressively with larval growth. Amylase activity was also detected in newly hatched larvae and increased 7 DAH followed by a gradual decrease. High free amino acid (FAA) content was detected in starry flounder eggs (110.72 mg/g dry weight). Total FAA content dropped to 43.29 mg/g in 4-DAH larvae and then decreased gradually to 13.74 mg/g in 24-DAH larvae. Most FAAs (except lysine and methionine) decreased >50% in 4-DAH larvae compared with those in eggs and then decreased to the lowest values in 24-DAH larvae. Changes in the protein amino acid (PAA) profile were much milder than those observed for FAAs. Most PAAs increased gradually during larval development, except lysine and phenylalanine. The percentages of free threonine, valine, isoleucine, and leucine decreased until the end of the trial, whereas the protein forms of these four AAs followed the opposite trend. A comparison of the essential AA composition of live food (rotifers, Artemia nauplii, and Artemia metanauplii) and larvae suggested that methionine was potentially the first limiting AA. These results may help develop starry flounder larviculture methods by solving the AA imbalance in live food. Moreover, the increased digestive enzyme activities indicate the possibility of introducing artificial compound feed.

  9. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic ??13C and ??15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes-resident and transient - collected across ???25?? of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in ??15N values of ???2.5% through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable ??15N and ??13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas ??15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ???1.5%, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean ??13C and ??15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean. ?? Inter-Research 2009.

  10. Evaluating hair as a predictor of blood mercury: the influence of ontogenetic phase and life history in pinnipeds

    Peterson, Sarah H.; McHuron, Elizabeth A.; Kennedy, Stephanie N.; Ackerman, Josh; Rea, Lorrie D.; Castellini, J. Margaret; O'Hara, Todd M.; Costa, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) biomonitoring of pinnipeds increasingly utilizes nonlethally collected tissues such as hair and blood. The relationship between total Hg concentrations ([THg]) in these tissues is not well understood for marine mammals, but it can be important for interpretation of tissue concentrations with respect to ecotoxicology and biomonitoring. We examined [THg] in blood and hair in multiple age classes of four pinniped species. For each species, we used paired blood and hair samples to quantify the ability of [THg] in hair to predict [THg] in blood at the time of sampling and examined the influence of varying ontogenetic phases and life history of the sampled animals. Overall, we found that the relationship between [THg] in hair and blood was affected by factors including age class, weaning status, growth, and the time difference between hair growth and sample collection. Hair [THg] was moderately to strongly predictive of current blood [THg] for adult female Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus), adult female California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), and adult harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), whereas hair [THg] was poorly predictive or not predictive (different times of year) of blood [THg] for adult northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris). Within species, except for very young pups, hair [THg] was a weaker predictor of blood [THg] for prereproductive animals than for adults likely due to growth, variability in foraging behavior, and transitions between ontogenetic phases. Our results indicate that the relationship between hair [THg] and blood [THg] in pinnipeds is variable and that ontogenetic phase and life history should be considered when interpreting [THg] in these tissues.

  11. Evaluating Hair as a Predictor of Blood Mercury: The Influence of Ontogenetic Phase and Life History in Pinnipeds.

    Peterson, Sarah H; McHuron, Elizabeth A; Kennedy, Stephanie N; Ackerman, Joshua T; Rea, Lorrie D; Castellini, J Margaret; O'Hara, Todd M; Costa, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) biomonitoring of pinnipeds increasingly utilizes nonlethally collected tissues such as hair and blood. The relationship between total Hg concentrations ([THg]) in these tissues is not well understood for marine mammals, but it can be important for interpretation of tissue concentrations with respect to ecotoxicology and biomonitoring. We examined [THg] in blood and hair in multiple age classes of four pinniped species. For each species, we used paired blood and hair samples to quantify the ability of [THg] in hair to predict [THg] in blood at the time of sampling and examined the influence of varying ontogenetic phases and life history of the sampled animals. Overall, we found that the relationship between [THg] in hair and blood was affected by factors including age class, weaning status, growth, and the time difference between hair growth and sample collection. Hair [THg] was moderately to strongly predictive of current blood [THg] for adult female Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus), adult female California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), and adult harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), whereas hair [THg] was poorly predictive or not predictive (different times of year) of blood [THg] for adult northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris). Within species, except for very young pups, hair [THg] was a weaker predictor of blood [THg] for prereproductive animals than for adults likely due to growth, variability in foraging behavior, and transitions between ontogenetic phases. Our results indicate that the relationship between hair [THg] and blood [THg] in pinnipeds is variable and that ontogenetic phase and life history should be considered when interpreting [THg] in these tissues. PMID:26149950

  12. A pedagogy of abundance

    Weller, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The digitisation of content combined with a global network for delivery and an open system for sharing has seen radical changes in many industries. The economic model which has underpinned many content based industries has been based on an assumption of scarcity. With a digital, open, networked approach we are witnessing a shift to abundance of content, and subsequently new economic models are being developed which have this as an assumption. In this article the role of scarcity in developing...

  13. Interstellar Atomic Abundances

    Jenkins, E B

    2003-01-01

    A broad array of interstellar absorption features that appear in the ultraviolet spectra of bright sources allows us to measure the abundances and ionization states of many important heavy elements that exist as free atoms in the interstellar medium. By comparing these abundances with reference values in the Sun, we find that some elements have abundances relative to hydrogen that are approximately consistent with their respective solar values, while others are depleted by factors that range from a few up to around 1000. These depletions are caused by the atoms condensing into solid form onto dust grains. Their strengths are governed by the volatility of compounds that are produced, together with the densities and velocities of the gas clouds. We may characterize the depletion trends in terms of a limited set of parameters; ones derived here are based on measurements of 15 elements toward 144 stars with known values of N(H I) and N(H2). In turn, these parameters may be applied to studies of the production, de...

  14. Abundances in galaxies

    Standard (or mildly inhomogeneous) Big Bang nucleosynthesis theory is well confirmed by abundance measurements of light elements up to 7Li and the resulting upper limit to the number of neutrino families confirmed in accelerator experiments. Extreme inhomogeneous models with a closure density in form of baryons seem to be ruled out and there is no evidence for a cosmic 'floor' to 9Be or heavier elements predicted in some versions of those models. Galaxies show a correlation between luminous mass and abundance of carbon and heavier elements, usually attributed to escape of hot gas from shallow potential wells. Uncertainties include the role of dark matter and biparametric behaviour of ellipticals. Spirals have radial gradients which may arise from a variety of causes. In our own Galaxy one can distinguish three stellar populations - disk, halo and bulge - characterised by differing metallicity distribution functions. Differential abundance effects are found among different elements in stars as a function of metallicity and presumably age, notably in the ratio of oxygen and α-particle elements to iron. These may eventually be exploitable to set a time scale for the formation of the halo, bulge and disk. (orig.)

  15. Heterochronic processes in human evolution: an ontogenetic analysis of the hominid pelvis.

    Berge, C

    1998-04-01

    Changes in pelvic shape in human ontogeny and hominid phylogeny suggest that the heterochronic processes involved differ greatly from the neotenic process traditionally described in the evolution of the skull. The morphology of 150 juvenile and adult pelves of African apes, 60 juvenile and adult pelves of modern humans, two adult pelves and a juvenile hip bone of australopithecines (Sts 14, AL 288, MLD 7) was studied. Multivariate results, ontogenetic allometries, and growth curves confirm that the pelvic growth pattern in humans differs markedly from those of the African apes. The results permit the following conclusions. First, the appearance of a new feature (acetabulo-cristal buttress and cristal tubercle) at the time of human birth allows the addition of traits, such as the attainment of a proportionally narrower pelvis, with more sagittally positioned iliac blades. Pelvic proportions and orientation change progressively in early childhood as bipedalism is practiced. Other changes in pelvic proportions occur later with the adolescent growth spurt. Second, comparison of juvenile and adult australopithecines to modern humans indicates that 1) some pelvic traits of adult Australopithecus resemble those of neonate Homo; 2) the pelvic growth of Australopithecus was probably closer to that of apes, than to that of humans; and 3) prolonged growth in length of hindlimb and pelvis after sexual maturity seems to be a unique feature of Homo. The position of the acetabulo-cristal buttress and of the cristal tubercle on the ilium are similar in adult Australopithecus and neonate Homo suggesting that this feature may have been displaced later during hominid evolution. Progressive displacement of the acetabulo-cristal buttress on the ilium occurs both during hominid evolution (from Australopithecus to Homo sapiens) and human growth (from neonate to adult). This suggests peramorphic evolution of the pelvic morphology of hominids combining three processes of recapitulation

  16. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle fiber type, fiber diameter and myoglobin concentration in the Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris

    Colby eMoore

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris (NES are known to be deep, long-duration divers and to sustain long-repeated patterns of breath-hold, or apnea. Some phocid dives remain within the bounds of aerobic metabolism, accompanied by physiological responses inducing lung compression, bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction. Current data suggest an absence of type IIb fibers in pinniped locomotory musculature. To date, no fiber type data exist for NES, a consummate deep diver. In this study, NES were biopsied in the wild. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle were revealed through succinate dehydrogenase (SDH based fiber typing. Results indicated a predominance of uniformly shaped, large type I fibers and elevated myoglobin (Mb concentrations in the longissimus dorsi (LD muscle of adults. No type II muscle fibers were detected in any adult sampled. This was in contrast to the juvenile animals that demonstrated type II myosin in Western Blot analysis, indicative of an ontogenetic change in skeletal muscle with maturation. These data support previous hypotheses that the absence of type II fibers indicates reliance on aerobic metabolism during dives, as well as a depressed metabolic rate and low energy locomotion. We also suggest that the lack of type IIb fibers (adults may provide a protection against ischemia reperfusion (IR injury in vasoconstricted peripheral skeletal muscle.

  17. Intersexual allometry differences and ontogenetic shifts of coloration patterns in two aquatic turtles, Graptemys oculifera and Graptemys flavimaculata.

    Ennen, Joshua R; Lindeman, Peter V; Lovich, Jeffrey E

    2015-06-01

    Coloration can play critical roles in a species' biology. The allometry of color patterns may be useful for elucidating the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for shaping the traits. We measured characteristics relating to eight aspects of color patterns from Graptemys oculifera and G. flavimaculata to investigate the allometric differences among male, female, and unsexed juvenile specimens. Additionally, we investigated ontogenetic shifts by incorporating the unsexed juveniles into the male and female datasets. In general, male color traits were isometric (i.e., color scaled with body size), while females and juvenile color traits were hypoallometric, growing in size more slowly than the increase in body size. When we included unsexed juveniles in our male and female datasets, our linear regression analyses found all relationships to be hypoallometric and our model selection analysis found support for nonlinear models describing the relationship between body size and color patterns, suggestive of an ontogenetic shift in coloration traits for both sexes at maturity. Although color is critical for many species' biology and therefore under strong selective pressure in many other species, our results are likely explained by an epiphenomenon related to the different selection pressures on body size and growth rates between juveniles and adults and less attributable to the evolution of color patterns themselves. PMID:26078863

  18. Biometrie sexual and ontogenetic dimorphism on the marine catfish Genidens genidens (Siluriformes, Ariidae in a tropical estuary

    Larissa G Paiva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the ontogenetic sexual dimorphism of Genidens genidens in Guanabara Bay, southeastern coast of Brazil. Altogether 378 specimens were anayzed (233 females and 145 males with total length ranging from 13.3 to 43.5 cm. Specimens were measured for 12 body measurements, sex was identified and maturity stages were recorded and classified. Pearson's linear correlation reveled a significant positive correlation between total length and all other body measures, except for base adipose fin, mouth depth and eye depth for immature females. Analyses nested PERMANOVA desing showed significant differences between maturity stages for each sex, between sexes considering or not maturity stages, indicating a variation in morphometric characteristics driven by sexual dimorphism. Differences among all maturity stages were also found, indicating an ontogenetic morphological difference. But immature individuals didn't differ between sexes indicating that differentiation patterns starts with sexual development. The most important measures differing males and females were related to head characteristics, which appears to be key parameters to evaluate sexual differences. Due to male incubation of fertilized eggs and juvenile individuals <59 mm in their oral cavity, head measures are proposed to be sex dimorphism not related to reproduction, but with post reproductive fase due to ecological and biological needs.

  19. The conceptual framework of ontogenetic trajectories: parallel transport allows the recognition and visualization of pure deformation patterns.

    Piras, P; Teresi, L; Traversetti, L; Varano, V; Gabriele, S; Kotsakis, T; Raia, P; Puddu, P E; Scalici, M

    2016-05-01

    Ontogeny is usually studied by analyzing a deformation series spanning over juvenile to adult shapes. In geometric morphometrics, this approach implies applying generalized Procrustes analysis coupled with principal component analysis on multiple individuals or multiple species datasets. The trouble with such a procedure is that it mixes intra- and inter-group variation. While MANCOVA models are relevant statistical/mathematical tools to draw inferences about the similarities of trajectories, if one wants to observe and interpret the morphological deformation alone by filtering inter-group variability, a particular tool, namely parallel transport, is necessary. In the context of ontogenetic trajectories, one should firstly perform separate multivariate regressions between shape and size, using regression predictions to estimate within-group deformations relative to the smallest individuals. These deformations are then applied to a common reference (the mean of per-group smallest individuals). The estimation of deformations can be performed on the Riemannian manifold by using sophisticated connection metrics. Nevertheless, parallel transport can be effectively achieved by estimating deformations in the Euclidean space via ordinary Procrustes analysis. This approach proved very useful in comparing ontogenetic trajectories of species presenting large morphological differences at early developmental stages. PMID:27161949

  20. A novel length back-calculation approach accounting for ontogenetic changes in the fish length - otolith size relationship during the early life of sprat (Sprattus sprattus)

    Guenther, Claudia C.; Temming, Axel; Baumann, Hannes;

    2012-01-01

    An individual-based length back-calculation method was developed for juvenile Baltic sprat (Sprattus sprattus), accounting for ontogenetic changes in the relationship between fish length and otolith length. In sprat, metamorphosis from larvae to juveniles is characterized by the coincidence of low......, which is supposed to be critical in determining recruitment strength in Baltic sprat....

  1. Abundance, Excess, Waste

    Rox De Luca

    2016-02-01

    Her recent work focuses on the concepts of abundance, excess and waste. These concerns translate directly into vibrant and colourful garlands that she constructs from discarded plastics collected on Bondi Beach where she lives. The process of collecting is fastidious, as is the process of sorting and grading the plastics by colour and size. This initial gathering and sorting process is followed by threading the components onto strings of wire. When completed, these assemblages stand in stark contrast to the ease of disposability associated with the materials that arrive on the shoreline as evidence of our collective human neglect and destruction of the environment around us. The contrast is heightened by the fact that the constructed garlands embody the paradoxical beauty of our plastic waste byproducts, while also evoking the ways by which those byproducts similarly accumulate in randomly assorted patterns across the oceans and beaches of the planet.

  2. Setting the reference for the use of Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera: Chironomidae as bioindicator: Ontogenetic pattern of larval head structures

    Débora Rebechi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Species of Chironomidae are widely used as bioindicators of water quality, since their larvae undergo morphological deformities when in contact with sediment contaminated with chemicals. In this work we endeavored to study the morphology of head structures (antennae, mandible, mentum, pecten epipharyngis, ventromental plate and premandible throughout the development of the four larval instars of Chironomus sancticaroli Strixino & Strixino, 1981, which can be used in environmental impact analyses. Our results show that it is possible to differentiate among larval instars by doing a quantitative analysis on the number of striae on the ventromental plates. The six structures analyzed changed during larval ontogeny. These changes are part of the ontogeny of the immature stages not exposed to xenobiotics. We believe that the morphological pattern defined in this work can be used for comparisons with ontogenetic changes observed in field studies conducted in polluted environments.

  3. Ontogenetic allometry constrains cranial shape of the head-first burrowing worm lizard Cynisca leucura (Squamata: Amphisbaenidae).

    Hipsley, Christy A; Rentinck, Marc-Nicolas; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Müller, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Amphisbaenians are fossorial, predominantly limbless squamate reptiles with distinct cranial shapes corresponding to specific burrowing behaviors. Due to their cryptic lifestyles and the scarcity of museum specimens, little is known of their intraspecific variation, particularly regarding cranial osteology. This represents a critical lack of information, because the majority of morphological investigations of squamate relationships are based on cranial characters. We investigated cranial variation in the West African Coast Worm Lizard Cynisca leucura, a round-headed member of the Amphisbaenidae. Using geometric morphometric analyses of three-dimensional computed tomographic scans, we found that cranial osteology of C. leucura is highly conserved, with the majority of shape changes occurring during growth as the cranium becomes more slender and elongate, accompanied by increasing interdigitation among the dermal roofing bones. Elements of the ventral portion of the cranium remain loosely connected in adults, possibly as a protective mechanism against repeated compression and torsion during burrow excavation. Intraspecific variation was strongly correlated with size change from juveniles to adults, indicating a dominant role of ontogenetic allometry in determining cranial shape. We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism, either during growth or among adults. Given the fossorial habits of C. leucura, we hypothesize that cranial allometry is under strong stabilizing selection to maintain adequate proportions for head-first digging, thereby constraining the ability of individuals to respond to differing selection pressures, including sexual selection and variation in diet or microhabitat. For species in which digging imposes less mechanical stress (e.g., in softer sand), allometric associations during growth may be weakened, allowing changes to the ontogenetic trajectory and subsequent morphological traits. Such developmental dissociation between size and shape, known

  4. Ontogenetic and among-individual variation in foraging strategies of northeast Pacific white sharks based on stable isotope analysis.

    Sora L Kim

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence for individuality in dietary preferences and foraging behaviors within populations of various species. This is especially important for apex predators, since they can potentially have wide dietary niches and a large impact on trophic dynamics within ecosystems. We evaluate the diet of an apex predator, the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, by measuring the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of vertebral growth bands to create lifetime records for 15 individuals from California. Isotopic variations in white shark diets can reflect within-region differences among prey (most importantly related to trophic level, as well as differences in baseline values among the regions in which sharks forage, and both prey and habitat preferences may shift with age. The magnitude of isotopic variation among sharks in our study (>5‰ for both elements is too great to be explained solely by geographic differences, and so must reflect differences in prey choice that may vary with sex, size, age and location. Ontogenetic patterns in δ(15N values vary considerably among individuals, and one third of the population fit each of these descriptions: 1 δ(15N values increased throughout life, 2 δ(15N values increased to a plateau at ∼5 years of age, and 3 δ(15N values remained roughly constant values throughout life. Isotopic data for the population span more than one trophic level, and we offer a qualitative evaluation of diet using shark-specific collagen discrimination factors estimated from a 3+ year captive feeding experiment (Δ(13C(shark-diet and Δ(15N(shark-diet equal 4.2‰ and 2.5‰, respectively. We assess the degree of individuality with a proportional similarity index that distinguishes specialists and generalists. The isotopic variance is partitioned among differences between-individual (48%, within-individuals (40%, and by calendar year of sub-adulthood (12%. Our data reveal substantial ontogenetic and

  5. Ontogenetic and among-individual variation in foraging strategies of northeast Pacific white sharks based on stable isotope analysis.

    Kim, Sora L; Tinker, M Tim; Estes, James A; Koch, Paul L

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence for individuality in dietary preferences and foraging behaviors within populations of various species. This is especially important for apex predators, since they can potentially have wide dietary niches and a large impact on trophic dynamics within ecosystems. We evaluate the diet of an apex predator, the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), by measuring the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of vertebral growth bands to create lifetime records for 15 individuals from California. Isotopic variations in white shark diets can reflect within-region differences among prey (most importantly related to trophic level), as well as differences in baseline values among the regions in which sharks forage, and both prey and habitat preferences may shift with age. The magnitude of isotopic variation among sharks in our study (>5‰ for both elements) is too great to be explained solely by geographic differences, and so must reflect differences in prey choice that may vary with sex, size, age and location. Ontogenetic patterns in δ(15)N values vary considerably among individuals, and one third of the population fit each of these descriptions: 1) δ(15)N values increased throughout life, 2) δ(15)N values increased to a plateau at ∼5 years of age, and 3) δ(15)N values remained roughly constant values throughout life. Isotopic data for the population span more than one trophic level, and we offer a qualitative evaluation of diet using shark-specific collagen discrimination factors estimated from a 3+ year captive feeding experiment (Δ(13)C(shark-diet) and Δ(15)N(shark-diet) equal 4.2‰ and 2.5‰, respectively). We assess the degree of individuality with a proportional similarity index that distinguishes specialists and generalists. The isotopic variance is partitioned among differences between-individual (48%), within-individuals (40%), and by calendar year of sub-adulthood (12%). Our data reveal substantial ontogenetic and

  6. Primordial Deuterium Abundance Measurements

    Levshakov, S A; Takahara, F; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Kegel, Wilhelm H.; Takahara, Fumio

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium abundances measured recently from QSO absorption-line systems lie in the range from 3 10^{-5} to 3 10^{-4}, which shed some questions on standard big bang theory. We show that this discordance may simply be an artifact caused by inadequate analysis ignoring spatial correlations in the velocity field in turbulent media. The generalized procedure (accounting for such correlations) is suggested to reconcile the D/H measurements. An example is presented based on two high-resolution observations of Q1009+2956 (low D/H) [1,2] and Q1718+4807 (high D/H) [8,9]. We show that both observations are compatible with D/H = 4.1 - 4.6 10^{-5}, and thus support SBBN. The estimated mean value = 4.4 10^{-5} corresponds to the baryon-to-photon ratio during SBBN eta = 4.4 10^{-10} which yields the present-day baryon density Omega_b h^2 = 0.015.

  7. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria): Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina

    Dick, Daniel G.; Maxwell, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria). We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum) was produced by a series of different evolutionary developmental changes that are known for other taxa showing tooth reduction and loss. Specifically, this species evolved functional edentulism by evolutionary changes in the growth allometry of the dentition and by altering growth rates through ontogeny. This observation supports previous hypotheses that S. quadriscissus underwent ontogenetic tooth reduction. Tooth reduction in S. quadriscissus may be caused by unique selective pressures resulting from prey choice and feeding behavior, expanding our current understanding of the mechanisms producing tooth reduction. PMID:26579712

  8. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria: Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina.

    Daniel G Dick

    Full Text Available We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria. We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum was produced by a series of different evolutionary developmental changes that are known for other taxa showing tooth reduction and loss. Specifically, this species evolved functional edentulism by evolutionary changes in the growth allometry of the dentition and by altering growth rates through ontogeny. This observation supports previous hypotheses that S. quadriscissus underwent ontogenetic tooth reduction. Tooth reduction in S. quadriscissus may be caused by unique selective pressures resulting from prey choice and feeding behavior, expanding our current understanding of the mechanisms producing tooth reduction.

  9. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria): Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina.

    Dick, Daniel G; Maxwell, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria). We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum) was produced by a series of different evolutionary developmental changes that are known for other taxa showing tooth reduction and loss. Specifically, this species evolved functional edentulism by evolutionary changes in the growth allometry of the dentition and by altering growth rates through ontogeny. This observation supports previous hypotheses that S. quadriscissus underwent ontogenetic tooth reduction. Tooth reduction in S. quadriscissus may be caused by unique selective pressures resulting from prey choice and feeding behavior, expanding our current understanding of the mechanisms producing tooth reduction. PMID:26579712

  10. Ontogenetic study of the skull in modern humans and the common chimpanzees: neotenic hypothesis reconsidered with a tridimensional Procrustes analysis.

    Penin, Xavier; Berge, Christine; Baylac, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Heterochronic studies compare ontogenetic trajectories of an organ in different species: here, the skulls of common chimpanzees and modern humans. A growth trajectory requires three parameters: size, shape, and ontogenetic age. One of the great advantages of the Procrustes method is the precise definition of size and shape for whole organs such as the skull. The estimated ontogenetic age (dental stages) is added to the plot to give a graphical representation to compare growth trajectories. We used the skulls of 41 Homo sapiens and 50 Pan troglodytes at various stages of growth. The Procrustes superimposition of all specimens was completed by statistical procedures (principal component analysis, multivariate regression, and discriminant function) to calculate separately size-related shape changes (allometry common to chimpanzees and humans), and interspecific shape differences (discriminant function). The results confirm the neotenic theory of the human skull (sensu Gould [1977] Ontogeny and Phylogeny, Cambridge: Harvard University Press; Alberch et al. [1979] Paleobiology 5:296-317), but modify it slightly. Human growth is clearly retarded in terms of both the magnitude of changes (size-shape covariation) and shape alone (size-shape dissociation) with respect to the chimpanzees. At the end of growth, the adult skull in humans reaches an allometric shape (size-related shape) which is equivalent to that of juvenile chimpanzees with no permanent teeth, and a size which is equivalent to that of adult chimpanzees. Our results show that human neoteny involves not only shape retardation (paedomorphosis), but also changes in relative growth velocity. Before the eruption of the first molar, human growth is accelerated, and then strongly decelerated, relative to the growth of the chimpanzee as a reference. This entails a complex process, which explains why these species reach the same overall (i.e., brain + face) size in adult stage. The neotenic traits seem to concern

  11. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria): Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina

    Dick, Daniel G.; Maxwell, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria). We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum) was p...

  12. Beyond body size: muscle biochemistry and body shape explain ontogenetic variation of anti-predatory behaviour in the lizard Salvator merianae.

    de Barros, Fábio Cury; de Carvalho, José Eduardo; Abe, Augusto Shinya; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2016-06-01

    Anti-predatory behaviour evolves under the strong action of natural selection because the success of individuals avoiding predation essentially defines their fitness. Choice of anti-predatory strategies is defined by prey characteristics as well as environmental temperature. An additional dimension often relegated in this multilevel equation is the ontogenetic component. In the tegu Salvator merianae, adults run away from predators at high temperatures but prefer fighting when it is cold, whereas juveniles exhibit the same flight strategy within a wide thermal range. Here, we integrate physiology and morphology to understand ontogenetic variation in the temperature-dependent shift of anti-predatory behaviour in these lizards. We compiled data for body shape and size, and quantified enzyme activity in hindlimb and head muscles, testing the hypothesis that morphophysiological models explain ontogenetic variation in behavioural associations. Our prediction is that juveniles exhibit body shape and muscle biochemistry that enhance flight strategies. We identified biochemical differences between muscles mainly in the LDH:CS ratio, whereby hindlimb muscles were more glycolytic than the jaw musculature. Juveniles, which often use evasive strategies to avoid predation, have more glycolytic hindlimb muscles and are much smaller when compared with adults 1-2 years old. Ontogenetic differences in body shape were identified but marginally contributed to behavioural variation between juvenile and adult tegus, and variation in anti-predatory behaviour in these lizards resides mainly in associations between body size and muscle biochemistry. Our results are discussed in the ecological context of predator avoidance by individuals differing in body size living at temperature-variable environments, where restrictions imposed by the cold could be compensated by specific phenotypes. PMID:26994181

  13. Solar System Abundances of the Elements

    Lodders, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Representative abundances of the chemical elements for use as a solar abundance standard in astronomical and planetary studies are summarized. Updated abundance tables for solar system abundances based on meteorites and photospheric measurements are presented.

  14. [Ontogenetic Mechanisms of Explosive Morphological Divergence in the Lake Tana (Ethiopia) Species Flock of Large African Barbs (Labeobarbus; Cyprinidae; Teleostei)].

    Shkila, F N; Lazebny, O E; Kapitanova, D V; Abdissa, Belay; Borisov, V B; Smirnov, S V

    2015-01-01

    Species flock of Lake Tana (Ethiopia) large African barbs (Labeobarbus; Cyprinidae; Teleostei) was studied as a model system for investigating ontogenetic mechanisms of the explosive morphological divergence often accompanying sympatric speciation in bony fishes. Comparative morphological analysis carried out with the use ofgeometric morphometric techniques revealed quantitative differences in the head shapes of species under study. Comparative analysis of skull development revealed significant interspecies differences in the temporal characteristics of craniogenesis in these species. These two lines of evidence suggest that heterochronies in craniogenesis underlie divergence in the head shapes of adult Tana barbs. This prediction was verified via experimental changes of temporal characteristics of craniogenesis in L. intermedius, a putative ancestor for the Lake Tana species flock. For this aim, timing and rate of skull development were changed by artificial manipulation of thyroid hormone levels. In sum, it was shown that it is heterochronies that underlie an explosive morphological divergence of the Lake Tana barbs species flock. Our findings together with those reported in the literature suggest variability in the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis to contribute to these heterochronies. PMID:26606829

  15. Characterising ontogenetic niche shifts in Nile crocodile using stable isotope (δ13C, δ15N) analyses of scute keratin.

    Radloff, Frans G T; Hobson, Keith A; Leslie, Alison J

    2012-09-01

    Nile crocodiles undergo a three to five order of magnitude increase in body size during their lifespan. This shift coincides with a change in resource and habitat use which influences the strength, type and symmetry of interactions with other species. Identifying size-specific crocodile groups displaying similar traits is important for conservation planning. Here, we illustrate how stable carbon (δ(13) C) and nitrogen (δ(15) N) isotope analysis of scute keratin, together with breakpoint modelling analysis can be used to characterise ontogenetic niche shifts. Using a sample set of 238 crocodiles from the Okavango Delta, Botswana (35-463 cm total length), we found prominent size-related changes in the scute keratin δ(13) C and δ(15) N profiles close to 40 and 119 cm snout-vent length. The first shift corroborated the findings of a traditional stomach-content study conducted on the same population at the same time, and the second conformed to known crocodile ecology. This approach can be used as a first approximation to identify size-specific groups within crocodile populations, and these can then be investigated further using isotopic or other methods. PMID:22462522

  16. Seasonal and ontogenetic variation of skin microbial communities and relationships to natural disease dynamics in declining amphibians.

    Longo, Ana V; Savage, Anna E; Hewson, Ian; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2015-07-01

    Recently, microbiologists have focused on characterizing the probiotic role of skin bacteria for amphibians threatened by the fungal disease chytridiomycosis. However, the specific characteristics of microbial diversity required to maintain health or trigger disease are still not well understood in natural populations. We hypothesized that seasonal and developmental transitions affecting susceptibility to chytridiomycosis could also alter the stability of microbial assemblages. To test our hypothesis, we examined patterns of skin bacterial diversity in two species of declining amphibians (Lithobates yavapaiensis and Eleutherodactylus coqui) affected by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We focused on two important transitions that affect Bd susceptibility: ontogenetic (from juvenile to adult) shifts in E. coqui and seasonal (from summer to winter) shifts in L. yavapaiensis. We used a combination of community-fingerprinting analyses and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to quantify changes in bacterial diversity and assemblage composition between seasons and developmental stages, and to investigate the relationship between bacterial diversity and pathogen load. We found that winter-sampled frogs and juveniles, two states associated with increased Bd susceptibility, exhibited higher diversity compared with summer-sampled frogs and adult individuals. Our findings also revealed that hosts harbouring higher bacterial diversity carried lower Bd infections, providing support for the protective role of bacterial communities. Ongoing work to understand skin microbiome resilience after pathogen disturbance has the potential to identify key taxa involved in disease resistance. PMID:26587253

  17. Ontogenetic histological changes in the wood of mango (Mangifera indica L. cv Deshi) exposed to coal-smoke pollution

    Gupta, M.C.; Iqbal, M. [Dept. of Botany, New Delhi (India)

    2005-11-01

    Trees of Mangifera indica L. cv Deshi growing at two sites, one heavily polluted due to coal-smoke emanating from a thermal power plant and the other free from such pollution, were examined across their boles (from pith to cambium) to trace ontogenetic changes induced by coal-smoke pollutants in the wood structure with special reference to vessels and fibres. Wood formation was hampered in the polluted environment, as evident from the width of annual rings, indicating an adverse influence of coal-smoke pollutants on the cambial activity. The pollutants inhibited dimensional growth of tracheal elements and promoted frequency and grouping of vessels since early growth stages. The increasing vessel number per square millimeter of wood and the decreasing dimensions of vessel elements and fibres resulted in low values for vulnerability and mesomorphic ratios in the polluted trees. The ratio of the length of fibres to that of vessel elements also decreased. With the growing age, the decline in vulnerability ratio and mesomorphic ratio was enhanced whereas that in the fibre/vessel-element length ratio was minimized.

  18. Temperature and ontogenetic effects on color change in the larval salamander species Ambystoma barbouri and Ambystoma texanum

    Temperature has been shown to affect body color in several species of amphibians. The interaction between color and temperature may also change over larval ontogeny, perhaps because of age-related or seasonal changes in selection pressures on color. We quantified the effects of temperature on the color of the salamander sister species Ambystoma barbouri and Ambystoma texanum over larval ontogeny. We found that early-stage larvae responded to cold temperatures with a dark color relative to that of the warm temperature response. Both species then exhibited an ontogenetic shift in larval color, with larvae becoming lighter with age. Interestingly, older larvae showed decreased plasticity in color change to temperature when compared with younger stages. Older A. texanum larvae exhibited a reversal in the direction of color change, with cold temperatures inducing a lighter color relative to warm temperatures. We suggest that the overall pattern of color change (a plastic color response to temperature for young larvae, a progressive lightening of larvae over development, and an apparent loss of color plasticity to temperature over ontogeny) can be plausibly explained by seasonal changes in environmental factors (temperature, ultraviolet radiation) selecting for body color. (author)

  19. Statistical parametric mapping of the regional distribution and ontogenetic scaling of foot pressures during walking in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Pataky, Todd C; Hill, Zoe; Hutchinson, John R

    2012-05-01

    Foot pressure distributions during locomotion have causal links with the anatomical and structural configurations of the foot tissues and the mechanics of locomotion. Elephant feet have five toes bound in a flexible pad of fibrous tissue (digital cushion). Does this specialized foot design control peak foot pressures in such giant animals? And how does body size, such as during ontogenetic growth, influence foot pressures? We addressed these questions by studying foot pressure distributions in elephant feet and their correlation with body mass and centre of pressure trajectories, using statistical parametric mapping (SPM), a neuro-imaging technology. Our results show a positive correlation between body mass and peak pressures, with the highest pressures dominated by the distal ends of the lateral toes (digits 3, 4 and 5). We also demonstrate that pressure reduction in the elephant digital cushion is a complex interaction of its viscoelastic tissue structure and its centre of pressure trajectories, because there is a tendency to avoid rear 'heel' contact as an elephant grows. Using SPM, we present a complete map of pressure distributions in elephant feet during ontogeny by performing statistical analysis at the pixel level across the entire plantar/palmar surface. We hope that our study will build confidence in the potential clinical and scaling applications of mammalian foot pressures, given our findings in support of a link between regional peak pressures and pathogenesis in elephant feet. PMID:22496296

  20. Morphological and ontogenetic stratification of abyssal and hadal Eurythenes gryllus sensu lato (Amphipoda: Lysianassoidea) from the Peru-Chile Trench

    Eustace, Ryan M.; Ritchie, Heather; Kilgallen, Niamh M.; Piertney, Stuart B.; Jamieson, Alan J.

    2016-03-01

    The globally ubiquitous lysianassoid amphipod, Eurythenes gryllus, has been shown to consist of multiple genetically distinct cryptic taxa, with depth considered a major driver of speciation and morphological divergence. Here we examine morphological variation of E. gryllus sensu lato through a continuous depth distribution that spans from abyssal (3000-6000 m) into hadal depths (>6000 m) in the Peru-Chile Trench (SE Pacific Ocean). Three distinct morphospecies were identified: one was confirmed as being E. magellanicus (4602-5329 m) based on DNA sequence and morphological similarity. The other two morphologically distinct species were named based upon depth of occurrence; Abyssal (4602-6173 m) and Hadal (6173-8074 m). The three Eurythenes morphospecies showed vertical ontogenetic stratification across their bathymetric range, where juveniles were found shallower in their depth range and mature females deeper. Potential ecological and evolutionary drivers that explain the observed patterns of intra and inter-specific structure, such as hydrostatic pressure and topographical isolation, are discussed.

  1. The effects of temperature and substrate on ontogenetic behavior of bastard halibut, Paralichthys olivaceus (T. et S.)

    LIU Dong; XIAN Weiwei; ZHU Xinhua

    2005-01-01

    The effects of temperature and substrate on ontogenetic patterns and settlement behavior of bastard halibut, Paralichthys olivaceus (T. et S.) were studied in a series of laboratory experiments. Analysis on stage-based data revealed that except for settlement, and compared to the substrate, the ambient temperature dominantly controlled the hatch success and subsequent development of the species. The oosperm optimum survival rate of 60% during hatching occurred at 20℃, and survival rate of 29%, at 18℃ for larval rearing. The survival rate of larvae reared under variable temperature of 3.5-4.5℃ was higher than that of those reared under stable temperature. The maximum survival rate of 29%, corresponded to variation at temperature of 4℃. With increase in age newly settled juveniles preferred to lie on the fine substrate and gradually moved on the coarse substrate. GLM (general linear model) analysis showed that the combination of temperature and substrate had no significant impact on the survival of settling larvae, but definitely affected the duration of settlement.

  2. Phenological mismatch and ontogenetic diet shifts interactively affect offspring condition in a passerine.

    Samplonius, Jelmer M; Kappers, Elena F; Brands, Stef; Both, Christiaan

    2016-09-01

    Climate change may cause phenological asynchrony between trophic levels, which can lead to mismatched reproduction in animals. Although indirect effects of mismatch on fitness are well described, direct effects on parental prey choice are not. Moreover, direct effects of prey variation on offspring condition throughout their early development are understudied. Here, we used camera trap data collected over 2 years to study the effects of trophic mismatch and nestling age on prey choice in pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). Furthermore, we studied the effect of mismatch and variation in nestling diet on offspring condition. Both experimentally induced and natural mismatches with the caterpillar peak negatively affected absolute and relative numbers of caterpillars and offspring condition (mass, tarsus and wing length) and positively affected absolute and relative numbers of flying insects in the nestling diet. Feeding more flying insects was negatively correlated with nestling day 12 mass. Both descriptive and experimental data showed preferential feeding of spiders when nestlings were spiders during this phase was positively correlated with tarsus growth. These results highlight the need for a more inclusive framework to study phenological mismatch in nature. The general focus on only one prey type, the rarity of studies that measure environmental abundance of prey, and the lack of timing experiments in dietary studies currently hamper understanding of the actual trophic interactions that affect fitness under climate change. PMID:27263989

  3. Estimating Animal Abundance: Review III

    Schwarz, Carl J; Seber, George A. F.

    1999-01-01

    The literature describing methods for estimating animal abundance and related parameters continues to grow. This paper reviews recent developments in the subject over the past seven years and updates two previous reviews.

  4. Spatial, seasonal and ontogenetic variation in the diet of Astyanax aff. fasciatus (Ostariophysi: Characidae in an Atlantic Forest river, Southern Brazil

    Luciano Lazzarini Wolff

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study described the feeding habits of the characin Astyanax aff. fasciatus. The diet compositions of specimens from two sites (A and B on a river in Southern Brazil were compared according to the size of individuals and seasonal period. The collections were performed monthly from March 2005 to February 2006, where the stomach contents of 290 specimens were assessed. Food items for A. aff. fasciatus were basically composed of plants and insects, especially leaf fragments, seeds, fruits, filamentous algae, aquatic and terrestrial insects and insect fragments. At site A, the most common items were insect and plant fragments. Conversely at site B, plant fragments were more representative. In general, all items of animal origin showed the highest feeding index values at site A, whereas at site B detritus and grass items were more abundant. The composition of items varied seasonally, with higher diversity of items being recorded during the spring at both sites. Smaller individuals preferred items of animal origin, while the larger ones consumed mainly items of plant origin. According to its size, A. aff. fasciatus in this study may be considered a species with insectivorous tendencies when immature or herbivorous tendencies when adult. Nevertheless, its feeding habits may be flexible according to resource availability, showing wide ontogenetic, besides spatial and temporal variation.Este estudo descreveu os hábitos alimentares do lambari Astyanax aff. fasciatus. Foram comparadas as composições alimentares de espécimes de dois sítios (A e B de um rio no sul do Brasil de acordo com o tamanho dos indivíduos e do período sazonal. As coletas foram realizadas mensalmente de março de 2005 a fevereiro de 2006, sendo o conteúdo estomacal de 290 exemplares analisado. A dieta de A. aff. fasciatus foi composta basicamente por plantas e insetos, especialmente fragmentos de folhas, sementes, frutos, algas filamentosas, insetos aquáticos e terrestres

  5. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    Maas, Z G; Hinkle, K

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H$^{35}$Cl at 3.69851 $\\mu$m. The high resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m telescope. The average [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with --0.72$<$[Fe/H]$<$0.20 is [$^{35}$Cl/Fe]=(--0.10$\\pm$0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16$\\pm$0.15) dex. The [$^{35}$Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of $\\sim$0.35 dex above model predictions suggesting chemical evolution models are under producing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and \\ion{H}{2} regions. In one star where both H$^{35}$Cl a...

  6. Ontogenetic shifts in terrestrial reliance of stream-dwelling brown trout

    Javier Sánchez-Hernández

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on terrestrial reliance of brown trout (Salmo trutta and compared it to the potential prey available (macrozoobenthos and drifting invertebrates in three temperate rivers (Galicia, NW Spain, with special emphasis on variations in terrestrial energy intake through the ontogeny of brown trout. Additionally, we paid particular attention to individual variation of terrestrial resource use within and between age classes. Prey items were grouped in four categories: i aquatic invertebrates; ii imagoes of aquatic invertebrates; iii terrestrial invertebrates; and iv fish prey. Next, energy composition was measured according to dry weight-energy equations for each individual in line with above-mentioned prey categories. Our findings illustrate that terrestrial invertebrates appeared to be scarce in the environment, whereas aquatic food resources were rather abundant and accessible. The use of terrestrial invertebrates tended to increase with age, but with a high degree of inter-individual variation in resource use. In fact, the individual reliance of brown trout on terrestrial invertebrates may vary considerably (between 0% and 76.9%. Besides, the frequency of terrestrial foragers, i.e., individuals with terrestrial invertebrates in their stomachs, increased with age, except in one population which had the maximum value in the age-2 class. The acquisition of terrestrial invertebrates thus appears to be a process strongly dependent upon the actual food availability in the environment, but with a high degree of individual variance in resource use within the same age class. Finally, we discuss that terrestrial invertebrates may largely contribute to cover the energy intake of the species, highlighting the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and thereby the importance of riparian canopy cover as a key factor for food supply of stream-dwelling salmonids species.

  7. Variation in honey bee gut microbial diversity affected by ontogenetic stage, age and geographic location.

    Zuzana Hroncova

    Full Text Available Social honey bees, Apis mellifera, host a set of distinct microbiota, which is similar across the continents and various honey bee species. Some of these bacteria, such as lactobacilli, have been linked to immunity and defence against pathogens. Pathogen defence is crucial, particularly in larval stages, as many pathogens affect the brood. However, information on larval microbiota is conflicting. Seven developmental stages and drones were sampled from 3 colonies at each of the 4 geographic locations of A. mellifera carnica, and the samples were maintained separately for analysis. We analysed the variation and abundance of important bacterial groups and taxa in the collected bees. Major bacterial groups were evaluated over the entire life of honey bee individuals, where digestive tracts of same aged bees were sampled in the course of time. The results showed that the microbial tract of 6-day-old 5th instar larvae were nearly equally rich in total microbial counts per total digestive tract weight as foraging bees, showing a high percentage of various lactobacilli (Firmicutes and Gilliamella apicola (Gammaproteobacteria 1. However, during pupation, microbial counts were significantly reduced but recovered quickly by 6 days post-emergence. Between emergence and day 6, imago reached the highest counts of Firmicutes and Gammaproteobacteria, which then gradually declined with bee age. Redundancy analysis conducted using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis identified bacterial species that were characteristic of each developmental stage. The results suggest that 3-day 4th instar larvae contain low microbial counts that increase 2-fold by day 6 and then decrease during pupation. Microbial succession of the imago begins soon after emergence. We found that bacterial counts do not show only yearly cycles within a colony, but vary on the individual level. Sampling and pooling adult bees or 6th day larvae may lead to high errors and variability, as both

  8. Larval fish abundance and physical forcing in the Gulf of Alaska, 1981-2003

    Doyle, Miriam J.; Picquelle, Susan J.; Mier, Kathryn L.; Spillane, Michael C.; Bond, Nicholas A.

    2009-03-01

    The present study investigates ecological patterns and relationships to environmental variables among a time-series of larval fish species abundance from late spring surveys (1981-2003) in the northwest Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Links between interannual variation in species abundance and the physical environment were explored using generalized additive modeling (GAM). Trends in larval abundance and connections with physical variables displayed patterns that indicate unique and complex responses among species to environmental forcing during the larval period. In particular, the observed patterns suggest that ontogenetic-specific responses, representing sub-intervals of early life, are important. In addition, a notable degree of synchrony in larval abundance trends, and similarity in links with physical variables, were observed among species with common early life history patterns. The deepwater spawners, northern lampfish, arrowtooth flounder, and Pacific halibut, were most abundant in the study area during the 1990s, in association with enhanced wind-driven onshore and alongshore transport. Years of high abundance for Pacific cod, walleye pollock, and northern rock sole were associated with cooler winters and enhanced alongshore winds during spring. High larval abundance for spring-summer spawning rockfish species and southern rock sole seemed to be favored by warmer spring temperatures later in the time-series. This apparent exposure-response coupling seems to be connected to both local-scale and basin-scale environmental signals, to varying degrees depending on specific early life history characteristics. Understanding such ecological connections contributes to the evaluation of vulnerability and resilience among GOA species’ early life history patterns to fluctuating climate and oceanographic conditions. This investigation also provides crucial information for the identification of “environmental indicators” that may have a broad-spectrum effect on multiple

  9. Solar and Stellar Photospheric Abundances

    Prieto, Carlos Allende

    2016-01-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  10. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  11. Evidence for ontogenetic feeding strategies in four calanoid copepods in the East Sea (Japan Sea) in summer, revealed by stable isotope analysis

    Im, Dong-Hoon; Wi, Jin Hee; Suh, Hae-Lip

    2015-09-01

    Deciphering the ontogenetic feeding ecology of copepods is essential to understanding their role in the energy transfer of marine ecosystems. We used stable isotope analysis to examine the ontogenetic feeding strategies of the four coexisting calanoid copepods, Mesocalanus tenuicornis, Metridia pacifica, Calanus sinicus, and Neocalanus plumchrus, in the East Sea (Japan Sea) in summer. Moreover, we used the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of small-sized plankton in three cell size fractions, pico- (< 2 μm), nano- (2-20 μm) and microplankton (20-200 μm), to identify the dietary preference at each developmental stage. The relative carbon masses of pico-, nano- and microplankton were 18, 38, and 44%, respectively, and their δ13C and δ15N values gradually increased with increasing size classes. The ontogenetic trophic position of four copepods were relatively low and ranged from 2.1 to 2.6, indicating that herbivores feed on small-sized phytoplankton, pico- and nanoplankton. Among copepodid stages, the δ13C and δ15N values of M. tenuicornis and C. sinicus differed significantly, while those of M. pacifica and N. plumchrus were not significantly different. In M. tenuicornis, the smallest species among the four copepods examined, the diet preference of CIV for picoplankton changed to nanoplankton in the adult stage. When M. pacifica developed from CIV to adult, the diet preference changed from pico- to microplankton. The proportion of microplankton in the diet of C. sinicus and N. plumchrus increased from CIV to female adult and from CIII to CV, respectively. During the developmental progress in copepodid stages, the smaller copepods significantly changed their dietary preference from pico- to microplankton, while the larger copepods consistently fed on microplankton. We suggest that smaller copepods have an advantage in survival at early copepodid stages compared with larger copepods in summer when microplankton biomass is relatively low.

  12. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  13. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  14. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  15. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  16. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  17. Hf Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    Lawler, J E; Labby, Z E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements, accurate to about +/- 5 percent, are reported for 41 odd-parity levels of Hf II. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 150 lines of Hf II. Approximately half of these new transition probabilities overlap with recent independent measurements using a similar approach. The two sets of measurements are found to be in good agreement for measurements in common. Our new laboratory data are applied to refine the hafnium photospheric solar abundance and to determine hafnium abundances in 10 metal-poor giant stars with enhanced r-process abundances. For the Sun we derive log epsilon (Hf) = 0.88 +/- 0.08 from four lines; the uncertainty is dominated by the weakness of the lines and their blending by other spectral features. Within the uncertainties of our analysis, the r-process-rich stars possess constant Hf/La and Hf/Eu abundance ratios, log epsilon (Hf...

  18. Gd Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    Den Hartog, E A; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2006-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 49 even-parity and 14 odd-parity levels of Gd II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 611 lines of Gd II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Gd II transition probabilities and the first using a high performance Fourier transform spectrometer. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Gd abundance, log epsilon = 1.11 +/- 0.03. Revised Gd abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars CS 22892-052, BD+17 3248, and HD 115444. The resulting Gd/Eu abundance ratios are in very good agreement with the solar-system r-process ratio. We have employed the increasingly accurate stellar abundance determinations, resulting in large part from the more precise laboratory atomic data, to predict directly the Solar System r-process elemental...

  19. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001. The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959 and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965 open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992, and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993. However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001. The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004 is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004 emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004 also suggest that

  20. Sm Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    Lawler, J E; Sneden, C; Cowan, J J

    2005-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 212 odd-parity levels of Sm II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier-transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for more than 900 lines of Sm II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Sm II transition probabilities using modern methods. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Sm abundance, log epsilon = 1.00 +/- 0.03, from 26 lines. The spectra of three very metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich stars also have been analyzed, employing between 55 and 72 Sm II lines per star. The abundance ratios of Sm relative to other rare earth elements in these stars are in agreement, and are consistent with ratios expected from rapid neutron-capture nucleosynthesis (the r-process).

  1. Variability of root traits in common bean genotypes at different levels of phosphorus supply and ontogenetic stages

    Roberto dos Santos Trindade

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivars with enhanced root growth would be a strategy for increasing P uptake and grain yield in tropical soils, but the strong plasticity of root traits may compromise their inclusion in breeding programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the genotypic variability of root traits in common bean plants at two ontogenetic stages and two soil P levels. Twenty-four common bean genotypes, comprising the four growth habits that exist in the species and two wild genotypes, were grown in 4 kg pots at two levels of applied P (20 and 80 mg kg-1 and harvested at the stages of pod setting and early pod filling. Root area and root length were measured by digital image analysis. Significant genotype × P level and genotype × harvest interactions in analysis of variance indicate that the genotypic variation of root traits depended on soil nutrient availability and the stage at which evaluation was made. Genotypes differed for taproot mass, basal and lateral root mass, root area and root length at both P levels and growth stages; differences in specific root area and length were small. Genotypes with growth habits II (upright indeterminate and III (prostrate indeterminate showed better adaptation to limited P supply than genotypes of groups I (determinate and IV (indeterminate climbing. Between the two harvests, genotypes of groups II and III increased the mass of basal and lateral roots by 40 and 50 %, respectively, whereas genotypes of groups I and IV by only 7 and 19 %. Values of the genotypic coefficient of determination, which estimates the proportion of phenotypic variance resulting from genetic effects, were higher at early pod filling than at pod setting. Correlations between shoot mass and root mass, which could indicate indirect selection of root systems via aboveground biomass, were higher at early pod filling than at pod setting. The results indicate that selection for root

  2. Abundances in stars with exoplanets

    Israelian, Garik

    2003-01-01

    Extensive spectroscopic studies of stars with and without planets have concluded that stars hosting planets are significantly more metal-rich than those without planets. More subtle trends of different chemical elements begin to appear as the number of detected extrasolar planetary systems continues to grow. I review our current knowledge concerning the observed abundance trends of various chemical elements in stars with exoplanets and their possible implications.

  3. Oxygen Gas Phase Abundance Revisited

    André, M K; Howk, J C; Ferlet, R; Désert, J M; Hébrard, G; Lacour, S; Lecavelier-des-Etangs, A; Vidal-Madjar, A; Moos, H W

    2003-01-01

    We present new measurements of the interstellar gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines towards 19 early-type galactic stars at an average distance of 2.6 kpc. We derive O {\\small I} column densities from {\\it HST}/STIS observations of the weak 1355 \\AA intersystem transition. We derive total hydrogen column densities [N(H {\\small I})+2N(H$_2$)] using {\\it HST}/STIS observations of \\lya and {\\it FUSE} observations of molecular hydrogen. The molecular hydrogen content of these sight lines ranges from f(H$_2$) = 2N(H$_2$)/[N(H {\\small I})+2N(H$_2$)] = 0.03 to 0.47. The average $$ of 6.3$\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ mag$^{-1}$ with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance along these sight lines, which probe a wide range of galactic environments in the distant ISM, is 10$^6$ \\oh = $408 \\pm 13$ (1 $\\sigma$ in the mean). %$({\\rm O/H})_{gas} = 408 \\pm 14$(1 $\\sigma$). We see no evidence for decreasing gas-phase oxygen abundance with increasing molecular hydroge...

  4. Planetary nebulae abundances and stellar evolution

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2006-01-01

    A summary is given of planetary nebulae abundances from ISO measurements. It is shown that these nebulae show abundance gradients (with galactocentric distance), which in the case of neon, argon, sulfur and oxygen (with four exceptions) are the same as HII regions and early type star abundance gradients. The abundance of these elements predicted from these gradients at the distance of the Sun from the center are exactly the solar abundance. Sulfur is the exception to this; the reason for this...

  5. Lead abundance in the uranium star CS 31082-001

    Plez, B.; Hill, V.; Cayrel, R.; Spite, M.; Barbuy, B.; Beers, T.C.; Bonifacio, P.; Primas, F.; Nordström, B.

    2004-01-01

    stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data......stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data...

  6. A note on the abundance conjecture

    Dorsch, Tobias; Lazić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We prove that the abundance conjecture for non-uniruled klt pairs in dimension $n$ implies the abundance conjecture for uniruled klt pairs in dimension $n$, assuming the Minimal Model Program in lower dimensions.

  7. EXODUS TO THE PROMISED LAND AS EVINCED IN NINETEENTH- AND TWENTIETH- CENTURY AMERICAN FICTION

    Cristina Denisa Arsene-Onu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Exodus has been one of the favorite fictional topics undertaken by American fiction writers due to the fact that they belong to the so-called “Chosen People” that were not to trespass God’s covenant. My paper identifies two major Exodus themes: the Israelites’ Exodus from Egypt (the Biblical wilderness, and the Promised Land and human/divine justice as considered in the Bible. Observing the typological concept, these themes are analyzed in connection with their American antitype themes: the Pilgrim Fathers’ Exodus from Europe (the American continent as a counterpart to the Biblical Mosaic wilderness and America (New England as the Promised Land and the Puritans’ judicial system.

  8. Solar System chemical abundances corrected for systematics

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    The relative chemical abundances between CI meteorites and the solar photosphere exhibit a significant trend with condensation temperature. A trend with condensation temperature is also seen when the solar photospheric abundances are compared to those of nearby solar twins. We use both these trends to determine the alteration of the elemental abundances of the meteorties and the photosphere by fractionation and calculate a new set of primordial Solar System abundances.

  9. Variações temporais e ontogenéticas na dieta de um peixe onívoro em ambiente impactado (reservatório e em ambiente natural (baía da bacia do rio Cuiabá = Temporal and ontogenetic diet changes of omnivorous fish in an impacted (reservoir and in a natural environment (lagoon

    Edson Lourenço da Silva

    2007-10-01

    composed predominantly of insects in almost every period, and in all size classes, whereas in the lagoon seasonal and ontogenetic variations in the diet were observed. The results showed that P. maculatus has high trophic plasticity, and it was very opportunistic, consuming the abundant terrestrial food resources, mainly insects, when the reservoir started to flood the surrounding land.

  10. [Correlation between the output and composition of essential oil and the level of salicylic acid in mint plants at different ontogenetic stages].

    Shelepova, O V; Kondrat'eva, V V; Voronkova, T V; Olekhnovich, L S

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the content of acetylsalicylic acid and the output and qualitative composition of essential oil have been studied in mint plants (Mentha spicata L. and cultivar Medichka) during their ontogenesis with allowance for changes in weather conditions. Ontogenetic changes in the level of acetylsalicylic acid in leaf tissues are found to be similar in both cv. Medichka and M. spicata. In the case of cv. Medichka, this change is connected with the dynamics of the production and the qualitative composition of essential oil; in the case of M. spicata, this connection is less expressed. The role of acetylsalicylic acid and essential oil in plant adaptation to the environment is discussed. PMID:24171311

  11. Are ontogenetic shifts in diet linked to shifts in feeding mechanics? Scaling of the feeding apparatus in the banded watersnake Nerodia fasciata.

    Vincent, Shawn E; Moon, Brad R; Herrel, Anthony; Kley, Nathan J

    2007-06-01

    The effects of size on animal behaviour, ecology, and physiology are widespread. Theoretical models have been developed to predict how animal form, function, and performance should change with increasing size. Yet, numerous animals undergo dramatic shifts in ecology (e.g. habitat use, diet) that may directly influence the functioning and presumably the scaling of the musculoskeletal system. For example, previous studies have shown that banded watersnakes (Nerodia fasciata) switch from fish prey as juveniles to frog prey as adults, and that fish and frogs represent functionally distinct prey types to watersnakes. We therefore tested whether this ontogenetic shift in diet was coupled to changes in the scaling patterns of the cranial musculoskeletal system in an ontogenetic size series (70-600 mm snout-vent length) of banded watersnakes. We found that all cranial bones and gape size exhibited significant negative allometry, whereas the muscle physiological cross-sectional area (pCSAs) scaled either isometrically or with positive allometry against snout-vent length. By contrast, we found that gape size, most cranial bones, and muscle pCSAs exhibited highly significant positive allometry against head length. Furthermore, the mechanical advantage of the jaw-closing lever system remained constant over ontogeny. Overall, these cranial allometries should enable watersnakes to meet the functional requirements of switching from fusiform fish to bulky frog prey. However, recent studies have reported highly similar allometries in a wide diversity of vertebrate taxa, suggesting that positive allometry within the cranial musculoskeletal system may actually be a general characteristic of vertebrates. PMID:17562879

  12. Ontogenetic improvement of visual function in the medaka Oryzias latipes based on an optomotor testing system for larval and adult fish

    Carvalho, P.S.M.; Noltie, D.B.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    We developed a system for evaluation of visual function in larval and adult fish. Both optomotor (swimming) and optokinetic (eye movement) responses were monitored and recorded using a system of rotating stripes. The system allowed manipulation of factors such as width of the stripes used, rotation speed of the striped drum, and light illuminance levels within both the scotopic and photopic ranges. Precise control of these factors allowed quantitative measurements of visual acuity and motion detection. Using this apparatus, we tested the hypothesis that significant posthatch ontogenetic improvements in visual function occur in the medaka Oryzias latipes, and also that this species shows significant in ovo neuronal development. Significant improvements in the acuity angle alpha (ability to discriminate detail) were observed from approximately 5 degrees at hatch to 1 degree in the oldest adult stages. In addition, we measured a significant improvement in flicker fusion thresholds (motion detection skills) between larval and adult life stages within both the scotopic and photopic ranges of light illuminance. Ranges of flicker fusion thresholds (X?? ?? SD) at log I=1.96 (photopic) varied from 37.2 ?? 1.6 cycles/s in young adults to 18.6 ?? 1.6 cycles/s in young larvae 10 days posthatch. At log I= - 2.54 (scotopic), flicker fusion thresholds varied from 5.8 ?? 0.7 cycles/s in young adults to 1.7 ?? 0.4 cycles/s in young larvae 10 days posthatch. Light sensitivity increased approximately 2.9 log units from early hatched larval stages to adults. The demonstrated ontogenetic improvements in visual function probably enable the fish to explore new resources, thereby enlarging their fundamental niche. ?? 2002 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Habitat partitioning by five congeneric and abundant Choerodon species (Labridae) in a large subtropical marine embayment

    Fairclough, D. V.; Clarke, K. R.; Valesini, F. J.; Potter, I. C.

    2008-04-01

    species in being relatively abundant in each inner gulf habitat and undergoing an ontogenetic change in habitat. Thus, while its juveniles lived predominantly in seagrass, its adults occupied mostly reefs and rocky shorelines. Choerodon cephalotes occurred almost exclusively in seagrass, while C. cyanodus was relatively most abundant along rocky shorelines. Choerodon schoenleinii, the only one of the five Choerodon species to be widely distributed outside Australia, occupied reefs and, to a lesser extent, rocky shorelines in the inner gulfs. The above differences in habitat among Choerodon species would reduce the potential for competition for spatial resources among these abundant and similar species and between the juveniles and adults of one of the species.

  14. Surface abundances of ON stars

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  15. Origin of Cosmic Chemical Abundances

    Maio, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e$^-$, H, H$^+$, H$^-$, He, He$^+$, He$^{++}$, D, D$^+$, H$_2$, H$_2^+$, HD, HeH$^+$), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers at redshift $z\\gtrsim 2$. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below $\\sim 10^4\\,\\rm K$, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/...

  16. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  17. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  18. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  19. Partitioning of Habitat and Prey by Abundant and Similar-sized Species of the Triglidae and Pempherididae (Teleostei) in coastal waters

    Platell, M. E.; Potter, I. C.

    1999-02-01

    greater extent on rather than above the substratum surface. The diets of all species underwent ontogenetic changes, which were particularly marked in P. klunzingeriwhere an increase in body size was accompanied by a reduced consumption of mysids and an increased ingestion of errant polychaetes and amphipods. The fact that L. modesta, L. papilio, P. klunzingeriand P. elongatusare partially segregated by habitat and feed on suites of prey which differ in composition, allied with an interfamilial difference in the time of feeding, would reduce the likelihood of competition for resources amongst these four species, when they co-occur and are abundant. Furthermore, ontogenetic changes in diet would reduce the potential for intraspecific competition for food.

  20. The Sulfur Abundance Anomaly in Planetary Nebulae

    Henry, R B C; Kwitter, K B; Milingo, M B

    2006-01-01

    The failure of S and O abundances in most planetary nebulae to display the same strong direct correlation that is observed in extragalactic H II regions represents one of the most perplexing problems in the area of PN abundances today. Galactic chemical evolution models as well as large amounts of observational evidence from H II region studies support the contention that cosmic abundances of alpha elements such as O, Ne, S, Cl, and Ar increase together in lockstep. Yet abundance results from the Henry, Kwitter, & Balick (2004) database show a strong tendency for most PNe to have S abundances that are significantly less than expected from the observed level of O. One reasonable hypothesis for the sulfur anomaly is the past failure to properly measure the abundances of unseen ionization stages above S^+2. Future observations with Spitzer will allow us to test this hypothesis.

  1. Oxygen abundances in nearby dwarf irregular galaxies

    Oxygen abundances are obtained by optical spectrophotometry of H II regions in seven nearby dwarf irregular galaxies. All of these yield oxygen abundances of less than 1/10 of the solar value, and most are in the range of 3-5 percent of the solar value. This suggests that observations of nearby dwarf galaxies may provide an effective means for studying the chemical evolution of low-mass galaxies and, possibly, the primordial helium abundance. A strong correlation is found between the oxygen abundances and absolute magnitudes for nearby irregular galaxies. This correlation will be useful for estimating abundances of irregular galaxies without observable H II regions, and possibly as a distance indicator for irregular galaxies with known abundances. It is inferred from this relationship that infall is no more important in irregular galaxies with extremely large H I halos than in typical irregular galaxies. 72 refs

  2. Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES

    Smiljanic, R

    2014-01-01

    Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

  3. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide va...

  4. Monitoring Butterfly Abundance: Beyond Pollard Walks

    Pellet, Jérôme; Bried, Jason T.; Parietti, David; Gander, Antoine; Heer, Patrick O.; Cherix, Daniel; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    Most butterfly monitoring protocols rely on counts along transects (Pollard walks) to generate species abundance indices and track population trends. It is still too often ignored that a population count results from two processes: the biological process (true abundance) and the statistical process (our ability to properly quantify abundance). Because individual detectability tends to vary in space (e.g., among sites) and time (e.g., among years), it remains unclear whether index counts truly...

  5. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  6. Ontogenetic variations in the diet of two invasive gobies, Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas, 1814) and Ponticola kessleri (Günther, 1861), from the middle Danube (Slovakia) with notice on their potential impact on benthic invertebrate communities.

    Števove, Barbora; Kováč, Vladimír

    2016-07-01

    In this study, ontogenetic variations in diet of invasive bighead goby Ponticola kessleri and round goby Neogobius melanostomus from the middle Danube were analysed. Index of stomach fullness, Fulton's condition factor, index of food importance, frequency of occurrence, biomass, electivity, and proportions of invasive organisms in their diet were examined. Changes in the diet during ontogeny of both species emphasise the differences in their trophic niches. Our results combined with literary data suggest that bighead goby may threaten small native benthic fish species as a predator (especially in the invasion front), whereas round goby can potentially impact native fish species of all ontogenetic phases by competing for food. Round goby appear to have strong impact on bivalves, especially in the invasion front. High consumption of invasive organisms by bighead goby may help the native macroinvertebrate community. Thus, in contrast to round goby, bighead goby does not seem to be a hot candidate for being a nuisance invader. PMID:27031302

  7. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  8. Taking species abundance distributions beyond individuals

    Morlon, Helene; White, Ethan P.; Etienne, Rampal S.; Green, Jessica L.; Ostling, Annette; Alonso, David; Enquist, Brian J.; He, Fangliang; Hurlbert, Allen; Magurran, Anne E.; Maurer, Brian A.; McGill, Brian J.; Olff, Han; Storch, David; Zillio, Tommaso; Chave, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    The species abundance distribution (SAD) is one of the few universal patterns in ecology. Research on this fundamental distribution has primarily focused on the study of numerical counts, irrespective of the traits of individuals. Here we show that considering a set of Generalized Species Abundance

  9. Methanol abundance in low mass protostars

    Maret, S

    2004-01-01

    Methanol lines observations of a sample of low mass Class 0 protostars are presented. Using a 1D radiative transfer model, I show that several protostars have large abundance jumps in the inner hot and dense region of envelopes, probably because of thermal grain mantle evaporation. These abundances are compared with a grain surface chemistry model.

  10. Solar Energetic Particles: Sampling Coronal Abundances

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-05-01

    In the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shock waves out through the corona that accelerate elements of the ambient material to MeV energies in a fairly democratic, temperature-independent manner. These events provide the most complete source of information on element abundances in the corona. Relative abundances of 22 elements from H through Zn display the well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) that distinguishes coronal and photospheric material. For most elements, the main abundance variations depend upon the gyrofrequency, and hence on the charge-to-mass ratio, Q/A, of the ion. Abundance variations in the dominant species, H and He, are not Q/A dependent, presumably because of non-linear wave-particle interactions of H and He during acceleration. Impulsive flares provide a different sample of material that confirms the Ne:Mg:Si and He/C abundances in the corona.

  11. Silicon abundances in population I giants

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    Silicon to carbon abundance ratios for population I giants were determined from emission lines originating in the transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae. For effective temperatures larger than 6200 K we find a group of stars with increased silicon to carbon but normal nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios. These stars are presumably descendents from Ap stars with increased surface silicon to carbon abundance ratios. For G stars this anomaly disappears as is to be expected due to the increased depth of the convection zone and therefore deeper mixing which dilutes the surface overabundances. The disappearance of the abundance anomalies proves that the anomalous abundances observed for the F giants are indeed only a surface phenomenon. It also proves that the same holds for their progenitors, the Ap and Am stars, as has been generally believed. Unexplained is the increased silicon to carbon abundance ratio observed for several stars cooler than 5100 L. RS CVn and related stars do not show this increased abundance ratio. There are also some giants which appear to be enriched in carbon, perhaps due to a helium flash with some mixing if the star is a clump star.

  12. Ontogenetic changes in location and morphology of chloride cells during early life stages of the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus adapted to fresh and brackish water.

    Fridman, S; Bron, J E; Rana, K J

    2011-09-01

    Ontogenetic changes in the location, size, density and morphology of chloride cells in the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus adapted to fresh and brackish water are described using Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase immunohistochemistry, light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The pattern of chloride cell distribution changed during development under both treatments, with chloride cell density decreasing significantly from hatch to 7 days post-hatch, but appearing on the inner opercular area at 3 days post-hatch and increasing significantly thereafter (P larvae. In both treatments, chloride cells located on the outer operculum and tail showed a marked increase in size with age, but cells located on the abdominal epithelium of the yolk sac and the inner operculum showed a significant decrease in size (P larvae from 1 day post-hatch onwards were always significantly larger (P larvae. SEM revealed structural differences in chloride cell apical morphology according to environmental conditions. There appears to be clearly defined temporal staging of the appearance of adaptive mechanisms that confer an ability to cope with varying environmental conditions during early development. PMID:21884103

  13. Profiles of thyrotropin, thyroid hormones, follicular cells and type I deiodinase gene expression during ontogenetic development of tilapia larvae and juveniles.

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Shu-Chuan; Shen, Shu Chane; Wu, Su Mei

    2014-10-01

    The aims of the present study are to determine whether triiodothyronine (T3) and/or thyroxine (T4) in tilapia larvae is gifted through the mother, and to investigate the change profiles of thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid follicular cells and type I deiodinase (D1) gene expression following larval development. T3 and T4 contents were measured using radioimmunoassay, thyrotropin was observed using immunocytochemistry, and the D1 gene was cloned and measured using real-time PCR. Results indicated that the β-TSH-immunoreactive cells (thyrotropin ICC) signals were detected at 9 dph (i.e., 9 days of post-hatching). Thyroid follicular cells were observed first at 3 dph, while the T3 contents of the whole body gradually decreased before 11 dph. T4 contents were detected until 13 dph, with higher secretion during 19-21 dph. In addition, the T3 synthesis was not inhibited by thiourea (TU) before 13 dph, but the TU response in the larvae appeared after 13 dph. Type I deiodinase (D1: GenBank accession number KC591724) was found to contain 2444 bases and encoded 248 amino acids. The D1 mRNA expression began to increase at 13 dph, with a higher expression during 15-19 dph. These results suggested that the T3 contents were maternally derived before 13 dph. Both thyroid hormonal changes and some parameters related to thyroid hormone synthesis in ontogenetic tilapia are discussed. PMID:24894980

  14. The role of spatial and ontogenetic morphological variation in the expansion of the geographic range of the tropical brown alga, Turbinaria ornata.

    Stewart, Hannah L

    2008-12-01

    Like many reefs worldwide, reefs in French Polynesia are experiencing a shift from coral-dominated to algal-dominated systems. The macroalga Turbinaria ornata comprises the majority of the increasing algal biomass on the barrier reefs surrounding these islands, and its distribution is increasing throughout this region. Aspects of the ecomorphology of Turbinaria make it ideally suited to thrive under the physical conditions found across barrier reefs throughout French Polynesia. Spatial morphological variation allows Turbinaria to produce morphotypes that are suited either to the calm, unidirectional, slowly flowing water in the backreef or to the high-energy wave-driven flow of the forereef. Backreef plants are flexible and produce airbladders that make them buoyant, whereas forereef plants are not buoyant, but strong and stiff. Production of bladders and resulting buoyancy has been found to be a phenotypically plastic trait in response to movement of water and confers advantages to backreef plants and plays an important role in dispersal. Ontogenetic variation of buoyancy, material properties, and reproductive capacity is part of a dispersal strategy whereby fertile, buoyant fronds drift between oceanic islands and form new populations, thereby contributing to the recent expansion of range of T. ornata across French Polynesia. PMID:21669827

  15. Morphology, ontogenetic features and SSU rRNA gene-based phylogeny of a soil ciliate, Bistichella cystiformans spec. nov. (Protista, Ciliophora, Stichotrichia).

    Fan, Yangbo; Hu, Xiaozhong; Gao, Feng; Al-Farraj, Saleh A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2014-12-01

    The morphology, ontogeny and SSU rRNA gene-based phylogeny of Bistichella cystiformans spec. nov., isolated from the slightly saline soil of a mangrove wetland in Zhanjiang, southern China, were investigated. The novel species was characterized by having five to eight buccal cirri arranged in a row, three to five transverse cirri, four macronuclear nodules aligned, and 17-32 and 20-34 cirri in frontoventral rows V and VI, respectively, both extending to the transverse cirri. The main ontogenetic features of the novel species were as follows: (1) the parental adoral zone of the membranelles is completely inherited by the proter; (2) the frontoventral and transverse cirri are formed in a six-anlagen mode; (3) basically, the frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlagen II-V generate one transverse cirrus each at their posterior ends, while anlage VI provides no transverse cirrus; (4) both marginal rows and dorsal kineties develop intrakinetally, no dorsal kinety fragment is formed; and (5) the macronuclear nodules fuse into a single mass at the middle stage. Phylogenetic analyses based on the SSU rRNA gene showed that the novel species groups with the clade containing Bistichella variabilis, Parabistichella variabilis, Uroleptoides magnigranulosus and two species of the genus Orthoamphisiella. Given present knowledge, it was considered to be still too early to come to a final conclusion regarding the familial classification of the genus Bistichella; further investigations of key taxa with additional molecular markers are required. PMID:25242538

  16. Predicting the dynamics of protein abundance.

    Mehdi, Ahmed M; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA-protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation efficiency

  17. CUMULATIVE OXYGEN ABUNDANCES OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Studying the global evolution of spiral galaxies requires determining their overall chemical compositions. However, since spirals tend to possess gradients in their chemical compositions, determining their overall chemical abundances poses a challenge. In this study, the framework for a newly proposed method for determining the overall oxygen abundance of a disk is established. By separately integrating the absolute amounts of hydrogen and oxygen out to large radii, the cumulative oxygen abundance is shown to approach an asymptotic value. In this manner, a reliable account of the overall chemical state of a disk is revealed.

  18. Lithium Abundance of Metal-poor Stars

    Hua-Wei Zhang; Gang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra have been obtained for 32 metal-poor stars. The equivalent widths of Li λ6708A were measured and the lithium abundances were derived. The average lithium abundance of 21 stars on the lithium plateau is 2.33±0.02 dex. The Lithium plateau exhibits a marginal trend along metallicity, dA(Li)/d[Fe/H] = 0.12±0.06, and no clear trend with the effective temperature. The trend indicates that the abundance of lithium plateau may not be primordial and that a part of the lithium was produced in Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE).

  19. Study of the primordial lithium abundance

    2011-01-01

    Lithium isotopes have attracted an intense interest because the abundance of both 6Li and 6Li from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the puzzles in nuclear astrophysics. Many investigations of both astrophysical observation and nucleosynthesis calculation have been carried out to solve the puzzle, but it is not solved yet. Several nuclear reactions involving lithium have been indirectly measured at China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing. The Standard BBN (SBBN) network calculations are then performed to investigate the primordial Lithium abundance. The result shows that these nuclear reactions have minimal effect on the SBBN abundances of 6Li and 7Li.

  20. Abundance analysis of HD 22920 spectra

    Khalack, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The new spectropolarimetric observations of HD 22920 with ESPaDOnS at CFHT reveal a strong variability of its spectral line profiles with the phase of stellar rotation. We have obtained Teff = 13640 K, logg=3.72 for this star from the best fit of its nine Balmer line profiles. The respective model of stellar atmosphere was calculated to perform abundance analysis of HD 22920 using the spectra obtained for three different phases of stellar rotation. We have found that silicon and chromium abundances appear to be vertically stratified in the atmosphere of HD 22920. Meanwhile, silicon shows hints for a possible variability of vertical abundance stratification with rotational phase.

  1. Iron abundance in the atmosphere of Arcturus

    Sheminova, V A

    2015-01-01

    Abundance of iron in the atmosphere of Arcturus has been determined from the profiles or regions of the profiles of the weak lines sensitive to iron abundance. The selected lines of Fe I and Fe II were synthesized with the MARCS theoretical models of the atmosphere. From the observed profiles of lines available with a high spectral resolution in the atlas by Hinkle and Wallace (2005), the values of the iron abundance $A = 6.95 \\pm 0.03$ and the radial-tangential macroturbulent velocity $5.6 \\pm 0.2$ km/s were obtained for Arcturus. The same physical quantities were found for the Sun as a star; they are $7.42 \\pm 0.02$ and $3.4 \\pm 0.3$ km/s, respectively. For Arcturus, the iron abundance relative to the solar one was determined with the differential method as [Fe/H] $=-0.48 \\pm 0.02$.

  2. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    Yang, G C; Spite, M; Chen, Y Q; Zhao, G; Zhang, B; Liu, G Q; Liu, Y J; Liu, N; Deng, L C; Spite, F; Hill, V; Zhang, C X

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures, surface gravities, metallicity and microturbulent velocity) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their light elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-ca...

  3. SWFSC/MMTD: Vaquita Abundance Survey 1997

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1997, the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) conducted a survey designed to estimate the abundance of vaquita, the Gulf of California harbor porpoise...

  4. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    California Department of Resources — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  5. Testing Relationships between Energy and Vertebrate Abundance

    Understanding what drives variation in the abundance of organisms is fundamental to evolutionary ecology and wildlife management. Yet despite its importance, there is still great uncertainty about the main factors influencing variation in vertebrate abundance across taxa. We believe valuable knowledge and increased predictive power could be gained by taking into account both the intrinsic factors of species and the extrinsic factors related to environmental surroundings in the commonly cited RQ model, which provides a simple conceptual framework valid at both the interspecific and the intraspecific scales. Approaches comparing studies undertaken at different spatial and taxonomic scales could be key to our ability to better predict abundance, and thanks to the increased availability of population size data, global geographic datasets, and improved comparative methods, there might be unprecedented opportunities to (1) gain a greater understanding of vertebrate abundance patterns and (2) test existing theories on free-ranging animals.

  6. Primordial Deuterium Abundance and Cosmic Baryon Density

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of cosmic abundances of the light elements with the density of baryonic stars and gas in the universe today provides a critical test of big bang theory and a powerful probe of the nature of dark matter. A new technique allows determination of cosmic deuterium abundances in quasar absorption clouds at large redshift, allowing a new test of big bang homogeneity in diverse, very distant systems. The first results of these studies are summarized, along with their implications. The ...

  7. Unprecedented accurate abundances: signatures of other Earths?

    Melendez, J.; Asplund, M.; Gustafsson, B.; Yong, D.; Ramirez, I.

    2009-01-01

    For more than 140 years the chemical composition of our Sun has been considered typical of solar-type stars. Our highly differential elemental abundance analysis of unprecedented accuracy (~0.01 dex) of the Sun relative to solar twins, shows that the Sun has a peculiar chemical composition with a ~20% depletion of refractory elements relative to the volatile elements in comparison with solar twins. The abundance differences correlate strongly with the condensation temperatures of the elements...

  8. Estimating whale abundance using sparse hydrophone arrays

    Harris, Danielle Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring has been used to investigate many aspects of marine mammal ecology, although methods to estimate absolute abundance and density using acoustic data have only been developed in recent years. The instrument configuration in an acoustic survey determines which abundance estimation methods can be used. Sparsely distributed arrays of instruments are useful because wide geographic areas can be covered. However, instrument spacing in sparse arrays is such that the same...

  9. Spatial scaling of species abundance distributions

    Borda-de-Água, Luís; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Pereira, Henrique M

    2012-01-01

    Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Ecography © 2012 Nordic Society Oikos. Species abundance distributions are an essential tool in describing the biodiversity of ecological communities. We now know that their shape changes as a function of the size of area sampled. Here we analyze the scaling properties of species abundance distributions by using the moments of the logarithmically transformed number of individuals. We find that the moments as a function of area size are well fitted by power law...

  10. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    Magurran, A.E; Henderson, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in l...

  11. Solar Models with New Low Metal Abundances

    Yang, Wuming

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, the photospheric abundances of the Sun had been revised several times by many observers. The standard solar models constructed with the new low-metal abundances disagree with helioseismic results and detected neutrino fluxes. The solar model problem has puzzled some stellar physicists for more than 10 years. Rotation, enhanced diffusion, convection overshoot, and magnetic fields are used to reconcile the new abundances with helioseismology. The too low helium subsurface abundance in enhanced diffusion models can be improved by the mixing caused by rotation and magnetic fields. The problem of the depth of the convective zone in rotating models can be resolved by convection overshoot. Consequently, the Asplund–Grevesse–Sauval rotation model including overshooting (AGSR) reproduces the seismically inferred sound-speed and density profiles and the convection zone depth as well as the Grevesse & Sauval model computed before. But this model fails to reproduce the surface helium abundance, which is 0.2393 (2.6σ away from the seismic value), and neutrino fluxes. The magnetic model called AGSM keeps the agreement of the AGSR and improves the prediction of the surface helium abundance. The observed separation ratios r02 and r13 are reasonably reproduced by AGSM. Moreover, neutrino fluxes calculated by this model are not far from the detected neutrino fluxes and the predictions of previous works.

  12. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  13. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  14. Modelling Void Abundance in Modified Gravity

    Voivodic, Rodrigo; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F

    2016-01-01

    We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f(R) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surv...

  15. Variações temporais e ontogenéticas na dieta de um peixe onívoro em ambiente impactado (reservatório e em ambiente natural (baía da bacia do rio Cuiabá - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i4.878 Temporal and ontogenetic diet changes of omnivorous fish in an impacted (reservoir and in a natural environment (lagoon - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i4.878

    Rosemara Fugi

    2008-02-01

    . maculatus was composed predominantly of insects in almost every period, and in all size classes, whereas in the lagoon seasonal and ontogenetic variations in the diet were observed. The results showed that P. maculatus has high trophic plasticity, and it was very opportunistic, consuming the abundant terrestrial food resources, mainly insects, when the reservoir started to flood the surrounding land.

  16. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  17. Linking species abundance distributions in numerical abundance and biomass through simple assumptions about community structure

    Henderson, Peter A.; Magurran, Anne E

    2010-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) are widely used as a tool for summarizing ecological communities but may have different shapes, depending on the currency used to measure species importance. We develop a simple plotting method that links SADs in the alternative currencies of numerical abundance and biomass and is underpinned by testable predictions about how organisms occupy physical space. When log numerical abundance is plotted against log biomass, the species lie within an approximat...

  18. Variety, sex and ontogenetic differences in the pelvic limb muscle architectural properties of leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and their links with locomotor performance.

    Rose, Kayleigh A; Nudds, Robert L; Codd, Jonathan R

    2016-06-01

    Leghorn (layer) chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) differ in locomotor morphology and performance due to artificial selection for standard (large) and bantam (small) varieties, sexual dimorphisms and ontogenetic stage. Here, the hind limb skeletal muscle architectural properties of mature and juvenile standard breeds and mature bantams are compared and linked to measures of locomotor performance. Mature males possessed greater relative muscle physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) than their conspecific females, indicative of greater force-generating capacity, and in line with their greater maximum sustainable speeds compared with females. Furthermore, some of the relative fascicle lengths of the pennate muscles were greater in mature males than in mature females, which may permit greater muscle contractibility. Immature standard leghorns, however, did not share the same dimorphisms as their mature forms. The differences in architectural properties between immature and mature standard males indicate that with the onset of male sexual maturity, concomitant with increasing muscle mass in males, the relative fascicle lengths of pennate muscles and the relative PCSAs of the parallel-fibred muscles also increase. The age-related differences in standard breed male muscle architecture are linked to the presence and absence of sex differences in maximum aerobic speeds. Males of bantam and standard varieties shared similar muscle proportions (% body mass), but exhibited intrinsic muscle differences with a tendency for greater force-generating capabilities in bantams and greater contractile capabilities in standards. The metabolic costs associated with the longer fascicle lengths, together with more crouched limbs in standard than in bantam males may explain the lack of allometry in the minimum metabolic cost of transport between these birds of different size. PMID:26969917

  19. Good abundances from bad spectra; 1, techniques

    Bryn, J; Wyse, R F G; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F G

    1995-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract true iron abundances and surface gravities from spectra of the type provided by the multiple-object fibre-fed spectroscopic radial-velocity surveys underway with 2dF, HYDRA, NESSIE, and the forthcoming Sloan survey. Our method is optimised for low S/N, intermediate resolution blue spectra of G stars. Spectroscopic indices sensitive to iron abundance and gravity are defined from a set of narrow (few Angstrom) wavelength intervals, and calibrated using synthetic spectra. We have also defined a single abundance indicator which is able to provide useful iron abundance information from spectra having S/N ratios as low as 10 per Angstrom. The theoretical basis and calibration using synthetic spectra are described in this paper. The empirical calibration of these techniques by application to observational data is described in Jones, Wyse and Gilmore (PASP July 1995). The technique provides precise iron abundances, with zero-point correct to \\sim 0.1 dex, and is reliable, with ...

  20. Oxygen abundance maps of CALIFA galaxies

    Zinchenko, I A; Grebel, E K; Sanchez, S F; Vilchez, J M

    2016-01-01

    We construct maps of the oxygen abundance distribution across the disks of 88 galaxies using CALIFA data release 2 (DR2) spectra. The position of the center of a galaxy (coordinates on the plate) were also taken from the CALIFA DR2. The galaxy inclination, the position angle of the major axis, and the optical radius were determined from the analysis of the surface brightnesses in the SDSS $g$ and $r$ bands of the photometric maps of SDSS data release 9. We explore the global azimuthal abundance asymmetry in the disks of the CALIFA galaxies and the presence of a break in the radial oxygen abundance distribution. We found that there is no significant global azimuthal asymmetry for our sample of galaxies, i.e., the asymmetry is small, usually lower than 0.05 dex. The scatter in oxygen abundances around the abundance gradient has a comparable value, $\\lesssim 0.05$ dex. A significant (possibly dominant) fraction of the asymmetry can be attributed to the uncertainties in the geometrical parameters of these galaxie...

  1. Abundances of Molecular Species in Barnard 68

    Francesco, J D; Welch, W J; Bergin, E A; Francesco, James Di; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Welch, William J.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2002-01-01

    Abundances for 5 molecules (C18O, CS, NH3, H2CO, and C3H2) and 1 molecular ion (N2H+) and upper limits for the abundances of 1 molecule (13CO) and 1 molecular ion (HCO+) are derived for gas within the Bok globule Barnard 68 (B68). The abundances were determined using our own BIMA millimeter interferometer data and single-dish data gathered from the literature, in conjunction with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Since B68 is the only starless core to have its density structure strongly constrained via extinction mapping, a major uncertainty has been removed from these determinations. All abundances for B68 are lower than those derived for translucent and cold dense clouds, but perhaps only significantly for N2H+, NH3, and C3H2. Depletion of CS toward the extinction peak of B68 is hinted at by the large offset between the extinction peak and the position of maximum CS line brightness. Abundances derived here for C18O and N2H+ are consistent with other, recently determined values at positions observed in...

  2. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community.

  3. Estimating the relationship between abundance and distribution

    Rindorf, Anna; Lewy, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies investigate the relationship between abundance and distribution using indices reflecting one of the three aspects of distribution: proportion of area occupied, aggregation, and geographical range. Using simulations and analytical derivations, we examine whether these indices...... based on Euclidean distance to the centre of gravity of the spatial distribution. Only the proportion of structurally empty areas, Lloyds index, and indices of the distance to the centre of gravity of the spatial distribution are unbiased at all levels of abundance. The remaining indices generate...... relationships between abundance and distribution even in cases where no underlying relationships exists, although the problem decreases for measures derived from Lorenz curves when samples contain more than four individuals on average. To illustrate the problem, the indices are applied to juvenile North Sea cod...

  4. Unprecedented accurate abundances: signatures of other Earths?

    Melendez, J; Gustafsson, B; Yong, D; Ramírez, I

    2009-01-01

    For more than 140 years the chemical composition of our Sun has been considered typical of solar-type stars. Our highly differential elemental abundance analysis of unprecedented accuracy (~0.01 dex) of the Sun relative to solar twins, shows that the Sun has a peculiar chemical composition with a ~20% depletion of refractory elements relative to the volatile elements in comparison with solar twins. The abundance differences correlate strongly with the condensation temperatures of the elements. A similar study of solar analogs from planet surveys shows that this peculiarity also holds in comparisons with solar analogs known to have close-in giant planets while the majority of solar analogs without detected giant planets show the solar abundance pattern. The peculiarities in the solar chemical composition can be explained as signatures of the formation of terrestrial planets like our own Earth.

  5. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    Krugler, J. A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5×106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by mass to range from 0.9 to 1.1 M⊙. They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H]=-0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and the Gecko spectrograph on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis and were analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, metallicity, and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to decrease linearly with metallicity down to [Fe/H]˜-4.0 with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread ˜1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K.

  6. A stress-responsive late embryogenesis abundant protein 7 (CsLEA7) of tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] encodes for a chaperone that imparts tolerance to Escherichia coli against stresses.

    Paul, Asosii; Singh, Sewa; Sharma, Shweta; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-11-01

    The present study characterized CsLEA7, a group 7 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene, from tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze]. The gene had an open reading frame of 462 base pairs encoding 153 amino acids with calculated molecular weight of 16.63 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 4.93. Analysis revealed CsLEA7 to be an intrinsically ordered protein consisting of nine β-strands and two α-helices. CsLEA7 expressed ubiquitously in all the tissues analyzed with highest level of transcripts in mature leaf as compared to in flower bud, younger leaves, stem and fruit. Expression was the least in root tissue. CsLEA7 exhibited up-regulation in response to low temperature, polyethylene glycol-8000, sodium chloride and hydrogen peroxide in tea. Analysis of the promoter of CsLEA7 revealed a core promoter element and distinct cis-acting regulatory elements regulating gene expression under abiotic stresses. CsLEA7 exhibited chaperonic activity as evinced by protection to malate dehydrogenase against heat denaturation assay. Recombinant Escherichia coli cells producing CsLEA7 exhibited improved tolerance against diverse cues: polyethylene glycol-8000, sodium chloride, hydrogen peroxide and low temperature signifying its role in imparting stress tolerance. PMID:25052187

  7. Metal Abundances in Hot DO White Dwarfs

    Werner, K; Ringat, E; Kruk, J W

    2012-01-01

    The relatively high abundance of carbon in the hot DO white dwarf RE0503-289 indicates that it is a descendant of a PG1159 star. This is corroborated by the recent detection of the extremely high abundances of trans-Fe elements which stem from s-process nucleosynthesis in the precursor AGB star, dredged up by a late He-shell flash and possibly amplified by radiative levitation. On the other hand, the hottest known DO white dwarf, KPD0005+5106, cannot have evolved from a PG1159 star but represents a distinct He-rich evolutionary sequence that possibly originates from a binary white dwarf merger.

  8. Non-Salmonid Abundance - Line Features [ds186

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. The "Other Fish" category contains data collected...

  9. North Sea Elasmobranchs: distribution, abundance and biodiversity

    Daan, N.; Heessen, H.J.L.; Hofstede, ter R.

    2005-01-01

    Based on data from various international and national surveys, an overview is given of the fine-scale distribution (resolution of 20¿longitude * 10¿ latitude; ¿ 10*10 nm) and trends in abundance of elasmobranch species reported from the North Sea. Presence-absence maps are produced based on 4 survey

  10. Heavy element abundances and massive star formation

    Wang, Boqi; Silk, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) remains a great challenge in astronomy. In the solar neighborhood, the IMF is reasonable well determined for stellar masses from about 0.1 to 60 solar mass. However, outside the solar neighborhood, the IMF is poorly known. Among those frequently discussed arguments favoring a different IMF outside the solar neighborhood are the estimated time to consume the remaining gas in spiral galaxies, and the high rate of forming massive stars in starburst galaxies. An interesting question then is whether there may be an independent way of testing possible variations in the IMF. Indeed, the heavy elements in the interstellar medium are mostly synthesized in massive stars, so increasing, or decreasing, the fraction of massive stars naturally leads to a variation in the heavy element yield, and thus, the metallicity. The observed abundance should severely constrain any deviations of the IMF from the locally determined IMF. We focus on element oxygen, which is the most abundant heavy element in the interstellar medium. Oxygen is ejected only by massive stars that can become Type 1 supernovae, and the oxygen abundance is, therefore, a sensitive function of the fraction of massive stars in the IMF. Adopting oxygen enables us to avoid uncertainties in Type 1 supernovae. We use the nucleosynthesis results to calculate the oxygen yield for given IMF. We then calculate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium assuming instantaneous recycling of oxygen.

  11. The Galactic Thick Disk Stellar Abundances

    Prochaska, J X; Carney, B W; McWilliam, A; Wolfe, A M; Prochaska, Jason X.; Naumov, Sergei O.; Carney, Bruce W.; William, Andrew Mc; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2000-01-01

    We present first results from a program to measure the chemical abundances of a large (N>30) sample of thick disk stars with the principal goal of investigating the formation history of the Galactic thick disk. Our analysis confirms previous studies of O and Mg in the thick disk stars which reported enhancements in excess of the thin disk population. Furthermore, the observations of Si, Ca, Ti, Mn, Co, V, Zn, Al, and Eu all argue that the thick disk population has a distinct chemical history from the thin disk. With the exception of V and Co, the thick disk abundance patterns match or tend towards the values observed for halo stars with [Fe/H]~-1. This suggests that the thick disk stars had a chemical enrichment history similar to the metal-rich halo stars. With the possible exception of Si, the thick disk abundance patterns are in excellent agreement with the chemical abundances observed in the metal-poor bulge stars suggesting the two populations formed from the same gas reservoir at a common epoch. We disc...

  12. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  13. Will Abundant Natural Gas Solve Climate Change?

    McJeon, H. C.; Edmonds, J.; Bauer, N.; Leon, C.; Fisher, B.; Flannery, B.; Hilaire, J.; Krey, V.; Marangoni, G.; Mi, R.; Riahi, K.; Rogner, H.; Tavoni, M.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid deployment of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technologies enabled the production of previously uneconomic shale gas resources in North America. Global deployment of these advanced gas production technologies could bring large influx of economically competitive unconventional gas resources to the energy system. It has been hoped that abundant natural gas substituting for coal could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, which in turn could reduce climate forcing. Other researchers countered that the non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas production make its lifecycle emissions higher than those of coal. In this study, we employ five state-of-the-art integrated assessment models (IAMs) of energy-economy-climate systems to assess the full impact of abundant gas on climate change. The models show large additional natural gas consumption up to +170% by 2050. The impact on CO2 emissions, however, is found to be much smaller (from -2% to +11%), and a majority of the models reported a small increase in climate forcing (from -0.3% to +7%) associated with the increased use of abundant gas. Our results show that while globally abundant gas may substantially change the future energy market equilibrium, it will not significantly mitigate climate change on its own in the absence of climate policies.

  14. Abundance of Terrestrial Planets by Microlensing

    Yock, Philip

    2000-01-01

    Terrestrial planets may be detected using the gravitational microlensing technique. This was demonstrated in the high magnification event MACHO-98-BLG-35. Observing strategies aimed at measuring the abundance of terrestrial planets are discussed, using both existing telescopes and planned telescopes.

  15. Quasar Elemental Abundances at High Redshifts

    Dietrich, M.; Hamann, F.; Shields, J. C.; Constantin, A.; Heidt, J.; Jaeger, K.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Wagner, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    framework of the most recent photoionization models to estimate the metallicity of the gas associated with the high-z quasars. Standard photoionization parameters and the assumption of secondary nitrogen enrichment indicate an average abundance of Z/Z_sol = 4 to 5 in the line emitting gas. Assuming a time...

  16. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Silva, J. V. Sales

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, alpha-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of alpha-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anti-correlated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90% of the barium stars belong to the thin disk population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an AGB star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  17. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Sales Silva, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scaleheight, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, α-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars cannot be represented by a single Gaussian distribution. The abundances of α-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anticorrelated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90 per cent of the barium stars belong to the thin disc population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an asymptotic giant branch star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  18. Ocean Acidification and Increased Temperature Have Both Positive and Negative Effects on Early Ontogenetic Traits of a Rocky Shore Keystone Predator Species

    Manríquez, Patricio H.; Jara, María Elisa; Seguel, Mylene E.; Torres, Rodrigo; Alarcon, Emilio; Lee, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming is expected to have significant effects on several traits of marine organisms. The gastropod Concholepas concholepas is a rocky shore keystone predator characteristic of the south-eastern Pacific coast of South America and an important natural resource exploited by small-scale artisanal fishermen along the coast of Chile and Peru. In this study, we used small juveniles of C. concholepas collected from the rocky intertidal habitats of southern Chile (39°S) to evaluate under laboratory conditions the potential consequences of projected near-future levels of ocean acidification and warming for important early ontogenetic traits. The individuals were exposed long-term (5.8 months) to contrasting pCO2 (ca. 500 and 1400 μatm) and temperature (15 and 19°C) levels. After this period we compared body growth traits, dislodgement resistance, predator-escape response, self-righting and metabolic rates. With respect to these traits there was no evidence of a synergistic interaction between pCO2 and temperature. Shell growth was negatively affected by high pCO2 levels only at 15°C. High pCO2 levels also had a negative effect on the predator-escape response. Conversely, dislodgement resistance and self-righting were positively affected by high pCO2 levels at both temperatures. High tenacity and fast self-righting would reduce predation risk in nature and might compensate for the negative effects of high pCO2 levels on other important defensive traits such as shell size and escape behaviour. We conclude that climate change might produce in C. concholepas positive and negative effects in physiology and behaviour. In fact, some of the behavioural responses might be a consequence of physiological effects, such as changes in chemosensory capacity (e.g. predator-escape response) or secretion of adhesive mucous (e.g. dislodgement resistance). Moreover, we conclude that positive behavioural responses may assist in the adaptation

  19. Ocean Acidification and Increased Temperature Have Both Positive and Negative Effects on Early Ontogenetic Traits of a Rocky Shore Keystone Predator Species.

    Patricio H Manríquez

    Full Text Available The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming is expected to have significant effects on several traits of marine organisms. The gastropod Concholepas concholepas is a rocky shore keystone predator characteristic of the south-eastern Pacific coast of South America and an important natural resource exploited by small-scale artisanal fishermen along the coast of Chile and Peru. In this study, we used small juveniles of C. concholepas collected from the rocky intertidal habitats of southern Chile (39 °S to evaluate under laboratory conditions the potential consequences of projected near-future levels of ocean acidification and warming for important early ontogenetic traits. The individuals were exposed long-term (5.8 months to contrasting pCO2 (ca. 500 and 1400 μatm and temperature (15 and 19 °C levels. After this period we compared body growth traits, dislodgement resistance, predator-escape response, self-righting and metabolic rates. With respect to these traits there was no evidence of a synergistic interaction between pCO2 and temperature. Shell growth was negatively affected by high pCO2 levels only at 15 °C. High pCO2 levels also had a negative effect on the predator-escape response. Conversely, dislodgement resistance and self-righting were positively affected by high pCO2 levels at both temperatures. High tenacity and fast self-righting would reduce predation risk in nature and might compensate for the negative effects of high pCO2 levels on other important defensive traits such as shell size and escape behaviour. We conclude that climate change might produce in C. concholepas positive and negative effects in physiology and behaviour. In fact, some of the behavioural responses might be a consequence of physiological effects, such as changes in chemosensory capacity (e.g. predator-escape response or secretion of adhesive mucous (e.g. dislodgement resistance. Moreover, we conclude that positive behavioural responses may assist

  20. Ocean Acidification and Increased Temperature Have Both Positive and Negative Effects on Early Ontogenetic Traits of a Rocky Shore Keystone Predator Species.

    Manríquez, Patricio H; Jara, María Elisa; Seguel, Mylene E; Torres, Rodrigo; Alarcon, Emilio; Lee, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming is expected to have significant effects on several traits of marine organisms. The gastropod Concholepas concholepas is a rocky shore keystone predator characteristic of the south-eastern Pacific coast of South America and an important natural resource exploited by small-scale artisanal fishermen along the coast of Chile and Peru. In this study, we used small juveniles of C. concholepas collected from the rocky intertidal habitats of southern Chile (39 °S) to evaluate under laboratory conditions the potential consequences of projected near-future levels of ocean acidification and warming for important early ontogenetic traits. The individuals were exposed long-term (5.8 months) to contrasting pCO2 (ca. 500 and 1400 μatm) and temperature (15 and 19 °C) levels. After this period we compared body growth traits, dislodgement resistance, predator-escape response, self-righting and metabolic rates. With respect to these traits there was no evidence of a synergistic interaction between pCO2 and temperature. Shell growth was negatively affected by high pCO2 levels only at 15 °C. High pCO2 levels also had a negative effect on the predator-escape response. Conversely, dislodgement resistance and self-righting were positively affected by high pCO2 levels at both temperatures. High tenacity and fast self-righting would reduce predation risk in nature and might compensate for the negative effects of high pCO2 levels on other important defensive traits such as shell size and escape behaviour. We conclude that climate change might produce in C. concholepas positive and negative effects in physiology and behaviour. In fact, some of the behavioural responses might be a consequence of physiological effects, such as changes in chemosensory capacity (e.g. predator-escape response) or secretion of adhesive mucous (e.g. dislodgement resistance). Moreover, we conclude that positive behavioural responses may assist in the

  1. Daily otolith growth and ontogenetic geochemical signatures of age-0 anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus in the Gulf of Cádiz (SW Spain.

    I. A. CATALÁN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The European anchovy fishery in the Gulf of Cádiz (ICES Division IXa South is largely influenced by age-0 individuals. Knowledge of young of the year growth dynamics is crucial for management, yet data on daily growth are lacking in the area. Linking growth patterns to the environment requires information on habitat occupancy through ontogeny of the fish that reach the fishery, as anchovy use different areas of the Gulf and the Guadalquivir Estuary through development. We describe the growth dynamics of age-0 anchovy through otolith microstructure analysis, and couple these data with data on microchemical signals in the otoliths to shed light into habitat use and growth dynamics in the area. Age-0 anchovy captured in September, 2011 in the Gulf ranged from 3 to 6 months old for similar sizes, with average growth rates varying twofold. Individual non-linear growth curves showed that maximum otolith growth was positively correlated with the date of spawning, which in turn was negatively correlated with the time to reach maximum growth. There was no correlation between growth parameters and body length or condition (Fulton K at capture. The strontium:calcium (Sr/Ca and magnesium:calcium (Mg/Ca ratios were significantly lower at the edge of the otolith (approximately the age of capture than at ages corresponding to larval and early juveniles (<60 days old, but values fell within typical estuarine-dwelling species. The barium:calcium ratio (Ba/Ca increased significantly in the edge of the otolith, which possibly resulted from residency in highly productive coastal waters or from ontogenetic effects. The variance in otolith elemental ratios was larger at otolith back-calculated ages around 50 days old, age which coincides with the presumed closer dependence of estuarine waters. Our data are a first step towards understanding the contribution of the estuarine system to the fishery of anchovy in the Gulf. The limitations of the approach and future

  2. Relative abundance determinations in extremely metal poor giants. II. Transition probabilities and the abundance determinations

    The abundances of Fe and other elements are determined for a star of intermediate metallicity and for nine extremely metal poor stars, including two members of the globular cluster M92 and CD -38 deg 245. The accuracy of the transition probabilities for Fe I and other elements is evaluated. The distribution of the abundances of other elements with respect to Fe is the same for most of the cases studied. Manganese is the only element that shows a different relative abundance in an extremely metal poor star. 120 refs

  3. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  4. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    Yang, Guo-Chao; Liang, Yan-Chun; Spite, Monique; Chen, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guo-Qing; Liu, Yu-Juan; Liu, Nian; Deng, Li-Cai; Spite, Francois; Hill, Vanessa; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξt) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants as indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their Na, Al, α- and iron-peak elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-capture) process elements relative to the Sun. Their median abundances of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] are 0.54, 0.65 and 0.40, respectively. The Y I and Zr I abundances are lower than Ba, La and Eu, but higher than the α- and iron-peak elements for the strong Ba stars and similar to the iron-peak elements for the mild stars. There exists a positive correlation between Ba intensity and [Ba/Fe]. For the n-capture elements (Y, Zr, Ba, La), there is an anti-correlation between their [X/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We identify nine of our sample stars as strong Ba stars with [Ba/Fe] >0.6 where seven of them have Ba intensity Ba=2-5, one has Ba=1.5 and another one has Ba=1.0. The remaining ten stars are classified as mild Ba stars with 0.17<[Ba/Fe] <0.54.

  5. Cranial discrete traits in the middle pleistocene humans from Sima de los Huesos (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain). Does hypostosis represent any increase in "ontogenetic stress" along the Neanderthal lineage?

    Manzi, G; Gracia, A; Arsuaga, J L

    2000-03-01

    Cranial discrete traits may be regarded as markers of dynamic responses to general and local perturbations of the morphogenetic pattern, particularly when they are viewed and examined in terms of hypostosis vs. hyperostosis. There are indications, in fact, that the variation between these two opposite conditions relates to mechanical stress suffered by the bony structures during early stages of growth and development. In a previous comparison between Neanderthals and modern humans, variable degrees and contrasting distribution patterns of hypostosis were found [Manzi et al. (1996), JHE30: 511-527]. In the present paper, the occurrence, expression and cranial distribution of 20 hypo-hyperostotic traits are examined in the Middle Pleistocene sample from Atapuerca - Sima de los Huesos (Spain), with the principal aim being to test whether or not the degree of cranial hypostosis increases during the evolution of the Neanderthals. Other Middle Pleistocene representatives of the genus Homo (Kabwe and Petralona), the Italian Neanderthals, and a large recent European sample are also considered. A general consistency between the gradual appearance and stabilization of the Neanderthal cranial features and the results of the present analysis is found and is interpreted as an indication that hypostosis does mark the occurrence of "ontogenetic stress". As suggested more than half a century ago by S. Sergi, an increase in "ontogenetic stress" in the Neanderthal lineage could result from the relationship between intracranial pressures and other (heterochronic) effects produced by the growth of a large brain (encephalization) and the ossification of an archaic (platycephalic) cranial vault. PMID:10683308

  6. The primordial deuterium abundance problems and prospects

    Levshakov, S A; Kegel, W H; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Takahara, Fumio; Kegel, Wilhelm H.

    1997-01-01

    The current status of extragalactic deuterium abundance is discussed using two examples of `low' and `high' D/H measurements. We show that the discordance of these two types of D abundances may be a consequence of the spatial correlations in the stochastic velocity field. Within the framework of the generalized procedure (accounting for such effects) one finds good agreement between different observations and the theoretical predictions for standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN). In particular, we show that the deuterium absorption seen at z = 2.504 toward Q1009+2956 and the H+D Ly-alpha profile observed at z = 0.701 toward Q1718+4807 are compatible with D/H $\\sim 4.1 - 4.6\\times10^{-5}$. This result supports SBBN and, thus, no inhomogeneity is needed. The problem of precise D/H measurements is discussed.

  7. The evolution of abundances in the galaxy

    This very brief review of the evolution of the abundances in our Galaxy first recalls the main observational facts regarding such abundances which have to be taken into account by any model of chemical evolution of our Galaxy. After having defined what are the crucial parameters which define such models, the emphasis is made on two approaches: the first analyzed by Vangioni--Flam and Audouze, 1988, and Andreani et al., 1988, in which the rate of star formation is bimodal i.e., is allowed to vary with time, and the second favoured by Matteucci and Francois, 1989, who invoke a multizone galactic model with infall (inflow) of external gas into the galactic disk. A list of problems to be considered in future work is finally proposed

  8. Helium abundance in the Orion A source

    The H, He 66α (22.4 GHz) and H, He 56α (36.5 GHz) recombination line observations were made at several positions of the central region of Orion A (R ∼ 3'). The observed relative helium abundance y' is found to increase with the angular distance from the nebular centre and to amount the mean value of 11.6% at the peripherycal positions. The comparison with the results of low frequency observations (H, He 109α, ν ∼ 5.0 GHz) shows that measurements towards the centre (y'=8-9%) is in agreement with the low frequency measurements of y', however y' at the peripherycal positions are higher than that at low frequency. The nebula model of a ''blister'' type is constructed to explain such behaviour. The conclusions are made that the actual helium abundance y in Orion A is ∼ 12%, the Orion Nebula expands and its radial velocity is ∼ 5 km/s

  9. Elemental Abundances in PG1159 Stars

    Werner, K; Reiff, E; Kruk, J W

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric elemental abundances of these stars allow to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted elemental abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. PG1159 stars appear to be the direct progeny of [WC] stars.

  10. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    Aver, Erik; Porter, R L; Skillman, Evan D

    2013-01-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y_p. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, & Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, & Stasinska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y_p. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increase...

  11. Abundances in the diffuse interstellar medium

    The wealth of interstellar absorption line data obtained with the Copernicus and IUE satellites has opened up a new era in studies of the interstellar gas. It is now well established that certain elements, generally those with high condensation temperatures, are substantially under-abundant in the gas-phase relative to total solar or cosmic abundances. This depletion of elements is due to the existence of solid material in the form of dust grains in the interstellar medium. Surprisingly, however, recent surveys indicate that even volatile elements such as Zn and S are significantly depleted in many sight lines. Developments in this field which have been made possible by the large base of UV interstellar absorption line data built up over recent years are reviewed and the implications of the results for our understanding of the physical processes governing depletion are discussed. (author)

  12. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    screened more than 20 macrofauna species for nitrous oxide production and identified filter-feeders and deposit-feeders that occur ubiquitously and at high abundance (e.g., chironomids, ephemeropterans, snails, and mussels) as the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species......Detritivorous macrofauna species co-ingest large quantities of microorganisms some of which survive the gut passage. Denitrifying bacteria, in particular, become metabolically induced by anoxic conditions, nitrate, and labile organic compounds in the gut of invertebrates. A striking consequence...... that do not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. Ephemera danica, a very abundant mayfly larva, was monitored monthly in a nitrate-polluted stream. Nitrous oxide production by this filter-feeder was highly dependent on nitrate availability...

  13. Attenuation of species abundance distributions by sampling.

    Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Darnell, Ross

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying biodiversity aspects such as species presence/ absence, richness and abundance is an important challenge to answer scientific and resource management questions. In practice, biodiversity can only be assessed from biological material taken by surveys, a difficult task given limited time and resources. A type of random sampling, or often called sub-sampling, is a commonly used technique to reduce the amount of time and effort for investigating large quantities of biological samples. However, it is not immediately clear how (sub-)sampling affects the estimate of biodiversity aspects from a quantitative perspective. This paper specifies the effect of (sub-)sampling as attenuation of the species abundance distribution (SAD), and articulates how the sampling bias is induced to the SAD by random sampling. The framework presented also reveals some confusion in previous theoretical studies. PMID:26064626

  14. Abundances in Damped Ly-alpha Galaxies

    Molaro, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Damped Ly_alpha galaxies provide a sample of young galaxies where chemical abundances can be derived throughout the whole universe with an accuracy comparable to that for the local universe. Despite a large spread in redshift, HI column density and metallicity, DLA galaxies show a remarkable uniformity in the elemental ratios rather suggestive of similar chemical evolution if not of an unique population. These galaxies are characterized by a moderate, if any, enhancement of alpha-elements ove...

  15. Natural Resource Abundance and Human Capital Accumulation

    Jean-Philippe C. Stijns

    2001-01-01

    This study examines indicators of human capital accumulation together with data for natural resource abundance and rents in a panel of 102 countries running from 1970 to 1999. Mineral wealth makes a positive and marked difference on human capital accumulation. Matching on observables reveals that cross-country results are not driven by a third factor such as overall economic development. Political stability does seem to affect both human capital accumulation and subsoil wealth, but not enough...

  16. Chemical Abundance Inhomogeneities in Globular Cluster Stars

    Cohen, Judith G.

    2004-01-01

    It is now clear that abundance variations from star-to-star among the light elements, particularly C, N, O, Na and Al, are ubiquitous within galactic globular clusters; they appear seen whenever data of high quality is obtained for a sufficiently large sample of stars within such a cluster. The correlations and anti-correlations among these elements and the range of variation of each element appear to be independent of stellar evolutionary state, with the exception that enhanced depletion of ...

  17. Chemical Abundances and Milky Way Formation

    Gilmore, Gerry; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2004-01-01

    Stellar chemical element ratios have well-defined systematic trends as a function of abundance, with an excellent correlation of these trends with stellar populations defined kinematically. This is remarkable, and has significant implications for Galactic evolution. The source function, the stellar Initial Mass Function, must be nearly invariant with time, place and metallicity. Each forming star must see a well-mixed mass-averaged IMF yield, implying low star formation rates, with most star ...

  18. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    de Castro, D B; Roig, F; Jilinski, E; Drake, N A; Chavero, C; Silva, J V Sales

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, $alpha$-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code {\\sc moog}. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of $alpha$-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heav...

  19. Water Abundance in Molecular Cloud Cores

    Snell, R L; Ashby, M L N; Bergin, E A; Chin, G; Erickson, N R; Goldsmith, P F; Harwit, M; Kleiner, S C; Koch, D G; Neufeld, D A; Patten, B M; Plume, R; Schieder, R; Stauffer, J R; Tolls, V; Wang, Z; Winnewisser, G; Zhang, Y F; Melnick, G J

    2000-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) observations of the 1_{10}-1_{01} transition of ortho-water at 557 GHz toward 12 molecular cloud cores. The water emission was detected in NGC 7538, Rho Oph A, NGC 2024, CRL 2591, W3, W3(OH), Mon R2, and W33, and was not detected in TMC-1, L134N, and B335. We also present a small map of the water emission in S140. Observations of the H_2^{18}O line were obtained toward S140 and NGC 7538, but no emission was detected. The abundance of ortho-water relative to H_2 in the giant molecular cloud cores was found to vary between 6x10^{-10} and 1x10^{-8}. Five of the cloud cores in our sample have previous water detections; however, in all cases the emission is thought to arise from hot cores with small angular extents. The water abundance estimated for the hot core gas is at least 100 times larger than in the gas probed by SWAS. The most stringent upper limit on the ortho-water abundance in dark clouds is provided in TMC-1, where the 3-sigma upper limit on the ...

  20. Abundances In Very Metal Poor Dwarf Stars

    Cohen, J G; McWilliam, A; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Wasserburg, G J; Ivans, I I; Dehn, M; Karlsson, T; Melendez, J; Cohen, Judith G.; Christlieb, Norbert; William, Andrew Mc; Shectman, Steve; Thompson, Ian; Ivans, Inese; Dehn, Matthias; Karlsson, Torgny

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the detailed composition of 28 extremely metal-poor dwarfs, 22 of which are from the Hamburg/ESO Survey, based on Keck Echelle spectra. Our sample has a median [Fe/H] of -2.7 dex, extends to -3.5 dex, and is somewhat less metal-poor than was expected from [Fe/H](HK,HES) determined from low resolution spectra. Our analysis supports the existence of a sharp decline in the distribution of halo stars with metallicity below [Fe/H] = -3.0 dex. So far no additional turnoff stars with [Fe/H]}<-3.5 have been identified in our follow up efforts. For the best observed elements between Mg and Ni, we find that the abundance ratios appear to have reached a plateau, i.e. [X/Fe] is approximately constant as a function of [Fe/H], except for Cr, Mn and Co, which show trends of abundance ratios varying with [Fe/H]. These abundance ratios at low metallicity correspond approximately to the yield expected from Type II SN with a narrow range in mass and explosion parameters; high mass Type II SN progenitors are requir...

  1. Abundances in Stars with Debris Disks

    Ritchey, Adam M; Stone, Myra; Wallerstein, George

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a detailed chemical abundance analysis for a sample of solar-type stars known to exhibit excess infrared emission associated with dusty debris disks. Our sample of 28 stars was selected based on results from the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS) Spitzer Legacy Program, for the purpose of investigating whether the stellar atmospheres have been polluted with planetary material, which could indicate that the metallicity enhancement in stars with planets is due to metal-rich infall in the later stages of star and planet formation. The preliminary results presented here consist of precise abundances for 15 elements (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, and Ni) for half of the stars in our sample. We find that none of the stars investigated so far exhibit the expected trend of increasing elemental abundance with increasing condensation temperature, which would result from the stars having accreted planetary debris. Rather, the slopes of linear least...

  2. CH abundance gradient in TMC-1

    Suutarinen, Aleksi; Harju, Jorma; Heikkilä, Arto; Hotzel, Stephan; Juvela, Mika; Millar, Tom J; Walsh, Catherina; Wouterloot, Jan Gerard Amos

    2011-01-01

    We observed the 9-cm Lambda-doubling lines of CH along the dense filament of TMC-1. The CH column densities were compared with the total H2 column densities derived using the 2MASS NIR data and previously published SCUBA maps and with OH column densities derived using previous observations with Effelsberg. We also modelled the chemical evolution of TMC-1 adopting physical conditions typical of dark clouds using the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry gas-phase reaction network to aid the interpretation of the observed OH/CH abundance ratios. The CH column density has a clear peak in the vicinity of the cyanopolyyne maximum of TMC-1. The fractional CH abundance relative to H2 increases steadily from the northwestern end of the filament where it lies around 1.0e-8, to the southeast where it reaches a value of 2.0e-8. The OH and CH column densities are well correlated, and we obtained OH/CH abundance ratios of ~ 16 - 20. These values are clearly larger than what has been measured recently in diffuse interstellar g...

  3. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance.

    Craig J Mageean

    Full Text Available Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data.

  4. Aerial survey estimates of fallow deer abundance

    Gogan, Peter J.; Gates, Natalie B.; Lubow, Bruce C.; Pettit, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the distribution and abundance of an ungulate species is essential prior to establishing and implementing a management program. We used ground surveys to determine distribution and ground and aerial surveys and individually marked deer to estimate the abundance of fallow deer (Dama dama) in north-coastal California. Fallow deer had limited distribution and heterogeneous densities. Estimated post-rut densities across 4 annual surveys ranged from a low of 1.4 (SE=0.2) deer/km2 to a high of 3.3 (se=0.5) deer/km2 in a low density stratum and from 49.0 (SE=8.3) deer/km2 to 111.6 deer/km2 in a high density stratum. Sightability was positively influenced by the presence of white color-phase deer in a group and group size, and varied between airial and ground-based observers and by density strata. Our findings underscore the utility of double-observer surveys and aerial surveys with individually marked deer, both incorporating covariates to model sightability, to estimate deer abundance.

  5. Principal Component Analysis on Chemical Abundances Spaces

    Ting, Y S; Kobayashi, C; De Silva, G M; Bland-Hawthorn, J

    2011-01-01

    [Shortened] In preparation for the HERMES chemical tagging survey of about a million Galactic FGK stars, we estimate the number of independent dimensions of the space defined by the stellar chemical element abundances [X/Fe]. [...] We explore abundances in several environments, including solar neighbourhood thin/thick disk stars, halo metal-poor stars, globular clusters, open clusters, the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. [...] We find that, especially at low metallicity, the production of r-process elements is likely to be associated with the production of alpha-elements. This may support the core-collapse supernovae as the r-process site. We also verify the over-abundances of light s-process elements at low metallicity, and find that the relative contribution decreases at higher metallicity, which suggests that this lighter elements primary process may be associated with massive stars. [...] Our analysis reveals two types of core-collapse supernovae: one produces mainly alpha-e...

  6. Environmental factors shaping ungulate abundances in Poland.

    Borowik, Tomasz; Cornulier, Thomas; Jędrzejewska, Bogumiła

    2013-01-01

    Population densities of large herbivores are determined by the diverse effects of density-dependent and independent environmental factors. In this study, we used the official 1998-2003 inventory data on ungulate numbers from 462 forest districts and 23 national parks across Poland to determine the roles of various environmental factors in shaping country-wide spatial patterns of ungulate abundances. Spatially explicit generalized additive mixed models showed that different sets of environmental variables explained 39 to 50 % of the variation in red deer Cervus elaphus, wild boar Sus scrofa, and roe deer Capreolus capreolus abundances. For all of the studied species, low forest cover and the mean January temperature were the most important factors limiting their numbers. Woodland cover above 40-50 % held the highest densities for these species. Wild boar and roe deer were more numerous in deciduous or mixed woodlands within a matrix of arable land. Furthermore, we found significant positive effects of marshes and water bodies on wild boar abundances. A juxtaposition of obtained results with ongoing environmental changes (global warming, increase in forest cover) may indicate future growth in ungulate distributions and numbers. PMID:24244044

  7. The shape of terrestrial abundance distributions.

    Alroy, John

    2015-09-01

    Ecologists widely accept that the distribution of abundances in most communities is fairly flat but heavily dominated by a few species. The reason for this is that species abundances are thought to follow certain theoretical distributions that predict such a pattern. However, previous studies have focused on either a few theoretical distributions or a few empirical distributions. I illustrate abundance patterns in 1055 samples of trees, bats, small terrestrial mammals, birds, lizards, frogs, ants, dung beetles, butterflies, and odonates. Five existing theoretical distributions make inaccurate predictions about the frequencies of the most common species and of the average species, and most of them fit the overall patterns poorly, according to the maximum likelihood-related Kullback-Leibler divergence statistic. Instead, the data support a low-dominance distribution here called the "double geometric." Depending on the value of its two governing parameters, it may resemble either the geometric series distribution or the lognormal series distribution. However, unlike any other model, it assumes both that richness is finite and that species compete unequally for resources in a two-dimensional niche landscape, which implies that niche breadths are variable and that trait distributions are neither arrayed along a single dimension nor randomly associated. The hypothesis that niche space is multidimensional helps to explain how numerous species can coexist despite interacting strongly. PMID:26601249

  8. Distribution and Abundance of Mars' Atmospheric Argon

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Nelli, Steven; Murphy, Jim; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Janes, K. D.; Crombie, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    One and one half Mars years (MY 26 and 27) of atmospheric Argon measurements are described and studied in the context of understanding how Argon, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. Argon data are from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Subsystem (GS) of the suite of three instruments comprising the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). A comprehensive data analysis including gamma-ray production and attenuation by the atmosphere is included. Of particular interest is the enhanced abundance of Ar over the observed Ar abundance at lower latitudes at south (up to a factor of 10) and north (up to a factor of 4) polar regions during winter. Calibration of the measurements to actual Ar abundance is possible because GS measurements cover the same latitude and season as measurements made by the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) on Viking Landers 1 and 2 (VL1 and VL2). [2].

  9. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  10. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Yp. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Yp. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Yp = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Yp = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination

  11. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    Magurran, Anne E.; Henderson, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in large bodied species in guilds where habitat structure provides protection from predators, but not in those guilds associated with open habitats and where safety in numbers is a mechanism for reducing predation risk. We further demonstrate that while there is temporal turnover in the abundances and identities of species that comprise these guilds, guild rank order is conserved across our 30-year time series. These results demonstrate that ecological communities are not randomly assembled but can be decomposed into guilds where capacity is predictably allocated among species. PMID:22787020

  12. Galactic abundance gradients from Cepheids : On the iron abundance gradient around 10-12 kpc

    Lemasle, B.; Francois, P.; Piersimoni, A.; Pedicelli, S.; Bono, G.; Laney, C. D.; Primas, F.; Romaniello, M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Classical Cepheids can be adopted to trace the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk since their distances can be estimated with very high accuracy. Aims: Homogeneous iron abundance measurements for 33 Galactic Cepheids located in the outer disk together with accurate distance determinations based on near-infrared photometry are adopted to constrain the Galactic iron gradient beyond 10 kpc. Methods: Iron abundances were determined using high resolution Cepheid spectra collected wit...

  13. Ontogenetic, spatial and temporal variations in the feeding ecology of Deuterodon langei Travassos, 1957 (Teleostei: Characidae in a Neotropical stream from the Atlantic rainforest, southern Brazil

    Jean R. S. Vitule

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Information related to the diet of one species always contributes to the knowledge of its bionomy and the functioning of the ecosystem in which the species lives. Therefore, understanding the feeding ecology of one fish population and its ontogenetic, spatial and temporal aspects help to understand the structure of fish assemblages and river communities. Knowledge of this structure is essential for habitat management and biodiversity conservation. The feeding ecology of Deuterodon langei Travassos, 1957 was studied through analyses of diet composition, sharing of resources, feeding strategy and contribution of food items to the width of its niche. The analysis included an assessment of ontogenetic, spatial and seasonal variations. The species was considered omnivorous with great plasticity caused by seasonal variation in food availability throughout the river basin, but mainly through ontogeny. The diet of smaller individuals revealed a predominance of insects and other arthropods, while the diet of larger specimens showed allochthonous plant items as the main components. The low intestinal quotient (IQ values for the smaller individuals were accounted for their mainly insectivorous diet. The greater relative length of the intestine can account for the greater plasticity of the adult diet, enabling them to use diet items of larger size and more difficult digestion, such as plant items. Therefore, shifts in feeding ecology during growth are confirmed in this omnivorous tropical river fish, strengthening the concept that, when comparing food habits among species, fish size must be taken into account. This study also provides needed information regarding the feeding ecology of fishes intrinsically associated with the Atlantic rainforest, one of the most threatened and biodiverse ecosystems of the planet.Informações relacionadas à alimentação de uma espécie contribuem para o conhecimento de sua bionomia e funcionamento do ecossistema no qual

  14. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  15. Abundance anomalies in tidal disruption events

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    The ˜10 per cent of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than M* ≳ M⊙ should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ˜25 per cent on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high-density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main-sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle - stars with M* ≳ M⊙ quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low-mass stars evolve slowly and high-mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to ˜1-2 M⊙ stars disrupted on the main sequence. Like helium, portions of the debris will show still larger changes in C and N, and the anomalies decline as the star leaves the main sequence. The enhanced [N/C] abundance ratio of these TDEs provides the first natural explanation for the rare, nitrogen-rich quasars and may also explain the strong nitrogen emission seen in ultraviolet spectra of ASASSN-14li.

  16. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    Aver, Erik [Department of Physics, Gonzaga University, 502 E Boone Ave, Spokane, WA, 99258 (United States); Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455 (United States); Porter, R.L., E-mail: aver@gonzaga.edu, E-mail: olive@umn.edu, E-mail: ryanlporter@gmail.com, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y{sub p}. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y{sub p}. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Y{sub p} = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Y{sub p} = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination.

  17. Abundances of refractory elements in quasars

    New observations of iron, silicon, aluminum, magnesium, and carbon lines in quasars are presented. From comparison of these and previous observations with theoretical models, it is found that the gas-phase abundances of these refractory elements cannot be much less than solar, and in particular that they do not show the order of magnitude depletions that are found in planetary nebulae and the interstellar medium. Because of this lack of depletion of refractory elements it is argued that the broad emission-line clouds are probably deviod of dust

  18. North Sea Elasmobranchs: distribution, abundance and biodiversity

    Daan, N.; Heessen, H.J.L.; Hofstede, ter, AHM Arthur

    2005-01-01

    Based on data from various international and national surveys, an overview is given of the fine-scale distribution (resolution of 20¿longitude * 10¿ latitude; ¿ 10*10 nm) and trends in abundance of elasmobranch species reported from the North Sea. Presence-absence maps are produced based on 4 surveys, which help to delineate distribution limits of the less common species, while maps in terms of catch rates (International Bottom Trawl Survey data only) are given for the seven most common shark...

  19. Abundance Anomalies In Tidal Disruption Events

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The ~10% of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than the Sun should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ~25% on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of ...

  20. Detecting significant changes in protein abundance

    Kai Kammers

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We review and demonstrate how an empirical Bayes method, shrinking a protein's sample variance towards a pooled estimate, leads to far more powerful and stable inference to detect significant changes in protein abundance compared to ordinary t-tests. Using examples from isobaric mass labelled proteomic experiments we show how to analyze data from multiple experiments simultaneously, and discuss the effects of missing data on the inference. We also present easy to use open source software for normalization of mass spectrometry data and inference based on moderated test statistics.

  1. Abundance and diversity of marine microbial eukaryotes

    Pernice, Massimo Ciro

    2014-01-01

    [EN]Microeukaryotes are important ecological players in any kind of ecosystem, most notably in the ocean, and it is therefore essential to collect information about their abundance and diversity. To achieve this general goal this thesis was structured in two parts. The first part represents an effort to define our “diversity unit” from studies based on the well-known cloning and Sanger sequencing approach. Basically, we wanted to establish a solid baseline for the second part of the thesis. W...

  2. Non-additive effects of genotypic diversity increase floral abundance and abundance of floral visitors.

    Mark A Genung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of distinct genotypes per plot of Solidago altissima, we document that genotypic diversity of a dominant plant can indirectly influence flower visitor abundance. Across two years, we found that 1 plant genotype explained 45% and 92% of the variation in flower visitor abundance in 2007 and 2008, respectively; and 2 plant genotypic diversity had a positive and non-additive effect on floral abundance and the abundance of flower visitors, as plots established with multiple genotypes produced 25% more flowers and received 45% more flower visits than would be expected under an additive model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide evidence that declines in genotypic diversity may be an important but little considered factor for understanding plant-pollinator dynamics, with implications for the global decline in pollinators due to reduced plant diversity in both agricultural and natural ecosystems.

  3. Metal Abundances of KISS Galaxies. V. Nebular Abundances of Fifteen Intermediate Luminosity Star-Forming Galaxies

    Hirschauer, Alec S; Bresolin, Fabio; Saviane, Ivo; Yegorova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    We present high S/N spectroscopy of 15 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) cataloged in the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey (KISS), selected for their possession of high equivalent width [O III] lines. The primary goal of this study was to attempt to derive direct-method ($T_e$) abundances for use in constraining the upper-metallicity branch of the $R_{23}$ relation. The spectra cover the full optical region from [O II]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}3726,3729 to [S III]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}9069,9531 and include the measurement of [O III]{\\lambda}4363 in 13 objects. From these spectra, we determine abundance ratios of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon. We find these galaxies to predominantly possess oxygen abundances in the range of 8.0 $\\lesssim$ 12+log(O/H) $\\lesssim$ 8.3. We present a comparison of direct-method abundances with empirical SEL techniques, revealing several discrepancies. We also present a comparison of direct-method oxygen abundance calculations using electron temperatures determined from e...

  4. Beryllium Abundances of Solar-Analog Stars

    Takeda, Yoichi; Honda, Satoshi; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Ando, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    An extensive beryllium abundance analysis was conducted for 118 solar analogs (along with 87 FGK standard stars) by applying the spectrum synthesis technique to the near-UV region comprising the Be II line at 3131.066 A, in an attempt to investigate whether Be suffers any depletion such as the case of Li showing a large diversity. We found that, while most of these Sun-like stars are superficially similar in terms of their A(Be) (Be abundances) around the solar value within ~ +/- 0.2dex, 4 out of 118 samples turned out strikingly Be-deficient (by more than ~2 dex) and these 4 stars belong to the group of lowest v_e sin i (projected rotation velocity). Moreover, even for the other majority showing an apparent similarity in Be, we can recognize a tendency that A(Be) gradually increases with an increase in v_e sin i. These observational facts suggest that any solar analog star (including the Sun) generally suffers some kind of Be depletion during their lives, where the rotational velocity (or the angular momentu...

  5. Fluorine Abundances in the Milky Way Bulge

    Cunha, K; Gibson, B K

    2008-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) abundances are derived in a sample of 6 bulge red giants in Baade's Window. These giants span a factor of 10 in metallicity and this is the first study to define the behavior of 19F with metallicity in the bulge. The bulge results show an increase in F/O with increasing oxygen. This trend overlaps what is found in the disk at comparable metallicities, with the most oxygen-rich bulge target extending the disk trend. The increase in F/O in the disk arises from 19F synthesis in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars through stellar winds. The lack of an s-process enhancement in the most fluorine-rich bulge giant in this study, suggests that WR stars represented a larger contribution than AGB stars to 19F production in the bulge when compared to the disk. If this result for fluorine is combined with the previously published overall decline in the O/Mg abundance ratios in metal-rich bulge stars, it suggests that WR winds played a role in shaping chemical evolut...

  6. Oxygen Abundance Measurements of SHIELD Galaxies

    Haurberg, Nathalie C; Cannon, John M; Marshall, Melissa V

    2015-01-01

    We have derived oxygen abundances for 8 galaxies from the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD survey is an ongoing study of very low-mass galaxies, with M$_{\\rm HI}$ between 10$^{6.5}$ and 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, that were detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. H$\\alpha$ images from the WIYN 3.5m telescope show that these 8 SHIELD galaxies each possess one or two active star-forming regions which were targeted with long-slit spectral observations using the Mayall 4m telescope at KPNO. We obtained a direct measurement of the electron temperature by detection of the weak [O III] $\\lambda$4363 line in 2 of the HII regions. Oxygen abundances for the other HII regions were estimated using a strong-line method. When the SHIELD galaxies are plotted on a B-band luminosity-metallicity diagram they appear to suggest a slightly shallower slope to the relationship than normally seen. However, that offset is systematically reduced when the near-infrared luminosity is used ins...

  7. Abundance Anomalies In Tidal Disruption Events

    Kochanek, C S

    2015-01-01

    The ~10% of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than the Sun should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ~25% on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle -- stars more massive than the Sun quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low mass stars evolve slowly and high mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to 1-2Msun stars disr...

  8. Element Abundances through the Cosmic Ages

    Pettini, M

    2003-01-01

    The horizon for studies of element abundances has expanded dramatically in the last ten years. Once the domain of astronomers concerned chiefly with stars and nearby galaxies, this field has now become a key component of observational cosmology, as technological advances have made it possible to measure the abundances of several chemical elements in a variety of environments at redshifts up to z = 4, when the universe was in its infancy. In this series of lectures I summarise current knowledge on the chemical make-up of distant galaxies observed directly in their starlight, and of interstellar and intergalactic gas seen in absorption against the spectra of bright background sources. The picture which is emerging is one where the universe at z = 3 already included many of the constituents of today's galaxies-even at these early times we see evidence for Population I and II stars, while the `smoking gun' for Population III objects may be hidden in the chemical composition of the lowest density regions of the in...

  9. Automatic abundance analysis of high resolution spectra

    Bonifacio, P; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Caffau, Elisabetta

    2003-01-01

    We describe an automatic procedure for determining abundances from high resolution spectra. Such procedures are becoming increasingly important as large amounts of data are delivered from 8m telescopes and their high-multiplexing fiber facilities, such as FLAMES on ESO-VLT. The present procedure is specifically targeted for the analysis of spectra of giants in the Sgr dSph; however, the procedure may be, in principle, tailored to analyse stars of any type. Emphasis is placed on the algorithms and on the stability of the method; the external accuracy rests, ultimately, on the reliability of the theoretical models (model-atmospheres, synthetic spectra) used to interpret the data. Comparison of the results of the procedure with the results of a traditional analysis for 12 Sgr giants shows that abundances accurate at the level of 0.2 dex, comparable with that of traditional analysis of the same spectra, may be derived in a fast and efficient way. Such automatic procedures are not meant to replace the traditional ...

  10. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  11. Beryllium abundances in stars hosting giant planets

    Santos, N C; Israelian, G; Mayor, M; Rebolo, R; García-Gíl, A; Pérez de Taoro, M R; Randich, S

    2002-01-01

    We have derived beryllium abundances in a wide sample of stars hosting planets, with spectral types in the range F7V-K0V, aimed at studying in detail the effects of the presence of planets on the structure and evolution of the associated stars. Predictions from current models are compared with the derived abundances and suggestions are provided to explain the observed inconsistencies. We show that while still not clear, the results suggest that theoretical models may have to be revised for stars with Teff<5500K. On the other hand, a comparison between planet host and non-planet host stars shows no clear difference between both populations. Although preliminary, this result favors a ``primordial'' origin for the metallicity ``excess'' observed for the planetary host stars. Under this assumption, i.e. that there would be no differences between stars with and without giant planets, the light element depletion pattern of our sample of stars may also be used to further investigate and constraint Li and Be deple...

  12. TEA: A Code for Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. (1958) and Eriksson (1971). It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method o...

  13. Forms and genesis of species abundance distributions

    Evans O. Ochiaga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Species abundance distribution (SAD is one of the most important metrics in community ecology. SAD curves take a hollow or hyperbolic shape in a histogram plot with many rare species and only a few common species. In general, the shape of SAD is largely log-normally distributed, although the mechanism behind this particular SAD shape still remains elusive. Here, we aim to review four major parametric forms of SAD and three contending mechanisms that could potentially explain this highly skewed form of SAD. The parametric forms reviewed here include log series, negative binomial, lognormal and geometric distributions. The mechanisms reviewed here include the maximum entropy theory of ecology, neutral theory and the theory of proportionate effect.

  14. $^{7}$Li abundances in halo stars testing stellar evolution models and the primordial $^{7}$Li abundance

    Chaboyer, B; Brian Chaboyer

    1994-01-01

    A large number of stellar evolution models with [Fe/H] = -2.3 and -3.3 have been calculated in order to determine the primordial .sup(7)Li abundance and to test current stellar evolution models by a comparison to the extensive database of Li abundances in extremely metal poor halo stars observed by Thorburn (1994). Standard models do a good job of fitting the observed Li abundances in stars hotter than 5600 K. They predict a primordial ^7Li abundance of log N(Li) = 2.24\\pm 0.03. Models which include microscopic diffusion predict a downward curvature in the .sup(7)Li destruction isochrones at hot temperatures which is not present in the observations. Thus, the observations clearly rule out models which include uninhibited microscopic diffusion of .sup(7)Li from the surface of the star. The [Fe/H] = -2.3 stellar models which include both diffusion and rotational mixing provide an excellent match to the observations. Both the plateau stars and the heavily depleted cool stars are well fit by these models. The rot...

  15. Dynamical implications of Jupiter's tropospheric ammonia abundance

    Showman, Adam P.; de Pater, Imke

    2005-03-01

    Groundbased radio observations indicate that Jupiter's ammonia is globally depleted from 0.6 bars to at least 4-6 bars relative to the deep abundance of ˜3 times solar, a fact that has so far defied explanation. The observations also indicate that (i) the depletion is greater in belts than zones, and (ii) the greatest depletion occurs within Jupiter's local 5-μm hot spots, which have recently been detected at radio wavelengths. Here, we first show that both the global depletion and its belt-zone variation can be explained by a simple model for the interaction of moist convection with Jupiter's cloud-layer circulation. If the global depletion is dynamical in origin, then important endmember models for the belt-zone circulation can be ruled out. Next, we show that the radio observations of Jupiter's 5-μm hot spots imply that the equatorial wave inferred to cause hot spots induces vertical parcel oscillation of a factor of ˜2 in pressure near the 2-bar level, which places important constraints on hot-spot dynamics. Finally, using spatially resolved radio maps, we demonstrate that low-latitude features exceeding ˜4000 km diameter, such as the equatorial plumes and large vortices, are also depleted in ammonia from 0.6 bars to at least 2 bars relative to the deep abundance of 3 times solar. If any low-latitude features exist that contain 3-times-solar ammonia up to the 0.6-bar ammonia condensation level, they must have diameters less than ˜4000 km.

  16. Abundant thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel

    It has long been known that thorium-232 is a fertile radioactive material that can produce energy in nuclear reactors for conversion to electricity. Thorium-232 is well suited to a variety of reactor types including molten fluoride salt designs, heavy water CANDU configurations, and helium-cooled TRISO-fueled systems. Among contentious commercial nuclear power issues are the questions of what to do with long-lived radioactive waste and how to minimize weapon proliferation dangers. The substitution of thorium for uranium as fuel in nuclear reactors has significant potential for minimizing both problems. Thorium is three times more abundant in nature than uranium. Whereas uranium has to be imported, there is enough thorium in the United States alone to provide adequate grid power for many centuries. A well-designed thorium reactor could produce electricity less expensively than a next-generation coal-fired plant or a current-generation uranium-fueled nuclear reactor. Importantly, thorium reactors produce substantially less long-lived radioactive waste than uranium reactors. Thorium-fueled reactors with molten salt configurations and very high temperature thorium-based TRISO-fueled reactors are both recommended for priority Generation IV funding in the 2030 time frame. - Highlights: • Thorium is an abundant nuclear fuel that is well suited to three advanced reactor configurations. • Important thorium reactor configurations include molten salt, CANDU, and TRISO systems. • Thorium has important nuclear waste disposal advantages relative to pressurized water reactors. • Thorium as a nuclear fuel has important advantages relative to weapon non-proliferation

  17. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    Ishihama, Y.; Schmidt, T.; Rappsilber, J.;

    2008-01-01

    sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed em...... between protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion: Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work represent the most complete study of protein abundance in a bacterial cell so far. We show significant associations between the abundance of a protein and its...

  18. Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data

    Cowan, J J; Sneden, C; Den Hartog, E A; Collier, J L; Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; Collier, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy -- the progenitors of the halo stars -- responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingl...

  19. Abundance of sardine fish species in Bangladesh

    Roy Bikram Jit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted during January, 2012 to December 2012 in the sardine fisheries which is occurred both in artisanal and industrial fishing sector in the marine water of the Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh region. During this study period the total landing amounts by weight of sardines were 7352.99 MT, among these 23.76% (1747.22 MT was exploited by the artisanal mechanized boats and 76.24% (5605.77 MT captured through different industrial fishing trawlers and contributed 17.51% of the total marine fish production by commercial fish trawlers during the study period. 4 sardine species have been recorded from our marine territory. Among them, 2 sardine species are highly abundant, Sardinella fimbriata total production volumes was 5495.79 MT (74.74% contributed 1747.22MT (31.79% from the artisanal and 3748.57MT (68.21% from the industrial sector and Dussumieria acuta production amounts was 1857.20MT (25.26% contributed only from the industrial fishing sector.Species wise contribution shows that S. fimbriata contributed 100% in the artisanal sector and in the industrial fishing S. fimbriata contributed 66.87% and D. acuta contributed the rest 33.13%. The distribution of the S. fimbriata is within 10-20 meters depth and abundance was observed in the southern part of the South patches and South of south patches (N: 210.09// -22, E: 920.04/-07 to N: 200.45/-25, E: 920.18/-56 and 10-50m depth in onshore and off shore areas in the north-west to north-east of Middle ground (Kohinoor point -N: 210.36/.23, E: 900.06/.43 to N: 210.18/.18, E 910.17/.57. The distribution of the D. acuta is within 40-60 m. depth and abundance was observed in the north-west to north-east of Middle ground areas (Kohinoor point - N: 210.36/.23, E: 900.06/.43 to N: 210.18/.18, E 910.17/.57 and south-west to south-east of Middle ground (Kohinoor point- N: 200-17/.29, E: 900.15/.21 to N: 200.29/.56, E: 910.24/.22 in the Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh region. The peak capture season of

  20. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins in legumes

    Marina eBattaglia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirms the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions.

  1. Radiogenic lead-208 abundance 88.34 %

    Brazil has a long tradition in thorium technology, from the monazite ores mining until the production of the nuclear grade thorium compounds. Early in 1969 the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN) designed a project for a pilot plant installation to purify the thorium compounds, based on the solvent extraction technique. Thorium compounds used came from monazite's industrialization. During the course of the operation of this plant, a crude sludge were formed containing thorium not extracted and the whole rare earths, plus minor impurities like sodium, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, iron, silicon, phosphate and the thorium daughters were accumulated. Included is the radiogenic lead-208. This sludge, hereafter named 'RETOTER', was treated with hydrochloric acid and the lead was separated and recovered by anion exchange technology. The lead-208 was analyzed by mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS) technique. The lead-208 abundance measure was 88.34%, this allowed the calculation of the thermal neutron capture cross section of σ0γ = 14,6 +/- 0.7 mb, considerably lower than the σ0γ = 174.2 +/- 0.7 mb value of the natural lead. (author)

  2. Comparing halo bias from abundance and clustering

    Hoffmann, Kai; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    We model the abundance of haloes in the $\\sim(3 \\ \\text{Gpc}/h)^3$ volume of the MICE Grand Challenge simulation by fitting the universal mass function with an improved Jack-Knife error covariance estimator that matches theory predictions. We present unifying relations between different fitting models and new predictions for linear ($b_1$) and non-linear ($c_2$ and $c_3$) halo clustering bias. Different mass function fits show strong variations in their overall poor performance when including the low mass range ($M_h \\lesssim 3 \\ 10^{12} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$) in the analysis, which indicates noisy friends-of-friends halo detection given the MICE resolution ($m_p \\simeq 3 \\ 10^{10} \\ M_{\\odot}$/h). Together with fits from the literature we find an overall variance in the amplitudes of around $10%$ in the low mass and up to $50%$ in the high mass (galaxy cluster) range ($M_h > 10^{14} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$). These variations propagate into a $10%$ change in $b_1$ predictions and a $50%$ change in $c_2$ or $c_3$. Despite the...

  3. Abundances in the Planetary Nebula IC 5217

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Woo-Baik; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical wavelength spectroscopic data were secured in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10,050A, for the planetary nebula IC 5217 with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. These optical spectra have been analyzed along with the near-UV and UV archive data. Diagnostic analyses indicate a nebular physical condition with electron temperature of about 10,700 K (from the [O III] lines) and the density of N(sub epsilon) = 5000/cm. Ionic concentrations have been derived with the representative diagnostics, and with the aid of a photoionization model construction, we derived the elemental abundances. Contrary to the previous studies found in the literature, He and C appear to be depleted compared to the average planetary nebula and to the Sun (and S marginally so), while the remaining elements appear to be close to the average value. IC 5217 may have evolved from an O-rich progenitor and the central star temperature of IC 5217 is likely to be 92,000 K.

  4. Non-Additive Effects of Genotypic Diversity Increase Floral Abundance and Abundance of Floral Visitors

    Mark A Genung; Jean-Philippe Lessard; Claire B Brown; Bunn, Windy A.; Cregger, Melissa A.; W M Nicholas Reynolds; Emmi Felker-Quinn; Stevenson, Mary L.; Hartley, Amanda S.; Gregory M. Crutsinger; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of dist...

  5. The Origin of Element Abundance Variations in Solar Energetic Particles

    Reames, Donald V.

    2016-07-01

    Abundance enhancements, during acceleration and transport in both gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events, vary approximately as power laws in the mass-to-charge ratio [ A/Q] of the ions. Since the Q-values depend upon the electron temperature of the source plasma, this has allowed a determination of this temperature from the pattern of element-abundance enhancements and a verification of the expected inverse-time dependence of the power of A/Q for diffusive transport of ions from the SEP events, with scattering mean free paths found to be between 0.2 and 1 AU. SEP events derived from plasma of different temperatures map into different regions in typical cross-plots of abundances, spreading the distributions. In comparisons of SEP events with temperatures above 2 MK, impulsive events show much broader non-thermal variation of abundances than do gradual events. The extensive shock waves accelerating ions in gradual events may average over much of an active region where numerous but smaller magnetic reconnections, "nanojets", produce suprathermal seed ions, thus averaging over varying abundances, while an impulsive SEP event only samples one local region of abundance variations. Evidence for a reference He/O-abundance ratio of 91, rather than 57, is also found for the hotter plasma. However, while this is similar to the solar-wind abundance of He/O, the solar-wind abundances otherwise provide an unacceptably poor reference for the SEP-abundance enhancements, generating extremely large errors.

  6. Abundance models improve spatial and temporal prioritization of conservation resources.

    Johnston, Alison; Fink, Daniel; Reynolds, Mark D; Hochachka, Wesley M; Sullivan, Brian L; Bruns, Nicholas E; Hallstein, Eric; Merrifield, Matt S; Matsumoto, Sandi; Kelling, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Conservation prioritization requires knowledge about organism distribution and density. This information is often inferred from models that estimate the probability of species occurrence rather than from models that estimate species abundance, because abundance data are harder to obtain and model. However, occurrence and abundance may not display similar patterns and therefore development of robust, scalable, abundance models is critical to ensuring that scarce conservation resources are applied where they can have the greatest benefits. Motivated by a dynamic land conservation program, we develop and assess a general method for modeling relative abundance using citizen science monitoring data. Weekly estimates of relative abundance and occurrence were compared for prioritizing times and locations of conservation actions for migratory waterbird species in California, USA. We found that abundance estimates consistently provided better rankings of observed counts than occurrence estimates. Additionally, the relationship between abundance and occurrence was nonlinear and varied by species and season. Across species, locations prioritized by occurrence models had only 10-58% overlap with locations prioritized by abundance models, highlighting that occurrence models will not typically identify the locations of highest abundance that are vital for conservation of populations. PMID:26591443

  7. Reanalysis of the interstellar CH abundance

    A detailed investigation of the term structure of the X2II, A2Δ, B2Σ-, and C2Σ+ systems of CH is presented, as well as a discussion of a number of errors that have been found with respect to the historical analysis of the interstellar CH abundance. The primary cause for these errors is the neglect of the Λ doubling of the ground state. The effects of including this splitting are the following: (1) the oscillator strength doubles for each line arising from the ground state of the B-X and C-X electronic systems; (2) the 4300, 3886, and 3143 A lines each consist of a blend of two lines separated by 1.43, 1.28, and 2.17 km s-1, respectively; (3) the line at 3886 A arises solely from the upper half of the Λ doublet, and the lines at 3890 and 3878 A arise from the lower half of the Λ doublet; (4) the line at 3143 A arises solely from the lower half of the Λ doublet, and the lines at 3146 and 3137 A arise from the upper half of the Λ doublet; (5) the excitation temperature (a measure of the relative level population) of the ground-state Λ doublet has been calculated for the interstellar CH along the line of sight toward four stars (zeta Per, zeta Oph, X Per, and chi Oph) using published equivalent withs. The excitation temperature appears to be less than zero toward X Per and zeta Per, indicating that the population of the ground-state Λ doublet is inverted. The level populations along other lines of sight are known to be inverted from observations of the radio CH lines; this is the first detection of a radio maser by optical methods

  8. Cosmological implications of two conflicting deuterium abundances

    Constraints on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and on cosmological parameters from conflicting deuterium observations in different high redshift QSO systems are discussed. The high deuterium observations by Carswell et al., Songaila et al., and Rugers and Hogan are consistent with 4He and 7Li observations and standard BBN (Nν =3) and allows Nν≤3.6 at 95% C.L., but are inconsistent with local observations of D and 3He in the context of conventional theories of stellar and galactic evolution. In contrast, the low deuterium observations by Tytler, Fan, and Burles and Burles and Tytler are consistent with the constraints from local galactic observations, but require Nν=1.9±0.3 at 68% C.L., excluding standard BBN at 99.9% C.L., unless the systematic uncertainties in the 4He observations have been underestimated by a large amount. The high and low primordial deuterium abundances imply, respectively, ΩBh2=0.005 endash 0.01 and ΩBh2=0.02 endash 0.03 at 95% C.L. When combined with the high baryon fraction inferred from x-ray observations of rich clusters, the corresponding total mass densities (for 50≤H0≤90) are ΩM=0.05 endash 0.20 and ΩM=0.2 endash 0.7, respectively (95% C.L.). The range of ΩM corresponding to high D is in conflict with dynamical constraints (Ωm≥0.2 endash 0.3) and with the shape parameter constraint (Γ=ΩMh=0.25±0.05) from large scale structure formation in CDM and ΛCDM models. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Testing spherical evolution for modelling void abundances

    Achitouv, Ixandra; Neyrinck, Mark; Paranjape, Aseem

    2015-08-01

    We compare analytical predictions of void volume functions to those measured from N-body simulations, detecting voids with the ZOBOV void finder. We push to very small, non-linear voids, below few Mpc radius, by considering the unsampled dark matter density field. We also study the case where voids are identified using haloes. We develop analytical formula for the void abundance of both the excursion set approach and the peaks formalism. These formulas are valid for random walks smoothed with a top-hat filter in real space, with a large class of realistic barrier models. We test the extent to which the spherical evolution approximation, which forms the basis of the analytical predictions, models the highly aspherical voids that occur in the cosmic web, and are found by a watershed-based algorithm such as ZOBOV. We show that the volume function returned by ZOBOV is quite sensitive to the choice of treatment of subvoids, a fact that has not been appreciated previously. For reasonable choices of subvoid exclusion, we find that the Lagrangian density δv of the ZOBOV voids - which is predicted to be a constant δv ≈ -2.7 in the spherical evolution model - is different from the predicted value, showing substantial scatter and scale dependence. This result applies to voids identified at z = 0 with effective radius between 1 and 10 h-1 Mpc. Our analytical approximations are flexible enough to give a good description of the resulting volume function; however, this happens for choices of parameter values that are different from those suggested by the spherical evolution assumption. We conclude that analytical models for voids must move away from the spherical approximation in order to be applied successfully to observations, and we discuss some possible ways forward.

  10. Nitrogen abundances in damped Lyalpha absorbers

    Zafar, T.; Centurión, M.; Molaro, P.; Péroux, C.; D'Odorico, V.; Vladilo, G.

    Nitrogen is thought to have both primary and secondary origins depending on whether the seed carbon and oxygen are produced by the star itself (primary) or already present in the interstellar medium (secondary) from which star forms. Damped Lyalpha (DLA) and sub-DLA systems with typical metallicities of -3.0≲ Z/Z⊙ ≲ -0.5 are excellent tools to study nitrogen production. We made a search for nitrogen in the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Ultraviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) advanced data products (EUADP) database. In the EUADP database, we find 10 new measurements and 9 upper limits of nitrogen. We further compiled DLA/sub-DLA data from the literature with estimates available of nitrogen and alpha -elements. This yields a total of 98 systems, i.e. the largest nitrogen abundance sample investigated so far. In agreement with previous studies, we indeed find a bimodal [N/alpha ] behaviour: three-quarter systems show a mean value of [N/alpha ] =-0.87 with a scatter of 0.21 dex and one-quarter shows ratios clustered at [N/alpha ] = -1.43 with a lower dispersion of 0.13 dex. The high [N/alpha ] group is consistent with the blue compact dwarves and dwarf irregular galaxies, suggesting primary nitrogen production. The low [N/alpha ] group is the lowest ever observed in any astrophysical site and probably provides an evidence of the primary production by fast rotating massive stars in young sites. Moreover, we find a transition between the two [N/alpha ] groups around [N/H] ≃-2.5. The transition is not abrupt and there are a few systems lying in the transition region. Additional observations of DLAs/sub-DLAs below [N/H] <-2.5 would provide more clues.

  11. Shallow extra mixing in solar twins inferred from Be abundances

    Maia, M Tucci; Castro, M; Asplund, M; Ramírez, I; Monroe, T R; Nascimento, J D do; Yong, D

    2015-01-01

    Lithium and beryllium are destroyed at different temperatures in stellar interiors. As such, their relative abundances offer excellent probes of the nature and extent of mixing processes within and below the convection zone. We determine Be abundances for a sample of eight solar twins for which Li abundances have previously been determined. The analyzed solar twins span a very wide range of age, 0.5-8.2 Gyr, which enables us to study secular evolution of Li and Be depletion. We gathered high-quality UVES/VLT spectra and obtained Be abundances by spectral synthesis of the Be II 313 nm doublet. The derived beryllium abundances exhibit no significant variation with age. The more fragile Li, however, exhibits a monotonically decreasing abundance with increasing age. Therefore, relatively shallow extra mixing below the convection zone is necessary to simultaneously account for the observed Li and Be behavior in the Sun and solar twins.

  12. Radial molecular abundances and gas cooling in starless cores

    Sipilä, O

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We aim to simulate radial profiles of molecular abundances and the gas temperature in cold and heavily shielded starless cores by combining chemical and radiative transfer models. Methods: A determination of the dust temperature in a modified Bonnor-Ebert sphere is used to calculate initial radial molecular abundance profiles. The abundances of selected cooling molecules corresponding to two different core ages are then extracted to determine the gas temperature at two time steps. The calculation is repeated in an iterative process yielding molecular abundances consistent with the gas temperature. Line emission profiles for selected substances are calculated using simulated abundance profiles. Results: The gas temperature is a function of time; the gas heats up as the core gets older because the cooling molecules are depleted onto grain surfaces. The contributions of the various cooling molecules to the total cooling power change with time. Radial chemical abundance profiles are non-trivial: different s...

  13. TEA: A Code for Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, M Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. (1958) and Eriksson (1971). It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp (1999), the free thermochemical equilibrium code CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications), and the example given by White et al. (1958). Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is ...

  14. Radial molecular abundances and gas cooling in starless cores

    Sipilä, O.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We aim to simulate radial profiles of molecular abundances and the gas temperature in cold and heavily shielded starless cores by combining chemical and radiative transfer models. Methods: A determination of the dust temperature in a modified Bonnor-Ebert sphere is used to calculate initial radial molecular abundance profiles. The abundances of selected cooling molecules corresponding to two different core ages are then extracted to determine the gas temperature at two time steps. The c...

  15. Abundance and Diversity of Viruses in Six Delaware Soils

    Williamson, Kurt E.; Radosevich, Mark; Wommack, K. Eric

    2005-01-01

    The importance of viruses in marine microbial ecology has been established over the past decade. Specifically, viruses influence bacterial abundance and community composition through lysis and alter bacterial genetic diversity through transduction and lysogenic conversion. By contrast, the abundance and distribution of viruses in soils are almost completely unknown. This study describes the abundance and diversity of autochthonous viruses in six Delaware soils: two agricultural soils, two coa...

  16. A Data-intensive Assessment of the Species Abundance Distribution

    Baldridge, Elita

    2013-01-01

    The hollow curve species abundance distribution describes the pattern of large numbers of rare species and a small number of common species in a community. The species abundance distribution is one of the most ubiquitous patterns in nature and many models have been proposed to explain the mechanisms that generate this pattern. While there have been numerous comparisons of species abundance distribution models, most of these comparisons only use a small subset of available models, focus on a s...

  17. Occupancy, spatial variance, and the abundance of species

    He, F.; Gaston, K J

    2003-01-01

    A notable and consistent ecological observation known for a long time is that spatial variance in the abundance of a species increases with its mean abundance and that this relationship typically conforms well to a simple power law (Taylor 1961). Indeed, such models can be used at a spectrum of spatial scales to describe spatial variance in the abundance of a single species at different times or in different regions and of different species across the same set of areas (Tayl...

  18. Ecological niche structure and rangewide abundance patterns of species

    Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Díaz-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A. Townsend; Yáñez-Arenas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Spatial abundance patterns across species' ranges have attracted intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographical distance from the range centre, but tests of this idea have shown that the effect may occur indeed only in a minority of cases. We explore an alternative hypothesis: that species' abundances decline with distance from the centroid of the species' habitable conditions in environmental space (the ecological nic...

  19. Positive Interspecific Relationship between Temporal Occurrence and Abundance in Insects

    Scrosati, Ricardo A; Ruth D Patten; Lauff, Randolph F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most studied macroecological patterns is the interspecific abundance-occupancy relationship, which relates species distribution and abundance across space. Interspecific relationships between temporal distribution and abundance, however, remain largely unexplored. Using data for a natural assemblage of tabanid flies measured daily during spring and summer in Nova Scotia, we found that temporal occurrence (proportion of sampling dates in which a species occurred in an experimental t...

  20. Hydrostatic gas distributions: global estimates of temperature and abundance

    Ciotti, L.; Pellegrini, S

    2008-01-01

    Estimating the temperature and metal abundance of the intracluster and the intragroup media is crucial to determine their global metal content and to determine fundamental cosmological parameters. When a spatially resolved temperature or abundance profile cannot be recovered from observations (e.g., for distant objects), or deprojection is difficult (e.g., due to a significant non-spherical shape), only global average temperature and abundance are derived. After introducing a general techniqu...

  1. Cross-Scale Interactions and the Distribution-Abundance Relationship

    Werner, Earl E.; Davis, Christopher J.; Skelly, David K.; Relyea, Rick A.; Benard, Michael F.; McCauley, Shannon J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive interspecific relationships between local abundance and extent of regional distribution are among the most ubiquitous patterns in ecology. Although multiple hypotheses have been proposed, the mechanisms underlying distribution-abundance (d-a) relationships remain poorly understood. We examined the intra- and interspecific distribution-abundance relationships for a metacommunity of 13 amphibian species sampled for 15 consecutive years. Mean density of larvae in occupied ponds was posi...

  2. Modelling occurrence and abundance of species when detection is imperfect

    Royle, J. Andrew; Nichols, J.D.; Kery, M.

    2005-01-01

    Relationships between species abundance and occupancy are of considerable interest in metapopulation biology and in macroecology. Such relationships may be described concisely using probability models that characterize variation in abundance of a species. However, estimation of the parameters of these models in most ecological problems is impaired by imperfect detection. When organisms are detected imperfectly, observed counts are biased estimates of true abundance, and this induces bias in stated occupancy or occurrence probability. In this paper we consider a class of models that enable estimation of abundance/occupancy relationships from counts of organisms that result from surveys in which detection is imperfect. Under such models, parameter estimation and inference are based on conventional likelihood methods. We provide an application of these models to geographically extensive breeding bird survey data in which alternative models of abundance are considered that include factors that influence variation in abundance and detectability. Using these models, we produce estimates of abundance and occupancy maps that honor important sources of spatial variation in avian abundance and provide clearly interpretable characterizations of abundance and occupancy adjusted for imperfect detection.

  3. Parent Stars of Extrasolar Planets. IX. Lithium Abundances

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    We compare the Li abundances of a sample of stars with planets discovered with the Doppler method to a sample of stars without detected planets. We prepared the samples by combining the Li abundances reported in several recent studies in a consistent way. Our results confirm recent claims that the Li abundances of stars with planets are smaller than those of stars without planets near the solar temperature. We also find that the vsini and $R^{'}_{\\rm HK}$ anomalies correlate with the Li abund...

  4. Abundances of the heavy elements in the Magellanic Clouds. I. Metal abundances of F-type supergiants

    Metal abundances of eight F-type supergiants in each of the Magellanic Clouds were determined using the results of high-resolution spectroscopy analysis of these stars, together with new Stromgren uvby and Cousins (1980) BVRI photometry. It was found that the mean Fe abundance (Fe/H) for the SMC is -0.65 + or - 0.2 dex, and the mean Fe abundance for the LMC is -0.30 + or - 0.2 dex. The abundances of stars in both the SMC and LMC appear relatively uniform, and the abundances of the elements relative to Fe are very similar in both Magellanic Clouds and in Canopus (the carbon-to-iron abundances are the same for all three). It was also found that Nd and Sm are overabundant in both clouds, supporting the trends found by Spite et al. (1988) for the three SMC stars they studied. 140 refs

  5. The end of abundance. Economic solutions to water scarcity

    Zetland, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    In a past of abundance, we had clean water to meet our demands for showers, pools, farms and rivers. Our laws and customs did not need to regulate or ration demand. Over time, our demand has grown, and scarcity has replaced abundance. We don't have as much clean water as we want. We can respond to t

  6. Elemental abundances of the B6 IV star Xi Octantis

    Adelman, Saul J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.

    1993-01-01

    An elemental abundance study used AAT echelle spectrograms of the ultrasharp-lined, superficially normal B6 IV star Xi Octantis. The derived abundances fall within the trends of values derived for normal B main-sequence band stars. On average, they are 0.28 dex less than solar.

  7. Variation in rank abundance replicate samples and impact of clustering

    Neuteboom, J.H.; Struik, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Calculating a single-sample rank abundance curve by using the negative-binomial distribution provides a way to investigate the variability within rank abundance replicate samples and yields a measure of the degree of heterogeneity of the sampled community. The calculation of the single-sample rank a

  8. A protocol for sampling vascular epiphyte richness and abundance

    J.H.D. Wolf; S.R. Gradstein; N.M. Nadkarni

    2009-01-01

    The sampling of epiphytes is fraught with methodological difficulties. We present a protocol to sample and analyse vascular epiphyte richness and abundance in forests of different structure (SVERA). Epiphyte abundance is estimated as biomass by recording the number of plant components in a range of

  9. The implicit assumption of symmetry and the species abundance distribution

    Alonso, David; Ostling, Annette; Etienne, Rampal S.

    2008-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) have played a historical role in the development of community ecology. They summarize information about the number and the relative abundance of the species encountered in a sample from a given community. For years ecologists have developed theory to characteri

  10. Abundance Survey of M and K Dwarf Stars

    Woolf, Vincent M. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98133 (United States); Wallerstein, George [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98133 (United States)

    2005-07-25

    We report the measurement of chemical abundances in 35 low-mass main sequence (M and K dwarf) stars. We have measured the abundance of 12 elements in Kapteyn's Star, a nearby halo M subdwarf. The abundances indicate an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.98, which is about 0.5 dex smaller than that measured in the only previous published measurement using atomic absorption lines. We have measured Fe and Ti abundances in 35 M and K dwarfs with -2.39 [Fe/H] +0.21 using atomic absorption lines, mostly in the 8000A <{lambda} < 8850A range. These will be used to calibrate photometric and low-resolution spectrum metallicity indices for low mass dwarfs, which will make metallicity estimates for these stars more certain. We also describe some difficulties encountered which are not normally necessary to consider when studying warmer stars.

  11. Carbon and nitrogen abundances determined from transition layer lines

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining relative carbon, nitrogen, and silicon abundances from the emission-line fluxes in the lower transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae is explored. Observations for main-sequence and luminosity class IV stars with presumably solar element abundances show that for the lower transition layers Em = BT sup -gamma. For a given carbon abundance the constants gamma and B in this relation can be determined from the C II and C IV emission-line fluxes. From the N V and S IV lines, the abundances of these elements relative to carbon can be determined from their surface emission-line fluxes. Ratios of N/C abundances determined in this way for some giants and supergiants agree within the limits of errors with those determined from molecular bands. For giants, an increase in the ratio of N/C at B-V of about 0.8 is found, as expected theoretically.

  12. Europium Isotopic Abundances in Very Metal-poor Stars

    Sneden, C; Lawler, J E; Burles, S M; Beers, T C; Fuller, G M; Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Burles, Scott; Beers, Timothy C.; Fuller, George M.

    2002-01-01

    Europium isotopic abundance fractions are reported for the very metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich giant stars CS 22892-052, HD 115444, and BD +17 3248. The abundance fractions, derived from analysis of several strong Eu II lines appearing in high-resolution spectra of these stars, are in excellent agreement with each other and with their values in the Solar System: fraction(\\iso{Eu}{151}) ~= fraction(\\iso{Eu}{153}) ~= 0.5. Detailed abundance studies of very metal-poor stars have previously shown that the total elemental abundances of stable atoms with atomic numbers z >= 56 typically match very closely those of a scaled solar-system r-process abundance distribution. The present results for the first time extend this agreement to the isotopic level.

  13. The lithium abundances of a large sample of red giants

    The lithium abundances for 378 G/K giants are derived with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium correction considered. Among these are 23 stars that host planetary systems. The lithium abundance is investigated, as a function of metallicity, effective temperature, and rotational velocity, as well as the impact of a giant planet on G/K giants. The results show that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. The lithium abundance has no correlation with rotational velocity at v sin i < 10 km s–1. Giants with planets present lower lithium abundance and slow rotational velocity (v sin i < 4 km s–1). Our sample includes three Li-rich G/K giants, 36 Li-normal stars, and 339 Li-depleted stars. The fraction of Li-rich stars in this sample agrees with the general rate of less than 1% in the literature, and the stars that show normal amounts of Li are supposed to possess the same abundance at the current interstellar medium. For the Li-depleted giants, Li-deficiency may have already taken place at the main sequence stage for many intermediate mass (1.5-5 M ☉) G/K giants. Finally, we present the lithium abundance and kinematic parameters for an enlarged sample of 565 giants using a compilation of the literature, and confirm that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. With the enlarged sample, we investigate the differences between the lithium abundance in thin-/thick-disk giants, which indicate that the lithium abundance in thick-disk giants is more depleted than that in thin-disk giants.

  14. Carbon and nitrogen abundance variations in globular cluster red giants

    Martell, Sarah L.

    2008-06-01

    This dissertation describes investigations into two of the persistent questions of elemental abundances in Galactic globular clusters: the phenomenon of deep mixing, observed through the progressive depletion of surface carbon abundance as stars evolve along the red giant branch, and abundance bimodality, a phenomenon observed only in globular clusters, in which a subset of stars in a given globular cluster have a distinctive pattern of elemental enhancements and depletions relative to the Solar pattern. The first chapter gives an introduction to the history of globular cluster abundance studies, with particular focus on low-resolution spectroscopy. For both deep mixing and abundance bimodality, the leading theoretical models and the data which support and challenge them are laid out. Each section ends with a description of presently-unanswered questions; these are the motivation for the various projects contained in this dissertation. The second chapter describes the use of molecular handstrengths for determining elemental abundances from low-resolution spectra, and introduces a new CH bandstrength index that is designed to be sensitive to carbon abundance and insensitive to nitrogen abundance in Pop. II red giants over a wide range of metallicity. Various CH indices defined elsewhere in the literature are also discussed, and are shown to have comparable accuracy to the new index only over a limited range of stellar properties. Carbon abundances determined using the new CH index are compared to literature abundances for a few stars, and general concordance with published abundances is found. The third chapter contains a large-scale application of the new CH index: a survey of present-day carbon abundances and calculated carbon depletion rates in bright red giants belonging to eleven Galactic globular clusters spanning the full metallicity range of halo globular clusters. Targets were selected with similar evolutionary states, were observed with one instrument on

  15. Desarrollo ontogenético y redescripción del adulto de Epidamaeus mitlsensillus (Acari: Oribatida: Damaeidae Ontogenetic development and redescription of the adult of Epidamaeus mitlsensillus (Acari: Oribatida: Damaeidae

    Ricardo Iglesias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe e ilustra el desarrollo ontogenético completo de Epidamaeus mitlsensillus Palacios-Vargas, 1984 (larva, protoninfa, deutoninfa y tritoninfa, del volcán Popocatépetl, Estado de México; asimismo, se redescribe el adulto. Los ejemplares fueron aclarados, disecados y montados en preparaciones semipermanentes con líquido de Hoyer para su observación y toma de mediciones. Las ilustraciones, que se presentan en láminas, fueron realizadas con ayuda de cámara clara, entintadas y luego escaneadas.The complete ontogenetic development of Epidamaeus mitlsensillus Palacios-Vargas, 1984 (larva, protonymph, deutonymph, and tritonymph from the Popocatepetl Volcano, State of México, is described and illustrated and redescription of the adult is done. The specimens were cleared, dissected and mounted on semi-permanent slides in Hoyer's solution for observation and measurements. Drawings were done using a camera lucida, then inked, scanned, and arranged in plates.

  16. Anatomia e desenvolvimento ontogenético de Coffea arabica L. var. typica Cramer Anatomy and ontogenetical development of Coffea arabica L. var. typica Cramer

    D. M. Dedecca

    1957-01-01

    layer of hardened and lignified cells, with scattered stomata. Mesocarp is formed by several layers of polyhedric, large and lignified cells, the innermost of which are somewhat compressed and flattened. Amidst these cells are visible the vascular bundles showing a great amount of fibers. Endocarp is about 100 microns thick and constitutes in the ripe fruits the so-called "seed parchment". Studied in cross section the endocarp shows to be formed by 5-6 layers of intercrossing strong fibers, what gives this zone of tissue an extraordinary strength. Maceration allows the detailed examination of the individual fibers which measure 350-370 microns in length by 20-45 microns in transverse diameter. The cell walls are very thick and provided with ramiform pits; cell lumen is almost occluded. The coffee seeds or coffee beans are elliptical or egg-shaped, plane-convex, possessing a longitudinal furrow on the plane surface. Seed coat is represented by the so-called "silver skin", which ontogenetically originates from the primine, the single ovule integument. This seed coat is about 70 microns thick and anatomically shows to be constituted by an outer layer of fibers somewhat similar to the endocarp fibers; they are, however, shorter, measuring the longest ones 180-320 microns in length and 18-30 microns in transverse diameter. Their thick walls are provided with round, elliptical, or elongated simple pits. The size of these fibers, the thickness and number of pits on their walls are considered by Chevalier as important taxonomic characteristics for the differentiation of Coffea species. Completing the silver skin structure there are several layers of amorphic parenchyma tissue, and a layer of indistinct cells which originate from the innermost cell layer of the primine. On the other hand, the fibers had their origin from the outermost cell layer of the primine. Endosperm is foimed by polyhedric cells of very thick cellulosic walls, functioning the cellulose in this case as food

  17. Abundance Inequality in Freshwater Communities Has an Ecological Origin.

    Passy, Sophia I

    2016-04-01

    The hollow-shaped species abundance distribution (SAD) and its allied rank abundance distribution (RAD)-showing that abundance is unevenly distributed among species-are some of the most studied patterns in ecology. To explain the nature of abundance inequality, I developed a novel framework identifying environmental favorability, which controls the balance between reproduction and immigration, as the ultimate source and species stress tolerance as a proximate factor. Thus, under harsh conditions, only a few tolerant species can reproduce, while some sensitive species can be present in low numbers due to chance immigration. This would lead to high abundance inequality between the two groups of species. Under benign conditions, both groups can reproduce and give rise to higher abundance equality. To test these ideas, I examined the variability in the parameters of a Poisson lognormal fit of the SAD and a square root fit of the RAD in diatom and fish communities across US streams. Indeed, as environmental favorability increased, more sensitive forms were able to establish large populations, diminishing the abundance disparity between locally common and rare species. Finally, it was demonstrated that in diatoms, the RAD belonged to the same family of relationships as those of population density with body size and regional distribution. PMID:27028078

  18. Abundance analysis of the outer halo globular cluster Palomar 14

    Caliskan, S; Grebel, K E

    2011-01-01

    We determine the elemental abundances of nine red giant stars belonging to Palomar 14 (Pal 14). Pal 14 is an outer halo globular cluster (GC) at a distance of \\sim 70 kpc. Our abundance analysis is based on high-resolution spectra and one-dimensional stellar model atmospheres.We derived the abundances for the iron peak elements Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, the {\\alpha}-elements O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, the light odd element Na, and the neutron-capture elements Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Dy, and Cu. Our data do not permit us to investigate light element (i.e., O to Mg) abundance variations. The neutron-capture elements show an r-process signature. We compare our measurements with the abundance ratios of inner and other outer halo GCs, halo field stars, GCs of recognized extragalactic origin, and stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). The abundance pattern of Pal 14 is almost identical to those of Pal 3 and Pal 4, the next distant members of the outer halo GC population after Pal 14. The abundance pattern of Pal 14 is...

  19. Beryllium Abundances in Stars of One-Solar-Mass

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant

    2008-01-01

    We have determined Be abundances in 50 F and G dwarfs in the mass range of 0.9 $\\leq$ M$_\\odot$ $\\leq$ 1.1 as determined by Lambert & Reddy. The effective temperatures are 5600 to 6400 K and metallicities from $-$0.65 to +0.11. The spectra were taken primarily with Keck I + HIRES. The Be abundances were found via spectral synthesis of Be II lines near 3130 \\AA. The Be abundances were investigated as a function of age, temperature, metallicity and Li abundance in this narrow mass range. Even though our stars are similar in mass, they show a range in Be abundances of a factor of $>$40. We find that [Be/Fe] has no dependence on temperature, but does show a spread of a factor of 6 at a given temperature. The reality of the spread is shown by two identical stars which differ from each other by a factor of two only in their abundances of Li and Be. Our thin-disk-star sample fits the trend between Be abundance and [Fe/H] found for halo and thick disk stars, extending it to about 4 orders of magnitude in the two ...

  20. Seasonal Abundance of Aphids and Aphidophagous Insects in Pecan

    Ghulam Abbas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal occurrence of aphids and aphidophagous insects was monitored for six years (2006–2011 from full leaf expansion in May to leaf fall in October in “Desirable” variety pecan trees that were not treated with insecticides. Aphid outbreaks occurred two times per season, once in the spring and again in the late summer. Yellow pecan and blackmargined aphids exceeded the recommended treatment thresholds one time and black pecan aphids exceeded the recommended treatment levels three times over the six seasons. Increases in aphidophagous insect abundance coincided with aphid outbreaks in five of the six seasons. Among aphidophagous insects Harmonia axyridis and Olla v-nigrum were frequently collected in both the tree canopy and at the ground level, whereas, Coccinella septempunctata, Hippodamia convergens were rarely found in the tree canopy and commonly found at the ground level. Green lacewing abundance was higher in the ground level than in the tree canopy. Brown lacewings were more abundant in the tree canopy than at the ground level. Dolichopodid and syrphid fly abundance, at the ground level increased during peak aphid abundance in the tree canopy. Application of an aqueous solution of fermenting molasses to the pecan foliage during an aphid outbreak significantly increased the abundance of ladybeetles and lacewings and significantly reduced the abundance of yellow pecan, blackmargined and black pecan aphids.

  1. Metal abundance range in the Draco dwarf galaxy

    The multichannel scanner of the Hale telescope was used to measure the spectral flux distributions of 23 red giants in the Draco system over the range lambda lambda 3240 to 7620. The memberships of these stars in Draco were checked by use of the spectral scans, and for 17 of them the observations are of sufficient quality that estimates of metal abundance can be made. The scans of the Draco stars resemble in every way the scans of red giants in globular clusters. Large differences are seen among the scans of the Draco stars, which are due to a range in Fe/H. The distribution over metal abundance was found from the abundance estimates; its half-width corresponds to an abundance range of a factor of 2.7. The mean metal abundance [Fe/H] = -1.86 +- 0.09, which is larger than the abundance of M92. This result does not support the previous claims that Draco is more metal poor than the most metal-deficient globular clusters. The implications of these results for the interpetations of Draco's color--magnitude diagram and variable star population are discussed. The chemical evolution of Draco was modeled with simple models that assume mass loss and prompt initial enrichment. These models provide adequate fits to the observed abundance distribution, and suggest that the proto-Draco was initially approx. 100 times more massive than Draco is today. 10 figures, 2 tables

  2. Geographical Range and Local Abundance of Tree Species in China

    Ren, Haibao; Condit, Richard; Chen, Bin; Mi, Xiangcheng; Cao, Min; Ye, Wanhui; Hao, Zhanqing; Ma, Keping

    2013-01-01

    Most studies on the geographical distribution of species have utilized a few well-known taxa in Europe and North America, with little research in China and its wide range of climate and forest types. We assembled large datasets to quantify the geographic ranges of tree species in China and to test several biogeographic hypotheses: 1) whether locally abundant species tend to be geographically widespread; 2) whether species are more abundant towards their range-centers; and 3) how abundances are correlated between sites. Local abundances of 651 species were derived from four tree plots of 20–25 ha where all individuals ≥1 cm in stem diameter were mapped and identified taxonomically. Range sizes of these species across China were then estimated from over 460,000 geo-referenced records; a Bayesian approach was used, allowing careful measures of error of each range estimate. The log-transformed range sizes had a bell-shaped distribution with a median of 703,000 km2, and >90% of 651 species had ranges >105 km2. There was no relationship between local abundance and range size, and no evidence for species being more abundant towards their range-centers. Finally, species’ abundances were positively correlated between sites. The widespread nature of most tree species in China suggests few are vulnerable to global extinction, and there is no indication of the double-peril that would result if rare species also had narrow ranges. PMID:24130772

  3. Geographical range and local abundance of tree species in China.

    Haibao Ren

    Full Text Available Most studies on the geographical distribution of species have utilized a few well-known taxa in Europe and North America, with little research in China and its wide range of climate and forest types. We assembled large datasets to quantify the geographic ranges of tree species in China and to test several biogeographic hypotheses: 1 whether locally abundant species tend to be geographically widespread; 2 whether species are more abundant towards their range-centers; and 3 how abundances are correlated between sites. Local abundances of 651 species were derived from four tree plots of 20-25 ha where all individuals ≥1 cm in stem diameter were mapped and identified taxonomically. Range sizes of these species across China were then estimated from over 460,000 geo-referenced records; a Bayesian approach was used, allowing careful measures of error of each range estimate. The log-transformed range sizes had a bell-shaped distribution with a median of 703,000 km(2, and >90% of 651 species had ranges >10(5 km(2. There was no relationship between local abundance and range size, and no evidence for species being more abundant towards their range-centers. Finally, species' abundances were positively correlated between sites. The widespread nature of most tree species in China suggests few are vulnerable to global extinction, and there is no indication of the double-peril that would result if rare species also had narrow ranges.

  4. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-01

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  5. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon [School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH93JR, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-07

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  6. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    Approximate carbon abundances and 12C/13C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 μm. A low mean carbon abundance ([C/H]=-0.64±0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author)

  7. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    Lazaro, C. (Inst. de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain)); Lynas-Gray, A.E. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Clegg, R.E.S. (Royal Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge (UK)); Mountain, C.M.; Zadrozny, A. (Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK))

    1991-03-01

    Approximate carbon abundances and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 {mu}m. A low mean carbon abundance ((C/H)=-0.64+-0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author).

  8. Abundances in southern Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies

    We have obtained optical spectrophotometry of H II regions in the southern Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies NGC 6822, WLM and SagDIG. Oxygen abundances are deduced via direct electron temperatures for NGC 6822 and WLM and via an empirical method for all three galaxies. These galaxies conform to the luminosity-abundance relationship for irregular galaxies. Although WLM shows a relatively low abundance, we find it unlikely that this is the cause of the lack of long-period Cepheid variables. (author)

  9. Constraints on chemical evolution models from QSOALS abundances

    Lauroesch, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Models of the formation and early chemical evolution of our Galaxy are guided and constrained by our knowledge of abundances in globular cluster stars and halo field stars. The abundance patterns identified in halo and disk stars should be discernible in absorption lines of gas clouds in forming galaxies which are accidentally lying in front of background QSO's. Conversely, the ensemble of QSO absorption line systems (QSOALS) at each redshift may suggest a detailed model for the formation of our Galaxy that is testable using abundance patterns in halo stars.

  10. Nitrogen and oxygen abundances in the Local Universe

    Vincenzo, Fiorenzo; Belfiore, Francesco; MAIOLINO, Roberto; Matteucci, Francesca; Ventura, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We present chemical evolution models aimed at reproducing the observed (N/O) vs. (O/H) abundance pattern of star forming galaxies in the Local Universe. We derive gas-phase abundances from SDSS spectroscopy and a complementary sample of low-metallicity dwarf galaxies, making use of a consistent set of abundance calibrations. This collection of data clearly confirms the existence of a plateau in the (N/O) ratio at very low metallicity, followed by an increase of this ratio up to high values as...

  11. Dust formation in a galaxy with primitive abundances.

    Sloan, G C; Matsuura, M; Zijlstra, A A; Lagadec, E; Groenewegen, M A T; Wood, P R; Szyszka, C; Bernard-Salas, J; van Loon, J Th

    2009-01-16

    Interstellar dust plays a crucial role in the evolution of galaxies. It governs the chemistry and physics of the interstellar medium. In the local universe, dust forms primarily in the ejecta from stars, but its composition and origin in galaxies at very early times remain controversial. We report observational evidence of dust forming around a carbon star in a nearby galaxy with a low abundance of heavy elements, 25 times lower than the solar abundance. The production of dust by a carbon star in a galaxy with such primitive abundances raises the possibility that carbon stars contributed carbonaceous dust in the early universe. PMID:19150838

  12. The determination of electron abundances in interstellar clouds

    Wootten, A.; Snell, R.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    An independent method is proposed for the determination of electron abundances in dense clouds based upon the abundance ratio of HCO(+) and CO. The method is derived from a simple application of gas phase ion molecule interstellar chemistry. It is noted that unlike the fractionation of deuterated molecules, it applies to warm as well as to cool clouds. The method is illustrated with the results of the recent abundance survey of Wooten et al. (1978). Finally, it is shown that in cases where deuterium enhancement is measured, an upper limit can be obtained for the cosmic ray ionization rate.

  13. A Photometric Method for estimating CNO Abundances in Globular Clusters

    Peat, David; Peat, David; Butler, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    Stromgren indices v and b are combined with broad-band index I, and a new index p, the short wavelength half of the v band, to estimate CN 4215A molecular absorption in a sample of stars in M22. The results have been used to estimate carbon and nitrogen abundances and suggest groups of stars within this cluster, each with a characteristic nitrogen abundance, but with a range of carbon abundances. The results suggest the possibility of stars consisting of material which has undergone CNO recycling two or three times. The method can be subsequently used for other globular clusters.

  14. Ecological niche structure and rangewide abundance patterns of species

    Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Díaz-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A. Townsend; Yáñez-Arenas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Spatial abundance patterns across species' ranges have attracted intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographical distance from the range centre, but tests of this idea have shown that the effect may occur indeed only in a minority of cases. We explore an alternative hypothesis: that species' abundances decline with distance from the centroid of the species' habitable conditions in environmental space (the ecological niche). We demonstrate consistent negative abundance–ecological distance relationships across all 11 species analysed (turtles to wolves), and that relationships in environmental space are consistently stronger than relationships in geographical space. PMID:23134784

  15. Oxygen isotopic distribution along the otolith growth axis by secondary ion mass spectrometry: Applications for studying ontogenetic change in the depth inhabited by deep-sea fishes

    Shiao, Jen-Chieh; Itoh, Shoichi; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki; Liao, Yun-Chih

    2014-02-01

    This study using tuna otoliths as working standards established a high lateral resolution and precision analysis to measure δ18Ootolith by secondary ion mass spectrometry. This analytical approach of the ion probe was applied to deep-sea fishes to reconstruct the likely depths inhabited by the fishes at different life history stages based on the measured δ18Ootolith values as a proxy of water temperature. Dramatic increases up to 5-6‰ in δ18Ootolith, representing a temperature decrease of approximately 20 °C, were detected in a blind cusk eel (Barathronus maculatus) otolith and in the otoliths of Synaphobranchus kaupii during leptocephalus metamorphosis to glass eel, inferred from the drop of otolith Sr/Ca ratios and increase of otolith growth increment width. δ18Ootolith profiles clearly divided the fish's life history into a planktonic stage in the mixed layer of the ocean and a benthic stage on the deep-sea ocean bottom. The habitat shift signal was recorded within a 150 μm width of otolith growth zone, which was too narrow to be clearly detected by mechanical drilling and conventional isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. However, variations down to -7‰ were found in δ18Ootolith profiles as the result of Cs2+ beam sputter in the core and larval portions of the otoliths. Carbon mapping by electron probe microanalyzer and staining by toluidine blue suggested abundant proteins existed in the areas with anomaly negative δ18Ootolith values, which cannot be interpreted as a habitat change but due to the isotopic fractionation by O emission from the proteins. These results implied that careful design and understanding of the chemical composition of the analytical areas or tracks on the heterogeneous otolith was essential for highly accurate and precise analysis.

  16. Detecting novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila

    Lee, Sanggyu; Bao, Jingyue; Zhou, Guolin; Shapiro, Joshua; Xu, Jinhua; Shi, Run Zhang; Lu, Xuemei; Clark, Terry; Johnson, Deborah; Kim, Yeong C; Wing, Claudia; Tseng, Charles; Sun, Min; Lin, Wei; Wang, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Du, Wei; Wu, Chung-I; Zhang, Xiuqing; Wang, San Ming

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that low-abundant transcripts may play fundamental roles in biological processes. In an attempt to estimate the prevalence of low-abundant transcripts in eukaryotic genomes, we performed a transcriptome analysis in Drosophila using the SAGE technique. We collected 244......,313 SAGE tags from transcripts expressed in Drosophila embryonic, larval, pupae, adult, and testicular tissue. From these SAGE tags, we identified 40,823 unique SAGE tags. Our analysis showed that 55% of the 40,823 unique SAGE tags are novel without matches in currently known Drosophila transcripts, and...... Drosophila genome. Our study reveals the presence of a significant number of novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila, and highlights the need to isolate these novel low-abundant transcripts for further biological studies. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Jun...

  17. Fundamental constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence

    2015-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, perform directed motion in gradients of concentration of attractants and repellents in a process called chemotaxis. The E. coli chemotaxis signaling pathway is a model for signal transduction, but it has unique features. We demonstrate that the need for fast signaling necessitates high abundances of the proteins involved in this pathway. We show that further constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins arise from the requirements of self-assembly, both of flagellar motors and of chemoreceptor arrays. All these constraints are specific to chemotaxis, and published data confirm that chemotaxis proteins tend to be more highly expressed than their homologs in other pathways. Employing a chemotaxis pathway model, we show that the gain of the pathway at the level of the response regulator CheY increases with overall chemotaxis protein abundances. This may explain why, at least in one E. coli strain, the abundance of all chemotaxis proteins is higher in media w...

  18. A Comparison of Stellar Elemental Abundance Techniques and Measurements

    Hinkel, Natalie R; Pagano, Michael D; Desch, Steven J; Anbar, Ariel D; Adibekyan, Vardan; Blanco-Cuaresma, Sergi; Carlberg, Joleen K; Mena, Elisa Delgado; Liu, Fan; Nordlander, Thomas; Sousa, Sergio G; Korn, Andreas; Gruyters, Pieter; Heiter, Ulrike; Jofre, Paula; Santos, Nuno C; Soubiran, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Stellar elemental abundances are important for understanding the fundamental properties of a star or stellar group, such as age and evolutionary history, as well as the composition of an orbiting planet. However, as abundance measurement techniques have progressed, there has been little standardization between individual methods and their comparisons. As a result, different stellar abundance procedures determine measurements that vary beyond quoted error for the same elements within the same stars (Hinkel et al. 2014). The purpose of this paper is to better understand the systematic variations between methods and offer recommendations for producing more accurate results in the future. We have invited a number of participants from around the world (Australia, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and USA) to calculate ten element abundances (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, Ni, Ba, and Eu) using the same stellar spectra for four stars (HD361, HD10700, HD121504, HD202206). Each group produced measurements for each of the sta...

  19. Impact of stochastic gas motions on galaxy cluster abundance profiles

    Rebusco, P; Böhringer, H; Forman, W

    2005-01-01

    The impact of stochastic gas motions on the metal distribution in cluster core is evaluated. Peaked abundance profiles are a characteristic feature of clusters with cool cores and abundance peaks are likely associated with the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) which dwell in cluster cores. The width of the abundance peaks is however significantly broader than the BCG light distribution, suggesting that some gas motions are transporting metals originating from within the BCG. Assuming that this process can be treated as diffusive and using the brightest X-ray cluster A426 (Perseus) as an example, we estimate that a diffusion coefficient of the order of $2 10^{29} {\\rm cm^2 s^{-1}}$ is needed to explain the width of the observed abundance profiles. Much lower (higher) diffusion coefficients would result in too peaked (too shallow) profiles. Such diffusion could be produced by stochastic gas motions and our analysis provides constraints on the product of their characteristic velocity and their spatial coherence ...

  20. Trek and ECCO: Abundance measurements of ultraheavy galactic cosmic rays

    Using the Trek detector, we have measured the abundances of the heaviest elements (with Z>70) in the galactic cosmic rays with sufficient charge resolution to resolve the even-Z elements. We find that the abundance of Pb compared to Pt is ∼3 times lower than the value expected from the most widely-held class of models of the origin of galactic cosmic ray nuclei, that is, origination in a partially ionized medium with solar-like composition. The low abundance of Pb is, however, consistent with the interstellar gas and dust model of Meyer, Drury and Ellison, and with a source enriched in r-process material, proposed by Binns et al. A high-resolution, high-statistics measurement of the abundances of the individual actinides would distinguish between these models. This is the goal of ECCO, the Extremely Heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer, which we plan to deploy on the International Space Station

  1. Abundances of the elements in the intergalactic medium

    We present a summary of the X-ray and optical spectroscopic data on emission lines from Z>6 elements in clusters of galaxies. The best data exists for Fe. For the ∼30 well observed clusters the mean Fe abundance is ∼1.4x10-5 (∼0.4 solar) but there appears to be a real variation of at least a factor of 2. X-ray emission lines from O, Mg, Si and S have been detected and their abundances are within a factor of a few of solar. Analysis of optical emission lines from cooling gas due to O, N and S also indicates abundances not too far from solar values. We discuss the implications of the presence of heavy elements in the intergalactic medium of clusters for the evolution of the chemical abundances of galaxies

  2. Unit scale abundance and habitat data - Calawah River Riverscape Study

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study was to identify the patterns of juvenile salmonid distribution and relative abundance in relation to habitat correlates. It is the first...

  3. The Helium abundance problem and non-minimally coupled quintessence

    Chen, Xuelei

    2000-01-01

    There is a tension between observed Helium abundance and the prediction of the standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We show that non-minimally quintessence model may help to reduce this tension between theory and observation.

  4. Solar models with new low-metal abundances

    Yang, Wuming

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, the photospheric abundances of the Sun had been revised several times by many observers. The standard solar models (SSM) constructed with the new low-metal abundances disagree with helioseismic results and detected neutrino fluxes. The solar model problem has been puzzled some stellar physicists for more than ten years. Rotation, enhanced diffusion, convection overshoot, and magnetic fields are used to reconcile the new abundances with helioseismology. The \\textbf{too} low-helium \\textbf{subsurface abundance} in enhanced diffusion models can be improved by the mixing caused by rotation and magnetic fields. The problem of the depth of the convective zone in rotating models can be resolved by convection overshoot. Consequently the Asplund-Grevesse-Sauval rotation model including overshooting (AGSR) reproduces the seismically inferred sound-speed and density profiles, and the convection zone depth as well as the Grevesse and Sauval (GS98) model computed before. But this model fails to reprodu...

  5. On the origin of elemental abundances in the terrestrial planets

    Elser, Sebastian; Moore, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The abundances of elements in the Earth and the terrestrial planets provide the initial conditions for life and clues as to the history and formation of the Solar System. We follow the pioneering work of Bond et al. (2010) and combine circumstellar disk models, chemical equilibrium calculations and dynamical simulations of planet formation to study the bulk composition of rocky planets. We use condensation sequence calculations to estimate the initial abundance of solids in the circumstellar disk with properties determined from time dependent theoretical models. We combine this with dynamical simulations of planetesimal growth that trace the solids during the planet formation process. We calculate the elemental abundances in the resulting planets and explore how these vary with the choice of disk model and the initial conditions within the Solar Nebula. Although certain characteristics of the terrestrial planets in the Solar System could be reproduced, none of our models could reproduce the abundance properti...

  6. Germanium and lead: significant differences between meteoritic and photospheric abundances

    Here we shall more closely look into the Ge and Pb reference abundance determinations in the photosphere and in C1 meteorites, and discuss their relevance to the problem of first ionization potential versus volatility in galactic cosmic ray's

  7. Relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site

    Seven hundred fifty-nine transects having a total length of 1,191 km were walked during 1981--1986 to determine the distribution and relative abundance of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The abundance of tortoises on NTS was low to very low relative to other populations in the Mojave Desert. Sign of tortoises was found from 880 to 1,570 m elevation and was more abundant above 1,200 m than has been reported previously for Nevada. Tortoises were more abundant on NTS on the upper alluvial fans and slopes of mountains than in valley bottoms. They also were more common on or near limestone and dolomite mountains than on mountains of volcanic origin

  8. Method for measuring the heavy stripped ion abundances of plasma

    A description is given of a system which uses a velocity filter and an energy filter in tandem to analyze the abundances and energy spreads of highly stripped ions. The system can also serve as a plasma diagnostic. (Auth.)

  9. Seabird abundance and behavior on Cape Peirce, Alaska, 1985

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the seabird abundance and behavior on Cape Peirce on Togiak National Wildlife Refuge. Methods and results are discussed. Species covered include...

  10. Investigating Detailed Abundance Patterns in the Hyades Cluster

    Williams, Drake; Schuler, Simon C.

    2016-01-01

    We have derived the paramters and abundances of up to 17 elements for seven stars within the Hyades open star cluster, through an analysis of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained via the Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m telescope and the 2dcoude cross-dispersed echelle spectrometer at the McDonald Observatory. Four of the stars are solar-type dwarves while three giants were also analyzed to better calculate an overall metallicity of the entire cluster. In addition, we investigated whether there are differences in various stellar abundance trends across the open cluster. Here we present the results of our abundance analysis and stellar parameter derivations of the seven stars and discuss the implications of stellar abundance patterns across star clusters. We acknowledge support provided by grant NNX12AD19G to S.C.S. from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as part of the Kepler Participating Scientist Program.

  11. Relative Abundance of Breeding Birds in the Dismal Swamp 1982

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To obtain an idea of the relative abundance of breeding birds in the predominant mixed swamp hardwoods forest of the Dismal Swamp in southeastern Virginia, a...

  12. Causality of the relationship between geographic distribution and species abundance

    Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Rahbek, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    The positive relationship between a species' geographic distribution and its abundance is one of ecology's most well-documented patterns, yet the causes behind this relationship remain unclear. Although many hypotheses have been proposed to account for distribution-abundance relationships none have...... attained unequivocal support. Accordingly, the positive association in distribution-abundance relationships is generally considered to be due to a combination of these proposed mechanisms acting in concert. In this review, we suggest that much of the disparity between these hypotheses stems from...... differences in terminology and ecological point of view. Realizing and accounting for these differences facilitates integration, so that the relative contributions of each mechanism may be evaluated. Here, we review all the mechanisms that have been proposed to account for distribution-abundance relationships...

  13. Whooping Crane Winter Abundance Survey Protocol Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This protocol is primarily designed to provide a mechanism for monitoring trends in whooping crane abundance on their wintering grounds along the Texas gulf coast....

  14. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  15. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    Mann Matthias

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the abundance of molecular components is an important prerequisite for building quantitative predictive models of cellular behavior. Proteins are central components of these models, since they carry out most of the fundamental processes in the cell. Thus far, protein concentrations have been difficult to measure on a large scale, but proteomic technologies have now advanced to a stage where this information becomes readily accessible. Results Here, we describe an experimental scheme to maximize the coverage of proteins identified by mass spectrometry of a complex biological sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed emPAI approach which takes into account the number of sequenced peptides per protein. The values of abundance are within a broad range and accurately reflect independently measured copy numbers per cell. As expected, the most abundant proteins were those involved in protein synthesis, most notably ribosomal proteins. Proteins involved in energy metabolism as well as those with binding function were also found in high copy number while proteins annotated with the terms metabolism, transcription, transport, and cellular organization were rare. The barrel-sandwich fold was found to be the structural fold with the highest abundance. Highly abundant proteins are predicted to be less prone to aggregation based on their length, pI values, and occurrence patterns of hydrophobic stretches. We also find that abundant proteins tend to be predominantly essential. Additionally we observe a significant correlation between protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work

  16. Morphological change in Newfoundland caribou: Effects of abundance and climate

    Shane P. Mahoney; Jackie N. Weir; J. Glenn Luther; Schaefer, James A; Shawn F. Morrison

    2011-01-01

    The demographic and environmental influences on large mammal morphology are central questions in ecology. We investigated the effects of population abundance and climate on body size and number of male antler points for the La Poile and Middle Ridge caribou (Rangifer tarandus, L. 1758) herds, Newfoundland, Canada. Across 40 years and 20-fold changes in abundance, adult males and females exhibited diminished stature as indicated by jawbone size (diastema and total mandible length) and the numb...

  17. Herbivory: effects on plant abundance, distribution and population growth

    Maron, John L.; Crone, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Plants are attacked by many different consumers. A critical question is how often, and under what conditions, common reductions in growth, fecundity or even survival that occur due to herbivory translate to meaningful impacts on abundance, distribution or dynamics of plant populations. Here, we review population-level studies of the effects of consumers on plant dynamics and evaluate: (i) whether particular consumers have predictably more or less influence on plant abundance, (ii) whether par...

  18. Clear cell mammary malignant myoepithelioma with abundant glycogens.

    Kuwabara, H.; Uda, H

    1997-01-01

    Malignant myoepithelioma (myoepithelial carcinoma) of the breast is extremely rare. A case is reported of a 46 year old female with clear cell mammary malignant myoepithelioma that, on histological examination, was glycogen abundant clear cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the clear cells showed myoepithelial differentiation--that is, they were a smooth muscle actin and S100 protein positive. This case shows that glycogen abundant clear cell carcinoma is a variant of malignant myoepitheli...

  19. Silicon and Oxygen Abundances in Planet-Host Stars

    Brugamyer, Erik; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Cochran, William D.; Sneden, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The positive correlation between planet detection rate and host star iron abundance lends strong support to the core accretion theory of planet formation. However, iron is not the most significant mass contributor to the cores of giant planets. Since giant planet cores are thought to grow from silicate grains with icy mantles, the likelihood of gas giant formation should depend heavily on the oxygen and silicon abundance of the planet formation environment. Here we compare the silicon and oxy...

  20. Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data

    Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; Hartog, E.A. den; Collier, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy -- the progenitors of the halo stars -- responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nu...

  1. Regularity underlies erratic population abundances in marine ecosystems

    Sun, Jie; Cornelius, Sean P.; Janssen, John; Gray, Kimberly A.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-01-01

    The abundance of a species' population in an ecosystem is rarely stationary, often exhibiting large fluctuations over time. Using historical data on marine species, we show that the year-to-year fluctuations of population growth rate obey a well-defined double-exponential (Laplace) distribution. This striking regularity allows us to devise a stochastic model despite seemingly irregular variations in population abundances. The model identifies the effect of reduced growth at low population den...

  2. Enhanced Abundances in Spiral Galaxies of the Pegasus I Cluster

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Blanc, Guillermo A.

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and ve...

  3. Literature survey of isotopic abundance data for 1987-1989

    Holden, N.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1989-08-09

    I have compiled all of the data on isotopic abundance measurements and their variation in nature for the time period since the last General Assembly. Most of the data deals with the variations in the abundances as given by per mil deviations from some standard. As such, they are not of major interest to the Atomic Weights Commission. However, there were some measurements which are of general interest in this list.

  4. An Extension of the Abundancy Index to Certain Quadratic Rings

    Defant, Colin

    2015-01-01

    We begin by introducing an extension of the traditional abundancy index to imaginary quadratic rings with unique factorization. After showing that many of the properties of the traditional abundancy index continue to hold in our extended form, we investigate what we call $n$-powerfully solitary numbers in these rings. This definition serves to extend the concept of solitary numbers, which have been defined and studied in the integers. We end with some open questions and a conjecture.

  5. Zooplankton composition and abundance in Mida Creek, Kenya

    Osore, M.K.W.; Mwaluma, J.M.; FIERS, F; Daro, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine the resident assemblages of zooplankton in Mida Creek, Kenya, a survey was conducted from May 1996 to Apr. 1997 for which we studied their seasonal composition, abundance, and distribution. Twenty-seven major zooplankton taxa were identified. The order Copepoda was the most abundant taxon dominated mainly by the genera Acartia, Paracalanus, Labidocera, Temora, Centropages, and Calanopia. Other common zooplankton taxa included the Medusae, Ctenophora, Brachyura larvae, an...

  6. Influence of fish behaviour on fish stock abundance estimations

    Fréon, Pierre; Gerlotto, François

    1988-01-01

    A new methodolgy is proposed for studying fish school behaviour, allowing to quantify its influence on stock abundance estimations. Observations are collected in open sea or inside a large net set in shallow waters. Preliminary results concerning fish reactions show a modification of the school structure under a research vessel using acoustic devices for abundance measurements. The school structure, even when the fish is not disturbed, shows an irregular density distribution in opposition to ...

  7. Literature survey of isotopic abundance data for 1987-1989

    I have compiled all of the data on isotopic abundance measurements and their variation in nature for the time period since the last General Assembly. Most of the data deals with the variations in the abundances as given by per mil deviations from some standard. As such, they are not of major interest to the Atomic Weights Commission. However, there were some measurements which are of general interest in this list

  8. Urban Warming Drives Insect Pest Abundance on Street Trees

    Meineke, Emily K.; Robert R Dunn; Sexton, Joseph O.; Frank, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Cities profoundly alter biological communities, favoring some species over others, though the mechanisms that govern these changes are largely unknown. Herbivorous arthropod pests are often more abundant in urban than in rural areas, and urban outbreaks have been attributed to reduced control by predators and parasitoids and to increased susceptibility of stressed urban plants. These hypotheses, however, leave many outbreaks unexplained and fail to predict variation in pest abundance within c...

  9. Investigating Host Star Abundances as Signatures of Terrestrial Planets

    Teske, J.; Schuler, S.; Cunha, K.; Smith, V.

    2014-03-01

    Kepler has fundamentally changed our view of exoplanets, revealing that Jupiter and Saturn-sized planets are not the most common. Of the current ~3600 Kepler planet candidates, ~65% are ≤2.5 REarth and nearly 300 orbit in/near their host stars' habitable zones (180Kanalog, host star abundances are indicative of the precursor materials available in the protoplanetary disk for incorporation into planets. Our own Sun is deficient by ~20% in refractory elements (Tc=900 K) relative to volatile elements when compared to most (~85%) solar-type stars [3,4,5,6]. This has been proposed as a signature of terrestrial planet formation, with the "missing" refractory elements incorporated into rocky planets [3,7,8]. The amount of missing material in our Sun amounts to that needed to form terrestrial planets [3,7,8], and the abundance patterns in meteorites mirror this solar abundance anomaly [9,10]. However, subsequent studies of stars with/without planets indicate that their abundance patterns may not be so different, or indistinguishable from Galactic chemical evolution [11,12,13]. Here we use traditional stellar abundance analysis (non-automated) to independently re-analyze the Keck/HIRES data presented in Melendez et al. (2012) [6] of one of the best solar twins known to date - though not yet known to host any planets - to investigate their finding of refractory elemental abundance depletion similar to the Sun. We compare our results to similar studies implementing the same type differential abundance analysis to search for a Sun-like abundance pattern using Keck/HIRES spectra of stars discovered by Kepler to host small (terrestrial) planets.

  10. Ruthenium and hafnium abundances in giant and dwarf barium stars

    Allen, D M

    2007-01-01

    We present abundances for Ru and Hf, compare them to abundances of other heavy elements, and discuss the problems found in determining Ru and Hf abundances with laboratory gf-values in the spectra of barium stars. We determined Ru and Hf abundances in a sample of giant and dwarf barium stars, by the spectral synthesis of two RuI (4080.574A and 4757.856A) and two HfII (4080.437A and 4093.155A) transitions. The stellar spectra were observed with FEROS/ESO, and the stellar atmospheric parameters lie in the range 4300 < Teff/K < 6500, -1.2 < [Fe/H] <= 0 and 1.4 <= log g < 4.6. The HfII 4080A and the RuI 4758A observed transitions result in a unreasonably high solar abundance, given certain known uncertainties, when fitted with laboratory gf-values. For these two transitions we determined empirical gf-values by fitting the observed line profiles of the spectra of the Sun and Arcturus. For the sample stars, this procedure resulted in a good agreement of Ru and Hf abundances given by the two availa...

  11. New calibrations for abundance determinations in HII regions

    Pilyugin, L S

    2016-01-01

    Simple relations for deriving the oxygen abundance in HII regions with intensities of the three strong emission lines R_2, R_3, and N_2 (R calibration) or S_2, R_3, and N_2 (S calibration) in their spectra are suggested. A sample of 313 reference HII regions of the counterpart method is used as calibrating data points. Relations for the determination of nitrogen abundances, the R calibration, are also constructed. We find that the oxygen and nitrogen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions can be estimated using the intensities of the two strong lines R_2 and N_2 (or S_2 and N_2 for oxygen) only. The corresponding two-dimensional relations are provided. There are considerable advantages of the suggested calibration relations as compared to the existing ones. First, the oxygen and nitrogen abundances estimated through the suggested calibrations agree with the Te-based abundances within ~0.1 dex over the whole metallicity range, i.e., the relative accuracy of the calibration-based abundances is 0.1 dex. Alth...

  12. SULFUR ABUNDANCES IN THE ORION ASSOCIATION B STARS

    Sulfur abundances are derived for a sample of 10 B main-sequence star members of the Orion association. The analysis is based on LTE plane-parallel model atmospheres and non-LTE line formation theory by means of a self-consistent spectrum synthesis analysis of lines from two ionization states of sulfur, S II and S III. The observations are high-resolution spectra obtained with the ARCES spectrograph at the Apache Point Observatory. The abundance distribution obtained for the Orion targets is homogeneous within the expected errors in the analysis: A(S) = 7.15 ± 0.05. This average abundance result is in agreement with the recommended solar value (both from modeling of the photospheres in one-dimensional and three-dimensional, and meteorites) and indicates that little, if any, chemical evolution of sulfur has taken place in the last ∼4.5 billion years. The sulfur abundances of the young stars in Orion are found to agree well with results for the Orion Nebulae, and place strong constraints on the amount of sulfur depletion onto grains as being very modest or nonexistent. The sulfur abundances for Orion are consistent with other measurements at a similar galactocentric radius: combined with previous results for other OB-type stars produce a relatively shallow sulfur abundance gradient with a slope of -0.037 ± 0.012 dex kpc-1.

  13. Chromospheric Models and the Oxygen Abundance in Giant Stars

    Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H.; Kurucz, R. L.

    2016-04-01

    Realistic stellar atmospheric models of two typical metal-poor giant stars in Omega Centauri, which include a chromosphere (CHR), influence the formation of optical lines of O i: the forbidden lines (λ6300, λ6363) and the infrared triplet (λλ7771‑7775). One-dimensional semi-empirical non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) models are constructed based on observed Balmer lines. A full non-LTE formulation is applied for evaluating the line strengths of O i, including photoionization by the Lyman continuum and photoexcitation by Lyα and Lyβ. Chromospheric models (CHR) yield forbidden oxygen transitions that are stronger than those in radiative/convective equilibrium (RCE) models. The triplet oxygen lines from high levels also appear stronger than those produced in an RCE model. The inferred oxygen abundance from realistic CHR models for these two stars is decreased by factors of ∼3 as compared to values derived from RCE models. A lower oxygen abundance suggests that intermediate-mass AGB stars contribute to the observed abundance pattern in globular clusters. A change in the oxygen abundance of metal-poor field giants could affect models of deep mixing episodes on the red giant branch. Changes in the oxygen abundance can impact other abundance determinations that are critical to astrophysics, including chemical tagging techniques and galactic chemical evolution.

  14. The Solar Flare Sulphur Abundance from RESIK Observations

    Sylwester, J; Phillips, K J H; Kuznetsov, V D

    2012-01-01

    The RESIK instrument on {\\em CORONAS-F} spacecraft observed several sulphur X-ray lines in three of its four channels covering the wavelength range 3.8-6.1 \\AA\\ during solar flares. The fluxes are analyzed to give the sulphur abundance. Data are chosen for when the instrument parameters were optimized. The measured fluxes of the \\ion{S}{15} $1s^2-1s4p$ ($w4$) line at 4.089 \\AA\\ gives $A({\\rm S}) = 7.16 \\pm 0.17$ (abundances on a logarithmic scale with $A({\\rm H}) = 12$) which we consider to be the most reliable. Estimates from other lines range from 7.13 to 7.24. The preferred S abundance estimate is very close to recent photospheric abundance estimates and to quiet-Sun solar wind and meteoritic abundances. This implies no fractionation of sulphur by processes tending to enhance the coronal abundance from the photospheric that depend on the first ionization potential (FIP), or that sulphur, though its FIP has an intermediate value of 10.36 eV, acts like a "high-FIP" element.

  15. Chemical abundances from planetary nebulae in local spiral galaxies

    Richer, M G

    2015-01-01

    While the chemical abudances observed in bright planetary nebulae in local spiral galaxies are less varied than their counterparts in dwarfs, they provide new insight. Their helium abundances are typically enriched by less than 50\\% compared to the primordial abundance. Nitrogen abundances always show some level of secondary enrichment, but the absolute enrichment is not extreme. In particular, type I PNe are rare among the bright PNe in local spirals. The oxygen and neon abundances are very well correlated and follow the relation between these abundances observed in star-forming galaxies, implying that either the progenitor stars of these PNe modify neither abundance substantially or that they modify both to maintain the ratio (not predicted by theory). According to theory, these results imply that the progenitor stars of bright PNe in local spirals have masses of about $2\\,\\mathrm M_{\\odot}$ or less. If so, the progenitors of these PNe have substantial lifetimes that allow us to use them to study the recent...

  16. A search for stars of very low metal abundance. VI. Detailed abundances of 313 metal-poor stars

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Burley, Gregory S.; Kelson, Daniel D. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sneden, Christopher, E-mail: iur@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We present radial velocities, equivalent widths, model atmosphere parameters, and abundances or upper limits for 53 species of 48 elements derived from high resolution optical spectroscopy of 313 metal-poor stars. A majority of these stars were selected from the metal-poor candidates of the HK Survey of Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We derive detailed abundances for 61% of these stars for the first time. Spectra were obtained during a 10 yr observing campaign using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, the Robert G. Tull Coudé Spectrograph on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory, and the High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We perform a standard LTE abundance analysis using MARCS model atmospheres, and we apply line-by-line statistical corrections to minimize systematic abundance differences arising when different sets of lines are available for analysis. We identify several abundance correlations with effective temperature. A comparison with previous abundance analyses reveals significant differences in stellar parameters, which we investigate in detail. Our metallicities are, on average, lower by ≈0.25 dex for red giants and ≈0.04 dex for subgiants. Our sample contains 19 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–3.5, 84 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–3.0, and 210 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–2.5. Detailed abundances are presented here or elsewhere for 91% of the 209 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–2.5 as estimated from medium resolution spectroscopy by Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We will discuss the interpretation of these abundances in subsequent papers.

  17. Clustering requires modified methyl-accepting sites in low-abundance but not high-abundance chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli.

    Lybarger, Suzanne R; Nair, Usha; Lilly, Angela A; Hazelbauer, Gerald L; Maddock, Janine R

    2005-05-01

    Chemotaxis signalling complexes of Escherichia coli, composed of chemoreceptors, CheA and CheW, form clusters located predominantly at cell poles. As the only kind of receptor in a cell, high-abundance receptors are polar and clustered whereas low-abundance chemoreceptors are polar but largely unclustered. We found that clustering was a function of the cytoplasmic, carboxyl-terminal domain and that effective clustering was conferred on low-abundance receptors by addition of the approximately 20-residue sequence from the carboxyl terminus of either high-abundance receptor. These sequences are different but share a carboxyl-terminal pentapeptide that enhances adaptational covalent modification and allows a physiological balance between modified and unmodified methyl-accepting sites, implying that receptor modification might influence clustering. Thus we investigated directly effects of modification state on chemoreceptor clustering. As the sole receptor type in a cell, low-abundance receptors were clustered only if modified, but high-abundance receptors were clustered independent of extent of modification. This difference could mean that the two receptor types are fundamentally different or that they are poised at different positions in the same conformational equilibrium. Notably, no receptor perturbation we tested altered a predominant location at cell poles, emphasizing a distinction between determinants of clustering and polar localization. PMID:15853891

  18. Change in avian abundance predicted from regional forest inventory data

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Tirpak, John M.; Jones-Farrand, D. Todd; Thompson, Frank R., III; Uihlein, William B.; Fitzgerald, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    An inability to predict population response to future habitat projections is a shortcoming in bird conservation planning. We sought to predict avian response to projections of future forest conditions that were developed from nationwide forest surveys within the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program. To accomplish this, we evaluated the historical relationship between silvicolous bird populations and FIA-derived forest conditions within 25 ecoregions that comprise the southeastern United States. We aggregated forest area by forest ownership, forest type, and tree size-class categories in county-based ecoregions for 5 time periods spanning 1963-2008. We assessed the relationship of forest data with contemporaneous indices of abundance for 24 silvicolous bird species that were obtained from Breeding Bird Surveys. Relationships between bird abundance and forest inventory data for 18 species were deemed sufficient as predictive models. We used these empirically derived relationships between regional forest conditions and bird populations to predict relative changes in abundance of these species within ecoregions that are anticipated to coincide with projected changes in forest variables through 2040. Predicted abundances of these 18 species are expected to remain relatively stable in over a quarter (27%) of the ecoregions. However, change in forest area and redistribution of forest types will likely result in changed abundance of some species within many ecosystems. For example, abundances of 11 species, including pine warbler (Dendroica pinus), brown-headed nuthatch (Sitta pusilla), and chuckwills- widow (Caprimulgus carolinensis), are projected to increase within more ecoregions than ecoregions where they will decrease. For 6 other species, such as blue-winged warbler (Vermivora pinus), Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus), and indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), we projected abundances will decrease within more ecoregions than ecoregions where they will

  19. Is abundance a species attribute? An example with haematophagous ectoparasites.

    Krasnov, Boris R; Shenbrot, Georgy I; Khokhlova, Irina S; Poulin, Robert

    2006-11-01

    Population density is a fundamental property of a species and yet it varies among populations of the same species. The variation comes from the interplay between intrinsic features of a species that tend to produce repeatable density values across all populations of the same species and extrinsic environmental factors that differ among localities and thus tend to produce spatial variation in density. Is inter-population variation in density too large for density to be considered a true species character? We addressed this question using data on abundance (number of parasites per individual host, i.e. equivalent to density) of fleas ectoparasitic on small mammals. The data included samples of 548 flea populations, representing 145 flea species and obtained from 48 different geographical regions. Abundances of the same flea species on the same host species, but in different regions, were more similar to each other than expected by chance, and varied significantly among flea species, with 46% of the variation among samples accounted by differences between flea species. Thus, estimates of abundance are repeatable within the same flea species. The same repeatability was also observed, but to a lesser extent, across flea genera, tribes and subfamilies. Independently of the identity of the flea species, abundance values recorded on the same host species, or in the same geographical region, also showed significant statistical repeatability, though not nearly as strong as that associated with abundance values from the same flea species. There were also no strong indications that regional differences in abiotic variables were an important determinant of variation in abundance of a given flea species on a given host species. Abundance thus appears to be a true species trait in fleas, although it varies somewhat within bounds set by species-specific life history traits. PMID:16896773

  20. Urban warming drives insect pest abundance on street trees.

    Meineke, Emily K; Dunn, Robert R; Sexton, Joseph O; Frank, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Cities profoundly alter biological communities, favoring some species over others, though the mechanisms that govern these changes are largely unknown. Herbivorous arthropod pests are often more abundant in urban than in rural areas, and urban outbreaks have been attributed to reduced control by predators and parasitoids and to increased susceptibility of stressed urban plants. These hypotheses, however, leave many outbreaks unexplained and fail to predict variation in pest abundance within cities. Here we show that the abundance of a common insect pest is positively related to temperature even when controlling for other habitat characteristics. The scale insect Parthenolecanium quercifex was 13 times more abundant on willow oak trees in the hottest parts of Raleigh, NC, in the southeastern United States, than in cooler areas, though parasitism rates were similar. We further separated the effects of heat from those of natural enemies and plant quality in a greenhouse reciprocal transplant experiment. P. quercifex collected from hot urban trees became more abundant in hot greenhouses than in cool greenhouses, whereas the abundance of P. quercifex collected from cooler urban trees remained low in hot and cool greenhouses. Parthenolecanium quercifex living in urban hot spots succeed with warming, and they do so because some demes have either acclimatized or adapted to high temperatures. Our results provide the first evidence that heat can be a key driver of insect pest outbreaks on urban trees. Since urban warming is similar in magnitude to global warming predicted in the next 50 years, pest abundance on city trees may foreshadow widespread outbreaks as natural forests also grow warmer. PMID:23544087

  1. Urban warming drives insect pest abundance on street trees.

    Emily K Meineke

    Full Text Available Cities profoundly alter biological communities, favoring some species over others, though the mechanisms that govern these changes are largely unknown. Herbivorous arthropod pests are often more abundant in urban than in rural areas, and urban outbreaks have been attributed to reduced control by predators and parasitoids and to increased susceptibility of stressed urban plants. These hypotheses, however, leave many outbreaks unexplained and fail to predict variation in pest abundance within cities. Here we show that the abundance of a common insect pest is positively related to temperature even when controlling for other habitat characteristics. The scale insect Parthenolecanium quercifex was 13 times more abundant on willow oak trees in the hottest parts of Raleigh, NC, in the southeastern United States, than in cooler areas, though parasitism rates were similar. We further separated the effects of heat from those of natural enemies and plant quality in a greenhouse reciprocal transplant experiment. P. quercifex collected from hot urban trees became more abundant in hot greenhouses than in cool greenhouses, whereas the abundance of P. quercifex collected from cooler urban trees remained low in hot and cool greenhouses. Parthenolecanium quercifex living in urban hot spots succeed with warming, and they do so because some demes have either acclimatized or adapted to high temperatures. Our results provide the first evidence that heat can be a key driver of insect pest outbreaks on urban trees. Since urban warming is similar in magnitude to global warming predicted in the next 50 years, pest abundance on city trees may foreshadow widespread outbreaks as natural forests also grow warmer.

  2. Spatio-temporal variability in ontogenetic guild structure of an intertidal fish assemblage in central Chile Variabilidad espacio-temporal en la estructura de gremios ontogenéticos de un ensamble de peces intermareales de Chile central

    PATRICIA A BERRÍOS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Species resource use can vary throughout ontogeny, potentially affecting community dynamics. This can be particularly important for species facing high variability in environmental conditions and going through several orders of magnitude in size, as intertidal fishes. However, the influence of the resulting ontogenetic changes in guild membership on the spatio-temporal structure of fish assemblages remains virtually unknown. Here we assessed the spatial and temporal variability in the ontogenetic feeding guild (OFG structure of the fish assemblage inhabiting the temperate rocky intertidal zone along central Chilean coast. This was done applying principal component analysis (PCA and randomization tests (R-test on the relative OFG composition of fish assemblages, obtained from seasonal samples from ten pools located at two heights in the intertidal zone in three localities between 33° and 34° S. Overall, the PCA and R-tests suggest that spatial variability dominated over temporal variability in OFG structure, mainly due to a higher representation of omnivore species at high intertidal pools in two of the three sampled localities. However, phenology-related changes in the representation of fish size-classes (i.e. carnivore recruitment in spring-summer along with ontogenetic differences in habitat selection (e.g., selection for low intertidal pools by bigger-sized carnivore OFG contributed to both spatial and temporal differentiation in OFG structure. Finally, the relative representation of each OFG correlated with that of their dominant species, without evidence for density compensation. This suggests low levels of functional redundancy among species in each OFG, highlighting the vulnerability of assemblage functioning to size-biased disturbances as fishing.El uso de los recursos puede variar a través de la ontogenia, afectando potencialmente las dinámicas comunitarias. Esto puede ser de particular importancia en especies que enfrentan alta

  3. Analysis and modeling of scale-invariance in plankton abundance

    Pelletier, J D

    1996-01-01

    The power spectrum, $S$, of horizontal transects of plankton abundance are often observed to have a power-law dependence on wavenumber, $k$, with exponent close to $-2$: $S(k)\\propto k^{-2}$ over a wide range of scales. I present power spectral analyses of aircraft lidar measurements of phytoplankton abundance from scales of 1 to 100 km. A power spectrum $S(k)\\propto k^{-2}$ is obtained. As a model for this observation, I consider a stochastic growth equation where the rate of change of plankton abundance is determined by turbulent mixing, modeled as a diffusion process in two dimensions, and exponential growth with a stochastically variable net growth rate representing a fluctuating environment. The model predicts a lognormal distribution of abundance and a power spectrum of horizontal transects $S(k)\\propto k^{-1.8}$, close to the observed spectrum. The model equation predicts that the power spectrum of variations in abundance in time at a point in space is $S(f)\\propto f^{-1.5}$ (where $f$ is the frequency...

  4. Influence of edge on predator prey distribution and abundance

    Ferguson, Steven H.

    2004-03-01

    I investigated the effect of spatial configuration on distribution and abundance of invertebrate trophic groups by counting soil arthropods under boxes (21 × 9.5 cm) arranged in six different patterns that varied in the amount of edge (137-305 cm). I predicted fewer individuals from the consumer trophic group (Collembola) in box groups with greater amount of edge. This prediction was based on the assumption that predators (mites, ants, spiders, centipedes) select edge during foraging and thereby reduce abundance of the less mobile consumer group under box patterns with greater edge. Consumer abundance (Collembola) was not correlated with amount of edge. Among the predator groups, mite, ant and centipede abundance related to the amount of edge of box groups. However, in contrast to predictions, abundance of these predators was negatively correlated with amount of edge in box patterns. All Collembola predators, with the exception of ants, were less clumped in distribution than Collembola. The results are inconsistent with the view that predators used box edges to predate the less mobile consumer trophic group. Alternative explanations for the spatial patterns other than predator-prey relations include (1) a negative relationship between edge and moisture, (2) a positive relationship between edge and detritus decomposition (i.e. mycelium as food for the consumer group), and (3) a negative relationship between edge and the interstices between adjacent boxes. Landscape patterns likely affect microclimate, food, and predator-prey relations and, therefore, future experimental designs need to control these factors individually to distinguish among alternative hypotheses.

  5. Beryllium abundances in stars with planets:Extending the sample

    Gálvez-Ortiz, M C; Hernández, J I González; Israelian, G; Santos, N C; Rebolo, R; Ecuvillon, A

    2011-01-01

    Context: Chemical abundances of light elements as beryllium in planet-host stars allow us to study the planet formation scenarios and/or investigate possible surface pollution processes. Aims: We present here an extension of previous beryllium abundance studies. The complete sample consists of 70 stars hosting planets and 30 stars without known planetary companions. The aim of this paper is to further assess the trends found in previous studies with less number of objects. This will provide more information on the processes of depletion and mixing of light elements in the interior of late type stars, and will provide possible explanations for the abundance differences between stars that host planets and "single" stars. Methods: Using high resolution UVES spectra, we measure beryllium abundances of 26 stars that host planets and 1 "single" star mainly using the \\lambda 3131.065 A Be II line, by fitting synthetic spectra to the observational data. We also compile beryllium abundance measurements of 44 stars hos...

  6. Enhanced Abundances in Spiral Galaxies of the Pegasus I Cluster

    Robertson, Paul; Blanc, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to ISM-ICM interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of 3 H I deficient spirals and 2 H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13\\pm0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log(O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our resul...

  7. ENHANCED ABUNDANCES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES OF THE PEGASUS I CLUSTER

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Blanc, Guillermo A., E-mail: paul@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: gblancm@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-03-20

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to interstellar-medium-intracluster-medium interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of three H I deficient spirals and two H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13 {+-} 0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log (O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our results suggest that similar environmental mechanisms are driving the heavy element enhancement in both clusters.

  8. ENHANCED ABUNDANCES IN SPIRAL GALAXIES OF THE PEGASUS I CLUSTER

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to interstellar-medium-intracluster-medium interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of three H I deficient spirals and two H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13 ± 0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log (O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our results suggest that similar environmental mechanisms are driving the heavy element enhancement in both clusters.

  9. Applications of abundance data and requirements for cosmochemical modeling

    Busemann, H.; Binns, W. R.; Chiappini, C.; Gloeckler, G.; Hoppe, P.; Kirilova, Donka; Leske, R. A.; Manuel, O. K.; Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.)

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of the universe from Big Bang to its present state requires an understanding of the evolution of the abundances of the elements and isotopes in galaxies, stars, the interstellar medium, the Sun and the heliosphere, planets and meteorites. Processes that change the state of the universe include Big Bang nucleosynthesis, star formation and stellar nucleosynthesis, galactic chemical evolution, propagation of cosmic rays, spallation, ionization and particle transport of interstellar material, formation of the solar system, solar wind emission and its fractionation (FIP/FIT effect), mixing processes in stellar interiors, condensation of material and subsequent geochemical fractionation. Here, we attempt to compile some major issues in cosmochemistry that can be addressed with a better knowledge of the respective element or isotope abundances. Present and future missions such as Genesis, Stardust, Interstellar Pathfinder, and Interstellar Probe, improvements of remote sensing instrumentation and experiments on extraterrestrial material such as meteorites, presolar grains, and lunar or returned planetary or cometary samples will result in an improved database of elemental and isotopic abundances. This includes the primordial abundances of D, 3He, 4He, and 7Li, abundances of the heavier elements in stars and galaxies, the composition of the interstellar medium, solar wind and comets as well as the (highly) volatile elements in the solar system such as helium, nitrogen, oxygen or xenon.

  10. Sulfur and zinc abundances of red giant stars

    Takeda, Yoichi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Sato, Bun'ei

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur and zinc are chemically volatile elements, which play significant roles as depletion-free tracers in studying galactic chemical evolution. However, regarding red giants having evolved off the main sequence, reliable abundance determinations of S and Zn seem to be difficult despite that a few studies have been reported so far. Given this situation, we tried to establish the abundances of these elements for an extensive sample of 239 field GK giants (-0.8 < [Fe/H] < +0.2), by applying the spectrum-fitting technique to S I 8694-5, S I 6757, and Zn I 6362 lines and by taking into account the non-LTE effect. Besides, similar abundance analysis was done for 160 FGK dwarfs to be used for comparison. The non-LTE corrections for the S and Zn abundances derived from these lines turned out < 0.1(-0.2) dex for most cases and not very significant. It revealed that the S I 6757 feature is more reliable as an abundance indicator than S I 8694-5 for the case of red giants, because the latter suffers blending ...

  11. Correlation between lithium abundances and ages of solar twin stars

    Carlos, Marilia; Melendez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We want to determine the lithium abundances of solar twin stars as a function of stellar age to provide constraints for stellar evolutions models and to investigate whether there is a connection between low Li abundance and the occurrence of planets. For a sample of 21 solar twins observed with the HARPS spectrograph at high spectral resolution (R~115.000) and very high signal-to-noise ratio (600 < S/N < 2400), precise lithium abundances were obtained by spectral synthesis of the LiI 6707.8 A line and compared to stellar ages, masses, and metallicities determined from a spectroscopic analysis of the same set of HARPS spectra. We show that for the large majority of the solar twins there is a strong correlation between lithium abundance and stellar age. As the age increases from 1 to 9 Gyr, the Li abundance decreases by a factor of ~ 50. The relation agrees fairly well with predictions from non-standard stellar evolution models of Li destruction at the bottom of the upper convection zone. Two stars deviat...

  12. New Radial Abundance Gradients for NGC 628 and NGC 2403

    Berg, Danielle A; Garnett, Donald R; Croxall, Kevin V; Marble, Andrew R; Smith, J D; Gordon, Karl; Kennicutt, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Motived by recent ISM studies, we present high quality MMT and Gemini spectroscopic observations of H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxies NGC 628 and NGC 2403 in order to measure their chemical abundance gradients. Using long-slit and multi-object mask optical spectroscopy, we obtained measurements of the temperature sensitive auroral lines [O III] {\\lambda}4363 and/or [N II] {\\lambda}5755 at a strength of 4{\\sigma} or greater in 11 H II regions in NGC 628 and 7 regions in NGC 2403. These observations allow us, for the first time, to derive an oxygen abundance gradient in NGC 628 based solely on "direct" oxygen abundances of H II regions: 12 + log(O/H) = (8.43+/-0.03) + (-0.017+/-0.002) x Rg (dex/kpc), with a dispersion in log(O/H) of {\\sigma} = 0.10 dex, from 14 regions with a radial coverage of ~2-19 kpc. This is a significantly shallower slope than found by previous "strong-line" abundance studies. In NGC 2403, we derive an oxygen abundance gradient of 12 + log(O/H) = (8.48+/-0.04) + (-0.032+/-0.007) ...

  13. Effect of disjunct size distributions on foraminiferal species abundance determinations

    Martin, R.E.; Liddell, W.D.

    1988-02-01

    Studies of foraminiferal distribution and abundance have typically employed a procedure (standard method) that entails counting approximately 300 specimens from a size range greater than some specified minimum (commonly 63 or 125 ..mu..m). This method fails to take into account that foraminifera may be found only within certain size fractions, either because of species specific size ranges or taphonomic processes (sorting, transport, abrasion). Use of a modified counting procedure (sieve method) takes into account foraminiferal size distributions. The sieve method uses counts of up to 300 specimens in each sand-size fraction (0.125-0.25, 0.25-0.5, 0.5-1, 1-2 mm) of each sample. Counts are then totaled for each sample (up to 1200 specimens per site) and used in determination of species abundances for each site. The sieve method has been of considerable utility in recognition of a foraminiferal bathymetric zonation preserved in sediment assemblages from fringing reef environments at Discovery Bay, north Jamaica. Well-documented reef zones (based on corals and physiography) are clearly defined in Q-mode cluster analysis (UPGMA) of species abundances determined using the sieve method. In contrast, individual fore reef zones are not recognized in cluster analysis of foraminiferal species abundances based on the standard method, nor by cluster analysis of species abundances within individual size fractions.

  14. Elemental abundances of intermediate age open cluster NGC 3680

    Mitschang, A W; Zucker, D B

    2012-01-01

    We present a new abundance analysis of the intermediate age Galactic open cluster NGC 3680, based on high resolution, high signal-to-noise VLT/UVES spectroscopic data. Several element abundances are presented for this cluster for the first time, but most notably we derive abundances for the light and heavy s-process elements Y, Ba, La, and Nd. The serendipitous measurement of the rare-earth r-process element Gd is also reported. This cluster exhibits a significant enhancement of Na in giants as compared to dwarfs, which may be a proxy for an O to Na anti-correlation as observed in Galactic globular clusters but not open clusters. We also observe a step-like enhancement of heavy s-process elements towards higher atomic number, contrary to expectations from AGB nucleosynthesis models, suggesting that the r-process played a significant role in the generation of both La and Nd in this cluster

  15. O, Na, Ba and Eu abundance patterns in open clusters

    MacLean, B T; Lattanzio, J

    2014-01-01

    Open clusters are historically regarded as single-aged stellar populations representative of star formation within the Galactic disk. Recent literature has questioned this view, based on discrepant Na abundances relative to the field, and concerns about the longevity of bound clusters contributing to a selection bias: perhaps long-lived open clusters are chemically different to the star formation events that contributed to the Galactic disk. We explore a large sample of high resolution Na, O, Ba & Eu abundances from the literature, homogenized as much as reasonable including accounting for NLTE effects, variations in analysis and choice of spectral lines. Compared to a template globular cluster and representative field stars, we find no significant abundance trends, confirming that the process producing the Na-O anti-correlation in globular clusters is not present in open clusters. Furthermore, previously reported Na-enhancement of open clusters is found to be an artefact of NLTE effects, with the open cl...

  16. La and Eu Abundances in Metal-poor Halo Stars

    Cardillo, Harrison; Burris, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Elements with atomic number greater than Z=26 (the Iron Peak) cannot be formed through fusion in a star's core; the majority of these elements are produced through one of two neutron-capture processes. Early in the history of the Galaxy, the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is believed to be responsible for the production of elements Z=56 and beyond. These elements require at least one generation of stars to have completed their life cycle in order to be synthesized. Therefore, if we observe the heavy metal abundances in what are called Population II stars (metal-poor stars), then we can begin to make inferences about the chemistry of the earliest stars in the Galaxy. To contribute to this picture of the early universe, the Lanthanum and Europium abundances of low-metallicity stars will be measured and trends in these abundances based on comparisons to existing related literature will be sought.

  17. The abundant world: Paul Feyerabend's metaphysics of science.

    Brown, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide an interpretation of Feyerabend's metaphysics of science as found in late works like Conquest of Abundance and Tyranny of Science. Feyerabend's late metaphysics consists of an attempt to criticize and provide a systematic alternative to traditional scientific realism, a package of views he sometimes referred to as "scientific materialism." Scientific materialism is objectionable not only on metaphysical grounds, nor because it provides a poor ground for understanding science, but because it implies problematic claims about the epistemic and cultural authority of science, claims incompatible with situating science properly in democratic societies. I show how Feyerabend's metaphysical view, which I call "the abundant world" or "abundant realism," constitute a sophisticated and challenging form of ontological pluralism that makes interesting connections with contemporary philosophy of science and issues of the political and policy role of science in a democratic society. PMID:27269274

  18. Ammonia abundance in the coma of Halley's Comet

    Consideration is given to recent work by Allen et al. (1987) which suggests that the value of the ratio of the abundance of the atomic masses 19 to 18 observed in situ in the inner coma of Comet Halley is incompatible with a pure H2O nucleus and requires an NH3 abundance of 1-2 percent. The present authors discuss possible ways of explaining the radial profile of r = 19/18, which deemphasizes the presence of NH3. It is shown that the observed value of the 19/18 mass ratio in the inner coma does not necessarily imply the existence of a significant abundance of NH3. An elevated UV flux, for which there is circumstantial evidence, could produce the same effect. 21 references

  19. Element abundances in X-ray emitting plasmas in stars

    Testa, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Studies of element abundances in stars are of fundamental interest for their impact in a wide astrophysical context, from our understanding of galactic chemistry and its evolution, to their effect on models of stellar interiors, to the influence of the composition of material in young stellar environments on the planet formation process. We review recent results of studies of abundance properties of X-ray emitting plasmas in stars, ranging from the corona of the Sun and other solar-like stars, to pre-main sequence low-mass stars, and to early-type stars. We discuss the status of our understanding of abundance patterns in stellar X-ray plasmas, and recent advances made possible by accurate diagnostics now accessible thanks to the high resolution X-ray spectroscopy with Chandra and XMM-Newton.

  20. Resolving microbial membership using Abundance and Variability In Taxonomy ('AVIT ).

    Chakrabarti, Anirikh; Siddharth, Jay; Lauber, Christian L; Membrez, Mathieu; Betrisey, Bertrand; Loyer, Carole; Chou, Chieh Jason; Pataky, Zoltan; Golay, Alain; Parkinson, Scott J

    2016-01-01

    Development of NGS has revolutionized the analysis in microbial ecology contributing to our deeper understanding of microbiota in health and disease. However, the quality, quantity and confidence of summarized taxonomic abundances are in need of further scrutiny due to sample dependent and independent effects. In this article we introduce 'AVIT (Abundance and Variability In Taxonomy), an unbiased method to enrich for assigned members of microbial communities. As opposed to using a priori thresholds, 'AVIT uses inherent abundance and variability of taxa in a dataset to determine the inclusion or rejection of each taxa for further downstream analysis. Using in-vitro and in-vivo studies, we benchmarked performance and parameterized 'AVIT to establish a framework for investigating the dynamic range of microbial community membership in clinically relevant scenarios. PMID:27530237

  1. Revised element abundances for WC-type central stars

    Todt, H; Hamann, W -R

    2007-01-01

    According to previous spectral analyses of Wolf-Rayet type central stars, late [WC] subtypes show systematically higher carbon-to-helium abundance ratios than early [WC] subtypes. If this were true, it would rule out that these stars form an evolutionary sequence. However, due to the different parameter domains and diagnostic lines, one might suspect systematic errors being the source of this discrepancy. In an ongoing project we are therefore checking the [WC] analyses by means of the last generation of non-LTE models for expanding stellar atmospheres which account for line-blanketing and wind clumping. So far, the abundance discrepancy is not resolved. Further element abundances (H, N, Fe) are determined and compared with evolutionary predictions.

  2. Severe plant invasions can increase mycorrhizal fungal abundance and diversity

    Lekberg, Ylva; Gibbons, Sean; Rosendahl, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    )-but not cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum)-support a higher abundance and diversity of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) than multi-species native plant communities. The higher AMF richness associated with knapweed and spurge is unlikely due to a co-invasion by AMF, because a separate sampling showed...... that individual native forbs hosted a similar AMF abundance and richness as exotic forbs. Native grasses associated with fewer AMF taxa, which could explain the reduced AMF richness in native, grass-dominated communities. The three invasive plant species harbored distinct AMF communities, and analyses of co......-occurring native and invasive plants indicate that differences were partly driven by the invasive plants and were not the result of pre-invasion conditions. Our results suggest that invasions by mycotrophic plants that replace poorer hosts can increase AMF abundance and richness. The high AMF richness...

  3. Abundance-range size relationships in stream vegetation in Denmark

    Riis, Tenna; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2002-01-01

    thecultivated lowlands of Denmark, we examined the overall relationship betweenlocal abundance and geographical range size of the vascular flora. We found asignificant positive relationship for all species at all stream localities andan even stronger relationship for ecologically similar species...... streamhabitattypes of the same width and lengthwise locations in different stream systemsdidnot show a stronger positive relationship than the overall relationship. Thefewobligatory submerged species having a high local abundance and low range sizecould not be regarded as specialist species on narrowly distributed...... resources.Their occurrence is probably a temporal phenomenon due to the profound habitatdestruction during the last 100 years, restricting to a few localities thespecies that were previously widely distributed. Many species presently survivein a marginal position of low range size and low local abundance...

  4. Diversity is maintained by seasonal variation in species abundance

    2013-01-01

    Background Some of the most marked temporal fluctuations in species abundances are linked to seasons. In theory, multispecies assemblages can persist if species use shared resources at different times, thereby minimizing interspecific competition. However, there is scant empirical evidence supporting these predictions and, to the best of our knowledge, seasonal variation has never been explored in the context of fluctuation-mediated coexistence. Results Using an exceptionally well-documented estuarine fish assemblage, sampled monthly for over 30 years, we show that temporal shifts in species abundances underpin species coexistence. Species fall into distinct seasonal groups, within which spatial resource use is more heterogeneous than would be expected by chance at those times when competition for food is most intense. We also detect seasonal variation in the richness and evenness of the community, again linked to shifts in resource availability. Conclusions These results reveal that spatiotemporal shifts in community composition minimize competitive interactions and help stabilize total abundance. PMID:24007204

  5. Relative species abundance of replicator dynamics with sparse interactions

    Obuchi, Tomoyuki; Tokita, Kei

    2016-01-01

    A theory of relative species abundance on sparsely-connected networks is presented by investigating the replicator dynamics with symmetric interactions. Sparseness of a network involves difficulty in analyzing the fixed points of the equation, and we avoid this problem by treating large self interaction $u$, which allows us to construct a perturbative expansion. Based on this perturbation, we find that the nature of the interactions is directly connected to the abundance distribution, and some characteristic behaviors, such as multiple peaks in the abundance distribution and all species coexistence at moderate values of $u$, are discovered in a wide class of the distribution of the interactions. The all species coexistence collapses at a critical value of $u$, $u_c$, and this collapsing is regarded as a phase transition. To get more quantitative information, we also construct a non-perturbative theory on random graphs based on techniques of statistical mechanics. The result shows those characteristic behavior...

  6. Oxygen Abundance Methods in SDSS: View from Modern Statistics

    Fei Shi; Gang Zhao; James Wicker

    2010-09-01

    Our purpose is to find which is the most reliable one among various oxygen abundance determination methods. We will test the validity of several different oxygen abundance determination methods using methods of modern statistics. These methods include Bayesian analysis and information scoring. We will analyze a sample of ∼ 6000 HII galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic observations data release four. All methods that we used drew the same conclusion that the method is a more reliable oxygen abundance determination method than the Bayesian metallicity method under the existing telescope ability. The ratios of the likelihoods between the different kinds of methods tell us that the , , and 32 methods are consistent with each other because the and 32 methods are calibrated by method. The Bayesian and 23 methods are consistent with each other because both are calibrated by a galaxy model. In either case, the 2 method is an unreliable method.

  7. The effects of He I 10830 on helium abundance determinations

    Aver, Erik; Skillman, Evan D

    2015-01-01

    Observations of helium and hydrogen emission lines from metal-poor extragalactic H II regions provide an independent method for determining the primordial helium abundance, Y_p. Traditionally, the emission lines employed are in the visible wavelength range, and the number of suitable lines is limited. Furthermore, when using these lines, large systematic uncertainties in helium abundance determinations arise due to the degeneracy of physical parameters, such as temperature and density. Recently, Izotov, Thuan, & Guseva (2014) have pioneered adding the He 10830 infrared emission line in helium abundance determinations. The strong electron density dependence of He 10830 makes it ideal for better constraining density, potentially breaking the degeneracy with temperature. We revisit our analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, & Stasinska (2007) and incorporate the newly available observations of He 10830 by scaling them using the observed-to-theoretical Paschen-gamma ratio. The solutions are b...

  8. The Iron Abundance of IOTA Herculis From Ultraviolet Iron Lines

    Grigsby, J.; Mulliss, C.; Baer, G.

    1995-03-01

    We have obtained (Adelman 1992, 1993, private comunication) coadded, high-resolution IUE spectra of Iota Herculis (B3 IV) in both short wavelength (SWP) and long wavelength (LWP) regions. The spectra span the ultraviolet spectrum from 110 - 300 nm and have a SNR of roughly 30 -50; they are described in Adelman et. al. (1993, ApJ 419, 276). Abundance indicators were 54 lines of Fe II and 26 lines of Fe III whose atomic parameters have been measured in the laboratory. LTE synthetic spectra for comparison with observations were produced with the Kurucz model atmosphere and spectral synthesis codes ATLAS9/SYNTHE (Kurucz 1979, ApJS 40,1; Kurucz and Avrett 1981, SAO Special Report 391). Model parameters were chosen from the literature: effective temperature = 17500 K, log g =3.75, v sin i= 11 km/s, and turbulent velocity = 0 km/s. (Peters and Polidan 1985, in IAU Symposium 111, ed. D. S. Hayes et al. (Dordrecht: Reidel), 417). We determined the equivalent widths of the chosen lines by fitting gaussian profiles to the lines and by measuring the equivalent widths of the gaussians. We derived abundances by fitting a straight line to a plot of observed equivalent widths vs. synthetic equivalent widths; we adjusted the iron abundance of the models until a slope of unity was achieved. The abundances derived from the different ionization stages are in agreement: Fe II lines indicate an iron abundance that is 34 +15/-10% the solar value([Fe/H]=-0.47 +0.16-0.15dex), while from Fe III lines we obtain 34 +/- 10% ([Fe/H]=-0.47 +0.11/-0.15 dex). A search of the literature suggests that no previous investigations of this star's iron abundance have found agreement between the different ionization stages. We thank Saul Adelman for his generous assistance, and the Faculty Research Fund Board of Wittenberg University for support of this research.

  9. HD 209621: Abundances of neutron-capture elements

    Goswami, Aruna; Aoki, Wako

    2010-01-01

    High resolution spectra obtained from the Subaru Telescope High Dispersion Spectrograph have been used to update the stellar atmospheric parameters and metallicity of the star HD 209621. We have derived a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.93 for this star, and have found a large enhancement of carbon and of heavy elements, with respect to iron. Updates on the elemental abundances of four s-process elements (Y, Ce, Pr, Nd) along with the first estimates of abundances for a number of other heavy eleme...

  10. Suppressing the QCD axion abundance by hidden monopoles

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS; Takahashi, Fuminobu [Tokyo Univ., Miyagi (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS; Yamada, Masaki [Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS; DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    We study the Witten effect of hidden monopoles on the QCD axion dynamics, and show that its abundance as well as isocurvature perturbations can be significantly suppressed if there is a sufficient amount of hidden monopoles. When the hidden monopoles make up a significant fraction of dark matter, the Witten effect suppresses the abundance of axion with the decay constant smaller than 10{sup 12} GeV. The cosmological domain wall problem of the QCD axion can also be avoided, relaxing the upper bound on the decay constant when the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is spontaneously broken after inflation.

  11. How Does Abundant Display Space Support Data Analysis?

    Knudsen, Søren

    This thesis explores information visualizations on large, high-resolution touch displays for analysis of massive amounts of data. The ever increasing rate at which data is collected about everything from peoples’ health, over organisations expenditures, to scientific experiments, necessitates new...... data analysis techniques. Information visualizations on large, high-resolution touch displays is a promising answer to these needs, and provide abundant display space for people to make sense of data. However, little is known about how to tailor interactive visualizations to abundant display space or...

  12. Distribution and abundance of West Greenland humpback whales ( Megaptera novaeangliae )

    Larsen, Finn; Hammond, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    Photo-identification surveys of humpback whales Megaptera novaeangliae were conducted at West Greenland during 1988-93, the last 2 years of which were part of the internationally coordinated humpback whale research programme YoNAH, with the primary aim of estimating abundance for the West Greenland...... effort. A total of 670 groups of humpback whales was encountered leading to the identification of 348 individual animals. Three areas of concentration were identified: an area off Nuuk; an area at c. 63degrees30'N; and an area off Frederikshab. Sequential Petersen capture-recapture estimates of abundance...

  13. Species abundance patterns : the problem of testing stochastic models

    Bersier, Louis-Félix; Sugihara, George

    2009-01-01

    1. Tokeshi (1990) proposed a goodness-of-fit test to distinguish among a general class of stochastic species abundance models using field data. This test is a good first step, but it is impaired by some shortcomings: there is no adjustment for the number of species (the rejection rate increases with the number of species in a data set); the variance of the generated abundance distributions are not taken into account (data sets with higher variance than a model are not rejected). 2. We pro...

  14. Instruction manual for ORNL tandem high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer

    Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.; Chrisite, W.H.; Walker, R.L.; Carter, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    This manual describes the physical characteristics of the tandem mass spectrometer built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the International Atomic Energy Agency. Specific requirements met include ability to run small samples, high abundance sensitivity, good precision and accuracy, and adequate sample throughput. The instrument is capable of running uranium samples as small as 10/sup -12/ g and has an abundance sensitivity in excess of 10/sup 6/. Precision and accuracy are enhanced by a special sweep control circuit. Sample throughput is 6 to 12 samples per day. Operating instructions are also given.

  15. Asteroseismic estimate of helium abundance of 16 Cyg A, B

    Verma Kuldeep

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The helium ionization zone in a star leaves a characteristic signature on its oscillation frequencies, which can be used to estimate the helium content in the envelope of the star. We use the oscillation frequencies of 16 Cyg A and B, obtained using 2.5 years of Kepler data, to estimate the envelope helium abundance of these stars. We find the envelope helium abundance to lie in the range 0.231–0.251 for 16 Cyg A and 0.218–0.266 for 16 Cyg B.

  16. Factors affecting Culicoides species composition and abundance in avian nests

    Martínez de la Puente, Josué; Merino, Santiago; Tomás, Gustavo; Morales, Judith; Lobato, Elisa; Talavera, Salvador; Sarto i Monteys, V.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms affecting patterns of vector distribution among host individuals may influence the population and evol- utionary dynamics of vectors, hosts and the parasites transmitted. We studied the role of different factors affecting the species composition and abundance of Culicoides found in nests of the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). We identified 1531 females and 2 males of 7 different Culicoides species in nests, with C. simulator being the most abundant species, followed by C. kibunensis, ...

  17. Boom in boarfish abundance: insight from otolith analysis

    Coad, Julie Olivia; Hüssy, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The boarfish Capros aper is a pelagic shoaling species widely distributed along the Northeast Atlantic continental shelf. In recent years, this species has experienced a dramatic boom in abundance in the Bay of Biscay and Celtic Sea. This study aims at resolving the mechanisms responsible...... was not correlated with growth in the same year. However, year‐class strength was significantly correlated with adult growth the previous year, together with temperature during the months following spawning. The age structure shows that this species is very long lived (>30 years), but that a considerable proportion...... abundance...

  18. Bulk eutectic Cu–Ag alloys with abundant twin boundaries

    Abundant growth twin boundaries are found and characterized in two bulk eutectic Cu–Ag alloys that can be obtained conveniently. The statistical electron backscattering diffraction results show that both hetero-twin and cube-on-cube orientation relationships coexist in the eutectic Cu–Ag alloy. The tensile strength of the eutectic alloy increases with a decrease in the layer thickness of the Cu/Ag phase. This study provides a potential way to produce bulk eutectic Cu–Ag alloy with abundant twin boundaries that offers a combination of high strength and high ductility.

  19. Metal-abundance determinations from near-UV spectra - application to the mean metal abundance of M32

    Near-UV spectra for the nucleus of the elliptical galaxy M32 and for 60 field stars have been obtained which cover the wavelength interval 3200-3900 A at a resolution of 2.5 A FWHM. A depression in the pseudocontinuum shortward of 3504 A is found to be quite sensitive to metal abundance. The results indicate that the luminosity-weighted mean metal Fe/H abundance ratio for M32 at 3500 A is about -0.1, and that the giant branch contributes slightly less than 30 percent of the light at 4000 A. The luminosity-weighted N/Fe abundance ratio is shown to be approximately equal to that of solar neighborhood stars. 40 references

  20. Morphological change in Newfoundland caribou: Effects of abundance and climate

    Shane P. Mahoney

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The demographic and environmental influences on large mammal morphology are central questions in ecology. We investigated the effects of population abundance and climate on body size and number of male antler points for the La Poile and Middle Ridge caribou (Rangifer tarandus, L. 1758 herds, Newfoundland, Canada. Across 40 years and 20-fold changes in abundance, adult males and females exhibited diminished stature as indicated by jawbone size (diastema and total mandible length and the number of antler points at the time of harvest. Associations between jawbone size and population abundance at birth were consistently negative for both herds, both sexes, and all age classes. Large-scale climate patterns, as measured by the North Atlantic Oscillation in the winter prior to birth, were also negatively associated with jawbone size. Declines in male antler size, as measured by the number of antler points, were not well predicted by either abundance or climate, suggesting other factors (e.g., current, rather than latent, foraging conditions may be involved. We conclude that these morphological changes indicate competition for food resources.

  1. Abundance analysis of s-process enhanced barium stars

    Mahanta, Upakul; Karinkuzhi, Drisya; Goswami, Aruna; Duorah, Kalpana

    2016-08-01

    Detailed chemical composition studies of stars with enhanced abundances of neutron-capture elements can provide observational constraints for neutron-capture nucleosynthesis studies and clues for understanding their contribution to the Galactic chemical enrichment. We present abundance results from high-resolution spectral analyses of a sample of four chemically peculiar stars characterized by s-process enhancement. High-Resolution spectra (R ˜42000) of these objects spanning a wavelength range from 4000 to 6800 Å, are taken from the ELODIE archive. We have estimated the stellar atmospheric parameters, the effective temperature Teff, the surface gravity log g, and metallicity [Fe/H] from local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis using model atmospheres. We report estimates of elemental abundances for several neutron-capture elements, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Dy. While HD 49641 and HD 58368 show [Ba/Fe] ≥ 1.16 the other two objects HD 119650 and HD 191010 are found to be mild barium stars with [Ba/Fe] ˜ 0.4. The derived abundances of the elements are interpreted on the basis of existing theories for understanding their origin and evolution.

  2. Abundance of eukaryotic microbes in the deep subtropical North Atlantic

    Morgan-Smith, D.; Herndl, G.J.; van Aken, H.M.; Bochdansky, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    The meso- and bathypelagic ocean comprises the largest habitat on earth, yet we know very little about the distribution and activity of protists in this environment. These small eukaryotes are responsible for controlling bacterial abundance in the surface ocean and are major players in the material

  3. Coronae of Stars with Super Solar Elemental Abundances

    Peretz, Uria; Drake, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the First Ionization Potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with super-solar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, $\\iota$ Hor, HR 7291, $\\tau$ Boo, and $\\alpha$ Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances measured in this paper are obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra on board the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and $\\tau$ Boo no FIP effect is present, while $\\iota$ H...

  4. Monitoring the abundance of plastic debris in the marine environment

    Ryan, P.G.; Moore, C.J. C.J.; Franeker, van J.A.; Moloney, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Plastic debris has significant environmental and economic impacts in marine systems. Monitoring is crucial to assess the efficacy of measures implemented to reduce the abundance of plastic debris, but it is complicated by large spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the amounts of plastic debris and

  5. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and the Observed Abundances of Light Elements

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1996-01-01

    The predictions of Standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis are summarized and compared with observations of abundances of helium in HII regions, deuterium in quasar absorbers, deuterium and helium-3 in the Galaxy, and lithium in metal-poor stars. It is concluded that the prospects are good for a precise test of the theory.

  6. Generating potassium abundance variations in the Solar Nebula

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    An intriguing aspect of chondritic meteorites is that they are complementary: while their separate components have wildly varying abundances, bulk chondrites have nearly solar composition. This implies that the nearly-solar reservoirs in which chondrites were born were in turn assembled from sub-reservoirs of differing compositions that birthed the different components. We focus on explaining the potassium abundance variations between chondrules even within a single chondrite, while maintaining the observed CI 41K to 39K ratios. This requires physically separating potassium and chondrules while the temperature is high enough for K to be in the gas phase. We examine several mechanisms which could drive the dust through gas and show that to do so locally would have required long (sub-orbital to many orbits) time scales; with shortest potassium depletion time scales occurring in a scenario where chondrules formed high above the midplane and settled out of the evaporated potassium. While orbital time scales are at odds with laboratory chondrule cooling rate estimates, any other model for the origin for the potassium abundance variation has to wrestle with the severe logistical difficulty of generating a plethora of correlated reservoirs which varied strongly in their potassium abundances, but not in their potassium isotope ratios.

  7. Asteroseismic determination of helium abundance in stellar envelopes

    Basu, S; Antia, H M; Demarque, P; Basu, Sarbani; Mazumdar, Anwesh; Demarque, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Intermediate degree modes of the solar oscillations have previously been used to determine the solar helium abundance to a high degree of precision. However, we cannot expect to observe such modes in other stars. In this work we investigate whether low degree modes that should be available from space-based asteroseismology missions can be used to determine the helium abundance, Y, in stellar envelopes with sufficient precision. We find that the oscillatory signal in the frequencies caused by the depression in \\Gamma_1 in the second helium ionisation zone can be used to determine the envelope helium abundance of low mass main sequence stars. For frequency errors of 1 part in 10^4, we expect errors \\sigma_Y in the estimated helium abundance to range from 0.03 for 0.8M_sun stars to 0.01 for 1.2M_sun stars. The task is more complicated in evolved stars, such as subgiants, but is still feasible if the relative errors in the frequencies are less than 10^{-4}.

  8. Direct Oxygen Abundances for Low Luminosity LVL Galaxies

    Berg, Danielle A; Marble, Andrew R; van Zee, Liese; Engelbracht, Charles W; Lee, Janice C; Kennicutt, Robert C; Jr.,; Calzetti, Daniela; Dale, Daniel A; Johnson, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    We present MMT spectroscopic observations of HII regions in 42 low luminosity galaxies in the LVL. For 31 galaxies, we measured the temperature sensitive [O III] line at a strength of 4 sigma or greater, and thus determine direct oxygen abundances. Our results provide the first direct estimates of oxygen abundance for 19 galaxies. Oxygen abundances were compared to B-band and 4.5 micron luminosities and stellar masses in order to characterize the luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) and mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationships at low-luminosity. We present and analyze a "Combined Select" sample composed of 38 objects (drawn from our parent sample and the literature) with direct oxygen abundances and reliable distance determinations (TRGB or Ceph). Consistent with previous studies, the B-band and 4.5 micron L-Z relationships were found to be 12+log(O/H)=(6.27+/-0.21)+(-0.11+/-0.01)M_B and 12+log(O/H)=(6.10+/-0.21)+(-0.10+/-0.01)M_[4.5] (sigma=0.15 and 0.14). For this sample, we derive a M-Z relationship of 12+log(O/H)=(5....

  9. Chemical Constraints on the Oxygen Abundances in Jupiter and Saturn

    Wang, Dong

    2012-01-01

    We perform a comparative analysis of the chemical kinetics of CO and $\\rm PH_3$ in Jupiter and Saturn to assess the full set of constraints available on the troposphere water abundance in the two giant planets. For carbon monoxide we employ both a widely used CO kinetic scheme from Yung et al, and a newly identified CO chemical scheme from Visscher and Moses. For $\\rm PH_3$ chemical scheme, we use the same chemical scheme as in Visscher and Fegley. Yung's chemical scheme for CO yields a water enrichment of 0.95 - 23.0 times solar abundance on Jupiter, and an upper limit of 14.0 for Saturn. Visscher's chemical scheme in contrast produces a water enrichment of 0.24 - 2.6 times solar abundance in Jupiter, and for Saturn an upper limit for water enrichment of 8.0. From this scheme, which takes advantage of the most up-to-date kinetics, we preclude high water enrichments on Jupiter and Saturn, and show that the kinetics approach yields Jovian bulk abundance in which values of C/O elevated relative to solar are adm...

  10. High abundances of cyanomyoviruses in marine ecosystems demonstrate ecological relevance.

    Matteson, Audrey R; Rowe, Janet M; Ponsero, Alise J; Pimentel, Tiana M; Boyd, Philip W; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2013-05-01

    The distribution of cyanomyoviruses was estimated using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) approach that targeted the g20 gene as a proxy for phage. Samples were collected spatially during a > 3000 km transect through the Sargasso Sea and temporally during a gyre-constrained phytoplankton bloom within the southern Pacific Ocean. Cyanomyovirus abundances were lower in the Sargasso Sea than in the southern Pacific Ocean, ranging from 2.75 × 10(3) to 5.15 × 10(4) mL(-1) and correlating with the abundance of their potential hosts (Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus). Cyanomyovirus abundance in the southern Pacific Ocean (east of New Zealand) followed Synechococcus host populations in the system: this included a decrease in g20 gene copies (from 4.3 × 10(5) to 9.6 × 10(3) mL(-1) ) following the demise of a Synechococcus bloom. When compared with direct counts of viruses, observations suggest that the cyanomyoviruses comprised 0.5 to >25% of the total virus community. We estimated daily lysis rates of 0.2-46% of the standing stock of Synechococcus in the Pacific Ocean compared with c. Sargasso Sea. In total, our observations confirm this family of viruses is abundant in marine systems and that they are an important source of cyanobacterial mortality. PMID:23240688

  11. The abundance of (not just) dark matter haloes

    Sawala, Till; Crain, Robert A; Jenkins, Adrian; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Zavala, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect of baryons on the abundance of structures and substructures in a Lambda-CDM cosmology, using a pair of high resolution cosmological simulations from the GIMIC project. Both simulations use identical initial conditions, but while one contains only dark matter, the other also includes baryons. We find that gas pressure, reionisation, supernova feedback, stripping, and truncated accretion systematically reduce the total mass and the abundance of structures below ~10^12 solar masses compared to the pure dark matter simulation. Taking this into account and adopting an appropriate detection threshold lowers the abundance of observed galaxies with maximum circular velocities below 100 km/s, significantly reducing the reported discrepancy between Lambda-CDM and the measured HI velocity function of the ALFALFA survey. We also show that the stellar-to-total mass ratios of galaxies with stellar masses of ~10^5 - 10^7 solar masses inferred from abundance matching of the (sub)halo mass function to the ...

  12. Variation of the subhalo abundance in dark matter halos

    Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Makino, Junichiro

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed the statistics of subhalo abundance of galaxy-sized and giant-galaxy-sized halos formed in a high-resolution cosmological simulation of a 46.5Mpc cube with the uniform mass resolution of $10^6 M_{\\odot}$. We analyzed all halos with mass more than $1.5 \\times 10^{12}M_{\\odot}$ formed in this simulation box. The total number of halos was 125. We found that the subhalo abundance, measured by the number of subhalos with maximum rotation velocity larger than 10% of that of the parent halo, shows large halo-to-halo variations. The results of recent ultra-high-resolution runs fall within the variation of our samples. We found that the concentration parameter and the radius at the moment of the maximum expansion shows fairly tight correlation with the subhalo abundance. This correlation suggests that the variation of the subhalo abundance is at least partly due to the difference in the formation history. Halos formed earlier have smaller number of subhalos at present.

  13. Oxygen abundances and the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies

    Tosi., M; Angeles I. Díaz

    1983-01-01

    This is an electronic version of an article published in Memorie della Società Astronomica Italiana. Tosi, M. and A. I. Díaz. Oxygen abundances and the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies. Memorie della Società Astronomica Italiana 54, 4 (1983): 889-890

  14. Peudomonas fluorescens diversity and abundance in the rhizosphere

    Amina, Melinai; Ahmed, Bensoltane; Khaladi, Mederbel

    2010-05-01

    It is now over 30 years since that a several plant associated strains of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. are known to produce antimicrobial metabolites, playing a significant role in the biological control of a lot of plant diseases. For that, the interest in the use of these bacteria for biocontrol of plant pathogenic agents has increased. However, few comprehensive studies have described the abundance of this soil borne bacteria in the region of Mascara (Northern-Algerian West). In the connection of this problem, this work was done by monitoring the number of indigenous Pseudomonas fluorescens organisms in three stations characterizing different ecosystems, to document their abundance, diversity and investigate the relationship between P. fluorescens abundance and soil properties. Our quantitative plate counting results hence the conception of their ecology in the rhizosphere. Thus, quantitative results has confirmed that P. fluorescens are successful root colonizers with strong predominance and competed for many ecological niche, where their distribution were correlated significantly (P<0.05) with the majority of soil properties. Keywords: P. Fluorescens, Ecosystems, Abundance, Diversity, Correlated, Soil Properties.

  15. Nepenthes diversity and abundance in five habitats in Brunei Darussalam

    Nurul Amal Latiff

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Nepenthes is known to be diverse in Bornean forests and has been   recorded in Brunei Darussalam in various forest types. We aim to investigate variation in Nepenthes species richness and abundance at five forest types throughout Brunei Darussalam: open secondary, heath, peat swamp, white sand and mixed dipterocarp forests. A total of thirty-nine 5 × 5 m2 plots were set up in these forest types. Within each plot,     Nepenthes species abundance was quantified, with Nepenthes voucher specimens collected and identified to determine species richness. No significant differences were detected either for Nepenthes species richness or abundance between the five forest types, despite records of Nepenthes in Brunei showing preferences for particular habitat types. We     suggest that average species richness and abundance remained constant regardless of forest types in this study, but that these results would likely change if sampling intensity is increased in future studies. 

  16. Abundances of 30 elements in 23 metal-poor stars

    Johnson, J A

    2002-01-01

    We report the abundances of 30 elements in 23 metal-poor ([Fe/H] 0.10 dex, the relative abundances, especially between closely allied atoms such as the rare earth group, often show only small (<0.03 dex) changes. We found that some strong lines of FeI, MnI and CrI consistently gave lower abundances by ~0.2 dex, a number larger than the quoted errors in the gf values. After considering a model with depth-dependent microturbulent velocity and a model with hotter temperatures in the upper layers, we conclude that the latter did a better job of resolving the problem and agreeing with observational evidence for the structure of stars. The error analysis includes the effects of correlation of Teff, log g, and microturbulent velocity errors, which is crucial for certain element ratios, such as [Mg/Fe]. The abundances presented here are being analyzed and discussed in a separate series of papers.

  17. The abundance and isotopic composition of water in eucrites

    Barrett, T. J.; Barnes, J. J.; TartèSe, R.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Greenwood, R. C.; Charlier, B. L. A.; Grady, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Volatile elements play a key role in the dynamics of planetary evolution. Extensive work has been carried out to determine the abundance, distribution, and source(s) of volatiles in planetary bodies such as the Earth, Moon, and Mars. A recent study showed that the water in apatite from eucrites has similar hydrogen isotopic compositions compared to water in terrestrial rocks and carbonaceous chondrites, suggesting that water accreted very early in the inner solar system given the ancient crystallization ages (~4.5 Ga) of eucrites. Here, the measurements of water (reported as equivalent H2O abundances) and the hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of apatite from five basaltic eucrites and one cumulate eucrite are reported. Apatite H2O abundances range from ~30 to ~3500 ppm and are associated with a weighted average δD value of -34 ± 67‰. No systematic variations or correlations are observed in H2O abundance or δD value with eucrite geochemical trend or metamorphic grade. These results extend the range of previously published hydrogen isotope data for eucrites and confirm the striking homogeneity in the H-isotopic composition of water in eucrites, which is consistent with a common source for water in the inner solar system.

  18. Dilaton could affect abundance of dark matter particles

    2007-01-01

    "The amount of dark matter left over from the early universe may be less than previously believed. new research shows that the "relic abundance" of stable dark matter particles such as the neutralino may be reduced as compared to standard cosmology theories due to the effects of the "dilaton", a particle with zero spin in the gravitational sector of strings." (1 page)

  19. Lithium abundance in a sample of solar-like stars

    López-Valdivia, R.; Hernández-Águila, J. B.; Bertone, E.; Chávez, M.; Cruz-Saenz de Miera, F.; Amazo-Gómez, E. M.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the determination of the lithium abundance [A(Li)] of 52 solar-like stars. For 41 objects the A(Li) here presented corresponds to the first measurement. We have measured the equivalent widths of the 6708 Å lithium feature in high-resolution spectroscopic images (R ˜ 80 000), obtained at the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro (Sonora, Mexico), as part of the first scientific observations of the revitalized Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) Echelle Spectrograph, now known as the Cananea High-resolution Spectrograph (CanHiS). Lithium abundances were derived with the Fortran code MOOG, using as fundamental input a set of atmospheric parameters recently obtained by our group. With the help of an additional small sample with previous A(Li) determinations, we demonstrate that our lithium abundances are in agreement, to within uncertainties, with other works. Two target objects stand out from the rest of the sample. The star BD+47 3218 (Teff = 6050 ± 52 K, A(Li) = 1.86 ± 0.07 dex) lies inside the so-called lithium desert in the A(Li)-Teff plane. The other object, BD+28 4515, has an A(Li) = 3.05 ± 0.07 dex, which is the highest of our sample and compatible with the expected abundances of relatively young stars.

  20. Invasive lionfish reduce native fish abundance on a regional scale.

    Ballew, Nicholas G; Bacheler, Nathan M; Kellison, G Todd; Schueller, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lionfish pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity and fisheries throughout Atlantic waters off of the southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we employ a spatially replicated Before-After-Control-Impact analysis with temporal pairing to quantify for the first time the impact of the lionfish invasion on native fish abundance across a broad regional scale and over the entire duration of the lionfish invasion (1990-2014). Our results suggest that 1) lionfish-impacted areas off of the southeastern United States are most prevalent off-shore near the continental shelf-break but are also common near-shore and 2) in impacted areas, lionfish have reduced tomtate (a native forage fish) abundance by 45% since the invasion began. Tomtate served as a model native fish species in our analysis, and as such, it is likely that the lionfish invasion has had similar impacts on other species, some of which may be of economic importance. Barring the development of a control strategy that reverses the lionfish invasion, the abundance of lionfish in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico will likely remain at or above current levels. Consequently, the effect of lionfish on native fish abundance will likely continue for the foreseeable future. PMID:27578096

  1. Light element abundances, galactic evolution, and the universal baryon density

    The present mean universal mean baryon density, rho/sub b/, is of particular interest because, in Friedmann cosmologies with no cosmological constant, it is this quantity together with the Hubble constant, H/sub o/, which determines the spatial curvature of the universe, i.e., whether it is open or closed. The most stringent upper limit to rho/sub b/ so far established comes from the present deuterium abundance. This paper proposes an alternative method to evaluate the range of permissible values of rho/sub b/. The method considers the abundance of both D and 7Li. By utilizing the abundance ratio of 7Li to D, the difficulty associated with the astration process can be essentially canceled from the problem. Further, this method is slightly more sensitive to rho/sub b/ than the method which uses the D abundance alone. The ratio of 7Li to D mass fractions is plotted as a function of the present baryon density for a background temperature of 2.80K. Results are tabulated; they indicate that rho/sub b/ is too small to close the universe by a factor of the order of 5. 1 figure, 1 table

  2. Lithium abundances in high- and low-alpha halo stars

    Nissen, P. E.; Schuster, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    ``high-alpha '' stars were formed in situ in the inner parts of the Galaxy, whereas the ``low-alpha '' ones have been accreted from satellite galaxies. In order to see if there is any systematic difference in the lithium abundances of high- and low-alpha stars, equivalent widths of the iLi 6707.8 Å line...... have been measured from VLT/UVES and NOT/FIES spectra and used to derive Li abundances. Furthermore, stellar masses are determined from evolutionary tracks in the log T_eff - log g diagram. For stars with masses 0.7 < M/M☉ < 0.9 and heavy-element fractions 0.001 ⪉ Z < 0.006, the lithium abundance is...... high- and low-alpha stars agrees well, which underlines the universality of the origin of lithium. We suggest that these old halo stars were formed with a lithium abundance close to the primordial value, and that lithium in their atmospheres has been depleted in timea with an approximately linear...

  3. Lead abundance in the uranium star CS 31082-001

    Plez, B; Cayrel, R; Spite, M; Barbuy, B; Beers, T C; Bonifacio, P; Primas, F; Nordström, B

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper we were able to measure the abundance of uranium and thorium in the very-metal poor halo giant BPS CS 31082-001, but only obtained an upper limit for the abundance of lead (Pb). We have got from ESO 17 hours of additional exposure on this star in order to secure a detection of the minimum amount of lead expected to be present in CS 31082-001, the amount arising from the decay of the original content of Th and U in the star. We report here this successful detection. We find an LTE abundance log(Pb/H)+12=-0.55 \\pm 0.15 dex, one dex below the upper limits given by other authors for the similar stars CS 22892-052 and BD +17d3248, also enhanced in r-process elements. From the observed present abundances of Th and U in the star, the expected amount of Pb produced by the decay of 232Th, and 238U alone, over 12-15 Gyr is -0.73\\pm 0.17 dex. The decay of 235U is more difficult to estimate, but is probably slightly below the contribution of 238U, making the contribution of the 3 actinides only slight...

  4. Red Supergiants as Cosmic Abundance Probes: The Magellanic Clouds

    Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach; Plez, Bertrand; Bergemann, Maria; Evans, Chris; Patrick, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Red Supergiants (RSGs) are cool (~4000K), highly luminous stars (L - 10^5 Lsun), and are among the brightest near-infrared (NIR) sources in star-forming galaxies. This makes them powerful probes of the properties of their host galaxies, such as kinematics and chemical abundances. We have developed a technique whereby metallicities of RSGs may be extracted from a narrow spectral window around 1{\\mu}m from only moderate resolution data. The method is therefore extremely efficient, allowing stars at large distances to be studied, and so has tremendous potential for extragalactic abundance work. Here, we present an abundance study of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC respectively) using samples of 9-10 RSGs in each. We find average abundances for the two galaxies of [Z]LMC = -0.37 +/- 0.14 and [Z]SMC = -0.53 +/- 0.16 (with respect to a Solar metallicity of Zsun=0.012). These values are consistent with other studies of young stars in these galaxies, and though our result for the SMC may appear hig...

  5. The abundance and isotopic composition of water in eucrites

    Barrett, T. J.; Barnes, J. J.; TartèSe, R.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Greenwood, R. C.; Charlier, B. L. A.; Grady, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    Volatile elements play a key role in the dynamics of planetary evolution. Extensive work has been carried out to determine the abundance, distribution, and source(s) of volatiles in planetary bodies such as the Earth, Moon, and Mars. A recent study showed that the water in apatite from eucrites has similar hydrogen isotopic compositions compared to water in terrestrial rocks and carbonaceous chondrites, suggesting that water accreted very early in the inner solar system given the ancient crystallization ages (~4.5 Ga) of eucrites. Here, the measurements of water (reported as equivalent H2O abundances) and the hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of apatite from five basaltic eucrites and one cumulate eucrite are reported. Apatite H2O abundances range from ~30 to ~3500 ppm and are associated with a weighted average δD value of -34 ± 67‰. No systematic variations or correlations are observed in H2O abundance or δD value with eucrite geochemical trend or metamorphic grade. These results extend the range of previously published hydrogen isotope data for eucrites and confirm the striking homogeneity in the H-isotopic composition of water in eucrites, which is consistent with a common source for water in the inner solar system.

  6. High-resolution abundance analysis of HD 140283

    Siqueira-Mello, C; Barbuy, B; Spite, M; Spite, F; Korotin, S A

    2015-01-01

    HD 140283 is a reference subgiant that is metal poor and confirmed to be a very old star. The abundances of this type of old star can constrain the nature and nucleosynthesis processes that occurred in its (even older) progenitors. The present study may shed light on nucleosynthesis processes yielding heavy elements early in the Galaxy. A detailed abundance analysis of a high-quality spectrum is carried out, with the intent of providing a reference on stellar lines and abundances of a very old, metal-poor subgiant. We aim to derive abundances from most available and measurable spectral lines. The analysis is carried out using high-resolution (R = 81 000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (800 < S/N/pixel < 3400) spectrum, in the wavelength range 3700 - 10475, obtained with a seven-hour exposure time, using the ESPaDOnS at the CFHT. The calculations in LTE were performed with the OSMARCS 1D atmospheric model and the spectrum synthesis code Turbospectrum, while the analysis in NLTE is based on the MULTI code...

  7. "Capture" Me if You Can: Estimating Abundance of Dolphin Populations

    Thompson, Jessica; Curran, Mary Carla; Cox, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Animal populations are monitored over time to assess the effects of environmental disaster and disease, as well as the efficacy of laws designed to protect them. Determining the abundance of a species within a defined area is one method of monitoring a population. In "Capture" Me if You Can, middle school students will use data collected…

  8. Pastoral del Nino: Bringing the Abundant Life to Paraguayan Children

    Austin, Ann Berghout; Aquino, Cyle; Burro, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Pastoral del Nino is transforming children's lives in rural Paraguay. Part of Pastoral Social (Catholic Social Services), Pastoral del Nino's primary focus is to bring "vida en abundancia" (the abundant life) to families by ensuring that mothers survive childbirth and children reach their first birthdays. In addition, the organization promotes…

  9. Elemental Abundance Survey of The Galactic Thick Disk

    Reddy, B E; Allende-Prieto, C; Reddy, Bacham E.; Lambert, David L.; Prieto, Carlos Allende

    2006-01-01

    [Abridged abstract] We have performed an abundance analysis for 176 F- and G- dwarfs of the Galactic thick disk component. Using accurate radial velocities combined with $Hipparcos$ astrometry, kinematics (U, V, and W) and Galactic orbital parameters were computed. We estimate the probability for a star to belong to the thin disk, the thick disk or the halo. Abundances of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Ba, Ce, Nd, and Eu have been obtained. The abundances for thick disk stars are compared with those for thin disk members from Reddy et al. (2003). The ratios of $\\alpha$-elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca and Ti) to iron for thick disk disk stars show a clear enhancement compared to thin disk members in the range $-0.3 <$ [Fe/H] $ < -1.2$. There are also other elements -- Al, Sc, V, Co, and possibly Zn -- which show enhanced ratios to iron in the thick disk relative to the thin disk. The abundances of Na, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Cu (relative to Fe) are very similar for thin and thick dis...

  10. Generating potassium abundance variations in the Solar Nebula

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    An intriguing aspect of chondritic meteorites is that they are complementary: while their separate components have wildly varying abundances, bulk chondrites have nearly solar composition. This implies that the nearly solar reservoirs in which chondrites were born were in turn assembled from sub-reservoirs of differing compositions that birthed the different components. We focus on explaining the potassium abundance variations between chondrules even within a single chondrite, while maintaining the observed CI 41K to 39K ratios. This requires physically separating potassium and chondrules while the temperature is high enough for K to be in the gas phase. We examine several mechanisms which could drive the dust through gas and show that to do so locally would have required long (sub-orbital to many orbits) time scales; with shortest potassium depletion time-scales occurring in a scenario where chondrules formed high above the mid-plane and settled out of the evaporated potassium. While orbital time-scales are at odds with laboratory chondrule cooling rate estimates, any other model for the origin for the potassium abundance variation has to wrestle with the severe logistical difficulty of generating a plethora of correlated reservoirs which varied strongly in their potassium abundances, but not in their potassium isotope ratios.

  11. Chemical abundances of distant extremely metal-poor unevolved stars

    Bonifacio, P; Caffau, E; Ludwig, H -G; Spite, M; Hernández, J I González; Behara, N T

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of our study is to determine the chemical composition of a sample of 16 candidate Extremely Metal-Poor (EMP) dwarf stars, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). There are two main purposes: in the first place to verify the reliability of the metallicity estimates derived from the SDSS spectra; in the second place to see if the abundance trends found for the brighter nearer stars studied previously also hold for this sample of fainter, more distant stars. Methods: We used the UVES at the VLT to obtain high-resolution spectra of the programme stars. The abundances were determined by an automatic analysis with the MyGIsFOS code, with the exception of lithium, for which the abundances were determined from the measured equivalent widths of the Li I resonance doublet. Results: All candidates are confirmed to be EMP stars, with [Fe/H]<= -3.0. The chemical composition of the sample of stars is similar to that of brighter and nearer samples. We measured the lithium abundance for 12 st...

  12. Cross-scale interactions and the distribution-abundance relationship.

    Werner, Earl E; Davis, Christopher J; Skelly, David K; Relyea, Rick A; Benard, Michael F; McCauley, Shannon J

    2014-01-01

    Positive interspecific relationships between local abundance and extent of regional distribution are among the most ubiquitous patterns in ecology. Although multiple hypotheses have been proposed, the mechanisms underlying distribution-abundance (d-a) relationships remain poorly understood. We examined the intra- and interspecific distribution-abundance relationships for a metacommunity of 13 amphibian species sampled for 15 consecutive years. Mean density of larvae in occupied ponds was positively related to number of ponds occupied by species; employing the fraction of ponds uniquely available to each species this same relationship sharply decelerates. The latter relationship suggested that more abundant species inhabited most available habitats annually, whereas rarer species were dispersal limited. We inferred the mechanisms responsible for this pattern based on the dynamics of one species, Pseudacris triseriata, which transitioned between a rare, narrowly distributed species to a common, widely distributed species and then back again. Both transitions were presaged by marked changes in mean local densities driven by climatic effects on habitat quality. We identified threshold densities separating these population regime shifts that differed with landscape configuration. Our data suggest that these transitions were caused by strong cross-scale interactions between local resource/niche processes and larger scale metapopulation processes. The patterns we observed have relevance for understanding the mechanisms of interspecific d-a relationships and critical thresholds associated with habitat fragmentation. PMID:24875899

  13. The Origin of Element Abundance Variations in Solar Energetic Particles

    Reames, Donald V

    2016-01-01

    Abundance enhancements, during acceleration and transport in both gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events, vary approximately as power laws in the mass-to-charge ratio A/Q of the ions. Since the Q values depend upon the electron temperature of the source plasma, this has allowed a determination of this temperature from the pattern of element abundance enhancements and a verification of the expected inverse-time dependence of the power of A/Q for diffusive transport of ions from the SEP events, with scattering mean free paths found to be between 0.2 and 1 AU. SEP events derived from plasma of different temperatures map into different regions in typical cross-plots of abundances, spreading the distributions. In comparisons of SEP events with temperatures above 2 MK, impulsive events show much broader non-thermal variation of abundances than do gradual events. The extensive shock waves accelerating ions in gradual events may average over much of an active region where numerous but smaller mag...

  14. Asymptotic size determines species abundance in the marine size spectrum

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Beyer, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The majority of higher organisms in the marine environment display indeterminate growth; that is, they continue to grow throughout their life, limited by an asymptotic size. We derive the abundance of species as a function of their asymptotic size. The derivation is based on size-spectrum theory...

  15. Interaction of detritus with abundance of cyanobacteria and microalgae

    Gons, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    Detritus particles interact with phytoplankton growth through light attenuation and nutrient retention. A model is described for predicting abundance of cyanobacteria and microalgae in relation to the detritus dynamics in shallow lakes with varying phosphorus load. Steady-state P distribution among

  16. Latitudinal patterns in the abundance of major marine bacterioplankton groups

    Wietz, Matthias; Gram, Lone; Jørgensen, Bo; Schramm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the abundance of major marine bacterioplankton taxa and two bacterial genera (Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio) in surface seawater at 24 stations around the world. Catalyzed Reporter Deposition-Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) showed that Alphaproteobacteria (average...... relative abundance 37%, average absolute abundance 3.7×105 cells mL-1) including SAR11 (30%/3×105), Gammaproteobacteria (14%/1.2×105), and Bacteroidetes (12%/1.3×105) globally dominated the bacterioplankton. The SAR86 clade (4.6%/4.1×104) and Actinobacteria (4.5%/4×104) were detected ubiquitously, whereas...... Archaea were scarce (0.6%/4.2×103). The Roseobacter clade (averaging 3.8%/3.5×104), Pseudoalteromonas (2.6%/2.1×104), and Vibrio (1.5%/1.3×104) showed cosmopolitan occurrence. Principal Component Analysis revealed a latitudinal pattern in bacterial abundances by clustering samples according to lower and...

  17. On the Abundance of Holmium in the Sun

    Bord, D J; Bord, Donald J.; Cowley, Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    The abundance of holmium (Z = 67) in the Sun remains uncertain. The photospheric abundance, based on lines of Ho II, has been reported as +0.26 +/- 0.16 (on the usual scale where log(H) = 12.00), while the meteoretic value is +0.51 +/- 0.02. Cowan code calculations have been undertaken to improve the partition function for this ion by including important contributions from unobserved levels arising from the (4f^{11}6p + 4f^{10}(5d + 6s)^{2}) group. Based on 6994 computed energy levels, the partition function for Ho II is 67.41 for a temperature of 6000 K. This is approximately 1.5 times larger than the value derived from the 49 published levels. The new partition function alone leads to an increase in the solar abundance of Ho to log(Ho) = +0.43. This is within 0.08 dex of the meteoretic abundance. Support for this result has been obtained through LTE spectrum synthesis calculations of a previously unidentified weak line at 3416.38 A in the solar spectrum. Attributing the feature to Ho II, the observations ma...

  18. Relic abundance of mass-varying cold dark matter particles

    Rosenfeld, R.

    2005-01-01

    In models of coupled dark energy and dark matter the mass of the dark matter particle depends on the cosmological evolution of the dark energy field. In this note we exemplify in a simple model the effects of this mass variation on the relic abundance of cold dark matter.

  19. Oxygen abundance in coronal streamers during solar minimum

    D. Marocchi

    Full Text Available We present a study of the oxygen abundance relative to hydrogen in the equatorial streamer belt of the solar corona during the recent period of activity minimum. The oxygen abundance is derived from the spectroscopic observations of the outer corona performed during 1996 with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (SOHO in the ultra-violet region. This study shows that the depletion of oxygen, by almost one order of magnitude with respect to the photospheric values, found in the inner part of streamers by Raymond et al. (1997a is a common feature of the solar minimum streamer belt, which exhibits an abundance structure with the following characteristics. In the core of streamers the oxygen abundance is 1.3 × 10-4 at 1.5 R , then it drops to 0.8 × 10-4 at 1.7 R , value which remains almost constant out to 2.2 R . In the lateral bright structures that are ob-served to surround the core of streamers in the oxygen emission, the oxygen abundance drops monotonically with heliodistance, from 3.5 × 10-4 at 1.5 R to 2.2 × 10-4 at 2.2 R . The oxygen abundance structure found in the streamer belt is consistent with the model of magnetic topology of streamers proposed by Noci et al. (1997. The composition of the plasma contained in streamers is not the same as observed in the slow solar wind. Even in the lateral branches, richer in oxygen, at 2.2 R the abundance drops by a factor 2 with respect to the slow wind plasma observed with Ulysses during the declining phase of the solar cycle. Hence the slow wind does not appear to originate primarily from streamers, with the exception perhaps of the plasma flowing along the heliospheric current sheet.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (solar wind plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (corona and transition region; ultraviolet emissions

  20. Abundance modelling of invasive and indigenous Culicoides species in Spain

    Els Ducheyne

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a novel methodology applied in Spain to model spatial abundance patterns of potential vectors of disease at a medium spatial resolution of 5 x 5 km using a countrywide database with abundance data for five Culicoides species, random regression Forest modelling and a spatial dataset of ground measured and remotely sensed eco-climatic and environmental predictor variables. First the probability of occurrence was computed. In a second step a direct regression between the probability of occurrence and trap abundance was established to verify the linearity of the relationship. Finally the probability of occurrence was used in combination with the set of predictor variables to model abundance. In each case the variable importance of the predictors was used to biologically interpret results and to compare both model outputs, and model performance was assessed using four different accuracy measures. Results are shown for C. imicola, C. newsteadii, C. pulicaris group, C. punctatus and C. obsoletus group. In each case the probability of occurrence is a good predictor of abundance at the used spatial resolution of 5 x 5 km. In addition, the C. imicola and C. obsoletus group are highly driven by summer rainfall. The spatial pattern is inverse between the two species, indicating that the lower and upper thresholds are different. C. pulicaris group is mainly driven by temperature. The patterns for C. newsteadii and C. punctatus are less clear. It is concluded that the proposed methodology can be used as an input to transmission-infection-recovery (TIR models and R0 models. The methodology will become available to the general public as part of the VECMAPTM software.

  1. ZIRCONIUM, BARIUM, LANTHANUM, AND EUROPIUM ABUNDANCES IN OPEN CLUSTERS

    We present an analysis of the s-process elements Zr, Ba, and La and the r-process element Eu in a sample of 50 stars in 19 open clusters. Stellar abundances of each element are based on measures of a minimum of two lines per species via both equivalent width and spectrum synthesis techniques. We investigate cluster mean neutron-capture abundance trends as a function of cluster age and location in the Milky Way disk and compare them to results found in other studies in the literature. We find a statistically significant trend of increasing cluster [Ba/Fe] as a function of decreasing cluster age, in agreement with recent findings for other open cluster samples, supporting the increased importance of low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to the generation of s-process elements. However, the other s-process elements, [La/Fe] and [Zr/Fe], do not show similar dependences, in contrast to theoretical expectations and the limited observational data from other studies. Conversely, cluster [Eu/Fe] ratios show a slight increase with increasing cluster age, although with marginal statistical significance. Ratios of [s/r]-process abundances, [Ba/Eu] and [La/Eu], however, show more clearly the increasing efficiency of s-process relative to r-process enrichment in open cluster chemical evolution, with significant increases among younger clusters. Last, cluster neutron-capture element abundances appear to be independent of Galactocentric distance. We conclude that a homogeneous analysis of a larger sample of open clusters is needed to resolve the apparent discrepant conclusions between different studies regarding s-process element abundance trends with age to better inform models of galactic chemical evolution.

  2. Estimating abundance in the presence of species uncertainty

    Chambert, Thierry A; Hossack, Blake R.; Fishback, LeeAnn; Davenport, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    1.N-mixture models have become a popular method for estimating abundance of free-ranging animals that are not marked or identified individually. These models have been used on count data for single species that can be identified with certainty. However, co-occurring species often look similar during one or more life stages, making it difficult to assign species for all recorded captures. This uncertainty creates problems for estimating species-specific abundance and it can often limit life stages to which we can make inference. 2.We present a new extension of N-mixture models that accounts for species uncertainty. In addition to estimating site-specific abundances and detection probabilities, this model allows estimating probability of correct assignment of species identity. We implement this hierarchical model in a Bayesian framework and provide all code for running the model in BUGS-language programs. 3.We present an application of the model on count data from two sympatric freshwater fishes, the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans) and the ninespine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius), ad illustrate implementation of covariate effects (habitat characteristics). In addition, we used a simulation study to validate the model and illustrate potential sample size issues. We also compared, for both real and simulated data, estimates provided by our model to those obtained by a simple N-mixture model when captures of unknown species identification were discarded. In the latter case, abundance estimates appeared highly biased and very imprecise, while our new model provided unbiased estimates with higher precision. 4.This extension of the N-mixture model should be useful for a wide variety of studies and taxa, as species uncertainty is a common issue. It should notably help improve investigation of abundance and vital rate characteristics of organisms’ early life stages, which are sometimes more difficult to identify than adults.

  3. 尼罗罗非鱼仔鱼个体发育及性腺分化的发育%Ontogenetic Development and Gonadal Differentiation and Development of Larvae Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L. )

    陈兴汉; 刘晓春; 蒙子宁; 张勇; 林浩然; 叶卫

    2012-01-01

    通过形态学、组织学的描述和显微结构的观察,研究了尼罗罗非鱼(Oreochromis niloticus)仔鱼在自然水温条件下(26~30℃)的个体发育和性腺分化发育过程。结果表明,仔鱼个体发育分为2个时期,仔鱼前期(从出膜到卵黄囊消失)和仔鱼后期(卵黄囊消失至奇鳍褶消失);性腺发育分化的时序为:5DPH时,开始出现生殖嵴;10DPH时,出现少数原始生殖细胞,形成原始性腺;28DPH时,可清晰辨认卵原细胞,呈现明显的性腺分化组织学特征,至42DPH时可辨认精原细胞。%Larvae of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were observed morphologically, histologically and micro- structurally under the natural condition with the temperature ranging from 26℃ to 28℃ in terms of ontogenetic de- velopment and gonadal differentiation and development. Observations showed that the development of larvae Nile tilapia can be divided into two stages: early larval stage from hatching to the complete yolk-sac absorption, and late larval stage from the complete yolk-sac absorption to the appearance of odd fin fold. The sex differentiation oc- curs at around 28 days post hatching (DPH). The genital ridge, incomplete velum and enteron start to appear at 5 DPH. The primordial germ cells (PGCs) appear at 10 DPH although few, and form primordial gonad. The ooeytes can be easily distinguished at 28 DPH and show clear histological characteristics of gonadal differentiation. The spermatogonia can be distinguished at 42 DPH.

  4. Variación interpoblacional y ontogenética en la dieta de la rana llorona Physalaemus albonotatus (Anura: Leiuperidae Interpopulation and ontogenetic variation in the diet of the menwig frog Physalaemus albonotatus (Anura: Leiuperidae

    Diego Alejandro Falico

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se analizó y comparó el espectro trófico de 2 poblaciones de Physalaemus albonotatus que habitan en ecosistemas diferentes: a un terreno baldío urbano y b un área protegida del valle aluvial del río Paraná Medio. La dieta de Physalaemus albonotatus está compuesta fundamentalmente de hormigas, coleópteros, colémbolos e isópodos, pero con numerosas presas secundarias. Al comparar 3 grupos etarios de los individuos en cada población (adultos, subadultos y jóvenes se encontró una variación ontogenética relacionada con el volumen, cantidad y tipo de presa ingerida. Los anfibios adultos consumieron mayor cantidad de presas y más voluminosas, pero el nicho trófico de los jóvenes fue más amplio. Entre los adultos, la similitud de la dieta entre sexos fue muy elevada, aunque las hembras consumieron más hormigas que los machos. Si bien el solapamiento trófico entre las poblaciones fue elevado, la amplitud trófica resultó mayor en la población del humedal fluvial. Las diferencias en la alimentación encontradas entre las 2 poblaciones y lo registrado en otros trabajos realizados en diferentes ambientes reflejan la plasticidad trófica de este anuro, característica que le permite prosperar en hábitats diversos, incluso en los muy antropizados.We analyzed and compared the feeding of 2 populations of Physalaemus albonotatus inhabiting different ecosystems: a an urban vacant lot, and b a protected area of Middle Paraná River floodplain. The diet of Physalaemus albonotatus is mainly composed by ants, beetles, springtails and woodlouses, but also included several secondary preys. While comparing adults, subadults and juveniles diet on each population, we found an ontogenetic diet variation related to changes in prey type and volume as well as in number of prey items per gut. Bigger frogs consumed a greater amount of prey and more voluminous arthropods, while juveniles had a larger trophic niche breadth. Despite the great similarity in

  5. Comparación ontogénica de la frecuencia de muda en Rhinella marina (Anura, Bufonidae Ontogenetic comparison of the molting frequency in Rhinella marina (Anura: Bufonidae

    Teófila M. Triana

    2013-03-01

    hours (Chi-square, χ2=7.891, p=0.019, particularly in the two groups of juveniles, who moulted mostly at night, as adults did not show any clear difference. It is possible that the highest molting frequency in juveniles may be related to their ontogenetic status, with a smaller size and higher metabolic and developmental rate.

  6. METHODS IN GEOMETRIC MORPHOMETRICS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS IN ONTOGENETIC AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OF ANIMALS%几何形态学方法及其在动物发育与系统进化研究中的应用

    葛德燕; 夏霖; 吕雪霏; 黄乘明; 杨奇森; 黄建华

    2012-01-01

    简要回顾了几何形态学的发展历史,介绍了30多年来该领域使用的主要方法及其在生物发育与进化研究中的实际应用.除目前应用最为广泛的标点法和轮廓线法外,基于三维数据的表面特征分析和有限元分析也在该领域得到推广.这些方法可运用于分析两性分化、异速生长、种群分化、种上进化以及复杂功能结构的形态集成等科学问题.几何形态学与生物信息学的综合运用还将有利于探讨表型变化与遗传物质变化的相关性.随着生物成像技术和海量数据计算技术的进步,几何形态学将由目前以二维数据为主的研究向三维重建和分析的方向发展.%Geometric morphometrics has been recognized as one of the most important tools in Biology. Investigations referring to the ontogeny and evolution of several animal groups have been fascinated by development of new theories and methods in ths field, while those theories and methods are poorly known to China so far. Here, we give a brief introduction on the methodologies proposed in the last thirty years, and the application of geometric morphometrics in studying on the development and evolution of animals. The most frequendy used methods are landmarks, outlines, while surface analysis and finite element analysis have been proposed based on 3-dimentional data in the last decade. The ontogenetic, intraspecific, interspecific shape variation and the morphological integration of complex structure could be investigated by geometric morphometrics. Combining geometric morphometrics with bioinformatics probably will promote a better understanding on the ontogeny and evolution of different animals. With the development of technologies in biological imaging and mass data processing, the 3-D geometric analysis probably will replace the 2 D dominated methods.

  7. Measuring β-diversity with species abundance data.

    Barwell, Louise J; Isaac, Nick J B; Kunin, William E

    2015-07-01

    In 2003, 24 presence-absence β-diversity metrics were reviewed and a number of trade-offs and redundancies identified. We present a parallel investigation into the performance of abundance-based metrics of β-diversity. β-diversity is a multi-faceted concept, central to spatial ecology. There are multiple metrics available to quantify it: the choice of metric is an important decision. We test 16 conceptual properties and two sampling properties of a β-diversity metric: metrics should be 1) independent of α-diversity and 2) cumulative along a gradient of species turnover. Similarity should be 3) probabilistic when assemblages are independently and identically distributed. Metrics should have 4) a minimum of zero and increase monotonically with the degree of 5) species turnover, 6) decoupling of species ranks and 7) evenness differences. However, complete species turnover should always generate greater values of β than extreme 8) rank shifts or 9) evenness differences. Metrics should 10) have a fixed upper limit, 11) symmetry (βA,B  = βB,A ), 12) double-zero asymmetry for double absences and double presences and 13) not decrease in a series of nested assemblages. Additionally, metrics should be independent of 14) species replication 15) the units of abundance and 16) differences in total abundance between sampling units. When samples are used to infer β-diversity, metrics should be 1) independent of sample sizes and 2) independent of unequal sample sizes. We test 29 metrics for these properties and five 'personality' properties. Thirteen metrics were outperformed or equalled across all conceptual and sampling properties. Differences in sensitivity to species' abundance lead to a performance trade-off between sample size bias and the ability to detect turnover among rare species. In general, abundance-based metrics are substantially less biased in the face of undersampling, although the presence-absence metric, βsim , performed well overall. Only

  8. Peculiarities of {\\alpha}-element abundances in Galactic open clusters

    Marsakov, V A; Koval', V V; Shpigel', L V

    2016-01-01

    A catalog compiling the parameters of 346 open clusters, including their metallicities, positions, ages, and velocities has been composed. The elements of the Galactic orbits for 272 of the clusters have been calculated. Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances, [el/Fe], for 14 elements synthesized in various nuclear processes averaged over data from 109 publications are presented for 90 clusters. Since no systematic effects distorting the relative abundances of the studied elements in these clusters have been found, these difference suggest real differences between clusters with high, elongated orbits and field stars. In particular, this supports the earlier conclusion, based on an analysis of the elements of the Galactic orbits, that some clusters formed as a result of interactions between high-velocity, metal-poor clouds and the interstellar medium of the Galactic thin disk. On average, clusterswith high, elongated orbits and metallicities ${\\rm [Fe/H]} - 0.1$ formed as a result of interact...

  9. Chemical Abundance Patterns and the Early Environment of Dwarf Galaxies

    Corlies, Lauren; Tumlinson, Jason; Bryan, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that abundance pattern differences exist between low metallicity stars in the Milky Way stellar halo and those in the dwarf satellite galaxies. This paper takes a first look at what role the early environment for pre-galactic star formation might have played in shaping these stellar populations. In particular, we consider whether differences in cross-pollution between the progenitors of the stellar halo and the satellites could help to explain the differences in abundance patterns. Using an N-body simulation, we find that the progenitor halos of the main halo are primarily clustered together at z=10 while the progenitors of the satellite galaxies remain on the outskirts of this cluster. Next, analytically modeled supernova-driven winds show that main halo progenitors cross-pollute each other more effectively while satellite galaxy progenitors remain more isolated. Thus, inhomogeneous cross-pollution as a result of different high-z spatial locations of each system's progenitors can ...

  10. Comparing Amino Acid Abundances and Distributions Across Carbonaceous Chondrite Groups

    Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Meteorites are grouped according to bulk properties such as chemical composition and mineralogy. These parameters can vary significantly among the different carbonaceous chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CR, CH, CB, CV and CK). We have determined the amino acid abundances of more than 30 primary amino acids in meteorites from each of the eight groups, revealing several interesting trends. There are noticeable differences in the structural diversity and overall abundances of amino acids between meteorites from the different chondrite groups. Because meteorites may have been an important source of amino acids to the prebiotic Earth and these organic compounds are essential for life as we know it, the observed variations of these molecules may have been important for the origins of life.

  11. Generating potassium abundance variations in the Solar Nebula

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    An intriguing aspect of chondritic meteorites is that they are complementary: while their separate components have wildly varying abundances, bulk chondrites have nearly solar composition. This implies that the nearly-solar reservoirs in which chondrites were born were in turn assembled from sub-reservoirs of differing compositions that birthed the different components. We focus on explaining the potassium abundance variations between chondrules even within a single chondrite, while maintaining the observed CI $^{41}$K to $^{39}$K ratios. This requires physically separating potassium and chondrules while the temperature is high enough for K to be in the gas phase. We examine several mechanisms which could drive the dust through gas and show that to do so locally would have required long (sub-orbital to many orbits) time scales; with shortest potassium depletion time scales occurring in a scenario where chondrules formed high above the midplane and settled out of the evaporated potassium. While orbital time sc...

  12. Abundance analysis of extremely metal-poor stars

    Hansen, T.; Hansen, C. J.; Christlieb, N.; Andersen, J.

    2016-01-01

    The outer atmosphere of the first generations of low-mass (M elements into the early ISM. Thus a detailed abundance analysis of low-mass, metal-poor stars can help us track these gasses and provide insight into the formation processes that took place in the very early stages of our Galaxy. Preliminary result of a 25-star homogeneously analysed sample of metal- poor candidates from the Hamburg/ESO survey is presented. The main focus is on the most metal-poor stars of the sample; stars with [Fe/H] abundance pattern of these ultra metal-poor (UMP) stars is used to extract key information of the earliest ongoing formation processes (ranging from hydrostatic burning to neutron-capture processes).

  13. Reddening, Abundances, and Line Formation in SNe II

    Baron, E; Hauschildt, P H; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2007-01-01

    We present detailed NLTE spectral synthesis models of the Type II supernova 2005cs, which occurred in M51 and for which the explosion time is well determined. We show that previous estimates for the reddening were significantly too high and briefly discuss how this will effect the inferred progenitor mass. We also show that standard CNO-burning enhanced abundances require far too large an oxygen depletion, although there is evidence for a single optical N II line and the sodium abundance shows clear evidence for enhancement over solar both as expected from CNO processing. Finally we calculate a distance using the SEAM method. Given the broad range of distances to M51 in the literature, the determination of a distance using Cepheid variables would be quite valuable.

  14. Multiple peaks of species abundance distributions induced by sparse interactions

    Obuchi, Tomoyuki; Tokita, Kei

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the replicator dynamics with "sparse" symmetric interactions which represent specialist-specialist interactions in ecological communities. By considering a large self interaction $u$, we conduct a perturbative expansion which manifests that the nature of the interactions has a direct impact on the species abundance distribution. The central results are all species coexistence in a realistic range of the model parameters and that a certain discrete nature of the interactions induces multiple peaks in the species abundance distribution, providing the possibility of theoretically explaining multiple peaks observed in various field studies. To get more quantitative information, we also construct a non-perturbative theory which becomes exact on tree-like networks if all the species coexist, providing exact critical values of $u$ below which extinct species emerge. Numerical simulations in various different situations are conducted and they clarify the robustness of the presented mechanism of all spe...

  15. Foraminifera Species Richness, Abundance, and Diversity Research in Bolinas, California

    Brunwin, N.; Ingram, Z.; Mendez, M.; Sandoval, K.

    2015-12-01

    Foraminifera are abundant, diverse, respond rapidly to environmental change, and are present in all marine and estuarine environments, making them important indicator species. A survey of occurrence and distribution of foraminifera in the Bolinas Lagoon, Marin County, California was carried out by Hedman in 1975, but no study since has focused on foraminiferal composition within this important ecosystem. In July 2015, the Careers in Science (CiS) Intern Program collected samples at 12 sites previously examined in the 1975 study. Thirty-six samples were collected from the upper few centimeters of sediment from a variety of intertidal and subtidal environments within the lagoon. Foraminifera from each sample were isolated, identified and species richness, abundance and diversity quantified. Furthermore, comparisons of faunal composition represented in our recent collection and that of Hedman's 1975 report are made.

  16. New Insights on Jupiter's Deep Water Abundance from Disequilibrium Species

    Wang, Dong; Lunine, Jonathan; Mousis, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The bulk water abundance on Jupiter potentially constrains the planet's formation conditions. We improve the chemical constraints on Jupiter's deep water abundance in this paper. The eddy diffusion coefficient is used to model vertical mixing in planetary atmosphere, and based on laboratory studies dedicated to turbulent rotating convection, we propose a new formulation of the eddy diffusion coefficient for the troposphere of giant planets. The new formulation predicts a smooth transition from the slow rotation regime (near the equator) to the rapid rotation regime (near the pole). We estimate an uncertainty for the newly derived coefficient of less than 25$\\%$, which is much better than the one order of magnitude uncertainty used in the literature. We then reevaluate the water constraint provided by CO, using the newer eddy diffusion coefficient. We considered two updated CO kinetic models, one model constrains the water enrichment (relative to solar) between 0.1 and 0.75, while the other constrains the wate...

  17. Lead and uranium group abundances in cosmic rays

    Yadav, J. S.; Perelygin, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of Lead and Uranium group abundances in cosmic rays is discussed in understanding their evolution and propagation. The electronic detectors can provide good charge resolution but poor data statistics. The plastic detectors can provide somewhat better statistics but charge resolution deteriorates. The extraterrestrial crystals can provide good statistics but with poor charge resolution. Recent studies of extraterrestrial crystals regarding their calibration to accelerated uranium ion beam and track etch kinetics are discussed. It is hoped that a charge resolution of two charge units can be achieved provided an additional parameter is taken into account. The prospects to study abundances of Lead group, Uranium group and superheavy element in extraterrestrial crystals are discussed, and usefulness of these studies in the light of studies with electronic and plastic detectors is assessed.

  18. Statistical analysis of Fe abundances gradients in the Galaxy

    CUI; Chenzhou

    2001-01-01

    [1]Shaver, P. A., McGee, R. X., Newton, L. M. et al., The galactic abundance gradient, MNRAS, 983, 204: 53.[2]Amnuel, P. R., The features of chemical abundances in Galactic planetary nebulae, MNRAS, 993, 26: 263.[3]Maciel, W. J., Kǒppen, J., Abundance gradents from disk planetary nebulae: O, Ne, S and Ar, A&A, 994, 282, 436.[4]Maciel, W. J., Abundance gradients from planetary nebulae in the galactic disk, IAU Samp., 997, 80: 397.[5]Maciel, W. J., Quireza, C., Abundance gradients in the outer galactic disk from planetary nebulae, A&A, 999, 345: 629.[6]Lennon, D. J., Dufton, P. L., Fitzsimmons, A. et al., Dolidze 25: a metal-deficient galactic open cluster, A&A, 990, 240: 349.[7]Fitzsimmons, A., Dufton, P. L., Rolleston, W. R. J., A comparison of oxygen and nitrogen abundances in young clusters and associations and in the interstellar gas, MNRAS, 992, 259: 489.[8]Kilian, J., Montenbruck, O., Nissen, P. E., The galactic distribution of chemical elements as derived from B-stars in open clusters, A&A, 994, 284: 437.[9]Kaufer, A., Szeifert, T., Krenzin, R. et al., The galactic abundance gradients traced by B-type stars, A&A, 994, 289: 740.[10]Smartt, S. J., Dufton, P. L., Rolleston, W. R. J., A metal deficient early B-type star near the edge of the galactic disk, A&A, 996, 305: 64.[11]Smartt, S. J., Dufton, P. L., Rolleston, W. R. J., The chemical composition towards the galactic anti-centre, A&A, 996, 30: 23.[12]Binette, L., Dopita, M. A., D'Odorico, S. et al., The galactic abundance gradient from supernova remnant observations, A&A, 982, 5: 35.[13]Dauphole, B., Geffert, M., Colin, J. et al., The kinematics of globular clusters, apocentric distances and a halo metallicity gradient, A&A, 996, 33: 9.[14]Marsakov, V. A., Shevelev, Y. G., Catalogue of ages, metallicities, orbital elements and other parameters for nearby F stars, BICDS, 995, 47: 3.[15]Cayrel de Strobel, G., Soubiran, C., Friel, E. D. et al., A

  19. Light bosons and photospheric solutions to the solar abundance problem

    Vincent, Aaron C; Trampedach, Regner

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that current spectroscopic determinations of the chemical composition of the Sun are starkly at odds with the metallicity implied by helioseismology. We propose that the discrepancy may be due to conversion of photons to a new light boson in the solar photosphere. We investigate the impact of particles with axion-like interactions with the photon on the inferred photospheric abundances. Conversion of photons into new light bosons can in principle easily produce the +0.2 dex change in derived abundances required to reconcile spectroscopic and helioseismological determinations of the solar metallicity. We show that this is however not possible for any of the presently-allowed parameter space of either the QCD axion or a standard axion-like particle. We speculate that other models involving photon-boson mixing, such as hidden photons, might prove more successful.

  20. ASPCAP: The Apogee Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline

    Pérez, Ana E García; Holtzman, Jon A; Shetrone, Matthew; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Carrera, Ricardo; Cunha, Katia; García-Hernández, D A; Johnson, Jennifer A; Majewski, Steven R; Nidever, David L; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Shane, Neville; Smith, Verne V; Sobeck, Jennifer; Troup, Nicholas; Zamora, Olga; Bovy, Jo; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Feuillet, Diane; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Hayden, Michael R; Hearty, Fred R; Nguyen, Duy C; O'Connell, Robert W; Pinsonneault, Marc H; Weinberg, David H; Wilson, John C; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has built the largest moderately high-resolution (R=22, 500) spectroscopic map of the stars across the Milky Way, and including dust-obscured areas. The APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) is the software developed for the automated analysis of these spectra. ASPCAP determines atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances from observed spectra by comparing observed spectra to libraries of theoretical spectra, using chi-2 minimization in a multidimensional parameter space. The package consists of a fortran90 code that does the actual minimization, and a wrapper IDL code for book-keeping and data handling. This paper explains in detail the ASPCAP components and functionality, and presents results from a number of tests designed to check its performance. ASPCAP provides stellar effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities precise to 2%, 0.1 dex, and 0.05 dex, respectively, for most APOGEE stars, wh...

  1. Circular RNAs are abundant, conserved, and associated with ALU repeats

    Jeck, William R.; Sorrentino, Jessica A.; Wang, Kai; Slevin, Michael K.; Christin E Burd; Liu, Jinze; Marzluff, William F.; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    Using a novel approach to identify exonic circular RNAs (ecircRNAs), the authors show widespread production of circular RNAs from a significant fraction of expressed genes in murine and human cells. They demonstrate that several of these noncoding transcripts are stable and abundant and can be targeted by siRNA. Bioinformatic analysis of the entire ecircRNA complement revealed gene features associated with RNA circularization.

  2. Vertical Distribution and Seasonal Abundance of Zooplankters in Lake Tanganyika

    NARITA, Tetsuya; NISIBULA, Mulimbwa; MIZUNO, Toshihiko

    1986-01-01

    Vertical distribution and seasonal abundance of zooplankters were studied in Lake Tanganyika. Faunal composition of zooplankton was simple. Limnocnida tanganicae, copepod nauplii, Diaptomus simplex, cyclopoids, and shrimp were collected by closing nets. Nauplii were dominant in number, but cyclopoid copepodites were dominant in biomass. The biomass calculated was in the range of 1.2-3.7 (average 2.3) g/m² excluding shrimp and medusa. For the vertical distribution of the copepods, the larger t...

  3. Extraction of Water Treatment Coagulant from Locally Abundant Kaolin Clays

    Fidelis Chigondo; Benias Chomunorwa Nyamunda; Vuyo Bhebhe

    2015-01-01

    Rapid industrialisation is contributing to water pollution. There is a need to identify cheaper and efficient methods of removing contaminants as the demand for clean water rises. A study is carried out to investigate the extraction of alum from locally abundant kaolin clays using sulphuric acid. Alum is a coagulant that is used for raw water treatment. The kaolin clay and alum were characterized by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effects of particle size, calcination...

  4. The comparison of pollen abundance in air and honey samples

    Ingrida Šaulienė; Laura Šukienė; Auste Noreikaite-Merkeliene; Vidmantas Pileckas

    2015-01-01

    Honey as a food has long been used in human nutrition and is still popular. Honey is important because of its therapeutic, prophylactic and strengthening value. Pollen is one of the most decisive components that ensure the quality and type of honey. Modern society becomes more and more sensitive to airborne pollen. Therefore, it is crucial to determine the composition of allergenic plant pollen in natural honey. For this purpose, we studied and compared pollen abundance in honey and air sampl...

  5. Peculiarities of α-element abundances in Galactic open clusters

    Marsakov, V. A.; Gozha, M. L.; Koval', V. V.; Shpigel', L. V.

    2016-01-01

    A catalog compiling the parameters of 346 open clusters, including their metallicities, positions, ages, and velocities has been composed. The elements of the Galactic orbits for 272 of the clusters have been calculated. Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances, [el/Fe], for 14 elements synthesized in various nuclear processes averaged over data from 109 publications are presented for 90 clusters. The compiled data indicate that the relative abundances of primary α elements (oxygen and magnesium) exhibit different dependences on metallicity, age, Galactocentric distance, and the elements of the Galactic orbits in clusters with high, elongated orbits satisfying the criterion ( Z max 2 + 4 e 2)1/2 > 0.40 and in field stars of the Galactic thin disk ( Z max is the maximum distance of the orbit from the Galactic plane in kiloparsec and e is the eccentricity of the Galactic orbit). Since no systematic effects distorting the relative abundances of the studied elements in these clusters have been found, these difference suggest real differences between clusters with high, elongated orbits and field stars. In particular, this supports the earlier conclusion, based on an analysis of the elements of the Galactic orbits, that some clusters formed as a result of interactions between high-velocity,metal-poor clouds and the interstellar mediumof theGalactic thin disk. On average, clusters with high, elongated orbits and metallicities [Fe/H] rate and/or the masses of Type II supernovae were lower than near the Galactic plane. It is also shown that, on average, the relative abundances of the primary a elements are higher in relatively metal-rich clusters with high, elongated orbits than in field stars. This can be understood if clusters with [Fe/H] > -0.1 formed as a result of interactions between metal-rich clouds with intermediate velocities and the interstellar medium of the Galactic disk; such clouds could form from returning gas in a so-called "Galactic

  6. Review of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and Primordial Abundances

    Tytler, David; O'Meara, John M.; SUZUKI, Nao; Lubin, Dan

    2000-01-01

    Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) is the synthesis of the light nuclei, Deuterium, He3, He4 and Li7, during the first few minutes of the universe. This review concentrates on recent improvements in the measurement of the primordial (after BBN, and prior to modification) abundances of these nuclei. We mention improvement in the standard theory, and the non-standard extensions which are limited by the data. (abridged)

  7. Ecogenomics and biogeochemical impacts of uncultivated globally abundant ocean viruses

    Roux, Simon

    2016-05-12

    Ocean microbes drive global-scale biogeochemical cycling, but do so under constraints imposed by viruses on host community composition, metabolism, and evolutionary trajectories. Due to sampling and cultivation challenges, genome-level viral diversity remains poorly described and grossly understudied in nature such that <1% of observed surface ocean viruses, even those that are abundant and ubiquitous, are ?known?. Here we analyze a global map of abundant, double stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses and viral-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes (AMGs) with genomic and ecological contexts through the Global Ocean Viromes (GOV) dataset, which includes complete genomes and large genomic fragments from both surface and deep ocean viruses sampled during the Tara Oceans and Malaspina research expeditions. A total of 15,222 epi- and mesopelagic viral populations were identified that comprised 867 viral clusters (VCs, approximately genus-level groups). This roughly triples known ocean viral populations, doubles known candidate bacterial and archaeal virus genera, and near-completely samples epipelagic communities at both the population and VC level. Thirty-eight of the 867 VCs were identified as the most impactful dsDNA viral groups in the oceans, as these were locally or globally abundant and accounted together for nearly half of the viral populations in any GOV sample. Most of these were predicted in silico to infect dominant, ecologically relevant microbes, while two thirds of them represent newly described viruses that lacked any cultivated representative. Beyond these taxon-specific ecological observations, we identified 243 viral-encoded AMGs in GOV, only 95 of which were known. Deeper analyses of 4 of these AMGs revealed that abundant viruses directly manipulate sulfur and nitrogen cycling, and do so throughout the epipelagic ocean. Together these data provide a critically-needed organismal catalog and functional context to begin meaningfully integrating viruses into

  8. Ecological correlates of abundance in the Tana mangabey (Cercocebus galeritus).

    Wieczkowski, Julie

    2004-07-01

    I investigated the ecological correlates of abundance in the Tana mangabey (Cercocebus galeritus), one of the world's most endangered primates, with the goal of recommending management strategies. I systematically selected 31 forest fragments throughout the mangabey's 60-km distribution along the lower Tana River in southeastern Kenya. Within the 31 fragments, I measured vegetation structure, food abundance, and human forest product use in 107 belt transects, and conducted 370 mangabey surveys. I used a weighted multiple regression analysis to determine whether there was a dependence between the selected forest attributes and the mean number of mangabey groups per fragment. Fragment area and density of trees > or =10 cm diameter at breast height (DBH) were the only variables that significantly correlated with the variation in mangabey abundance. No additional variables were significant when the analysis was limited to forest fragments inside the Tana River Primate National Reserve (TRPNR) or to fragments outside the TRPNR. When I estimated the resources available before recent human forest product use by adding nonharvested and harvested variables, the total basal area of the top 15 food species became significant. This was only within the TRPNR, however. Management, therefore, should focus on increasing forest area, density of trees > or =10 cm DBH, and coverage of food trees throughout the mangabey's distribution. Solutions must be found for the problem of forest clearing, and forest product use must be better managed to protect the habitat of this critically endangered primate. The significance of food abundance only within the TRPNR suggests a need to collect dietary data from mangabey groups in fragments toward the southern limit of the mangabey's distribution, where plant species composition differs from that in fragments in which dietary data have been previously collected. PMID:15258957

  9. Thorium: Does Crustal Abundance Lead to Economic Availability?

    Brett W. Jordan; Rod Eggert; Brent Dixon; Brett Carlsen

    2014-01-01

    Recently, interest in thorium's potential use in a nuclear fuel cycle has been renewed. Thorium is more abundant, at least on average, than uranium in the earth's crust and, therefore, could theoretically extend the use of nuclear energy technology beyond the economic limits of uranium resources. This paper provides an economic assessment of thorium availability by creating cumulative-availability and potential mining-industry cost curves, based on known thorium resources. These tools provide...

  10. Coral-Associated Actinobacteria: Diversity, Abundance, and Biotechnological Potentials

    Mahmoud, Huda M.; Kalendar, Aisha A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with three types of coral thriving in a thermally stressed coral reef system north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni have been found to harbor equivalent numbers of culturable Actinobacteria in their tissues but not in their mucus. However, different cul...

  11. Histogrammatic Method for Determining Relative Abundance of Input Gas Pulse

    Mandrake, Lukas; Bornstein, Benjamin J.; Madzunkov, Stojan; MacAskill, John A.

    2012-01-01

    To satisfy the Major Constituents Analysis (MCA) requirements for the Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM), this software analyzes the relative abundance ratios for N2, O2, Ar, and CO2 as a function of time and constructs their best-estimate mean. A histogram is first built of all abundance ratios for each of the species vs time. The abundance peaks corresponding to the intended measurement and any obfuscating background are then separated via standard peak-finding techniques in histogram space. A voting scheme is then used to include/exclude this particular time sample in the final average based on its membership to the intended measurement or the background population. This results in a robust and reasonable estimate of the abundance of trace components such as CO2 and Ar even in the presence of obfuscating backgrounds internal to the VCAM device. VCAM can provide a means for monitoring the air within the enclosed environments, such as the ISS (International Space Station), Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), a Lunar Habitat, or another vehicle traveling to Mars. Its miniature pre-concentrator, gas chromatograph (GC), and mass spectrometer can provide unbiased detection of a large number of organic species as well as MCA analysis. VCAM s software can identify the concentration of trace chemicals and whether the chemicals are on a targeted list of hazardous compounds. This innovation s performance and reliability on orbit, along with the ground team s assessment of its raw data and analysis results, will validate its technology for future use and development.

  12. The abundance and environment of dark matter haloes

    Metuki, Ofer; Libeskind, Noam I.; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    An open question in cosmology and the theory of structure formation is to what extent does environment affect the properties of galaxies and haloes. The present paper aims at shedding light on this problem. The paper focuses on the analysis of a dark matter only simulation and it addresses the issue of how the environment affects the abundance of haloes, which are are assigned four attributes: their virial mass, an ambient density calculated with an aperture that scales with $R_{vir}$ ($\\Delt...

  13. The evolution of C and O abundances in stellar populations

    Nissen, Poul E.; Schuster, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen abundances in F and G main-sequence stars ranging in metallicity from [Fe/H] = -1.6 to +0.5 are determined from a non-LTE analysis of C i and O i atomic lines in high-resolution spectra. Both C and O are good tracers of stellar populations; distinct trends of [C/Fe] and [O/Fe] a...

  14. The abundance threshold for plague as a critical percolation phenomenon

    Davis, S; Trapman, P; Leirs, H;

    2008-01-01

    is a percolation threshold, which arises from the difference in scale between the movements that transport infectious fleas between family groups and the vast size of contiguous landscapes colonized by gerbils. Conventional theory predicts that abundance thresholds for the spread of infectious......-appraisal of other invasion thresholds, such as those for epidemic viral infections in African lions (Panthera leo), and of other disease systems such as bovine tuberculosis (caused by Mycobacterium bovis) in badgers (Meles meles)....

  15. Experiences in Uranium Abundance Analysis Using the MTE Methodology

    BLACK CLAUDIE KATE; Zuleger, Evelyn; HORTA DOMENECH Joan; VARGAS ZUNIGA Martin

    2012-01-01

    The ITU in Karlsruhe routinely analyses a multitude of samples from a wide range of internal and external customers for safeguards. High through-put analysis techniques are employed using meticulous care to ensure accurate, precise and timely results are provided. Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) is used for isotopic analysis of Uranium to determine abundance and concentration information. At ITU we employ the modified total evaporation (MTE) methodology[1] for minor isotope an...

  16. Relative resource abundance explains butterfly biodiversity in island communities

    Yamamoto, Naoaki; Yokoyama, Jun; Kawata, Masakado

    2007-01-01

    Ecologists have long been intrigued by the factors that control the pattern of biodiversity, i.e., the distribution and abundance of species. Previous studies have demonstrated that coexisting species partition their resources and/or that the compositional similarity between communities is determined by environmental factors, lending support to the niche-assembly model. However, no attempt has been made to test whether the relative amount of resources that reflects relative niche space contro...

  17. Linking species abundance distributions and body size in monogenean communities

    Poulin, R.; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2008-01-01

    Parasite communities are characterised by one or a few numerically dominant species and many rare species. Although this pattern is well recognised, its underlying causes remain unknown. In this study, we tested whether variation in abundance among species within parasite communities can be explained by interspecific variation in body size. We used data on nine fish species (families Serranidae and Lethrinidae) from New Caledonia, each harbouring strictly host-specific diplectanid monogenean ...

  18. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons From Voyager and Cassini

    Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Romani, Paul. N.; Allen, Mark; Zhang, Xi; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Flasar, F. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C_2H_2) and ...

  19. Phenology and abundance of Enoicyla pusilla in conifer stands

    M. J. Lombardero

    2013-01-01

    Aim of Study. We study the abundance of Enoicyla pusilla (Burmeister) in pine plantations and the effects of silvicultural thinning on insect population. This species is considered a rare member of the order Trichoptera, reported as absent or occasional in conifer forests. It has been suggested that the proliferation of conifer plantations may be a threat for this species by favoring population isolation. Area of study. Plantations of native and non-native pines in Galicia (NW of Spain).Mater...

  20. Microspatial variation in marine biofilm abundance on intertidal rock surfaces

    Aitchison, JC; Williams, GA; Hutchinson, N; Nagarkar, S

    2006-01-01

    The effect of substrate surface roughness on small-scale patchiness and the ability of molluscan grazers to feed on intertidal biofilms was examined in a factorial experiment. Granite slabs were treated to create 4 different levels of surface roughness, and biofilm and macroalgae were allowed to recruit. Biofilm cover varied greatly with slab roughness, and was spatially patchy at a scale of millimetres. Diatoms dominated the biofilm, but were less abundant on surfaces with the smallest pits....