WorldWideScience

Sample records for abt-737-induced mitochondrial membrane

  1. Lipid metabolism in mitochondrial membranes.

    Mayr, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes have a unique lipid composition necessary for proper shape and function of the organelle. Mitochondrial lipid metabolism involves biosynthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, the latter is a precursor of the late endosomal lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. It also includes mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis necessary for the formation of the lipid cofactor lipoic acid. Furthermore the synthesis of coenzyme Q takes place in mitochondria as well as essential parts of the steroid and vitamin D metabolism. Lipid transport and remodelling, which are necessary for tailoring and maintaining specific membrane properties, are just partially unravelled. Mitochondrial lipids are involved in organelle maintenance, fission and fusion, mitophagy and cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis. Mutations in TAZ, SERAC1 and AGK affect mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism and cause Barth syndrome, MEGDEL and Sengers syndrome, respectively. In these disorders an abnormal mitochondrial energy metabolism was found, which seems to be due to disturbed protein-lipid interactions, affecting especially enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation. Since a growing number of enzymes and transport processes are recognised as parts of the mitochondrial lipid metabolism, a further increase of lipid-related disorders can be expected. PMID:25082432

  2. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  3. Sorting pathways of mitochondrial inner membrane proteins

    Mahlke, Kerstin; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Martin, Jörg; Horwich, Arthur; Hartl, Franz-Ulrich; Neupert, Walter

    1990-01-01

    Two distinct pathways of sorting and assembly of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inner membrane proteins are described. In the first pathway, precursor proteins that carry amino-terminal targeting signals are initially translocated via contact sites between both mitochondrial membranes into the mitochondrial matrix. They become proteolytically processed, interact with the 60-kDa heat-shock protein hsp60 in the matrix and are retranslocated to the inner membrane. The sorting of subunit 9 of Neur...

  4. Platelet mitochondrial membrane potential in Parkinson's disease

    Antony, P.M.; Boyd, O.; Trefois, C.; Ammerlaan, W; Ostaszewski, M.; Baumuratov, A.S.; Longhino, L.; Antunes, L; Koopman, W.J.H.; Balling, R; Diederich, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), which has been reported not to be restricted to striatal neurons. However, studies that analyzed mitochondrial function at the level of selected enzymatic activities in peripheral tissues have produced conflicting data. We considered the electron transport chain as a complex system with mitochondrial membrane potential as an integrative indicator for mitochondrial fitness. METHODS: Twenty-five IPD pati...

  5. A mitochondrially targeted compound delays aging in yeast through a mechanism linking mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism to mitochondrial redox biology

    Michelle T. Burstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study revealed a mechanism of delaying aging in yeast by a natural compound which specifically impacts mitochondrial redox processes. In this mechanism, exogenously added lithocholic bile acid enters yeast cells, accumulates mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and elicits an age-related remodeling of phospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes. Such remodeling of mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics progresses with the chronological age of a yeast cell and ultimately causes significant changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome. These changes in the composition of membrane phospholipids alter mitochondrial abundance and morphology, thereby triggering changes in the age-related chronology of such longevity-defining redox processes as mitochondrial respiration, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, the preservation of cellular homeostasis of mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species, and the coupling of electron transport to ATP synthesis.

  6. Transport of proteins across mitochondrial membranes

    Neupert, Walter

    1994-01-01

    The vast majority of proteins comprising the mitochondrion are encoded by nuclear genes, synthesized on ribosomes in the cytosol, and translocated into the various mitochondrial subcompartments. During this process proteins must cross the lipid membranes of the mitochondrion without interfering with the integrity or functions of the organelle. In recent years an approach combining biochemical, molecular, genetic, and morphological methodology has provided insights into various aspects of this...

  7. Methylseleninic acid potentiates multiple types of cancer cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by targeting Mcl-1 and Bad

    Yin, Shutao; Dong, Yinhui; Li, Jinghua;

    2012-01-01

    overcome such resistance to restore the sensitivity. In the present study, a second-generation selenium compound methylseleninic acid (MSeA) synergistically sensitized MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, HT-29 human colon cancer cells and DU145 human prostate cancer cells to apoptosis induction by ABT...

  8. Proteolytic cleavage of Opa1 stimulates mitochondrial inner membrane fusion and couples fusion to oxidative phosphorylation

    Mishra, Prashant; Carelli, Valerio; Manfredi, Giovanni; Chan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial fusion is essential for maintenance of mitochondrial function. The mitofusin GTPases control mitochondrial outer membrane fusion, whereas the dynamin-related GTPase Opa1 mediates inner membrane fusion. We show that mitochondrial inner membrane fusion is tuned by the level of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), whereas outer membrane fusion is insensitive. Consequently, cells from patients with pathogenic mtDNA mutations show a selective defect in mitochondrial inner membrane fus...

  9. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    Cécile Sauvanet

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from

  10. Dysfunction of Rice Mitochondrial Membrane Induced by Yb3+.

    Gao, Jia-Ling; Wu, Man; Liu, Wen; Feng, Zhi-Jiang; Zhang, Ye-Zhong; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi; Dai, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Ytterbium (Yb), a widely used rare earth element, is treated as highly toxic to human being and adverseness to plant. Mitochondria play a significant role in plant growth and development, and are proposed as a potential target for ytterbium toxicity. In this paper, the biological effect of Yb(3+) on isolated rice mitochondria was investigated. We found that Yb(3+) with high concentrations (200 ~ 600 μM) not only induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (mtMPT), but also disturbed the mitochondrial ultrastructure. Moreover, Yb(3+) caused the respiratory chain damage, ROS formation, membrane potential decrease, and mitochondrial complex II activity reverse. The results above suggested that Yb(3+) with high concentrations could induce mitochondrial membrane dysfunction. These findings will support some valuable information to the safe application of Yb-based agents. PMID:26305923

  11. Platelet mitochondrial membrane potential in Parkinson's disease

    Antony, P.M.; Boyd, O.; Trefois, C.; Ammerlaan, W.; Ostaszewski, M.; Baumuratov, A.S.; Longhino, L.; Antunes, L.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Balling, R.; Diederich, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), which has been reported not to be restricted to striatal neurons. However, studies that analyzed mitochondrial function at the level of selected enzymatic activities in peripheral tissues have produced confli

  12. Mechanisms of ER Stress-Mediated Mitochondrial Membrane Permeabilization.

    Gupta, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    During apoptosis, the process of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) represents a point-of-no-return as it commits the cell to death. Here we have assessed the role of caspases, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore on ER stress-induced MOMP and subsequent cell death. Induction of ER stress leads to upregulation of several genes such as Grp78, Edem1, Erp72, Atf4, Wars, Herp, p58ipk, and ERdj4 and leads to caspase activation, release of mitochondrial intermembrane proteins and dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from caspase-9, -2 and, -3 knock-out mice were resistant to ER stress-induced apoptosis which correlated with decreased processing of pro-caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with caspase inhibitors (Boc-D.fmk and DEVD.fmk) attenuated ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. However, only deficiency of caspase-9 and -2 could prevent ER stress-mediated loss of DeltaPsim. Bcl-2 overexpression or pretreatment of cells with the cell permeable BH4 domain (BH4-Tat) or the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors, bongkrekic acid or cyclosporine A, attenuated the ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. These data suggest a role for caspase-9 and -2, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential during ER stress-induced apoptosis.

  13. Regulation of glycolytic oscillations by mitochondrial and plasma membrane H+-ATPases

    Olsen, Lars Folke; Andersen, Ann Zahle; Lunding, Anita;

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the coupling between glycolytic and mitochondrial membrane potential oscillations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under semianaerobic conditions. Glycolysis was measured as NADH autofluorescence, and mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using the fluorescent dye 3,3'-diethylo...

  14. Mitochondrial Swelling and Incipient Outer Membrane Rupture in Preapoptotic and Apoptotic Cells

    Sesso, A.; Belizário, JE; Marques, MM; Higuchi, ML; Schumacher, RI; Colquhoun, A; Ito, E.; Kawakami, J.

    2012-01-01

    Outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) rupture was first noted in isolated mitochondria in which the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) had lost its selective permeability. This phenomenon referred to as mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) refers to a permeabilized inner membrane that originates a large swelling in the mitochondrial matrix, which distends the outer membrane until it ruptures. Here, we have expanded previous electron microscopic observations that in apoptotic cells, OMM ru...

  15. Polyethylenimine-mediated impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and membrane integrity

    Larsen, Anna Karina; Malinska, Dominika; Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela;

    2012-01-01

    The 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI) is a highly efficient synthetic polycation used in transfection protocols, but also triggers mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic cell death processes where the mechanistic issues are poorly understood. We now demonstrate that PEI in a concentration- and time......-dependent manner can affect functions (membrane potential, swelling and respiration) and ultrastructural integrity of freshly isolated rat liver mitochondria. The threshold concentration for detection of PEI-mediated impairment of rat liver mitochondrial functions is 3 µg/mL, however, lower PEI levels still exert...... some effects on mitochondrial morphology and respiration, and these may be related to the inherent membrane perturbing properties of this polycation. The PEI-mediated mitochondrial swelling phase is biphasic, with a fast decaying initial period (most prominent from 4 µg/mL PEI) followed by a slower...

  16. Mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization and remodelling in apoptosis

    Jourdain, Alexis; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Many human pathologies are associated with defects in mitochondria such as diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases or cancer. This tiny organelle is involved in a plethora of processes in mammalian cells, including energy production, lipid metabolism and cell death. In the so-called intrinsic apoptotic pathway, the outer mitochondrial membrane (MOM) is premeabilized by the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 members Bax and Bak, allowing the release of apoptogenic factors such as cytochrome c from the inter-mem...

  17. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players.

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca(2+) transients which are further transduced by Ca(2+) sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca(2+) signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca(2+) across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca(2+) signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca(2+) signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca(2+) concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca(2+) across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle. PMID:27065186

  18. Topology of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    Fraser, F; Corstorphine, C G; Zammit, V A

    1997-01-01

    The topology of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) in the outer membrane of rat liver mitochondria was studied using several approaches. 1. The accessibility of the active site and malonyl-CoA-binding site of the enzyme from the cytosolic aspect of the membrane was investigated using preparations of octanoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA immobilized on to agarose beads to render them impermeant through the outer membrane. Both immobilized ligands were fully able to interact effectively with CPT I. 2. The effects of proteinase K and trypsin on the activity and malonyl-CoA sensitivity of CPT I were studied using preparations of mitochondria that were either intact or had their outer membranes ruptured by hypo-osmotic swelling (OMRM). Proteinase K had a marked but similar effect on CPT I activity irrespective of whether only the cytosolic or both sides of the membrane were exposed to it. However, it affected sensitivity more rapidly in OMRM. By contrast, trypsin only reduced CPT I activity when incubated with OMRM. The sensitivity of the residual CPT I activity was unaffected by trypsin. 3. The proteolytic fragments generated by these treatments were studied by Western blotting using three anti-peptide antibodies raised against linear epitopes of CPT I. These showed that a proteinase K-sensitive site close to the N-terminus was accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane. No trypsin-sensitive sites were accessible in intact mitochondria. In OMRM, both proteinase K and trypsin acted from the inter-membrane space side of the membrane. 4. The ability of intact mitochondria and OMRM to bind to each of the three anti-peptide antibodies was used to study the accessibility of the respective epitopes on the cytosolic and inter-membrane space sides of the membrane. 5. The results of all these approaches indicate that CPT I adopts a bitopic topology within the mitochondrial outer membrane; it has two transmembrane domains, and both the N- and C-termini are exposed on the

  19. Characterization of the mitochondrial inner membrane protein translocator Tim17 from Trypanosoma brucei

    Singha, Ujjal K; PEPRAH, EMMANUEL; Williams, Shuntae; Walker, Robert; Saha, Lipi; Chaudhuri, Minu

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translocation machinery in the kinetoplastid parasites, like Trypanosoma brucei, has been characterized poorly. In T. brucei genome data base, one homolog for a protein translocator of mitochondrial inner membrane (Tim) has been found, which is closely related to Tim17 from other species. The T. brucei Tim17 (TbTim17) has a molecular mass 16.2 kDa and it possesses four characteristic transmembrane domains. The protein is localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane. The...

  20. Role of cardiolipins in the inner mitochondrial membrane: insight gained through atom-scale simulations

    Róg, Tomasz; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Munck, Nana;

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes are unique in many ways. Unlike other cellular membranes, they are comprised of two membranes instead of just one, and cardiolipins, one of the abundant lipid species in mitochondrial membranes, are not found in significant amounts elsewhere in the cell. Among other aspects......), phosphatidylcholines (PCs), and phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs). For comparison, we also consider pure one-component bilayers and mixed PC-PE, PC-CL, and PE-CL membranes. We find that the influence of CLs on membrane properties depends strongly on membrane composition. This is highlighted by studies of the stability...... of CL-containing membranes, which indicate that the interactions of CL in ternary lipid bilayers cannot be deduced from the corresponding ones in binary membranes. Moreover, while the membrane properties in the hydrocarbon region are only weakly affected by CLs, the changes at the membrane-water...

  1. Development of a no-wash assay for mitochondrial membrane potential using the styryl dye DASPEI

    Reveles Jensen, Kristian; Rekling, Jens C

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of several diseases and may also result from drugs with unwanted side effects on mitochondrial biochemistry. The mitochondrial membrane potential is a good indicator of mitochondrial function. Here, the authors have developed a no-wash mitochondrial membrane......-handling stability, and thus is suitable for large-scale screening efforts. In summary, the DASPEI assay is simple and rapid and may be of use in toxicological testing, drug target discovery, and mechanistic models of diseases involving mitochondrial dysfunction....... potential assay using 2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-ethylpyridinium iodide (DASPEI), a rarely used mitochondrial potentiometric probe, in a 96-well format using a fluorescent plate reader. The assay was validated using 2 protonophores (CCCP, DNP), which are known uncouplers, and the neuroleptic thioridazine...

  2. p53's mitochondrial translocation and MOMP action is independent of Puma and Bax and severely disrupts mitochondrial membrane integrity

    Sonja Wolff; Susan Erster; Gustavo Palacios; Ute M Moll

    2008-01-01

    p53's apoptotic program consists of transcription-dependent and transcription-independent pathways. In the latter, physical interactions between mitochondrial p53 and anti-and pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family of mitochondrial permeability regulators are central. Using isogenic cell systems with defined deficiencies, we characterize in detail how mitochondrial p53 contributes to mitochondrial permeabilization, to what extent its action depends on other key Bcl2 family members and define its release activity. We show that mitochondrial p53 is highly efficient in inducing the release of soluble and insoluble apoptogenic factors by severely disrupting outer and inner mitochondrial membrane integrity. This action is associated with wild-type p53-induced oligomerization of Bax, Bak and VDAC and the formation of a stress-induced endogenous complex between p53 and cyclophilin D, normally located at the inner membrane. Tumor-derived p53 mutants are deficient in activating the Bax/Bak lipid pore. These actions are independent of Puma and Bax. Importantly, the latter distinguishes the mitochondrial from the cytosolic p53 death pathway.

  3. Clueless is a conserved ribonucleoprotein that binds the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane

    Aditya Sen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial function is tied to the nucleus, in that hundreds of proteins encoded by nuclear genes must be imported into mitochondria. While post-translational import is fairly well understood, emerging evidence supports that mitochondrial site-specific import, or co-translational import, also occurs. However, the mechanism and the extent to which it is used are not fully understood. We have previously shown Clueless (Clu, a conserved multi-domain protein, associates with mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including Translocase of outer membrane 20, and genetically and physically interacts with the PINK1–Parkin pathway. The human ortholog of Clu, Cluh, was shown to bind nuclear-encoded mitochondrially destined mRNAs. Here we identify the conserved tetratricopeptide domain of Clu as predominantly responsible for binding mRNA. In addition, we show Clu interacts with the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taken together, these data support a model whereby Clu binds to and mitochondrially targets mRNAs to facilitate mRNA localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane, potentially for site-specific or co-translational import. This role may link the presence of efficient mitochondrial protein import to mitochondrial quality control through the PINK1–Parkin pathway.

  4. Clueless is a conserved ribonucleoprotein that binds the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    Sen, Aditya; Cox, Rachel T

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is tied to the nucleus, in that hundreds of proteins encoded by nuclear genes must be imported into mitochondria. While post-translational import is fairly well understood, emerging evidence supports that mitochondrial site-specific import, or co-translational import, also occurs. However, the mechanism and the extent to which it is used are not fully understood. We have previously shown Clueless (Clu), a conserved multi-domain protein, associates with mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including Translocase of outer membrane 20, and genetically and physically interacts with the PINK1-Parkin pathway. The human ortholog of Clu, Cluh, was shown to bind nuclear-encoded mitochondrially destined mRNAs. Here we identify the conserved tetratricopeptide domain of Clu as predominantly responsible for binding mRNA. In addition, we show Clu interacts with the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taken together, these data support a model whereby Clu binds to and mitochondrially targets mRNAs to facilitate mRNA localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane, potentially for site-specific or co-translational import. This role may link the presence of efficient mitochondrial protein import to mitochondrial quality control through the PINK1-Parkin pathway. PMID:26834020

  5. Selective sorting and destruction of mitochondrial membrane proteins in aged yeast

    Hughes, Adam L; Hughes, Casey E; Henderson, Kiersten A; Yazvenko, Nina; Gottschling, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, and underlies the development of many diseases. Cells maintain mitochondrial homeostasis through a number of pathways that remodel the mitochondrial proteome or alter mitochondrial content during times of stress or metabolic adaptation. Here, using yeast as a model system, we identify a new mitochondrial degradation system that remodels the mitochondrial proteome of aged cells. Unlike many common mitochondrial degradation pathways, this system selectively removes a subset of membrane proteins from the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes, while leaving the remainder of the organelle intact. Selective removal of preexisting proteins is achieved by sorting into a mitochondrial-derived compartment, or MDC, followed by release through mitochondrial fission and elimination by autophagy. Formation of MDCs requires the import receptors Tom70/71, and failure to form these structures exacerbates preexisting mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the MDC pathway provides protection to mitochondria in times of stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13943.001 PMID:27097106

  6. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma [Laboratory for Molecular Design of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Harashima, Hideyoshi, E-mail: harasima@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory for Molecular Design of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  7. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  8. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein hFis1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and fission through self-interaction

    Mitochondrial fission in mammals is mediated by at least two proteins, DLP1/Drp1 and hFis1. DLP1 mediates the scission of mitochondrial membranes through GTP hydrolysis, and hFis1 is a putative DLP1 receptor anchored at the mitochondrial outer membrane by a C-terminal single transmembrane domain. The cytosolic domain of hFis1 contains six α-helices (α1-α6) out of which α2-α5 form two tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) folds. In this study, by using chimeric constructs, we demonstrated that the cytosolic domain contains the necessary information for hFis1 function during mitochondrial fission. By using transient expression of different mutant forms of the hFis1 protein, we found that hFis1 self-interaction plays an important role in mitochondrial fission. Our results show that deletion of the α1 helix greatly increased the formation of dimeric and oligomeric forms of hFis1, indicating that α1 helix functions as a negative regulator of the hFis1 self-interaction. Further mutational approaches revealed that a tyrosine residue in the α5 helix and the linker between α3 and α4 helices participate in hFis1 oligomerization. Mutations causing oligomerization defect greatly reduced the ability to induce not only mitochondrial fragmentation by full-length hFis1 but also the formation of swollen ball-shaped mitochondria caused by α1-deleted hFis1. Our data suggest that oligomerization of hFis1 in the mitochondrial outer membrane plays a role in mitochondrial fission, potentially through participating in fission factor recruitment

  9. The Taz1p transacylase is imported and sorted into the outer mitochondrial membrane via a membrane anchor domain.

    Herndon, Jenny D; Claypool, Steven M; Koehler, Carla M

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin, Taz1p, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cause Barth syndrome, a disease of defective cardiolipin remodeling. Taz1p is an interfacial membrane protein that localizes to both the outer and inner membranes, lining the intermembrane space. Pathogenic point mutations in Taz1p that alter import and membrane insertion result in accumulation of monolysocardiolipin. In this study, we used yeast as a model to investigate the biogenesis of Taz1p. We show that to achieve this unique topology in mitochondria, Taz1p follows a novel import pathway in which it crosses the outer membrane via the translocase of the outer membrane and then uses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex of the intermembrane space to insert into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taz1p is then transported to membranes of an intermediate density to reach a location in the inner membrane. Moreover, a pathogenic mutation within the membrane anchor (V224R) alters Taz1p import so that it bypasses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex and interacts with the translocase of the inner membrane, TIM23, to reach the matrix. Critical targeting information for Taz1p resides in the membrane anchor and flanking sequences, which are often mutated in Barth syndrome patients. These studies suggest that altering the mitochondrial import pathway of Taz1p may be important in understanding the molecular basis of Barth syndrome. PMID:24078306

  10. Replication factors transiently associate with mtDNA at the mitochondrial inner membrane to facilitate replication

    Rajala, N.; Gerhold, J.M.; Martinsson, P.; Klymov, A.; Spelbrink, H.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is organized in discrete protein-DNA complexes, nucleoids, that are usually considered to be mitochondrial-inner-membrane associated. Here we addressed the association of replication factors with nucleoids and show that endogenous mtDNA helicase Twinkle and single-stranded

  11. Expression of a mitochondrial progesterone receptor in human spermatozoa correlates with a progestin-dependent increase in mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Tantibhedhyangkul, J; Hawkins, K C; Dai, Q; Mu, K; Dunn, C N; Miller, S E; Price, T M

    2014-11-01

    The hyperactivation of human spermatozoa necessary for fertilization requires a substantial increase in cellular energy production. The factors responsible for increasing cellular energy remain poorly defined. This article proposes a role for a novel mitochondrial progesterone receptor (PR-M) in modulation of mitochondrial activity. Basic science studies demonstrate a 38 kDa protein with western blot analysis, consistent with PR-M; whereas imaging studies with confocal and immunoelectron microscopy demonstrate a PR on the mitochondria. Treatment with a PR-specific progestin shows increased mitochondrial membrane potential, not related to induction of an acrosome reaction. The increase in mitochondrial membrane potential was inhibited by a specific PR antagonist, but not affected by an inhibitor to the progesterone-dependent Catsper voltage-activated channel. In conclusion, these studies suggest expression of a novel mitochondrial PR in human spermatozoa with a progestin-dependent increase in mitochondrial activity. This mechanism may serve to enhance cellular energy production as the spermatozoa traverse the female genital tract being exposed to increasing concentrations of progesterone. PMID:25187426

  12. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β. PMID:26722004

  13. Preliminary crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein Tim44p

    Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein and a major component of the TIM23 translocon. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P6322, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.25, c = 77.83 Å. There is one Tim44p molecule in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 43%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way

  14. Preliminary crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein Tim44p

    Josyula, Ratnakar [Department of Cell Biology, Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States); Jin, Zhongmin [SER-CAT, APS, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); McCombs, Deborah; DeLucas, Lawrence [Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States); Sha, Bingdong, E-mail: bdsha@uab.edu [Department of Cell Biology, Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein and a major component of the TIM23 translocon. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.25, c = 77.83 Å. There is one Tim44p molecule in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 43%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  15. Interaction of ADP, atractyloside, and gummiferin on the ADP translocase of the inner mitochondrial membrane

    Vignais, P.V.; Vignais, P.M.; Defaye, G.; Lauquin, G.; Doussiere, J.; Chabert, J.; Brandolin, G.

    1972-05-01

    From international conference on mechanism in bioenergetica; Bari, Italy (1 May 1972). Two specific inhibitors of the adenine nucleotide translocation, gummiferin (GUM), identified to 4-carboxyatractyloside and atractyloside (ATR), were labeled with /sup 35/S and their binding properties to whole mitochondria and inner mitochondrial membrane vesicles used to monitor changes of membrane conformation induced by ADP. (auth)

  16. Astrocytic mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization following extended oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    Andrej Korenić

    Full Text Available Astrocytes can tolerate longer periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD as compared to neurons. The reasons for this reduced vulnerability are not well understood. Particularly, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m in astrocytes, an indicator of the cellular redox state, have not been investigated during reperfusion after extended OGD exposure. Here, we subjected primary mouse astrocytes to glucose deprivation (GD, OGD and combinations of both conditions varying in duration and sequence. Changes in Δψ(m, visualized by change in the fluorescence of JC-1, were investigated within one hour after reconstitution of oxygen and glucose supply, intended to model in vivo reperfusion. In all experiments, astrocytes showed resilience to extended periods of OGD, which had little effect on Δψ(m during reperfusion, whereas GD caused a robust Δψ(m negativation. In case no Δψ(m negativation was observed after OGD, subsequent chemical oxygen deprivation (OD induced by sodium azide caused depolarization, which, however, was significantly delayed as compared to normoxic group. When GD preceded OD for 12 h, Δψ(m hyperpolarization was induced by both GD and subsequent OD, but significant interaction between these conditions was not detected. However, when GD was extended to 48 h preceding OGD, hyperpolarization enhanced during reperfusion. This implicates synergistic effects of both conditions in that sequence. These findings provide novel information regarding the role of the two main substrates of electron transport chain (glucose and oxygen and their hyperpolarizing effect on Δψ(m during substrate deprivation, thus shedding new light on mechanisms of astrocyte resilience to prolonged ischemic injury.

  17. Integrity of the plasma membrane, the acrosomal membrane, and the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm in Nelore bulls from puberty to sexual maturity

    L.S.L.S. Reis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal membrane integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of Nelore bull sperm from early puberty to early sexual maturity and their associations with sperm motility and vigor, the mass motility of the spermatozoa (wave motion, scrotal circumference, and testosterone. Sixty Nelore bulls aged 18 to 19 months were divided into four lots (n=15 bulls/lot and evaluated over 280 days. Semen samples, collected every 56 days by electroejaculation, were evaluated soon after collection for motility, vigor and wave motion under an optical microscope. Sperm membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial activity were evaluated under a fluorescent microscope using probe association (FITC-PSA, PI, JC-1, H342. The sperm were classified into eight integrity categories depending on whether they exhibited intact or damaged membranes, an intact or damaged acrosomal membrane, and high or low mitochondrial potential. The results show that bulls have a low amount of sperm with intact membranes at puberty, and the sperm show low motility, vigor, and wave motion; however, in bulls at early sexual maturity, the integrity of the sperm membrane increased significantly. The rate of sperm membrane damage was negatively correlated with motility, vigor, wave motion, and testosterone in the bulls, and a positive correlation existed between sperm plasma membrane integrity and scrotal circumference. The integrity of the acrosomal membrane was not influenced by puberty. During puberty and into early sexual maturity, bulls show low sperm mitochondrial potential, but when bulls reached sexual maturity, high membrane integrity with high mitochondrial potential was evident.

  18. Protein complexes in bacterial and yeast mitochondrial membranes differ in their sensitivity towards dissociation by SDS.

    Gubbens, Jacob; Slijper, Monique; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2008-12-01

    Previously, a 2D gel electrophoresis approach was developed for the Escherichia coli inner membrane, which detects membrane protein complexes that are stable in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at room temperature, and dissociate under the influence of trifluoroethanol [R. E. Spelbrink et al., J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005), 28742-8]. Here, the method was applied to the evolutionarily related mitochondrial inner membrane that was isolated from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, only very few proteins were found to be dissociated by trifluoroethanol of which Lpd1p, a component of multiple protein complexes localized in the mitochondrial matrix, is the most prominent. Usage of either milder or more stringent conditions did not yield any additional proteins that were released by fluorinated alcohols. This strongly suggests that membrane protein complexes in yeast are less stable in SDS solution than their E. coli counterparts, which might be due to the overall reduced hydrophobicity of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins. PMID:18817900

  19. Separate fusion of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes

    Malka, Florence; Guillery, Olwenn; Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Belenguer, Pascale; Lombès, Anne; Rojo, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are enveloped by two closely apposed boundary membranes with different properties and functions. It is known that they undergo fusion and fission, but it has remained unclear whether outer and inner membranes fuse simultaneously, coordinately or separately. We set up assays for the study of inner and outer membrane fusion in living human cells. Inner membrane fusion was more sensitive than outer membrane fusion to inhibition of glycolysis. Fusion of the inner membrane, but not of...

  20. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. PMID:27053724

  1. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 μM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dtmax of 105 ± 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 ± 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 ± 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 ± 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 ± 1 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 ± 3 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  2. Translocation of chicken heart apocytochrome c and its mutants (C17S, H18D) across mitochondrial membrane

    朱勇; 韩学海; 杨福愉

    1999-01-01

    Cytochrome c is a component of mitochondrial respiratory chain, located at the outer side of mitochondrial inner membrane. Its precursor, apocytochrome c, is encoded by a nuclear gene, synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, and posttranslationally imported into mitochondria, but apocytochrome c is unique in the translocation compared with most mitochondrial proteins. It does not carry a cleavable amino terminal targeting sequence; no proteinous receptor on the mitochondrial outer membrane is identified for its import and its translocation does not compete with other preproteins for translocation machinery in the outer membrane. Besides, neither ATP nor membrane potential is required for its translocation across mitochonctria.

  3. Integrity of the plasma membrane, the acrosomal membrane, and the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm in Nelore bulls from puberty to sexual maturity

    L. S. L. S. Reis; A.A. Ramos; A.S. Camargos; E. Oba

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study evaluated the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal membrane integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of Nelore bull sperm from early puberty to early sexual maturity and their associations with sperm motility and vigor, the mass motility of the spermatozoa (wave motion), scrotal circumference, and testosterone. Sixty Nelore bulls aged 18 to 19 months were divided into four lots (n=15 bulls/lot) and evaluated over 280 days. Semen samples, collected every 56 days by e...

  4. Knockdown of cytosolic glutaredoxin 1 leads to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential: implication in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Uzma Saeed

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction including that caused by oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1, a cytosolic thiol disulfide oxido-reductase, reduces glutathionylated proteins to protein thiols and helps maintain redox status of proteins during oxidative stress. Grx1 downregulation aggravates mitochondrial dysfunction in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and motor neuron disease. We examined the mechanism underlying the regulation of mitochondrial function by Grx1. Downregulation of Grx1 by shRNA results in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, which is prevented by the thiol antioxidant, alpha-lipoic acid, or by cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition. The thiol groups of voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC, an outer membrane protein in mitochondria but not adenosine nucleotide translocase (ANT, an inner membrane protein, are oxidized when Grx1 is downregulated. We then examined the effect of beta-N-oxalyl amino-L-alanine (L-BOAA, an excitatory amino acid implicated in neurolathyrism (a type of motor neuron disease, that causes mitochondrial dysfunction. Exposure of cells to L-BOAA resulted in loss of MMP, which was prevented by overexpression of Grx1. Grx1 expression is regulated by estrogen in the CNS and treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with estrogen upregulated Grx1 and protected from L-BOAA mediated MMP loss. Our studies demonstrate that Grx1, a cytosolic oxido-reductase, helps maintain mitochondrial integrity and prevents MMP loss caused by oxidative insult. Further, downregulation of Grx1 leads to mitochondrial dysfunction through oxidative modification of the outer membrane protein, VDAC, providing support for the critical role of Grx1 in maintenance of MMP.

  5. The presence of phosphate-binding protein in inner mitochondrial membrane

    Hatase,Osamu

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate-binding protein(s was found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of calf heart by Sephadex G-200 and G-25 gel filtration. The binding activity was inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and competed by a large amount of cold phosphate. The amount of phosphate bound to the fraction was 29 nmoles per mg of protein. Affinity chromatography with phosphate-bound Sepharose 4B confirmed the presence of phosphate-binding protein(s in the active fraction of mitochondrial membrane fractionated by gel filtration.

  6. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  7. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Akihiro Yamashita

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs, while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles. Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN. The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence.

  8. Localization of HPV-18 E2 at Mitochondrial Membranes Induces ROS Release and Modulates Host Cell Metabolism

    Deborah Lai; Chye Ling Tan; Jayantha Gunaratne; Ling Shih Quek; Wenlong Nei; Françoise Thierry; Sophie Bellanger

    2013-01-01

    Papillomavirus E2 proteins are predominantly retained in the nuclei of infected cells, but oncogenic (high-risk) HPV-18 and 16 E2 can shuttle between the host nucleus and cytoplasm. We show here that cytoplasmic HPV-18 E2 localizes to mitochondrial membranes, and independent mass spectrometry analyses of the E2 interactome revealed association to the inner mitochondrial membrane including components of the respiratory chain. Mitochondrial E2 association modifies the cristae morphology when an...

  9. KCl-Dependent Release of Mitochondrial Membrane-Bound Arginase Appears to Be a Novel Variant of Arginase-II

    Suman, Mishra; Rajnikant, Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Arginase regulates arginine metabolism, ornithine-urea cycle, and immunological surveillance. Arginase-I is predominant in cytosol, and arginase-II is localised in the mitochondria. A mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been proposed to be adsorbed with outer membrane of mitochondria which gets released by 150 mM potassium chloride (KCl). It is presumed that inclusion of 150 mM KCl in the homogenization medium would not only facilitate release of arginase bound with outer membrane of mitochondria but also affect functional anatomy of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzymes, and proteins. Therefore, it has been intended to characterize KCl-dependent release of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase from liver of mice. Results provide advancement in the area of arginase biology and suggest that fraction of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase contains mitochondrial arginase-II and a variant of arginase-II. PMID:27293971

  10. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    Benjamin Clémençon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp and inorganic phosphate (PiC carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1 under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003.

  11. Heinrich Wieland--prize lecture. Transport of proteins across mitochondrial membranes.

    Neupert, W

    1994-03-01

    The vast majority of proteins comprising the mitochondrion are encoded by nuclear genes, synthesized on ribosomes in the cytosol, and translocated into the various mitochondrial subcompartments. During this process proteins must cross the lipid membranes of the mitochondrion without interfering with the integrity or functions of the organelle. In recent years an approach combining biochemical, molecular, genetic, and morphological methodology has provided insights into various aspects of this complex process of intracellular protein sorting. In particular, a greater understanding of the molecular specificity and mechanism of targeting of mitochondrial preproteins has been reached, as a protein complex of the outer membrane which facilitates recognition and initial membrane insertion has been identified and characterized. Furthermore, pathways and components involved in the translocation of pre-proteins across the two mitochondrial membranes are being dissected and defined. The energetics of translocation and the processes of unfolding and folding of proteins during transmembrane transfer are closely linked to the function of a host of proteins known as heat-shock proteins or molecular chaperones, present both outside and inside the mitochondrion. In addition, the analysis of the process of folding of polypeptides in the mitochondrial matrix has allowed novel and unexpected insights into general pathways of protein folding assisted by folding factors. Pathways of sorting of proteins to the four different mitochondrial subcompartments--the outer membrane (OM), intermembrane space, inner membrane (IM) and matrix--are only partly understood and reveal an amazing complexity and variation. Many additional protein factors are involved in these latter processes, a few of which have been analyzed, such as cytochrome c heme lyase and cytochrome c1 heme lyase, enzymes that catalyze the covalent addition of the heme group to cytochrome c and c1 preproteins, and the

  12. Apoptosis Regulation via the Mitochondrial Pathway : Membrane Response upon Apoptotic Stimuli

    Sani, Marc-Antoine

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the investigation of the mitochondrial response mechanisms upon apoptotic stimuli. The specific objectives were the biophysical characterization of membrane dynamics and the specific roles of lipids in the context of apoptotic regulation occurring at the mitochondrion and its complex membrane systems. The BH4 domain is an anti-apoptotic specific domain of the Bcl-2 protein. Solid phase peptide synthesis was used to produce large amount of the peptide for biophysical...

  13. Mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production in primary disorders of ATP synthase

    Vojtíšková, Alena; Ješina, Pavel; Kalous, Martin; Kaplanová, Vilma; Houštěk, Josef; Tesařová, M.; Fornůsková, D.; Zeman, J.; Dubot, A.; Godinot, C.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1-2 (2004), s. 7-11. ISSN 1537-6524 R&D Projects: GA MZd NE6533; GA MŠk LN00A079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : ATP6 * membrane potential * mitochondrial diseases Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.464, year: 2004

  14. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  15. Outer membrane VDAC1 controls permeability transition of the inner mitochondrial membrane in cellulo during stress-induced apoptosis

    Flora Tomasello; Angela Messina; Lydia Lartigue; Laura Schembri; Chantal Medina; Simona Reina; Didier Thorava; Marc Crouzet; Francois Ichas; Vito De Pinto; Francesca De Giorgi

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)l is the main channel of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and it has been proposed to be part of the permeability transition pore (PTP), a putative multiprotein complex candidate agent of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Working at the single live cell level, we found that over-expression of VDAC1 triggers MPT at the mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM). Conversely, silencing VDAC1 ex-pression results in the inhibition of MPT caused by selenite-induced oxidative stress. This MOM-M1M crosstalk was modulated by Cyclosporin A and mitochondrial Cyclophilin D, but not by Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, indicative of PTP opera-tion. VDAC1-dependent MPT engages a positive feedback loop involving reactive oxygen species and p38-MAPK, and secondarily triggers a canonical apoptotic response including Bax activation, cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation. Our data thus support a model of the PTP complex involving VDAC1 at the MOM, and indicate that VDAC1-dependent MPT is an upstream mechanism playing a causal role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.

  16. Mitochondrial outer membrane forms bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are double-membrane organelles that move around and change their shapes dynamically. In plants, the dynamics of the outer membrane is not well understood. We recently demonstrated that mitochondria had tubular protrusions of the outer membrane with little or no matrix, called MOPs (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs). Here we show that a MOP can form a bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana. The bridge does not appear to involve the inner membranes. Live imaging revealed stretching of the MOP bridge, demonstrating the flexibility of the outer membrane. Mitochondria frequently undergo fission and fusion. These observations raise the possibility that MOPs bridges have a role in these processes. PMID:27031262

  17. Bacterial porin disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitizes host cells to apoptosis.

    Vera Kozjak-Pavlovic

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial PorB porin, an ATP-binding beta-barrel protein of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrhoeae, triggers host cell apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. PorB is targeted to and imported by host cell mitochondria, causing the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m. Here, we show that PorB induces the condensation of the mitochondrial matrix and the loss of cristae structures, sensitizing cells to the induction of apoptosis via signaling pathways activated by BH3-only proteins. PorB is imported into mitochondria through the general translocase TOM but, unexpectedly, is not recognized by the SAM sorting machinery, usually required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane. PorB integrates into the mitochondrial inner membrane, leading to the breakdown of DeltaPsi(m. The PorB channel is regulated by nucleotides and an isogenic PorB mutant defective in ATP-binding failed to induce DeltaPsi(m loss and apoptosis, demonstrating that dissipation of DeltaPsi(m is a requirement for cell death caused by neisserial infection.

  18. Loss of Drp1 function alters OPA1 processing and changes mitochondrial membrane organization

    RNAi mediated loss of Drp1 function changes mitochondrial morphology in cultured HeLa and HUVEC cells by shifting the balance of mitochondrial fission and fusion towards unopposed fusion. Over time, inhibition of Drp1 expression results in the formation of a highly branched mitochondrial network along with 'bulge'-like structures. These changes in mitochondrial morphology are accompanied by a reduction in levels of Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and 2 (Mfn2) and a modified proteolytic processing of OPA1 isoforms, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, our data imply that bulge formation is driven by Mfn1 action along with particular proteolytic short-OPA1 (s-OPA1) variants: Loss of Mfn2 in the absence of Drp1 results in an increase of Mfn1 levels along with processed s-OPA1-isoforms, thereby enhancing continuous 'fusion' and bulge formation. Moreover, bulge formation might reflect s-OPA1 mitochondrial membrane remodeling activity, resulting in the compartmentalization of cytochrome c deposits. The proteins Yme1L and PHB2 appeared not associated with the observed enhanced OPA1 proteolysis upon RNAi of Drp1, suggesting the existence of other OPA1 processing controlling proteins. Taken together, Drp1 appears to affect the activity of the mitochondrial fusion machinery by unbalancing the protein levels of mitofusins and OPA1.

  19. Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 form a complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Console, Lara; Giangregorio, Nicola; Indiveri, Cesare; Tonazzi, Annamaria

    2014-09-01

    Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 are members of the carnitine system, which are responsible of the regulation of the mitochondrial CoA/acyl-CoA ratio and of supplying substrates for the ß-oxidation to mitochondria. This study, using cross-Linking reagent, Blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation followed by detection with immunoblotting, shows conclusive evidence about the interaction between carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase supporting the channeling of acylcarnitines and carnitine at level of the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:24898781

  20. Alterations in Lipid Levels of Mitochondrial Membranes Induced by Amyloid-ß: A Protective Role of Melatonin

    Sergio A. Rosales-Corral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction, which is closely related to amyloid-ß (Aß generation, abnormal tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Alterations in membranal components, including cholesterol and fatty acids, their characteristics, disposition, and distribution along the membranes, have been studied as evidence of cell membrane alterations in AD brain. The majority of these studies have been focused on the cytoplasmic membrane; meanwhile the mitochondrial membranes have been less explored. In this work, we studied lipids and mitochondrial membranes in vivo, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar amyloid-ß (Aß. The purpose was to determine how Aß may be responsible for beginning of a vicious cycle where oxidative stress and alterations in cholesterol, lipids and fatty acids, feed back on each other to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We observed changes in mitochondrial membrane lipids, and fatty acids, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar Aß in aged Wistar rats. Melatonin, a well-known antioxidant and neuroimmunomodulator indoleamine, reversed some of these alterations and protected mitochondrial membranes from obvious damage. Additionally, melatonin increased the levels of linolenic and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, in the same site where amyloid ß was injected, favoring an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway.

  1. Simultaneous monitoring of ionophore- and inhibitor-mediated plasma and mitochondrial membrane potential changes in cultured neurons.

    Nicholls, David G

    2006-05-26

    Although natural and synthetic ionophores are widely exploited in cell studies, for example, to influence cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations and to depolarize in situ mitochondria, their inherent lack of membrane selectivity means that they affect the ion permeability of both plasma and mitochondrial membranes. A similar ambiguity affects the interpretation of signals from fluorescent membrane-permeant cations (usually termed "mitochondrial membrane potential indicators"), because the accumulation of these probes is influenced by both plasma and mitochondrial membrane potentials. To resolve some of these problems a technique is developed to allow simultaneous monitoring of plasma and mitochondrial membrane potentials at single-cell resolution using a cationic and anionic fluorescent probe. A computer program is described that transforms the fluorescence changes into dynamic estimates of changes in plasma and mitochondrial potentials. Exploiting this technique, primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons display a concentration-dependent response to ionomycin: low concentrations mimic nigericin by hyperpolarizing the mitochondria while slowly depolarizing the plasma membrane and maintaining a stable elevated cytoplasmic calcium. Higher ionomycin concentrations induce a stochastic failure of calcium homeostasis that precedes both mitochondrial depolarization and an enhanced rate of plasma membrane depolarization. In addition, the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone only selectively depolarizes mitochondria at submicromolar concentrations. ATP synthase reversal following respiratory chain inhibition depolarizes the mitochondria by 26 mV. PMID:16551630

  2. Bioenergetic disturbances in mitochondrial membranes under fast neutrons induced carcinogenesis

    Breedless male mice have been used to study the effect of exogenous DNA on breathing, exogenous phosphorylation and free-radical oxidation of liver mitochondrion membrane in the case of carcinogenesis induced by fast neutrops. It is established that while-body irradiation of rats with fast neutrons in the sublethal dose bring about increase of free-radical oxidation and decrease of oxidation phosphorylation in membranes of liver mitachondria in delayed terms after irradiation. Free-radical reactions in membranes of liver mitochondria are inhibited in the case of tumour formation of different localization. Systematic introduction of DNA into irradiated animals is accompanied by the decrease of the frequency of tumoUr development

  3. Bioenergetic disturbances in mitochondrial membranes under fast neutrons induced careinogenesis

    The effect of eXogenous DNA on breath, oxidation phosphorilation and free-radical oxidation of liver mitochondria membrane in rats in the case of carcinogenesis caused by fast neUtrons, is studied. The experiments are performed on breedless male rats which were whole-body irradiated by fast neutrons in the dose of 1 Gy. One group of animals received DNA preparation 24 hours and 30 min before irradiation, and then once a month for the period of one year. In the delayed period after the effect of radiation, the increase of free-radical oXidation and decrease of oxidation phosphorilation are observed in membranes of liver mitochondria. These changes precede the formation of indUced tumours. In the case of formation of tumours of different localization free-radical reactions in liver mitochondria membranes are inhibited. Systematic DNA introduction to irradiated animals is accompanied by the reduction of frequency of tumour development

  4. Improved glycaemic control decreases inner mitochondrial membrane leak in type 2 diabetes

    Rabøl, R; Højberg, P M V; Almdal, T;

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Several mechanisms have been targeted as culprits of weight gain during antihyperglycaemic treatment in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). These include reductions in glucosuria, increased food intake from fear of hypoglycaemia, the anabolic effect of insulin, decreased metabolic rate and increased...... efficiency in fuel usage. The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that mitochondrial efficiency increases as a result of insulin treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We included ten patients with T2DM (eight males) on oral antidiabetic treatment, median age: 51.5 years (range: 39...... reductions in inner mitochondrial membrane leak and increased efficiency of mitochondria. This change in mitochondrial physiology could contribute to the weight gain seen with antihyperglycaemic treatment....

  5. Outer mitochondrial membrane localization of apoptosis-inducing factor: mechanistic implications for release

    Seong‑Woon Yu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor, but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders.

  6. A model of mitochondrial creatine kinase binding to membranes: adsorption constants, essential amino acids and the effect of ionic strength

    Fedosov, Sergey; Belousova, Lubov; Plesner, Igor

    1993-01-01

    The quantitative aspects of mitochondrial creatinekinase (mitCK) binding to mitochondrial membranes were investigated. A simple adsorption and binding model was used for data fitting, taking into account the influence of protein concentration, pH, ionic strength and substrate concentration on the...

  7. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  8. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: Ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 μM) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca2+ efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP+ transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. - Graphical abstract: Guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane and induces cancer cell death Display Omitted Highlights: → We addressed the involvement of mitochondria in guttiferone (GA) toxicity toward cancer cells. → GA promoted membrane permeabilization, membrane potential dissipation, NAD(P)H depletion, ROS accumulation and ATP depletion. → These actions could be

  9. Apricot melanoidins prevent oxidative endothelial cell death by counteracting mitochondrial oxidation and membrane depolarization.

    Annalisa Cossu

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular benefits associated with diets rich in fruit and vegetables are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. However, whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed apricots were isolated and their presence confirmed by colorimetric analysis and browning index. Oxidative injury of endothelial cells (ECs is the key step for the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases (CVD, therefore the potential protective effect of apricot melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative mitochondrial damage and cell death was explored in human ECs. The redox state of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments was detected by using the redox-sensitive, fluorescent protein (roGFP, while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP was assessed with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. ECs exposure to hydrogen peroxide, dose-dependently induced mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation. Additionally detected hydrogen peroxide-induced phenomena were MMP dissipation and ECs death. Pretreatment of ECs with apricot melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular oxidation, mitochondrial depolarization and cell death. In this regard, our current results clearly indicate that melanoidins derived from heat-processed apricots, protect human ECs against oxidative stress.

  10. Feline immunodeficiency virus decreases cell-cell communication and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Danave, I R; Tiffany-Castiglioni, E; Zenger, E; Barhoumi, R.; Burghardt, R C; Collisson, E W

    1994-01-01

    The in vitro effects of viral replication on mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) were evaluated as two parameters of potential cellular injury. Two distinct cell types were infected with the Petaluma strain of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Primary astroglia supported acute FIV infection, resulting in syncytia within 3 days of infection, whereas immortalized Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells of epithelial origin supported persis...

  11. Localization of HPV-18 E2 at mitochondrial membranes induces ROS release and modulates host cell metabolism.

    Deborah Lai

    Full Text Available Papillomavirus E2 proteins are predominantly retained in the nuclei of infected cells, but oncogenic (high-risk HPV-18 and 16 E2 can shuttle between the host nucleus and cytoplasm. We show here that cytoplasmic HPV-18 E2 localizes to mitochondrial membranes, and independent mass spectrometry analyses of the E2 interactome revealed association to the inner mitochondrial membrane including components of the respiratory chain. Mitochondrial E2 association modifies the cristae morphology when analyzed by electron microscopy and increases production of mitochondrial ROS. This ROS release does not induce apoptosis, but instead correlates with stabilization of HIF-1α and increased glycolysis. These mitochondrial functions are not shared by the non-oncogenic (low-risk HPV-6 E2 protein, suggesting that modification of cellular metabolism by high-risk HPV E2 proteins could play a role in carcinogenesis by inducing the Warburg effect.

  12. VDAC electronics: 1. VDAC-hexo(gluco)kinase generator of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential.

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-05-01

    The simplest mechanism of the generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) by the VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)-hexokinase complex (VHC), suggested earlier, and by the VDAC-glucokinase complex (VGC), was computationally analyzed. Even at less than 4% of VDACs bound to hexokinase, the calculated OMP is high enough to trigger the electrical closure of VDACs beyond the complexes at threshold concentrations of glucose. These results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the Warburg effect is caused by the electrical closure of VDACs, leading to global restriction of the outer membrane permeability coupled to aerobic glycolysis. The model showed that the inhibition of the conductance and/or an increase in the voltage sensitivity of a relatively small fraction of VDACs by factors like tubulin potentiate the electrical closure of the remaining free VDACs. The extrusion of calcium ions from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the generated OMP, positive inside, might increase cancer cell resistance to death. Within the VGC model, the known effect of induction of ATP release from mitochondria by accumulated glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic beta cells might result not only of the known effect of GK dissociation from the VDAC-GK complex, but also of a decrease in the free energy of glucokinase reaction, leading to the OMP decrease and VDAC opening. We suggest that the VDAC-mediated electrical control of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, dependent on metabolic conditions, is a fundamental physiological mechanism of global regulation of mitochondrial functions and of cell death. PMID:24412217

  13. The oxidized phospholipid PazePC promotes permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes by Bax.

    Lidman, Martin; Pokorná, Šárka; Dingeldein, Artur P G; Sparrman, Tobias; Wallgren, Marcus; Šachl, Radek; Hof, Martin; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in programmed cell death via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is tightly regulated by the B-cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family. Intracellular oxidative stress causes the translocation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic family member, to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) where it induces membrane permeabilization. Oxidized phospholipids (OxPls) generated in the MOM during oxidative stress directly affect the onset and progression of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Here we use MOM-mimicking lipid vesicles doped with varying concentrations of 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC), an OxPl species known to significantly enhance Bax-membrane association, to investigate three key aspects of Bax's action at the MOM: 1) induction of Bax pores in membranes without additional mediator proteins, 2) existence of a threshold OxPl concentration required for Bax-membrane action and 3) mechanism by which PazePC disturbs membrane organization to facilitate Bax penetration. Fluorescence leakage studies revealed that Bax-induced leakage, especially its rate, increased with the vesicles' PazePC content without any detectable threshold neither for OxPl nor Bax. Moreover, the leakage rate correlated with the Bax to lipid ratio and the PazePC content. Solid state NMR studies and calorimetric experiments on the lipid vesicles confirmed that OxPl incorporation disrupted the membrane's organization, enabling Bax to penetrate into the membrane. In addition, 15N cross polarization (CP) and insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) MAS NMR experiments using uniformly (15)N-labeled Bax revealed dynamically restricted helical segments of Bax embedded in the membrane, while highly flexible protein segments were located outside or at the membrane surface. PMID:26947183

  14. Vimentin is involved in regulation of mitochondrial motility and membrane potential by Rac1

    Elena A. Matveeva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we show that binding of mitochondria to vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF is regulated by GTPase Rac1. The activation of Rac1 leads to a redoubling of mitochondrial motility in murine fibroblasts. Using double-mutants Rac1(G12V, F37L and Rac1(G12V, Y40H that are capable to activate different effectors of Rac1, we show that mitochondrial movements are regulated through PAK1 kinase. The involvement of PAK1 kinase is also confirmed by the fact that expression of its auto inhibitory domain (PID blocks the effect of activated Rac1 on mitochondrial motility. The observed effect of Rac1 and PAK1 kinase on mitochondria depends on phosphorylation of the Ser-55 of vimentin. Besides the effect on motility Rac1 activation also decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP which is detected by ∼20% drop of the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria stained with the potential sensitive dye TMRM. One of important consequences of the discovered regulation of MMP by Rac1 and PAK1 is a spatial differentiation of mitochondria in polarized fibroblasts: at the front of the cell they are less energized (by ∼25% than at the rear part.

  15. Insertion into the mitochondrial inner membrane of a polytopic protein, the nuclear-encoded Oxa1p.

    Herrmann, J M; Neupert, W; Stuart, R A

    1997-01-01

    Oxa1p, a nuclear-encoded protein of the mitochondrial inner membrane with five predicted transmembrane (TM) segments is synthesized as a precursor (pOxa1p) with an N-terminal presequence. It becomes imported in a process requiring the membrane potential, matrix ATP, mt-Hsp70 and the mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP). After processing, the negatively charged N-terminus of Oxa1p (approximately 90 amino acid residues) is translocated back across the inner membrane into the intermembrane s...

  16. The force exerted by the membrane potential during protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated on the basis of continuum electrostatics. The force is found to vary from 3.0 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 6.5 to 12 A, its measured range. In the present model, the decrease in force with increasing pore width arises from the shielding effect of water. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a purely membranous pore without water gives a force of 3.2 pN per unit charge, which should represent an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein barnase, these results imply that forces between 11 +/- 2 pN and 13.5 +/- 2.5 pN catalyze the unfolding of barnase in those experiments. A comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy is made.

  17. Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) and low mitochondrial membrane potential are specific for Barth syndrome.

    Karkucinska-Wieckowska, Agnieszka; Trubicka, Joanna; Werner, Bozena; Kokoszynska, Katarzyna; Pajdowska, Magdalena; Pronicki, Maciej; Czarnowska, Elzbieta; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Ziolkowska, Lidia; Jaron, Weronika; Dobrzanska, Anna; Ciara, Elzbieta; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Pronicka, Ewa

    2013-11-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked mitochondrial defect characterised by dilated cardiomyopathy, neutropaenia and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGCA). We report on two affected brothers with c.646G > A (p.G216R) TAZ gene mutations. The pathogenicity of the mutation, as indicated by the structure-based functional analyses, was further confirmed by abnormal monolysocardiolipin/cardiolipin ratio in dry blood spots of the patients as well as the occurrence of this mutation in another reported BTHS proband. In both brothers, 2D-echocardiography revealed some features of left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) despite marked differences in the course of the disease; the eldest child presented with isolated cardiomyopathy from late infancy, whereas the youngest showed severe lactic acidosis without 3-MGCA during the neonatal period. An examination of the patients' fibroblast cultures revealed that extremely low mitochondrial membrane potentials (mtΔΨ about 50 % of the control value) dominated other unspecific mitochondrial changes detected (respiratory chain dysfunction, abnormal ROS production and depressed antioxidant defense). 1) Our studies confirm generalised mitochondrial dysfunction in the skeletal muscle and the fibroblasts of BTHS patients, especially a severe impairment in the mtΔΨ and the inhibition of complex V activity. It can be hypothesised that impaired mtΔΨ and mitochondrial ATP synthase activity may contribute to episodes of cardiac arrhythmia that occurred unexpectedly in BTHS patients. 2) Severe lactic acidosis without 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in male neonates as well as an asymptomatic mild left ventricular noncompaction may characterise the ranges of natural history of Barth syndrome. PMID:23361305

  18. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  19. Cisplatin impairs rat liver mitochondrial functions by inducing changes on membrane ion permeability: Prevention by thiol group protecting agents

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is the most important platinum anticancer drug widely used in the treatment of head, neck, ovarian and testicular cancers. However, the mechanisms by which CisPt induces cytotoxicity, namely hepatotoxicity, are not completely understood. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of CisPt on rat liver mitochondrial functions (Ca2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), mitochondrial bioenergetics, and mitochondrial oxidative stress) to better understand the mechanism underlying its hepatotoxicity. The effect of thiol group protecting agents and some antioxidants against CisPt-induced mitochondrial damage was also investigated. Treatment of rat liver mitochondria with CisPt (20 nmol/mg protein) induced Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial swelling, depolarization of membrane potential (ΔΨ), Ca2+ release, and NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity decay. These effects were prevented by cyclosporine A (CyA), a potent and specific inhibitor of the MPT. In the concentration range of up to 40 nmol/mg protein, CisPt slightly inhibited state 3 and stimulated state 2 and state 4 respiration rates using succinate as respiratory substrate. The respiratory indexes, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ADP/O ratios, the ΔΨ, and the ADP phosphorylation rate were also depressed. CisPt induced mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization to protons (proton leak) but did not induce significant changes on mitochondrial H2O2 generation. All the effects induced by CisPt on rat liver mitochondria were prevented by thiol group protecting agents namely, glutathione (GSH), dithiothreitol (DTT), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine (CYS), whereas superoxide-dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate (ASC) were without effect. In conclusion, the anticancer drug CisPt: (1) increases the sensitivity of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced MPT; (2) interferes with mitochondrial bioenergetics by increasing mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization to H+; (3

  20. Soluble products of Escherichia coli induce mitochondrial dysfunction-related sperm membrane lipid peroxidation which is prevented by lactobacilli.

    Arcangelo Barbonetti

    Full Text Available Unidentified soluble factors secreted by E. coli, a frequently isolated microorganism in genitourinary infections, have been reported to inhibit mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, motility and vitality of human spermatozoa. Here we explore the mechanisms involved in the adverse impact of E. coli on sperm motility, focusing mainly on sperm mitochondrial function and possible membrane damage induced by mitochondrial-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, as lactobacilli, which dominate the vaginal ecosystem of healthy women, have been shown to exert anti-oxidant protective effects on spermatozoa, we also evaluated whether soluble products from these microorganisms could protect spermatozoa against the effects of E. coli. We assessed motility (by computer-aided semen analysis, ΔΨm (with JC-1 dye by flow cytometry, mitochondrial ROS generation (with MitoSOX red dye by flow cytometry and membrane lipid-peroxidation (with the fluorophore BODIPY C11 by flow cytometry of sperm suspensions exposed to E. coli in the presence and in the absence of a combination of 3 selected strains of lactobacilli (L. brevis, L. salivarius, L. plantarum. A Transwell system was used to avoid direct contact between spermatozoa and microorganisms. Soluble products of E. coli induced ΔΨm loss, mitochondrial generation of ROS and membrane lipid-peroxidation, resulting in motility loss. Soluble factors of lactobacilli prevented membrane lipid-peroxidation of E. coli-exposed spermatozoa, thus preserving their motility. In conclusion, sperm motility loss by soluble products of E. coli reflects a mitochondrial dysfunction-related membrane lipid-peroxidation. Lactobacilli could protect spermatozoa in the presence of vaginal disorders, by preventing ROS-induced membrane damage.

  1. Supplementation of T3 Recovers Hypothyroid Rat Liver Cells from Oxidatively Damaged Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Leading to Apoptosis

    Sutapa Mukherjee; Luna Samanta; Anita Roy; Shravani Bhanja; Chainy, Gagan B. N.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a growing medical concern. There are conflicting reports regarding the mechanism of oxidative stress in hypothyroidism. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is pivotal to thyroid dysfunction. The present study aimed to delineate the effects of hepatic inner mitochondrial membrane dysfunction as a consequence of 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil-induced hypothyroidism in rats. Increased oxidative stress predominance in the submitochondrial particles (SMP) and altered antioxidant defenses in ...

  2. Calpeptin, not calpain, directly inhibits an ion channel of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Derksen, Maria; Vorwerk, Christian; Siemen, Detlef

    2016-05-01

    The permeability transition pore (PTP) of inner mitochondrial membranes is a large conductance pathway for ions up to 1500 Da which opening is responsible for ion equilibration and loss of membrane potential in apoptosis and thus in several neurodegenerative diseases. The PTP can be regulated by the Ca(2+)-activated mitochondrial K channel (BK). Calpains are Ca(2+)-activated cystein proteases; calpeptin is an inhibitor of calpains. We wondered whether calpain or calpeptin can modulate activity of PTP or BK. Patch clamp experiments were performed on mitoplasts of rat liver (PTP) and of an astrocytoma cell line (BK). Channel-independent open probability (P o) was determined (PTP) and, taking into account the number of open levels, NPo by single channel analysis (BK). We find that PTP in the presence of Ca(2+) (200 μM) is uninfluenced by calpain (13 nM) and shows insignificant decrease by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (1 μM). The NPo of the BK is insensitive to calpain (54 nM), too. However, it is significantly and reversibly inhibited by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (IC50 = 42 μM). The results agree with calpeptin-induced activation of the PTP via inhibition of the BK. Screening experiments with respirometry show calpeptin effects, fitting to inhibition of the BK by calpeptin, and strong inhibition of state 3 respiration. PMID:26108743

  3. Ethanol influences on Bax associations with mitochondrial membrane proteins in neonatal rat cerebellum.

    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Siler-Marsiglio, Kendra; Paiva, Michael; Kotler, Alexandra; Rogozinski, Jonathan; Kubovec, Stacey; Coursen, Mary; Madorsky, Vladimir

    2013-02-01

    These studies investigated interactions taking place at the mitochondrial membrane in neonatal rat cerebellum following ethanol exposure and focused on interactions between proapoptotic Bax and proteins of the permeability transition pore (PTP), voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) of the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes, respectively. Cultured cerebellar granule cells were used to assess the role of these interactions in ethanol neurotoxicity. Analyses were made at the age of maximal cerebellar ethanol vulnerability (P4), compared to the later age of relative resistance (P7), to determine whether differential ethanol sensitivity was mirrored by differences in these molecular interactions. We found that, following ethanol exposure, Bax proapoptotic associations with both VDAC and ANT were increased, particularly at the age of greater ethanol sensitivity, and these interactions were sustained at this age for at least 2 h postexposure. Since Bax:VDAC interactions disrupt protective VDAC interactions with mitochondrial hexokinase (HXK), we also assessed VDAC:HXK associations following ethanol treatment and found such interactions were altered by ethanol treatment, but only at 2 h postexposure and only in the P4, ethanol-sensitive cerebellum. Ethanol neurotoxicity in cultured neuronal preparations was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of both VDAC and ANT interactions with Bax but not by a Bax channel blocker. Therefore, we conclude that, at this age, within the constraints of our experimental model, a primary mode of Bax-induced initiation of the apoptosis cascade following ethanol insult involves interactions with proteins of the PTP complex and not channel formation independent of PTP constituents. PMID:22767450

  4. Cucurbitacin-I inhibits Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B and survivin, induces defects in cell cycle progression and promotes ABT-737-induced cell death in a caspase-independent manner in malignant human glioma cells

    Premkumar, Daniel R.; Jane, Esther P.; Pollack, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Because STAT signaling is commonly activated in malignant gliomas as a result of constitutive EGFR activation, strategies for inhibiting the EGFR/JAK/STAT cascade are of significant interest. We, therefore, treated a panel of established glioma cell lines, including EGFR overexpressors, and primary cultures derived from patients diagnosed with glioblastoma with the JAK/STAT inhibitor cucurbitacin-I. Treatment with cucurbitacin-I depleted p-STAT3, p-STAT5, p-JAK1 and p-JAK2 levels, inhibited c...

  5. Role of Pterocarpus santalinus against mitochondrial dysfunction and membrane lipid changes induced by ulcerogens in rat gastric mucosa.

    Narayan, Shoba; Devi, R S; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2007-11-20

    Free radicals produced by ulcerogenic agents affect the TCA cycle enzymes located in the outer membrane of the mitochondria. Upon induction with ulcerogens, peroxidation of membrane lipids bring about alterations in the mitochondrial enzyme activity. This indicates an increase in the permeability levels of the mitochondrial membrane. The ability of PSE to scavenge the reactive oxygen species results in restoration of activities of TCA cycle enzymes. NSAIDs interfere with the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, resulting in uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation process. This usually results in diminished cellular ATP production. The recovery of gastric mucosal barrier function through maintenance of energy metabolism results in maintenance of ATP levels, as observed in this study upon treatment with PSE. Membrane integrity altered by peroxidation is known to have a modified fatty acid composition, a disruption of permeability, a decrease in electrical resistance, and increase in flip-flopping between monolayers and inactivated cross-linked proteins. The severe depletion of arachidonic acid in ulcer induced groups was prevented upon treatment with PSE. The acid inhibitory property of the herbal extract enables the maintenance of GL activity upon treatment with PSE. The ability to prevent membrane peroxidation has been traced to the presence of active constituents in the PSE. In essence, PSE has been found to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, provide mitochondrial cell integrity, through the maintenance of lipid bilayer by its ability to provide a hydrophobic character to the gastric mucosa, further indicating its ability to reverse the action of NSAIDs and mast cell degranulators in gastric mucosa. PMID:17719569

  6. Supplementation of T3 Recovers Hypothyroid Rat Liver Cells from Oxidatively Damaged Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Leading to Apoptosis

    Sutapa Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothyroidism is a growing medical concern. There are conflicting reports regarding the mechanism of oxidative stress in hypothyroidism. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is pivotal to thyroid dysfunction. The present study aimed to delineate the effects of hepatic inner mitochondrial membrane dysfunction as a consequence of 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil-induced hypothyroidism in rats. Increased oxidative stress predominance in the submitochondrial particles (SMP and altered antioxidant defenses in the mitochondrial matrix fraction correlated with hepatocyte apoptosis. In order to check whether the effects caused by hypothyroidism are reversed by T3, the above parameters were evaluated in a subset of T3-treated hypothyroid rats. Complex I activity was inhibited in hypothyroid SMP, whereas T3 supplementation upregulated electron transport chain complexes. Higher mitochondrial H2O2 levels in hypothyroidism due to reduced matrix GPx activity culminated in severe oxidative damage to membrane lipids. SMP and matrix proteins were stabilised in hypothyroidism but exhibited increased carbonylation after T3 administration. Glutathione content was higher in both. Hepatocyte apoptosis was evident in hypothyroid liver sections; T3 administration, on the other hand, exerted antiapoptotic and proproliferative effects. Hence, thyroid hormone level critically regulates functional integrity of hepatic mitochondria; hypothyroidism injures mitochondrial membrane lipids leading to hepatocyte apoptosis, which is substantially recovered upon T3 supplementation.

  7. Fusion of the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Outer Membrane in Rats Brown Adipose Tissue: Activation of Thermogenesis by Ca2+

    de Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A.; da Costa, Rodrigo Madeiro; de Andrade, Ivone Rosa; Benchimol, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria thermogenesis is regulated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP 1), GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we observed fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane with the mitochondrial outer membrane of rats BAT. Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA 1) was identified by immunoelectron microscopy in both ER and mitochondria. This finding led us to test the Ca2+ effect in BAT mitochondria thermogenesis. We found that Ca2+ increased the rate of respiration and heat production ...

  8. Immunoaffinity purification and characterization of mitochondrial membrane-bound D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase from Jaculus orientalis

    Cherkaoui-Malki Mustapha

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interconversion of two important energy metabolites, 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate (the major ketone bodies, is catalyzed by D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH1: EC 1.1.1.30, a NAD+-dependent enzyme. The eukaryotic enzyme is bound to the mitochondrial inner membrane and harbors a unique lecithin-dependent activity. Here, we report an advanced purification method of the mammalian BDH applied to the liver enzyme from jerboa (Jaculus orientalis, a hibernating rodent adapted to extreme diet and environmental conditions. Results Purifying BDH from jerboa liver overcomes its low specific activity in mitochondria for further biochemical characterization of the enzyme. This new procedure is based on the use of polyclonal antibodies raised against BDH from bacterial Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study improves the procedure for purification of both soluble microbial and mammalian membrane-bound BDH. Even though the Jaculus orientalis genome has not yet been sequenced, for the first time a D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase cDNA from jerboa was cloned and sequenced. Conclusion This study applies immunoaffinity chromatography to purify BDH, the membrane-bound and lipid-dependent enzyme, as a 31 kDa single polypeptide chain. In addition, bacterial BDH isolation was achieved in a two-step purification procedure, improving the knowledge of an enzyme involved in the lipid metabolism of a unique hibernating mammal. Sequence alignment revealed conserved putative amino acids for possible NAD+ interaction.

  9. Therapeutic Modulation of Apoptosis: Targeting the BCL-2 Family at the Interface of the Mitochondrial Membrane

    Nemec, Kathleen N.

    2008-01-01

    A vast portion of human disease results when the process of apoptosis is defective. Disorders resulting from inappropriate cell death range from autoimmune and neurodegenerative conditions to heart disease. Conversely, prevention of apoptosis is the hallmark of cancer and confounds the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. In the search for optimal targets that would enable the control of apoptosis, members of the BCL-2 family of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors have figured prominently. Development of BCL-2 antisense approaches, small molecules, and BH3 peptidomimetics has met with both success and failure. Success-because BCL-2 proteins play essential roles in apoptosis. Failure-because single targets for drug development have limited scope. By examining the activity of the BCL-2 proteins in relation to the mitochondrial landscape and drawing attention to the significant mitochondrial membrane alterations that ensue during apoptosis, we demonstrate the need for a broader based multi-disciplinary approach for the design of novel apoptosis-modulating compounds in the treatment of human disease. PMID:18972587

  10. Antioxidant activity of capsaicin on radiation-induced oxidation of murine hepatic mitochondrial membrane preparation

    Gangabhagirathi R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramachandran Gangabhagirathi,1 Ravi Joshi,2 1Bioorganic Division, 2Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India Abstract: Capsaicin is the major capsaicinoid in chili peppers and is widely used as a spice. It is also used for topical applications in cases of peripheral neuropathy. The present study deals with its role in modulation of gamma radiation-induced damages of the biochemical constituents of rat liver mitochondrial membrane (RLM preparation. The extent of lipid hydroperoxide formation, depletion in protein thiols, and formation of protein carbonyls have been biochemically assessed in the presence of varying concentrations of capsaicin in RLM. Decrease in the activities of the important antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, which is involved in the scavenging of free radicals, and the mitochondrial marker enzyme succinate dehydrogenase have been also looked into. Capsaicin has been found to efficiently inhibit radiation-induced biochemical alterations, namely lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. It also significantly prevented radiation-induced loss in the activity of antioxidant enzyme and the important endogenous antioxidant glutathione. The study suggests that capsaicin can act as an antioxidant and radioprotector in physiological systems. Keywords: capsaicin, gamma radiation, radioprotection, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, enzyme activity

  11. Diterpenylhydroquinones from Natural ent-Labdanes Induce Apoptosis through Decreased Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Mauricio Cuellar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the cytotoxic effects of seven ent-labdane derivatives 1–7 (0–100 μM in different human cancer cell lines. Our results showed that compounds 1–3 exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibition on the growth of the three different human cell lines, according to the sulphorhodamine B assay and produced morphological changes consistent with apoptosis, as confirmed by Hoestch 3342 staining analysis. They induced apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, as shown by nuclear condensation and fragmentation and caspase 3 activation. Such induction was associated with the depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential. These activities led to the cleavage of caspases and the trigger of cell death process. Overall, the compounds showed potent proapoptotic effects on the two different cancer cell lines, suggesting that the compounds deserve more extensive investigation of their potential medicinal applications.

  12. Cockayne syndrome group B protein promotes mitochondrial DNA stability by supporting the DNA repair association with the mitochondrial membrane

    Aamann, Maria Diget; Sorensen, Martin M; Hvitby, Christina Poulsen;

    2010-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human premature aging disorder associated with severe developmental deficiencies and neurodegeneration, and phenotypically it resembles some mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases. Most patients belong to complementation group B, and the CS group B (CSB) protein plays a role...... in genomic maintenance and transcriptome regulation. By immunocytochemistry, mitochondrial fractionation, and Western blotting, we demonstrate that CSB localizes to mitochondria in different types of cells, with increased mitochondrial distribution following menadione-induced oxidative stress....... Moreover, our results suggest that CSB plays a significant role in mitochondrial base excision repair (BER) regulation. In particular, we find reduced 8-oxo-guanine, uracil, and 5-hydroxy-uracil BER incision activities in CSB-deficient cells compared to wild-type cells. This deficiency correlates with...

  13. Understanding the molecular mechanism of protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane: still a long way to go.

    Marom, Milit; Azem, Abdussalam; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2011-03-01

    In order to reach the final place of their function, approximately half of the proteins in any eukaryotic cell have to be transported across or into one of the membranes in the cell. In this article, we present an overview of our current knowledge concerning the structural properties of the TIM23 complex and their relationship with the molecular mechanism of protein transport across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Protein translocation across or insertion into membranes. PMID:20646995

  14. The use of cardiolipin-containing liposomes as a model system to study the interaction between proteins and the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Marom, Milit; Azem, Abdussalam

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with biological membranes is a key factor in their biogenesis and proper function. Hence, unraveling the properties of this interaction is very important and constitutes an essential step in deciphering the structural and functional characteristics of a membrane protein. Here we describe the use of cardiolipin-containing liposomes to analyze the interaction of the import protein Tim44 with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Using this system we showed that Tim44 is peripherally attached to the membrane and we detected the membrane binding site of the protein. The cardiolipin-containing liposomes serve as an excellent in vitro model system to the inner mitochondrial membrane and thus provide a good tool to analyze the interaction of various mitochondrial proteins with the inner membrane. PMID:23996176

  15. Effect of irradiation on membrane-bound rabit liver mitochondrial enzymes in embryogenesis

    Effect of irradiation on protein content of inner mitochondrial membrane and on activity of certain enzymes of respiratory chain of hepatic mitochondria has been studied. Within 24 and 48 hr after total irradiation (200 R) of pregnant rabbits, the protein content of the inner membranes of 25-30 day-old embryos and the mothers was broken with the increase in the thickness and densitometric height of the protein spots. Changes were seen in NADH-oxidase, succinate oxidase and in cytochrome-c-oxidase activities of mitochondria of 20 day-old embryos within 4 hr after irradiation and within 1 hr after irradiation in adult rabbits. The NADH-oxidase and the succinate oxidase activities of 30 day-old embryos were insensitive to the effect of irradiation. The cytochrome-c-oxidase activity increased in mitochondria of 25-30 day-old embryos upon 24 hr of irradiation. Substantial depression of the thermostability of the NADH-oxidase system was seen within 24 hr after irradiation while cytochrome-c-oxidase did not change its thermostability. The unequal disturbances of the emzyme activity and thermostability upon the total irradiation are connected with the different state of mitochondria and with the specificity of enzymes of the respiratory chain. (author)

  16. Steady-state coupling of four membrane systems in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    Hill, T L

    1979-05-01

    According to Alexandre, Reynafarje, and Lehninger, four different membrane systems are involved, with definite stoichiometry, in the mitochondrial synthesis of ATP by electron transport, via proton transport. We adopt this model and pursue some of its thermodynamic consequences. At steady state, each of the four systems must have the same flux J through the membrane and the overall thermodynamic force X for oxidative phosphorylation is the sum of the four separate forces. From these properties, using an empirical linear flux-force relation for each system, it is easy to obtain J as a function of X. In turn, X depends on the inside [NAD+]/[NADH] and the outside [ATP]/[ADP][Pi] quotients (and on the pH inside). Thus, J is related to these quotients. The relationship we derive is similar to that described by Erecińska and Wilson, as deduced from a quite different model of oxidative phosphorylation. Proton transport is involved explicitly in three of the four systems of the present model. However, because of the steady-state stoichiometric coupling of the four systems, proton transport does not appear in the overall reaction. On the other hand, Erecińska and Wilson use, in their model, a direct connection between electron transport and ATP synthesis. The present paper demonstrates that J can be related to the quotients mentioned above without this direct connection. PMID:287064

  17. Mitochondrial Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) Is Part of an Outer Membrane Fatty Acid Transfer Complex*

    Lee, Kwangwon; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    CPT1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) in the liver mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) catalyzes the primary regulated step in overall mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. It has been suggested that the fundamental unit of CPT1a exists as a trimer, which, under native conditions, could form a dimer of the trimers, creating a hexamer channel for acylcarnitine translocation. To examine the state of CPT1a in the MOM, we employed a combined approach of sizing by mass and isolation using an immu...

  18. The Novel Tail-anchored Membrane Protein Mff Controls Mitochondrial and Peroxisomal Fission in Mammalian Cells

    Gandre-Babbe, Shilpa; van der Bliek, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    Few components of the mitochondrial fission machinery are known, even though mitochondrial fission is a complex process of vital importance for cell growth and survival. Here, we describe a novel protein that controls mitochondrial fission. This protein was identified in a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen using Drosophila cells. The human homologue of this protein was named Mitochondrial fission factor (Mff). Mitochondria of cells transfected with Mff siRNA form a closed network similar t...

  19. Inner-membrane proteins PMI/TMEM11 regulate mitochondrial morphogenesis independently of the DRP1/MFN fission/fusion pathways

    Rival, Thomas; Macchi, Marc; Arnauné-Pelloquin, Laetitia; Poidevin, Mickael; Maillet, Frédéric; Richard, Fabrice; Fatmi, Ahmed; Belenguer, Pascale; Royet, Julien

    2011-01-01

    This report identifies Drosophila PMI and its human ortholog TMEM11 as novel regulators of mitochondrial morphogenesis. PMI and TMEM11 are inner membrane proteins that control mitochondria dynamics independently of the DRP-1/MFN-1 pathways.

  20. Targeting of a Tail-anchored Protein to Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Outer Membrane by Independent but Competing Pathways

    Borgese, Nica; Gazzoni, Ilaria; Barberi, Massimo; Colombo, Sara; Pedrazzini, Emanuela

    2001-01-01

    Many mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins have a transmembrane domain near the C terminus and an N-terminal cytosolic moiety. It is not clear how these tail-anchored (TA) proteins posttranslationally select their target, but C-terminal charged residues play an important role. To investigate how discrimination between MOM and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) occurs, we used mammalian cytochrome b5, a TA protein existing in two, MOM or ER localized, versions. Substi...

  1. Binding of fluorescent lanthanides to rat liver mitochondrial membranes and calcium ion-binding proteins.

    Mikkelsen, R B; Wallach, D F

    1976-05-21

    (1) Tb3+ binding to mitochondrial membranes can be monitored by enhanced ion fluorescence at 545 nm with excitation at 285 nm. At low protein concentrations (less than 30 mug/ml) no inner filter effects are observed. (2) This binding is localized at the external surface of the inner membrane and is unaffected by inhibitors of respiration or oxidative phosphorylation. (3) A soluble Ca2+ binding protein isolated according to Lehninger, A.L. ((1971) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 42, 312-317) also binds Tb3+ with enhanced ion fluorescence upon excitation at 285 nm. The excitation spectrum of the isolated protein and of the intact mitochondria are indicative of an aromatic amino acid at the cation binding site. (4) Further characterization of the Tb3+-protein interaction revealed that there is more than one binding site per protein molecule and that these sites are clustered (less than 20 A). Neuraminidase treatment or organic solvent extraction of the protein did not affect fluorescent Tb3+ binding. (5) pH dependency studies of Tb3+ binding to the isolated protein or intact mitochondria demonstrated the importance of an ionizable group of pK greater than 6. At pH less than 7.5 the amount of Tb3+ bound to the isolated protein decreased with increase in pH as monitored by Tb3+ fluorescence. With intact mitochondria the opposite occurred with a large increase in Tb3+ fluorescence at higher pH. This increase was not observed when the mitochondria were preincubated with antimycin A and rotenone. PMID:6061

  2. A method of determining electrical potential gradient across mitochondrial membrane in perfused rat hearts.

    Wan, B; Doumen, C; Duszynski, J; Salama, G; LaNoue, K F

    1993-08-01

    The electrical potential gradient across the mitochondrial membrane (delta psi m) in perfused rat hearts was estimated by calculating the equilibrium distribution of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+), using measured kinetic constants of uptake and release of TPP+. First-order rate constants of TPP+ uptake were measured during 30-min perfusions of intact rat hearts with tracer amounts (5.0 nM) of tritium-labeled TPP+ ([3H]TPP+) in the perfusate. This was followed by a 30-min washout, during which the first-order rate constant of efflux was estimated. Values of [3H]TPP+ outside the heart and total [3H]TPP+ inside the heart at equilibrium were calculated. From this information and separately estimated time-averaged plasma membrane potentials (delta psi c) it was possible to calculate free cytosolic [3H]TPP+ at equilibrium. It was also possible to calculate free intramitochondrial [3H]TPP+ at equilibrium as the difference between total tissue [3H]TPP+ minus free cytosolic TPP+ and the sum of all the bound [3H]TPP+. Bound [3H]TPP+ was determined from [3H]TPP+ binding constants measured in separate experiments, using both isolated mitochondria and isolated cardiac myocytes under conditions where both delta psi m and delta psi c were zero. Delta psi m was calculated from the intramitochondrial and cytosolic free TPP+ concentrations using the Nernst equation. Values of delta psi m were 144.9 +/- 2.0 mV in hearts perfused with 5 mM pyruvate and 118.2 +/- 1.4 mV in hearts perfused with 11 mM glucose, in good agreement with delta psi m obtained from isolated rat heart mitochondria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8368347

  3. Mcp3 is a novel mitochondrial outer membrane protein that follows a unique IMP-dependent biogenesis pathway.

    Sinzel, Monika; Tan, Tao; Wendling, Philipp; Kalbacher, Hubert; Özbalci, Cagakan; Chelius, Xenia; Westermann, Benedikt; Brügger, Britta; Rapaport, Doron; Dimmer, Kai Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are separated from the remainder of the eukaryotic cell by the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). The MOM plays an important role in different transport processes like lipid trafficking and protein import. In yeast, the ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) has a central, but poorly defined role in both activities. To understand the functions of the ERMES, we searched for suppressors of the deficiency of one of its components, Mdm10, and identified a novel mitochondrial protein that we named Mdm10 complementing protein 3 (Mcp3). Mcp3 partially rescues a variety of ERMES-related phenotypes. We further demonstrate that Mcp3 is an integral protein of the MOM that follows a unique import pathway. It is recognized initially by the import receptor Tom70 and then crosses the MOM via the translocase of the outer membrane. Mcp3 is next relayed to the TIM23 translocase at the inner membrane, gets processed by the inner membrane peptidase (IMP) and finally integrates into the MOM. Hence, Mcp3 follows a novel biogenesis route where a MOM protein is processed by a peptidase of the inner membrane. PMID:27226123

  4. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition by low pH is associated with less extensive membrane protein thiol oxidation.

    Teixeira, B M; Kowaltowski, A J; Castilho, R F; Vercesi, A E

    1999-12-01

    Ca2+ and inorganic phosphate-induced mitochondrial swelling and membrane protein thiol oxidation, which are associated with mitochondrial permeability transition, are inhibited by progressively decreasing the incubation medium pH between 7.2 and 6.0. Nevertheless, the detection of mitochondrial H2O2 production under these conditions is increased. Permeability transition induced by phenylarsine oxide, which promotes membrane protein thiol cross-linkage in a process independent of Ca2+ or reactive oxygen species, is also strongly inhibited in acidic incubation media. In addition, we observed that the decreased protein thiol reactivity with phenylarsine oxide or phenylarsine oxide-induced swelling at pH 6.0 is reversed by diethyl pyrocarbonate, in a hydroxylamine-sensitive manner. These results provide evidence that the inhibition of mitrochondrial permeability transition observed at lower incubation medium pH is mediated by a decrease in membrane protein thiol reactivity, related to the protonation of protein histidyl residues. PMID:10841269

  5. Fibrates inhibit the apoptosis of Batten disease lymphoblast cells via autophagy recovery and regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Hong, Minho; Song, Ki Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Yi, SunShin; Lee, Yong Seok; Heo, Tae-Hwe; Jun, Hyun Sik; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2016-03-01

    Batten disease (BD; also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a genetic disorder inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and is characterized by blindness, seizures, cognitive decline, and early death resulting from the inherited mutation of the CLN3 gene. Mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, disrupted autophagy, and enhanced apoptosis have been suggested to play a role in BD pathogenesis. Fibrates, a class of lipid-lowering drugs that induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) activation, are the most commonly used PPAR agonists. Assuming that fibrates have a neuroprotective effect, we studied the effects of fibrates, fenofibrate, bezafibrate, and gemfibrozil on apoptosis, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and defective autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells. The viability of fibrate-treated BD lymphoblast cells increased to levels of normal lymphoblast cells. In addition, treatment with fibrates inhibited depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential in BD lymphoblast cells. Defective autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells was normalized when treated with fibrates as indicated by increased acridine orange staining. The recovery of autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells is most likely attributed to the upregulation of autophagy proteins, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and LC3 I/II, after treatment with fibrates. This study therefore suggests that fibrates may have a therapeutic potential against BD. PMID:26659390

  6. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria.

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C; Fernyhough, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30-35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. PMID:26647379

  7. Endophilin B2 promotes inner mitochondrial membrane degradation by forming heterodimers with Endophilin B1 during mitophagy

    Wang, Yi-Han; Wang, Jiu-Qiang; Wang, Qiaochu; Wang, Yun; Guo, Caixia; Chen, Quan; Chai, Tuanyao; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial sequestration by autophagosomes is a key step in mitophagy while the mechanisms mediating this process are not fully understood. It has been reported that Endophilin B1 (EB1) promotes mitochondrial sequestration by binding and shaping membrane. However, the role of EB1 homolog Endophilin B2 (EB2) in mitophagy remains unclear. Here we report that EB2 plays an indispensable role in mitochondria sequestration and inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) protein degradation during mitophagy. Similar to EB1, EB2 aggregates into foci and then translocates to damaged mitochondria. Loss of either EB2 and/or EB1 significantly enervates the foci translocation to fragmented mitochondria and IMM degradation, and the EB1/EB2 heterodimer formed by EB1/EB2 interaction promotes the above process. We noticed that, it is the dimer domain of EB2 but not that of EB1 mediating the heterodimer formation, manifesting the importance of EB2 in mitophagy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the EB foci formation is closely regulated by the PINK1-Parkin signaling pathway. From these results, we propose that EB1/EB2 heterodimers may serve as linkers between damaged mitochondria and phagophores during mitophagy. PMID:27112121

  8. Activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase in mitochondrial outer membranes and peroxisomes in digitonin-permeabilized hepatocytes. Selective modulation of mitochondrial enzyme activity by okadaic acid.

    Guzmán, M; Geelen, M J

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is described for the rapid measurement of the activity of mitochondrial-outer-membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPTo) and peroxisomal carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPTp) in digitonin-permeabilized hepatocytes. CPTo activity was determined as the tetradecylglycidate (TDGA)-sensitive malonyl-CoA-sensitive CPT activity, whereas CPTp activity was monitored as the TDGA-insensitive malonyl-CoA-sensitive CPT activity. Under these experimental conditions, the respective contributions of CPTo and CPTp to total hepatocellular malonyl-CoA-sensitive CPT activity were 74.6 and 25.4%, which correlated well with the values of 76.9 and 23.1% for the respective contributions of the mitochondrial and the peroxisomal compartment to total hepatocellular palmitate oxidation. The sensitivity of CPTo to inhibition by malonyl-CoA was very similar to that of CPTp; thus 50% inhibition of CPTo and CPTp activities was achieved with malonyl-CoA concentrations of 2.6 +/- 0.5 and 3.0 +/- 0.4 microM respectively. Short-term incubation of hepatocytes with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (i) increased the activity of CPTo and the rate of mitochondrial palmitate oxidation, (ii) decreased the affinity of CPTo for palmitoyl-CoA substrate, and (iii) decreased the sensitivity of CPTo to inhibition by malonyl-CoA. By contrast, neither the properties of CPTp nor the rate of peroxisomal palmitate oxidation were changed upon incubation of cells with okadaic acid. Results indicate therefore that CPTo, but not CPTp, may be regulated by a mechanism of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The physiological relevance of these findings is discussed. PMID:1332675

  9. Assessing the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cells and In Vivo using Targeted Click Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry.

    Logan, Angela; Pell, Victoria R; Shaffer, Karl J; Evans, Cameron; Stanley, Nathan J; Robb, Ellen L; Prime, Tracy A; Chouchani, Edward T; Cochemé, Helena M; Fearnley, Ian M; Vidoni, Sara; James, Andrew M; Porteous, Carolyn M; Partridge, Linda; Krieg, Thomas; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) is a major determinant and indicator of cell fate, but it is not possible to assess small changes in Δψm within cells or in vivo. To overcome this, we developed an approach that utilizes two mitochondria-targeted probes each containing a triphenylphosphonium (TPP) lipophilic cation that drives their accumulation in response to Δψm and the plasma membrane potential (Δψp). One probe contains an azido moiety and the other a cyclooctyne, which react together in a concentration-dependent manner by "click" chemistry to form MitoClick. As the mitochondrial accumulation of both probes depends exponentially on Δψm and Δψp, the rate of MitoClick formation is exquisitely sensitive to small changes in these potentials. MitoClick accumulation can then be quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This approach enables assessment of subtle changes in membrane potentials within cells and in the mouse heart in vivo. PMID:26712463

  10. Assessing the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cells and In Vivo using Targeted Click Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry

    Logan, Angela; Pell, Victoria R.; Shaffer, Karl J.; Evans, Cameron; Stanley, Nathan J.; Robb, Ellen L.; Prime, Tracy A.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Vidoni, Sara; James, Andrew M.; Porteous, Carolyn M.; Partridge, Linda; Krieg, Thomas; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) is a major determinant and indicator of cell fate, but it is not possible to assess small changes in Δψm within cells or in vivo. To overcome this, we developed an approach that utilizes two mitochondria-targeted probes each containing a triphenylphosphonium (TPP) lipophilic cation that drives their accumulation in response to Δψm and the plasma membrane potential (Δψp). One probe contains an azido moiety and the other a cyclooctyne, which react together in a concentration-dependent manner by “click” chemistry to form MitoClick. As the mitochondrial accumulation of both probes depends exponentially on Δψm and Δψp, the rate of MitoClick formation is exquisitely sensitive to small changes in these potentials. MitoClick accumulation can then be quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This approach enables assessment of subtle changes in membrane potentials within cells and in the mouse heart in vivo. PMID:26712463

  11. The Non-structural Protein of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Disrupts the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Induces Apoptosis.

    Barnwal, Bhaskar; Karlberg, Helen; Mirazimi, Ali; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have developed distinct strategies to overcome the host defense system. Regulation of apoptosis in response to viral infection is important for virus survival and dissemination. Like other viruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is known to regulate apoptosis. This study, for the first time, suggests that the non-structural protein NSs of CCHFV, a member of the genus Nairovirus, induces apoptosis. In this report, we demonstrated the expression of CCHFV NSs, which contains 150 amino acid residues, in CCHFV-infected cells. CCHFV NSs undergoes active degradation during infection. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of CCHFV NSs induces apoptosis, as reflected by caspase-3/7 activity and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, in different cell lines that support CCHFV replication. Using specific inhibitors, we showed that CCHFV NSs induces apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The minimal active region of the CCHFV NSs protein was determined to be 93-140 amino acid residues. Using alanine scanning, we demonstrated that Leu-127 and Leu-135 are the key residues for NSs-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, CCHFV NSs co-localizes in mitochondria and also disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential. We also demonstrated that Leu-127 and Leu-135 are important residues for disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential by NSs. Therefore, these results indicate that the C terminus of CCHFV NSs triggers mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, leading to activation of caspases, which, ultimately, leads to apoptosis. Given that multiple factors contribute to apoptosis during CCHFV infection, further studies are needed to define the involvement of CCHFV NSs in regulating apoptosis in infected cells. PMID:26574543

  12. Ionomycin-induced Ca2+ overload is not accompanied by mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation in murine pro-B cells

    Gabriela Ildiko Zonda; Ancuta Goriuc; Marcel Costuleanu

    2010-01-01

    There are extremely few data concerning the involvement of Ca2+ fluxes in the apoptosis of the pro-B cell type Ba/F3. Thus, we aimed the characterization of ionomycin-induced effects on Ba/F3 cells in vitro. Our obtained data show that cytosolic Ca2+ increased in Ba/F3 cells by 1 μM ionomycin in the presence of 1 mM Ca2+ for 24 hours did not induced significant effects on the mitochondrial membrane potential as compared with control cells. The same effects were also associated by ...

  13. Mitochondrial membrane potential is a suitable candidate for assessing pollution toxicity in fish

    Fish inhabiting polluted estuaries are highly exposed to severe stress characterized by an oxidant-antioxidant imbalance. The aim of the study was to explore the use of stress parameters such as adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (ATP/ADP) ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and total protein expression patterns as biomarkers against oxidant exposures in hepatocytes of Mugil cephalus living in either a contaminated (Test; Ennore) or uncontaminated (Control; Kovalam) estuary. Earlier, the pollutant stress impact was determined through light and electron microscopy studies. The ATP/ADP ratio was measured using high performance liquid chromatography; Δψm by fluorescent probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethyl benzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) dye and total protein expression patterns by protein profiling. The preponderance of stress impact was confirmed through microscopy studies that featured cytological alterations, disturbances in the surface morphology and in the cell organelles at the ultrastructural levels. Hepatocytes of test fish demonstrated a decrease in ATP and an increase in ADP and thereby alteration in ATP/ADP ratio (p < 0.05; 20.75%). A significant disturbance (p < 0.05; 26.57%) in Δψm with a ratio of J-aggregates/JC-1 monomer of 1 was observed for test fish hepatocytes compared to control group with a J-aggregates/JC-1 monomer ratio of 1.5. Quantitative assessment of protein expression levels also revealed enhanced induction of both low and high molecular weight proteins in test fish hepatocytes. The findings highlight the use of these parameters as the highly sensitive biomarkers in response to contaminant exposure compared to the routinely used antioxidant and oxidant stress parameters in biomonitoring programs. Among the measured parameters, the determination of Δψm may be suggested as a novel candidate as a biomarker because of its greater specificity and rapid quantitative risk assessment of pollutant

  14. Mitochondrial membrane potential is a suitable candidate for assessing pollution toxicity in fish

    Padmini, Ekambaram, E-mail: dstpadmini@rediffmail.com; Usha Rani, Munuswamy, E-mail: musharani.2007@rediffmail.com

    2011-09-01

    Fish inhabiting polluted estuaries are highly exposed to severe stress characterized by an oxidant-antioxidant imbalance. The aim of the study was to explore the use of stress parameters such as adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (ATP/ADP) ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{psi}m) and total protein expression patterns as biomarkers against oxidant exposures in hepatocytes of Mugil cephalus living in either a contaminated (Test; Ennore) or uncontaminated (Control; Kovalam) estuary. Earlier, the pollutant stress impact was determined through light and electron microscopy studies. The ATP/ADP ratio was measured using high performance liquid chromatography; {Delta}{psi}m by fluorescent probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethyl benzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) dye and total protein expression patterns by protein profiling. The preponderance of stress impact was confirmed through microscopy studies that featured cytological alterations, disturbances in the surface morphology and in the cell organelles at the ultrastructural levels. Hepatocytes of test fish demonstrated a decrease in ATP and an increase in ADP and thereby alteration in ATP/ADP ratio (p < 0.05; 20.75%). A significant disturbance (p < 0.05; 26.57%) in {Delta}{psi}m with a ratio of J-aggregates/JC-1 monomer of 1 was observed for test fish hepatocytes compared to control group with a J-aggregates/JC-1 monomer ratio of 1.5. Quantitative assessment of protein expression levels also revealed enhanced induction of both low and high molecular weight proteins in test fish hepatocytes. The findings highlight the use of these parameters as the highly sensitive biomarkers in response to contaminant exposure compared to the routinely used antioxidant and oxidant stress parameters in biomonitoring programs. Among the measured parameters, the determination of {Delta}{psi}m may be suggested as a novel candidate as a biomarker because of its greater specificity

  15. A transient increase in lipid peroxidation primes preadipocytes for delayed mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization and ATP depletion during prolonged exposure to fatty acids

    Rogers, Carlyle; Davis, Barbara; Neufer, P. Darrell; Murphy, Michael P.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Robidoux, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Preadipocytes are periodically subjected to fatty acid (FA) concentrations that are potentially cytotoxic. We tested the hypothesis that prolonged exposure of preadipocytes of human origin to a physiologically relevant mix of FAs leads to mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM) permeabilization and ultimately to mitochondrial crisis. We found that exposure of preadipocytes to FAs led to progressive cyclosporin A-sensitive MIM permeabilization, which in turn caused reduction in MIM potential (ΔΨM),...

  16. Photoactive mitochondria: in vivo transfer of a light-driven proton pump into the inner mitochondrial membrane of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Hoffmann, A; Hildebrandt, V; Heberle, J; Büldt, G

    1994-09-27

    The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) from Halobacterium salinarium has been genetically transferred into the inner mitochondrial membrane (IM) of the eukaryotic cell Schizosaccharomyces pombe, where the archaebacterial proton pump replaces or increases the proton gradient usually formed by the respiratory chain. For targeting and integration, as well as for the correct orientation of bR in the IM, the bacterioopsin gene (bop) was fused to signal sequences of IM proteins. Northern and Western blot analysis proved that all hybrid gene constructs containing the bop gene and a mitochondrial signal sequence were expressed and processed to mature bR. Fast transient absorption spectroscopy showed photocycle activity of bR integrated in the IM by formation of the M intermediate. Experiments with the pH-sensitive fluorescence dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and -6)-carboxyfluorescein revealed bR-mediated proton pumping from the mitochondrial matrix into the intermembrane space. Glucose uptake measurements under anaerobic conditions showed that yeast cells containing photoactive mitochondria need less sugar under illumination. In summary, our experiments demonstrate the functional genetic transfer of a light energy converter to a naturally nonphotoactive eukaryotic organism. PMID:7937771

  17. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABPPM) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABPPM have GOT enzymatic activity. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABPPM reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of [3H]oleate but not that of [35S]sulfobromophthalein or [14C]taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABPPM can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABPPM and mGOT are closely related

  18. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Highlights: ► Butachlor exhibited strong binding affinity with DNA and produced 8-oxodG adducts. ► Butachlor induced DNA strand breaks and micronuclei formation in PBMN cells. ► Butachlor induced ROS and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential in cells. ► Butachlor resulted in cell cycle arrest and eventually caused cellular necrosis. -- Abstract: Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka = 1.2 × 104 M−1) and binding capacity (n = 1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2′,7′-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24 h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow

  19. Palmitoylation of the immunity related GTPase, Irgm1: impact on membrane localization and ability to promote mitochondrial fission.

    Stanley C Henry

    Full Text Available The Immunity-Related GTPases (IRG are a family of large GTPases that mediate innate immune responses. Irgm1 is particularly critical for immunity to bacteria and protozoa, and for inflammatory homeostasis in the intestine. Although precise functions for Irgm1 have not been identified, prior studies have suggested roles in autophagy/mitophagy, phagosome remodeling, cell motility, and regulating the activity of other IRG proteins. These functions ostensibly hinge on the ability of Irgm1 to localize to intracellular membranes, such as those of the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria. Previously, it has been shown that an amphipathic helix, the αK helix, in the C-terminal portion of the protein partially mediates membrane binding. However, in absence of αK, there is still substantial binding of Irgm1 to cellular membranes, suggesting the presence of other membrane binding motifs. In the current work, an additional membrane localization motif was found in the form of palmitoylation at a cluster of cysteines near the αK. An Irgm1 mutant possessing alanine to cysteine substitutions at these amino acids demonstrated little residual palmitoylation, yet it displayed only a small decrease in localization to the Golgi and mitochondria. In contrast, a mutant containing the palmitoylation mutations in combination with mutations disrupting the amphipathic character of the αK displayed a complete loss of apparent localization to the Golgi and mitochondria, as well as an overall loss of association with cellular membranes in general. Additionally, Irgm1 was found to promote mitochondrial fission, and this function was undermined in Irgm1 mutants lacking the palmitoylation domain, and to a greater extent in those lacking the αK, or the αK and palmitoylation domains combined. Our data suggest that palmitoylation together with the αK helix firmly anchor Irgm1 in the Golgi and mitochondria, thus facilitating function of the protein.

  20. Sensitivity of inhibition of rat liver mitochondrial outer-membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase by malonyl-CoA to chemical- and temperature-induced changes in membrane fluidity.

    Kolodziej, M P; Zammit, V A

    1990-01-01

    We have tested the possibility that alterations in the fluidity of the outer membrane of rat liver mitochondria could result in changes in the sensitivity of overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I) to malonyl-CoA [Zammit (1986) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 14. 676-679]. The sensitivity of CPT I to malonyl-CoA inhibition was measured by using highly purified mitochondrial outer membranes prepared from fed or 48 h-starved rats in the presence and absence of agents that increase membrane fluidity by perturbing membrane lipid order [benzyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol (3-methylbutan-l-ol) and 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl-8-(cis-2-n-octylpropyl)octanoate (A2C)]. All these agents resulted in marked decreases in the ability of malonyl-CoA to inhibit CPT I. This effect was accompanied by a modest increase in the absolute activity of CPT I in the absence of malonyl-CoA when the short-chain alcohols were used, but not when A2C was used, suggesting that the effect of increased membrane fluidity to decrease the malonyl-CoA sensitivity of CPT I may occur independently from other actions that may affect more directly the active site of the enzyme. In confirmation of the potential importance of fluidity changes, we showed that a marked increase in sensitivity of CPT I to malonyl-CoA could be produced when assays were performed at lower temperatures than those normally employed. These observations are discussed in the context of the slowness of the changes in CPT I sensitivity to malonyl-CoA inhibition that are induced by physiological perturbations. PMID:2268270

  1. Cleavage by Caspase 8 and Mitochondrial Membrane Association Activate the BH3-only Protein Bid during TRAIL-induced Apoptosis.

    Huang, Kai; Zhang, Jingjing; O'Neill, Katelyn L; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Quadros, Rolen M; Tu, Yaping; Luo, Xu

    2016-05-27

    The BH3-only protein Bid is known as a critical mediator of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis following death receptor activation. However, since full-length Bid possesses potent apoptotic activity, the role of a caspase-mediated Bid cleavage is not established in vivo In addition, due to the fact that multiple caspases cleave Bid at the same site in vitro, the identity of the Bid-cleaving caspase during death receptor signaling remains uncertain. Moreover, as Bid maintains its overall structure following its cleavage by caspase 8, it remains unclear how Bid is activated upon cleavage. Here, Bid-deficient (Bid KO) colon cancer cells were generated by gene editing, and were reconstituted with wild-type or mutants of Bid. While the loss of Bid blocked apoptosis following treatment by TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), this blockade was relieved by re-introduction of the wild-type Bid. In contrast, the caspase-resistant mutant Bid(D60E) and a BH3 defective mutant Bid(G94E) failed to restore TRAIL-induced apoptosis. By generating Bid/Bax/Bak-deficient (TKO) cells, we demonstrated that Bid is primarily cleaved by caspase 8, not by effector caspases, to give rise to truncated Bid (tBid) upon TRAIL treatment. Importantly, despite the presence of an intact BH3 domain, a tBid mutant lacking the mitochondrial targeting helices (α6 and α7) showed diminished apoptotic activity. Together, these results for the first time establish that cleavage by caspase 8 and the subsequent association with the outer mitochondrial membrane are two critical events that activate Bid during death receptor-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27053107

  2. Mitochondrial Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) Is Part of an Outer Membrane Fatty Acid Transfer Complex*

    Lee, Kwangwon; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    CPT1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) in the liver mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) catalyzes the primary regulated step in overall mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. It has been suggested that the fundamental unit of CPT1a exists as a trimer, which, under native conditions, could form a dimer of the trimers, creating a hexamer channel for acylcarnitine translocation. To examine the state of CPT1a in the MOM, we employed a combined approach of sizing by mass and isolation using an immunological method. Blue native electrophoresis followed by detection with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry identified large molecular mass complexes that contained not only CPT1a but also long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). Immunoprecipitation with antisera against the proteins revealed a strong interaction between the three proteins. Immobilized CPT1a-specific antibodies immunocaptured not only CPT1a but also ACSL and VDAC, further strengthening findings with blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation. This study shows strong protein-protein interaction between CPT1a, ACSL, and VDAC. We propose that this complex transfers activated fatty acids through the MOM. PMID:21622568

  3. Mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) is part of an outer membrane fatty acid transfer complex.

    Lee, Kwangwon; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L

    2011-07-22

    CPT1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) in the liver mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) catalyzes the primary regulated step in overall mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. It has been suggested that the fundamental unit of CPT1a exists as a trimer, which, under native conditions, could form a dimer of the trimers, creating a hexamer channel for acylcarnitine translocation. To examine the state of CPT1a in the MOM, we employed a combined approach of sizing by mass and isolation using an immunological method. Blue native electrophoresis followed by detection with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry identified large molecular mass complexes that contained not only CPT1a but also long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). Immunoprecipitation with antisera against the proteins revealed a strong interaction between the three proteins. Immobilized CPT1a-specific antibodies immunocaptured not only CPT1a but also ACSL and VDAC, further strengthening findings with blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation. This study shows strong protein-protein interaction between CPT1a, ACSL, and VDAC. We propose that this complex transfers activated fatty acids through the MOM. PMID:21622568

  4. Membrane trafficking and mitochondrial abnormalities precede subunit c deposition in a cerebellar cell model of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    Cattaneo Elena

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background JNCL is a recessively inherited, childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease most-commonly caused by a ~1 kb CLN3 mutation. The resulting loss of battenin activity leads to deposition of mitochondrial ATP synthase, subunit c and a specific loss of CNS neurons. We previously generated Cln3Δex7/8 knock-in mice, which replicate the common JNCL mutation, express mutant battenin and display JNCL-like pathology. Results To elucidate the consequences of the common JNCL mutation in neuronal cells, we used P4 knock-in mouse cerebella to establish conditionally immortalized CbCln3 wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous neuronal precursor cell lines, which can be differentiated into MAP-2 and NeuN-positive, neuron-like cells. Homozygous CbCln3Δex7/8 precursor cells express low levels of mutant battenin and, when aged at confluency, accumulate ATPase subunit c. Recessive phenotypes are also observed at sub-confluent growth; cathepsin D transport and processing are altered, although enzyme activity is not significantly affected, lysosomal size and distribution are altered, and endocytosis is reduced. In addition, mitochondria are abnormally elongated, cellular ATP levels are decreased, and survival following oxidative stress is reduced. Conclusions These findings reveal that battenin is required for intracellular membrane trafficking and mitochondrial function. Moreover, these deficiencies are likely to be early events in the JNCL disease process and may particularly impact neuronal survival.

  5. Mitochondrial membrane potential in human neutrophils is maintained by complex III activity in the absence of supercomplex organisation.

    Bram J van Raam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils depend mainly on glycolysis for their energy provision. Their mitochondria maintain a membrane potential (Deltapsi(m, which is usually generated by the respiratory chain complexes. We investigated the source of Deltapsi(m in neutrophils, as compared to peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and HL-60 cells, and whether neutrophils can still utilise this Deltapsi(m for the generation of ATP. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Individual activity of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes was significantly reduced in neutrophils, except for complex II and V, but Deltapsi(m was still decreased by inhibition of complex III, confirming the role of the respiratory chain in maintaining Deltapsi(m. Complex V did not maintain Deltapsi(m by consumption of ATP, as has previously been suggested for eosinophils. We show that complex III in neutrophil mitochondria can receive electrons from glycolysis via the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle. Furthermore, respiratory supercomplexes, which contribute to efficient coupling of the respiratory chain to ATP synthesis, were lacking in neutrophil mitochondria. When HL-60 cells were differentiated to neutrophil-like cells, they lost mitochondrial supercomplex organisation while gaining increased aerobic glycolysis, just like neutrophils. CONCLUSIONS: We show that neutrophils can maintain Deltapsi(m via the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, whereby their mitochondria play an important role in the regulation of aerobic glycolysis, rather than producing energy themselves. This peculiar mitochondrial phenotype is acquired during differentiation from myeloid precursors.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a Ca/sup 2 +/ carrier candidate from calf heart inner mitochondrial membrane

    Jeng, A.Y.

    1979-01-01

    A protein was isolated from calf heart inner mitochondrial membrane with the aid of an electron paramagnetic resonance assay based on the relative binding properties of Ca/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ to the protein. Partial delipidation of the protein was performed by using either the organic solvent extraction procedure or the silicic acid column chromatography. Control experiments indicated that the Ca/sup 2 +/ transport properties of the isolated protein were not due to the contaminating phospholipids. A complete delipidation procedure was developd by using Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. Further characterization of the physical and chemical properties of the delipidated protein showed that delipidated protein becomes more hydrophobic in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ and alkaline pH in the organic solvent extraction experiments. Two possible models of calciphorin-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ transport in mitochondria are proposed. (PCS)

  7. Three-dimensional organization of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane around the mitochondrial constriction site in mammalian cells revealed by using focused-ion beam tomography.

    Ohta, Keisuke; Okayama, Satoko; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria associate at multiple contact sites to form specific domains known as mitochondria-ER associated membranes (MAMs) that play a role in the regulation of various cellular processes such as Ca2+ transfer, autophagy, and inflammation. Recently, it has been suggested that MAMs are also involved in mitochondrial dynamics, especially fission events. Cytological analysis showed that ER tubules were frequently located close to each other in mitochondrial fission sites that accumulate fission-related proteins. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of ER-mitochondrial contacts in yeast mitochondria by using cryo-electron tomography also showed that ER tubules were attached near the constriction site, which is considered to be a fission site1). MAMs have been suggested to play a role in the initiation of mitochondrial fission, although the molecular relationships between MAMs and the mitochondrial fission process have not been established. Although an ER-mitochondrial membrane association has also been observed at the fission site in mammalian mitochondria, the detailed organization of MAMs around mammalian mitochondria remains to be established. To visualize the 3D distribution of the ER-mitochondrial contacts around the mitochondria, especially around the constriction site in mammalian cells, we attempted 3D structural analysis of the mammalian cytoplasm using high-resolution focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) tomography, and observed the distribution pattern of ER contacts around the mammalian mitochondrial constriction site.Rat hepatocytes and HeLa cells were used. Liver tissue was obtained from male rats (Wistar, 6W) fixed by transcardial perfusion of 2% paraformaldehyde and 2.5% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4) under deep anesthesia. HeLa cells were fixed with the same fixative. The specimens were then stained en bloc to enhance membrane contrast and embedded in epoxy resin2). The surface of

  8. Interventional effect of phycocyanin on mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of PC12 cells after hypoxia/reoxygenation

    Nan Jiang; Yunliang Guo; Hongbing Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phycocyanin can relieve decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential through reducing production of active oxygen so as to protect neurons after hypoxia/reoxygenation.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of phycocyanin on activity of PC12 cells and mitochondrial membrane potential after hypoxia/reoxygenation.DESIGN: Randomized controlled study.SETTING: Cerebrovascular Disease Institute of Affiliated Hospital, Medical College of Qingdao University.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out at the Key Laboratory of Prevention and Cure for cerebropathia in Shandong Province from October to December 2005. PC12 cells, rat chromaffin tumor cells,were provided by Storage Center of Wuhan University; phycocyanin was provided by Ocean Institute of Academia Sinica; Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and rhodamine 123 were purchased from Sigma Company, USA; RPMI-1640 medium, fetal bovine serum and equine serum were purchased from Gibco Company, USA.METHODS: ① Culture of PC12 cells: PC12 cells were put into RPMI-1640 medium which contained 100 g/L heat inactivation equine serum and 0.05 volume fraction of fetal bovine serum and incubated in CO2 incubator at 37 ℃. Number of cells was regulated to 4 × 105 L-1, and cells were inoculated at 96-well culture plate.The final volume was 100 μL. ② Model establishing and grouping: Cultured PC12 cells were randomly divided into three groups: phycocyanin group, model control group and non-hypoxia group. At 24 hours before hypoxia, culture solution in phycocyanin group was added with phycocyanin so as to make sure the final concentration of 3 g/L, but cells in model control group did not add with phycocyanin. Cells in non-hypoxia group were also randomly divided into adding phycocyanin group (the final concentration of 3 g/L) and non-adding phycocyanin group. Cells in model control group and phycocyanin group were cultured with hypoxia for 1 hour and reoxygenation for 1, 2 and 3 hours; meanwhile, cells in non

  9. Effect of narcotics on membrane-bound mitochondrial processes in fish

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Michiels, Ellen; Stinckens, Evelyn; Maho, Walid; Blust, Ronny; Covaci, Adrian; Mayer, Philipp; Knapen, Dries

    Around 70% of industrial chemicals are hydrophobic compounds which are assumed to elicit toxicity through narcosis by accumulating in membranes and disrupting membrane integrity and function. Although narcosis has been recognized as an important toxicity mechanism for decades, ecotoxicological...... research has been mostly limited to the development of quantitative structure activity relations (QSARs) to predict toxicity, resulting in insufficient understanding of the exact mechanisms involved. In this study we investigate specific aspects of the mechanism of narcosis in fish using both alternative...

  10. [The effect of the homogenates from different developmental stages of the nematode Protostrongylus rufescens (Leuckart, 1895) on mitochondrial and lipid bilayer membranes].

    Kuchboev, A E; Kazakov, I; Asrarov, M I; Isakova, D T; Azimov, D A; Golovanov, V I

    2007-01-01

    The effect of the homogenates from different developmental stages of the nematode Protostrongylus rufescens on mitochondrial and lipid bilayer membranes has been studied. The homogenate of P. rufescens affects efficiently the cell energy by the inhibition of the mitochondrial respiration in the metabolic state V3, uncouples oxidative phosphorylation and affects the functions of mitochondria at the level of cyclosporine A-sensitive pore by making it highly permeable. Moreover, the nematode homogenate at the concentration of 1 mkg/ml increases efficiently the integral permeability of lipid bilayer membranes. An increase in this permeability is connected apparently with the formation of single ion channels. The channels of lipid bilayer membranes induced by the nematode homogenate show cation selectivity. PMID:17460939

  11. Effect of inorganic phosphate concentration on the nature of inner mitochondrial membrane alterations mediated by Ca2+ ions. A proposed model for phosphate-stimulated lipid peroxidation.

    Kowaltowski, A J; Castilho, R F; Grijalba, M T; Bechara, E J; Vercesi, A E

    1996-02-01

    Addition of high concentrations (>1 mm) of inorganic phosphate (Pi) or arsenate to Ca2+-loaded mitochondria was followed by increased rates of H2O2 production, membrane lipid peroxidation, and swelling. Mitochondrial swelling was only partially prevented either by butylhydroxytoluene, an inhibitor of lipid peroxidation, or cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This swelling was totally prevented by the simultaneous presence of these compounds. At lower Pi concentrations (1 mm), mitochondrial swelling is reversible and prevented by cyclosporin A, but not by butylhydroxytoluene. In any case (low or high phosphate concentration) exogenous catalase prevented mitochondrial swelling, suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in these mechanisms. Altogether, the data suggest that, at low Pi concentrations, membrane permeabilization is reversible and mediated by opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, whereas at high Pi concentrations, membrane permeabilization is irreversible because lipid peroxidation also takes place. Under these conditions, lipid peroxidation is strongly inhibited by sorbate, a putative quencher of triplet carbonyl species. This suggests that high Pi or arsenate concentrations stimulate propagation of the peroxidative reactions initiated by mitochondrial-generated ROS because these anions are able to catalyze Cn-aldehyde tautomerization producing enols, which can be oxidized by hemeproteins to yield the lower Cn - 1-aldehyde in the triplet state. This proposition was also supported by experiments using a model system consisting of phosphatidylcholine/dicethylphosphate liposomes and the triplet acetone-generating system isobutanal/horseradish peroxidase, where phosphate and Ca2+ cooperate to increase the yield of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. PMID:8621682

  12. A Mitochondrial Membrane Exopolyphosphatase Is Modulated by, and Plays a Role in, the Energy Metabolism of Hard Tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus Embryos

    Carlos Logullo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The physiological roles of polyphosphates (polyP recently found in arthropod mitochondria remain obscure. Here, the relationship between the mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase (PPX and the energy metabolism of hard tick Rhipicephalus microplus embryos are investigated. Mitochondrial respiration was activated by adenosine diphosphate using polyP as the only source of inorganic phosphate (Pi and this activation was much greater using polyP3 than polyP15. After mitochondrial subfractionation, most of the PPX activity was recovered in the membrane fraction and its kinetic analysis revealed that the affinity for polyP3 was 10 times stronger than that for polyP15. Membrane PPX activity was also increased in the presence of the respiratory substrate pyruvic acid and after addition of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone. Furthermore, these stimulatory effects disappeared upon addition of the cytochrome oxidase inhibitor potassium cyanide and the activity was completely inhibited by 20 µg/mL heparin. The activity was either increased or decreased by 50% upon addition of dithiothreitol or hydrogen peroxide, respectively, suggesting redox regulation. These results indicate a PPX activity that is regulated during mitochondrial respiration and that plays a role in adenosine-5’-triphosphate synthesis in hard tick embryos.

  13. Fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial outer membrane in rats brown adipose tissue: activation of thermogenesis by Ca2+.

    de Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A; da Costa, Rodrigo Madeiro; de Andrade, Ivone Rosa; Benchimol, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria thermogenesis is regulated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP 1), GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we observed fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane with the mitochondrial outer membrane of rats BAT. Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA 1) was identified by immunoelectron microscopy in both ER and mitochondria. This finding led us to test the Ca(2+) effect in BAT mitochondria thermogenesis. We found that Ca(2+) increased the rate of respiration and heat production measured with a microcalorimeter both in coupled and uncoupled mitochondria, but had no effect on the rate of ATP synthesis. The Ca(2+) concentration needed for half-maximal activation varied between 0.08 and 0.11 microM. The activation of respiration was less pronounced than that of heat production. Heat production and ATP synthesis were inhibited by rotenone and KCN. Liver mitochondria have no UCP1 and during respiration synthesize a large amount of ATP, produce little heat, GDP had no effect on mitochondria coupling, Ca(2+) strongly inhibited ATP synthesis and had little or no effect on the small amount of heat released. These finding indicate that Ca(2+) activation of thermogenesis may be a specific feature of BAT mitochondria not found in other mitochondria such as liver. PMID:20209153

  14. On-line measurements of oscillating mitochondrial membrane potential in glucose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Andersen, Ann Zahle; Poulsen, Allan K; Olsen, Lars Folke;

    2007-01-01

    We employed the fluorescent cyanine dye DiOC(2)(3) to measure membrane potential in semi-anaerobic yeast cells under conditions where glycolysis was oscillating. Oscillations in glycolysis were studied by means of the naturally abundant nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). We found that the...

  15. Quantum squeezed light for probing mitochondrial membranes and study of neuroprotectants.

    Gourley, Paul Lee; Copeland, Robert Guild; McDonald, Anthony Eugene; Hendricks, Judy K.; Naviaux, Robert K. (University of California, San Diego, CA)

    2005-01-01

    We report a new nanolaser technique for measuring characteristics of human mitochondria. Because mitochondria are so small, it has been difficult to study large populations using standard light microscope or flow cytometry techniques. We recently discovered a nano-optical transduction method for high-speed analysis of submicron organelles that is well suited to mitochondrial studies. This ultrasensitive detection technique uses nano-squeezing of light into photon modes imposed by the ultrasmall organelle dimensions in a semiconductor biocavity laser. In this paper, we use the method to study the lasing spectra of normal and diseased mitochondria. We find that the diseased mitochondria exhibit larger physical diameter and standard deviation. This morphological differences are also revealed in the lasing spectra. The diseased specimens have a larger spectral linewidth than the normal, and have more variability in their statistical distributions.

  16. Apaf-1-deficient fog mouse cell apoptosis involves hypopolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane,ATP depletion and citrate accumulation

    Iyoko Katoh; Shingo Sato; Nahoko Fukunishi; Hiroki Yoshida; Takasuke Imai; Shun-ichi Kurata

    2008-01-01

    To explore how the intrinsic apoptosis pathway is controlled in the spontaneous fog (forebrain overgrowth) mutant mice with an Apaf1 splicing deficiency,we examined spleen and bone marrow cells from Apaf1+/+(+/+) and Apaf1fog/fog (fog/fog) mice for initiator caspase-9 activation by cellular stresses.When the mitochondrial inner membrane potential (△Ψm) was disrupted by staurosporine,+/+ cells but not fog/fog cells activated caspase-9 to cause apoptosis,indicating the lack of apoptosomc (apoptosis protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1)/cytochrome c/(d)ATP/procaspase-9) function in fog/fog cells.However,when a marginal (~20%) decrease in △Ψm was caused by hydrogen peroxide (0.1 mM),peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (0.1 mM) and UV-C irradiation (20 J/m2),both +/+ and fog/fog cells triggeredprocaspase-9 auto-processing and its downstream cascade activation.Supporting our previous results,procaspase-9 pre-existing in the mitochondria induced its auto-processing before the cytosolic caspase activation regardless of the geuotypes.Cellular ATP concentration significantly decreased under the hypoactive AΨm condition.Furthermore,we detected accumulation of citrate,a kosmotrope known to facilitate procaspase-9 dimerization,probably due to a feedback control of the Krebs cycle by the electron transfer system.Thus,mitochondrial in situ caspase-9 activation may be caused by the major metabolic reactions in response to physiological stresses,which may represent a mode of Apaf-1-independent apoptosis hypothesized from recent genetic studies.

  17. Mitochondrial-encoded membrane protein transcripts are pyrimidine-rich while soluble protein transcripts and ribosomal RNA are purine-rich

    Samuels David C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic organisms contain mitochondria, organelles capable of producing large amounts of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains many mitochondria with many copies of mitochondrial DNA in each organelle. The mitochondrial DNA encodes a small but functionally critical portion of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery, a few other species-specific proteins, and the rRNA and tRNA used for the translation of these transcripts. Because the microenvironment of the mitochondrion is unique, mitochondrial genes may be subject to different selectional pressures than those affecting nuclear genes. Results From an analysis of the mitochondrial genomes of a wide range of eukaryotic species we show that there are three simple rules for the pyrimidine and purine abundances in mitochondrial DNA transcripts. Mitochondrial membrane protein transcripts are pyrimidine rich, rRNA transcripts are purine-rich and the soluble protein transcripts are purine-rich. The transitions between pyrimidine and purine-rich regions of the genomes are rapid and are easily visible on a pyrimidine-purine walk graph. These rules are followed, with few exceptions, independent of which strand encodes the gene. Despite the robustness of these rules across a diverse set of species, the magnitude of the differences between the pyrimidine and purine content is fairly small. Typically, the mitochondrial membrane protein transcripts have a pyrimidine richness of 56%, the rRNA transcripts are 55% purine, and the soluble protein transcripts are only 53% purine. Conclusion The pyrimidine richness of mitochondrial-encoded membrane protein transcripts is partly driven by U nucleotides in the second codon position in all species, which yields hydrophobic amino acids. The purine-richness of soluble protein transcripts is mainly driven by A nucleotides in the first codon position. The purine-richness of rRNA is also due to an abundance of A nucleotides. Possible

  18. [Effect of ethylmaleimide on the transport of Ca+ and K+ ions across mitochondrial membranes].

    Lofrumento, N E; Zanotti, F; Pavone, A

    1979-04-30

    As already reported, it has been found that the gradient of protons, set up across the inner membrane during the Ca2+ uptake by rat liver mitochondria, can be completely reversed by the addition of NEM. Identical results have been obtained by following the energy dependent K+ uptake. In these last conditions, the rate of H+ efflux supported by succinate oxidation is greatly enhanced only when NEM is added after rotenone. It is proposed that the increased rate other than to the inhibition of Pi uptake, as suggested by Reynafarje and Lehninger, could also be ascribed to a further decrease in the energetic level of the membrane as well as to an increased rate of succinate-Pi exchange diffusion reaction induced by NEM. A possible direct effect of NEM on succinate oxidation has been also considered to account for the inhibition observed when it is added before rotenone. PMID:554640

  19. Rapid detection of an ABT-737-sensitive primed for death state in cells using microplate-based respirometry.

    Pascaline Clerc

    Full Text Available Cells that exhibit an absolute dependence on the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for survival are termed "primed for death" and are killed by the BCL-2 antagonist ABT-737. Many cancers exhibit a primed phenotype, including some that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy due to high BCL-2 expression. We show here that 1 stable BCL-2 overexpression alone can induce a primed for death state and 2 that an ABT-737-induced loss of functional cytochrome c from the electron transport chain causes a reduction in maximal respiration that is readily detectable by microplate-based respirometry. Stable BCL-2 overexpression sensitized non-tumorigenic MCF10A mammary epithelial cells to ABT-737-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Mitochondria within permeabilized BCL-2 overexpressing cells were selectively vulnerable to ABT-737-induced cytochrome c release compared to those from control-transfected cells, consistent with a primed state. ABT-737 treatment caused a dose-dependent impairment of maximal O(2 consumption in MCF10A BCL-2 overexpressing cells but not in control-transfected cells or in immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking both BAX and BAK. This impairment was rescued by delivering exogenous cytochrome c to mitochondria via saponin-mediated plasma membrane permeabilization. An ABT-737-induced reduction in maximal O(2 consumption was also detectable in SP53, JeKo-1, and WEHI-231 B-cell lymphoma cell lines, with sensitivity correlating with BCL-2:MCL-1 ratio and with susceptibility (SP53 and JeKo-1 or resistance (WEHI-231 to ABT-737-induced apoptosis. Multiplexing respirometry assays to ELISA-based determination of cytochrome c redistribution confirmed that respiratory inhibition was associated with cytochrome c release. In summary, cell-based respiration assays were able to rapidly identify a primed for death state in cells with either artificially overexpressed or high endogenous BCL-2. Rapid detection of a primed for death state in

  20. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  1. Evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential using a computerized device with a tetraphenylphosphonium-selective electrode

    Labajová, A.; Vojtíšková, Alena; Křiváková, P.; Kofránek, J.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Houštěk, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 353, č. 1 (2006), s. 37-42. ISSN 0003-2697 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD303/03/H065; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/06/1261 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) 126/04/C; IGA MŠk(CZ) RP 394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : membrane potential * TPP -selective electrode Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.948, year: 2006

  2. Mitochondrial membranes with mono- and divalent salt: changes induced by salt ions on structure and dynamics

    Pöyry, Sanja; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko;

    2009-01-01

    membrane electrostatic potential. The changes induced by salt are more prominent in dynamical properties related to ion binding and formation of ion-lipid complexes and lipid aggregates, as rotational diffusion of lipids is slowed down by ions, especially in the case of CaCl(2). In the same spirit, lateral...... diffusion of lipids is slowed down rather considerably for increasing concentration of CaCl(2). Both findings for dynamic properties can be traced to the binding of ions with lipid head groups and the related changes in interaction patterns in the headgroup region, where the binding of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions...

  3. Cell membrane penetration and mitochondrial targeting by platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles.

    Torrano, Adriano A; Herrmann, Rudolf; Strobel, Claudia; Rennhak, Markus; Engelke, Hanna; Reller, Armin; Hilger, Ingrid; Wixforth, Achim; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    In this work we investigate the interaction between endothelial cells and nanoparticles emitted by catalytic converters. Although catalyst-derived particles are recognized as growing burden added to environmental pollution, very little is known about their health impact. We use platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles as model compounds for the actual emitted particles and focus on their fast uptake and association with mitochondria, the cell's powerhouse. Using live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we clearly show that 46 nm platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles can rapidly penetrate cell membranes and reach the cytosol. Moreover, if suitably targeted, these particles are able to selectively attach to mitochondria. These results are complemented by cytotoxicity assays, thus providing insights into the biological effects of these particles on cells. Interestingly, no permanent membrane disruption or any other significant adverse effects on cells were observed. The unusual uptake behavior observed for 46 nm nanoparticles was not observed for equivalent but larger 143 nm and 285 nm platinum-decorated particles. Our results demonstrate a remarkable particle size effect in which particles smaller than ∼50-100 nm escape the usual endocytic pathway and translocate directly into the cytosol, while particles larger than ∼150 nm are internalized by conventional endocytosis. Since the small particles are able to bypass endocytosis they could be explored as drug and gene delivery vehicles. Platinum-decorated nanoparticles are therefore highly interesting in the fields of nanotoxicology and nanomedicine. PMID:27341699

  4. Cell membrane penetration and mitochondrial targeting by platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles

    Torrano, Adriano A.; Herrmann, Rudolf; Strobel, Claudia; Rennhak, Markus; Engelke, Hanna; Reller, Armin; Hilger, Ingrid; Wixforth, Achim; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    In this work we investigate the interaction between endothelial cells and nanoparticles emitted by catalytic converters. Although catalyst-derived particles are recognized as growing burden added to environmental pollution, very little is known about their health impact. We use platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles as model compounds for the actual emitted particles and focus on their fast uptake and association with mitochondria, the cell's powerhouse. Using live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we clearly show that 46 nm platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles can rapidly penetrate cell membranes and reach the cytosol. Moreover, if suitably targeted, these particles are able to selectively attach to mitochondria. These results are complemented by cytotoxicity assays, thus providing insights into the biological effects of these particles on cells. Interestingly, no permanent membrane disruption or any other significant adverse effects on cells were observed. The unusual uptake behavior observed for 46 nm nanoparticles was not observed for equivalent but larger 143 nm and 285 nm platinum-decorated particles. Our results demonstrate a remarkable particle size effect in which particles smaller than ~50-100 nm escape the usual endocytic pathway and translocate directly into the cytosol, while particles larger than ~150 nm are internalized by conventional endocytosis. Since the small particles are able to bypass endocytosis they could be explored as drug and gene delivery vehicles. Platinum-decorated nanoparticles are therefore highly interesting in the fields of nanotoxicology and nanomedicine.In this work we investigate the interaction between endothelial cells and nanoparticles emitted by catalytic converters. Although catalyst-derived particles are recognized as growing burden added to environmental pollution, very little is known about their health impact. We use platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles as model compounds for the actual emitted particles and

  5. A transient increase in lipid peroxidation primes preadipocytes for delayed mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization and ATP depletion during prolonged exposure to fatty acids.

    Rogers, Carlyle; Davis, Barbara; Neufer, P Darrell; Murphy, Michael P; Anderson, Ethan J; Robidoux, Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Preadipocytes are periodically subjected to fatty acid (FA) concentrations that are potentially cytotoxic. We tested the hypothesis that prolonged exposure of preadipocytes of human origin to a physiologically relevant mix of FAs leads to mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM) permeabilization and ultimately to mitochondrial crisis. We found that exposure of preadipocytes to FAs led to progressive cyclosporin A-sensitive MIM permeabilization, which in turn caused a reduction in MIM potential, oxygen consumption, and ATP synthetic capacity and, ultimately, death. Additionally, we showed that FAs induce a transient increase in intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxide production, lasting roughly 30 and 120min for the ROS and lipid peroxides, respectively. MIM permeabilization and its deleterious consequences including mitochondrial crisis and cell death were prevented by treating the cells with the mitochondrial FA uptake inhibitor etomoxir, the mitochondrion-selective superoxide and lipid peroxide antioxidants MitoTempo and MitoQ, or the lipid peroxide and reactive carbonyl scavenger l-carnosine. FAs also promoted a delayed oxidative stress phase. However, the beneficial effects of etomoxir, MitoTempo, and l-carnosine were lost by delaying the treatment by 2h, suggesting that the initial phase was sufficient to prime the cells for the delayed MIM permeabilization and mitochondrial crisis. It also suggested that the second ROS production phase is a consequence of this loss in mitochondrial health. Altogether, our data suggest that approaches designed to diminish intramitochondrial ROS or lipid peroxide accumulation, as well as MIM permeabilization, are valid mechanism-based therapeutic avenues to prevent the loss in preadipocyte metabolic fitness associated with prolonged exposure to elevated FA levels. PMID:24269897

  6. Gene synthesis, bacterial expression, and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies of the rat outer mitochondrial membrane cytochrome b5.

    Rivera, M; Barillas-Mury, C; Christensen, K A; Little, J W; Wells, M A; Walker, F A

    1992-12-01

    The gene coding for the water-soluble domain of the outer mitochondrial membrane cytochrome b5 (OM cytochrome b5) from rat liver has been synthetized and expressed in Escherichia coli. The DNA sequence was obtained by back-translating the known amino acid sequence [Lederer, F., Ghrir, R., Guiard, B., Cortial, S., & Ito, A. (1983) Eur. J. Biochem. 132, 95-102]. The recombinant OM cytochrome b5 was characterized by UV-visible, EPR, and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The UV-visible and EPR spectra of the OM cytochrome b5 are almost identical to the ones obtained from the overexpressed rat microsomal cytochrome b5 [Bodman, S. B. V., Schyler, M. A., Jollie, D. R., & Sligar, S. G. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 9443-9447]. The one-dimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the OM cytochrome b5 indicates that the rhombic perturbation of the ferric center is essentially identical to that in the microsomal beef, rabbit, chicken, and rat cytochromes b5. Two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy (NOESY) and one-dimensional NOE difference spectroscopy were used to assign the contact-shifted resonances that correspond to each of the two isomers that result from the rotation of the heme around its alpha-gamma-meso axis. The assignment of the resonances allowed the determination of the heme orientation ratio in the OM cytochrome b5, which was found to be 1.0 +/- 0.1. It is noteworthy that the two cytochromes b5 that have similar populations of the two heme isomers (large heme disorder) originate from the rat liver. PMID:1333795

  7. Abrin P2 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase activation.

    Yu, Ying; Yang, Runmei; Zhao, Xiuyun; Qin, Dandan; Liu, Zhaoyang; Liu, Fang; Song, Xin; Li, Liqin; Feng, Renqing; Gao, Nannan

    2016-05-01

    To explore the cytotoxic mechanism of abrin P2 on human colon cancer HCT-8 cells, abrin P2 was isolated from the seed of Abrus precatorius L. It was found that abrin P2 exhibited cytotoxicity toward 12 different human cancer cell lines. Our results demonstrated that abrin P2 suppressed the proliferation of human colon cancer cells (HCT-8 cells) and induced cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases. The mechanism by which abrin P2 inhibited cell proliferation was via the down-regulation of cyclin B1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki67, as well as the up-regulation of P21. In addition, abrin P2 induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in the rate of HCT-8 cell apoptosis. Treatment with both Z-VAD-FMK, a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, and abrin P2 demonstrated that abrin P2 induced HCT-8 cell apoptosis via the activation of caspases. Together, our results revealed that abrin P2-induced apoptosis in HCT-8 cells was associated with the activation of caspases-3/-8/-9, the reduction in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and the increase in cytochrome c release. We further showed that abrin P2 administration effectively suppressed the growth of colon cancer xenografts in nude mice. This is the first report that abrin P2 effectively inhibits colon cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro by suppressing proliferation and inducing apoptosis. PMID:27055473

  8. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions. PMID:27404273

  9. The assembly of mitochondrial complex I : a product of nuclear-mitochondrial synergy

    Vogel, Rutger Oscar

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential to cellular energy production. Embedded in the mitochondrial inner membrane, the engine of the mitochondrial powerhouse is formed by the five enzymatic complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Dysfunction of this system results in mitochondrial disease,

  10. Cytological evidence that the C-terminus of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I is on the cytosolic face of the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    van der Leij, F R; Kram, A M; Bartelds, B; Roelofsen, H; Smid, G B; Takens, J; Zammit, V A; Kuipers, J R

    1999-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) is a key enzyme in the regulation of beta-oxidation. The topology of this enzyme has been difficult to elucidate by biochemical methods. We studied the topology of a fusion protein of muscle-type CPT I (M-CPT I) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) by microscopical means. To validate the use of the fusion protein, designated CPT I-GFP, we checked whether the main characteristics of native CPT I were retained. CPT I-GFP was expressed in HeLa cells after stable transfection. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in living cells revealed an extranuclear punctate distribution of CPT I-GFP, which coincided with a mitochondrial fluorescent marker. Immunogold electron microscopy localized CPT I-GFP almost exclusively to the mitochondrial periphery and showed that the C-terminus of CPT I must be on the cytosolic face of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Western analysis showed a protein that was 6 kDa smaller than predicted, which is consistent with previous results for the native M-CPT I. Mitochondria from CPT I-GFP-expressing cells showed an increased CPT activity that was inhibited by malonyl-CoA and was lost on solubilization with Triton X-100. We conclude that CPT I-GFP adopts the same topology as native CPT I and that its C-terminus is located on the cytosolic face of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The evidence supports a recently proposed model for the domain structure of CPT I based on biochemical evidence. PMID:10417344

  11. Overexpression of human SOD1 in VDAC1-less yeast restores mitochondrial functionality modulating beta-barrel outer membrane protein genes.

    Magrì, Andrea; Di Rosa, Maria Carmela; Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Guarino, Francesca; Reina, Simona; Messina, Angela; De Pinto, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1), the most important antioxidant defense against ROS in eukaryotic cells, localizes in cytosol and intermembrane space of mitochondria (IMS). Several evidences show a SOD1 intersection with both fermentative and respiratory metabolism. The Voltage Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC) is the main pore-forming protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM), and is considered the gatekeeper of mitochondrial metabolism. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking VDAC1 (Δpor1) is a very convenient model system, since it shows an impaired growth rate on non-fermentable carbon source. Transformation of Δpor1 yeast with human SOD1 completely restores the cell growth deficit in non-fermentative conditions and re-establishes the physiological levels of ROS, as well as the mitochondrial membrane potential. No similar result was found upon yeast SOD1 overexpression. A previous report highlighted the action of SOD1 as a transcription factor. Quantitative Real-Time PCR showed that β-barrel outer-membrane encoding-genes por2, tom40, sam50 are induced by hSOD1, but the same effect was not obtained in Δpor1Δpor2 yeast, indicating a crucial function for yVDAC2. Since the lack of VDAC1 in yeast can be considered a stress factor for the cell, hSOD1 could relieve it stimulating the expression of genes bringing to the recovery of the MOM function. Our results suggest a direct influence of SOD1 on VDAC. PMID:26947057

  12. Methyl glycol, methanol and DMSO effects on post-thaw motility, velocities, membrane integrity and mitochondrial function of Brycon orbignyanus and Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes) sperm.

    Viveiros, Ana T M; Nascimento, Ariane F; Leal, Marcelo C; Gonçalves, Antônio C S; Orfão, Laura H; Cosson, Jacky

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to use more accurate techniques to investigate the effects of cryoprotectants (CPAs) and extenders on post-thaw sperm quality of Brycon orbignyanus and Prochilodus lineatus. Six freezing media comprising the combination of three CPAs (DMSO, methanol and methyl glycol) and two extenders (BTS and glucose) were used. Sperm was diluted in each medium, loaded into 0.5-mL straws, frozen in a nitrogen vapor vessel (dry-shipper), and stored in liquid nitrogen at -196 °C. Post-thaw sperm motility rate and velocities (curvilinear = VCL; straight line = VSL; average path = VAP) were evaluated using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. Membrane integrity and mitochondrial function were determined using fluorochromes. Post-thaw quality was considered high when samples presented the following minimum values: 60 % motile sperm, 140 µm/s of VCL, 50 % intact sperm membrane and 50 % mitochondrial function integrity. High post-thaw quality was observed in B. orbignyanus sperm frozen in BTS-methyl glycol and in P. lineatus sperm frozen in BTS-methyl glycol, glucose-methyl glycol and glucose-methanol. All samples frozen in DMSO yielded low quality. The presence of ions in the BTS extender affected post-thaw sperm quality positively in B. orbignyanus and negatively in P. lineatus. Methyl glycol was the most suitable CPA for both fish species, leading to a good protection of cell membrane, mitochondrial function and motility apparatus during the cryopreservation process. For an improved protection, B. orbignyanus sperm should be frozen in an ionic freezing medium. PMID:25433690

  13. Levetiracetam differentially alters CD95 expression of neuronal cells and the mitochondrial membrane potential of immune and neuronal cells in vitro

    LeeAShapiro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological seizure disorder that affects over 100 million people worldwide. Levetiracetam, either alone, as monotherapy, or as adjunctive treatment, is widely used to control certain types of seizures. Despite its increasing popularity as a relatively safe and effective anti-convulsive treatment option, its mechanism(s of action are poorly understood. Studies have suggested neuronal, glial, and immune mechanisms of action. Understanding the precise mechanisms of action of Levetiracetam would be extremely beneficial in helping to understand the processes involved in seizure generation and epilepsy. Moreover, a full understanding of these mechanisms would help to create more efficacious treatments while minimizing side effects. The current study examined the effects of Levetiracetam on the mitochondrial membrane potential of neuronal and non-neuronal cells, in vitro, in order to determine if Levetiracetam influences metabolic processes in these cell types. In addition, this study sought to address possible immune-mediated mechanisms by determining if Levetiracetam alters the expression of immune receptor-ligand pairs. The results show that Levetiracetam induces expression of CD95 and CD178 on NGF-treated C17.2 neuronal cells. The results also show that Levetiracetam increases mitochondrial membrane potential on C17.2 neuronal cells in the presence of nerve growth factor. In contrast, Levetiracetam decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential of splenocytes and this effect was dependent on intact invariant chain, thus implicating immune cell interactions. These results suggest that both neuronal and non-neuronal anti-epileptic activities of Levetiracetam involve control over energy metabolism, more specifically, mΔΨ. Future studies are needed to further investigate this potential mechanism of action.

  14. Cholate extracts of mitochondrial outer membranes increase inhibition by malonyl-CoA of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I by a mechanism involving phospholipids.

    Mynatt, R L; Greenhaw, J J; Cook, G A

    1994-01-01

    It has been reported that sodium cholate can separate the catalytic component of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I (CPT-I) from a putative malonyl-CoA-binding regulatory protein capable of conferring sensitivity to malonyl-CoA on CPT-II. We found that cholate preferentially extracted a contaminating malonyl-CoA-sensitive CPT from mitochondrial inner membranes. When cholate extracts of outer membranes were incubated either with cholate extracts of inner membranes or with osmotically swollen mitochondria, inhibition of CPT by malonyl-CoA was increased. Treatment of intact mitochondria with subtilisin abolished the increased inhibition by malonyl-CoA, suggesting that the outer-membrane CPT-I was responsible for the increased inhibition. Incubation of cholate extracts with proteinase K did not prevent the increased inhibition. Fractionation of the cholate extract indicated the presence of phospholipids. Addition of cardiolipin or phosphatidylglycerol to osmotically swollen mitochondria increased sensitivity of CPT to malonyl-CoA, but several other phospholipids did not. When cardiolipin was added to intact mitochondria from either starved or fed rats, there were large increases in inhibition by malonyl-CoA; sensitivity in mitochondria from starved rats increased to that normally observed with mitochondria from fed rats. These results suggest that phospholipids are responsible for the increased inhibition of CPT by malonyl-CoA with added cholate extracts and that changes in membrane composition may be involved in the physiological regulation of CPT-I. PMID:8192665

  15. HBCDD-induced sustained reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and steroidogenesis in peripubertal rat Leydig cells

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), a brominated flame retardant added to various consumer products, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. We have previously shown that 6-hour exposure to HBCDD disturbs basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cAMP production was also observed. Here, we further expanded research on the effect of HBCDD on Leydig cells by using a prolonged exposure scenario. Cells were incubated in the presence of HBCDD during 24 h and then treated with HBCDD + hCG for additional 2 h. Results showed that HBCDD caused a sustained reduction in ATP level after 24 h of exposure, which persisted after additional 2-hour treatment with HBCDD + hCG. cAMP and androgen accumulations measured after 2 h of HBCDD + hCG treatment were also inhibited. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant inhibition in the expression of genes for steroidogenic enzymes, luteinizing hormone receptor, regulatory and transport proteins, and several transcription factors under both treatment conditions. Western blot analysis revealed a decreased level of 30 kDa steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) after HBCDD + hCG treatment. In addition, HBCDD decreased the conversion of 22-OH cholesterol to pregnenolone and androstenedione to testosterone, indicating loss of the activity of cytochrome P450C11A1 (CYP11A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17β). Cell survival was not affected, as confirmed by cytotoxicity and trypan blue tests or DNA fragmentation analysis. In summary, our data showed that HBCDD inhibits ATP supply, most likely through a decrease in ΔΨm, and targets multiple sites in the steroidogenic pathway in Leydig cells. - Highlights: • HBCDD causes a sustained reduction in ΔΨm and ATP level in Leydig cells. • Prolonged HBCDD exposure decreases hCG-supported steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. • HBCDD targets StAR, HSD17β and CYP11A1 in Leydig

  16. HBCDD-induced sustained reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and steroidogenesis in peripubertal rat Leydig cells

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Hrubik, Jelena; Glisic, Branka; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa, E-mail: nebojsa.andric@dbe.uns.ac.rs

    2015-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), a brominated flame retardant added to various consumer products, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. We have previously shown that 6-hour exposure to HBCDD disturbs basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cAMP production was also observed. Here, we further expanded research on the effect of HBCDD on Leydig cells by using a prolonged exposure scenario. Cells were incubated in the presence of HBCDD during 24 h and then treated with HBCDD + hCG for additional 2 h. Results showed that HBCDD caused a sustained reduction in ATP level after 24 h of exposure, which persisted after additional 2-hour treatment with HBCDD + hCG. cAMP and androgen accumulations measured after 2 h of HBCDD + hCG treatment were also inhibited. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant inhibition in the expression of genes for steroidogenic enzymes, luteinizing hormone receptor, regulatory and transport proteins, and several transcription factors under both treatment conditions. Western blot analysis revealed a decreased level of 30 kDa steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) after HBCDD + hCG treatment. In addition, HBCDD decreased the conversion of 22-OH cholesterol to pregnenolone and androstenedione to testosterone, indicating loss of the activity of cytochrome P450C11A1 (CYP11A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17β). Cell survival was not affected, as confirmed by cytotoxicity and trypan blue tests or DNA fragmentation analysis. In summary, our data showed that HBCDD inhibits ATP supply, most likely through a decrease in ΔΨm, and targets multiple sites in the steroidogenic pathway in Leydig cells. - Highlights: • HBCDD causes a sustained reduction in ΔΨm and ATP level in Leydig cells. • Prolonged HBCDD exposure decreases hCG-supported steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. • HBCDD targets StAR, HSD17β and CYP11A1 in Leydig

  17. Membraner

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  18. Kaempferol ameliorates aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) induced hepatocellular carcinoma through modifying metabolizing enzymes, membrane bound ATPases and mitochondrial TCA cycle enzymes

    Kulanthaivel Langeswaran; Rajendran Revathy; Subbaraj Gowtham Kumar; Shanmugam Vijayaprakash

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed to scrutinize the anticancer consequence of kaempferol against aflatoxin B1 induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Epidemiological studies of the incidence of liver cancer in the population, where dietary aflatoxin exposure is high, have provided much circumstantial evidence for the development of aflatoxin B1 induced primary liver cancer in humans. Methods:In the present investigation, aflatoxin B1 (2 mg/kg body weight i.p) was used as a hepatocarcinogen to induce hepatocellular carcinoma in experimental animals. Results: In the present analysis, on treatment with bioflavonoid kaempferol (100 mg/kg body weight p.o) the nucleic acids levels were brought back to normal and also the altered levels of biological enzymes such as membrane bound ATPase, carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial TCA cycle enzymes levels (P<0.01).Conclusions:Membrane bound ATPase, carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial TCA cycle enzymes were modulated by kaempferol evaluated on aflatoxin B1 induced primary liver carcinogenesis.

  19. Detection of phosphorylated subunits by combined LA-ICP-MS and MALDI-FTICR-MS analysis in yeast mitochondrial membrane complexes separated by blue native/SDS-PAGE

    Krause-Buchholz, Udo; Becker, J. Susanne; Zoriy, Miroslav; Pickhardt, Carola; Przybylski, Michael; Rödel, Gerhard; Becker, J. Sabine

    2006-01-01

    We report on the identification of phosphorylated subunits of yeast mitochondrial ATPase using a novel screening technique in combination with BN/SDS-PAGE. Protein complexes present in yeast mitochondrial membranes were separated in their native state in the first dimension and their subunit composition was resolved by SDS-PAGE in the second dimension. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to rapidly screen for the presence of phosphorus in the subunits. The detection limits of elements investigated in selected protein spots are in the low [mu]g g-1 concentration range. Sulfur was used as the internal standard element for quantification. Phosphorus was detected in two of the proteins, that were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICR-MS) as subunits Atp1p and Atp2p of the ATPase. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis using antibodies directed against phosphorylated amino acids. The combination of LA-ICP-MS and MALDI-FTICR-MS with BN/SDS-PAGE provides a fast and sensitive tool for structure analysis of phosphorus and metal-containing subunits of membrane protein complexes.

  20. Two Trichothecene Mycotoxins from Myrothecium roridum Induce Apoptosis of HepG-2 Cells via Caspase Activation and Disruption of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential.

    Ye, Wei; Chen, Yuchan; Li, Haohua; Zhang, Weimin; Liu, Hongxin; Sun, Zhanghua; Liu, Taomei; Li, Saini

    2016-01-01

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are a type of sesquiterpenoid produced by various kinds of plantpathogenic fungi. In this study, two trichothecene toxins, namely, a novel cytotoxic epiroridin acid and a known trichothecene, mytoxin B, were isolated from the endophytic fungus Myrothecium roridum derived from the medicinal plant Pogostemon cablin. The two trichothecene mytoxins were confirmed to induce the apoptosis of HepG-2 cells by cytomorphology inspection, DNA fragmentation detection, and flow cytometry assay. The cytotoxic mechanisms of the two mycotoxins were investigated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and detection of mitochondrial membrane potential. The results showed that the two trichothecene mycotoxins induced the apoptosis of cancer cell HepG-2 via activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, up-regulation of bax gene expression, down-regulation of bcl-2 gene expression, and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential of the HepG-2 cell. This study is the first to report on the cytotoxic mechanism of trichothecene mycotoxins from M. roridum. This study provides new clues for the development of attenuated trichothecene toxins in future treatment of liver cancer. PMID:27322225

  1. Phenethyl isothiocyanate-induced apoptosis in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells is mediated by reactive oxygen species-dependent disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Xiao, Dong; Lew, Karen L; Zeng, Yan; Xiao, Hui; Marynowski, Stanley W; Dhir, Rajiv; Singh, Shivendra V

    2006-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to gain insights into the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induction by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), which is a cancer chemopreventive constituent of cruciferous vegetables, using PC-3 human prostate cancer cells as a model. The PEITC-induced cell death in PC-3 cells was associated with disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria to the cytosol and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which were blocked in the presence of a combined mimetic of superoxide dismutase and catalase (Euk134). Ectopic expression of Bcl-xL, whose protein level is reduced markedly on treatment of PC-3 cells with PEITC, conferred partial protection against PEITC-induced apoptosis only at higher drug concentrations (>10 microM). Administration of 12 micromol PEITC/day (Monday through Friday) by oral gavage significantly retarded growth of PC-3 xenografts in athymic mice. For instance, 31 days after the initiation of PEITC administration, the average tumor volume in control mice (721 +/- 153 mm3) was approximately 2-fold higher compared with mice receiving 12 micromol PEITC/day. The PEITC-mediated inhibition of PC-3 xenograft growth was associated with induction of Bax and Bid proteins. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the PEITC-induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells is mediated by ROS-dependent disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential and regulated by Bax and Bid. PMID:16774948

  2. Imaging cytoskeleton--mitochondrial membrane attachments by embedment-free electron microscopy of saponin-extracted cells.

    Lin, A; Krockmalnic, G; Penman, S

    1990-01-01

    Embedment-free electron microscopy images the cytoskeleton and nuclear matrix, which are very difficult to visualize in conventional electron micrographs. However, to be effective, cell structures must be depleted of soluble proteins, which otherwise shroud cell architecture. Nonionic detergents effect this extraction, releasing soluble proteins but also destroying all membranes. Saponin can permeabilize plasma membranes, releasing soluble proteins while preserving many cytoplasmic membranes....

  3. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy.

    Vincent, Amy E; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  4. The role of nitric oxide signaling in food intake; insights from the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2 mutant mice

    Changjie Han; Qingguo Zhao; Baisong Lu

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in feeding control through involvement in brain lipid sensing, and regulating NPY/AgRP and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Nitric oxide is a signaling molecule in neurons and it stimulates feeding in many species. Whether reactive oxygen species affect feeding through interaction with nitric oxide is unclear. We previously reported that Immp2l mutation in mice causes excessive mitochondrial super...

  5. Effect of surface-potential modulators on the opening of lipid pores in liposomal and mitochondrial inner membranes induced by palmitate and calcium ions.

    Belosludtsev, Konstantin N; Belosludtseva, Natalia V; Agafonov, Alexey V; Penkov, Nikita V; Samartsev, Victor N; Lemasters, John J; Mironova, Galina D

    2015-10-01

    The effect of surface-potential modulators on palmitate/Ca2+-induced formation of lipid pores was studied in liposomal and inner mitochondrial membranes. Pore formation was monitored by sulforhodamine B release from liposomes and swelling of mitochondria. ζ-potential in liposomes was determined from electrophoretic mobility. Replacement of sucrose as the osmotic agent with KCl decreased negative ζ-potential in liposomes and increased resistance of both mitochondria and liposomes to the pore inducers, palmitic acid, and Ca2+. Micromolar Mg2+ also inhibited palmitate/Ca2+-induced permeabilization of liposomes. The rate of palmitate/Ca2+-induced, cyclosporin A-insensitive swelling of mitochondria increased 22% upon increasing pH from 7.0 to 7.8. At below the critical micelle concentration, the cationic detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (10 μM) and the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (10-50 μM) made the ζ-potential less and more negative, respectively, and inhibited and stimulated opening of mitochondrial palmitate/Ca2+-induced lipid pores. Taken together, the findings indicate that surface potential regulates palmitate/Ca2+-induced lipid pore opening. PMID:26014488

  6. Fluctuating vs. continuous exposure to H₂O₂: the effects on mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular calcium, and NF-κB in astroglia.

    Aleksandar Bajić

    Full Text Available The effects of H2O2 are widely studied in cell cultures and other in vitro systems. However, such investigations are performed with the assumption that H2O2 concentration is constant, which may not properly reflect in vivo settings, particularly in redox-turbulent microenvironments such as mitochondria. Here we introduced and tested a novel concept of fluctuating oxidative stress. We treated C6 astroglial cells and primary astrocytes with H2O2, using three regimes of exposure - continuous, as well as fluctuating at low or high rate, and evaluated mitochondrial membrane potential and other parameters of mitochondrial activity - respiration, reducing capacity, and superoxide production, as well as intracellular ATP, intracellular calcium, and NF-κB activation. When compared to continuous exposure, fluctuating H2O2 induced a pronounced hyperpolarization in mitochondria, whereas the activity of electron transport chain appears not to be significantly affected. H2O2 provoked a decrease of ATP level and an increase of intracellular calcium concentration, independently of the regime of treatment. However, fluctuating H2O2 induced a specific pattern of large-amplitude fluctuations of calcium concentration. An impact on NF-κB activation was observed for high rate fluctuations, whereas continuous and low rate fluctuating oxidative stress did not provoke significant effects. Presented results outline the (pathophysiological relevance of redox fluctuations.

  7. Mucuna pruriens and its major constituent L-DOPA recover spermatogenic loss by combating ROS, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis.

    Akhand Pratap Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ayurvedic medicinal system claims Mucuna pruriens (MP to possess pro-male fertility, aphrodisiac and adaptogenic properties. Some scientific evidence also supports its pro-male fertility properties; however, the mechanism of its action is not yet clear. The present study aimed at demonstrating spermatogenic restorative efficacy of MP and its major constituent L-DOPA (LD, and finding the possible mechanism of action thereof in a rat model. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Ethinyl estradiol (EE was administered at a rate of 3 mg/kg body weight (BW/day for a period of 14 days to generate a rat model with compromised spermatogenesis. MP and LD were administered in two separate groups of these animals starting 15(th day for a period of 56 days, and the results were compared with an auto-recovery (AR group. Sperm count and motility, testis histo-architecture, level of reactive oxygen species (ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, apoptosis, peripheral hormone levels and testicular germ cell populations were analysed, in all experimental groups. We observed efficient and quick recovery of spermatogenesis in MP and LD groups in comparison to the auto-recovery group. The treatment regulated ROS level, apoptosis, and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, recovered the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the number of testicular germ cells, ultimately leading to increased sperm count and motility. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: M. pruriens efficiently recovers the spermatogenic loss induced due to EE administration. The recovery is mediated by reduction in ROS level, restoration of MMP, regulation of apoptosis and eventual increase in the number of germ cells and regulation of apoptosis. The present study simplified the complexity of mechanism involved and provided meaningful insights into MP/LD mediated correction of spermatogenic impairment caused by estrogens exposure. This is the first study demonstrating that L-DOPA largely accounts for pro

  8. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology. PMID:25425472

  9. A cyclopalladated complex interacts with mitochondrial membrane thiol-groups and induces the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine and cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells

    Systemic therapy for cancer metastatic lesions is difficult and generally renders a poor clinical response. Structural analogs of cisplatin, the most widely used synthetic metal complexes, show toxic side-effects and tumor cell resistance. Recently, palladium complexes with increased stability are being investigated to circumvent these limitations, and a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd2 [S(-)C2, N-dmpa]2 (μ-dppe)Cl2} named C7a efficiently controls the subcutaneous development of B16F10-Nex2 murine melanoma in syngeneic mice. Presently, we investigated the melanoma cell killing mechanism induced by C7a, and extended preclinical studies. B16F10-Nex2 cells were treated in vitro with C7a in the presence/absence of DTT, and several parameters related to apoptosis induction were evaluated. Preclinical studies were performed, and mice were endovenously inoculated with B16F10-Nex2 cells, intraperitoneally treated with C7a, and lung metastatic nodules were counted. The cytotoxic effects and the respiratory metabolism were also determined in human tumor cell lines treated in vitro with C7a. Cyclopalladated complex interacts with thiol groups on the mitochondrial membrane proteins, causes dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induces Bax translocation from the cytosol to mitochondria, colocalizing with a mitochondrial tracker. C7a also induced an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, mainly from intracellular compartments, and a significant decrease in the ATP levels. Activation of effector caspases, chromatin condensation and DNA degradation, suggested that C7a activates the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine melanoma cells. In the preclinical studies, the C7a complex protected against murine metastatic melanoma and induced death in several human tumor cell lineages in vitro, including cisplatin-resistant ones. The mitochondria-dependent cell death was also induced by C7a in human tumor cells. The cyclopalladated C7a complex is an

  10. Functional Diversity of Human Mitochondrial J-proteins Is Independent of Their Association with the Inner Membrane Presequence Translocase.

    Sinha, Devanjan; Srivastava, Shubhi; D'Silva, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    Mitochondrial J-proteins play a critical role in governing Hsp70 activity and, hence, are essential for organellar protein translocation and folding. In contrast to yeast, which has a single J-protein Pam18, humans involve two J-proteins, DnaJC15 and DnaJC19, associated with contrasting cellular phenotype, to transport proteins into the mitochondria. Mutation in DnaJC19 results in dilated cardiomyopathy and ataxia syndrome, whereas expression of DnaJC15 regulates the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy. In the present study we have comparatively assessed the biochemical properties of the J-protein paralogs in relation to their association with the import channel. Both DnaJC15 and DnaJC19 formed two distinct subcomplexes with Magmas at the import channel. Knockdown analysis suggested an essential role for Magmas and DnaJC19 in organellar protein translocation and mitochondria biogenesis, whereas DnaJC15 had dispensable supportive function. The J-proteins were found to have equal affinity for Magmas and could stimulate mitochondrial Hsp70 ATPase activity by equivalent levels. Interestingly, we observed that DnaJC15 exhibits bifunctional properties. At the translocation channel, it involves conserved interactions and mechanism to translocate the precursors into mitochondria. In addition to protein transport, DnaJC15 also showed a dual role in yeast where its expression elicited enhanced sensitivity of cells to cisplatin that required the presence of a functional J-domain. The amount of DnaJC15 expressed in the cell was directly proportional to the sensitivity of cells. Our analysis indicates that the differential cellular phenotype displayed by human mitochondrial J-proteins is independent of their activity and association with Magmas at the translocation channel. PMID:27330077

  11. Inhibition of N-Methyl-D-aspartate-induced Retinal Neuronal Death by Polyarginine Peptides Is Linked to the Attenuation of Stress-induced Hyperpolarization of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Potential.

    Marshall, John; Wong, Kwoon Y; Rupasinghe, Chamila N; Tiwari, Rakesh; Zhao, Xiwu; Berberoglu, Eren D; Sinkler, Christopher; Liu, Jenney; Lee, Icksoo; Parang, Keykavous; Spaller, Mark R; Hüttemann, Maik; Goebel, Dennis J

    2015-09-01

    It is widely accepted that overactivation of NMDA receptors, resulting in calcium overload and consequent mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal ganglion neurons, plays a significant role in promoting neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma. Calcium has been shown to initiate a transient hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential triggering a burst of reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis. Strategies that enhance cell survival signaling pathways aimed at preventing this adverse hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential may provide a novel therapeutic intervention in retinal disease. In the retina, brain-derived neurotrophic factor has been shown to be neuroprotective, and our group previously reported a PSD-95/PDZ-binding cyclic peptide (CN2097) that augments brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced pro-survival signaling. Here, we examined the neuroprotective properties of CN2097 using an established retinal in vivo NMDA toxicity model. CN2097 completely attenuated NMDA-induced caspase 3-dependent and -independent cell death and PARP-1 activation pathways, blocked necrosis, and fully prevented the loss of long term ganglion cell viability. Although neuroprotection was partially dependent upon CN2097 binding to the PDZ domain of PSD-95, our results show that the polyarginine-rich transport moiety C-R(7), linked to the PDZ-PSD-95-binding cyclic peptide, was sufficient to mediate short and long term protection via a mitochondrial targeting mechanism. C-R(7) localized to mitochondria and was found to reduce mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, and the generation of reactive oxygen species, promoting survival of retinal neurons. PMID:26100636

  12. The tRNA(Gly) T10003C mutation in mitochondrial haplogroup M11b in a Chinese family with diabetes decreases the steady-state level of tRNA(Gly), increases aberrant reactive oxygen species production, and reduces mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Li, Wei; Wen, Chaowei; Li, Weixing; Wang, Hailing; Guan, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wanlin; Ye, Wei; Lu, Jianxin

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial diabetes originates mainly from mutations located in maternally transmitted, mitochondrial tRNA-coding genes. In a genetic screening program of type 2 diabetes conducted with a Chinese Han population, we found one family with suggestive maternally transmitted diabetes. The proband's mitochondrial genome was analyzed using DNA sequencing. Total 42 known nucleoside changes and 1 novel variant were identified, and the entire mitochondrial DNA sequence was assigned to haplogroup M11b. Phylogenetic analysis showed that a homoplasmic mutation, 10003T>C transition, occurred at the highly conserved site in the gene encoding tRNA(Gly). Using a transmitochondrial cybrid cell line harboring this mutation, we observed that the steady-state level of tRNA(Gly) significantly affected and the amount of tRNA(Gly) decreased by 97%, production of reactive oxygen species was enhanced, and mitochondrial membrane potential, mtDNA copy number and cellular oxygen consumption rate were remarkably decreased compared with wild-type cybrid cells. The homoplasmic 10003T>C mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Gly) gene suggested to be as a pathogenesis-related mutation which might contribute to the maternal inherited diabetes in the Han Chinese family. PMID:26134044

  13. The role of nitric oxide signaling in food intake; insights from the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2 mutant mice

    Changjie Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in feeding control through involvement in brain lipid sensing, and regulating NPY/AgRP and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Nitric oxide is a signaling molecule in neurons and it stimulates feeding in many species. Whether reactive oxygen species affect feeding through interaction with nitric oxide is unclear. We previously reported that Immp2l mutation in mice causes excessive mitochondrial superoxide generation, which causes infertility and early signs of aging. In our present study, reduced food intake in mutant mice resulted in significantly reduced body weight and fat composition while energy expenditure remained unchanged. Lysate from mutant brain showed a significant decrease in cGMP levels, suggesting insufficient nitric oxide signaling. Thus, our data suggests that reactive oxygen species may regulate food intake through modulating the bioavailability of nitric oxide.

  14. Flux control exerted by mitochondrial outer membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase over beta-oxidation, ketogenesis and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in hepatocytes isolated from rats in different metabolic states.

    Drynan, L; Quant, P A; Zammit, V A

    1996-01-01

    The Flux Control Coefficients of mitochondrial outer membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I) with respect to the overall rates of beta-oxidation, ketogenesis and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity were measured in hepatocytes isolated from rats in different metabolic states (fed, 24 h-starved, starved-refed and starved/insulin-treated). These conditions were chosen because there is controversy as to whether, when significant control ceases to be exerted by CPT I over the rate of fatty oxidation [Moir and Zammit (1994) Trends Biochem. Sci. 19, 313-317], this is transferred to one or more steps proximal to acylcarnitine synthesis (e.g. decreased delivery of fatty acids to the liver) or to the reaction catalysed by mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA synthase [Hegardt (1995) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 23, 486-490]. Therefore isolated hepatocytes were used in the present study to exclude the involvement of changes in the rate of delivery of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) to the liver, such as occur in vivo, and to ascertain whether, under conditions of constant supply of NEFA, CPT I retains control over the relevant fluxes of fatty acid oxidation to ketones and carbon dioxide, or whether control is transferred to another (intrahepatocytic) site. The results clearly show that the Flux Control Coefficients of CPT I with respect to overall beta-oxidation and ketogenesis are very high under all conditions investigated, indicating that control is not lost to another intrahepatic site during the metabolic transitions studied. The control of CPT I over tricarboxylic acid cycle activity was always very low. The significance of these findings for the integration of fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism in the liver is discussed. PMID:8760364

  15. Reduced Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Is a Late Adaptation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to Isometamidium Preceded by Mutations in the γ Subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase

    Munday, Jane C.; Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Stelmanis, Valters; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background Isometamidium is the main prophylactic drug used to prevent the infection of livestock with trypanosomes that cause Animal African Trypanosomiasis. As well as the animal infective trypanosome species, livestock can also harbor the closely related human infective subspecies T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Resistance to isometamidium is a growing concern, as is cross-resistance to the diamidine drugs diminazene and pentamidine. Methodology/Principal Findings Two isometamidium resistant Trypanosoma brucei clones were generated (ISMR1 and ISMR15), being 7270- and 16,000-fold resistant to isometamidium, respectively, which retained their ability to grow in vitro and establish an infection in mice. Considerable cross-resistance was shown to ethidium bromide and diminazene, with minor cross-resistance to pentamidine. The mitochondrial membrane potentials of both resistant cell lines were significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The net uptake rate of isometamidium was reduced 2-3-fold but isometamidium efflux was similar in wild-type and resistant lines. Fluorescence microscopy and PCR analysis revealed that ISMR1 and ISMR15 had completely lost their kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and both lines carried a mutation in the nuclearly encoded γ subunit gene of F1 ATPase, truncating the protein by 22 amino acids. The mutation compensated for the loss of the kinetoplast in bloodstream forms, allowing near-normal growth, and conferred considerable resistance to isometamidium and ethidium as well as significant resistance to diminazene and pentamidine, when expressed in wild type trypanosomes. Subsequent exposure to either isometamidium or ethidium led to rapid loss of kDNA and a further increase in isometamidium resistance. Conclusions/Significance Sub-lethal exposure to isometamidium gives rise to viable but highly resistant trypanosomes that, depending on sub-species, are infective to humans and cross-resistant to at least some diamidine drugs. The crucial

  16. Immunohistochemical expression of mitochondrial membrane complexes (MMCs) I, III, IV and V in malignant and benign periampullary epithelium: a potential target for drug therapy of periampullary cancer?

    Mitochondrial membrane complexes (MMCs) are key mediators of cellular oxidative phosphorylation, and inhibiting them could lead to cell death. No published data are available on the relative abundance of MMCs in different periampullary cancers. Therefore, we studied the expression profile of MMCs I, III, IV and V in periampullary cancers, reactive pancreatitis, normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis. This was a retrospective study on tissue microarrays constructed from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from 126 consecutive patients (cancer = 104, chronic pancreatitis = 22) undergoing pancreatic resections between June 2001 and June 2006. 78 specimens of chronic pancreatitis tissue were obtained adjacent to areas of cancer. Normal pancreatic tissue was obtained from the resection specimens in a total of 30 patients. Metastatic tumours in 61 regional lymph nodes from 61 patients were also studied. MMCs I, III, IV and V were highly expressed (p < 0.05) in all primary periampullary cancers compared with metastatic lymph nodes and adjacent benign pancreas. MMCs III, IV and V were highly expressed in all cancers regardless of type compared with chronic pancreatitis (p < 0.05). Higher expression of MMCs I and V was associated with better survival and may, in part, relate to lower expression of these MMCs in poorly differentiated tumours compared with well and moderately differentiated tumours. Differential expression of MMCs III, IV and V in primary periampullary cancers compared with adjacent benign periampullary tissue and chronic pancreatitis is a novel finding, which may render them attractive anticancer targets

  17. Cytotoxic effects induced by interferon-ω gene lipofection through ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in feline mammary carcinoma cells.

    Villaverde, Marcela Solange; Targovnik, Alexandra Marisa; Miranda, María Victoria; Finocchiaro, Liliana María Elena; Glikin, Gerardo Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Progress in comparative oncology promises advances in clinical cancer treatments for both companion animals and humans. In this context, feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) cells have been proposed as a suitable model to study human breast cancer. Based on our previous data about the advantages of using type I interferon gene therapy over the respective recombinant DNA derived protein, the present work explored the effects of feline interferon-ω gene (fIFNω) transfer on FMC cells. Three different cell variants derived from a single spontaneous highly aggressive FMC tumor were successfully established and characterized. Lipofection of the fIFNω gene displayed a significant cytotoxic effect on the three cell variants. The extent of the response was proportional to ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and calcium uptake. Moreover, a lower sensitivity to the treatment correlated with a higher malignant phenotype. Our results suggest that fIFNω lipofection could offer an alternative approach in veterinary oncology with equal or superior outcome and with less adverse effects than recombinant fIFNω therapy. PMID:27236354

  18. Enhanced induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in human U87 malignant glioma cells by aloe emodin.

    Ismail, Samhani; Haris, Khalilah; Abdul Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Johan, Muhammad Farid; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Aloe emodin, one of the active compounds found in Aloe vera leaves, plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and death. It has been reported to promote the anti-cancer effects in various cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism of inducing apoptosis by this agent is poorly understood in glioma cells. This research is to investigate the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest inducing by aloe emodin on U87 human malignant glioma cells. Aloe emodin showed a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of U87 cells proliferation and decreased the percentage of viable U87 cells via the induction of apoptosis. Characteristic morphological changes, such as the formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed with confocal microscope by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, supporting our viability study and flow cytometry analysis results. Our data also demonstrated that aloe emodin arrested the cell cycle in the S phase and promoted the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in U87 cells that indicated the early event of the mitochondria-induced apoptotic pathway. PMID:23869465

  19. Determination of high mitochondrial membrane potential in spermatozoa loaded with the mitochondrial probe 5,5',6,6'tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry.

    A flow cytometric method was developed to identify viable, energized sperm cells with high mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (''m), > 80-100 mV using the mitochondrial probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and the impermeant nuclear ...

  20. Mitochondrial Ion Channels

    O’Rourke, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In work spanning more than a century, mitochondria have been recognized for their multifunctional roles in metabolism, energy transduction, ion transport, inheritance, signaling, and cell death. Foremost among these tasks is the continuous production of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, which requires a large electrochemical driving force for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This process requires a membrane with relatively low permeability to ions to minimize energy dissipation. However, a wealth of evidence now indicates that both selective and nonselective ion channels are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, along with several known channels on the outer membrane. Some of these channels are active under physiological conditions, and others may be activated under pathophysiological conditions to act as the major determinants of cell life and death. This review summarizes research on mitochondrial ion channels and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. Except in a few cases, our understanding of the structure of mitochondrial ion channels is limited, indicating the need for focused discovery in this area. PMID:17059356

  1. Legionella pneumophila Secretes a Mitochondrial Carrier Protein during Infection

    Pavel Dolezal; Margareta Aili; Janette Tong; Jhih-Hang Jiang; Marobbio, Carlo M.T.; Sau Fung Lee; Ralf Schuelein; Simon Belluzzo; Eva Binova; Aurelie Mousnier; Gad Frankel; Giulia Giannuzzi; Ferdinando Palmieri; Kipros Gabriel; Thomas Naderer

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Mitochondrial carrier proteins evolved during endosymbiosis to transport substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. As such the proteins are associated exclusively with eukaryotic organisms. Despite this, we identified putative mitochondrial carrier proteins in the genomes of different intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. We named the mitochondrial carrier protein from L. pneumophila LncP and...

  2. Membrane-surfactant interactions. The role of surfactant in mitochondrial complex III-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles

    Complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase) was purified from beef heart mitochondria in the form of protein-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles (about 1:80:100 molar ratio). Detergent may be totally removed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and the resulting lipoprotein complexes retain full enzyme activity. In order to understand the role of surfactant in the mixed micelles, and the interaction of Triton X-100 with integral membrane proteins and phospholipid bilayers, both the protein-lipid-surfactant mixed micelles and the detergent-free lipoprotein system were examined from the point of view of particle size and ultrastructure, enzyme activity, tryptophan fluorescence quenching, 31P NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NMR and IR spectroscopic studies show that surfactant withdrawal induces a profound change in phospholipid architecture, from a micellar to a lamellar-like phase. However, electron microscopic observations fail to reveal the existence of lipid bilayers in the absence of detergent. We suggest that, under these conditions, the lipid:protein molar ratio (80:1) is too low to permit the formation of lipid bilayer planes, but the relative orientation and mobility of phospholipids with respect to proteins is similar to that of the lamellar phase. Protein conformational changes are also detected as a consequence of surfactant removal. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates an increase of peptide beta-structure in the absence of Triton X-100; changes in the amide II/amide I intensity ratio are also detected, although the precise meaning of these observations is unclear

  3. The mitochondria-independent cytotoxic effect of nelfinavir on leukemia cells can be enhanced by sorafenib-mediated mcl-1 downregulation and mitochondrial membrane destabilization

    Gingelmaier Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nelfinavir is an HIV protease inhibitor that has been used for a long period of time to treat HIV-infected individuals. It has recently emerged that nelfinavir could represent a prospective new anti-cancer drug, prompting us to test the effect of nelfinavir on leukemia cells. Methods By combining in vitro and ex vivo studies, the effect of nelfinavir on leukemia cells and non-malignant, bone marrow-derived tissue cells was analyzed. Results At a concentration of 9 μg/ml, nelfinavir induced death of 90% of HL60, IM9, and Jurkat cells. At the same concentration and treatment conditions, less than 10% of aspirated human bone marrow cells showed nelfinavir-induced cell damage. Nelfinavir-induced death of leukemia cells was accompanied by activation of caspases 3, 7, and 8. Despite caspase activation, the upregulation of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family member protein mcl-1 that resulted from nelfinavir treatment stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in primarily mitochondria-independent cell death. Pharmacological downregulation of mcl-1 expression by treatment with sorafenib (2 μg/ml significantly enhanced nelfinavir-induced apoptosis even at lower nelfinavir concentrations (5 μg/ml, but did not have additional detrimental effects on non-malignant bone marrow cells. Conclusions The ability of nelfinavir to induce apoptosis in leukemia cells as a single agent in a mitochondria-independent manner might suggest it could be used as a second or third line of treatment for leukemia patients for whom standard mitochondria-directed treatment strategies have failed. Combination treatment with nelfinavir and sorafenib might further enhance the efficacy of nelfinavir even on chemo-resistant leukemia cells.

  4. Mitochondrial haplogroups

    Benn, Marianne; Schwartz, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2008-01-01

    Rare mutations in the mitochondrial genome may cause disease. Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. We tested the hypothesis that common haplogroups predict risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other...

  5. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  6. Hsp90 inhibition decreases mitochondrial protein turnover.

    Daciana H Margineantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells treated with hsp90 inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic changes, including an expansion of the mitochondrial compartment, accompanied by mitochondrial fragmentation and condensed mitochondrial morphology, with ultimate compromise of mitochondrial integrity and apoptosis. FINDINGS: We identified several mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits, including several encoded by mtDNA, that are upregulated by hsp90 inhibitors, without corresponding changes in mRNA abundance. Post-transcriptional accumulation of mitochondrial proteins observed with hsp90 inhibitors is also seen in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Detailed studies of the OSCP subunit of mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase revealed the presence of mono- and polyubiquitinated OSCP in mitochondrial fractions. We demonstrate that processed OSCP undergoes retrotranslocation to a trypsin-sensitive form associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. Inhibition of proteasome or hsp90 function results in accumulation of both correctly targeted and retrotranslocated mitochondrial OSCP. CONCLUSIONS: Cytosolic turnover of mitochondrial proteins demonstrates a novel connection between mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Analogous to defective protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a mitochondrial unfolded protein response may play a role in the apoptotic effects of hsp90 and proteasome inhibitors.

  7. Cancer: Mitochondrial Origins

    Stefano, George B.; Kream, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The primacy of glucose derived from photosynthesis as an existential source of chemical energy across plant and animal phyla is universally accepted as a core principle in the biological sciences. In mammalian cells, initial processing of glucose to triose phosphate intermediates takes place within the cytosolic glycolytic pathway and terminates with temporal transport of reducing equivalents derived from pyruvate metabolism by membrane-associated respiratory complexes in the mitochondrial ma...

  8. Disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential during apoptosis induced by PSC 833 and CsA in multidrug-resistant lymphoid leukemia

    Previous findings from our laboratory demonstrated that when used at low concentration (0.1 μg ml-1), CsA as well as its analog PSC 833 were able to revert the MDR phenotype, while at high concentration (1 μg ml-1) were able to induce apoptosis. CsA induced apoptosis in leukemia cell lines sensitive (LBR-) and resistant to vincristine (LBR-V160), and doxorubicin (LBR-D160), while PSC 833 only induced apoptosis in vincristine-resistant cell line (LBR-V160). In this work, we investigated mitochondrial-associated mechanisms during CsA- and PSC 833-induced apoptosis. Mitochondrial function was evaluated by recording changes in its transmembrane potential, cytochrome c release, and caspase activation cascade. Results showed that CsA- and PSC 833-induced apoptosis was associated with mitochondrial depolarization, through potentiometric measurements with JC-1 and DiOC6 probes. Collapse of mitochondrial potential in these cell lines after CsA treatment was followed by cytochrome c release to the cytosol, reaching an increase of 2.61-fold in LBR-, 1.98-fold in LBR-V160, and 3.01-fold in the case of LBR-D160. However, in the case of PSC 833 treatment, induction of apoptosis in LBR-V160 was associated with mitochondrial depolarization followed by a lower cytochrome c release of 1.15-fold as compared with untreated cells. Caspase 3 activation was clearly observed in LBR-, LBR-V160, and LBR-D160 after CsA treatment, while in LBR-V160, PSC 833 was less effective inducing activation of this caspase. Neither caspase 6 nor 8 activity was observed in these three cell lines. Our results suggest that during CsA- and PSC 833-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction occurs. This is mediated through mitochondrial events, associated with an evident decrease in ΔΨm, cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation

  9. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    ... NINDS supports research focused on effective treatments and cures for mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases. Scientists are investigating the possible benefits of exercise programs and nutritional supplements, primarily natural and synthetic versions of CoQ10. While CoQ10 has ...

  10. Mitochondrial cytopathies.

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Most of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear DNA (nDNA) whereas a very small fraction is encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes can result in mitochondrial dysfunction which leads to a wide range of cellular perturbations including aberrant calcium homeostasis, excessive reactive oxygen species production, dysregulated apoptosis, and insufficient energy generation to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy demand. Impaired mitochondrial function in various tissues and organs results in the multi-organ manifestations of mitochondrial diseases including epilepsy, intellectual disability, skeletal and cardiac myopathies, hepatopathies, endocrinopathies, and nephropathies. Defects in nDNA genes can be inherited in an autosomal or X-linked manners, whereas, mtDNA is maternally inherited. Mitochondrial diseases can result from mutations of nDNA genes encoding subunits of the electron transport chain complexes or their assembly factors, proteins associated with the mitochondrial import or networking, mitochondrial translation factors, or proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance. MtDNA defects can be either point mutations or rearrangements. The diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders can be challenging in many cases and is based on clinical recognition, biochemical screening, histopathological studies, functional studies, and molecular genetic testing. Currently, there are no satisfactory therapies available for mitochondrial disorders that significantly alter the course of the disease. Therapeutic options include symptomatic treatment, cofactor supplementation, and exercise. PMID:26996063

  11. Novel super-resolution capable mitochondrial probe, MitoRed AIE, enables assessment of real-time molecular mitochondrial dynamics

    Lo, Camden Yeung-Wah; Chen, Sijie; Creed, Sarah Jayne; Kang, Miaomiao; Zhao, Na; Tang, Ben Zhong; Elgass, Kirstin Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria and mitochondrial dynamics play vital roles in health and disease. With the intricate nanometer-scale structure and rapid dynamics of mitochondria, super-resolution microscopy techniques possess great un-tapped potential to significantly contribute to understanding mitochondrial biology and kinetics. Here we present a novel mitochondrial probe (MitoRed AIE) suitable for live mitochondrial dynamics imaging and single particle tracking (SPT), together with a multi-dimensional data analysis approach to assess local mitochondrial (membrane) fluidity. The MitoRed AIE probe localizes primarily to mitochondrial membranes, with 95 ms fluorophore on-time delivering 106 photons/ms, characteristics which we exploit to demonstrate live cell 100 fps 3D time-lapse tracking of mitochondria. Combining our experimental and analytical approaches, we uncover mitochondrial dynamics at unprecedented time scales. This approach opens up a new regime into high spatio-temporal resolution dynamics in many areas of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27492961

  12. Mitochondrial Cristae: Where Beauty Meets Functionality.

    Cogliati, Sara; Enriquez, Jose A; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are dynamic bioenergetic compartments whose shape changes under different physiological conditions. Recent discoveries have unveiled the relation between cristae shape and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function, suggesting that membrane morphology modulates the organization and function of the OXPHOS system, with a direct impact on cellular metabolism. As a corollary, cristae-shaping proteins have emerged as potential modulators of mitochondrial bioenergetics, a concept confirmed by genetic experiments in mouse models of respiratory chain deficiency. Here, we review our knowledge of mitochondrial ultrastructural organization and how it impacts mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26857402

  13. Mitochondrial Diseases

    ... in your body tissues. If you have a metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are small structures that produce energy in ...

  14. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases****

    Chunyan Guo; Li Sun; Xueping Chen; Danshen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. Al these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive thera-peutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Oxygen Glucose Deprivation in Rat Hippocampal Slice Cultures Results in Alterations in Carnitine Homeostasis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Thomas F. Rau; Qing Lu; Shruti Sharma; Xutong Sun; Gregory Leary; Beckman, Matthew L.; Yali Hou; Wainwright, Mark S; Michael Kavanaugh; Poulsen, David J.; Black, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neurop...

  16. Determination of intracellular reactive oxygen species and high mitochondrial membrane potential in Percoll-treated viable boar sperm using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry.

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R

    2006-08-01

    The use of frozen semen in the swine industry is limited by problems with viability and fertility compared with liquid semen. Part of the reduction in sperm motility and fertility associated with cryopreservation may be due to oxidative damage from excessive or inappropriate formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Chemiluminescence measurements of ROS are not possible in live cells and are problematic because of poor specificity. An alternative approach, flow cytometry, was developed to identify viable boar sperm containing ROS utilizing the dyes hydroethidine and 2', 7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate as oxidizable substrates and impermeant DNA dyes to exclude dead sperm. The percentage of sperm with high mitochondrial transmembrane potential was determined by flow cytometry using the mitochondrial probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide with propidium iodide staining to exclude nonviable cells. Sperm were incubated with and without ROS generators and free radical scavengers. Basal ROS formation was low (less than 4%) and did not differ (P = 0.26) between viable fresh and frozen-thawed boar sperm. In addition, fresh and frozen-thawed viable sperm were equally susceptible (P = 0.20) to intracellular formation of ROS produced by xanthine/xanthine oxidase (94.4 and 87.9% of sperm, respectively). Menadione increased (P boar sperm, both were quite susceptible to external sources of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:16864869

  17. A mechanistic view of mitochondrial death decision pores

    Belizário, J E; Alves, J.; J.M. Occhiucci; M. Garay-Malpartida; Sesso, A.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria increase their outer and inner membrane permeability to solutes, protons and metabolites in response to a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic signaling events. The maintenance of cellular and intraorganelle ionic homeostasis, particularly for Ca2+, can determine cell survival or death. Mitochondrial death decision is centered on two processes: inner membrane permeabilization, such as that promoted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, formed across inner membranes whe...

  18. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  19. Pyr3, a TRPC3 channel blocker, potentiates dexamethasone sensitivity and apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by disturbing Ca(2+) signaling, mitochondrial membrane potential changes and reactive oxygen species production.

    Abdoul-Azize, Souleymane; Buquet, Catherine; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Dubus, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex) is used as a chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) because of its capacity to induce apoptosis. However, some ALL patients acquire resistance to glucocorticoids (GC). Thus, it is important to explore new agents to overcome GC resistance. The aim of the present work was to assess the ability of Pyr3, a selective inhibitor of transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3), to sensitize human ALL cells to Dex. We show here, for the first time, that Pyr3 enhances Dex sensitivity through the distraction of Dex-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in ALL cells (in vitro) and primary blasts (ex vivo) associated with mitochondrial-mediated reactive oxygen species production in ALL cells. Pyr3 alone induced Ca(2+) signaling via only endoplasmic reticulum-released Ca(2+) and exerted inhibitory effect on store-operated Ca(2+) entry in dose-dependent manner in ALL cell lines. Pre-incubation of cells with Pyr3 significantly curtailed the thapsigargin- and Dex-evoked Ca(2+) signaling in ALL cell lines. Pyr3 synergistically potentiated Dex lethality, as shown by the induction of cell mortality, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ALL cell lines. Moreover, Pyr3 disrupted Dex-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and increased the sensitivity of Dex-induced cell death in primary blasts from ALL patients. Additional analysis showed that co-treatment with Dex and Pyr3 results in mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and reactive oxygen species production in ALL cells. Together, Pyr3 exhibited potential therapeutic benefit in combination with Dex to inverse glucocorticoid resistance in human ALL and probably in other lymphoid malignancies. PMID:27179991

  20. Overexpression of mitochondrial sirtuins alters glycolysis and mitochondrial function in HEK293 cells.

    Michelle Barbi de Moura

    Full Text Available SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak.

  1. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Sirtuins Alters Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Function in HEK293 Cells

    Barbi de Moura, Michelle; Uppala, Radha; Zhang, Yuxun; Van Houten, Bennett; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose) all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak. PMID:25165814

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  4. Mitochondrial Fusion in Yeast Requires the Transmembrane GTPase Fzo1p

    Hermann, Greg J.; Thatcher, John W.; Mills, John P.; Hales, Karen G.; Fuller, Margaret T.; Nunnari, Jodi; Shaw, Janet M.

    1998-01-01

    Membrane fusion is required to establish the morphology and cellular distribution of the mitochondrial compartment. In Drosophila, mutations in the fuzzy onions (fzo) GTPase block a developmentally regulated mitochondrial fusion event during spermatogenesis. Here we report that the yeast orthologue of fuzzy onions, Fzo1p, plays a direct and conserved role in mitochondrial fusion. A conditional fzo1 mutation causes the mitochondrial reticulum to fragment and blocks mitochondrial fusion during ...

  5. Aqueous Cinnamon Extract (ACE-c from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia causes apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell line (SiHa through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential

    Chattopadhyay Samit

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoprevention, which includes the use of synthetic or natural agents (alone or in combination to block the development of cancer in human beings, is an extremely promising strategy for cancer prevention. Cinnamon is one of the most widely used herbal medicines with diverse biological activities including anti-tumor activity. In the present study, we have reported the anti-neoplastic activity of cinnamon in cervical cancer cell line, SiHa. Methods The aqueous cinnamon extract (ACE-c was analyzed for its cinnamaldehyde content by HPTLC analysis. The polyphenol content of ACE-c was measured by Folin-Ciocalteau method. Cytotoxicity analysis was performed by MTT assay. We studied the effect of cinnamon on growth kinetics by performing growth curve, colony formation and soft agar assays. The cells treated with ACE-c were analyzed for wound healing assay as well as for matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 expression at mRNA and protein level by RT-PCR and zymography, respectively. Her-2 protein expression was analyzed in the control and ACE-c treated samples by immunoblotting as well as confocal microscopy. Apoptosis studies and calcium signaling assays were analyzed by FACS. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm in cinnamon treated cells was studied by JC-1 staining and analyzed by confocal microscopy as well as FACS. Results Cinnamon alters the growth kinetics of SiHa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cells treated with ACE-c exhibited reduced number of colonies compared to the control cells. The treated cells exhibited reduced migration potential that could be explained due to downregulation of MMP-2 expression. Interestingly, the expression of Her-2 oncoprotein was significantly reduced in the presence of ACE-c. Cinnamon extract induced apoptosis in the cervical cancer cells through increase in intracellular calcium signaling as well as loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Conclusion Cinnamon could be used as a

  6. MARCH5 inactivation supports mitochondrial function during neurodegenerative stress

    Jia Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction with mitochondrial maintenance critical to neuronal survival. The mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MARCH5 has dual roles in the upkeep of mitochondrial function. MARCH5 is involved in targeted degradation of proteins harmful to mitochondria and impacts mitochondrial morphology upstream of the fission protein Drp1. In a neuronal cell model, dominant-negative MARCH5 prevents mitochondrial fragmentation during neurodegenerative stress induced by the neuron-specific reactive oxygen generator 6 hydroxydopamine, the complex I inhibitor rotenone or Alzheimer’s-releated Aβ peptide. In addition, preservation of mitochondrial function in terms of membrane potential and lower reactive oxygen generation was observed following inactivation of MARCH5. Our findings connect MARCH5 to neuronal stress responses and further emphasize the link between mitochondrial dynamics and function.

  7. Torilis japonica extract-generated intracellular ROS induces apoptosis by reducing the mitochondrial membrane potential via regulation of the AMPK-p38 MAPK signaling pathway in HCT116 colon cancer.

    Kim, Guen Tae; Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Young Min

    2016-09-01

    Torilis japonica extract (TJE) has been reported to possess diverse medicinal properties including anti‑inflammatory and antibacterial activities. However, the precise mechanism of its anticancer effect is not understood. Thus, we evaluated the apoptotic effects of TJE and examined its underlying molecular mechanisms in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. Our results show that TJE induces apoptosis through the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that it regulates the mitochondrial outer membrane potential via the AMPK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Importantly, ~50% of cancer cells have p53 mutations. Thus, the ability to induce apoptosis in a p53-independent manner would be of great value in cancer treatment. Our results show that not only does TJE regulate the AMPK/p38 signaling pathway, but it induces apoptosis in cells in which p53 has been knocked down using siRNA. Moreover, as in in vitro studies, TJE induced apoptosis and regulated apoptosis related-proteins in an HCT 116 xenograft model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TJE, a natural compound that may provide a substitute for chemotherapeutic drugs, has potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:27314881

  8. Normal skin and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts differentially regulate collagen and fibronectin expression as well as mitochondrial membrane potential in response to basic fibroblast growth factor

    Rui Song

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF regulates skin wound healing; however, the underlying mechanism remains to be defined. In the present study, we determined the effects of bFGF on the regulation of cell growth as well as collagen and fibronectin expression in fibroblasts from normal human skin and from hypertrophic scars. We then explored the involvement of mitochondria in mediating bFGF-inducedeffects on the fibroblasts. We isolated and cultivated normal and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts from tissue biopsies of patients who underwent plastic surgery for repairing hypertrophic scars. The fibroblasts were then treated with different concentrations of bFGF (ranging from 0.1 to 1000 ng/mL. The growth of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts became slower with selective inhibition of type I collagen production after exposure to bFGF. However, type III collagen expression was affected in both normal and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. Moreover, fibronectin expression in the normal fibroblasts was up-regulated after bFGF treatment. bFGF (1000 ng/mL also induced mitochondrial depolarization in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (P < 0.01. The cellular ATP level decreased in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (P < 0.05, while it increased in the normal fibroblasts following treatment with bFGF (P < 0.01. These data suggest that bFGF has differential effects and mechanisms on fibroblasts of the normal skin and hypertrophic scars, indicating that bFGF may play a role in the early phase of skin wound healing and post-burn scar formation.

  9. Mitochondrial Evolution

    Gray, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Viewed through the lens of the genome it contains, the mitochondrion is of unquestioned bacterial ancestry, originating from within the bacterial phylum α-Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria). Accordingly, the endosymbiont hypothesis—the idea that the mitochondrion evolved from a bacterial progenitor via symbiosis within an essentially eukaryotic host cell—has assumed the status of a theory. Yet mitochondrial genome evolution has taken radically different pathways in diverse eukaryotic lineag...

  10. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  11. A mitochondrial import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier

    Söllner, Thomas; Griffiths, Gareth; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Neupert, Walter

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a mitochondrial outer membrane protein of 72 kd (MOM72) that exhibits the properties of an import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC), the most abundant mitochondrial protein. Monospecific antibodies and Fab fragments against MOM72 selectively inhibit import of AAC at the level of specific binding to the mitochondria. AAC bound to the mitochondrial surface is coprecipitated with antibodies against MOM72 after lysis of mitochondria with detergent. MOM72 thus has a complem...

  12. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Modulate Mosquito Susceptibility to Plasmodium Infection

    Gonçalves, Renata L. S.; Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Oliveira, Giselle A.; Andersen, John F.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Pedro L Oliveira; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology, acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways and as an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that modulate redox metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that a novel member of the mitochondrial transporter protein family, Anopheles gambiae mitochondrial carrier 1 (AgMC1), is required to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential in mosquito midgut cells and modulates epithelial responses ...

  13. Importance of Mitochondrial Dynamics During Meiosis and Sporulation

    Gorsich, Steven W; Janet M Shaw

    2004-01-01

    Opposing fission and fusion events maintain the yeast mitochondrial network. Six proteins regulate these membrane dynamics during mitotic growth—Dnm1p, Mdv1p, and Fis1p mediate fission; Fzo1p, Mgm1p, and Ugo1p mediate fusion. Previous studies established that mitochondria fragment and rejoin at distinct stages during meiosis and sporulation, suggesting that mitochondrial fission and fusion are required during this process. Here we report that strains defective for mitochondrial fission alone,...

  14. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. PMID:27181353

  15. Insulin increases phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Bak, Steffen; Pedersen, Andreas James Thestrup;

    2014-01-01

    mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that insulin increases the phosphorylation of several mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo and provides a first step in the understanding of how insulin potentially regulates mitochondrial...

  16. Packing of transmembrane domain 2 of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A affects oligomerization and malonyl-CoA sensitivity of the mitochondrial outer membrane protein.

    Jenei, Zsuzsanna A; Warren, Gemma Z L; Hasan, Muhammad; Zammit, Victor A; Dixon, Ann M

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sequence-dependence of oligomerization of transmembrane domain 2 (TM2) of rat carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (rCPT1A), to elucidate the role of this domain in the function of the full-length enzyme. Oligomerization of TM2 was studied qualitatively using complementary genetic assays that facilitate measurement of helix-helix interactions in the Escherichia coli inner membrane, and multiple quantitative biophysical methods. The effects of TM2-mutations on oligomerization and malonyl-CoA inhibition of the full-length enzyme (expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris) were quantified. Changes designed to disrupt close-packing of the GXXXG(A) motifs reduced the oligomeric state of the corresponding TM2 peptides from hexamer to trimer (or lower), a reduction also observed on mutation of the TM2 sequence in the full-length enzyme. Disruption of these GXXXG(A) motifs had a parallel effect on the malonyl-CoA sensitivity of rCPT1A, reducing the IC(50) from 30.3 ± 5.0 to 3.0 ± 0.6 μM. For all measurements, wild-type rCPT1A was used as a control alongside various appropriate (e.g., molecular mass) standards. Our results suggest that sequence-determined, TM2-mediated oligomerization is likely to be involved in the modulation of malonyl-CoA inhibition of CPT1A in response to short- and long-term changes in protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions that occur in vivo. PMID:21917985

  17. The plant mitochondrial carrier family: functional and evolutionary aspects

    Ilka eHaferkamp; Stephan eSchmitz-Esser

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in respiration and energy production and are involved in multiple eukaryotic but also in several plant specific metabolic pathways. Solute carriers in the inner mitochondrial membrane connect the internal metabolism with that of the surrounding cell. Because of their common basic structure, these transport proteins affiliate to the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF). Generally, MCF proteins consist of six membrane-spanning helices, exhibit typical conserved domain...

  18. Activation of AMPKα2 Is Not Required for Mitochondrial FAT/CD36 Accumulation during Exercise

    Monaco, Cynthia; Whitfield, Jamie; Jain, Swati S.; Spriet, Lawrence L.; Bonen, Arend; Holloway, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to induce the translocation of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), a fatty acid transport protein, to both plasma and mitochondrial membranes. While previous studies have examined signals involved in the induction of FAT/CD36 translocation to sarcolemmal membranes, to date the signaling events responsible for FAT/CD36 accumulation on mitochondrial membranes have not been investigated. In the current study muscle contraction rapidly increased FAT/CD36 on plasma membranes...

  19. Grape seed proanthocyanidins promote apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells through alterations in Cdki-Cdk-cyclin cascade, and caspase-3 activation via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Meeran, Syed M; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2007-05-01

    Dietary grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) prevent photocarcinogenesis in mice. Here, we report that in vitro treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with GSPs inhibited cellular proliferation (13-89%) and induced cell death (1-48%) in a dose (5-100 mug/ml)- and time (24, 48 and 72 h)-dependent manner. GSP-induced inhibition of cell proliferation was associated with an increase in G1-phase arrest at 24 h, which was mediated through the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk) Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 and cyclins D1, D2 and E and simultaneous increase in protein expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (Cdki), Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27, and enhanced binding of Cdki-Cdk. The treatment of A431 cells with GSPs (20-80 mug/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in apoptotic cell death (26-58%), which was associated with an increased protein expression of proapoptotic Bax, decreased expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP. Pretreatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) blocked the GSP-induced apoptosis in A431 cells suggesting that GSP-induced apoptosis is associated primarily with the caspase-3-dependent pathway. Together, our study suggests that GSPs possess chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma cells in vitro, further in vivo mechanistic studies are required to verify the chemotherapeutic effect of GSPs in skin cancers. PMID:17437483

  20. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus;

    2014-01-01

    determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  1. Genetic deletion of the mitochondrial phosphate carrier desensitizes the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and causes cardiomyopathy

    Kwong, J Q; Davis, J; Baines, C P; Sargent, M.A.; Karch, J.; X. Wang; Huang, T.; Molkentin, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial phosphate carrier (PiC) is critical for ATP synthesis by serving as the primary means for mitochondrial phosphate import across the inner membrane. In addition to its role in energy production, PiC is hypothesized to have a role in cell death as either a component or a regulator of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) complex. Here, we have generated a mouse model with inducible and cardiac-specific deletion of the Slc25a3 gene (PiC protein). Loss of PiC pro...

  2. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes.

    Wada, Jun; Nakatsuka, Atsuko

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondria are involved in active and dynamic processes, such as mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial and cellular functions. In obesity and type 2 diabetes, impaired oxidation, reduced mitochondrial contents, lowered rates of oxidative phosphorylation and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production have been reported. Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by various transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), estrogen-related receptors (ERRs), and nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs). Mitochondrial fusion is promoted by mitofusin 1 (MFN1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), while fission is governed by the recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) by adaptor proteins such as mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), mitochondrial dynamics proteins of 49 and 51 kDa (MiD49 and MiD51), and fission 1 (FIS1). Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and PARKIN promote DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and the outer mitochondrial adaptor MiD51 is required in DRP1 recruitment and PARKIN-dependent mitophagy. This review describes the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics, its abnormality in diabetes and obesity, and pharmaceuticals targeting mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy. PMID:27339203

  3. Evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in obese adolescents

    Wilms, L; Larsen, J; Pedersen, P L;

    2010-01-01

    elucidate whether a lower metabolic rate is present. Methods: In a group of 34 obese adolescents (age <16 years and body mass index above the age-related 95th percentile), and an age- and gender-matched group of 32 lean adolescent, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and basal oxygen consumption were measured...... adolescents compared with lean adolescents. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a lower mitochondrial mass (6385 +/- 1962 a.u. vs. 7608 +/- 2328 a.u., p < 0.05) and mitochondrial membrane potential (11426 +/- 3861 a.u. vs. 14017 +/- 5536 a.u., p < 0.05) in obese adolescents compared with lean adolescents....... These results are even more pronounced in adolescents with obese mothers. Conclusion: In obese adolescents, the increased TSH and lowered VO(2) propose a lowered basal metabolic rate and the impaired mitochondrial function suggests a decreased thyroid hormone stimulation of mitochondrial energy...

  4. Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

    Venkatramanujam Srinivasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered one of the major causative factors in the aging process, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R, septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and Huntington's disease (HD. Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase activity, enhanced NO production, decreased respiratory complex activity, impaired electron transport system, and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore all have been suggested as factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Melatonin, the major hormone of the pineal gland, also acts as an antioxidant and as a regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective for preventing oxidative stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of PD, AD, and HD. In addition, melatonin is known to retard aging and to inhibit the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R lesions by maintaining respiratory complex activities, electron transport chain, and ATP production in mitochondria. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondrial membranes, a function not shared by other antioxidants. Melatonin has thus emerged as a major potential therapeutic tool for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as PD or AD, and for preventing the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R.

  5. Bile acids affect liver mitochondrial bioenergetics: possible relevance for cholestasis therapy

    Rolo, Anabela P.; Oliveira, Paulo J.; Moreno, António J. M.; Palmeira, Carlos M.

    2000-01-01

    It has been pointed out that intracellular accumulation of bile acids cause hepatocyte injury in cholestatic disease process. This study was aimed to test if cytotoxicity of these compounds is mediated through mitochondria dysfunction. Bile acids effects on isolated rat liver mitochondrial were analyzed by monitoring changes in membrane potential and mitochondrial respiration, as well as alterations in H+ membrane permeability and mitochondrial permeability transition pore induction. Increasi...

  6. NEW EMBO MEMBER’S REVIEW: Viral and bacterial proteins regulating apoptosis at the mitochondrial level

    Boya, Patricia; Roques, Bernard,; Kroemer, Guido

    2001-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) is a critical step of several apoptotic pathways. Some infectious intracellular pathogens can regulate (induce or inhibit) apoptosis of their host cells at the mitochondrial level, by targeting proteins to mitochondrial membranes that either induce or inhibit MMP. Pathogen-encoded mitochondrion-targeted proteins may or may not show amino acid sequence homology to Bcl-2-like proteins. Among the Bcl-2-unrelated, mitochondrion-targeted proteins, seve...

  7. Targeting and plasticity of mitochondrial proteins revealed by proximity-specific ribosome profiling

    Williams, Christopher C.; Jan, Calvin H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly all mitochondrial proteins are nuclear-encoded and are targeted to their mitochondrial destination from the cytosol. Here, we used proximity-specific ribosome profiling to comprehensively measure translation at the mitochondrial surface in yeast. Most inner membrane proteins were co-translationally targeted to mitochondria, reminiscent of proteins entering the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Comparison between mitochondrial and ER localization demonstrated that the vast majority of protein...

  8. Tissue-Specific Remodeling of the Mitochondrial Proteome in Type 1 Diabetic Akita Mice

    Bugger, Heiko; Dong CHEN; Riehle, Christian; Soto, Jamie; Theobald, Heather A.; Hu, Xiao X; Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Bart C Weimer; Abel, E. Dale

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To elucidate the molecular basis for mitochondrial dysfunction, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mitochondrial matrix and membrane fractions were generated from liver, brain, heart, and kidney of wild-type and type 1 diabetic Akita mice. Comparative proteomics was performed using label-free proteome expression analysis. Mitochondrial state 3 respirations and ATP synthesis were measured, and mitochondrial morphology ...

  9. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect

  10. The functional organization of mitochondrial genomes in human cells

    Kimura Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyzed the organization and function of mitochondrial DNA in a stable human cell line (ECV304, which is also known as T-24 containing mitochondria tagged with the yellow fluorescent protein. Results Mitochondrial DNA is organized in ~475 discrete foci containing 6–10 genomes. These foci (nucleoids are tethered directly or indirectly through mitochondrial membranes to kinesin, marked by KIF5B, and microtubules in the surrounding cytoplasm. In living cells, foci have an apparent diffusion constant of 1.1 × 10-3 μm2/s, and mitochondria always split next to a focus to distribute all DNA to one daughter. The kinetics of replication and transcription (monitored by immunolabelling after incorporating bromodeoxyuridine or bromouridine reveal that each genome replicates independently of others in a focus, and that newly-made RNA remains in a focus (residence half-time ~43 min long after it has been made. This mitochondrial RNA colocalizes with components of the cytoplasmic machinery that makes and imports nuclear-encoded proteins – that is, a ribosomal protein (S6, a nascent peptide associated protein (NAC, and the translocase in the outer membrane (Tom22. Conclusions The results suggest that clusters of mitochondrial genomes organize the translation machineries on both sides of the mitochondrial membranes. Then, proteins encoded by the nuclear genome and destined for the mitochondria will be made close to mitochondrial-encoded proteins so that they can be assembled efficiently into mitochondrial complexes.

  11. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    Lee, Icksoo, E-mail: icksoolee@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  12. A mechanistic view of mitochondrial death decision pores

    J.E. Belizário

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria increase their outer and inner membrane permeability to solutes, protons and metabolites in response to a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic signaling events. The maintenance of cellular and intraorganelle ionic homeostasis, particularly for Ca2+, can determine cell survival or death. Mitochondrial death decision is centered on two processes: inner membrane permeabilization, such as that promoted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, formed across inner membranes when Ca2+ reaches a critical threshold, and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, in which the pro-apoptotic proteins BID, BAX, and BAK play active roles. Membrane permeabilization leads to the release of apoptogenic proteins: cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, Smac/Diablo, HtrA2/Omi, and endonuclease G. Cytochrome c initiates the proteolytic activation of caspases, which in turn cleave hundreds of proteins to produce the morphological and biochemical changes of apoptosis. Voltage-dependent anion channel, cyclophilin D, adenine nucleotide translocase, and the pro-apoptotic proteins BID, BAX, and BAK may be part of the molecular composition of membrane pores leading to mitochondrial permeabilization, but this remains a central question to be resolved. Other transporting pores and channels, including the ceramide channel, the mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channel, as well as a non-specific outer membrane rupture may also be potential release pathways for these apoptogenic factors. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic models by which reactive oxygen species and caspases, via structural and conformational changes of membrane lipids and proteins, promote conditions for inner/outer membrane permeabilization, which may be followed by either opening of pores or a rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

  13. Identifying Compounds that Induce Opening of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore in Isolated Rat Liver Mitochondria.

    Marroquin, Lisa; Swiss, Rachel; Will, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) is a protein pore that forms in the inner mitochondrial membrane and allows the membrane to be permeable to all molecules of less than 1500 Da. Ca(2+), numerous reactive chemicals, and oxidative stress induce MPTP opening, whereas cyclosporin A (CsA) or bongkrekic acid block it. In addition, several drugs have been shown to induce MPTP opening, leading to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, swelling of the matrix because of water accumulation, rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, and release of intermembrane space proteins into the cytosol. This ultimately leads to the rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane and cell demise. Here, we describe an assay using isolated rat liver mitochondria that can detect Ca(2+)-dependent drug-induced opening of the MPTP, providing protocols for screening in both cuvette and 96-well format. PMID:24865648

  14. Mitochondrial genomes are retained by selective constraints on protein targeting.

    Björkholm, Patrik; Harish, Ajith; Hagström, Erik; Ernst, Andreas M; Andersson, Siv G E

    2015-08-18

    Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles in eukaryotic cells considered to be of bacterial origin. The mitochondrial genome has evolved under selection for minimization of gene content, yet it is not known why not all mitochondrial genes have been transferred to the nuclear genome. Here, we predict that hydrophobic membrane proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genomes would be recognized by the signal recognition particle and targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum if they were nuclear-encoded and translated in the cytoplasm. Expression of the mitochondrially encoded proteins Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1, Apocytochrome b, and ATP synthase subunit 6 in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells confirms export to the endoplasmic reticulum. To examine the extent to which the mitochondrial proteome is driven by selective constraints within the eukaryotic cell, we investigated the occurrence of mitochondrial protein domains in bacteria and eukaryotes. The accessory protein domains of the oxidative phosphorylation system are unique to mitochondria, indicating the evolution of new protein folds. Most of the identified domains in the accessory proteins of the ribosome are also found in eukaryotic proteins of other functions and locations. Overall, one-third of the protein domains identified in mitochondrial proteins are only rarely found in bacteria. We conclude that the mitochondrial genome has been maintained to ensure the correct localization of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. Taken together, the results suggest that selective constraints on the eukaryotic cell have played a major role in modulating the evolution of the mitochondrial genome and proteome. PMID:26195779

  15. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  16. Gemini surfactants mediate efficient mitochondrial gene delivery and expression.

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Cardoso, Ana L; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-03-01

    Gene delivery targeting mitochondria has the potential to transform the therapeutic landscape of mitochondrial genetic diseases. Taking advantage of the nonuniversal genetic code used by mitochondria, a plasmid DNA construct able to be specifically expressed in these organelles was designed by including a codon, which codes for an amino acid only if read by the mitochondrial ribosomes. In the present work, gemini surfactants were shown to successfully deliver plasmid DNA to mitochondria. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were taken up by cells through a variety of routes, including endocytic pathways, and showed propensity for inducing membrane destabilization under acidic conditions, thus facilitating cytoplasmic release of DNA. Furthermore, the complexes interacted extensively with lipid membrane models mimicking the composition of the mitochondrial membrane, which predicts a favored interaction of the complexes with mitochondria in the intracellular environment. This work unravels new possibilities for gene therapy toward mitochondrial diseases. PMID:25634573

  17. AMP-activated protein kinase mediates mitochondrial fission in response to energy stress

    Courchet, Julien; Lewis, Tommy L.; Losón, Oliver C.; Hellberg, Kristina; Young, Nathan P.; Chen, Hsiuchen; Polleux, Franck; Chan, David C.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria undergo fragmentation in response to electron transport chain (ETC) poisons and mitochondrial DNA–linked disease mutations, yet how these stimuli mechanistically connect to the mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery is poorly understood. We found that the energy-sensing adenosine monophosphate (AMP)–activated protein kinase (AMPK) is genetically required for cells to undergo rapid mitochondrial fragmentation after treatment with ETC inhibitors. Moreover, direct pharmacological activation of AMPK was sufficient to rapidly promote mitochondrial fragmentation even in the absence of mitochondrial stress. A screen for substrates of AMPK identified mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), a mitochondrial outer-membrane receptor for DRP1, the cytoplasmic guanosine triphosphatase that catalyzes mitochondrial fission. Nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic alleles of the AMPK sites in MFF revealed that it is a key effector of AMPK-mediated mitochondrial fission. PMID:26816379

  18. Pivotal role of AKAP121 in mitochondrial physiology.

    Czachor, Alexander; Failla, Athena; Lockey, Richard; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2016-04-15

    In this Perspective, we discuss some recent developments in the study of the mitochondrial scaffolding protein AKAP121 (also known as AKAP1, or AKAP149 as the human homolog), with an emphasis on its role in mitochondrial physiology. AKAP121 has been identified to function as a key regulatory molecule in several mitochondrial events including oxidative phosphorylation, the control of membrane potential, fission-induced apoptosis, maintenance of mitochondrial Ca(2+)homeostasis, and the phosphorylation of various mitochondrial respiratory chain substrate molecules. Furthermore, we discuss the role of hypoxia in prompting cellular stress and damage, which has been demonstrated to mediate the proteosomal degradation of AKAP121, leading to an increase in reactive oxgyen species production, mitochondrial dysfunction, and ultimately cell death. PMID:26825124

  19. Trypanosoma brucei has a canonical mitochondrial processing peptidase.

    Desy, Silvia; Schneider, André; Mani, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Most mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane proteins have N-terminal presequences which serve as import signals. After import these presequences are cleaved by the heterodimeric mitochondrial processing peptidase. In the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial protein import relies on presequences that are much shorter than in other eukaryotes. How they are processed is unknown. The trypansomal genome encodes four open reading frames that are annotated as mitochondrial processing peptidase. Here we show that RNAi-mediated ablation of two of these proteins leads to a growth arrest and a concomitant accumulation of mitochondrial precursor proteins inside mitochondria. Import experiments using isolated mitochondria from RNAi cell lines reveals that both proteins are required for efficient import and processing of the tested precursor protein. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation demonstrates that the proteins interact with each other. In summary these results show that we have identified the two subunits of the trypanosomal mitochondrial processing peptidase. PMID:22841752

  20. Effects of dietary fatty acids on mitochondrial phospholipid compositions, oxidative status and mitochondrial gene expression of zebrafish at different ages.

    Betancor, M B; Almaida-Pagán, P F; Hernández, A; Tocher, D R

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL) and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, oxidative status (TBARS content and SOD activity) and mtDNA gene expression of muscle and liver were analyzed in zebrafish fed two diets with lipid supplied either by rapeseed oil (RO) or a blend 60:40 of RO and DHA500 TG oil (DHA). Two feeding trials were performed using zebrafish from the same population of two ages (8 and 21 months). Dietary FA composition affected fish growth in 8-month-old animals, which could be related to an increase in stress promoted by diet composition. Lipid peroxidation was considerably higher in mitochondria of 8-month-old zebrafish fed the DHA diet than in animals fed the RO diet. This could indicate higher oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, very likely due to increased incorporation of DHA in PL of mitochondrial membranes. Lipids would be among the first molecules affected by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation could propagate oxidative reactions that would damage other molecules, including mtDNA. Mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and gene expression of 21-month-old fish showed lower responsiveness to diet composition than those of younger fish. Differences found in the effect of diet composition on mitochondrial lipids between the two age groups could be indicating age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes. PMID:26156499

  1. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology.

    Fischer, Tara D; Hylin, Michael J; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N; Waxham, M Neal; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  2. Control mechanisms in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

    Jana Hroudová; Zdeněk Fi(s)ar

    2013-01-01

    Distribution and activity of mitochondria are key factors in neuronal development, synaptic plasticity and axogenesis. The majority of energy sources, necessary for cellular functions, originate from oxidative phosphorylation located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The adenosine-5'- triphosphate production is regulated by many control mechanism–firstly by oxygen, substrate level, adenosine-5'-diphosphate level, mitochondrial membrane potential, and rate of coupling and proton leak. Recently, these mechanisms have been implemented by "second control mechanisms," such as reversible phosphorylation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and electron transport chain complexes, allosteric inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase, thyroid hormones, effects of fatty acids and uncoupling proteins. Impaired function of mitochondria is implicated in many diseases ranging from mitochondrial myopathies to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are usually related to the ability of mitochondria to generate adenosine-5'-triphosphate in response to energy demands. Large amounts of reactive oxygen species are released by defective mitochondria, similarly, decline of antioxidative enzyme activities (e.g. in the elderly) enhances reactive oxygen species production. We reviewed data concerning neuroplasticity, physiology, and control of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production.

  3. Mitochondrial disease and epilepsy.

    Rahman, Shamima

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are relatively common inborn errors of energy metabolism, with a combined prevalence of one in 5000. These disorders typically affect tissues with high energy requirements, and cerebral involvement occurs frequently in childhood, often manifesting in seizures. Mitochondrial diseases are genetically heterogeneous; to date, mutations have been reported in all 37 mitochondrially encoded genes and more than 80 nuclear genes. The major genetic causes of mitochondrial epilepsy are mitochondrial DNA mutations (including those typically associated with the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes [MELAS] and myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres [MERRF] syndromes); mutations in POLG (classically associated with Alpers syndrome but also presenting as the mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome [MIRAS], spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy [SCAE], and myoclonus, epilepsy, myopathy, sensory ataxia [MEMSA] syndromes in older individuals) and other disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance; complex I deficiency; disorders of coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis; and disorders of mitochondrial translation such as RARS2 mutations. It is not clear why some genetic defects, but not others, are particularly associated with seizures. Epilepsy may be the presenting feature of mitochondrial disease but is often part of a multisystem clinical presentation. Mitochondrial epilepsy may be very difficult to manage, and is often a poor prognostic feature. At present there are no curative treatments for mitochondrial disease. Individuals with mitochondrial epilepsy are frequently prescribed multiple anticonvulsants, and the role of vitamins and other nutritional supplements and the ketogenic diet remain unproven. PMID:22283595

  4. Mitochondrial involvement in drug-induced liver injury.

    Pessayre, Dominique; Mansouri, Abdellah; Berson, Alain; Fromenty, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major mechanism of liver injury. A parent drug or its reactive metabolite can trigger outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization or rupture due to mitochondrial permeability transition. The latter can severely deplete ATP and cause liver cell necrosis, or it can instead lead to apoptosis by releasing cytochrome c, which activates caspases in the cytosol. Necrosis and apoptosis can trigger cytolytic hepatitis resulting in lethal fulminant hepatitis in some patients. Other drugs severely inhibit mitochondrial function and trigger extensive microvesicular steatosis, hypoglycaemia, coma, and death. Milder and more prolonged forms of drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can also cause macrovacuolar steatosis. Although this is a benign liver lesion in the short-term, it can progress to steatohepatitis and then to cirrhosis. Patient susceptibility to drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and liver injury can sometimes be explained by genetic or acquired variations in drug metabolism and/or elimination that increase the concentration of the toxic species (parent drug or metabolite). Susceptibility may also be increased by the presence of another condition, which also impairs mitochondrial function, such as an inborn mitochondrial cytopathy, beta-oxidation defect, certain viral infections, pregnancy, or the obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. Liver injury due to mitochondrial dysfunction can have important consequences for pharmaceutical companies. It has led to the interruption of clinical trials, the recall of several drugs after marketing, or the introduction of severe black box warnings by drug agencies. Pharmaceutical companies should systematically investigate mitochondrial effects during lead selection or preclinical safety studies. PMID:20020267

  5. Mitochondrial membrane assembly of TMEM70 protein

    Kratochvílová, H.; Hejzlarová, Kateřina; Vrbacký, Marek; Mráček, Tomáš; Karbanová, Vendula; Tesařová, M.; Gombitová, A.; Cmarko, D.; Wittig, I.; Zeman, J.; Houštěk, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, Mar 2014 (2014), s. 1-9. ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0970; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria * ATP synthase * TMEM70 * biogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.249, year: 2014

  6. Mitochondrial emitted electromagnetic signals mediate retrograde signaling.

    Bagkos, Georgios; Koufopoulos, Kostas; Piperi, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence shows that mitochondria regulate nuclear transcriptional activity both in normal and cell stress conditions, known as retrograde signaling. Under normal mitochondrial function, retrograde signaling is associated with mitochondrial biogenesis, normal cell phenotype and metabolic profile. In contrast, mitochondrial dysfunction leads to abnormal (oncogenic) cell phenotype and altered bio-energetic profile (nucleus reprogramming). Despite intense research efforts, a concrete mechanism through which mitochondria determine the group of genes expressed by the nucleus is still missing. The present paper proposes a novel hypothesis regarding retrograde signaling. More specifically, it reveals the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the accompanied strong electromagnetic field (EF) as key regulatory factors of nuclear activity. Mitochondrial emitted EFs extend in long distance and affect the function of nuclear membrane receptors. Depending on their frequencies, EFs can directly activate or deactivate different groups of nuclear receptors and so determine nuclear gene expression. One of the key features of the above hypothesis is that nuclear membrane receptors, besides their own endogenous or chemical ligands (hormones, lipids, etc.), can also be activated by electromagnetic signals. Moreover, normal MMP values (about -140 mV) are associated with the production of high ATP quantities and small levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) while the hyperpolarization observed in all cancer cell types leads to a dramatic fall in ATP production and an analogous increase in ROS. The diminished ATP and increased ROS production negatively affect the function of all cellular systems including nucleus. Restoration of mitochondrial function, which is characterized by the fluctuation of MMP and EF values within a certain (normal) range, is proposed as a necessary condition for normal nuclear function and cancer therapy. PMID:26474928

  7. Mitochondrial disorders: disease mechanisms and therapeutic approaches.

    Poole, Olivia V; Hanna, Michael G; Pitceathly, Robert D S

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are now well recognized as an important cause of genetic disease. They exhibit remarkable phenotypic, biochemical, and molecular heterogeneity, and frequently involve multiple organ systems. Their complexity partly relates to the dual expression of mitochondrial proteins by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomic DNA. Multiple copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are present in a single human mitochondrion. Each molecule exists as a double-stranded, circular, helical structure containing 37 genes: 13 encode polypeptide subunits, whilst the remaining 24 encode 22 transfer and 2 ribosomal RNAs necessary for their synthesis. These protein subunits contribute towards four of five multimeric enzymes (so-called complex I/III/IV/V, with complex II entirely nuclear-encoded) embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The enzymes catalyze a sequence of redox reactions which ultimately generates adenine triphosphate, the cellular unit of energy, during oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The remaining OXPHOS subunits (more than 70 in total), in addition to the apparatus required for their transcription, translation, post-translational modification and assembly, are nuclear-encoded. The mitochondrion's dependence on nuclear DNA extends further to include the machinery required for the maintenance, replication, and repair of mtDNA molecules, the proteins for which are synthesized in the cell cytoplasm prior to transport across mitochondrial membrane for replication. Recent advancements in DNA analysis using next generation sequencing technology have provided an unprecedented expansion in the depth of knowledge concerning both molecular mechanisms and biological pathways which underpin many mitochondrial diseases. This understanding has led to the emergence of many potential targets and treatment strategies for these disorders for which there is currently no cure. This review highlights the challenges to therapy development and clinical trial design and

  8. Emerging aspects of treatment in mitochondrial disorders.

    Rahman, Shamima

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are clinically, biochemically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of two genomes, for which effective curative therapies are currently lacking. With the exception of a few rare vitamin/cofactor responsive conditions (including ACAD9 deficiency, disorders of coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis, and Leigh syndrome caused by mutations in the SLC19A3 transporter), the mainstay of treatment for the vast majority of patients involves supportive measures. The search for a cure for mitochondrial disease is the subject of intensive research efforts by many investigators across the globe, but the goal remains elusive. The clinical and genetic heterogeneity, multisystemic nature of many of these disorders, unpredictable natural course, relative inaccessibility of the mitochondrion and lack of validated, clinically meaningful outcome measures, have all presented great challenges to the design of rigorous clinical trials. This review discusses barriers to developing effective therapies for mitochondrial disease, models for evaluating the efficacy of novel treatments and summarises the most promising emerging therapies in six key areas: 1) antioxidant approaches; 2) stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis; 3) targeting mitochondrial membrane lipids, dynamics and mitophagy; 4) replacement therapy; 5) cell-based therapies; and 6) gene therapy approaches for both mtDNA and nuclear-encoded defects of mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:25962587

  9. Mba1, a Novel Component of the Mitochondrial Protein Export Machinery of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Preuss, Marc; Leonhard, Klaus; Hell, Kai; Stuart, Rosemary A.; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M.

    2001-01-01

    The biogenesis of mitochondria requires the integration of many proteins into the inner membrane from the matrix side. The inner membrane protein Oxa1 plays an important role in this process. We identified Mba1 as a second mitochondrial component that is required for efficient protein insertion. Like Oxa1, Mba1 specifically interacts both with mitochondrial translation products and with conservatively sorted, nuclear-encoded proteins during their integration into the inner membrane. Oxa1 and ...

  10. Exercise alters liver mitochondria phospholipidomic profile and mitochondrial activity in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Gonçalves, Inês O; Maciel, Elisabete; Passos, Emanuel; Torrella, Joan R.; Rizo, David; Viscor, Ginés; Rocha-Rodrigues, Silvia; Santos-Alves, Estela; Domingues, Maria R.; Oliveira, Paulo J; Ascensão, António; Magalhães, José

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane lipid composition is a critical factor in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Exercise is the most prescribed therapeutic strategy against NASH and a potential modulator of lipid membrane. Thus, we aimed to analyze whether physical exercise exerted preventive (voluntary physical activity – VPA) and therapeutic (endurance training – ET) effect on NASH-induced mitochondrial membrane changes. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 36) were divided into standard-diet sedentary (SS, n =...