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Sample records for abu wildlife sanctuary

  1. An ethnozoological study in the adjoining areas of Mount Abu wildlife sanctuary, India

    Mahawar Madan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that human beings are familiar with use of animals for food, cloth, medicine, etc. since ancient times. Enormous work has been done on ethnobotany and traditional medicine. Like plants, animal and their products are also possessing medicinal properties that can be exploited for the benefit of human beings. In India, many ethnic communities are dispersed all over the country and these people are still totally depended on local traditional medicinal system for their health care. India is gifted with faunal and floral biodiversity, Mount Abu wildlife sanctuary is also one of them, and thus the aim of this work was to take an ethnozoological field survey among Garasiya people (main tribal group of this area in the adjoining areas of this sanctuary. Method In order to document the ethnozoological information about animal and their products prevalent among these people in the adjoining area of Mount Abu wildlife sanctuary, a study was carried out from January, 2008 to April, 2008. Data were collected through semi-structured questionnaire and open interview with 25 (16 male and 9 female selected Garasiya people. The name of animal and other ethnozoological information were documented. Photographs and discussion were also recorded with the help of camera and voice recorder. Result A total of 24 animal species were used in 35 different medicinal purposes including asthma, weakness, tuberculosis, cough, paralysis and blister and for other religious purposes. It has been find out that animal used by Garasiya, consist of fourteen mammals, five birds, three reptiles, one arthropods and one amphibian. The meat of Cynopterus sphinx used to relieved fever and cough has the highest FL (96% although flesh of Sus scrofa and tooth of Elephas maximus have the lowest FL (12%. Some protected species such as Elephas maximus (elephant, Semnopithecus priam (monkey, Cervus unicolor (sambhar were also mentioned as important medicinal

  2. VEGETATION AND WILDLIFE OF LAOKHOWA WILDLIFE SANCTUARY IN ASSAM, INDIA

    Sanjeeb Kumar Nath

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The protective areas like National Parks, Wildlife Sanctuaries and reserve forests have attracted worldwide attention to study vegetation, floral diversity and other wild lives for its conservation, sustainable use and also for proper management of bioresources. Laokhowa Wildlife Sanctuary has most ideal habitat for Indian one horned rhinoceros and is one of its representative area in Brahmaputra flood plain. The sanctuary is one of the rich and ecological habitat for the wild variety of animals and plants species .The natural vegetation of the area is mainly contributed by forests of tall trees, grassland and wetland vegetation. The woodland provides food and shelter to a variety of animals and the grassland is the haven for a variety of herbivores. Besides these the wetlands and aquatic bodies provides food and shelter to avifauna, fish fauna and other wildlife. The present paper deals with the vegetation present in the sanctuary. The vegetation comprises (a Low alluvial savannah woodland (Salmaria – Albizzia(b Western Wet alluvial grasslands (c Riparian Fringing Forests (d Barringtonia Swamp forests (e Wetlands (f Plantation areas (g Degraded Forests. About 40 sq km areas is grassland; 6 sq km area is occupied by alluvial grassland in the Sanctuary.

  3. How the local community views wildlife conservation: a case of Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Mohd Shahnawaz Khan; Faiza Abbasi

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the local community’s attitudes towards wildlife conservation in Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary (HWS), Uttar Pradesh, India. It is the largest sanctuary in the state and under the highest anthropogenic pressure. People engage in fishing, livestock grazing, fuel wood/fodder collection, cash cropping of cucurbits in the sandy river banks for sustenance and commercial extraction of sand and grass for construction. These activities threaten the survival of threatene...

  4. Plant and soil nematodes from Lokchao Yangoupokpi Wildlife Sanctuary, Manipur, India

    N. Mohilal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study soil samples were collected from Lokchao Yangoupokpi Wildlife Sanctuary to investigate about what nematode species are associated with different plant hosts. This study shows rich nematode diversity in the sanctuary.

  5. Herpetofauna of Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Abhijit Das

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A herpetofaunal inventory based on field surveys, literature records and photographic records is presented for Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary and its environs, situated in the Terai region of Uttar Pradesh, India. We list a total of 10 species of amphibians and 42 species of reptiles from the area. Compiled observations presented here include biological notes on the Critically Endangered Gavialis gangeticus and new locality records and natural history information of poorly known species including Polypedates taeniatus and Sibynophis sagittarius. Besides recording members of currently recognized species complexes, the study also documents species that were either conferred to closely related species (e.g., Fejervarya cf. teraiensis or their identity remains to be ascertained (e.g., Kaloula sp.. The present study indicates that species count at Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary is likely to increase with additional surveys and systematic work.

  6. Herpetofauna of Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Abhijit Das; Dhruvajyoti Basu; Laurel Converse; Su-resh C Choudhury

    2012-01-01

    A herpetofaunal inventory based on field surveys, literature records and photographic records is presented for Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary and its environs, situated in the Terai region of Uttar Pradesh, India. We list a total of 10 species of amphibians and 42 species of reptiles from the area. Compiled observations presented here include biological notes on the Critically Endangered Gavialis gangeticus and new locality records and natural history information of poorly known species in...

  7. Entomofauna of Kane Wildlife Sanctuary, Arunachal Pradesh, northeastern India

    O.T. Singh; J. Chakravorty; R. Varatharajan

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the entomofauna of Kane Wildlife Sanctuary revealed the occurrence of 170 species of insects belonging to 39 families under nine orders. The Order Coleoptera was dominant with a maximum of 70 species followed by Thysanoptera and Odonata with 23 species each. Orthoptera, Hymenoptera and Collembola were respectively 18, 13 and eight species. Seven species were known to the order Diptera and only five species were encountered for Hemiptera. Two species of Dictyoptera viz., Cryptocera ...

  8. Entomofauna of Kane Wildlife Sanctuary, Arunachal Pradesh, northeastern India

    O.T. Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the entomofauna of Kane Wildlife Sanctuary revealed the occurrence of 170 species of insects belonging to 39 families under nine orders. The Order Coleoptera was dominant with a maximum of 70 species followed by Thysanoptera and Odonata with 23 species each. Orthoptera, Hymenoptera and Collembola were respectively 18, 13 and eight species. Seven species were known to the order Diptera and only five species were encountered for Hemiptera. Two species of Dictyoptera viz., Cryptocera sp. and Mantis sp. were also collected. Overall, 39 species of insects hitherto known only from other states, were recorded for the first time from Arunachal Pradesh through the present collection. This study is the first of its kind to collect and document the insects of the Sanctuary.

  9. Status of wetland birds of Chhilchhila Wildlife Sanctuary, Haryana, India

    P. Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Chhilchhila Wildlife Sanctuary (76036-76046 E and 29052-30000 N, situated in Kurukshetra District of Haryana provides an important wintering ground for a diverse range of wetland birds. This study was carried out from April 2009 to March 2012 to document the diversity of wetland birds. Altogether 57 species of wetland birds belonging to 37 genera and 16 families were recorded from the study area. Family Anatidae dominated the wetland bird community with 13 species. Among recorded species, 33 were winter migrants, two summer migrants and 22 were resident species. The winter migratory birds did not arrive at this wetland in one lot and at one time. Instead, they displayed a definite pattern specific to species for arrival and departure. They appeared at the wetland during mid-October and stayed up to early April. The composition of birds in major feeding guilds in the study area showed that the insectivore guild was the most common with 35.09% species, followed by carnivore (29.82%, omnivore (19.30%, herbivore (10.53% and piscivore (5.26%. Among the birds recorded in this study area, Darter (Anhinga melanogaster and Painted Stork (Mycterialeucocephala were Near Threatened species. Comb Duck (Sarkidiornismelanotos, listed in Appendix II of CITES, was also spotted in the sanctuary. The spotting of these threatened bird species highlights the importance of Chhilchhila Wildlife Sanctuary as a significant wetland bird habitat in Haryana. However, anthropogenic activities like fire wood collection, livestock grazing, cutting of emergent and fringe vegetation and improper management of the wetland are major threats to the ecology of this landscape.

  10. Ethnobotanical Knowledge Studied in Pocharam Wildlife Sanctuary, Telangana, India

    Pendem SAIDULU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey was conducted in 31 fringe villages of Pocharam wildlife sanctuary, Telangana, India, during 2010 to 2012, in order to explore and document the ethnobotanical knowledge of Yerukulas and Lambadis communities. There was revealed the use of 173 Angiosperm species. The pattern of the plant use as per habitat (terrestrial/aquatic, habit (growth form, plant part (organ and taxonomic category (families, nativity and occurrence (wild/cultivated were established. Dicots contribute more than Monocots to the medicinal and ethnobotanical use. This might be due to the species strength in the region. When the plant use-data were analyzed, trees contributed with 68 uses, followed by herbs (51, climbers (32 and shrubs (22. Perhaps this was a reflection of the floristic composition and the prevailing Phanero-therophytic climate. Out of the 173 plant taxa that were noted as being utilized by the ethnic people in the sanctuary, the greatest number (154; 89.1% were indigenous and wild. The introduced species were the crops under cultivation and planted. Although the local people use plants for various purposes, they largely serve medicinal scopes (83.24% and for subsistence (21.96%.

  11. Studies on bird diversity of Overa-Aru Wildlife Sanctuary of Jammu and Kashmir, India

    S.A. Khah

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Overa-Aru Wildlife Sanctuary is a tourist attraction for religious, adventure and wildlife tourism in Jammu and Kashmir, India. The Overa-Aru Sanctuary harbours different species of birds, reptiles and mammals and is home to a large number of plant species. In the present study, checklists of avian fauna, their migratory status, feeding habits, abundance and status, and site-wise population have been documented.

  12. Studies on bird diversity of Overa-Aru Wildlife Sanctuary of Jammu and Kashmir, India

    S.A. Khah; R.J. Rao; Wani, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Overa-Aru Wildlife Sanctuary is a tourist attraction for religious, adventure and wildlife tourism in Jammu and Kashmir, India. The Overa-Aru Sanctuary harbours different species of birds, reptiles and mammals and is home to a large number of plant species. In the present study, checklists of avian fauna, their migratory status, feeding habits, abundance and status, and site-wise population have been documented.

  13. How the local community views wildlife conservation: a case of Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Mohd. Shahnawaz Khan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to assess the local community’s attitudes towards wildlife conservation in Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary (HWS, Uttar Pradesh, India. It is the largest sanctuary in the state and under the highest anthropogenic pressure. People engage in fishing, livestock grazing, fuel wood/fodder collection, cash cropping of cucurbits in the sandy river banks for sustenance and commercial extraction of sand and grass for construction. These activities threaten the survival of threatened species like Swamp Deer Rucervus duvaucelii, Gangetic Dolphin Platanista gangetica, Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale perspicillata and Gharial Gavialis gangeticus. Interviews were conducted with heads of randomly selected families and ‘yes/no’ opinions were taken. Questions included direct statements on biodiversity status and relationship with the Sanctuary resources. Data was classified in percent values and it was found that there is no difference in people’s perception on increase, decrease or stability of biodiversity. Further, a majority of people find life around a protected area disadvantageous, or with dismal advantages. Building on this premise the study suggests that a better share in development and alternative livelihood options for the local community of HWS can decrease their dependence on natural resources and improve conservation as a favourable option in the present perceptions of the people.

  14. Hunting, Livelihoods and Declining Wildlife in the Hponkanrazi Wildlife Sanctuary, North Myanmar

    Rao, Madhu; Htun, Saw; Zaw, Than; Myint, Than

    2010-08-01

    The Hponkanrazi Wildlife Sanctuary, North Myanmar and three contiguous protected areas, comprise some of the largest expanses of natural forest remaining in the region. Demand for wildlife products has resulted in unsustainable exploitation of commercially valuable species resulting in local extirpation of vulnerable species. Camera trap, track and sign, and questionnaire-based surveys were used to examine (a) wildlife species targeted by hunters, (b) the importance of wild meat for household consumption, and (c) the significance of hunting as a livelihood activity for resident villages. Certain commercially valuable species highly preferred by hunters were either completely absent from hunt records (tiger, musk deer and otter) or infrequently obtained during actual hunts (bear, pangolin). Species obtained by hunters were commonly occurring species such as muntjacs with low commercial value and not highly preferred by hunters. Fifty eight percent of respondents ( n = 84) indicated trade, 27% listed subsistence use and 14% listed human-wildlife conflict as the main reason for hunting ( n = 84). Average amount of wild meat consumed per month is not significantly higher during the hunting season compared to the planting season (paired t-test, P > 0.05). Throughout the year, the average amount of fish consumed per month was higher than livestock or wild meat (Friedman test, P < 0.0001). Hunting is driven largely by trade and wild meat, while not a critical source of food for a large number of families could potentially be an important, indirect source of access to food for hunting families. Findings and trends from this study are potentially useful in helping design effective conservation strategies to address globally prevalent problems of declining wildlife populations and dependent human communities. The study provides recommendations to reduce illegal hunting and protect vulnerable species by strengthening park management through enforcement, increasing the

  15. Helminth parasite communities in anuran amphibians of Kalesar Wildlife Sanctuary (Haryana), India

    Rizvi, Anjum N.; Bhutia, Pasang T.

    2010-01-01

    Helminth parasite fauna in anuran amphibia were investigated during the general faunistic surveys of Kalesar Wildlife Sanctuary, situated in Haryana state. Three species of amphibian hosts were found to harbour 12 genera of helminth parasites. The prevalence, intensity and abundance were studied. Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis harboured maximum parasite species followed by Fejervarya limnocharis and Duttaphrynus melanostictus. In E. cyanophlyctis, among nematode parasites, the genus Camallanus was ...

  16. Diversity of macrofungal genus Russula and Amanita in Hirpora Wildlife Sanctuary, Southern Kashmir Himalayas

    SHAUKET AHMED PALA

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Pala SA, Wani AH, Mir RA. 2012. Diversity of macrofungal genus Russula and Amanita in Hirpora Wild Life Sancturary. Biodiversitas 13: 65-71. The Hirpora Wildlife Sanctuary that extends over an area of 114 km2 lies in the Pir Panjal range at a distance of 70 km in south-west of summer capital Srinagar. It is rich in biodiversity including macrofungal diversity. The Sanctuary has been subjected to high ecological and anthropogenic disturbance due to the construction of Mughal road which is major threat for its biodiversity. Since there is hardly any report of documentation of macrofungi from this sanctuary. In this back drop a survey was carried out during the year 2010 and 2011 to explore and invetorise macrofungal diversity of the sanctuary. During the survey a no of macrofungi were documented, among which Amanita and Russula were dominant genus represented by 7 species each. All the 14 species viz. Amanita ceciliae (Berk. & Broome Bas. Amanita flavoconia G.F. Atk., Amanita muscaria var. formosa Pers., Amanita pantherina (Fr. Krombh., Amanita phalloides (Fr. Link., Amanita vaginata (Bull. ex Fr. Vitt., Amanita virosa (Fr. Bertillon, Russula aeruginea Fr., Russula atropurpurea (Krombh. Britz., Russula aurea Pers., Russula cyanoxantha (Schaeff. Fr., Russula delica Fr. Russula emetica (Schaeff. ex Fr. Gray. and Russula nobilis Velen. are ectomycorrhizal in nature and among them Russula aeruginea Fr. is reported first time from the Kashmir.

  17. Analysing land and vegetation cover dynamics during last three decades in Katerniaghat wildlife sanctuary, India

    Chitale, V. S.; Behera, M. D.

    2014-10-01

    The change in the tropical forests could be clearly linked to the expansion of the human population and economies. An understanding of the anthropogenic forcing plays an important role in analyzing the impacts of climate change and the fate of tropical forests in the present and future scenario. In the present study, we analyze the impact of natural and anthropogenic factors in forest dynamics in Katerniaghat wildlife sanctuary situated along the Indo-Nepal border in Uttar Pradesh state, India. The study site is under tremendous pressure due to anthropogenic factors from surrounding areas since last three decades. The vegetation cover of the sanctuary primarily comprised of Shorea robusta forests, Tectona grandis plantation, and mixed deciduous forest; while the land cover comprised of agriculture, barren land, and water bodies. The classification accuracy was 83.5%, 91.5%, and 95.2% with MSS, IKONOS, and Quickbird datasets, respectively. Shorea robusta forests showed an increase of 16 km2; while Tectona grandis increased by 63.01 km2 during 1975-2010. The spatial heterogeneity in these tropical vegetation classes surrounded by the human dominated agricultural lands could not be addressed using Landsat MSS data due to coarse spatial resolution; whereas the IKONOS and Quickbird satellite datasets proved to advantageous, thus being able to precisely address the variations within the vegetation classes as well as in the land cover classes and along the edge areas. Massive deforestation during 1970s along the adjoining international boundary with Nepal has led to destruction of the wildlife corridor and has exposed the wildlife sanctuary to human interference like grazing and poaching. Higher rates of forest dynamics during the 25-year period indicate the vulnerability of the ecosystem to the natural and anthropogenic disturbances in the proximity of the sanctuary.

  18. Analysing land and vegetation cover dynamics during last three decades in Katerniaghat wildlife sanctuary, India

    V S Chitale; M D Behera

    2014-10-01

    The change in the tropical forests could be clearly linked to the expansion of the human population and economies. An understanding of the anthropogenic forcing plays an important role in analyzing the impacts of climate change and the fate of tropical forests in the present and future scenario. In the present study, we analyze the impact of natural and anthropogenic factors in forest dynamics in Katerniaghat wildlife sanctuary situated along the Indo-Nepal border in Uttar Pradesh state, India. The study site is under tremendous pressure due to anthropogenic factors from surrounding areas since last three decades. The vegetation cover of the sanctuary primarily comprised of Shorea robusta forests, Tectona grandis plantation, and mixed deciduous forest; while the land cover comprised of agriculture, barren land, and water bodies. The classification accuracy was 83.5%, 91.5%, and 95.2% with MSS, IKONOS, and Quickbird datasets, respectively. Shorea robusta forests showed an increase of 16 km2; while Tectona grandis increased by 63.01 km2 during 1975–2010. The spatial heterogeneity in these tropical vegetation classes surrounded by the human dominated agricultural lands could not be addressed using Landsat MSS data due to coarse spatial resolution; whereas the IKONOS and Quickbird satellite datasets proved to advantageous, thus being able to precisely address the variations within the vegetation classes as well as in the land cover classes and along the edge areas. Massive deforestation during 1970s along the adjoining international boundary with Nepal has led to destruction of the wildlife corridor and has exposed the wildlife sanctuary to interference like grazing and poaching. Higher rates of forest dynamics during the 25-year period indicate the vulnerability of the ecosystem to the natural and anthropogenic disturbances in the proximity of the sanctuary.

  19. Species composition and seasonal variation of butterflies in Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary, Jharkhand, India

    S.K. Verma

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary is located 10km from Jamshedpur in Jharkhand, India. The species composition and seasonal variation of butterflies was analyzed in this sanctuary over the course of 2 years. A total of 39 species belonging to 31 genera and 4 families were identified. Of these, Nymphalidae and Pieridae were found to be the dominant families, in comparison to Lycaenidae and Papilionidae. The monthly diversity was calculated by using the Shannon-Weiner diversity index. The highest diversity was found during late winter and spring while a comparatively low diversity was observed during the rainy season and summer. Nymphalidae showed the greatest variation with respect to distribution of species richness throughout the year. Nymphalidae and Lycaenidae showed greatest species richness and relative abundance during the rainy season. Little seasonal variation in species richness was observed in case of families Pieridae and Papilionidae

  20. The seasonality of butterflies in a semi-evergreen forest: Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, northeastern India

    Singh, Arun P.; Lina Gogoi; Jis Sebastain

    2015-01-01

    A study spanning 3.7 years on the butterflies of Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary GWS (21km2), a semi-evergreen forest, in Jorhat District of Assam, northeastern India revealed 211 species of butterflies belonging to 115 genera including 19 papilionids and seven ‘rare’ and ‘very rare’ species as per Evans list of the Indian sub-continent (Great Blue Mime Papilio paradoxa telearchus; Brown Forest BobScobura woolletti; Snowy Angle Darpa pteria dealbatahas; Constable Dichorragia nesimachus; Grey Baron ...

  1. An ethnozoological study in the adjoining areas of Mount Abu wildlife sanctuary, India

    Mahawar Madan; Jaroli DP; Vyas Nitin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background There is evidence that human beings are familiar with use of animals for food, cloth, medicine, etc. since ancient times. Enormous work has been done on ethnobotany and traditional medicine. Like plants, animal and their products are also possessing medicinal properties that can be exploited for the benefit of human beings. In India, many ethnic communities are dispersed all over the country and these people are still totally depended on local traditional medicinal system ...

  2. Implications of ecotourism development in protected areas: a study from Rema-Kalenga Wildlife Sanctuary, Bangladesh

    Rana MP

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on visitors profile study of protected area based tourist spots of Rema-Kalenga Wildlife Sanctuary (RKWS, Bangladesh to ascertain the potential of ecotourism. Study findings shows that 69% male constitute the visitors group while the maximum number of visitors was found in the age of below 30 years. Most of the visitors were literate and among them 43% visitors were student. Most (53% of visitors preferred to get recreation in holidays as they were employed. Visitors were highly preferred to come with friends group. About 92% respondents showed positive mind to come here in future while 89% respondents view that park has tourism potential. Most of the respondents reported the presence of wildlife (48% most notable followed by plant diversity and tribal community as recreational. From χ2 test it is found that highly significance association present between tourism potentiality of the wildlife sanctuary and some demographic variable like income of tourists (χ2 = 49.138, p < 0.000, visiting pattern (χ2 = 19.344, p < 0.000, education of tourists (χ2 = 50.226, p < 0.000, travelling distance (Km - χ2 = 11.427, p < 0.022, duration of staying (χ2 = 12.867, p < 0.002, frequency of visit (χ2 = 8.456, p < 0.015, visiting time (χ2 = 6.530, p < 0.011, problem in the study area (χ2 = 14.962, p < 0.021, occupation of tourists (χ2 = 8.848, p < 0.031. If the problems addressed by the visitors were solved, RKWS would be a bright place of eco-tourism in Bangladesh.

  3. Odonata (Insecta diversity of Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, the southern Western Ghats, India

    C.K. Adarsh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted at Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, Idukki District, Kerala, the southern Western Ghats, to assess the diversity of odonates. We report 48 species of odonates, which include 31 species of Anisoptera (dragonflies and 17 species of Zygoptera (damselflies. Among the dragonflies, the family Libellulidae dominated with 25 species, while Coenagrionidae with seven species was the dominant family among the damselflies. The odonate diversity of Chinnar WS accounted for 31.16 % of the odonates in Kerala and 27.58% of the odonates of the Western Ghats. Chinnar also recorded two species of odonates that are endemic to the Western Ghats, which are, the Pied Reed Tail Protosticta gravelyi and the Travancore Bamboo Tail Esme mudiensis.

  4. Growing stock and woody biomass assessment in Asola-Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary, Delhi, India.

    Kushwaha, S P S; Nandy, S; Gupta, Mohini

    2014-09-01

    Biomass is an important entity to understand the capacity of an ecosystem to sequester and accumulate carbon over time. The present study, done in collaboration with the Delhi Forest Department, focused on the estimation of growing stock and the woody biomass in the so-called lungs of Delhi--the Asola-Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary in northern Aravalli hills. The satellite-derived vegetation strata were field-inventoried using stratified random sampling procedure. Growing stock was calculated for the individual sample plots using field data and species-specific volume equations. Biomass was estimated from the growing stock and the specific gravity of the wood. Among the four vegetation types, viz. Prosopis juliflora, Anogeissus pendula, forest plantation and the scrub, the P. juliflora was found to be the dominant vegetation in the area, covering 23.43 km(2) of the total area. The study revealed that P. juliflora forest with moderate density had the highest (10.7 m(3)/ha) while A. pendula forest with moderate density had the lowest (3.6 m(3)/ha) mean volume. The mean woody biomass was also found to be maximum in P. juliflora forest with moderate density (10.3 t/ha) and lowest in A. pendula forest with moderate density (3.48 t/ha). The total growing stock was estimated to be 20,772.95 m(3) while total biomass worked out to be 19,366.83 t. A strong correlation was noticed between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the growing stock (R(2) = 0.84)/biomass (R(2) = 0.88). The study demonstrated that growing stock and the biomass of the woody vegetation in Asola-Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary could be estimated with high accuracy using optical remote sensing data. PMID:24859859

  5. Rediscovery of two rare butterflies Papilio elephenor Doubleday, 1845 and Shijimia moorei Leech, 1889 from proposed Ripu-Chirang Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    K. Choudhury

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Two rare butterflies Papilio elephenor Doubleday, 1886 and Moore’s Cupid Shijimia moorei Leech, 1889 were rediscovered from the proposed Ripu-Chirang Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India.

  6. A checklist of gilled mushrooms (Basidiomycota: Agaricomycetes) with diversity analysis in Hollongapar Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    Girish Gogoi; Vipin Parkash

    2015-01-01

    Hollongapar Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary is comprised of five distinct compartments.  A total of 138 species of gilled mushrooms belonging to 48 genera, 23 families, five orders of the class Agaricomycetes, division Basidiomycota, have been collected and analyzed. The order Agaricales was was found with the highest number of species (113), followed by Russulales (14), Polyporales (5), Cantharellales (4) and Boletales (2). The species Coprinellus disseminatus and Megacollybia rodmani have shown t...

  7. Community Structure and Seasonal Occurrence of Avian Fauna in Wetthigan Wildlife Sanctuary Magway Division, Myanmar (June, 2002 to July, 2003)

    Wetthigan Wildlife sanctuary is a small wetland in the dryzone area of Myanmar. It was established under the Department of Agricultural and Forest Notification No.275, since 1939; although there is no conservation management at present. The study period lasted for June, 2002 to July, 2003. A total of 130 bird species and their habitat requirements have been recorded from the seasonal survey. Biological observation on the flora and fauna in the sanctuary is being studied and classified as far as possible. The physical and chemical aspects are being studied in Monsoon, Winter and Summer. And then the impact of human activities were also have been investigated around the sanctuary during the study period. In Myanmar the most publics are lack of proper awareness on importance of conservation of wildlife that is the main threat to birds and habitat. Therefore, during the study period, the Environmental Education Programme have been presented at five primary schools in the study area. Finally, discussion and recommendations for the conservation of the avian community of the Wetthigan Wildlife Sancturary have been made based on the results of the present studies.

  8. Helminth parasite communities in anuran amphibians of Kalesar Wildlife Sanctuary (Haryana), India.

    Rizvi, Anjum N; Bhutia, Pasang T

    2010-10-01

    Helminth parasite fauna in anuran amphibia were investigated during the general faunistic surveys of Kalesar Wildlife Sanctuary, situated in Haryana state. Three species of amphibian hosts were found to harbour 12 genera of helminth parasites. The prevalence, intensity and abundance were studied. Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis harboured maximum parasite species followed by Fejervarya limnocharis and Duttaphrynus melanostictus. In E. cyanophlyctis, among nematode parasites, the genus Camallanus was most prevalent followed by Cosmocerca and Cosmocercoides, whereas, Rhabdias and Aplectana were the least prevalent genera. Among trematode parasites, Ganeo was the most prevalent genus and least was Diplodiscus. Acanthocephalus was recovered only once and no cestode infection was found. In F. limnocharis, the most prevalent nematode genus was Oxysomatium, followed by Cosmocerca and the only trematode recorded was Ganeo, whereas, cestode Proteocephalus was also recovered once. In D. melanostictus, only two nematode genera were recovered of which Oxysomatium was dominant followed by Cosmocerca. The helminth parasite community in anuran amphibia of Kalesar WLS comprised 52.9% of nematodes, 46.2% of trematodes, 0.58% cestodes and 0.29% acanthocephala. PMID:21966125

  9. The seasonality of butterflies in a semi-evergreen forest: Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, northeastern India

    Arun P. Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study spanning 3.7 years on the butterflies of Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary GWS (21km2, a semi-evergreen forest, in Jorhat District of Assam, northeastern India revealed 211 species of butterflies belonging to 115 genera including 19 papilionids and seven ‘rare’ and ‘very rare’ species as per Evans list of the Indian sub-continent (Great Blue Mime Papilio paradoxa telearchus; Brown Forest BobScobura woolletti; Snowy Angle Darpa pteria dealbatahas; Constable Dichorragia nesimachus; Grey Baron Euthalia anosia anosia; Sylhet Oakblue Arhopala silhetensis; Branded Yamfly Yasoda tripunctata. The butterflies showed a strong seasonality pattern in this forest with only one significant peak during the post monsoon (September-October when 118 species were in flight inside the forest which slowly declined to 92 species in November-December. Another peak (102 species was visible after winter from March to April. Species composition showed least similarity between pre-monsoon (March-May and post-monsoon (October-November seasons. The number of papilionid species were greater from July to December as compared from January to June. The findings of this study suggest that the pattern of seasonality in a semi-evergreen forest in northeastern India is distinct from that of the sub-tropical lowland forest in the Himalaya. Favourable logistics and rich diversity in GWS points to its rich potential in promoting ‘butterfly inclusive ecotourism’ in this remnant forest.

  10. Tree diversity and community characteristics in Talle Wildlife Sanctuary, Arunachal Pradesh, Eastern Himalaya, India

    Gyati Yam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in a temperate forest for enumeration of floristic diversity and community characteristics analysis of the Talle Wildlife Sanctuary. A random sampling approach was adopted. Altogether, 63 species were recorded from the sampled area (0.2 ha. Family dominance results showed that Lauraceae was the most dominant followed by Fagaceae. Seventy percent of species showed low frequency distribution and species having higher frequency classes were almost absent or represented by only a few species. Dominance distribution of species resulted in a log normal distribution pattern which further signifies that the forest community was heterogeneous in nature. Species Prediction and Diversity Estimation analysis categorized 80% of the species as a rare species group and 20% as abundant species group. Estimation of coefficient of variation showed that rare species have equal detection possibilities in the sampled area. Distribution of basal cover in different girth classes indicates a reverse trend to that of stand density. The results of this study show that the forest community composition is highly clustered and loosely colonized in nature.

  11. Diversity and distribution of spiders from Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    Dilip Kumar Kalita

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the identification of the spider assemblages with respect to their diversity and distribution in the semi evergreen forest, Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India. The paper aims to introduce this neglected Order- Araneae which is primarily unknown to Science particularly in Northeast India. A total of 95 species of spiders belonging to 56 genera and 18 families were recorded during the study from June-August and October-December, 2011. The species were identified using keys for Indian spiders from (Tikader, 1987; Platnick , 2011. Methodology included active searching at all layers from ground level to tree canopy layer accessible easily for hand collecting and visual surveys. This is the first attempt to report the spider assemblages and their microhabitat preferences from Assam, India. Such surveys are vital for conservation of these creatures and building a biodiversity database of this mega diverse group from a fragmented semi-evergreen forest ecosystem in Assam, India. This study is focused on the neglected diversity of spider fauna representing this semi evergreen forest.

  12. Landscape Metric Modeling - a Technique for Forest Disturbance Assessment in Shendurney Wildlife Sanctuary

    Subin Jose

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Deforestation and forest degradation are associated and progressive processes result in the anthropogenic stress, climate change, and conversion of the forest area into a mosaic of mature forest fragments, pasture, and degraded habitat. The present study addresses forest degradation assessment of landscape using landscape metrics. Geospatial techniques including GIS, remote sensing and fragstat methods are powerful tools in the assessment of forest degradation. The present study is carried out in Shendurney wildlife sanctuary located in the mega biodiversity hot spot of Western ghats, Kerala. A large extent of forest is affected by degradation in this region leading to depletion of forest biodiversity. For conservation of forest biodiversity and implementation of conservation strategies, forest degradation assessment of habitat destruction area is important. Two types of data are used in the study i.e. spatial and non-spatial data. Non-spatial data include both anthropogenic stress and climate data. The study shows that the disturbance index value ranges from 2.5 to 7.5 which has been reclassified into four disturbance zones as low disturbed, medium disturbed, high disturbed and very high disturbed. The analysis would play a key role in the formulation and implementation of forest conservation and management strategies.

  13. Population Ecology of the Endangered Himalayan Yew in Khokhan Wildlife Sanctuary of North Western Himalaya for Conservation Management

    Shreekar Pant; S.S. Samant

    2008-01-01

    The Himalayan Yew (Taxus baccata subsp, wallichiana) is an endangered native high value medicinal plant of the Himalayan Region. The several medicinal properties of the bark and leaves of this species have increased its risk of extinction due to pressures for utilization. It is also subjected to harvest for fuelwood. The species does not regenerate well from seed and that is another risk factor. The objective of this research was to investigate the population ecology of the species as a foundation for its conservation. Six forest communities in the Khokhan Wildlife Sanctuary where the species is present were sampled. The abundance of the species, impacts of harvesting and its current regeneration patterns indicate that it may soon be extirpated from the Sanctuary. A plan for conserving the remaining sub-populations is presented. It could provide a template for conservation in other locations where the species is at risk.

  14. Vegetation types, dominant compositions, woody plant diversity and stand structure in Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary of Northeast India.

    Majumdar, Koushik; Datta, B K

    2015-03-01

    Present study was carried out to assess the vegetation types, diversity and phytosociological status of woody plants in Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary of Tripura, Northeast India. Vegetation data was derived by 25 line transects (10 m wide and 500 m length, each 0.5 ha size). All woody species at >10 cm gbh (Girth at Breast Height) within each plots were measured and counted. A total of six forest types were classified by cluster analysis using Importance Value Index (IVI) of 289 woody species. Species diversity, forest structure and woody community associations were evaluated and discussed. One way ANOVA revealed significant differences in all species diversity measures and stand structure along the forest types. Distribution of stem density at ten different gbh classes showed reverse J-shaped curves. Population status of woody plants was also examined through grouping of all individuals into four population age stages viz. sapling ( or = 30 - 120 - 210 cm gbh) and old (> or =210 cm). To observe dominant composition and species population trend, IVI of top ten dominant species from all forest types were tabulated. The present study suggested that Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary is an important habitat in Tripura from floristic point of view and it should be conserved on priority basis for remaining wildlife endurances and monitor for forest livelihoods products for sustainable biodiversity conservation in this region. PMID:25895264

  15. Exudativory in the Bengal slow loris (Nycticebus bengalensis) in Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary, Tripura, northeast India.

    Swapna, N; Radhakrishna, Sindhu; Gupta, Atul K; Kumar, Ajith

    2010-02-01

    In this study we estimated the extent of exudativory in Nycticebus bengalensis and examined whether exudates can be considered as fallback foods. This study was carried out in Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary, northeastern India, in winter (December-February) and summer (March and April). We estimated time-activity budget using instantaneous sampling and used continuous focal animal sampling to record all instances and durations of feeding, over a total of 177 hr. Feeding accounted for 22.3+/-2.2% of the activity budget, with no seasonal difference. Bengal slow lorises fed on exudates, nectar, fruit, bark, invertebrates and avian eggs. In addition to scraping they also obtained exudates by gouging holes into the bark of trees. In winter, lorises almost exclusively fed on exudates (94.3% of winter feeding time). In summer, exudates (67.3%) and nectar from one species (22.3%) dominated the diet. This study identifies the Bengal slow loris as the most exudativorous loris. Exudates rather than being a staple fallback food, seem to be a preferred, patchily distributed and common food in the diet of the Bengal slow loris. Exudativory in this species is characterized by high selectivity among species and seasonal variation, which may be related to variations in productivity of exudates and their chemical composition. An understanding of these factors is necessary for predicting the response of this species to human disturbance such as logging. This study also underscores the importance of protecting some of the common species such as Terminalia belerica on which the loris feeds during periods of scarcity. PMID:19937974

  16. Habitat Suitability analysis of Koklass (Pucrasia macrolopha) Pheasant in Churdhar Wildlife Sanctuary of Himachal Pradesh, India using Geospatial Technology

    Eliza, K.; Sarma, K.

    2014-12-01

    Pheasants are at the brink of destruction due to degradation of forests, environmental pollution, climatic changes and extensive hunting of wild floras and faunas.The problem is more acute in the developing countries where wildlife and biodiversity conservation are often less prioritized due to more pressing demands of food security and poverty alleviation. Koklass Pheasant (Pucrasia macrolopha) species is distributed from Afghanistan and Pakistan in the east along the Himalayas to southeastern Tibet, western China and southeastern Mongolia.This species is grouped under endangered species in Red Data Book of Zoological Survey of India and also classified as least concern species according to IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.Conservation biologists and managers need a range of both classical analyses and specific modern tools to face the increasing threats to biodiversity. Among these tools, habitat-suitability modeling has recently emerged as a relevant technique to assess global impacts to define wide conservation priorities.The present study is carried out using remote sensing satellite imagery and GIS modeling technique for assessing habitat suitability of Koklass Pheasants and finding out the habitat factors influencing the Koklass distribution in Churdhar Wildlife Sanctuary, India. Effective management and conservation of wildlife populations and their habitats largely depend on our ability to understand and predict species-habitat interactions. Different thematic maps viz., land use/cover, forest types, drainage buffer, multiple ring buffers of sighting locations and multiple ring buffers of roads have been prepared to support the objective of the study. The Weighted Overlay Analysis model is used for identifying different potential areas of habitat for this endangered species. The most suitable area for Koklass Pheasant within the Wildlife Sanctuary is found to be about 23.8 percent of the total area which is due to favourable habitat conditions for the

  17. Odonate Diversity of Manjeera Wildlife Sanctuary with notes on Female Polymorphism of Neurothemis tullia (Drury, 1773 (Odonata: Libellulidae and Some Species Hitherto Unreported From Andhra Pradesh, India

    Kante Krishna Prasad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A total of 28 species of odonates, including 18 species of dragonflies (Suborder Anisoptera belonging to 3 families and 10 species of damselflies (Suborder Zygoptera belonging to two families were recorded from the Manjeera Wildlife Sanctuary between December 2010 to October 2012. The highest diversity of odonates was that of family Libellulidae (50%, followed by Coenagrionidae (32.14%, Aeshnidae (10.71%, Gomphidae (3.57% and Platycnemididae (3.57%. Four taxa, namely - Anaciaeschna jaspidea (Burmeister, 1839, Coenagrion dyeri (Fraser, 1924, Pseudagrion decorum (Rambur, 1842 and Rhodischnura nursei (Morton, 1907 are reported for the first time from Andhra Pradesh. We are also reporting for the first time the female polymorphism of Neurothemis tullia (Drury, 1773 (Anisoptera; Libellulidae from the Manjeera Wildlife Sanctuary, Medak District, Andhra Pradesh.

  18. A checklist of gilled mushrooms (Basidiomycota: Agaricomycetes with diversity analysis in Hollongapar Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    Girish Gogoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hollongapar Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary is comprised of five distinct compartments.  A total of 138 species of gilled mushrooms belonging to 48 genera, 23 families, five orders of the class Agaricomycetes, division Basidiomycota, have been collected and analyzed. The order Agaricales was was found with the highest number of species (113, followed by Russulales (14, Polyporales (5, Cantharellales (4 and Boletales (2. The species Coprinellus disseminatus and Megacollybia rodmani have shown the highest (8.26 and the lowest density (0.05, respectively.  A total of 24 species, e.g., Termitomyces albuminosus, Marasmius curreyi, Marasmiellus candidus, Leucocoprinus medioflavus, Mycena leaiana, Hygrocybe miniata, Collybia chrysoropha, Gymnopus confluens were common with frequency percentage of 11.9, whereas Megacollybia rodmani with less frequency percentage (2.4 was found only in few quadrates of the sanctuary.  The highly abundant species were Termitomyces medius (91.7 and Coprinellus disseminatus (86.8, and less abundant species were Psilocybe wayanadensis (1.0 and Lepiota sp. (1.0 in the study site.  The order of the species richness index (R compartment wise was 2>3>4>5>1. Both the Shannon diversity index and Simpson diversity index of agarics was maximum (1.88, 0.98 in compartment 2, whereas minimum (1.72, 0.95 in compartment 1 and 5, respectively.  Moreover, the compartment 2 was found very much similar with compartment 3 and very less similar with compartment 1. 

  19. Abundance of food plant species and food habits of Rhinoceros unicorns Linn. in Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    P. Konwar; M.K. Saikia; P.K. Saikia

    2009-01-01

    Food habits and abundance of food plant species of Rhinoceros unicornis in Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary were studied from January 1999 through December 2001. Totally 32 numbers of Rhino food plants were identified, of which 15 were grasses, four shrubs, five aquatic hydrophytes and eight tree species (21 terrestrial and 11 aquatic). During the dry season, the Rhino feeds on almost 90% food items from Hemarthria compressa, Arundo donax, Phragmites karka, Cerex rubro-brumee etc. The other shor...

  20. The food habits of the Himalayan Brown Bear Ursus arctos (Mammalia: Carnivora: Ursidae in Kugti Wildlife Sanctuary, Himachal Pradesh, India

    Bipan C. Rathore

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We documented the food habits of the Himalayan Brown Bear Ursus arctos in Kugti Wildlife Sanctuary, Himachal Pradesh, India, between 2002 and 2004 using scat analysis (n=222, direct observation (n=57, and feeding sign observations (n=57.  We concluded that Himalayan Brown Bears lead a predominantly herbivorous life style as plant matter occurred more frequently in scats (79% than animal matter (21%.  During summer, monsoon and fall, the frequency occurrence of plant matter was 72.2%, 77% and 91% respectively.  During early summer, brown bears foraged primarily on green vegetation such as Rumex nepalensis followed by Chaerophyllum reflexum.  Based on direct feeding observations, brown bears were observed to be feeding on 29 species of plants including agricultural crops and one fungi, Morchella esculenta.  The overuse by livestock, decline in local herbs and excessive extraction of high altitudinal medicinal plants in this habitat may pose a threat to the fragmented brown bear population. 

  1. Abundance of food plant species and food habits of Rhinoceros unicorns Linn. in Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    P. Konwar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Food habits and abundance of food plant species of Rhinoceros unicornis in Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary were studied from January 1999 through December 2001. Totally 32 numbers of Rhino food plants were identified, of which 15 were grasses, four shrubs, five aquatic hydrophytes and eight tree species (21 terrestrial and 11 aquatic. During the dry season, the Rhino feeds on almost 90% food items from Hemarthria compressa, Arundo donax, Phragmites karka, Cerex rubro-brumee etc. The other short grasses such as Cynodon dactylon, Andropogon ssp., Cenchrus ciliaris, Chrysopogon aciculatus and tender and young shoots and twigs of Schelristechya fuesche, Saccharum spontaneum, Lagerstroemia flosreginae etc. are consumed in limited portions. The rhino consumes 11 cultivated crops and vegetables, viz., Ricinus communis, Oryza sativa, Solanum melongena, Lycopersicon esculentum, Solanum tuberosum, Brassica nigra, Luffa cylindrica, Luffa acutangula, Cucurbita moschata, Cucumis sativus and Ipomoea batatas etc. Highest density of food plant species observed in the study area were Cynodon dactylon (167.5/m2, Hemarthria compressa (73.75/m2, Vetiveria zizanioides (56/m2, Saccharum ravannae (51.5/m2, Pharagmites karka (50.75/m2, Leersia hexandra (46.75/m2, Brachiarea pseudointerrupta (40/m2 and Eichhornia crassipes (35/m2.

  2. Spatial distribution and functional feeding groups of aquatic insects in a stream of Chakrashila Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    Barman B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic insects play important role in ecosystem functioning viz. nutrient cycling, primary production, decomposition and material translocation. The functional feeding group (FFG approach is an attempt to classify organisms, especially insects, according to their role in the processing of organic matter. An investigation during 2011–2013 was carried out on aquatic insects in different stretches of a stream of Chakrashila Wildlife Sanctuary located in western Assam, North East India which is designated as Key Biodiversity Area (KBA by IUCN. Physico-chemical properties of water of the stream like water temperature, dissolved oxygen, free-carbondioxide, pH, total alkalinity, electrical conductivity, phosphate and nitrate were estimated to correlate the aquatic insects of specific functional feeding groups with water quality. A total of seventeen species was recorded during the study period. Record of nine species in first year and fourteen species in second year under different functional feeding groups (FFG showed altitudinal variation. Highest percentage of predators was found in upstream. Collectors were recorded in upstream and downstream and shredders were recorded in midstream.

  3. Biodiversity and Indigenous Uses of Medicinal Plant in the Chandra Prabha Wildlife Sanctuary, Chandauli District, Uttar Pradesh

    Maurya Santosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional medicines are very important part of Indian culture. In this study the outcome of two-year study of ethnomedicinal uses of plants in Chandra Prabha Wildlife Sanctuary (CPWLS and nearby area is reported. Information related to different plants which are used by local community in the treatment of many common diseases and well-being in the area was collected. Data on the use of medicinal plants were collected using structured interview of about 122 participants and thorough observations and conversations with local communities. Approximately 100 plants belonging to 43 families used by the local healers were reported in this study. The plant species with the highest fidelity level (Fl were Holarrhena antidysenterica, Lawsonia inermis, Gymnema sylvestre, Dalbergia sissoo, Cassia fistula Linn., Butea monosperma (Lam. Kuntze., Boerhaavia diffusa Linn., Albizia lebbeck Benth., Aegle marmelos Correa., Sphaeranthus indicus Linn., and Solanum surattense Burm. f. The most frequent ailments reported were hepatitis, jaundice, constipation, and skin and urinary problems. The parts of the plants most frequently used were fruit, roots, and whole plants (17% followed by leaves (16% and bark (15%. This study presents new research efforts and perspectives on the search for new drugs based on local uses of medicinal plants.

  4. Diversity of soil fungi in dry deciduous forest of Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary, Western Ghats of southern India

    Shivakumar P.Banakar; B.Thippeswamy; B.V.Thirumalesh; K.J.Naveenkumar

    2012-01-01

    We assessed soil fungal diversity in the dry deciduous forest of a Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary of the Western Ghats (210.31 m a.s.(l).; N 13°44′ and E75°37′).Soil samples were collected by random mixed sampling during winter (November,2008),summer (March,2009) and monsoon (August,2009) seasons,and physico-chemical parameters were recorded.During winter,summer,and monsoon seasons,49,45 and 49of fungal species belongs to 20,18 and 19 of genera were isolated,respectively.Isolated soil fungi were mainly of the Mitosporic fungi,followed by Zygomycotina,Ascomycotina,Oomycotina and Coelomycetes.Indices of diversity,dominance and fisher alpha during winter,summer and monsoon seasons were 3.756,3.638 and 3.738 (H′),0.9737,0.9694and 0.9726 (1-D) and 18.84,29.83 and 19.46 (α),respectivelv.Spearman's (r) correlation coefficient of fungal population with physicochemical parameters of soils showed significantly positive and negative correlations (p<0.01) during winter,summer and monsoon seasons.Physico-chemical soil parameters played an important role in the occurrence,diversity,distribution,and relative abundance of fungal species in the tropical dry deciduous forest soil.

  5. Habitat Gardening--How Schoolyards Are Being Transformed into Wildlife Sanctuaries.

    Dunne, Niall

    2000-01-01

    Students from JFK High School and community gardening clubs in the Bronx cleaned up wetlands adjacent to the school and created various small theme gardens supporting diverse wildlife. Nationally, the schoolyard habitat movement aims to create stimulating outdoor environments where students can learn about local ecology, biodiversity, and…

  6. Forest resource use pattern in Kedarnath wildlife sanctuary and its fringe areas (a case study from Western Himalaya, India)

    The rural population of Himalaya has been strongly dependent on the forest resources for their livelihood for generations. The present study, carried out at three different altitudes of Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary (KWLS), explored forest resource-use patterns to understand rural peoples' dependency on the adjacent forests. A total of six forests were selected and the seven dependent villages were surveyed for the study of forest resource use patterns in relation to their socioeconomic status. Average fuelwood and fodder consumption were found to be 2.42 kg/capita/day and 43.96 kg/household/day respectively which was higher than the earlier reported values. Average fuelwood consumption by temporary dhaba (roadside refreshment establishments) owners (52.5 kg/dhaba/day) is much higher than the permanent villagers. Average cultivated land per family was less than 1 ha (0.56 ha). Inaccessibility of the area and deprived socio-economic status of the locals are largely responsible for the total dependency of the local inhabitants on nearby forests for fuelwood, fodder and other life supporting demands. Extensive farming of fuelwood trees on less used, barren land and establishment of fodder banks could be the alternative to bridge the gap between the demand and supply. Active participation of local people is mandatory for the conservation of these forests. - Highlights: • We studied energy consumption at different altitudes in Western Himalaya of India. • On an average, fuelwood and fodder consumption is 2.42 kg/capita/day and 43.96 kg/household/day respectively. • Maximum fuelwood (3.24 kg/capita/day) at higher and fodder consumption (1800 kg/household/day) at middle altitudes was recorded. • Dhabas (roadside refreshment establishments) consume much more fuelwood as compared to the permanent villagers (P<0.000, t-test). • Fuelwood consumption showed significant negative relationship with LPG (−0.87) and kerosene oil (−0.89)

  7. Use of GIS technique in mapping and conservation of medicinal plants – a case study in Shoolpaneshwar wildlife sanctuary, Gujarat

    Anjali Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available (Abstract selected from presentation in National Conference on Biodiversity of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Collection, Characterization and Utilization, held at Anand, India during November 24-25, 2010  Systematic mapping of species occurrence in a given area provides distributional pattern related to ecological parameters and their quantum of availability. It also gives an insight into the region where conservation has to be initiated. Using Arc GIS of version 9.3 and Cartalinx, distribution maps were prepared for 72 medicinal plants species of the Shoolpaneshwar wildlife sanctuary in Rajpipla East Forest Division of Narmada district in south Gujarat. Presence of tropical moist and dry deciduous mix forests makes the area a rich depository of many medicinal and other useful plants. It also forms catchments area of two major rivers, named Narmada and Karjan and two small rivers, Devganga and Tarav. Based on the parameters, like the recorded uses of medicinal plants, extent of utilization by the local inhabitants, commercial collection, rarity and threat factors, the list of 72 species was prioritized for mapping. The maps indicated not only the presence or absence of a species in a given forest compartment, but also showed the density classes for all the 72 selected species and 98 compartments. These maps will help in sustainable collection of medicinal plants, avoiding overexploitation of commercialized species. It will also help in streamlining the conservation measures such as germplasm collection and implementing suitable regeneration methods. Highlighting the significant results of our work, the paper intends to draw the attention of delegates of the seminar for undertaking such studies in other forest pockets.

  8. How many tigers Panthera tigris are there in Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand? An estimate using photographic capture-recapture sampling

    Simcharoen, S.; Pattanavibool, A.; Karanth, K.U.; Nichols, J.D.; Kumar, N.S.

    2007-01-01

    We used capture-recapture analyses to estimate the density of a tiger Panthera tigris population in the tropical forests of Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand, from photographic capture histories of 15 distinct individuals. The closure test results (z = 0.39, P = 0.65) provided some evidence in support of the demographic closure assumption. Fit of eight plausible closed models to the data indicated more support for model Mh, which incorporates individual heterogeneity in capture probabilities. This model generated an average capture probability $\\hat p$ = 0.42 and an abundance estimate of $\\widehat{N}(\\widehat{SE}[\\widehat{N}])$ = 19 (9.65) tigers. The sampled area of $\\widehat{A}(W)(\\widehat{SE}[\\widehat{A}(W)])$ = 477.2 (58.24) km2 yielded a density estimate of $\\widehat{D}(\\widehat{SE}[\\widehat{D}])$ = 3.98 (0.51) tigers per 100 km2. Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary could therefore hold 113 tigers and the entire Western Forest Complex c. 720 tigers. Although based on field protocols that constrained us to use sub-optimal analyses, this estimated tiger density is comparable to tiger densities in Indian reserves that support moderate prey abundances. However, tiger densities in well-protected Indian reserves with high prey abundances are three times higher. If given adequate protection we believe that the Western Forest Complex of Thailand could potentially harbour >2,000 wild tigers, highlighting its importance for global tiger conservation. The monitoring approaches we recommend here would be useful for managing this tiger population.

  9. Analysis of Land Use/Cover Changes and Animal Population Dynamics in a Wildlife Sanctuary in East Africa

    Charles Ndegwa Mundia; Yuji Murayama

    2009-01-01

    Changes in wildlife conservation areas have serious implications for ecological systems and the distribution of wildlife species. Using the Masai Mara ecosystem as an example, we analyzed long-term land use/cover changes and wildlife population dynamics. Multitemporal satellite images, together with physical and social economic data were employed in a post classification analysis with GIS to analyze outcomes of different land use practices and policies. The results show rapid land use/cover c...

  10. Some aspects of the ecology of the Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica (Erxleben, 1777 in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India and their conservation implications

    N. Baskaran

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica, an endemic species to India, is widely distributed from the evergreen to moist and dry deciduous forests of Western and Eastern Ghats and the central Indian hills. We studied its population distribution, activity, feeding, ranging and nesting behaviour across three major habitats in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India, during 1998-2000 to manage the species effectively. Extensive survey of the three major habitats—tropical moist, dry deciduous and dry thorn—in the sanctuary shows that its distribution is continuous in moist and dry deciduous forests with good canopy contiguity and patchy along riverine areas in dry thorn and dry deciduous forests with sparse trees and broken canopy. Density estimates using 55 direct sightings from 199 km line transects show a mean of 2.9 (plus or minus 0.313 squirrels/km2. Daylight activity and feeding patterns assessed through 24,098 minutes of focal sampling reveal that animals feed and rest equal amounts of time. The diet constitutes seeds, bark, petioles, leaves and fruits from 25 plants, with Tectona grandis as the principal food source (41%. Its home range size varied from 0.8-1.7 ha with a mean of 1.3ha. Nesting characteristics assessed through 83 nests surveyed along 54km transects showed that the squirrel uses 15 of the 33 tree species found, with higher preference to Schleichera oleosa and Mangifera indica. Nest trees are significantly larger in height, gbh and canopy contiguity than nearest non-nest trees, which are attributed to better protection and escape from predators. Maintenance of diverse natural habitats and reduction in anthropogenic pressure are measures suggested for the conservation of giant squirrel populations in the study area.

  11. Some aspects of the ecology of the Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica (Erxleben, 1777) in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India and their conservation implications

    N. Baskaran; Venkatesan, S.; J. Mani; Srivastava, S. K.; Desai, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Indian Giant Squirrel Ratufa indica, an endemic species to India, is widely distributed from the evergreen to moist and dry deciduous forests of Western and Eastern Ghats and the central Indian hills. We studied its population distribution, activity, feeding, ranging and nesting behaviour across three major habitats in the tropical forests of Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, southern India, during 1998-2000 to manage the species effectively. Extensive survey of the three major habitats—tropi...

  12. Biodiversity and Phytosociological Studies of Upstream and Downstream Riparian Areas of Pakistan: Special Reference to Taunsa Wildlife Sanctuary and Keti Shah Forests

    Pakistan riparian zone mostly belongs to Sindh and Punjab provinces and prone to climatic problems and anthropogenic activities. The research was conduct to estimate and compare the structure and composition of riverine floral diversity in low riparian zone of River Indus. The data was collected from Keti Shah forest and Taunsa wildlife sanctuary. Total 14259 plants/individuals were recorded, which belong to 54 plant species with 18 different families. In Taunsa pre-monsoon survey, total 30 plant species were found with 4476 plants from 16 different families. In Taunsa post-monsoon survey total 3348 individuals were recorded from 20 plant species and 9 families. Similarly, in Keti Shah forest, total 3975 individual were recorded from 22 species and 11 families during the pre-monsoon season and 2460 plants were recorded in post-monsoon season, belonging to 16 species and 10 families. These species mostly belong to Fabaceae, Poaceae, Cyperaceae and Asclepiadaceae. Different phytosociological parameters indicate Tamarix dioca, Cynodon dactylon, Desmostachya bipinnata, Imperata cylindrica, Fimbristylis hispidula, Acacia nilotica, Phragmites karka, Tamarix sp. and Saccharum bengalense as dominant species. The biodiversity in upstream and downstream areas were rich in pre-monsoon season in comparison to post-monsoon season in surveyed areas. This study is useful for management of the area in the future as conservation strategies can be made through considering the adaptive tree species in future plantation and endangered species can be conserved. (author)

  13. Structure, Composition and Dominance � Diversity Relations in Three Forest Types of a Part of Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary, Central Himalaya, India

    Dinesh Prasad SEMWAL

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant diversity assessment was carried out on the basis of species richness, tree crown cover and dominance-diversity pattern in different forests of Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary (KWLS, Central Himalaya, India during 2006-2009. The maximum tree species richness (10 spp. was observed in Rhododendron arboreum Sm. dominated mixed forest and minimum in Quercus leucotrichophora A. Camus. forest (8 spp.. Maximum tree density (170 trees/ha and high importance value index (89.68 was found in Q. semecarpifolia Sm. forest. Mixed Rhododendron arboreum Sm. forest showed high tree diversity (H=0.96, while shrub were found highest in Quercus leucotrichophora A. Camus forest (H=0.62 and herb diversity in Q. semecarpifolia Sm.forest (H=0.73 respectively Maximum tree crown cover (82% was observed in Rhododendron arboreum Sm. dominated mixed forest while minimum tree crown cover (58% was observed in Q. semecarpifolia Sm. forest. In general random distribution pattern (A/F ratio was observed in all three types of forest. Alterations of land use pattern and population pressure are found to be main cause of increase in resources exploitation and that ultimately decreases species richness and diversity. Agro-forestry, alternate use of sites for resources and providing a recovery period to the forests are some of the strategies suggested for forest conservation, management and sustainable utilization of resources by the local people.

  14. Ecological observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata: Agamidae in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India

    S.K. Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827 were undertaken in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India during the monsoons (July following quadrat sampling that was time-constrained. The study revealed that the area is one of the preferable habitats for the species. A population analysis showed that the relative abundance of the subadults was higher, followed by juveniles and adults during the study period. The beginning of activity of the lizards was found to vary over the study period depending on prevailing weather conditions. The activity pattern was bimodal, except across rain events. The study revealed two important ecological findings about these lizards; complete sealing of burrow during rains which differed from partial sealing on normal days and complete diurnal cycle of body colour changes during the monsoon. Feeding was the predominant activity of this lizard followed by basking, resting and chasing each other. The adult lizards were found to be strictly herbivorous, in spite of an abundance of insects available in the area during the period. Subadults and juveniles were found to eat both plant parts, as well as insects. Microhabitat use such as inside grass clumps was found to be higher followed by barren ground, under shade and on stones.

  15. Thracian Sanctuaries

    Maglova, Penka; Stoev, Alexey

    The greater part of ancient Thrace lies in the territory of modern Bulgaria. Rock-cut sanctuaries are characteristic elements of the Thracian cultural tradition, both rock-cut monuments in mountainous regions and temples and tombs within barrows in the lowlands.

  16. Wildlife

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes wildlife observations on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) between 1992 and 2009.

  17. Countering the lingering threat of the Abu Sayyaf group

    Cohn, Stephen C.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis will argue that the most effective strategy for eradicating the U.S. designated Foreign Terrorist Organization, the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG), is to bolster the current peace talks between the Republic of the Philippines and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). The MILF has been providing support and sanctuary to the ASG which has hindered U.S.-Philippine counter-terror operations. This thesis will explain why a shift in U.S.-Philippine strategy is required by examining what...

  18. A preliminary study on the activity budget of post released Eastern Hoolock Gibbon Hoolock leuconedys (Mammalia: Primates: Hylobatidae) in Mehao Wildlife Sanctuary, Arunachal Pradesh, India

    Kuladeep Roy; Himani Nautiyal; Soumya Dasgupta

    2015-01-01

    The Wildlife Trust of India has taken a long term responsibility to identify a suitable habitat for the threatened families of Eastern Hoolock Gibbon from a village called Dello in Arunachal Pradesh to a nearby forested area which was the earlier home of this species. There is an ongoing successful rescue and translocation programme since November, 2011 in which four Eastern Hoolock Gibbon families comprising 11 individuals were translocated in three different habitat types in and around the ...

  19. Wildlife

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the significant activities conducted in 1994 to monitor the wildlife resources of the Site. Wildlife populations inhabiting the Hanford Site are monitored in order to measure the status and condition of the populations and assess effects of Hanford operations

  20. Wildlife

    Cadwell, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the significant activities conducted in 1994 to monitor the wildlife resources of the Site. Wildlife populations inhabiting the Hanford Site are monitored in order to measure the status and condition of the populations and assess effects of Hanford operations.

  1. 76 FR 20368 - Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/Fish Screen Facility Protection...

    2011-04-12

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/ Fish Screen...) for the proposed Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/Fish Screen Facility...) pumping plant and fish screen facility. This notice advises the public that we intend to...

  2. Sanctuaries of urban sociability

    Greve, Anni

    : It shares qualities with, or can be deprived of, the orthodoxy of the religious sanctuary. Secondly, they function as sanctuaries in two historical contexts. They can be studied either as an integral part of the political regime or alongside the public realm of the political elite. My focus is the...... response to, and in conditions of, social change and unrest. We see a revival of religions in modern urban societies, or the birth of ‘The Post Secular City’ (Beaumont 2008). Less attention has been paid to similar mechanisms in the era of early modernism. The paper points to ways by which religious...

  3. Sanctuaries of urban sociability

    Greve, Anni

    latter. Thirdly, they are not perceived of as pockets of resistance; however, the sanctuaries studied have offered possibilities for acquiring a social etiquette, aesthetic skills and a social morality which point beyond the local community or the lodge formations, irregular intrigues and power plays of...... sanctuaries were reinvented during Tokugawa. In this historical period Buddhism and Shinto were thoroughly intertwined (Reader 2005). People of Edo ‘picked and mixed’ from both religions. The focus is on issues of practice and on levels of engagement in a variety of events as indices of religiosity....

  4. Iran: what nuclear sanctuary?

    The author continues his study of Iran and its implicit nuclear strategy by showing us the three circles of sanctuary that it contains. He shows to what extent this country, with its strong and ancient geopolitical identity, has managed to restore its rank at the centre of the geostrategic and geo-economic chessboard of the region. (author)

  5. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  6. National Marine Sanctuary Digital Boundary Files

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of these sanctuaries are...

  7. Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  8. Monitor National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  9. Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and othermanaged areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries...

  10. Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  11. Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  12. Grays Reef National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and othermanaged areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  13. Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  14. Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  15. Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of these sanctuaries are...

  16. Wildlife

    The Hanford Site serves a refuge for migratory waterfowl, upland game birds, and a variety of mammals. These wildlife have unrestricted access to several areas near site facilities (primarily waste-water ponds) that contain low levels of radionuclides attributable to site operations. Sampling is performed routinely in the vicinity of operating areas where the highest potential exists for uptake of radionuclides by wildlife. The number of animals that visit these areas is small compared to the total population in the area, and, as a result, human consumption of an animal from one of the sampling locations is unlikely. Nevertheless, these samples help provide an estimate of the maximum potential dose impact if onsite game were consumed. Fish sampling is also performed routinely along the Hanford reach of the Columbia River. Results provide an indication of the average radionuclide concentrations attributable to Hanford in local fish so that the potential dose impact to humans for this pathway can be evaluated. Analytical results of terrestrial wildlife samples collected during 1981 were very similar to those observed in recent previous years. Samples of fish collected from the Columbia River along the Hanford Site showed no discernible difference in radionuclide concentration compared to samples collected upstream of the Site. The dose that would be received by a person following consumption of any of the sampled species at the maximum radionuclide concentration observed in 1982 would be well within the applicable DOE dose standards

  17. Prehistoric sanctuaries in Daunia

    Antonello, E; Tunzi, A M; Zupone, M Lo

    2013-01-01

    Daunia is a region in northern Apulia with many interesting archaeological sites, particularly of the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Beginning from the fifth millennium BC, the farmers living in the wide plain of Daunia dug hypogea and holes in sites that could be considered prehistoric sanctuaries. The characteristics of the rows of holes indicate a ritual use, and the archaeologists tend to exclude other applications, such as post holes and cultivations. The rows have possibly an astronomical orientation, and in the sanctuary discovered near Ordona, some stars of the Centaurus-Crux group (may be alpha Centauri itself) could have been used as targets. In past centuries, astronomers and scholars have remarked this spectacular region of the sky, and its possible relevance for the ancient civilizations was pointed out for example by G.V. Schiaparelli in 1903. In his work on the astronomy in the Old Testament, he mentioned in particular the observations of the astronomer W.S. Jacob and of other scholars. It would be ...

  18. Abrasive Blasting Unit (ABU) - 16270

    NUKEM Technologies was contracted to supply a dry, automated drum belt (tumbling) Abrasive Blasting Unit (ABU) to the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission in Ispra, Italy. The ABU was installed in the centralised radioactive waste management area of the JRC-Ispra site in Italy. The unit is to be employed for the decontamination to clearance levels of slightly contaminated metal components and, where practical, concrete or heavy concrete (density ∼3200 kg/m3) blocks arising from the dismantling of nuclear facilities. The presentation is based on the successful construction and installation of the ABU at the JRC Ispra site. Among the several possibilities of adapting conventional abrasive units to nuclear applications, an automatic tumbling machine was preferred, due to the larger output and (mainly) for the ease of operation, with minimum direct handling of contaminated material by operators, thus satisfying the ALARA principle. Consideration was also given to Belgoprocess' successful experience with a predecessor, similar unit. After adequate size reduction batches of up to about 800 kg of material to be decontaminated are automatically introduced into the blasting chamber. Pieces between 100 mm and 800 mm long, between 100 mm and 500 mm wide and between 5 mm and 300 mm high can be effectively treated in the unit, the maximum weight of a single piece being limited to 100 kg. Short lengths of pipe may be included; the final dimensions of pipe to be decontaminated will be established during the nuclear commissioning tests. Other components with hard-to-reach surfaces may also be included. The content of the chamber is tumbled by two bladed drums, while sharp steel grit is sprayed onto the contaminated components, thus removing the surface layer including any contamination. From experience, 30 minutes of treatment is sufficient to remove contamination to levels below expected clearance levels for most materials. The decontaminated components are removed

  19. Putting the spotlight on internally displaced animals (IDAs): a survey of primate sanctuaries in Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

    Trayford, Hannah R; Farmer, Kay H

    2013-02-01

    As anthropogenic activity makes deeper incursions into forests, fragmenting habitat, wildlife is forced into closer proximity to humans leading to increased incidences of human-wildlife conflict and wildlife displacement. These same incursions facilitate poaching for the commercial trade in dead and live animals. As a direct result, the number of sanctuaries and internally displaced animals (IDAs) in need of sanctuary placement and rehabilitation are increasing. We focus on internally displaced primates given the prevalence of primate-focused facilities and anthropomorphic considerations surrounding this taxonomic group. Surveys were distributed globally to map the extent and range of native primate sanctuaries and species. Over 70 facilities care for more than 6,000 native primates comprising 64 species, with almost half listed as endangered or critically endangered. As not all sanctuaries were identified at the time of the survey distribution, we estimate that the actual number of facilities is closer to double this number with a captive population in excess of 10,000 individual primates. Native primate sanctuaries hold significant numbers of primates in long-term captive care, with less than half (37%) identified as candidates for release. The surveyed sanctuary population accounts for 35% of the world's captive primates, as compared to ISIS-registered (where ISIS is International Species Information System) zoological facilities, although we estimate that the actual population is closer to 58%. For some species, the sanctuary population represents the only population in captivity. We discuss the prevalence of range-state sanctuaries and their primate populations, and issues surrounding their future development and management. PMID:23097324

  20. Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  1. Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  2. Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  3. Strengthened enforcement enhances marine sanctuary performance

    Brendan P. Kelaher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine sanctuaries are areas where the extraction of biota is not permitted. Although most marine sanctuaries have a positive influence on biotic communities, not all sanctuaries are meeting their conservation objectives. Amidst possible explanations (e.g., size, age and isolation, insufficient enforcement is often speculated to be a key driver of marine sanctuary underperformance. Despite this, there are few studies directly linking quantitative enforcement data to changes in biotic communities within marine sanctuaries. Here, we used an asymmetrical-BACI experimental design from 2006–2012 to test whether new enforcement initiatives enhanced abundances of target fishes and threatened species in an existing large sub-tropical marine sanctuary relative to areas open to fishing. Implementation of the new enforcement initiatives in 2010 was associated with a 201% increase in annual fine rate and a significant increase in target fish and elasmobranch abundance, as well as sightings of a critically-endangered shark, in the marine sanctuary relative to areas open to fishing. Overall, these results demonstrate that strengthening enforcement can have a rapid positive influence on target fish and perhaps threatened species in a subtropical marine sanctuary. From this, we contend that increased enforcement guided by risk-based compliance planning and operations may be a useful first step for improving underperforming marine sanctuaries.

  4. Wildlife Displacement and Dispersal Area Reduction by Human Activities within Kimana Group Ranch Corridor Near Amboseli, Kenya

    McNaught, Megan

    2007-01-01

    The Tsavo/Amboseli Ecosystem represents one of the major remaining wildlife conservation blocks in Kenya. This ecosystem consists of four protected areas which are safe havens for wildlife: Amboseli National Park, Kimana Wildlife Sanctuary, Tsavo West National Park, and Chyulu Hills. This research focused on the wildlife displacement and dispersal…

  5. Hamiguitan Range: A sanctuary for native flora.

    Amoroso, Victor B; Aspiras, Reyno A

    2011-01-01

    Hamiguitan Range is one of the wildlife sanctuaries in the Philippines having unique biodiversity resources that are at risk due to forest degradation and conversion of forested land to agriculture, shifting cultivation, and over-collection. Thus, it is the main concern of this research to identify and assess the endemic and endangered flora of Hamiguitan Range. Field reconnaissance and transect walk showed five vegetation types namely: agro-ecosystem, dipterocarp, montane, typical mossy and mossy-pygmy forests. Inventory of plant species revealed 163 endemic species, 35 threatened species, and 33 rare species. Assessment of plants also showed seven species as new record in Mindanao and one species as new record in the Philippines. Noteworthy is the discovery of Nepenthes micramphora, a new species of pitcher plant found in the high altitudes of Hamiguitan Range. This species is also considered site endemic, rare, and threatened. The result of the study also showed that the five vegetation types of Mt. Hamiguitan harbor a number of endangered, endemic, and rare species of plants. Thus, the result of this study would serve as basis for the formulation of policies for the protection and conservation of these species and their habitats before these plants become extinct. PMID:23961098

  6. 78 FR 16705 - Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/Fish Screen Facility Protection...

    2013-03-18

    ... methods, including public notices in local newspapers and a notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 26569... Fish and Wildlife Service Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/ Fish Screen... (PCGID-PID) Pumping Plan/Fish Screen Facility Protection Project is now available. The final...

  7. 78 FR 76317 - Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/Fish Screen Facility Protection...

    2013-12-17

    ... Register (77 FR 26569, May 4, 2012). We held a public meeting to solicit comments on the Draft EIS/EIR on... Fish and Wildlife Service Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/ Fish Screen...-PID) Pumping Plan/Fish Screen Facility Protection Project is now available. The ROD includes...

  8. 77 FR 26569 - Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/Fish Screen Facility Protection...

    2012-05-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Llano Seco Riparian Sanctuary Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/ Fish Screen... Unit Restoration and Pumping Plant/Fish Screen Facility Protection Project in Glenn and Butte Counties... and Provident Irrigation Districts (PCGID-PID) pumping plant and fish screen facility. The draft...

  9. THE YARMOUKIAN POTTERY ASSEMBLAGE OF TELL ABU SUWWAN, JORDAN

    Al Nahar, Maysoon; Kafafi, Zeidan

    2015-01-01

    The archaeological excavations conducted at the site Tell Abu Suwwan indicated that it was continuously occupied during two main periods from the Middle Pre-Pottery Neolithic B through the Pottery Neolithic (Yarmoukian). The main focus of this paper is to study the pottery assemblage encountered in the Yarmoukian strata at Abu Tell Suwwan. Excavations at Tell Abu Suwwan in 2005 - 2008 yielded a total of 488 pieces of Yarmoukian pottery. The sample under study includes 86 Yarmoukian pottery sh...

  10. 77 FR 27185 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    2012-05-09

    ... Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council AGENCY: Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS... the following vacant seats on the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council...

  11. 40 CFR 230.40 - Sanctuaries and refuges.

    2010-07-01

    ... 404(b)(1) GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFICATION OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.40 Sanctuaries and refuges. (a) Sanctuaries and refuges consist...

  12. Abu Dhabi: prudence in the future

    Abu Dhabi is the largest oil producer of the 7 United Arab Emirates. The government is strictly controlling the production rate and has lowered it by 110,000 bpd to 740,000 bpd. Even further cuts have been ordered recently. Reserves are estimated at 50 times present production rate, but may be overestimated. Efforts are being made in the areas of offshore exploration and secondary recovery. There is only one refinery, and even domestic needs require refinery expansion. A new refinery of 120,000 bpd capacity is under construction at Ruweis. Most of the production is exported to Japan, followed by the US, France, the Netherlands and Dutch Indies. The most interesting field is Zakum, the full development of which may cost $4 billion.

  13. Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd as a Modern Muslim Thinker

    NUR ZAINATUL NADRA ZAINOL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd is a thinker who has produced works in the fields of theology, philosophy, law, politics and humanities. Abu Zayd’s thought, partly on the Quran and its hermeneutics has stirred controversy in Egypt and the Muslim world. This research focuses on the controversy surrounding Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd which led to the declaration of his apostasy by the Supreme Court of Egypt in 1995, as well as his controversial thoughts on the Quran, its method of exegesis and certain fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence issues such as the hijab (veil and polygamy. This paper serves as a literature review which employs the content analysis as a methodology to elaborate on Abu Zayd’s controversial thoughts based on his books, as well as through the views of Muslim and Western scholars on those thoughts.

  14. Documentation and Monitoring of Built Heritage in Abu Dhabi, Uae

    Muhammad, S.

    2013-07-01

    The ancient oasis-city of Al Ain in Abu Dhabi Emirate still retains the most important and outstanding cultural heritage of United Arab Emirates (UAE). The larger area of Abu Dhabi Emirate comprised of archaeological sites, cultural landscapes and historic buildings dating back to 3rd millennium to the recent pre-oil era. Traditional materials like stone, earth and palm wood were used in combination with local construction methods. For the last seven years the newly formed Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi)1 has been actively involved in conservation of built heritage in Abu Dhabi Emirate with the help of its Conservation Section. Documentation prior to any conservation and restoration works is considered as a basic pre-requisite for understanding an historic building or site. It is a process which continues during the conservation of any monument and is the only accurate tool for recording information in order to understand the structure, ultimately leading to the management of cultural heritage. Application and use of tools, ranging from basic manual techniques to 3D laser scanning, based on the best practices and international guidelines the exercise will help in establishing a documentation lab with standard procedures, specifications and tools for the documentation and monitoring the built heritage of Abu Dhabi Emirate. This paper will discuss a range of case studies and will demonstrate how documentation and monitoring of the built heritage has augmented the various conservation initiatives on a variety of building types.

  15. Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary: Sanctuary Integrated Monitoring Network (SIMoN)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sanctuary Integrated Monitoring Network (SIMoN) is an integrated, long-term program that takes an ecosystem approach to identify and understand changes to the...

  16. Kajian Kuat Tekan Bebas pada Tanah Lempung yang Distabilisasi dengan Gypsum dan Abu Ampas Tebu

    Gultom, Deddy Jhon Jonatan

    2015-01-01

    Stabilisasi tanah sering sekali digunakan dalam proyek konstruksi guna memperbaiki struktural tanah di lapangan. Proses stabilisasi tanah tersebut dapat dilakukan dengan cara mencampurkan bahan stabilisator sepertigypsum, semen, bitumen, dan bahan-bahan olahan limbah pabrik seperti abu ampas tebu, abu sekam padi, abu cangkang sawit. Penelitian ini meneliti suatu proses stabilisasi tanah dengan menggunakan bahan campuran gypsum yang telah ditetapkan kadarnya sebesar 2% dan abu ampas tebu y...

  17. UAE-Abu Dhabi: World Oil Report 1991

    This paper reports that production expansion projects remain the focus in Abu Dhabi, with increased drilling operations underway both on and offshore. Only Abu Dhabi Co. for Onshore Operations (Adco) and Abu Dhabi Marine Operating Co. (Adma-Opco) provide any information about activity in the Emirate. Plans call for boosting productive capacity by 1 million bpd to near 3 million bpd. Present sustainable capacity is estimated at 1.8 million bpd by the CIA. This rate has been exceeded recently (it reached over 2 million bpd) to take advantage of higher prices in late 1990 and to make up for the shortfall due to loss of Iraqi and Kuwaiti exports. However, it does not appear higher rates can be sustained for a long period of time. By year-end 1992, sustainable output has been projected to reach 2.3 million bpd

  18. Abu Kamil algèbre et analyse diophantienne

    Rashed, Roshdi

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical wrks of Abu Kamil (floruit circa 880) were produced two generations after the works of Al-Khwarizmi, the founder of algebra. They opened up fields of research that proved fertile up until the seventeenth century, and were soon to become both a reference and a model. Their influence was decisive on the development of algebra in Arabic no less than in Latin and Hebrew. There will be found in the present publication the first rigorously critical edition of Abu Kamil s works, as well as the first ever translation into a modern language.Text and translation are preceded by an exhau

  19. A BIODIVERSITY HUB: SANDI BIRD SANCTUARY, HARDOI, UTTAR PRADESH, INDIA

    Adesh Kumar; Amita Kanaujia; Sonika Kushwaha; Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Diversity refers variety in nature i.e. the variety of life on Earth and its biological diversity is commonly referred to as biodiversity. Sandi Bird sanctuary was developed and conserved in the year 1990 as natural biodiversity hub for aquatic vegetation as well as local residents and migratory birds. This Sanctuary has an area of 309 hectares. A study of faunal diversity in Sandi Bird Sanctuary was done during January 2013 to March 2014. Sandi Bird Sanctuary is well known as popular tourist...

  20. Can "Federal Sanctuaries" be identified in Triphylia and Arkadia?

    Nielsen, Thomas Heine

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses whether federal sanctuaries - such as are known from the Achaian and Aitolian Federations - can be identified in Triphylia and Arkadia in the Peloponnese. It is concluded that on present evidence it is not possible to identify such sanctuaries in these areas......This paper discusses whether federal sanctuaries - such as are known from the Achaian and Aitolian Federations - can be identified in Triphylia and Arkadia in the Peloponnese. It is concluded that on present evidence it is not possible to identify such sanctuaries in these areas...

  1. Astronomical orientations in sanctuaries of Daunia

    Antonello, E; Sisto, A M Tunzi; LoZupone, M

    2013-01-01

    Prehistoric sanctuaries of Daunia date back several thousand years. During the Neolithic and Bronze Age the farmers in that region dug hypogea and holes whose characteristics suggest a ritual use. In the present note we summarize the results of the astronomical analysis of the orientation of the row holes in three different sites, and we point out the possible use of the setting of the stars of Centaurus. An interesting archaeological confirmation of an archaeoastronomical prediction is also reported.

  2. Status and distribution pattern of coarse woody debris along an altitudinal gradient in Askot Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttarakhand, West Himalaya%喜马拉雅山西部Askot野生动物保护区内粗木质残体沿山高度分布格局与现状

    Bhupendra Singh Adhikari

    2009-01-01

    A rapid assessment on the status and distribution patterns of coarse woody debris (CWD) was conducted by laying five curvilin-ear transects (transects A, B, C, D and E; major trails), along an altitudinal gradient starting from 900 to 2 600 m, in three major watersheds (Charigad, Dogarhigad and upper Gosigad) of Goriganga catchment in Askot Wildlife Sanctuary, India. At every 100 m rise in altitude a hectare plot (100 m × 100 m) was selected. Results showed that the percentage contribution by different succession phases was in the de-creasing order: phase Ⅰ phase Ⅱ phase Ⅳ phase Ⅲ for snags, and phase Ⅲ phase Ⅱ phase Ⅳ phase I for logs. Snag density in chit pine forest was high in transect A (11 snags·ha-1) at 1 500 m, and the value in rianj oak forest was high in transect B (10 snags·ha-1) at 2 300 m. The total available mass of snags and logs in chit pine forest was 13.9 t, of which snags mass accounted for 41% of the total mass and logs mass for 59%. While the total value was 5.6 t in rianj oak forest, of which snags and logs accounted for 60% and 40% of the total mass, respectively. Moreover, the presence of CWD in the study area if not harvested, would provide a great opportunity to the orchids in future to flourish by providing protection. The high densities of snags and logs in chit pine forest at mid-altitudinal zone led to less species richness and lower density of ground flora as the zone receives more light, accompanying with lower soil moisture, and thus only the domi-nant species occupy the habitat.%在印度Askot野生动物保护区Goriganga流域的3个分水岭(Charigad,Dogarhigad和upper Gosigad)内,沿着海拔高度900~2600m设置5条曲线调查样带(样带A、B、C、D和E),调查了粗木质残体的分布格局和状况.海拔高度每升高100 m设置一块1 hm2的样地.结果表明,不同演替阶段的粗木质残体百分比贡献率按降低顺序排列依次是:枯立木--相位Ⅰ>相位Ⅱ>相位Ⅳ>相位Ⅲ;

  3. Middle East gas export projects: The case of Abu Dhabi

    Abu Dhabi is ranked in the industry journals in the top 5 in the world tables of both oil and gas reserves. Gas is produced both Onshore and Offshore from associated and non-associated fields. Production has tripped during the last ten years and will increase further in the next few years as a result of current and planned investment. Development of Abu Dhabi's gas resources is aimed at enhancing oil production and recovery, meeting local and export demand and eliminating waste. Companies in Abu Dhabi are involved in all the main sectors of gas industry including production, processing, transportation and sales. The first large LNG export project by sea in Arabian Gulf was established in 1977 from Abu to Japan. Development continues and the gas is exported as LNG and is also processed into LPG and Pentane Plus for export. Japan remains the main market. The volume of Condensate available for export and processing will increase significantly in the next few years. In order to ensure a continuing and increasing supply of gas to world markets, in future years, prices will need to provide an adequate return on investment and should also reflect the environmental advantages of gas. 9 tabs

  4. Perkembangan Teater di Bali melalui Sosok Dramawan Abu Bakar

    I Nyoman Darma Putra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA Western-style of theatre has developed in Bali since the turnof the twentieth century, but it has rarely attracted scholarly attention. Studies on the performing arts in Bali have mainly focused on Balinese (traditional dance and drama. This should come as no surprise given that Balinese dance and drama have developed as a broad and inseparable part of Balinese custom and religious practice. Against this phenomena, this article traces the development of Western-style theatre in Bali through the artistic activities of the prominent playwright, performer and director, Abu Bakar. From the 1960s until the present, Abu Bakar has been an active promoter of Westernsty letheatre in Bali as well as in the main cities of Java andeven in Singapore. He has also has helped students and theatre groups around Bali to study and perform theatre. Initially, Abu Bakar established his own theatre group, Poliklinik, which hascontinued to stage performances as well as collaborating with young people or student theatre study clubs. His extensiverecord of artistic activity has been recorded in newspaper reports and reviews and these form the main source of documentation in this article. By examining qualitative data collected from newspaper archives and interviews, including with Abu Bakar, this article proposes a contemporary historyof theatre or modern drama in Bali.

  5. 42 CFR 9.3 - Sanctuary policies and responsibilities.

    2010-10-01

    ... contractor. (2) Direct the BOD to: (i) Ensure that chimpanzees accepted into the sanctuary are not discharged... science and with knowledge in behavioral primatology; (C) Individual(s) with experience in the animal... PROVISIONS STANDARDS OF CARE FOR CHIMPANZEES HELD IN THE FEDERALLY SUPPORTED SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.3...

  6. A BIODIVERSITY HUB: SANDI BIRD SANCTUARY, HARDOI, UTTAR PRADESH, INDIA

    Adesh Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diversity refers variety in nature i.e. the variety of life on Earth and its biological diversity is commonly referred to as biodiversity. Sandi Bird sanctuary was developed and conserved in the year 1990 as natural biodiversity hub for aquatic vegetation as well as local residents and migratory birds. This Sanctuary has an area of 309 hectares. A study of faunal diversity in Sandi Bird Sanctuary was done during January 2013 to March 2014. Sandi Bird Sanctuary is well known as popular tourist destination because of the diverse assemblage of avifauna especially migratory water birds that congregate at the Sandi Bird Sanctuary in winter. The result includes 3 species of annelids belonging to 3 orders, 10 orders of insects with 61 species, 4 species of mollusks belonging to 3 orders, 11 species of fishes belonging to 5 families, 3 species of amphibians and 15 species of reptiles belonging to 13 families, 157 species of birds, and 12 species of mammals belonging to 09 families from Sandi Bird Sanctuary. The sanctuary is an envoy area of the Indo-gangetic eco-system. Wetland vegetation is also found in the sanctuary.

  7. 15 CFR 922.163 - Prohibited activities-Sanctuary-wide.

    2010-01-01

    ... permitted under 50 CFR part 622. (ii) Harvesting, or attempting to harvest, any live rock from the Sanctuary... which endangers life, limb, marine resources, or property. (6) Conduct of diving/snorkeling without flag... seabird in or above the Sanctuary, except as authorized by the Marine Mammal Protection Act, as...

  8. 76 FR 2611 - Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Regulations Revisions

    2011-01-14

    ... sanctuary's terms of designation (59 FR 24586, May 11, 1994). This proposed rule revises the OCNMS... (NOAA 1993) and the final rule adopting regulations for OCNMS, 59 FR 24597 (May 11, 1994)). 4. Revise... sanctuary's area as approximately 2,500 square nautical miles (approximately 8,577 square kilometers) (59...

  9. 76 FR 65565 - Expansion of Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Regulatory Changes, and Sanctuary Name Change

    2011-10-21

    ... longline fishery in 2001; mass coral bleaching events in 1994, 2002, and 2003; and nonpoint source... period in February and March of 2009 (74 FR 5641) to identify issues and gauge interest within American... April 26, 1986 (51 FR 15878). The proposed changes would: 1. Modify the name of the sanctuary...

  10. Pemanfaatan Limbah Abu Terbang Sebagai Penguat Aluminium Matrix Composite

    Subarmono Subarmono

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to utilize fly ash which is obtained from waste of combustion of coal in steam power plant as a reinforcement of aluminum matrix composite (AMC. The amounts of fly ash of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10% wt were added to fine aluminum powder (dimension of particles are smaller than 40 µm. Each composition was mixed using a rotary mixer for 3 hr. The mixture was uniaxially pressed and it was followed by isostatic compaction with a pressure of 100 MPa to produce green bodies. They was pressureless sintered in argon atmosphere at various temperatures of 500°C, 525°C, 550°C, 575°C and 600ºC. Bending strength, Vickers hardness, wear resistance, density of the AMC were tested, and the microstructures were observed using SEM. The results show that the mechanical properties increase with increasing the fly ash content up to 5% wt. The bending strength, hardness, porosity and wear rate are 74 MPa, 66 VHN, 4.5% and 0.04 mg/(MPa.m, respectively. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk memanfaatkan abu terbang sebagai penguat komposit bermatrik aluminium (AMC. Abu terbang merupakan limbah pembakaran batu bara pada pembangkit listrik tenaga uap. Abu terbang sejumlah 2,5%; 5%; 7,5% dan 10% berat dicampur dengan serbuk aluminium (ukuran serbuk lebih kesil dari 40 µm. Setiap campuran diaduk menggunakan rotay mixer selama 3 jam. Campuran aluminum dan abu terbang dikompaksi secara uniaksial dilanjutkan kompaksi secara isostatik dengan tekanan 100 MPa dan diikuti sintering tanpa tekanan dengan lingkungan gas argon dan variasi temperatur 500°C, 525°C, 550°C, 575°C dan 600°C. Kekuatan bending, kekerasan Vickers, ketahanan aus dan densitas komposit diuji serta struktur mikro diamati menggunakan SEM. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa sifat mekanis meningkat seiring dengan peningkatan fraksi berat abu terbang sampai 5% berat, selebihnya terjadi penurunan. Kekuatam bending, kekerasan Vickers, porositas dan laju keausan berturut

  11. Wildlife Conservation in Kenya's Maasailand, 1850s-2000: Contested Histories of an African People and their Landscape

    Oyugi, Willis Mathews Okech

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the problem of human-wildlife conflicts in Kenya from 1850 to 2000 and seeks to contribute to the larger discourse on indigenous peoples' notions of the environment and its conservation. I examine alarming declines of wildlife populations of upwards of 60 percent by the 1990s that were attributed to persistent human-wildlife conflicts in and around the expansive Maasai group ranches/game sanctuaries bordering Amboseli National Park and Masai Mara Game Reserve, two...

  12. Patient cost-sharing for ambulatory neuropsychiatric services in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    Hamidi, Samer; Abouallaban, Yousef; Alhamad, Sultan; Meirambayeva, Aizhan

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Neuropsychiatric disorders are of high concern and burden of disease in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The aim of this study is to describe patient cost-sharing patterns, insurance coverage of ambulatory neuropsychiatric disorders, and utilization of neuropsychiatric services in Abu Dhabi. Methods The study utilized the data published by Health Authority-Abu Dhabi (HAAD) and the American Center for Psychiatry and Neurology (ACPN) records in Abu Dhabi. The data were ...

  13. Wildlife in Chernobyl forests

    The article is a review of a book addressed Wormwood Forest: a natural history of Chernobyl which describes life in Europe's largest wildlife sanctuary in the region surrounding the Chernobyl station. Since the accident, the area has largely been a safe haven from hunters and farmers, allowing the wildlife to live in an undisturbed environment. Against this backdrop, the book describes in detail, a highly controversial programme that released an endangered species of horse into the zone. Lack of funding for such programmes makes it nearly impossible to administer them. The book blends reportage, popular science and encounters with the zone's few residents. The result is an account of a remarkable land, its people and animals seen through the eyes of the locals, the author and the zoologists, botanists and radiologists who travelled with her around the zone. The radiation is the book's ever-present protagonist, as the author describes in detail how it works itself through the entire food chain and environment. Along the author's journey through the affected regions of Belarus and Ukraine she debunks several myths surrounding Chernobyl and the nuclear industry in general. In fact, while there have been a small number of cases of mutations observed in some species, these are not as dramatic as the Chernobyl mythology.

  14. Industralization plan in the oil sector in Abu Dhabi

    1981-05-01

    Abu Dhabi's oil discoveries are changing a simple tribal community into an industrial society. The socio-economic changes and the infrastructure needs associated with rapid economic development are largely the responsibility of the public sector, while Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (AGNOC) and its partners focus on an exploration and development program that will conserve natural resources. ADNOC companies provide three types of petroleum services: exploration and production, transportation and distribution, and marine services. ADNOC projects completed, under completion, committed and under study are summarized. Projects in transportation and telecommunications networks, utilities, and housing reflect government-industry cooperation. The country also encourages the joint-venture participation of foreign countries as long as there is an equitable sharing of risks and benefits. (DCK)

  15. Abu Dhabi und Dubai: Wirtschaftliche Entwicklung wie aus 1001 Nacht?

    Benner, Maximilian

    2011-01-01

    The development of Abu Dhabi and Dubai during past years seems breathtaking. Both emirates pursue a strategy of diversifying their economic structure and thus of becoming less dependent on oil and gas. The obvious goal is to secure their prosperity for an era beyond oil. Diversification is a relevant strategic imperative for other resource-rich developing countries, too. In view of the current transformation processes in Arab countries the question whether differing strategies of the two emir...

  16. The sustainability of economic growth in Abu Dhabi

    Bram SMEETS

    2013-01-01

    Abu Dhabi has experienced an unprecedented development during the last half century, growing rapidly from a remote desert settlement to a thriving metropolitan. Today, the Emirate ranks among the countries with the highest GDP per capita in the world, and this impressive development is anticipated to continue in the decades to come.However, there are several challenges to the sustainability of the current economic prosperity, and the environmental degradation that was caused by the rapid deve...

  17. Coincident Observations of Surface Ozone and NMVOCs over Abu Dhabi

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The vertical profiles of ozone are measured coincidently with non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi international airport (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E) during the years 2012 - 2014. Some of the profiles show elevated surface ozone >95 ppbv during the winter months (December, January and February). The ground-level NMVOCs obtained from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system also show elevated values of acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. NMVOCs and ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than the values in winter season. NMVOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption, and serve as precursor of ozone. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the NMVOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. Abu Dhabi is located at the edge of the Arabian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in the neighboring Gulf region. The preliminary results indicate that wintertime enhancement in ozone is associated with large values of NMVOCs at Abu Dhabi. The domestic production of surface ozone is estimated from the combination of oxygen recombination and NMVOCs and compared with the data. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in Abu Dhabi is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries. We will present ozone sounding and NMVOCs data and our model estimates of surface ozone, including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  18. Psychological health of orphan bonobos and chimpanzees in African sanctuaries.

    Victoria Wobber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Facilities across Africa care for apes orphaned by the trade for "bushmeat." These facilities, called sanctuaries, provide housing for apes such as bonobos (Pan paniscus and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes who have been illegally taken from the wild and sold as pets. Although these circumstances are undoubtedly stressful for the apes, most individuals arrive at the sanctuaries as infants and are subsequently provided with rich physical and social environments that can facilitate the expression of species-typical behaviors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We tested whether bonobo and chimpanzee orphans living in sanctuaries show any behavioral, physiological, or cognitive abnormalities relative to other individuals in captivity as a result of the early-life stress they experience. Orphans showed lower levels of aberrant behaviors, similar levels of average cortisol, and highly similar performances on a broad battery of cognitive tests in comparisons with individuals of the same species who were either living at a zoo or were reared by their mothers at the sanctuaries. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these results support the rehabilitation strategy used by sanctuaries in the Pan-African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA and suggest that the orphans we examined did not show long-term signs of stress as a result of their capture. Our findings also show that sanctuary apes are as psychologically healthy as apes in other captive settings and thus represent a valuable resource for non-invasive research.

  19. Geomorphological evolution of the dynamic Abu Dhabi coastline

    Lokier, S. W.; Onuma, T.; Hamada, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Abu Dhabi coastline provides an ideal setting for studying sedimentation processes in an arid depositional environment directly analogous to that of many of the region's Mesozoic petroleum reservoirs. This coastline displays a low-angle ramp geometry with supratidal evaporite precipitation passing offshore, through a broad carbonate-evaporite intertidal setting with complex depositional facies geometries, into a subtidal carbonate depositional environment. The coast is locally protected from open marine conditions by a number of peninsulas and offshore shoals and islands associated with the east-west trending Great Pearl Bank. This offers an ideal setting for studying the effects of relative sea-level fluctuations on sedimentary systems and shoreline morphology. A late Holocene progradation rate of 0.75 m/yr has previously been established for the Abu Dhabi Sabkha system (Lokier and Steuber, 2008) however we conjecture that the system has now entered a broadly retrogradational phase. By applying current estimates of global sea level rise of 3.3 mm/yr derived from satellite altimetry and tide gauges (Cazenave and Nerem, 2004; Leuliette et al., 2004), we calculate present day marine transgression of the Abu Dhabi shoreline at a rate of 8.25 m/yr. This study utilised 7 years of fieldwork observations and satellite imagery to establish numerous lines of evidence for active retrogradation over an area of Abu Dhabi coastline lying between Al Dabb'iya in the east and Abu al Abyad in the west. The landward advance of spits and beach ridge systems was monitored at several locations with rates of retrogradation of up to 28 m per year being recorded in some instances. These are significantly greater than those predicted from sea-level rise and may indicate a local subsidence. The landward and seaward limits of microbial mat belts are strongly controlled by their location in the intertidal zone. The seaward side of the Recent microbial mat belt in the Abu Dhabi Sabkha is

  20. Designing Professional Development for Principals in a Context of Change: The Case of Abu Dhabi

    Blaik Hourani, Rida; Stringer, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Schools in Abu Dhabi are going through a period of transformation and reform. The Abu Dhabi Education Council commenced a professional development plan for principals to enhance their capabilities to manage and initiate change in light of the reforms. This study was conducted to explore principals' perspectives on professional development…

  1. Cetaceans in the Indian Ocean Sanctuary: A Review

    Parsons, E. C. M.; Jenner, K. C. S.; Baldwin, R.; Rudolph, P.; De Boer, M.N.; Eyre, E.L.; Simmonds, M.P.; Keith, S.G.; Rosenbaum, H. C.; Peddemors, V M; McCabe, K.A.; Burton, C. L. K.; Jenner, M.N.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of mainly published information relating to the cetaceans of the Indian Ocean Sanctuary (IOS). It highlights a number of new studies and other initiatives linked to the Sanctuary and reviews the current understanding of the biology of the Sanctuary’s cetaceans. Cetaceans in the IOS are exposed to a range of threats, including by-catch and the effects of climate change. Whilst no quantification can be made of these threats at this t...

  2. Raptor Sanctuary: a Collaboration Scheme for Raptor Conservation in Indonesia

    Gunawan Gunawan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To support efforts on raptors conservation, it is necessary to activate multi-approach programs. Some approaches can be developed to raise public awareness. Raptor rehabilitation and release programs, environmental education and ecotourism are also important in this way. The establishment of Raptor Sanctuary (Suaka Elang was the result of the collaboration between governmental organizations, NGOs, and companies. The Raptor Sanctuary is expected to contribute actively in the raptor conservation strategies and efforts inIndonesia, particularly onJavaIsland. Since its establishment in November 2008, the Raptor Sanctuary focused on activities and programs such as rescue and rehabilitation for the release of confiscated raptors, developing conservation-based environmental education, and enhancing public and stakeholders’ capacities through participation in training courses and seminars. The Raptor Sanctuary had unique effective approaches to implement its activities to be handled directly by the Raptor Sanctuary or each partner. It is suggested that the Raptor Sanctuary can be introduced as an example of how to implement the effective strategy for raptor conservation.

  3. Introduction of an Emergency Response Plan for flood loading of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in Malaysia

    Said, N. F. Md; Sidek, L. M.; Basri, H.; Muda, R. S.; Razad, A. Z. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Sultan Abu Bakar Dam Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is designed to assist employees for identifying, monitoring, responding and mitigation dam safety emergencies. This paper is outlined to identification of an organization chart, responsibility for emergency management team and triggering level in Sultan Abu Bakar Dam ERP. ERP is a plan that guides responsibilities for proper operation of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in respond to emergency incidents affecting the dam. Based on this study four major responsibilities are needed for Abu Bakar Dam owing to protect any probable risk for downstream which they can be Incident Commander, Deputy Incident Commander, On-Scene Commander, Civil Engineer. In conclusion, having organization charts based on ERP studies can be helpful for decreasing the probable risks in any projects such as Abu Bakar Dam and it is a way to identify and suspected and actual dam safety emergencies.

  4. 78 FR 40545 - Designation of Abd Al-Ra'Ouf Abu Zaid Mohamed Hamza, also known as Abdul Rauf Abuzaid, also known...

    2013-07-05

    ... Designation of Abd Al-Ra'Ouf Abu Zaid Mohamed Hamza, also known as Abdul Rauf Abuzaid, also known as Abdel... Mohamed Hamza, also known as Abdul Rauf Abuzaid, also known as Abdel Raouf Abu Zayid Hamza, also known as... Abu Zaid Mohamed, also known as Abd-al-Ra'uf Abu Zayd Muhammad Hamza, also known as Abdul Raouf...

  5. STUDI PENGGUNAAN KATALIS ABU SABUT KELAPA, ABU TANDAN SAWIT DAN K2CO3 UNTUK KONVERSI MINYAK JARAK MENJADI BIODIESEL

    Husni Husin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A STUDY ON THE UTILIZATION OF OIL PALM FIBRE AND FRUIT BUNCH ASH AND K2CO3 FOR CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF JATHROPA OIL TO BIODIESEL. Study on the use of coconut fiber ash, palm bunch ash and K2CO3 as the catalysts for conversion of jatropha oil into biodiesel using methanol solvent has been done. The biodiesel is produced by converting unpurified jatropha oil over catalyst through transesterification reaction. The catalysts are burned at temperature of 500, 600, 800 and 900oC for 10 hours. Transesterification reaction is conducted in three-neck flask at constant temperature of 60oC for 3 hours. The results showed that the unburned and burned coconut fiber ashes at 800oC catalysts give the highest biodiesel yield (87.05 and 87.97% with low soap content (0.23-0.26%. The characteristic of biodiesel produced over those catalysts met the Indonesian and international quality standards, therefore those catalysts can be used as substitute for K2CO3 commercial catalyst.Abstrak   Studi penggunaan katalis abu sabut kelapa, abu tandan sawit dan K2CO3 untuk konversi minyak jarak menjadi biodiesel dengan pelarut metanol telah dilakukan. Biodiesel dibuat melalui konversi minyak jarak yang belum dimurnikan, menggunakan katalis, melalui reaksi transesterifikasi. Katalis-katalis tersebut dipijarkan pada temperatur 500, 600, 800 dan 900oC selama 10 jam. Reaksi dilangsungkan dalam labu leher tiga pada temperatur konstan 60oC selama 3 jam. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan penggunaan katalis abu sabut kelapa tanpa pemijaran dan dengan pemijaran pada 800oC memberikan perolehan biodiesel tertinggi (87,05 dan 87,97% dengan kadar sabun rendah (0,23-0,26%. Karakteristik biodiesel yang dihasilkan dari penggunaan katalis-katalis tersebut ini telah sesuai dengan syarat mutu yang ditetapkan oleh Standar Indonesia dan Internasional, sehingga katalis-katalis tersebut layak digunakan sebagai pengganti katalis K2CO3 komersial

  6. Spot shrimp habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  7. California market squid habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  8. White abalone habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  9. Sheep crab habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  10. California spiny lobster habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  11. Black abalone habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  12. Adult thresher shark habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  13. Red abalone habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  14. California halibut habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) is updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the...

  15. Giant seabass habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  16. Purple sea urchin habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  17. California sheephead habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  18. California sea cucumber habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuary Program (ONMS) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the...

  19. Red sea urchin habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  20. Warty sea cucumber habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  1. Ridgeback rock shrimp habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  2. Juvenile thresher shark habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  3. Pacific angel shark habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  4. Rockcrabs of the genus Cancer habitat suitability model for Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Biogeographic Assessment

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) updates and revises the management plans for each of its 13 sanctuaries. This process, which is open to the public,...

  5. Wildlife Communication

    Steen, Kim Arild; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Karstoft, Henrik;

    This report contains a progress report for the ph.d. project titled “Wildlife Communication”. The project focuses on investigating how signal processing and pattern recognition can be used to improve wildlife management in agriculture. Wildlife management systems used today experience habituation...

  6. Renewable energy policy options for Abu Dhabi: Drivers and barriers

    Climate change and fossil fuel depletion are the main drivers for the recent focus on Renewable Energy (RE) resources. However, since the high cost of RE technologies is the main obstacle facing the diffusion of RE power generation, economic and political intervention is inevitable. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE) population and economic growth are the main causes of a sharp increase of energy demand. Two key related factors highlight the need to establish a RE sector: first the UAE has one of the highest carbon footprint in the world and second, the rate of depletion of its main energy generation resource – fossil fuel. In this study, we present a review of overall policies in sixty-one countries, focusing on their efforts to adopt RE resources in the power sector, and on their implementation of fundamental policies implemented. Furthermore, we investigate the applicability to Abu Dhabi UAE of the main RE policies implemented worldwide. As a result of our analysis, we recommend the implementation of a mixed policy of Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) and the Quota system for RE electricity generation in order for the UAE to meet its 7% target by 2020. - Highlights: ► Comprehensive review of renewable energy policy mechanisms. ► Summarizes the renewable energy policy adoptions, targets, and installed capacity in many countries. ► Gives recommendations on renewable energy policy options for Abu Dhabi, an oil rich country.

  7. 77 FR 21878 - Revisions of Boundaries for the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and Underwater Preserve...

    2012-04-12

    ... Sanctuary (TBNMS or sanctuary), which is jointly managed by NOAA and the State of Michigan (65 FR 39041... inclusion in the national marine sanctuary system could provide additional opportunities for tourism and... includes properties of traditional religious and cultural importance to an Indian tribe or Native...

  8. 75 FR 76319 - Amendments to National Marine Sanctuary Regulations Regarding Low Overflights in Designated Zones

    2010-12-08

    ...NOAA proposes to amend the regulations of the Channel Islands, Monterey Bay, Gulf of the Farallones, and Olympic Coast national marine sanctuaries relating to sanctuary overflights. Specifically, NOAA proposes to: amend the regulations requiring that motorized aircraft maintain certain minimum altitudes above specified locations within the boundaries of the listed sanctuaries; and state that......

  9. Abu Ghraib: Prisoner Abuse in the Light of Islamic and International Laws

    Syed Serajul Islam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study analyses the prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib in the light of Islamic and International laws. Using documentary sources, the paper argues that Islamic law is far superior than the International law as enshrined in the Geneva Conventions and the United Nations Charter on the treatment of prisoners of war. It found the abuse of the prisoners at Abu Ghraib a routine operation carried out in obedience to orders issued by the higher authorities. The photographs portraying images of dehumanization in Abu Ghraib is unacceptable either in Islamic or international law.

  10. 241-SY-101 multi-functional instrument tree acceptance for beneficial use (ABU)

    This document formally demonstrates that the ABU process for the 241-SY-101 risers 17B and 17C Multi-functional Instrument Trees (MIT's) has been properly completed in accordance with the approved ABU checklists. For each item required on the ABU Checklist, a bibliography of the documentation prepared and released to satisfy the requirements is provided. Release of this documentation signifies that the tank farm Operations, Engineering, and Maintenance organizations have accepted responsibility for the MIT'S in 241-SY-101 Risers 17B and 17C

  11. Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd and the limits of reform in contemporary Islamic thought

    Oweidat, Nadia; Rogan, Eugene; Ramadan, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines in depth the thought and ideas of the Egyptian intellectual Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd as a representative of modernist Isalmic thought. In unpacking and analysingAbu Zayd’s ideas, this thesis focuses on five major issues: shari‘a, Islam and politics, the Arab-Islamic heritage, history, and the issue of women’s rights. This thesis argues that Abu Zayd’s thought suffers from some of the same weaknesses he attacked in traditional and Islamist thought. By focusing on...

  12. Comparative hematological variables of Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) kept in Lahore Zoo and Lahore Wildlife Park, Pakistan

    SAJJAD, Sumera; Farooq, Umer; MALIK, Husna; ANWAR, Maryah; Ahmad, Ijaz

    2012-01-01

    In Pakistan, a scant number of Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) are being kept at various zoos or in certain wildlife sanctuaries, and there is a dearth of literature regarding the effect of captivity on their physiological parameters. The present study was hence conducted to determine and compare the hematological alterations in tigers of Bengal origin (Panthera tigris tigris) kept in captivity at Lahore Zoo (LZ) (n = 4) and in the seminatural environment of Lahore Wildlife Park (LWP) ...

  13. Petroleum maturation modelling, Abu Gabra Sharaf area, Muglad Basin, Sudan

    Mohamed, Abdalla Y.; Pearson, Michael J.; Ashcroft, William A.; Whiteman, A. J.

    2002-08-01

    Structural and maturation studies in the northwest of the Muglad Basin, Sudan showed a thick sedimentary section up to 9000 m in the deep sub-basins and an average of about 6000 m in the Sharaf-Abu Gabra Ridge. The isopach map of the Lower Cretaceous Abu Gabra-Sharaf formations, which contain source rocks, showed a thickness of sedimentary section between 2000 and 5000 m. The burial history showed high subsidence rates during the first rifting phase with relatively low subsidence rates during the following two phases in this part of the basin. Significant erosion of the sedimentary section occurred in the ridge area during Miocene and Cenomanian-Albian times. The geothermal gradients in the modelled wells range between 18 and 27.5 °C/km corresponding to the relatively wide range of present day heat flow of between 37 and 63 mW/m 2, averaging 50 mW/m 2. Heat flow history curves consistent with vitrinite reflectance data were adopted with elevated high heat flow (75 mW/m 2) during the first rifting phase followed by minor peaks (average 60 mW/m 2) during the second and the third rifting phases. Application of a kinetic vitrinite maturation model resulted in a present day oil window between 2000 and 4500 m. The source rock of the Abu Gabra (AG) and Sharaf (SH) formations, which has an average total organic carbon of 1.0% and hydrogen index (HI) of 280, was modelled for hydrocarbon generation. The section was divided into four layers; AG-1 (Albian), AG-2 (Aptian), SH-1 (Barremian) and SH-2 (Neocomian). Conditions for hydrocarbon generation are present throughout the Sharaf formation and in AG-2. The generation model suggests an average generation amount of 4 mgHC/g rock in the lower three modelled layers with a timing range between 120 Ma and the present. Total calculated oil volume is about 370 US billion bbls and the expected volume expelled and migrated (40%) is 150 US billion bbls. The total gas expelled and migrated (90%) is 1600 US trillion cu ft. Retention of

  14. Distribution of heavy metals in the coastal area of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates

    Highlights: • The article reports heavy metal concentrations in the coastline of Abu Dhabi. • ICP–MS and X-ray fluorescence were used to analyze heavy metals in 57 samples. • Enrichment factor, geoaccumulation index, and pollution load index were calculated. • Abu Dhabi coastal area was determined to be unpolluted. • The area was slightly contaminated with arsenic. - Abstract: Fifty-seven sediment samples were collected from Abu Dhabi coastal area, United Arab Emirates (UAE). The concentrations of heavy metals including antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, lead, molybdenum, nickel and zinc were obtained using Inductively Coupled Plasma–Mass Spectroscopy (ICP–MS) and X-ray fluorescence. Heavy metal contaminations in Abu Dhabi had increased since 2004. Nevertheless, the enrichment factors, geoaccumulation indices and the pollution load index of 0.3 showed no pollution with any of the measured metals except arsenic

  15. Civic Cohesion, and Sanctuaries for Coming to Terms with Modernity

    Greve, Anni

    2006-01-01

    The city is a key location of the modern social world, a home of rootlessness and transient everyday encounters between individuals. This essay explores the idea of 'the sanctuary' as a way in which people look for anchorage, and create and re-create images of a society, to cope with and negotiate...... Durkheim sees ritual -especially sacred drama - as at once a symbolism and an aesthetics, complete with the energies of a free creative 'surplus'. Even if in the end 'the sanctuary' is unequal to the marketplace, it is a necessary refuge of the transformative social imagination and a realm, not of everyday...

  16. Using seabird habitat modeling to inform marine spatial planning in central California's National Marine Sanctuaries.

    Jennifer McGowan

    Full Text Available Understanding seabird habitat preferences is critical to future wildlife conservation and threat mitigation in California. The objective of this study was to investigate drivers of seabird habitat selection within the Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries to identify areas for targeted conservation planning. We used seabird abundance data collected by the Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies Program (ACCESS from 2004-2011. We used zero-inflated negative binomial regression to model species abundance and distribution as a function of near surface ocean water properties, distances to geographic features and oceanographic climate indices to identify patterns in foraging habitat selection. We evaluated seasonal, inter-annual and species-specific variability of at-sea distributions for the five most abundant seabirds nesting on the Farallon Islands: western gull (Larus occidentalis, common murre (Uria aalge, Cassin's auklet (Ptychorampus aleuticus, rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata and Brandt's cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus. The waters in the vicinity of Cordell Bank and the continental shelf east of the Farallon Islands emerged as persistent and highly selected foraging areas across all species. Further, we conducted a spatial prioritization exercise to optimize seabird conservation areas with and without considering impacts of current human activities. We explored three conservation scenarios where 10, 30 and 50 percent of highly selected, species-specific foraging areas would be conserved. We compared and contrasted results in relation to existing marine protected areas (MPAs and the future alternative energy footprint identified by the California Ocean Uses Atlas. Our results show that the majority of highly selected seabird habitat lies outside of state MPAs where threats from shipping, oil spills, and offshore energy development remain. This analysis accentuates the need for innovative marine

  17. The impact of Merowe Dam on Simulium hamedense vector of onchocerciasis in Abu Hamed focus - Northern Sudan

    Zarroug, Isam MA; Elaagip, Arwa H.; Abuelmaali, Sara A.; Hanan A. Mohamed; Wigdan A ElMubarak; Hashim, Kamal; Deran, Tong Chor M.; Aziz, Nabil; Tarig B Higazi

    2014-01-01

    Background Abu Hamed, the northernmost onchocerciasis focus in the world, is located along the River Nile banks in the Nubian Desert. Hydroelectric dams can alter activity of black flies and may provide breeding sites for black fly. Merowe Dam, the largest hydropower project in Africa, was built west of Abu Hamed focus in 2009. The impact of the Dam on onchocerciasis and its black fly vectors in Abu Hamed focus was measured in this study. Findings Entomological surveys for aquatic stages and ...

  18. 78 FR 38848 - Re-establishing the Sanctuary Nomination Process

    2013-06-28

    ... replaced this process with the Site Evaluation List (SEL) (48 FR 24295). As described in NOAA regulations... Nomination Process AGENCY: Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS), National Ocean Service, National... nomination process and is proposing to amend its regulations governing the process for nominating...

  19. Sailors and sanctuaries of the ancient Greek world

    Alan Johnston

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The many small maritime sanctuaries where Greek sailors left offerings to the gods are much less well known than such great cult centres as Delphi and Olympia on the mainland. UCL archaeologists have been contributing to the study of these widely scattered but significant sites for over a century, a tradition that continues today.

  20. 76 FR 67348 - Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Regulations Revisions

    2011-11-01

    ... process (73 FR 53161; September 15, 2008). The public was invited to comment on the proposed rule, draft... changes proposed in the proposed rule (76 FR 2611; January 14, 2011) as a response to public comments... sanctuary's terms of designation (59 FR 24586, May 11, 1994). The final management plan can be downloaded...

  1. 76 FR 6368 - Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Regulations Revisions

    2011-02-04

    ...On January 14, 2011, NOAA published a proposed rule in the Federal Register to revise the regulations for the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (76 FR 2611). This notice extends the public comment period stated in that proposed rule by an additional 10...

  2. 78 FR 5997 - Amendments to National Marine Sanctuary Regulations

    2013-01-28

    ... further explained in 73 FR 70488, 70499- 70501, Nov. 20, 2008 and is hereby incorporated in this notice... Fisheries Management Council's Coral reef Ecosystems Fishery Management Plan (69 FR 8336, Feb. 24, 2004... ] sanctuaries (Flower Garden Banks NMS, Olympic Coast NMS, and the Florida Keys NMS) provide the areal...

  3. The Sanctuary Model of Trauma-Informed Organizational Change

    Bloom, Sandra L.; Sreedhar, Sarah Yanosy

    2008-01-01

    This article features the Sanctuary Model[R], a trauma-informed method for creating or changing an organizational culture. Although the model is based on trauma theory, its tenets have application in working with children and adults across a wide diagnostic spectrum. Originally developed in a short-term, acute inpatient psychiatric setting for…

  4. Tsetse and trypanosomiasis at the Ngulia Rhino sanctuary

    The conservation of black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in Kenya involves the translocation of rhinoceros to protected sanctuaries, e.g. the recently enlarged 69 km2 sanctuary at Ngulia in Tsavo West National Park. As the black rhinoceros is known to be particularly susceptible to infection with Trypanosoma brucei, there is a strong possibility that the stress of translocation will induce health problems that would not normally occur in resident populations. Similarly, the movement of animals born in tsetse-free areas to tsetse-infested areas may result in trypanosomiasis problems because of loss of immune protection in the absence of challenge in early life. Finally, there is some concern over the possibility of facilitating genetic exchange in T. brucei through the artificial movement of animals over long distances into novel environments. To aid in the development of prudent management practices, we initiated baseline studies on tsetse distribution and trypanosomiasis at the Ngulia sanctuary. To date, we have completed a dry season survey of tsetse distribution over a 125 km2 area centred on the sanctuary and have characterized the nature of the trypanosomiasis challenge in different areas. Trypanosomiasis challenge at Ngulia involves a variety of Trypanosoma spp. Nevertheless, an unusual finding is the lack of diversity in Nannomonas parasites, with most belonging to the savannah group of T. congolense

  5. Stated preferences for future management developments in the hospitality sector: a case study of Abu Dhabi, UAE

    Al Suwaidi, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Abu-Dhabi (AD) is the largest of the seven Emirates that comprise the United Arab Emirates. Abu-Dhabi, the capital of the UAE with 1,493,000 inhabitants, accounts for 86.7% of the total surface area of the state. The emirate of Abu-Dhabi, through its Policy Agenda 2007-2008, the strategic Plan 2008-2012 and the Plan Vision Abu-Dhabi 2030 has recently re-branded itself and has made a series of assertive moves in order to boost the tourism and hospitality sectors as a means to a more diversifie...

  6. Auditing wildlife

    B.K. Reilly; Y. Reillly

    2003-01-01

    Reilly B.K. and Y. Reilly. 2003. Auditing wildlife. Koedoe 46(2): 97–102. Pretoria. ISSN 0075-6458. Accountants and auditors are increasingly confronted with the problem of auditing wildlife populations on game ranches as their clients' asset base expands into this industry. This paper aims to provide guidelines on these actions based on case study data and research in the field of wildlife monitoring. Parties entering into dispute on numbers of animals on a property often resort to their au...

  7. Auditing wildlife

    B.K. Reilly

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Reilly B.K. and Y. Reilly. 2003. Auditing wildlife. Koedoe 46(2: 97–102. Pretoria. ISSN 0075-6458. Accountants and auditors are increasingly confronted with the problem of auditing wildlife populations on game ranches as their clients' asset base expands into this industry. This paper aims to provide guidelines on these actions based on case study data and research in the field of wildlife monitoring. Parties entering into dispute on numbers of animals on a property often resort to their auditors for advice. This paper tracks a method of deciding on whether or not to audit the population based on wildlife value and an initial sample count. This will act as a guideline for the accounting profession when confronted by this problem.

  8. Abu Dhabi: human resource development for nuclear energy programmes

    On 14-18 March 2010, the city of Abu Dhabi, the United Arab Emirates, hosted the International conference on the development of human resource for introduction and expansion of nuclear energy programs. The conference was organized by the IAEA in cooperation with Foratom and other organisations. The plenary session was dedicated to discussions on key topics of the conference, such as the current status and issues of staffing in the nuclear energy industries in the IAEA member nations, national strategies for development of human resource for nuclear energy, as well as the need for global efforts in that area. Russian representatives made several reports: about education of nuclear professionals in Russia, in particular in MEPhI (a list of facilities available to make training, especially the full-scale and analytical simulators, was presented); a report discussed the role of the international nuclear portal www. atomic-energy.ru in attracting and developing the potential of young nuclear professionals; an interactive presentation was made describing the experience that VNIIAES has in the creation and upgrades of systems for personnel training for nuclear power plants, use of simulators, systems of distant learning and computerized training systems

  9. Human transportation network as ecological barrier for wildlife on Brazilian Pantanal-Cerrado corridors

    Fischer, Wagner A.; Ramos-Neto, Mario B.; Silveira, Leandro; Jacomo, Anah T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Highway impacts on terrestrial fauna are known as a serious mortality source for several species around the world. Despite the international concerns about this issue, only recently has this question been included in Brazilian policies of transportation. Brazilian Pantanal and Cerrado biomes and corridors are known as two of the broadest wildlife sanctuaries in South America, and their fauna movements has been drastically affected by road development. The last 13 years of road fauna-...

  10. The sanctuary of Demeter at Mytilene: a diachronic and contextual study

    Cronkite, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis describes and analyses the archaeological remains of the Demeter sanctuary at Mytilene, Lesbos which was excavated from 1983 to 1994. The thesis is divided into two sections, the main text and a site catalogue. In the main text, chapters one and two provide a discussion of the possible origins of Demeter and a details description of the remains of the sanctuary at Mytilene. Chapters three and four examine topography and artifacts from a broad range of Demeter sanctuaries, while cha...

  11. Migration of P-12 Education from Its Current State to One of High Quality: The Aspirations of Abu Dhabi

    Badri, Masood; Al Khaili, Mugheer

    2014-01-01

    Key system challenges identified by the Abu Dhabi Education Council provided the impetus for an aggressive strategic plan as necessary guidance and support for the development of the P-12 education system to contribute to advancing its positioning in the global knowledge economy. For the Abu Dhabi Education Council, the analysis served as a tool…

  12. 78 FR 68821 - Availability of Seats for National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Councils

    2013-11-15

    ... Hutto, Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, 99 Pacific Street, Building 455A, Monterey, CA 93940... Advisory Council: Native Hawaiian, Elder (alternate); and Native Hawaiian (alternate). Olympic...

  13. 77 FR 8810 - Availability of Seats for the Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    2012-02-15

    ... Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Sport diving and charter/commercial fishing... they are applying; community and professional affiliations; philosophy regarding the protection...

  14. 78 FR 11821 - Availability of Seats for the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    2013-02-20

    ... National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council (council): Recreation, Business/Economic Development, Tourism..., including education, research, fishing, diving, tourism, economic development, and the community at...

  15. 75 FR 12726 - Availability of Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    2010-03-17

    ... vacant seats on the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Tourism alternate...), Chuinash Community member and alternate, Business alternate, and Commercial Fishing alternate....

  16. 78 FR 5779 - Extension of Application Period for Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary...

    2013-01-28

    ... Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Business Alternate, Non-consumptive Recreation... seat for which they are applying; community and professional affiliations; philosophy regarding...

  17. 76 FR 41763 - Availability of Seats for the Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    2011-07-15

    ... Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Business/Industry and Community-at-Large: Tutuila... the seat for which they are applying; community and professional affiliations; philosophy...

  18. DIALOG ANTAR-IMAN SEBAGAI RESOLUSI KONFLIK TAWARAN MOHAMMED ABU-NIMER

    Akhmad Rizqon Khamami

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Many are doubt about the roles of religion in maintaining peace, accusing it even as a source of conflicts. However, others attempt to prove that religion can become a peace keeper. In Islam, this idea comes from Mohammed Abu Nimer. This article examines Abu Nimer’s ideas of non-violence approaches to conflict resolution. It explores his non-violence initiatives in peace building and analyzes his arguments for conflict resolution and the necessity of interfaith dialogue. To him, interfaith dialogue is a medium through which world peace amongst religious communities can be established. It is only and through dialogue that people can avoid having hostilities and violent conflict in the name of religion. This article argues that Abu Nimer’s method can be classified into communicative pluralism that combines particularist views and universalist views. His approaches to peace building and conflict resolution feature unique concepts that differ from other interfaith activists. 

  19. SINTESIS SILIKA AEROGEL DENGAN BAHAN DASAR ABU BAGASSE

    Nazriati Nazriati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available SYNTHESIS OF SILICA AEROGEL FROM BAGASSE ASH. Synthesis of silica aerogel from bagasse ash was done by alkaline extraction followed by sol-gel. Bagasse ash was extracted with NaOH at its boiling temperature for one hour with continue stirring, to produce sodium silicate. Subsequently, sodium silicate was pass through ionic exchanger resin, to produces silicic acid (SA. Silicic acid solution was then added with TMCS and HMDS as surface modifier agent. In order to form gel pH must be adjusted to final pH of 8-9 by addition of NH4OH solution. The resulting gel then was aged and dried at ambient pressure and at a certain time and temperature. Characterization of products was done by measuring its pore volume, surface area, and hydrophobisity (contact angle. TMCS serves as water expeller from the pores and subsequently surface was modified by HMDS and TMCS. HMDS content will linearly increase surface area, pore volume, and the contact angle of the resulting silica aerogel. Characteristics of silica aerogel was generated by varying the composition of the SA:TMCS:HMDS resulting has a surface area of 50-488 m2/g, pore volume from 0.2 to 0.9 m3 /g, the contact angle of 48-119 and pore diameter ranging from 5.7-22.56 nm. Based on the resulting pore diameter, the synthesized of silica aerogel categorized as mesoporous.      Abstrak   Sintesis silika aerogel dari bahan dasar abu bagasse dilakukan dengan ekstraksi basa dan diikuti dengan sol-gel. Abu bagasse diekstrak dengan NaOH pada suhu didihnya sambil diaduk selama satu jam, menghasilkan sodium silikat. Selanjutnya, sodium silikat dilewatkan resin penukar ion, menghasilkan asam silicic (SA. Larutan asam silicic kemudian ditambahkan trimethy­l­chlorosilane (TMCS dan hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS sebagai agen pemodifikasi permukaan. Untuk terjadinya gel pH diatur hingga mencapai 8-9 dengan penambahan larutan NH4OH. Gel yang dihasilkan kemudian di-aging dan dikeringkan pada tekanan ambien pada suhu dan

  20. Wildlife Inventory Plan : [Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines the wildlife inventory objectives for Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge. Procedures are outlined for the following surveys: goose census,...

  1. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area Wildlife Inventory Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Wildlife Inventory Plan discusses the following protocols; wildlife inventory procedures, physical facility needs, manpower days, and special considerations.

  2. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Mingo National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Mingo NWR outlines procedures for monitoring the distribution, abundance, and population dynamics of the species of wildlife...

  3. Wildlife Inventory Plan: Seney National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Wildlife Inventory Plan is the guideline employed to obtain useful parameters related to the distribution, abundance, and population dynamics of wildlife...

  4. The Theatre of Cruelty: Dehumanization, Objectification & Abu Ghraib

    Christiana Spens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A clumsy pyramid of kneeling men, naked apart from the hoods over their heads, with a smiling, fair-headed woman and a grinning man with a moustache, wearing green cleaning gloves; a slight woman with a blank expression and a man on the floor, on a limp leash; a hooded, robed figure, standing on a box with his arms outstretched and a pose similar to the crucifixion, with sinister wires behind him, and otherwise blank surroundings.  A row of more hooded, naked men, forced to do sexual acts as a female prison guard (Lynndie England, tanned and wearing various shades of khaki, grins and does a thumbs up sign, pointing at him, her cigarette tilted and her expression not altogether different from Bonnie in 'Bonnie and Clyde. 'A man in uniform and a black beanie hat, sitting on an Iraqi prisoner. Another pyramid of naked detainees, with a man and women behind them, smiling arm in arm, as if they are standing by a caught wild boar or large fish, or a well-organised barbeque. The moustached man (Charles Graner, again smiling and giving a thumbs up sign, this time over a corpse, whose bloody eyes have been bandaged. A naked prisoner covering his ears, as several dogs bark at him, and soldiers watch on. Another prisoner chained to a bed-frame, with some underpants covering his face.  These infamous scenes, shown in the Abu Ghraib photographs, shocked many people, and the perpetrators of the torture depicted were condemned by the relevant authorities. They transformed from clandestine mementos of hidden violence to records of an international scandal and evidence of serious crime. Their meaning changed depending on who saw them, how they were interpreted, what reactions they provoked, and the rulings of the courts regarding the people involved. They went from being private victory shots, to an international public relations disaster, to evidence of breaking of the Geneva Convention.

  5. Partial Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Sampler (ISVS) Carts

    This document provides the ''Partial'' Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU), for the Type 4 in-situ vapor sampler system (ISVS). This document is generated to support the completion of equipment modifications and engineering documentation for the ISVS system that is used for sampling gaseous vapors in the Hanford single shell radioactive waste storage tanks. The ABU is used to document the items required for transferring the ISVS system to operations for field use. This document is generated following Characterization Engineering Desk Instruction DI-CE-004-001

  6. Distribution of heavy metals in the coastal area of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates.

    Al Rashdi, Saeed; Arabi, Alya A; Howari, Fares M; Siad, Abdi

    2015-08-15

    Fifty-seven sediment samples were collected from Abu Dhabi coastal area, United Arab Emirates (UAE). The concentrations of heavy metals including antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, lead, molybdenum, nickel and zinc were obtained using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence. Heavy metal contaminations in Abu Dhabi had increased since 2004. Nevertheless, the enrichment factors, geoaccumulation indices and the pollution load index of 0.3 showed no pollution with any of the measured metals except arsenic. PMID:26081249

  7. Abu Dhabi-Great Britain and the crisis over jurisdiction 1959-1960

    Federico Velez

    2011-01-01

    Las demandas presentadas por el Jeque Shakhbout en 1959 para obtener la plena soberanía jurídica sobre el emirato de Abu Dhabi generaron una crisis diplomática plasmada en la correspondencia interna del gobierno Británico. Con sus demandas, el Jeque Shakhbout forzaba a la burocracia a cargo de los Estados de la Tregua – La Oficina de Asuntos Extranjeros en Londres, el representante del gobierno Británico en Bahreín, y los agente administrativos y políticos en Dubai y Abu Dhabi a reexaminar la...

  8. Abu Dhabi-Great Britain and the crisis over jurisdiction 1959-1960

    Federico Velez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Las demandas presentadas por el Jeque Shakhbout en 1959 para obtener la plena soberanía jurídica sobre el emirato de Abu Dhabi generaron una crisis diplomática plasmada en la correspondencia interna del gobierno Británico. Con sus demandas, el Jeque Shakhbout forzaba a la burocracia a cargo de los Estados de la Tregua – La Oficina de Asuntos Extranjeros en Londres, el representante del gobierno Británico en Bahreín, y los agente administrativos y políticos en Dubai y Abu Dhabi a reexaminar las bases legales de la presencia Británica en la zona y los límites éticos del sistema judicial impuesto sobre sus habitantes. La crisis va mas allá de una discusión sobre los poderes jurisdiccionales. La crisis nos ofrece una ventana a las contradicciones inherentes a la  presencia Británica en la zona, en el marco del movimiento nacionalista árabe y del desarrollo de la industria petrolera y la futura redefinición de la relación entre Abu Dhabi  y la Gran Bretaña.Palabras clave: Abu Dhabi, Gran Bretaña, colonialismo___________________________Abstract:Demands to the British government for supreme jurisdiction over his territory presented by the ruler of Abu Dhabi in 1959 created a diplomatic crisis captured in the internal correspondence of the British government. Sheikh Shakhbout forced the entire bureaucracy that was dealing with the Trucial States – the Foreign Office in London, the British Resident in Bahrain, and the Political and Administrative Agents in Abu Dhabi and Dubai – to reexamine the legality of their presence in the region and the ethical limits of the judicial system imposed on this land.The crisis went beyond the mere discussion over jurisdictional powers. It is also a window into the contradictions linked to the British presence in the region, within the framework of the nascent Arab Nationalist movement and the development of the oil industry . All of which will soon change the nature of the relationship between

  9. 78 FR 10606 - Final Management Plan and Environmental Assessment for Monitor National Marine Sanctuary: Notice...

    2013-02-14

    ... Management Plan Review Coordinator, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary, 100 Museum Drive, Newport News, VA... National Marine Sanctuary (MNMS) Web site at http://monitor.noaa.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... Policy Act, that analyzes the environmental impacts of the revised management plan. NOAA's analysis...

  10. 15 CFR Appendix V to Subpart P of... - Sanctuary Preservation Areas Boundary Coordinates

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanctuary Preservation Areas Boundary Coordinates V Appendix V to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce... National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. P, App. V Appendix V to Subpart P of Part...

  11. 75 FR 970 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    2010-01-07

    ... Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council AGENCY: Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS... and alternate members of the following seats on its Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine... other various groups that help to focus efforts and attention on the humpback whale and its...

  12. 75 FR 17055 - Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary Regulations on the Use of Spearfishing Gear; Correction

    2010-04-05

    ... possession of spearfishing gear in Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary (75 FR 7361). After the regulations... Administration (NOAA) published a document in the Federal Register on February 19, 2010 (75 FR 7361) on the use... Sanctuary Regulations on the Use of Spearfishing Gear; Correction AGENCY: Office of National...

  13. Industrial Wastewater Treatment Using Local Natural Soil in Abu Dhabi, U.A.E

    H. A. Tayim; A. H. Al-Yazouri

    2005-01-01

    Local soil from the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirate is investigated for its efficiency in removing heavy metals from industrial wastewater. Eight different industrial water effluents from different industries were treated. Pb, Zn, Fe, Cu and Mn were removed from industrial wastewaters yielding treated water with heavy metal concentrations well below the maximum limits enforced by environmental protection agencies.

  14. The Westernization of Arab Pedagogies: Abu Dhabi Attempts to Move towards a Knowledge Economy

    Chrystall, Steve

    2014-01-01

    As the oil reserves in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) are forecast to become depleted over the next 50 to 150 years, the emirate of Abu Dhabi has set a vision to develop a knowledge economy in order to develop alternative sources of revenue in areas such as tourism, alternative energy and innovative business enterprises. Reformation of its…

  15. Some dared call it torture: cultural resonance, Abu Ghraib, and a selectively echoing press

    C.M. Rowling; T.M. Jones; P. Sheets

    2011-01-01

    This study draws upon research on "indexing" and "cascading activation" to explore U.S. political and news discourse surrounding the Abu Ghraib prison scandal. Specifically, we systematically analyze White House, military, congressional, and news messages. In so doing, we incorporate scholarship on

  16. Variation by Gender in Abu Dhabi High School Students' Interests in Physics

    Badri, Masood; Mazroui, Karima Al; Al Rashedi, Asma; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Abu Dhabi high school students' interest in physics in different contexts was investigated with a survey conducted in connection with the international project, The Relevance of Science Education (ROSE). The sample consisted of 2248 students in public and private schools. Means of most items that belong to the school physics context for both girls…

  17. A biogeographic assessment of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary: a review of boundary expansion concepts for NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary Program

    2005-01-01

    The priority management goal of the National Marine Sanctuaries Program (NMSP) is to protect marine ecosystems and biodiversity. This goal requires an understanding of broad-scale ecological relationships and linkages between marine resources and physical oceanography to support an ecosystem management approach. The Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (CINMS) is currently reviewing its management plan and investigating boundary expansion. A management plan study area (henceforth, Study ...

  18. Populations of domesticated cattle and buffalo in the Western Forest Complex of Thailand and their possible impacts on the wildlife community.

    Chaiyarat, Rattanawat; Srikosamatara, Sompod

    2009-03-01

    The Western Forest Complex (WEFCOM) of Thailand is comprised of many protected areas and has one of the highest wildlife populations in the country. Populations of wildlife in the WEFCOM have decreased dramatically over recent years. Rapid economic development has resulted in the conversion of forest into agricultural and pastoral land, which has directly and indirectly impacted the wildlife community. This research aimed to evaluate populations of domesticated cattle (Bos indicus) and buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the WEFCOM and their possible impacts on the wildlife community. Domesticated cattle and buffalo keepers from 1561 (or 3.3%) of houses in and near WEFCOM were interviewed. The average number of animals per household was 15.6 cattle and 8.5 buffalo. Most villagers released domesticated cattle and buffalo to forage in the protected areas. This tended to have a high impact on the wildlife community in Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary and Tungyai Naresuan Wildlife Sanctuary. The least impacted areas were Luam Khlong Ngu National Park, Thong Pha Phum National Park and Chaleam Ratanakosin National Park. With a high risk to the wildlife community, law enforcement should be used in combination with a certain level of co-management with local communities. PMID:19036494

  19. Narora reservoir, U.P. - - a potential bird sanctuary

    Narora (28deg 15'N, 78deg 23'E) in Bulandshahr district of Uttar Pradesh is the site of India's fourth atomic power plant. It lies on the main migratory route of the birds of Palaearctic region. Due to damming of the river Ganga, a huge reservoir is formed. About 120 species of birds are found in the reservoir area. Important ones are listed. The potentiality of the reservoir and adjoining marshes for development of a bird sanctuary is assessed. (M.G.B.)

  20. Reproductive Characteristics of Mullet (Liza abu H., 1843) (Pisces Mugilidae) in the Atatürk Dam Lake, Southeastern Turkey

    Şahinöz(2), Erdinç; Doğu, Zafer; Aral, Faruk; Şevik, Ramazan; ATAR, Hasan Hüseyin

    2011-01-01

    In this study reproductive biology of Liza abu (Pisces Mugilidae) from Atatürk Dam Lake in the Euphrates River Basin was observed. Some reproductive characteristics such as age, egg number, sexual determination, gonadosomatic index (GSI) of Liza abu (n=821) are taken into consideration. The relationship between total weight (Wt), and total length (Lt) and fecundity (F) were investigated during the period from January 2004 to December 2005. The ages of investigated fish ranged from 1 to 5....

  1. High resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Late Miocene Abu Madi Formation, Northern Nile Delta Basin

    Sarhan, Mohammad Abdelfattah

    2015-12-01

    Abu Madi Formation represents the Upper Miocene Messinian age in the Nile Delta basin. It consists mainly of sandstones and shale intercalations and because of its richness in hydrocarbon, it has been subdivided by the petroleum companies into Level-I, Level-II and Level-III, respectively according to the increase in the sandstone to the shale ratio. The Miocene cycle in the northern subsurface section of the Nile Delta encompasses three main formations namely from the base; Sidi Salim formation, Qawasim Formation and Abu Madi Formation at the top. The high resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis, using gamma ray responses, has been done for the Late Miocene formation in the northern part of the Nile delta subsurface section. For this purpose, the gamma-ray logs of ten deep wells, arranged in four cross-sections trending in almost north-south direction throughout the northern region of the Nile Delta, were analyzed. The analysis has revealed that the interpreted 4th order depositional cycles within Abu Madi Formation display great variations in both number and gamma ray responses in each investigated well, and cannot be traced laterally, even in the nearest well. These variations in the interpreted 4th order depositional sequences could be attributed to the presence of normal faults buried in the inter-area laying between the investigated wells. This finding matches with the conclusion of that Abu Madi Formation represents a part of the Upper Miocene Nile Delta syn-rift megasequence, developed during the Upper Miocene rift phase of the Red Sea - Gulf of Suez province in Egypt. Accordingly, in the sequence stratigraphic approach, the depositional history of Abu Madi Formation was strongly overprinted by the tectonic controls rather than the relative sea-level changes which are assumed to be of a secondary influence. Regarding the hydrocarbon aspects of the Abu Madi Formation, the present work recommends to direct the drilling efforts into the stratigraphic traps

  2. Wildlife inventory plan [1985

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1938 as a refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds and other wildlife. While the refuge represents...

  3. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary objective at Shiawassee is to provide food and cover for migratory birds, with emphasis on waterfowl, during spring and fall migrations. A Wildlife...

  4. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Ottawa NWR describes the inventory programs relation to Refuge objectives and outlines the programs policies and administration....

  5. Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge wildlife checklist

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Checklist with habitat, season, and abundance codes for wildlife species at Ruby Lake NWR. Includes bird, mammal, amphibian, reptile, and fish species.

  6. Wildlife Inventory Plan: Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this inventory plan for Tetlin NWR is to provide a management tool for the measurement of progress in attaining wildlife population goals. This...

  7. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a plan to obtain useful parameters related to the distribution, abundance, and population dynamics of the species of wildlife inhabiting Necedah NWR. The...

  8. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Ottawa NWR describes the inventory program’s relation to Refuge objectives and outlines the program’s policies and administration....

  9. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Muscatatuck NWR Wildlife Inventory Plan summarizes procedures for monitoring wood duck production, monitoring Canada goose and mallard production, and...

  10. Wildlife management memoradum: Utilization of wildlife resources

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Outlines the interview technique designed to determine harvest of wildlife resources by subsistence and native hunters. Collections of birds, eggs, mammals, etc....

  11. Transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections in Healthcare Settings, Abu Dhabi

    Nguyen, Duc; Aden, Bashir; Al Bandar, Zyad; Al Dhaheri, Wafa; Abu Elkheir, Kheir; Khudair, Ahmed; Al Mulla, Mariam; El Saleh, Feda; Imambaccus, Hala; Al Kaabi, Nawal; Sheikh, Farrukh Amin; Sasse, Jurgen; Turner, Andrew; Abdel Wareth, Laila; Weber, Stefan; Al Ameri, Asma; Abu Amer, Wesal; Alami, Negar N.; Bunga, Sudhir; Haynes, Lia M.; Hall, Aron J.; Kallen, Alexander J.; Kuhar, David; Pham, Huong; Pringle, Kimberly; Tong, Suxiang; Whitaker, Brett L.; Gerber, Susan I.; Al Hosani, Farida Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections sharply increased in the Arabian Peninsula during spring 2014. In Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, these infections occurred primarily among healthcare workers and patients. To identify and describe epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of persons with healthcare-associated infection, we reviewed laboratory-confirmed MERS-CoV cases reported to the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi during January 1, 2013–May 9, 2014. Of 65 case-patients identified with MERS-CoV infection, 27 (42%) had healthcare-associated cases. Epidemiologic and genetic sequencing findings suggest that 3 healthcare clusters of MERS-CoV infection occurred, including 1 that resulted in 20 infected persons in 1 hospital. MERS-CoV in healthcare settings spread predominantly before MERS-CoV infection was diagnosed, underscoring the importance of increasing awareness and infection control measures at first points of entry to healthcare facilities. PMID:26981708

  12. Variation by Gender in Abu Dhabi High School Students' Interests in Physics

    Badri, Masood; Mazroui, Karima Al; Al Rashedi, Asma; Yang, Guang

    2016-04-01

    Abu Dhabi high school students' interest in physics in different contexts was investigated with a survey conducted in connection with the international project, The Relevance of Science Education (ROSE). The sample consisted of 2248 students in public and private schools. Means of most items that belong to the school physics context for both girls and boys were below the score of (3.0). The most interesting topics for both genders were connected with fantasy items. The least interesting items (particularly for girls) were connected with artifacts and technological processes. Girls assigned the highest scores for "why we dream" and "life and death." Boys assigned the highest scores for "inventions and discoveries" and "life outside of earth." The main message of the study is that new curricular approaches and textbooks can be developed through combining technological and human contexts. The implications for curriculum development, teacher professional development programs, and other education strategies in Abu Dhabi are discussed in light of the ROSE survey.

  13. Comunicación y territorialización. Extraños en Abu Ghraib

    Cristina Peñamarín

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo estudia los medios en los procesos de territorialización y de formación de “causas colectivas”, que mueven la acción política, en los discursos públicos durante la guerra de Irak y en las fotografías de Abu Ghraib. Para ello, analiza la transmisión de emociones colectivizadoras de acuerdo con las diferentes categorizaciones de los otros. The paper studies media in territory processes and the formation of "collective causes", that can move political action, in public discourses during Iraq war and in Abu Ghraib pictures. For this purpose, it analyses transmission of collective emotions based on different categories of “the others”.

  14. THE ACOUSTICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SAYYIDINA ABU BAKAR MOSQUE, UTeM

    DG. H. KASSIM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Muslim world, mosques are built with grandeur architectural design to depict an important house of worship in Islam. Unfortunately the acoustical performance in mosque is rarely considered at the design stage which eventually deteriorates the speech intelligibility. This includes the Sayyidina Abu Bakar Mosque in UTeM where poor subjective speech clarity is experienced during congregation. The objective of this paper is to discuss the acoustical characteristics of the mosque. The CATT indoor acoustic software was used to calculate important room acoustic parameters such as reverberation time (RT and clarity (C50. The measurement was conducted to validate the RT from the simulation where good agreement is obtained. This study finds that the Sayyidina Abu Bakar Mosque UTeM has poor acoustical performance at low frequencies below 1 kHz, i.e. the frequency range which is significantly responsible for the speech intelligibility

  15. Pengaruh Penambahan Abu Sekam Padi Dan Cangkang Kemiri Terhadap Sifat Mekanis Beton

    Gurning, Sandro Janesra

    2014-01-01

    Beton merupakan material utama untuk konstruksi yang banyak digunakan di seluruh dunia. Semakin meluasnya penggunaan beton menunjukkan juga semakin banyak kebutuhan beton di masa yang akan datang, namun bahan baku pembentuk beton yang selama ini diperoleh dari alam cenderung menurun mendorong peneliti menambahkan bahan-bahan lain yang mempunyai sifat yang sama dengan pembentuk beton dalam campuran beton. Salah satunya adalah pemanfaatan limbah abu sekam padi dan cangkang kem...

  16. Adolescents’ perception of substance use and factors influencing its use: a qualitative study in Abu Dhabi

    Alhyas, Layla; Al Ozaibi, Naseeba; Elarabi, Hisham; El-Kashef, Ahmed; Wanigaratne, Shamil; Almarzouqi, Amna; Alhosani, Ayesha; Al Ghaferi, Hamad

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this article is to gain a deeper understanding of the attitudes and perceptions of adolescents in the United Arab Emirates regarding substance and to identify factors that, in their view, may influence the risk of substance use and suggest possible interventions. Design This was a qualitative study that used a focus group approach. Setting The study was carried out in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Participants Male and female teenagers aged 13-18 years re...

  17. Health System Reform and Organisational Culture: An Exploratory Study in Abu Dhabi Public Healthcare Sector

    Jammoul, Nada Youssef

    2015-01-01

    The Health system in Abu Dhabi has undergone a series of far reaching reforms during the past six years, yet in spite of the structural transformations, public confidence in the performance of this vital sector is still skeptical at best and employee engagement is still low. The thesis was underpinned by the aim to reveal the challenges in public health system reform outside the context of western administration. This thesis is an attempt to analyse the intricate, multidimensional concept of ...

  18. Automatic Acquisition of Machine Translation Resources in the Abu-MaTran Project

    Toral, Antonio; Pirinen, Tommi; Way, Andy; Rubino, Raphaël; Ramírez Sánchez, Gema; Ortiz Rojas, Sergio; Sánchez-Cartagena, Víctor M.; Ferrández-Tordera, Jorge; Forcada, Mikel L.; Esplà-Gomis, Miquel; Ljubešić, Nikola; Klubička, Filip; Prokopidis, Prokopis; Papavassiliou, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the research and development activities carried out to alleviate the language resources' bottleneck in machine translation within the Abu-MaTran project. We have developed a range of tools for the acquisition of the main resources required by the two most popular approaches to machine translation, i.e. statistical (corpora) and rule-based models (dictionaries and rules). All these tools have been released under open-source licenses and have been developed wi...

  19. Comunicación y territorialización. Extraños en Abu Ghraib

    Peñamarín, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    El trabajo estudia los medios en los procesos de territorialización y de formación de “causas colectivas”, que mueven la acción política, en los discursos públicos durante la guerra de Irak y en las fotografías de Abu Ghraib. Para ello, analiza la transmisión de emociones colectivizadoras de acuerdo con las diferentes categorizaciones de los otros.

  20. Phytoplankton community in abu-qir bay as a hot spot on the southeastern mediterranean coast

    Shams El-Din, N.G.; Dorgham, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The phytoplankton community in the stressed part of Abu Qir Bay was studied monthly relative to the prevailing ecological conditions from April 1998 to March 1999 at eight stations. The study recorded a total of 182 species of both fresh and marine origins, belonging to diatoms (89 species), chlorophytes (34 species), dinoflagellates (26 species), cyanophytes (18 species), euglenophytes (12 species), silicoflagellates (2 species), and cryptophyte (one species). Most of the recorded species oc...

  1. Antioxidant activity and mineral composition of three Mediterranean common seaweeds from Abu-Qir Bay, Egypt

    Hanan M. Khairy; El-Sheikh, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant activity and mineral composition were evaluated seasonally from spring to autumn 2010 in the three common seaweeds Ulva lactuca Linnaeus (Chlorophyta), Jania rubens (Linnaeus) J.V. Lamouroux and Pterocladia capillacea (S.G. Gmelin) Bornet (Rhodophyta). The antioxidant activity was measured with β-carotene, total phenol content and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl). Seaweeds were collected from the rocky site near Boughaz El-Maadya Abu-Qir Bay of Alexandria, Egypt. The results s...

  2. THE ACOUSTICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SAYYIDINA ABU BAKAR MOSQUE, UTeM

    Dg. H. Kassim; A. Putra; M. J. M. NOR

    2015-01-01

    In the Muslim world, mosques are built with grandeur architectural design to depict an important house of worship in Islam. Unfortunately the acoustical performance in mosque is rarely considered at the design stage which eventually deteriorates the speech intelligibility. This includes the Sayyidina Abu Bakar Mosque in UTeM where poor subjective speech clarity is experienced during congregation. The objective of this paper is to discuss the acoustical characteristics of the mosque. The CATT ...

  3. Leadership and followership practices in learning organisations:a case study of Abu Dhabi education council

    Al Kalbani, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    This thesis studies the relationship between practices in learning organisation and social practices at the Abu Dhabi Education Council (ADEC). The research domain was broken down into six research (questions), which affect the development of a learning organisation at ADEC. 1) What is the impact of the roles of leaders on developing learning organisation characteristics with in ADEC? 2) What is the impact of the relationship between leaders and followers on developing learning organisation c...

  4. Scleractinian Density for Florida Keys national Marine Sanctuary from 1999-2012 (NODC Accession 0123059)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains records of scleractinian colony density, within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, compiled from multiple sources. These are: SCREAM,...

  5. 77 FR 64796 - Availability of Seats for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    2012-10-23

    ... Business and Tourism Activity Panel (``BTAP'') co-chaired by the Business/Industry Representative and Tourism Representative, each dealing with matters concerning research, education, conservation and human... Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Agriculture, At-Large (2),...

  6. 75 FR 61424 - Availability of Seats for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    2010-10-05

    ... Representative, and the Business and Tourism Activity Panel (``BTAP'') chaired by the Business/Industry... Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: At-Large (1), Education, Diving, and...

  7. 78 FR 49728 - Availability of Seats for National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Councils

    2013-08-15

    ... and Monitoring (primary member); Research and Monitoring (alternate); Tourism--Lower Keys (primary member); and Tourism--Lower Keys (alternate). Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Advisory... Recreation (alternate); Business/Commerce (primary member); Business/Commerce (alternate);...

  8. 75 FR 57442 - Availability of Seats for the Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    2010-09-21

    ... Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Business/Industry, Tourism, Community-at-Large...; philosophy regarding the protection and management of marine resources; and possibly the length of...

  9. Cruise NF-12-04-SERA (Sanctuary Regional Development and Assessment) (EK60)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 1)Ship based mapping and characterization of benthic habitats in the waters around Gray?s Reef National Marine Sanctuary. Collected data will need to include...

  10. Biogeographic Characterization of Benthic Composition within the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (2006 - 2007)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The overarching goal of this collaboration was to provide the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) staff with information on biogeographic...

  11. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary - trak121_0701 - Survey tracklines from effort 121_0701

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat polygon coverages are being created for the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS).In 2007, approximately 438 km tracklines were run to...

  12. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary - trak111_0205 - Survey tracklines for effort 111_0205

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat polygon coverages are being created for the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS).In 2002, approximately 585 km tracklines were run to...

  13. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary - trak122_0702 - Survey tracklines from effort 122_0702

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat polygon coverages are being created for the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS).In 2007, approximately 438 km tracklines were run to...

  14. Cruise NF-12-04-SERA (Sanctuary Regional Development and Assessment) (Reson7125)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 1)Ship based mapping and characterization of benthic habitats in the waters around Gray?s Reef National Marine Sanctuary. Collected data will need to include...

  15. Biogeographic Characterization of Fish Communities within the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (2006 - 2007)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The overarching goal of this collaboration was to provide the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) staff with information on biogeographic...

  16. Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary - Biogeographic Assessment Study Area Spatial Extent

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spatial extent of digital products for Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Project, conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA)...

  17. Sero-Prevalence and Epidemiology of Brucellosis in Camels, Sheep and Goats in Abu Dhabi Emirate

    Maymona A Mohammed

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a disease of animals caused by Brucella species and is transmissible to humans. This study was undertaken to determine the sero-prevalence of the disease in livestock including sheep and goats and camels, in different regions of Abu Dhabi emirate and to identify factors associated with the epidemiology of the disease. A serological study using 6126 blood samples from livestock were obtained from 267 farms (Izaba during the period from January 2009 to December 2010. The Rose Bengal Plate Test and competitive ELISA were used as screening and confirmatory tests, respectively. The overall sero-prevalence of Brucella antibodies was 8.00% and 7.00% detected by the RBPT by c-ELISA respectively. Brucella prevalence was 8.3, 5.9 and 4.7% in Alain, Abu Dhabi and Western region. The prevalence of the disease was higher (8.4% in sheep and goats than (4.4% in camels respectively. The result showed that, the prevalence of brucellosis was significantly higher in females than male (p<0.04 Out of the 267 farms sampled in the study, 147 (55.1% were infected with Brucella There was strong correlation between herd size and prevalence of the disease, very large herds had significantly higher prevalence when compared with small ones. The study revealed light of a size able prevalence among livestock in Abu Dhabi Emirate and the results reflect the necessity of a control program of the disease is needed to be adopted.

  18. Tycho Brahe, Abu Mashar, and the comet beyond Venus (ninth century A.D.)

    Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Mugrauer, Markus; Luge, Daniela; van Gent, Rob

    2016-01-01

    From his observations of the A.D. 1572 super-nova and the A.D. 1577 comet, Tycho Brahe concluded that such transient celestial objects are outside the Earth's atmosphere, and he quoted the 9th century A.D. Persian astrologer and astronomer Abu Mashar: Dixit Albumasar, Cometa supra Venerem visus fuit, i.e. that he had reported much earlier that comets were seen beyond Venus. However, even from a more detailed Latin translation, the observations and logic behind Abu Mashar's conclusion were not understandable. We present here the original Arabic text (MS Ankara, Saib 199) together with our translation and interpretation: Abu Mashar reported that he had observed Venus in (or projected onto) the tail of a comet and concluded that the comet was behind Venus, because he had observed the extinction of Venus due to the cometary tail to be negligible (light of Venus was unimpaired). He then concluded that the comet would be located behind Venus. He also mentioned that others had observed Jupiter and Saturn in cometary...

  19. An ecological characterization of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Region: oceanographic, biogeographic, and contaminants assessment

    2006-01-01

    The mission of NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) is to serve as the trustee for a system of marine protected areas, to conserve, protect, and enhance their biodiversity, ecological integrity, and cultural legacy while facilitating compatible uses. Since 1972, thirteen National Marine Sanctuaries, representing a wide variety of ocean environments, have been established, each with management goals tuned to their unique diversity. Extending from Cape Ann to Cape Cod across the mout...

  20. Places of Sanctuary: Religious Revivalism and the Politics of Immigration in New Mexico

    Villarreal Garza, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examines the overlapping dimensions of secular and religious sanctuary place making by comparing the faith-based Sanctuary Movement(s) of the 1980s with the rise of present-day local immigration policy activism in New Mexico and beyond. Placing immigrant rights activism alongside religious revivalism, I also examine how the contemporary immigrant rights movement intersects with Renovación Carismática, a transnational Catholic charismatic renewal movement that originated in C...

  1. Progress report from the strategic sanctuary for the destruction of free will

    Kollectiv, Galia; Kollectiv, Pil

    2016-01-01

    Progress Report from the Strategic Sanctuary for the Destruction of Free Will presents a new work combining film, music and installation that juxtaposes the setting of the institution with the aesthetics of psychedelia.Progress Report from the Strategic Sanctuary for the Destruction of Free Will is an installation, film and sound work that takes over the gallery. Using plain white card, it distorts the structure of the gallery’s architecture, producing a paranoid shrunken space. Inside this s...

  2. Chromium biogeochemical cycle in Abu Kir Bay, east of Alexandria, Egypt

    Aboul Dahab, O.

    1989-10-01

    Abu Kir Bay, east of Alexandria, is affected by two main point sources of pollution, namely Tabia Pumping Station and Lake Edku Outlet. Chromium was measured in the Bay effluents, sea water, marine organisms of different trophic levels, and sediments. Chromium concentration and mass emission from TPS (242 μg l -1 and 436 kg d -1) to the Bay are very high compared to those of Lake Edku Outlet (33 μg l -1 and 116 kg d -1). Average Cr concentrations in the Bay coastal waters during the period of study, were 0·120 μg l -1, 0·775 μg l -1 and 1·185 μg l -1, respectively, for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and particulate pphase. The surface distribution of Cr in the coastal waters showed the impact of Tabia Pumping Station on the Bay. On the basis of sediment concentrations of Cr in Abu Kir Bay, two 'hot spots' of the element were identified. The area around Tabia Pumping Station outfall (> 300 μg g -1 dw) and another one in the immediate vincinity of Lake Outlet (> 200 μg g -1 dw). Chromium concentrations in Abu Kir Bay organisms increased in the following order: mixed plankton (68 μg kg -1) > Sardina pilchardus (80 μg kg -1) ⩾ Mugil capito (82 μg kg -1) > Mullus barbatus (111 μ kg -1) > Solea solea (123 μg kg -1) > Penaeus kerathurus (168 μg kg -1 > Donax trunculus (209 μ kg -1) > Neptunus pelagicus (369 μg kg -1) > Ulva species (1867 μg kg -1) > Enteromorpha species (3345 μg kg -1). The sequence is consistent for organisms from both west and east Abu Kir Bay, regardless of the significantly low Cr concentrations of the latter. The study showed that algae and crabs play a critical role in the biological transport of Cr and can be considered the best accumulators of the element. From the total amount of Cr flux to the Bay, 552 kg d -1, flushing of the Bay to the open sea removes 262 kg d -1, and sedimentation within the Bay is 242 kg d -1. Finally, an input/output box model for Cr in Abu Kir Bay was constructed to help in understanding its biogeochemical cycle.

  3. Workshop on marine mammal research & monitoring in the National Marine Sanctuaries, Wailea, Maui, Hawaii, 28 November 1999

    2001-01-01

    The Second National Workshop on Marine Mammal Research and Monitoring in the National Marine Sanctuaries was held on 28 November 1999 in Maui, Hawaii. The workshop preceded the Thirteenth Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals, and provided an opportunity to review and promote marine mammal research and monitoring in the National Marine Sanctuaries (NMS). The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers and sanctuary staff and to improve marine mammal research...

  4. PEMANFAATAN ABU VULKANIK GUNUNG MERAPI SEBAGAI GEOPOLIMER (SUATU POLIMER ANORGANIK ALUMINOSILIKAT

    E. Kusumastuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sintesis geopolimer telah dilakukan dengan memanfaatkan abu vulkanik Gunung Merapi. Geopolimer merupakan suatu polimer anorganik aluminosilikat dengan rantai Si-O-Al yang disintesis dari material yang kaya akan silika dan alumina dengan larutan pengaktif natrium hidroksida. Analisis kandungan kimia abu vulkanik Merapi menunjukkan bahwa material ini termasuk material pozzolan dengan kandungan silika dan alumina yang tinggi, yakni 45,7% berat SiO2; 14,00% berat Al2O3; 16,1% berat CaO; 18,2% berat Fe2O3 dan 3,86% berat K2O. Perbandingan mol SiO2/Al2O3 dalam abu vulkanik Merapi tergolong tinggi yakni 5,55. Abu vulkanik Merapi dapat disintesis menjadi geopolimer meskipun mempunyai rasio mol SiO2/Al2O3 yang tinggi dengan menggunakan larutan pengaktif NaOH 66,67% serta menambah waktu curing selama 3 hari pada suhu 70°C untuk membantu proses kondensasi (lepasnya molekul air pada proses geopolimerisasinya. Geopolimerisasi abu vulkanik Merapi pada suhu kamar tidak dapat terjadi, ditandai dengan kekuatannya yang sangat rendah. Karakterisasi pada geopolimer berbahan dasar abu vulkanik menunjukkan bahwa kuat tekan optimum dicapai pada komposisi dengan perbandingan abu vulkanik/Na silikat/NaOH/H2O sebesar 50/10/4/6 dengan kekuatan 61,16 MPa. Analisis kualitatif berupa fasa mineral dengan XRD dan ikatan kimia dengan FTIR menunjukkan bahwa telah terbentuk fasa amorf aluminosilikat geopolimer dengan ikatan Si–O–Si atau Si–O–Al. Synthesis of geopolymer has been done by using Merapi volcanic ash. Geopolymer is an aluminosilicate inorganic polymer with Si-O-Al chain that has been synthesized from silica-and alumina-rich materials by using activator solution natrium hydroxide. The analysis of Merapi volcanic ash content showed that it was a pozzolan material containing high-silica alumina, with 45,7% of SiO2; 14,00% of Al2O3; 16,1% of  CaO; 18,2% of Fe2O3 and 3,86% of K2O. Mol ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 was high, it is 5,55. Although it

  5. Creating a sanctuary for wild Steelhead Trout through hatchery operations

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Deschutes River basin in north-central Oregon supports a wild population of threatened summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The basin has seen large...

  6. Food and feeding behaviour of Asiatic elephant (Elephas maximus Linn.) in Kuldiha Wild Life Sanctuary, Odisha, India.

    Mohapatra, Kalpana K; Patra, A K; Paramanik, D S

    2013-01-01

    The feeding behaviour of Asiatic elephant (Elephas maximus) with food reference was studied in Kuldiha Wildlife Sanctuary in Odisha during 2007 to 2009. Though the study area houses a good number of plant species only 71 species were identified as elephant fodder plants. The food trail of elephant was observed as twig breaking, bark peeling, branch breaking, stem twisting uprooting and flower plucking in different regions of study area during different seasons. Alteration of predominantly browsing strategy with that of grazing around the year was related to seasonal variation of food plants. Consumption of tree species (56%) was highest as compared to shrubs (20%), herbs (14%) and climbers (10%). A high degree of variation in dicot- monocot ratio (61:10)) was marked during identification of elephant fodder plant by direct observation. Microscopic analysis of dung showing a high degree of variation in average dicot- monocot ratio suggested that the food plant selection of elephant was highly opportunistic and seasonal. The elephants extensively fed on the plant species like Careya arborea, Kydia calycina, Helicteres isora, Mallotus philippinensis, Aegle marmelos, Zizyphus mauritiona, Bauhinia racemosa, Bauhinia vahlii, Mimosa pudica, Asparagus racemosus, Smilax zeylanica and Diosporea species. They were fond of Madhuca indica (Mahula) flowers in winter and fruits of Mangifera indica (Mango) in summer. They were never found feeding on Tectona grandis and Eucalyptus maculate inside the study area. PMID:24006812

  7. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Inventory Plan outlines the strategy, techniques and purpose of a wildlife inventory on the Refuge. Futhermore...

  8. Wildlife inventory plan, Becharof National Wildlife Refuge, King Salmon, Alaska

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This wildlife inventory plan for Becharof National Wildlife Refuge outlines the different projects and surveys that will help conserve fish and wildlife populations...

  9. Epidemiology and referral patterns of patients with chronic kidney disease in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi

    Nick Richards

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to estimates, the dialysis prevalence in Abu Dhabi is around 370 per million population. The annual growth is 12-15% and the dialysis population is likely to double in the next five years. Most patients present to dialysis as an emergency and only 2.7% have an arteriovenous fistula at the first dialysis. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the Emirate is undefined. A study of the epidemiology of CKD and referral patterns was undertaken. SEHA, the Abu Dhabi Health Service delivery company, has a unified computer system containing all measurements made in its laboratories. This study considered all serum creatinine measurements performed between 1 September 2011 and 31 October 2012 from outpatient departments or emergency rooms. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGRF was calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula (the Schwartz formula was used for children. We identified 331,360 samples from 212,314 individuals. The mean serum creatinine was 61 ± 48 μmol/L in females (59 ± 43 μmol/L in Emiratis, 63 ± 54 μmol/L in expatriates and 87 ± 69 μmol/L in males (80 ± 59 μmol/L in Emiratis, 92 ± 74 μmol/L in expatriates. Among Emiratis, 4.6% of males and 2.8% of females had an eGFR between CKD 3 and 5. Among expatriates, 4.2% of males and 3.2% of females had an eGFR between CKD 3 and 5. On average, eight months elapsed before a patient with CKD 3, and three months for a patient in CKD 5, to attend the nephrology clinic. This study has defined the prevalence of CKD within Abu Dhabi and demonstrated the need to improve identification and referral of CKD patients. Possible solutions include campaigns to increase public and physician awareness of CKD.

  10. Epidemiology and referral patterns of patients with chronic kidney disease in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi.

    Richards, Nick; Hassan, Mohamed; Saleh, Abdul Karim; Dastoor, Hormazdiar; Bernieh, Bassam; Abouchacra, Samra; Al Jabri, Omar; Fleischmann, Alan; Richards, Marie; Marcelli, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    According to estimates, the dialysis prevalence in Abu Dhabi is around 370 per million population. The annual growth is 12-15% and the dialysis population is likely to double in the next five years. Most patients present to dialysis as an emergency and only 2.7% have an arteriovenous fistula at the first dialysis. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the Emirate is undefined. A study of the epidemiology of CKD and referral patterns was undertaken. SEHA, the Abu Dhabi Health Service delivery company, has a unified computer system containing all measurements made in its laboratories. This study considered all serum creatinine measurements performed between 1 September 2011 and 31 October 2012 from outpatient departments or emergency rooms. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGRF) was calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula (the Schwartz formula was used for children). We identified 331,360 samples from 212,314 individuals. The mean serum creatinine was 61 ± 48 μmol/L in females (59 ± 43 μmol/L in Emiratis, 63 ± 54 μmol/L in expatriates) and 87 ± 69 μmol/L in males (80 ± 59 μmol/L in Emiratis, 92 ± 74 μmol/L in expatriates). Among Emiratis, 4.6% of males and 2.8% of females had an eGFR between CKD 3 and 5. Among expatriates, 4.2% of males and 3.2% of females had an eGFR between CKD 3 and 5. On average, eight months elapsed before a patient with CKD 3, and three months for a patient in CKD 5, to attend the nephrology clinic. This study has defined the prevalence of CKD within Abu Dhabi and demonstrated the need to improve identification and referral of CKD patients. Possible solutions include campaigns to increase public and physician awareness of CKD. PMID:26354587