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Sample records for absorption bgo detector

  1. L3 detector: BGO assembly

    CERN

    1989-01-01

    Explanation and presentation of its construction ( Feb-March 1989). The detector is a multi-layered cylindrical set of different devices, each of them measuring physical quantities relevant to the reconstruction of the collision under study. The three main outer layers are the electro-magnetic calorimeter (also called BGO because it's made of Bismuth Germanium Oxide), the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) and the muon detector.

  2. L3 experiment's detector : BGO assembly hall

    CERN

    1987-01-01

    The detector is a multi-layered cylindrical set of different devices, each of them measuring physical quantities relevant to the reconstruction of the collision under study. The three main outer layers are the electro-magnetic calorimeter (also called BGO because it's made of Bismuth Germanium Oxide), the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) and the muon detector.

  3. Searches for axioelectric effect of solar axions with BGO-scintillator and BGO-bolometer detectors

    Muratova, V N; Giorni, L; Nagorny, S S; Pattavina, L; Bakhlanov, S V; Beeman, J W; Bellini, F; Biassoni, M; Capelli, S; Clemenza, M; Dratchnev, I S; Ferri, E; Giachero, A; Gotti, C; Kayunov, A S; Maiano, C; Maino, M; Pavan, M; Pirro, S; Semenov, D A; Sisti, M; Unzhakov, E V

    2015-01-01

    A search for axioelectric absorption of 5.5 MeV solar axions produced in the $p + d \\rightarrow {^3\\rm{He}}+\\gamma~(5.5~ \\rm{MeV})$ reaction has been performed with a BGO detectors. A model-independent limit on the product of axion-nucleon $g_{AN}^3$ and axion-electron $g_{Ae}$ coupling constants has been obtained: $| g_{Ae}\\times g_{AN}^3|< 1.9\\times 10^{-10}$ for 90\\% C.L..

  4. Comparison of LSO and BGO block detectors for prompt gamma imaging in ion beam therapy

    Hueso-González, F.; Biegun, A. K.; Dendooven, P.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Golnik, C.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Petzoldt, J.; Römer, K. E.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    2015-09-01

    A major weakness of ion beam therapy is the lack of tools for verifying the particle range in clinical routine. The application of the Compton camera concept for the imaging of prompt gamma rays, a by-product of the irradiation correlated to the dose distribution, is a promising approach for range assessment and even three-dimensional in vivo dosimetry. Multiple position sensitive gamma ray detectors arranged in scatter and absorber planes, together with an imaging algorithm, are required to reconstruct the prompt gamma emission density map. Conventional block detectors deployed in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which are based on Lu2SiO5:Ce (LSO) and Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillators, are suitable candidates for the absorber of a Compton camera due to their high density and absorption efficiency with respect to the prompt gamma energy range (several MeV). We compare experimentally LSO and BGO block detectors in clinical-like radiation fields in terms of energy, spatial and time resolution. The high energy range compensates for the low light yield of the BGO material and boosts significantly its performance compared to the PET scenario. Notwithstanding the overall superiority of LSO, BGO catches up in the field of prompt gamma imaging and can be considered as a competitive alternative to LSO for the absorber plane due to its lower price and the lack of intrinsic radioactivity.

  5. Comparison of LSO and BGO block detectors for prompt gamma imaging in ion beam therapy

    A major weakness of ion beam therapy is the lack of tools for verifying the particle range in clinical routine. The application of the Compton camera concept for the imaging of prompt gamma rays, a by-product of the irradiation correlated to the dose distribution, is a promising approach for range assessment and even three-dimensional in vivo dosimetry. Multiple position sensitive gamma ray detectors arranged in scatter and absorber planes, together with an imaging algorithm, are required to reconstruct the prompt gamma emission density map. Conventional block detectors deployed in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which are based on Lu2SiO5:Ce (LSO) and Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillators, are suitable candidates for the absorber of a Compton camera due to their high density and absorption efficiency with respect to the prompt gamma energy range (several MeV). We compare experimentally LSO and BGO block detectors in clinical-like radiation fields in terms of energy, spatial and time resolution. The high energy range compensates for the low light yield of the BGO material and boosts significantly its performance compared to the PET scenario. Notwithstanding the overall superiority of LSO, BGO catches up in the field of prompt gamma imaging and can be considered as a competitive alternative to LSO for the absorber plane due to its lower price and the lack of intrinsic radioactivity

  6. Improvement of light coupling in BGO detector module by optimization of the crystal shape

    Detector shape optimization study was carried out for the high resolution 4x4 array BGO-PMT coupling scheme to be employed in the spherical positron emission tomograph. To improve the light collection efficiency in the BGO detector array, the authors have employed bullet nose shape BGO crystal in the front side as well as in the back side of detector the latter to be coupled to PMT's photocathode. First, it is believed that the smooth and round front side bullet nose shape could eliminate the sharp corners of the crystal thereby improves the light collection efficiency. Secondly, the bullet nose shape at the back side of crystal which to be coupled to PMT will provide optimal coupling between the crystal and PMT by the focusing property of the bullet nose shape of the crystal. Computer simulations and experimental study were carried out and results are reported

  7. The calibration and electron energy reconstruction of the BGO ECAL of the DAMPE detector

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Dong, Jianing; Wei, Yifeng; Wen, Sicheng; Zhang, Yunlong; Li, Zhiying; Feng, Changqing; Gao, Shanshan; Shen, ZhongTao; Zhang, Deliang; Zhang, Junbin; Wang, Qi; Ma, SiYuan; Yang, Di; Jiang, Di; Chen, Dengyi; Hu, Yiming; Huang, Guangshun; Wang, Xiaolian; Xu, Zizong; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi; Gong, Yizhong

    2016-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a space experiment designed to search for dark matter indirectly by measuring the spectra of photons, electrons, and positrons up to 10 TeV. The BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is its main sub-detector for energy measurement. In this paper, the instrumentation and development of the BGO ECAL is briefly described. The calibration on the ground, including the pedestal, minimum ionizing particle (MIP) peak, dynode ratio, and attenuation length with the cosmic rays and beam particles is discussed in detail. Also, the energy reconstruction results of the electrons from the beam test are presented.

  8. BGO radiation damage effects optical absorption, thermoluminescence and thermoconductivity

    Lecoq, P; Rostaing, B

    1991-01-01

    After irradiation, the light transmission of bismuth germanate monocrystals decreases, mainly in the blue, as a consequence of the formation of colour centres. The absorption, thermoluminescence and thermoconductivity spectra were studied for different kinds of irradiation, different doses and at different temperatures. Doped samples were also tested, showing the role of impurities, mainly iron, in the process of damage. Finally a model is proposed which explains all the experimental results.

  9. Fast γ-ray coincidence timing using a BGO detector array in a nuclear reaction experiment

    The (7Li, 7Be) nuclear charge-exchange reaction has been investigated at E(7Li)=350 MeV. Coincidences were measured between the charged 7Be reaction products in the focal plane of a magnetic spectrometer and 430-keV Doppler-shifted γ-rays from the decay in flight of excited 7Be ejectiles. The latter were detected in a compact BGO detector array. Fast timing was used to optimize the separation between prompt and randoms events. The BGO output signals display the statistical distribution of the arrival times of individual photoelectrons from the photocathode in the photomultiplier tubes. A timing resolution of 6.5 ns relative to the accelerator RF was obtained. A simple model was successfully developed to simulate the BGO output signals with a statistical distribution of a predetermined number of photoelectrons modulated by the light output response of the scintillator and the single-photoelectron gain distribution and transit time through the photomultiplier tube. It is concluded that the timing resolution is primarily limited by the small number of photoelectrons. ((orig.))

  10. Testing and assessment of a large BGO detector for beach monitoring of radioactive particles

    The Beach Monitoring Steering Group (BMSG) was set up by UKAEA to explore whether improved systems for beach monitoring of radioactive particles are available. The BMSG commissioned the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI/NGD), and other companies, to test their most sensitive system. This paper presents the results of trials in a specially created test facility at UKAEA Harwell with a large BGO detector. The detector's size and weight mean that it would be suitable for vehicle deployment but would be too large and heavy to carry in areas that could not be accessed by a vehicle. However, it would be possible to use the same methodology that is described here with a smaller detector capable of being carried in a backpack, albeit with reduced sensitivity for particle detection. The approach that we present is also applicable, with modifications, to the detection of offshore particles using a towed seabed detector

  11. Tests of prototype hexagon BGO detectors for the inner array of the γ-ray facility for ATLAS

    BGO detectors of hexagonal shape are planned for use in the inner array of the γ-ray facility currently under construction for ATLAS. Here, the results of tests performed on prototype detectors are reported. Four crystals obtained from the different manufacturers were tested for energy resolution, timing resolution and light collection efficiency

  12. A quantitative PGNAA study for use in aqueous solution measurements using Am-Be neutron source and BGO scintillation detector

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Ahmadi, P.; Doost-Mohammadi, V.

    2016-02-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system including an Am-Be neutron source and BGO scintillation detector are used for quantitative analysis of bulk samples. Both Monte Carlo-simulated and experimental data are considered as input data libraries for two different procedures based on neural network and least squares methods. The results confirm the feasibility and precision of the proposed methods.

  13. Development of a detector setup based on BGO single crystals to measure high energy gamma spectra of neutron sources

    Radiation detectors based on Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) single crystal scintillators have many applications, mainly in high-energy physics, and nuclear industry. The BGO possesses several advantages including high density, large effective atomic number Zeff, small radiation length, high radiation hardness, stability of chemical properties, non-hygroscopic nature and much smaller afterglow which make these crystals indispensable in many applications. These crystals are the best choices for the spectroscopy of high energies gamma rays which are usually produced from (γ, n) reactions in various neutron sources. The major applications of these crystals in high energy physics and to detect high energy gammas require large size crystals. It has been well known that the signal output from BGO crystals is strongly governed by the purity and crystal defects. To grow high quality single crystals with large size and minimum number of defects has always been a daunting task for crystal growers. In this communication, we describe the growth and characterization BGO single crystals. Fabrication of a setup based on BGO scintillator useful to measure gamma-rays from an Am-Be neutron source is discussed

  14. Simulation and study on the γ response spectrum of BGO detector by the application of monte carlo code MOCA

    Application of Monte Carlo method to build spectra library is useful to reduce experiment workload in Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA). The new Monte Carlo Code MOCA was used to simulate the response spectra of BGO detector for gamma rays from 137Cs, 60Co and neutron induced gamma rays from S and Ti. The results were compared with general code MCNP, show that the agreement of MOCA between simulation and experiment is better than MCNP. This research indicates that building spectra library by Monte Carlo method is feasible. (authors)

  15. The BGO Calorimeter of BGO-OD Experiment

    Bantes, B.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bella, A.; Bielefeldt, P.; Bieling, J.; Bleckwenn, M.; Böse, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.-Th; Burdeynyi, D.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Geffers, D.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Girolami, B.; Glazier, D.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, P.-F.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I.; Mandaglio, G.; Mei, P.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.-G.; Zimmermann, T.

    2015-02-01

    The BGO Rugby Ball is a large solid angle electromagnetic calorimeter now installed in the ELSA Facility in Bonn. The BGO is operating in the BGO-OD experiment aiming to study meson photoproduction off proton and neutron induced by a Bremsstrahlung polarized gamma beam of energies from 0.2 to 3.2 GeV and an intensity of 5 × 107 photons per second. The scintillating material characteristics and the photomultiplier read-out make this detector particularly suited for the detection of medium energy photons and electrons with very good energy resolution. The detector has been equipped with a new electronics read-out system, consisting of 30 sampling ADC Wie-Ne-R modules which perform the off-line reconstruction of the signal start-time allowing for a good timing resolution. Performances in linearity, resolution and time response have been carefully tested at the Beam Test Facility of the INFN National Laboratories in Frascati by using a matrix of 7 BGO crystals coupled to photomultipliers and equipped with the Wie-Ne-R sampling ADCs.

  16. WA80 BGO calorimetry electronics

    This paper describes instrumentation designed for BGO scintillator-based calorimetry of particles covering a very wide range of energies (from less than 50 MeV to 50 GeV). The instrumentation was designed to have a measurement accuracy of 0.1% over as much of the energy range as possible so the energy resolution of BGO would be the limiting factor. Two 1.5-cm2 photodiodes were used per 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm x 25 cm BGO crystal. Both a charge-sensitive preamplifier and a pulse processor were developed specifically for the needs of the WA80 experiment. The preamplifier was designed for high detector capacitance (100 to 700 pF), low integral and differential non-linearity and low power consumption (200 mW). The pulse processor is a time-invariant shaping amplifier with integral peak-detect-and-hold and automatic gain selection circuits. The amplifier use quasi-triangular shaping with 4 μs peaking time, and the hold circuit is gated with a fast first level trigger. The system has more than 20 bits of effective resolution when used with an external 12-bit ADC. Results from beam tests at CERN are presented. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. Simulation of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    Johnstone, Russell [University of Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    The goal of the BGO Open-Dipole (BGO-OD) project is the systematic investigation of the photoproduction of mesons off the nucleon. These processes are related to the structure of both the mesons and the baryons involved in reactions typical of low-energy hadronic physics. In order to fully understand and accurately interpret the results of the BGO-OD experiment it will be necessary to have a full detector and reaction simulation so that effects from detector resolution and acceptance can be accounted for in the final results. The simulation of the BGO-OD will be be undertaken with the Explora Virtual Monte-Carlo (VMC) software framework. This allows for one common user code to be implemented under Geant4, Geant3 and Fluka. The simulation software is also an analysis tool and such flexibility will be key to an efficient final analysis of the data from the BGO-OD experiment. Presented here are current status of the simulation software for the BGO-OD project and the relevant geometry of the BGO-OD, including the central BGO rugby ball detector with the dual-layer Multiwire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and the forward spectrometer, consisting of a large dipole magnet, tracking detectors and the Time-of-Flight walls. Simulation of the magnetic field will also be covered.

  18. Multilayer passive shielding of scintillation detectors based on BGO, NaI(Tl), and stilbene crystals operating in intense neutron fields with an energy of 14.1 MeV

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Valkovic, V.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Zontikov, A. O.; Ivanov, I. Zh.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Krylov, A. R.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ruskov, I. N.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Skoy, V. R.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the issues related to choosing the optimum type of passive shielding of scintillation detectors based on BGO, NaI(Tl), and stilbene crystals from the direct penetration of neutron radiation with an energy of 14.1 MeV that was emitted isotropically into a solid angle of 4π. A series of experimental measurements of the count-rate suppression factor that may be obtained for the indicated detectors through the use of various shielding filters comprising iron, lead, and borated polyethylene layers with a total thickness not exceeding 50 cm are conducted.

  19. Evaluation of granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, CaF sub 2 :Eu and ZnS:Ag for alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination in a flow-cell radiation detector

    Devol, T A; Fjeld, R A

    1999-01-01

    Granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, and CaF sub 2 :Eu; CaF sub 2 :Eu coated with a fluorescent polymer, and combinations of coated and uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu with ZnS:Ag were evaluated for their ability to discriminate between alpha and beta particles in a flow-cell radiation detector. The evaluations were based on the analysis of pulse shape spectra. Various granulated scintillators were packed into flow cell detectors that were coils of 3.0 mm ODx1.5 mm ID fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon[reg] tubing positioned between dual photomultiplier tubes for analysis. The best pulse shape discrimination was obtained for a combination of equal masses of uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu (63-90 mu m) and ZnS:Ag (10 mu m), which had a 9% spillover. Additional research is needed to reduce the spillover.

  20. Readout Electronics for BGO Calorimeter of DAMPE: Status during the First Half-year after Launching

    Ma, Siyuan; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Deliang; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientic satellite which was successfully launched into a 500 Km sun-synchronous orbit, on December 17th, 2015, from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center of China. The major scientific objective of DAMPE mission is indirect searching for dark matter by observing high energy primary cosmic rays, especially positrons/electrons and gamma rays with an energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. The BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) calorimeter, which is a critical sub-detector of DAMPE payload, was developed for measuring the energy of cosmic particles, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information. It is composed of 308 BGO crystal logs, with the size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*60cm for each log to form a total absorption electromagnetic calorimeter. All the BGO logs are stacked in 14 layers, with each layer consisting of 22 BGO crystal logs and each log is viewed by two Hamamatsu R5610A PMTs (photomultiplier tubes), from both sides respectively. Each PMT incorporates a three dynode pick off to achieve a large dynamic range, which results in 616 PMTs and 1848 signal channels. The main function of readout electronics system, which consists of 16 FEE(Front End Electronics) modules, is to precisely measure the charge of PMT signals and providing "hit" signals. The hit signals are sent to the trigger module of PDPU (Payload Data Process Unit) to generate triggers for the payload. The calibration of the BGO calorimeter is composed of pedestal testing and electronic linear scale, which are executed frequently in the space after launching. The data of the testing is transmitted to ground station in the form of scientific data. The monitor status consists of temperature, current and status words of the FEE, which are measured and recorded every 16 seconds and packed in the engineering data, then transmitted to ground station. The status of the BGO calorimeter can be evaluated by the calibration

  1. A novel compact Ge-BGO Compton-suppression spectrometer

    Voigt, M.J.A. de [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Bacelar, J.C. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Micek, S.L. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Schotanus, P. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Verhoef, B.A.W. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Wintraecken, Y.J.E. [Eindhoven Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands). Cyclotron Lab.; Vermeulen, P. [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Lammerdries 25, Olen (Belgium)

    1995-03-15

    A novel Compton-suppression spectrometer has been designed and its performance has been tested experimentally. The device consists of a single BGO crystal with a cylindrical well that holds a Ge crystal without interfering material between the crystals. Both crystals are cooled to an equilibrium temperature of 104 K which allows a proper performance of the Ge detector. The BGO crystal is read out by a single PM tube. Photodiodes have been applied to investigate the light yield and timing properties of BGO at low temperature. The light transport phenomena were well reproduced by computer simulations. The photopeak-to-total ratio amounts to 0.74 with an average suppression factor of 10.1 for a {sup 137}Cs source and 0.60 and 6.4, respectively, for a {sup 60}Co source. These results are well reproduced by Monte Carlo codes simulating the {gamma}-ray interactions, also taking into account some charge-collection inefficiency. ((orig.)).

  2. A novel compact Ge-BGO Compton-suppression spectrometer

    A novel Compton-suppression spectrometer has been designed and its performance has been tested experimentally. The device consists of a single BGO crystal with a cylindrical well that holds a Ge crystal without interfering material between the crystals. Both crystals are cooled to an equilibrium temperature of 104 K which allows a proper performance of the Ge detector. The BGO crystal is read out by a single PM tube. Photodiodes have been applied to investigate the light yield and timing properties of BGO at low temperature. The light transport phenomena were well reproduced by computer simulations. The photopeak-to-total ratio amounts to 0.74 with an average suppression factor of 10.1 for a 137Cs source and 0.60 and 6.4, respectively, for a 60Co source. These results are well reproduced by Monte Carlo codes simulating the γ-ray interactions, also taking into account some charge-collection inefficiency. ((orig.))

  3. Activation of BGO crystals with 1.5 GeV protons

    A cylindrical bismuth germanate (BGO) detector (7.5 cm diameter x 7.5 cm long) and a cylindrical bare crystal of BGO (2.5 cm diameter x 2.5 cm long) were exposed to a fluence of 1.1x108 protons cm-2 at 1.5 GeV energy, roughly equivalent to that expected on an interplanetary journey to Mars. No degradation in the energy resolution or counting efficiency of the BGO detector was observed, although the background continuum increased significantly. Events emanating from the bare crystal were counted externally with a high-resolution germanium detector. The activation lines identified were compared to a spectrum from an externally counted BGO detector taken on a high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica. (orig.)

  4. BGO front-end electronics and signal processing in the MXGS instrument for the ASIM mission

    Skogseide, Yngve; Cenkeramaddi, Linga Reddy; Genov, Georgi;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the Bismuth Germanate Oxide (BGO) front-end electronics design and signal processing in Modular X- and Gamma ray sensor (MXGS) instrument onboard the Atmosphere Space Interaction Monitor (ASIM) mission, funded by the European Space Agency. University of Bergen is responsible for...... the design and development of the detector layers and readout electronics for the MXGS instrument. The principal objective of the instrument is to detect Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes (TGFs), which are related to thunderstorm activity. The digital pulse processing scheme used in the MXGS BGO detector...... gives it a significantly higher rate capability than what has been achieved in other instruments used in the study of terrestrial gamma flashes. The front-end electronics for the BGO detector layer in MXGS system also uses fewer components compared to conventional analog front-ends for BGO detectors...

  5. Activation of BGO crystals with 1. 5 GeV protons

    Rester, A.C.; Bamford, G.J.; Coldwell, R.L. (Florida Univ., Alachua, FL (USA). Inst. for Astrophysics and Planetary Exploration); Trombka, J.I. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Lab. for Astronomy and Solar Physics)

    1990-11-15

    A cylindrical bismuth germanate (BGO) detector (7.5 cm diameter x 7.5 cm long) and a cylindrical bare crystal of BGO (2.5 cm diameter x 2.5 cm long) were exposed to a fluence of 1.1x10{sup 8} protons cm{sup -2} at 1.5 GeV energy, roughly equivalent to that expected on an interplanetary journey to Mars. No degradation in the energy resolution or counting efficiency of the BGO detector was observed, although the background continuum increased significantly. Events emanating from the bare crystal were counted externally with a high-resolution germanium detector. The activation lines identified were compared to a spectrum from an externally counted BGO detector taken on a high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica. (orig.).

  6. Design of the Readout Electronics for the Qualification Model of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter

    Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Deliang; Zhang, Junbin; Gao, Shanshan; Yang, Di; Zhang, Yunlong; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite being developed in China, aimed at cosmic ray study, gamma ray astronomy, and searching for the clue of dark matter particles, with a planned mission period of more than 3 years and an orbit altitude of about 500 km. The BGO Calorimeter, which consists of 308 BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxid) crystal bars, 616 PMTs (photomultiplier tubes) and 1848 dynode signals, has approximately 32 radiation lengths. It is a crucial sub-detector...

  7. A BGO scintillating bolometer for gamma and alpha spectroscopy

    Cardani, Laura; Di Domizio, Sergio; Gironi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    A 891 g BGO scintillating bolometer has been tested at 10 mK in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). The discrimination capability, the radio-purity of the compound and the main features of the crystal have been studied in order to demonstrate the excellent performances obtained by operating a scintillating bolometer in the field of gamma and alpha spectroscopy. The sensitivity of this detector in the study of extremely low surface contaminations has been investigated.

  8. Search for axioelectric effect of solar axions using BGO scintillating bolometer

    Derbin, A.V.; Kayunov, A.S.; Muratova, V.N.; Semenov, D.A.; Unzhakov, E.V. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Gironi, L.; Biassoni, M.; Capelli, S.; Clemenza, M.; Ferri, E.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Pavan, M.; Sisti, M. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy); Nagorny, S.S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, INFN, L' Aquila, AQ (Italy); Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Beeman, J.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Drachnev, I.S. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Gran Sasso Science Institute, INFN, L' Aquila, AQ (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    A search for axioelectric absorption of solar axions produced in the p + d → {sup 3}He + γ(5.5 MeV) reaction has been performed with a BGO detector placed in a low-background setup. A model-independent limit on the combination of axion.nucleon and axion.electron coupling constants has been obtained: vertical stroke g{sub Ae} x g{sup 3}{sub AN} vertical stroke < 1.9 x 10{sup -10} for 90 % confidence level. The constraint of the axion.electron coupling constant has been obtained for hadronic axion with masses of (0.1.1) MeV: vertical stroke g{sub Ae} vertical stroke ≤ (0.96. 8.2) x 10{sup -8}. (orig.)

  9. Structure design and enviromental test of BGO calorimeter for satellite DAMPE

    Hu, Yiming; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Yunlong; Chen, Dengyi; Chang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer, DAMPE, is a new designed satellite developed for the new Innovation 2020 program of Chinese Academy of Sciences. As the most important payload of China's first scientific satellite for detecting dark matter, the primary purposes of BGO calorimeter is to measure the energy of incident high energy electrons and gamma rays (5GeV-10TeV) and to identify hadron and electronics. BGO calorimeter also provides an important background discriminator by measuring the energy deposition due to the particle shower that produced by the e^{±}, γ and imaging their shower development profile. Structure design of BGO calorimeter is described in this paper. The new designed BGO calorimeter consists of 308 BGO crystals coupled with photomultiplier tubes on its two ends. The envelop size of the BGO calorimeter is 907.5mm×907.5mm×494.5mm,and the weight of which is 1051.4Kg. The most important purpose of mechanical design is how to package so heavy crystals into a detector as required arrangement and to make sure reliability and safety. This paper describes the results of vibration tests using the Flight Module of the BGO Calorimeter for the DAMPE satellite. During the vibration tests, no degradation of the mechanical assembly was observed. After random or sinusoidal vibrations, there was no significant changes of the frequency signatures observed during the modal surveys. The comparison of results of cosmic ray tests before and after the vibration shows no change in the performance of the BGO calorimeter.

  10. A BGO scintillating bolometer for γ and α spectroscopy

    A 891 g BGO (Bi4Ge3O12) scintillating bolometer has been tested at 10 mK in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). The discrimination capability, the radio-purity of the compound and the main features of the crystal have been studied in order to demonstrate the excellent performances obtained by operating a scintillating bolometer in the field of γ and α spectroscopy. The sensitivity of this detector in the study of extremely low surface contaminations has been investigated.

  11. Study on Radiation Condition in DAMPE Orbit by Analyzing the Engineering Data of BGO Calorimeter

    Feng, Changqing; Liu, Shubin; Zhang, Yunlong; Ma, Siyuan

    2016-07-01

    The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite which was successfully launched into a 500 Km sun-synchronous orbit, on December 17th, 2015, from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center of China. The major scientific objectives of the DAMPE mission are primary cosmic ray, gamma ray astronomy and dark matter particles, by observing high energy primary cosmic rays, especially positrons/electrons and gamma rays with an energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. The BGO calorimeter is a critical sub-detector of DAMPE payload, for measuring the energy of cosmic particles, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information. It utilizes 308 BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) crystal logs with the size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*60cm for each log, to form a total absorption electromagnetic calorimeter. All the BGO logs are stacked in 14 layers, with each layer consisting of 22 BGO crystal logs and each log is viewed by two Hamamatsu R5610A PMTs (photomultiplier tubes), from both sides respectively. In order to achieve a large dynamic range, each PMT base incorporates a three dynode (2, 5, 8) pick off, which results in 616 PMTs and 1848 signal channels. The readout electronics system, which consists of 16 FEE (Front End Electronics) modules, was developed. Its main functions are based on the Flash-based FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) chip and low power, 32-channel VA160 and VATA160 ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) for precisely measuring the charge of PMT signals and providing "hit" signals as well. The hit signals are sent to the trigger module of PDPU (Payload Data Process Unit) and the hit rates of each layer is real-timely recorded by counters and packed into the engineering data, which directly reflect the flux of particles which fly into or pass through the detectors. In order to mitigate the SEU (Single Event Upset) effect in radioactive space environment, certain protecting methods, such as TMR

  12. The BGO collaboration progress report 1990

    A large solid angle BGO calorimeter is under contruction for photo-nuclear experiments at intermediate energy facilities. In this note the status progress of the project, the technical steps undertaken in the construction of the apparatus and the goals of this initiative are reviewed

  13. Imaging performance of silicon photomultipliers coupled to BGO and CsI:Na arrays

    The aim of this study is to investigate the imaging performance of a silicon photomultiplier array (ArraySL-4) photodetector for possible PET and potentially SPECT applications using BGO and CsI(Na) pixellated scintillators. Our main objectives are: i) the comparison of the ArraySL-4 to the older version SensL's SPMArray4 photo detector in terms of energy resolution and peak to valley ratio of a row profile in the flood image and ii) the study of the effect of different coupling schemes using ultra transmitting glass windows of various thicknesses. We acquired raw images from two pixellated scintillators (BGO with 2 × 2×5 mm3 and CsI:Na with 1 × 1×5 mm3 pixel sizes) irradiated with 511 keV and 1274.5 keV γ-rays from a 22Na source. The SiPM array detector allowed the clear visualization of the discrete 2 × 2 mm2 pixellated BGO and 1 × 1 mm2 CsI:Na scintillator elements at room temperature (no cooling). The energy resolution of the new SensL ArraySL-4 detector for the 2 × 2×5 mm3 BGO pixellated scintillator array is improved for rather 6 percentage points (energy resolution improvement equal to 22%) and the peak to valley ratio is measured higher for both scintillator arrays (for BGO 68% (1.7 × ) and for CsI:Na 154% (2.5 × )) compared with SPMArray4. The clear identification of the 1 × 1 mm2 CsI:Na scintillator elements provides evidence that the combination of those SiPMs with even smaller arrays can be used as an efficient imaging detector module. Optical coupling significantly improves image uniformity, while the use of BK7 ultra transmitting glass window with 1.35 mm thickness provided the best measure energy resolution equal to 21.5%

  14. Temperature Dependence Calibration and Correction of the DAMPE BGO Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Wei, Yifeng; Zhang, Yunlong; Wen, Sicheng; Wang, Chi; Li, Zhiying; Feng, Changqing; Wang, Xiaolian; Xu, Zizong; Huang, Guangshun; Liu, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    A BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is built for the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) mission. The effect of temperature on the BGO ECAL was investigated with a thermal vacuum experiment. The light output of a BGO crystal depends on temperature significantly. The temperature coefficient of each BGO crystal bar has been calibrated, and a correction method is also presented in this paper.

  15. Characterization of Photon-Counting Detector Responsivity for Non-Linear Two-Photon Absorption Process

    Sburlan, S. E.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-band absorption at 1550 nm has been demonstrated and characterized on silicon Geiger mode detectors which normally would be expected to have no response at this wavelength. We compare responsivity measurements to singlephoton absorption for wavelengths slightly above the bandgap wavelength of silicon (approx. 1100 microns). One application for this low efficiency sub-band absorption is in deep space optical communication systems where it is desirable to track a 1030 nm uplink beacon on the same flight terminal detector array that monitors a 1550 nm downlink signal for pointingcontrol. The currently observed absorption at 1550 nm provides 60-70 dB of isolation compared to the response at 1064 nm, which is desirable to avoid saturation of the detector by scattered light from the downlink laser.

  16. Performances of large BGO crystals below 20 MeV

    This paper presents the performances of large tapered BGO crystals to low energy photons of 6 to 20 MeV. The read-out of the crystals was made with large area photodiodes associated to shaping amplifiers

  17. Computer modelling of radiation generated defects in BGO scintillators

    This paper describes a computer modelling study of bismuth germanate, Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO), a material of current interest in applications as a scintillator for photon and electron detection. A potential is derived by fitting to the structure of the material, and this potential is then used to calculate formation energies of basic defects in BGO. This information is then used to draw conclusions about the defect properties of the material

  18. A compact Ge-BGO coincidence array for ultra-sensitive in-beam gamma spectroscopy

    Ultra-weak resonances in nuclear reactions impose a challenge on experimentalists. The present work describes the setup used in the first direct measurement of extremely weak low energy resonances of the 18O(α, γ)22Ne reaction. A Clover HPGe detector in coincidence with specified energy windows in BGO counters covering a large solid angle, and combined with large plastic veto counters led to a significantly improved sensitivity, thus allowing for the clear identification of specific γ-transitions. Different modes of operation have been tested for optimizing the final experimental setup

  19. Performance of a dual readout calorimeter with a BGO electromagnetic section

    The dual readout technique has been tested on a hybrid calorimeter. The electromagnetic section of this instrument consists of 100 BGO crystals and the hadronic section is made out scintillating and Cherenkov fibers embedded in a copper matrix (DREAM). The electromagnetic fraction of hadronic showers is evaluated on an event-by-event basis from the relative amounts of Cherenkov and scintillation lights produced in the shower development. The performance of such a calorimeter in terms of energy resolution is presented. Effects of side leakage on detector performance are also studied.

  20. Segmented Monolithic Germanium Detector Arrays for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Final Report

    The experimental results from the Phase I effort were extremely encouraging. During Phase I PHDs Co. made the first strides toward a new detector technology that could have great impact on synchrotron x-ray absorption (XAS) measurements, and x-ray detector technology in general. Detector hardware that allowed critical demonstration measurements of our technology was designed and fabricated. This new technology allows good charge collection from many pixels on a single side of a multi-element monolithic germanium planar detector. The detector technology provides 'dot-like' collection electrodes having very low capacitance. The detector technology appears to perform as anticipated in the Phase I proposal. In particular, the 7-pixel detector studied showed remarkable properties; making it an interesting example of detector physics. The technology is enabled by the use of amorphous germanium contact technology on germanium planar detectors. Because of the scalability associated with the fabrication of these technologies at PHDs Co., we anticipate being able to supply larger detector systems at significantly lower cost than systems made in the conventional manner.

  1. Plasmonic structure integrated single-photon detector configurations to improve absorptance and polarization contrast

    Mária Csete; Gábor Szekeres; András Szenes; Anikó Szalai; Gábor Szabó

    2014-01-01

    Configurations capable of maximizing both the absorption component of system detection efficiency and the achievable polarization contrast were determined for 1550 nm polarized light illumination of different plasmonic structure integrated superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) consisting of p = 264 nm and P = 792 nm periodic niobium nitride (NbN) patterns on silica substrate. Global effective NbN absorptance maxima appear in case of p/s-polarized light illumination in S/P-...

  2. A large acceptance detector system (LADS) for studies of pion absorption

    Alteholz, T.; Androi`c, D.; Backenstoss, G. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland)]|[Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburg, PA (United States)]|[Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany)] [and others; LADS Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    A large acceptance detector system (LADS) has been designed and built at the Paul Scherrer Institute to study multi-particle final states following pion-nucleus absorption. It consists of a 28-sector cylinder of plastic scintillators of 1.6 m active length and 1.4 m diameter, two cylindrical wire chambers, and two 14-sector plastic scintillator end-caps which close each end. The nearly 4{pi} solid angle coverage of this detector minimizes uncertainties associated with extrapolations over unmeasured regions of phase space. The design and the performance of the LADS detector are presented. (orig.).

  3. Imaging properties of a positron tomograph with 280 BGO crystals

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Vuletich, T.

    1980-11-01

    The basic imaging properties of the Donner 280-BGO-Crystal positron tomograph were measured and compared with the same system when it was equipped with 280 NaI(T1) crystals. The NaI(T1) crystals were 8 mm x 30 mm x 50 mm deep, sealed in 10 mm wide stainless steel cans. The BGO crystals are 9.5 mm x 32 mm x 32 mm deep and as they are not hygroscopic do not require sealed cans. With a shielding gap of 3 cm (section thickness 1.7 cm FWHM) the sensitivity of the BGO system is 55,000 events per sec for 1 ..mu..Ci per cm/sup 3/ in a 20 cm cylinder of water, which is 2.3 times higher than the NaI(T1) system. For a 200 ..mu..Ci/cm line source on the ring axis in a 20 cm diameter water cylinder, the BGO system records 86% of the scatter fraction and 66% of the accidental fraction of the NaI(T1) system. The lower light yield and poorer time resolution of BGO requires a wider coincidence timing window than NaI(T1). However, the ability to use full-energy pulse height selection with a 2.3-fold improvement in sensitivity results in an overall reduction in the fraction of accidental events recorded. The in-plane resolution of the BGO system is 9 to 10 mm FWHM within the central 30 cm diameter field, and the radial elongation at the edge of the field in the NaI(T1) system has been nearly eliminated.

  4. Imaging properties of a positron tomograph with 280 BGO crystals

    The basic imaging properties of the Donner 280-BGO-Crystal positron tomograph were measured and compared with the same system when it was equipped with 280 NaI(T1) crystals. The NaI(T1) crystals were 8 mm x 30 mm x 50 mm deep, sealed in 10 mm wide stainless steel cans. The BGO crystals are 9.5 mm x 32 mm x 32 mm deep and as they are not hygroscopic do not require sealed cans. With a shielding gap of 3 cm (section thickness 1.7 cm FWHM) the sensitivity of the BGO system is 55,000 events per sec for 1 μCi per cm3 in a 20 cm cylinder of water, which is 2.3 times higher than the NaI(T1) system. For a 200 μCi/cm line source on the ring axis in a 20 cm diameter water cylinder, the BGO system records 86% of the scatter fraction and 66% of the accidental fraction of the NaI(T1) system. The lower light yield and poorer time resolution of BGO requires a wider coincidence timing window than NaI(T1). However, the ability to use full-energy pulse height selection with a 2.3-fold improvement in sensitivity results in an overall reduction in the fraction of accidental events recorded. The in-plane resolution of the BGO system is 9 to 10 mm FWHM within the central 30 cm diameter field, and the radial elongation at the edge of the field in the NaI(T1) system has been nearly eliminated

  5. Temperature dependence calibration and correction of the DAMPE BGO electromagnetic calorimeter

    Wei, Y. F.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y. L.; Wen, S. C.; Wang, C.; Li, Z. Y.; Feng, C. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Huang, G. S.; Liu, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    A BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is built for the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) mission. The temperature effect on the BGO ECAL was investigated with a thermal vacuum experiment. The light output of a BGO crystal depends on temperature significantly, and the readout system is also affected by temperature. The temperature coefficient of each BGO detection unit has been calibrated, and a correction method is also presented in this paper.

  6. Single event effect hardness for the front-end ASICs in the DAMPE satellite BGO calorimeter

    Shan-Shan, Gao; Di, Jiang; Chang-Qing, Feng; Kai, Xi; Shu-Bin, Liu; Qi, An

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a Chinese scientific satellite designed for cosmic ray studies with a primary scientific goal of indirect detection of dark matter particles. As a crucial sub-detector, the BGO calorimeter measures the energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In order to implement high-density front-end electronics (FEE) with the ability to measure 1848 signals from 616 photomultiplier tubes on the strictly constrained satellite platform, two kinds of 32-channel front-end ASICs, VA160 and VATA160, are customized. However, a space mission period of more than 3 years makes single event effects (SEEs) become threats to reliability. In order to evaluate SEE sensitivities of these chips and verify the effectiveness of mitigation methods, a series of laser-induced and heavy ion-induced SEE tests were performed. Benefiting from the single event latch-up (SEL) protection circuit for power supply, the triple module redundancy (TMR) technology for the configuration registers and the optimized sequential design for the data acquisition process, 52 VA160 chips and 32 VATA160 chips have been applied in the flight model of the BGO calorimeter with radiation hardness assurance. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04040202-4) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (WK2030040048)

  7. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm2 which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm2 pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is 55Fe test source (MnKα, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 μsec peaking time. At 0.5 μsec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting

  8. Plasmonic structure integrated single-photon detector configurations to improve absorptance and polarization contrast

    Csete, Maria; Szenes, Andras; Szalai, Aniko; Szabo, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Configurations capable of maximizing both absorptance and polarization contrast were determined for 1550 nm polarized light illumination of different plasmonic structure integrated superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) consisting of p=264 nm and P=792 nm periodic niobium-nitride (NbN) patterns on silica substrate. Global NbN absorptance maxima appear in case of p/s-polarized light illumination in S/P-orientation (gamma=90 azimuthal angle) and the highest polarization contrast is attained in S-orientation of all devices. Common nanophotonical origin of absorptance enhancement is collective resonance on nano-cavity-gratings with different profiles, which is promoted by coupling between localized modes in quarter wavelength MIM nano-cavities and laterally synchronized Brewster-Zenneck-type surface waves in integrated SNSPDs possessing a three-quarter-wavelength-scaled periodicity. The spectral sensitivity and dispersion characteristics reveal that device design specific optimal configurations...

  9. nBn and pBp infrared detectors with graded barrier layer, graded absorption layer, or chirped strained layer super lattice absorption layer

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An nBn detector is described where for some embodiments the barrier layer has a concentration gradient, for some embodiments the absorption layer has a concentration gradient, and for some embodiments the absorption layer is a chirped strained layer super lattice. The use of a graded barrier or absorption layer, or the use of a chirped strained layer super lattice for the absorption layer, allows for design of the energy bands so that the valence band may be aligned across the device. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  10. Simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption system using photodiode array detector

    A photodiode array (PDA) detector-multichannel analyser (MCA) system has been coupled to a flame and a graphite furnace atomiser and tested for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption analysis. Multielement hollow cathode lamps (HCL) are used as light source. Spectral lines are dispersed through a spectrograph with triple gratings and detected by a 25.4 mm PDA detector consisting of 1024 elements. The optical MCA system is capable of recording multiple spectra spanned by the spectrograph/PDA. The transmitted intensity spectra obtained for the standard and analyte solutions during flame or graphite furnace atomisation are converted to absorbance spectra using the MCA software provided. Results from the comparison studies show that the linear range and sensitivities for Ni-Co-Fe and Cu-Cr obtained from the simultaneous measurements are within the same order of magnitudes as those from conventional single element determinations using photomultiplier tube detection. The study also shows that non-atomic absorption can be readily corrected by a two-line method where non-atomic absorption lines can be chosen from the spectra recorded simultaneously. The proposed system has been evaluated for the determination of trace elements using NBS standard reference water SRM 1643b

  11. Energy correction for the BGO calorimeter of DAMPE using an electron beam

    Li, Zhi-Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wei, Yi-Feng; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Yun-Long; Wen, Si-Cheng; Wang, Xiao-Lian; Xu, Zi-Zong; Huang, Guang-Shun

    2016-08-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer is an orbital indirect dark matter search experiment which measures the spectra of photons, electrons and positrons originating from deep space. The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), made of bismuth germinate (BGO), is one of the key sub-detectors of DAMPE, and is designed for energy measurement with a large dynamic range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In this paper, methods for energy correction are discussed, in order to reconstruct the primary energy of the incident electrons. Different methods are chosen for the appropriate energy ranges. The correction results of Geant4 simulation and beam test data (at CERN) are presented. Supported by the Chinese 973 Program (2010CB833002), the Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Science (XDA04040202-4) and 100 Talents Program of CAS

  12. Study on FPGA SEU Mitigation for Readout Electronics of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter

    Shen, Zhongtao; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Deliang; Jiang, Di; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The BGO calorimeter, which provides a wide measurement range of the primary cosmic ray spectrum, is a key sub-detector of Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE). The readout electronics of calorimeter consists of 16 pieces of Actel ProASIC Plus FLASH-based FPGA, of which the design-level flip-flops and embedded block RAMs are single event upset (SEU) sensitive in the harsh space environment. Therefore to comply with radiation hardness assurance (RHA), SEU mitigation methods, including partial triple modular redundancy (TMR), CRC checksum, and multi-domain reset are analyzed and tested by the heavy-ion beam test. Composed of multi-level redundancy, a FPGA design with the characteristics of SEU tolerance and low resource consumption is implemented for the readout electronics.

  13. Natural gas pipeline leak detector based on NIR diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Gao, Xiaoming; Fan, Hong; Huang, Teng; Wang, Xia; Bao, Jian; Li, Xiaoyun; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2006-09-01

    The paper reports on the development of an integrated natural gas pipeline leak detector based on diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The detector transmits a 1.653 μm DFB diode laser with 10 mW and detects a fraction of the backscatter reflected from the topographic targets. To eliminate the effect of topographic scatter targets, a ratio detection technique was used. Wavelength modulation and harmonic detection were used to improve the detection sensitivity. The experimental detection limit is 50 ppm m, remote detection for a distance up to 20 m away topographic scatter target is demonstrated. Using a known simulative leak pipe, minimum detectable pipe leak flux is less than 10 ml/min.

  14. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Bucher, J.J.; Allen, P.G.; Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.; Madden, N.W.; Cork, C.; Luke, P.; Pehl, D.; Malone, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Engineering Div.

    1995-03-01

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm{sup 2} pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is < 10% for 5.9 keV photons that fall within 0.5 mm of the pixel boundaries. The detector electronics system uses pre-amplifiers built at LBNL with commercial Tennelec Model TC 244 amplifiers. Using an {sup 55}Fe test source (MnK{sub {alpha}}, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 {mu}sec peaking time. At 0.5 {mu}sec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting.

  15. Tow efficiency correction functions of source self-absorption of an HPGe detector

    The efficiency correction function of source absorption of an HPGe γ detector is determined by experiment in energy range from 59.5 keV to 1408 keV and density range from 0.3 g/cm3 to 2.0 g/cm3. Fit Polynomial and fit Sigmoidal are compared. The results show that fit Sigmoidal is better than fit polynomial, and the detection efficiency at any points of energy and density could be conveniently calculated with it in calibrated range. (authors)

  16. A study of energy correction for the electron beam data in the BGO ECAL of the DAMPE

    Li, Zhiying; Wei, Yifeng; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Yunlong; Wen, Sicheng; Wang, Xiaolian; Xu, Zizong; Huang, Guangshun

    2015-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is an orbital experiment aiming at searching for dark matter indirectly by measuring the spectra of photons, electrons and positrons originating from deep space. The BGO electromagnetic calorimeter is one of the key sub-detectors of the DAMPE, which is designed for high energy measurement with a large dynamic range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In this paper, some methods for energy correction are discussed and tried, in order to reconstruct the primary energy of the incident electrons. Different methods are chosen for the appropriate energy ranges. The results of Geant4 simulation and beam test data (at CERN) are presented.

  17. The nonlinear light output of NaI(Tl) detectors in the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer

    Rasco, B.C., E-mail: crasco@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Fijałkowska, A.; Karny, M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, PL-02093 Warszawa (Poland); Rykaczewski, K.P. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wolińska-Cichocka, M. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw PL-02-093 (Poland); Grzywacz, R.; Goetz, K.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37966 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    A new detector array, the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS), was commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). Total absorption gamma spectra measured with MTAS are expected to improve beta-feeding patterns and beta strength functions in fission products. MTAS is constructed out of hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors with a unique central module surrounded by 18 identical crystals assembled in three rings. The total NaI(Tl) mass of MTAS is over 1000 kg. The response of the central and other 18 MTAS modules to γ-radiation was simulated using the GEANT4 toolkit modified to analyze the nonlinear light output of NaI(Tl). A detailed description of the GEANT4 modifications made is discussed. Simulated energy resolution of MTAS modules is found to agree well with the measurements for single γ transitions of 662 keV ({sup 137}Cs) with 8.2% full width half maximum (FWHM), 835 keV ({sup 54}Mn) with FWHM of 7.5% FWHM, and 1115 keV ({sup 65}Zn) with FWHM of 6.5%. Simulations of single and multiple γ-rays from {sup 60}Co are also discussed.

  18. First results from the commissioning of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    Bella Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA accelerator facility in Bonn combines the highly segmented BGO calorimeter with a particle tracking magnetic spectrometer at forward angles. An extensive physics program using an energy tagged Bremsstrahlung photon beam is planned. The commissioning phase of the experiment is recently complete, enhancements for the BGO-OD experiment are nevertheless in development. Recent results from the analysis of the commissioning data, which includes particle track reconstruction in the forward spectrometer and momentum reconstruction with the BGO calorimeter are presented.

  19. Plasmonic Structure Integrated Single-Photon Detector Configurations to Improve Absorptance and Polarization Contrast

    Mária Csete

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Configurations capable of maximizing both the absorption component of system detection efficiency and the achievable polarization contrast were determined for 1550 nm polarized light illumination of different plasmonic structure integrated superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs consisting of p = 264 nm and P = 792 nm periodic niobium nitride (NbN patterns on silica substrate. Global effective NbN absorptance maxima appear in case of p/s-polarized light illumination in S/P-orientation (γ = 90°/0° azimuthal angle and the highest polarization contrast is attained in S-orientation of all devices. Common nanophotonical origin of absorptance enhancement is collective resonance on nanocavity gratings with different profiles, which is promoted by coupling between localized modes in quarter-wavelength metal-insulator-metal nanocavities and laterally synchronized Brewster-Zenneck-type surface waves in integrated SNSPDs possessing a three-quarter-wavelength-scaled periodicity. The spectral sensitivity and dispersion characteristics reveal that device design specific optimal configurations exist.

  20. Onboard calibration circuit for the DAMPE BGO calorimeter front-end electronics

    Zhang, De-Liang; Feng, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Bin; Wang, Qi; Ma, Si-Yuan; Shen, Zhong-Tao; Jiang, Di; Gao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yun-Long; Guo, Jian-Hua; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-05-01

    DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite which is mainly aimed at indirectly searching for dark matter in space. One critical sub-detector of the DAMPE payload is the BGO (bismuth germanium oxide) calorimeter, which contains 1848 PMT (photomultiplier tube) dynodes and 16 FEE (Front-End Electronics) boards. VA160 and VATA160, two 32-channel low power ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), are adopted as the key components on the FEEs to perform charge measurement for the PMT signals. In order to monitor the parameter drift which may be caused by temperature variation, aging, or other environmental factors, an onboard calibration circuit is designed for the VA160 and VATA160 ASICs. It is mainly composed of a 12-bit DAC (Digital to Analog Converter), an operational amplifier and an analog switch. Test results showed that a dynamic range of 0–30 pC with a precision of 5 fC (Root Meam Square, RMS) was achieved, which covers the VA160’s input range. It can be used to compensate for the temperature drift and test the trigger function of the FEEs. The calibration circuit has been implemented for the front-end electronics of the BGO Calorimeter and verified by all the environmental tests for both Qualification Model and Flight Model of DAMPE. The DAMPE satellite was launched at the end of 2015 and the calibration circuit will operate periodically in space. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04040202-4), and National Basic Research Program (973 Program) of China (2010CB833002) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11273070)

  1. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than ∼1 ns are recorded by the ''classical'' technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent ''pump-probe'' technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {[Ru(bpy)3]2+ and a less symmetric derivative} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity.

  2. Background reduction of a HPGe-BGO anti-Compton system and its application to soil contamination monitoring

    Accurate gamma spectrometry is widely performed by HPGe detectors. The limit of detection of gamma spectrometry system is determined by two main factors: the detector efficiency and its background. To obtain higher efficiencies, larger detectors have to be used, but their price become forbidding, thus it is common to try to reduce their background. For static laboratory systems optimal shielding can be used, but massive shielding is not practical for mobile systems intended to be operated outdoors, as for ground contamination survey. The main contribution to the background in an HPGe gamma spectrometer (except the background radiation) is due to the Compton scattering. When photons are Compton scattered in the detector, only a part of their energy is transmitted to the detector, and the pulse will not contribute to the main photo-peak, but will appear at a lower energy, as part of the background. A lower energy gamma peak will be superposed on this background, and its limit of detection will be higher. A practical way to solve the problem is to position an additional detector around the HPGe and operate it in anti-coincidence with the HPGe detector. Coincident pulses from both detectors, mostly from Compton-scattering, will not be counted, and the background will be reduced. This setup is called anti-Compton, and the characteristic of an anti-Compton system based on a HPGe detector, surrounded by a BGO scintillator, is presented in this work. Its application to ground monitoring is also presented

  3. HPGe detector photopeak efficiency calculation including self-absorption and coincidence corrections for Marinelli beaker sources using compact analytical expressions

    Direct mathematical methods to calculate total and full-energy peak (photopeak) efficiencies, coincidence correction factors and the source self-absorption of a closed end coaxial HPGe detector for Marinelli beaker sources have been derived. The source self-absorption is determined by calculating the photon path length in the source volume. The attenuation of photons by the Marinelli beaker and the detector cap materials is also calculated. In the experiments gamma aqueous sources containing several radionuclides covering the energy range from 60 to 1836 keV were used. By comparison, the theoretical and experimental full-energy peak efficiency values are in good agreement

  4. HPGe detector photopeak efficiency calculation including self-absorption and coincidence corrections for cylindrical sources using compact analytical expressions

    Direct mathematical methods to calculate total and photopeak efficiencies, coincidence correction factors and the source medium self-absorption of closed end coaxial HPGe detector for cylindrical sources have been derived. By comparison, the theoretical and experimental efficiency values are in good agreement. (author)

  5. Standoff gas leak detectors based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Frish, M. B.; Wainner, R. T.; Green, B. D.; Laderer, M. C.; Allen, M. G.

    2005-11-01

    Trace gas sensing and analysis by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a robust and reliable technology accepted for industrial process monitoring and control, quality assurance, environmental sensing, plant safety, and infrastructure security. Sensors incorporating well-packaged wavelength-stabilized near-infrared (1.2 to 2.0 μm) laser sources sense over a dozen toxic or industrially-important gases. A large emerging application for TDLAS is standoff sensing of gas leaks, e.g. from natural gas pipelines. The Remote Methane Leak Detector (RMLD), a handheld standoff TDLAS leak survey tool that we developed, is replacing traditional leak detection tools that must be physically immersed within a leak to detect it. Employing a 10 mW 1.6 micron DFB laser, the RMLD illuminates a non-cooperative topographic surface, up to 30 m distant, and analyzes returned scattered light to deduce the presence of excess methane. The eye-safe, battery-powered, 6-pound handheld RMLD enhances walking pipeline survey rates by more than 30%. When combined with a spinning or rastering mirror, the RMLD serves as a platform for mobile leak mapping systems. Also, to enable high-altitude surveying and provide aerial disaster response, we are extending the standoff range to 3000 m by adding an EDFA to the laser transmitter.

  6. Self-absorption corrections of various sample-detector geometries in gamma-ray spectrometry using sample Monte Carlo Simulations

    Corrections for self-absorption in gamma-ray spectrometry have been developed using a simple Monte Carlo simulation technique. The simulation enables the calculation of gamma-ray path lengths in the sample which, using available data, can be used to calculate self-absorption correction factors. The simulation was carried out on three sample geometries: disk, Marinelli beaker, and cylinder (for well-type detectors). Mathematical models and experimental measurements are used to evaluate the simulations. A good agreement of within a few percents was observed. The simulation results are also in good agreement with those reported in the literature. The simulation code was carried out in FORTRAN 90,

  7. HPGe detector photopeak efficiency calculation including self-absorption and coincidence corrections for cylindrical sources using compact analytical expressions

    Total and full-energy peak efficiencies, coincidence correction factors and the source self-absorption of a p-type coaxial HPGe detector for cylindrical sources have been calculated using direct analytical expressions. In the experiments gamma aqueous sources containing several radionuclides covering the energy range from 60 to 1836 keV were used. By comparison, the theoretical and experimental full-energy peak efficiency values are in good agreement. (author)

  8. Design of composite detectors for energetic γ ray

    The efficiencies of clover and cluster composite detectors using NaI and BGO crystals as the media for detection of energetic γ ray are systematically simulated with Monte Carlo method. It is showed that the efficiency of the composite BGO detector is much higher than that of the composite NaI detector in the same geometry of detection media concerned. NaI crystal is not thought as a suitable medium of composite detectors for high energy γ ray duo to low efficiency, Doppler broadening and distortion to γ spectrum with comparison to BGO crystal. The composite BGO detectors have many advantages such as large photopeak efficiency, small Doppler effect and regular γ spectrum. As to the clover and cluster composite detectors made with the cylinders of BGO crystal in original size Φ76 x 127, the intrinsic photopeak efficiencies are over 40% and the enhanced factor of absolute efficiencies are as high as 2.4 and 2.7, respectively, for γ ray at 22 MeV. Furthermore, the enhanced factor of absolute efficiency increases fast with γ ray energy

  9. Short-wave infrared barriode detectors using InGaAsSb absorption material lattice matched to GaSb

    Short-wave infrared barriode detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. An absorption layer composition of In0.28Ga0.72As0.25Sb0.75 allowed for lattice matching to GaSb and cut-off wavelengths of 2.9 μm at 250 K and 3.0 μm at room temperature. Arrhenius plots of the dark current density showed diffusion limited dark currents approaching those expected for optimized HgCdTe-based detectors. Specific detectivity figures of around 7×1010 Jones and 1×1010 Jones were calculated, for 240 K and room temperature, respectively. Significantly, these devices could support focal plane arrays working at higher operating temperatures

  10. Short-wave infrared barriode detectors using InGaAsSb absorption material lattice matched to GaSb

    Craig, A. P.; Percy, B.; Marshall, A. R. J. [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Jain, M. [Amethyst Research Ltd., Kelvin Campus, West of Scotland Science Park, Glasgow G20 0SP (United Kingdom); Wicks, G.; Hossain, K. [Amethyst Research, Inc., 123 Case Circle, Ardmore, Oklahoma 73401 (United States); Golding, T. [Amethyst Research Ltd., Kelvin Campus, West of Scotland Science Park, Glasgow G20 0SP (United Kingdom); Amethyst Research, Inc., 123 Case Circle, Ardmore, Oklahoma 73401 (United States); McEwan, K.; Howle, C. [Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-18

    Short-wave infrared barriode detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. An absorption layer composition of In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75} allowed for lattice matching to GaSb and cut-off wavelengths of 2.9 μm at 250 K and 3.0 μm at room temperature. Arrhenius plots of the dark current density showed diffusion limited dark currents approaching those expected for optimized HgCdTe-based detectors. Specific detectivity figures of around 7×10{sup 10} Jones and 1×10{sup 10} Jones were calculated, for 240 K and room temperature, respectively. Significantly, these devices could support focal plane arrays working at higher operating temperatures.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of diluted system by undulator photon source and multi-element solid-state detector

    Tanida, H

    2001-01-01

    In order to measure the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum of an ultra-diluted system, an optics and detector control system for a synchrotron radiation beamline is developed. The undulator gap width is continuously tuned to obtain the maximum X-ray photon flux during the energy scan for the EXAFS measurement. A piezoelectric translator optimizes the parallelism of the double crystal in a monochromator at each measurement point to compensate for mechanical errors of the monochromator, resulting in a smooth and intense X-ray photon flux during the measurement. For a detection of a weak fluorescence signal from diluted samples, a 19-element solid-state detector and digital signal processor are used. A K-edge EXAFS spectrum of iron in a myoglobin aqueous solution with a concentration of 5.58 parts per million was obtained by this system.

  12. Absorption phenomenon study of low energies gamma rays in the Eurogam detector STACK

    The composite 4 π γ detector STACK is made of a pile of Ge Crystals in which the 2 circular surfaces are active, one implanted with Boron, the other diffused with Lithium and introducing a dead zone. The goal of this study is to research the dead zones and to study their influence upon the detection efficiency

  13. Response of BGO sectors to protons up to 170 MeV

    The response to monoenergetic protons of 24 cm long pyramidal BGO sectors, designed for a 4π spectrometer, was measured up to 173 MeV by scattering 200 MeV protons off a polyethylene target. The experimental results are compared with lower energy results and Monte Carlo calculations performed with a modified version of the GEANT code. (orig.)

  14. Properties of BGO thin films under the influence of gamma radiation

    It is important to know the behaviour of materials under the influence of radiation for the effective design of novel sensor systems. Optical properties of bismuth germinate (Bi4Ge3O12-BGO) thin films were investigated in terms of their perception to gamma radiation exposure. An Edwards E306A vacuum thermal coating system was used for thin films deposition. BGO films with a thickness of 200 nm were exposed to a disk-type 137Cs gamma radiation source with an activity of 370 kBq. Optical properties of the films were investigated using CARY IE UV-Visible Spectrophotometer. Calculated optical band gap for as-deposited BGO thin film was 1.95 eV. Gamma radiation induced changes in the optical properties of thin films, which could be explained by the variation in the degree of disorder. From the density-of-state model, it is known that optical band gap decreases with an increasing degree of disorder of the amorphous phase. Electrical properties of BGO thin films were recorded in real time using a low power capacitive interface system with a high resolution, which is based on Delta-sigma modulator. At doses from 0 to 1.5 mGy little if any changes in the capacitance were measured. This could be explained by co-existence of two processes, namely creation and annihilation of defects under the influence of radiation. After a threshold dose of 1.5 mGy creation of defects becomes more prevailing and the BGO film capacitance has gradually increased in value from 2.97 pF to 7.09 pF after irradiation with a 2.44 mGy dose

  15. Formation of slab waveguides in eulytine type BGO and CaF2 crystals by implantation of MeV nitrogen ions

    Ion implantation, compared with other waveguide fabrication methods, has some unique advantages. It has proved to be a universal technique for producing waveguides in most optical materials. The authors of the present article reported fabrication of channel and slab waveguides in an Erbium-doped tungsten tellurite glass by implantation of MeV energy N+ ions. The present article reports successful adaptation of the same technique to the fabrication of slab waveguides in eulytine type bismuth germanate (BGO) and CaF2 crystals. This is the first report on successful waveguide fabrication in these materials using 3.5 MeV N+ ions at implanted fluences between 5 × 1015 and 4 × 1016 ions/cm2. Spectroscopic ellipsometric measurements revealed the existence of guiding structures in both materials. M-line spectroscopic measurements indicated guiding effect in the as-implanted BGO up to 1550 nm and up to 980 nm in the as-implanted CaF2. Ion implantation induced the appearance of three peaks in the UV/Vis absorption spectrum of CaF2, that can be attributed to colour centres.

  16. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detector with High Absorption Yields Utilizing Silicon Pixel Absorbers

    Shiki, Shigetomo; Fujii, Go; Ukibe, Masahiro; Kitajima, Yoshinori; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2016-07-01

    A superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) array detector along with silicon pixel absorbers (STJ-SPA) is fabricated to achieve high detection efficiency at X-ray energies below 10 keV. The STJ pixels have dimensions of 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and are composed of Nb-Al/AlOX/Al-Nb thin layers. The SPAs are also 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and have a depth of 400 \\upmu m, and are isolated from each other by a deep trench with a depth of 350 \\upmu m. The detection efficiency of the STJ-SPA exceeds 95 % at X-ray energies below 10 keV, and its energy resolution is 82 eV FWHM, as measured at the Si K\\upalpha line at 1740 eV. By means of the STJ-SPA detector, the X-ray absorption spectrum of the light element sulfur with a concentration of less than 0.1 wt% in a soda-lime glass sample was successfully acquired.

  17. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detector with High Absorption Yields Utilizing Silicon Pixel Absorbers

    Shiki, Shigetomo; Fujii, Go; Ukibe, Masahiro; Kitajima, Yoshinori; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2016-02-01

    A superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) array detector along with silicon pixel absorbers (STJ-SPA) is fabricated to achieve high detection efficiency at X-ray energies below 10 keV. The STJ pixels have dimensions of 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and are composed of Nb-Al/AlOX /Al-Nb thin layers. The SPAs are also 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and have a depth of 400 \\upmu m, and are isolated from each other by a deep trench with a depth of 350 \\upmu m. The detection efficiency of the STJ-SPA exceeds 95 % at X-ray energies below 10 keV, and its energy resolution is 82 eV FWHM, as measured at the Si K\\upalpha line at 1740 eV. By means of the STJ-SPA detector, the X-ray absorption spectrum of the light element sulfur with a concentration of less than 0.1 wt% in a soda-lime glass sample was successfully acquired.

  18. Single Event Effect Hardness for the Front-end ASICs Applied in BGO Calorimeter of DAMPE Satellite

    Gao, Shan-Shan; Feng, Chang-Qing; Xi, Kai; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a Chinese scientific satellite designed for cosmic ray study with a primary scientific goal of indirect search of dark matter particles. As a crucial sub-detector, BGO calorimeter measures the energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In order to implement high-density front-end electronics (FEE) with the ability to measure 1848 signals from 616 photomultiplier tubes on the strictly constrained satellite platform, two kinds of 32-channel front-end ASICs, VA160 and VATA160, are customized. However, a space mission period of more than 3 years makes single event effect (SEE) a probable threat to reliability. In order to evaluate the SEE sensitivity of the chips and verify the effectiveness of mitigation methods, a series of laser-induced and heavy ion-induced SEE tests were performed. Benefiting from the single event latch-up (SEL) protection circuit for power supply, the triple module redundancy (TMR) technology for the configuration regist...

  19. Forward production of J//psi/ in hadronic interactions and calibration of a large BGO electromagnetic calorimeter

    In the first part of this thesis, we describe an analysis of J//psi/ produced in the forward direction in the reaction πN → μ+μ/sup /minus//X. The data for this analysis were collected by Fermilab experiment E615. We measured the cross section for J//psi/ production and the angular distribution of muons from J//psi/ decay. We found evidence for longitudinal polarization of J//psi/ produced in the kinematic limit where the J//psi/ carries a large fraction of the incident pion's longitudinal momentum. This is the first experimental observation of longitudinal polarization of J//psi/ produced in hadronic interactions. In the second part of this thesis, we describe the construction and calibration of a large Bismuth Germanante (BGO) electromagnetic calorimeter designed to study e+e/sup /minus// collisions at center-of-mass energies near the Z0 mass. The calorimeter is a subdetector of the L3 detector and will be installed in the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) of the European Organization for Nuclear Research. We present the results of a calibration of the calorimeter in an electron test beam at electron energies of 2, 10, and 50 GeV. We show that the accuracy of the calibration is 0.8% at 2 GeV, improving to better than 0.5% at 10 GeV and above. 65 refs., 72 figs., 21 tabs

  20. Phase I of a BGO sum-energy/multiplicity spectrometer and multi-Compton-suppression spectrometer system. Progress report

    The status of the performance testing and design of BGO hexagonal modules, the use of photosensitive diodes as a substitute for PMT's, and design and testing of a Ge Comptons suppressed spectrometer is summarized

  1. Measurements of photon mass attenuation coefficients for Ge and BGO crystals at 10 MeV

    The photon mass attenuation coefficients of the important materials for γ-ray detection, Ge and BGO (Bi4Ge3O12) crystals, have been measured for 10.0 MeV γ-rays. The measurement system using the laser-Compton backscattering γ-rays and the high-resolution high-energy photon spectrometer has been developed and utilized. The effectiveness of the system achieving the total systematic uncertainties of 0.5% for the measurements of the photon mass attenuation coefficients was demonstrated. It was shown that the measured photon mass attenuation coefficients, 318.1±1.7 [cm2/g] for the Ge crystal and 425.2±2.4 [cm2/g] for the BGO crystal, agree within the achieved experimental uncertainties with the evaluated values including atomic and nuclear processes at 10.0 MeV. (author)

  2. Testing and assessment of large BGO detector for beach monitoring of radioactive particles

    van der Graaf, E.R.; Rigollet, C.; Maleka, P.P.; Jones, D.G.

    2007-01-01

    The Beach Monitoring Steering Group (BMSG) was set up by UKAEA to explore whether improved systems for beach monitoring of radioactive particles are available. The BMSG commissioned the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI/N

  3. Design of a high dynamic range photomultiplier base board for the BGO ECAL of DAMPE

    A base board for photomultiplier tube (PMT) with multi-dynode readout has been developed for the BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE). In order to cover a high dynamic range of energy measurements, the signals are read out from different sensitive dynodes 2, 5, and 8 (Dy2, Dy5 and Dy8). The performance of this new type of base board is studied with a light-emitting diode (LED) system and cosmic rays. A wide measuring range from 0.5 to 1.0×105 MIPs can be achieved using the VA32 readout Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC)

  4. Detector for the positron-emission tomographer

    The γ-detector has been tested with two HPM-30/II and a series of heavy crystals (BGO, GSO and CeF3). The results of tests are presented. The best spatial resolution of 2.3 mm and 3 mm has been obtained with GSO and CeF3 crystals, respectively. Possibilities of using the drift time measurement technique for the location of γquanta conversions are considered. 13 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  5. A novel surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic detector to study the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Nonaka, Takamasa; Okuda, Chikaaki; Oka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Makimura, Yoshinari; Kondo, Yasuhito; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Yoji

    2016-09-01

    A surface-sensitive conversion-electron-yield X-ray absorption fine structure (CEY-XAFS) detector that operates at elevated temperatures is developed to investigate the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The detector enables measurements with the sample temperature controlled from room temperature up to 450 °C. The detector is applied to the LiNi0.75Co0.15Al0.05Mg0.05O2 cathode material at 0% state of charge (SOC) and 50% SOC to examine the chemical changes that occur during heating in the absence of an electrolyte. The combination of surface-sensitive CEY-XAFS and bulk-sensitive transmission-mode XAFS shows that the reduction of Ni and Co ions begins at the surface of the cathode particles at around 150 °C, and propagates inside the particle upon further heating. These changes with heating are irreversible and are more obvious at 50% SOC than at 0% SOC. The fraction of reduced Ni ions is larger than that of reduced Co ions. These results demonstrate the capability of the developed detector to obtain important information for the safe employment of this cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

  6. Determination of the self-absorption in environmental samples of Marinelli-geometry and HPGe-detectors using Monte-Carlo-simulations

    Measuring smallest activities requires high efficiencies and large sample volumes. Both demands are well accomplished by a Marinelli-beaker geometry. Because of the relative long mean path lengths compared to the mean free paths of photons in the sample material the measurement is affected by the self-absorption in the volume source. It is the purpose of this study to calculate self-absorption correction factors CSA making use of the Monte- Carlo-transport-code EGS4 simulating Marinelli-geometry and HPGe-detectors for photon energies in the range from 20 keV to.2 MeV. Fitting the results of the Monte-Carlo-calculations yielded an analytical term which covers the desired energy range as well as arbitrary chemical compositions and densities of environmental samples from 0.1 g/ccm to 2.0 g/ccm

  7. Total-absorption detector with CsI(Tl) crystal for measurement of gamma-quantum energies of 10-104 MeV

    A total-absorption shower scintillation gamma spectrometer is described. The spectrometer is designed for measurement of the energies of gamma quanta produced by interaction of relativistic particles with single crystals. The detector is based on a CsI(Tl) crystal, which is viewed by an FEU-49 photomultiplier operating at 660 V. The dynamic range of gamma-quantum energy measurement is 10-104 MeV. The energy resolution is 9% for gamma quanta with an energy of 4.43 MeV

  8. Possible use of a BGO array for neutron stimulated emission computed tomography by summing adjacent signals

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is a new approach for biological spectroscopy and imaging. Since the gamma-ray photons emitted from stimulated element have energies from 100 keV to about 6 MeV, previous reports have proposed that the projection path can be defined by the neutron beam. In this paper, another possible method has been applied and the performance presented through simulations. When using signals from a single BGO crystal it is impossible to achieve good energy resolution for such high-energy photons. When summing additional signals from adjacent crystals, the energy spectrum becomes much better. Using an energy window with energy resolution of 90 keV, an average intrinsic spatial resolution of 3.938 mm FWHM is obtained

  9. Onboard Calibration Circuit for the Front-end Electronics of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter

    Zhang, De-Liang; Zhang, Jun-Bin; Wang, Qi; Ma, Si-Yuan; Gao, Shan-Shan; Shen, Zhong-Tao; Jiang, Di; Guo, Jian-Hua; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    An onboard calibration circuit has been designed for the front-end electronics (FEE) of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter. It is mainly composed of a 12 bit DAC, an operation amplifier and an analog switch. Test results showed that a dynamic range of 0 ~ 30 pC with a precision of 5 fC was achieved, which meets the requirements of the front-end electronics. Furthermore, it is used to test the trigger function of the FEEs. The calibration circuit has been implemented and verified by all the environmental tests for both Qualification Model and Flight Model of DAMPE. The DAMPE satellite will be launched at the end of 2015 and the calibration circuit will perform onboard calibration in space.

  10. SU-C-201-01: Investigation of the Effects of Scintillator Surface Treatment On Light Output Measurements with SiPM Detectors

    Valenciaga, Y; Prout, D; Chatziioannou, A [University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the effect of different scintillator surface treatments (BGO crystals) on the fraction of scintillation photons that exit the crystal and reach the photodetector (SiPM). Methods: Positron Emission Tomography is based on the detection of light that exits scintillator crystals, after annihilation photons deposit energy inside these crystals. A considerable fraction of the scintillation light gets trapped or absorbed after going through multiple internal reflections on the interfaces surrounding the crystals. BGO scintillator crystals generate considerably less scintillation light than crystals made of LSO and its variants. Therefore, it is crucial that the small amount of light produced by BGO exits towards the light detector. The surface treatment of scintillator crystals is among the factors affecting the ability of scintillation light to reach the detectors. In this study, we analyze the effect of different crystal surface treatments on the fraction of scintillation light that is detected by the solid state photodetector (SiPM), once energy is deposited inside a BGO crystal. Simulations were performed by a Monte Carlo based software named GATE, and validated by measurements from individual BGO crystals coupled to Philips digital-SiPM sensor (DPC-3200). Results: The results showed an increment in light collection of about 4 percent when only the exit face of the BGO crystal, is unpolished; compared to when all the faces are polished. However, leaving several faces unpolished caused a reduction of at least 10 percent of light output when the interaction occurs as far from the exit face of the crystal as possible compared to when it occurs very close to the exit face. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the advantages on light collection from leaving unpolished the exit face of BGO crystals. The configuration with best light output will be used to obtain flood images from BGO crystal arrays coupled to SiPM sensors.

  11. Practical self-absorption correction method for various environmental samples in a 1000 cm3 Marinelli container to perform accurate radioactivity determination with HPGe detectors

    The self-absorption of large volume samples is an important issue in gamma-ray spectrometry using high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, a large number of radioactivity measurements of various environmental samples have been performed using 1000 cm3 containers. This study uses Monte Carlo simulations and a semiempirical function to address the self-absorption correction factor for the samples in the 1000 cm3 Marinelli container that has been widely marketed after the accident. The presented factor was validated by experiments using test sources and was shown to be accurate for a wide range of linear attenuation coefficients μ(0.05 - 1.0 cm-1). This suggests that the proposed correction factor is applicable to almost all environmental samples. In addition, an interlaboratory comparison where participants were asked to determine the radioactivity of a certified reference material demonstrated that the proposed correction factor can be used with HPGe detectors of different crystal sizes. (author)

  12. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam

  13. Study of the signal response of the MÖNCH 25μm pitch hybrid pixel detector at different photon absorption depths

    MÖNCH is a 25 μm pitch hybrid silicon pixel detector with a charge integrating analog read-out front-end in each pixel. The small pixel size brings new challenges in bump-bonding, power consumption and chip design. The MÖNCH02 prototype ASIC, manufactured in UMC 110 nm technology with a field of view of 4×4 mm2 and 160×160 pixels, has been characterized in the single photon regime, i.e. with less than one photon acquired per frame on average on a 3×3 pixel cluster. The low noise and small pixel size allow spatial interpolation with high resolution. Understanding charge sharing as a function of the photon absorption depth and sensor bias is a key for optimal processing of single photon data for high resolution imaging. To characterize the charge collection of the detector, the sensor was illuminated with a 20 keV photon beam in edge-on configuration at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra. By slicing the beam by means of a 5 μm slit and scanning through the 320 μm silicon sensor depth, the charge collection is characterized as a function of the photon absorption depth for different sensor bias voltages

  14. Optical absorption characteristics in the assessment of powder phosphor-based x-ray detectors: from nano- to micro-scale

    Liaparinos, P. F.

    2015-11-01

    X-ray phosphor-based detectors have enormously improved the quality of medical imaging examinations through the optimization of optical diffusion. In recent years, with the development of science and technology in the field of materials, improved powder phosphors require structural and optical properties that contribute to better optical signal propagation. The purpose of this paper was to provide a quantitative and qualitative understanding of the optical absorption characteristics in the assessment of powder phosphor-based detectors (from nano- scale up to micro-scale). Variations on the optical absorption parameters (i.e. the light extinction coefficient {{m}\\text{ext}} and the percentage probability of light absorption p%) were evaluated based on Mie calculations examining a wide range of light wavelengths, particle refractive indices and sizes. To model and assess the effects of the aforementioned parameters on optical diffusion, Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed considering: (i) phosphors of different layer thickness, 100 μm (thin layer) and 300 μm (thick layer), respectively, (ii) light extinction coefficient values, 1, 3 and 6 μm-1, and (iii) percentage probability of light absorption p% in the range 10-4-10-2. Results showed that the {{m}\\text{ext}} coefficient is high for phosphor grains in the submicron scale and for low light wavelengths. At higher wavelengths (above 650 nm), optical quanta follow approximately similar depths until interaction for grain diameter 500 nm and 1 μm. Regarding the variability of the refractive index, high variations of the {{m}\\text{ext}} coefficient occurred above 1.6. Furthermore, results derived from Monte Carlo modeling showed that high spatial resolution phosphors can be accomplished by increasing the {{m}\\text{ext}} parameter. More specifically, the FWHM was found to decrease (i.e. higher resolution): (i) 4.8% at 100 μm and (ii) 9.5%, at 300 μm layer thickness. This study attempted to

  15. Invisible Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Radio Morphologies and Five New H i 21cm Absorption Line Detectors

    Yan, Ting; Stocke, John T.; Darling, Jeremy; Momjian, Emmanuel; Sharma, Soniya; Kanekar, Nissim

    2016-03-01

    This is the second paper directed toward finding new highly redshifted atomic and molecular absorption lines at radio frequencies. To this end, we selected a sample of 80 candidates for obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and presented their basic optical/near-infrared (NIR) properties in Paper I. In this paper, we present both high-resolution radio continuum images for all of these sources and H i 21 cm absorption spectroscopy for a few selected sources in this sample. A-configuration 4.9 and 8.5 GHz Very Large Array continuum observations find that 52 sources are compact or have substantial compact components with size 0.1 Jy at 4.9 GHz. The 36 most compact sources were then observed with the Very Long Baseline Array at 1.4 GHz. One definite and 10 candidate Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs) are newly identified, which is a detection rate of CSOs ∼three times higher than the detection rate previously found in purely flux-limited samples. Based on possessing compact components with high flux densities, 60 of these sources are good candidates for absorption-line searches. Twenty-seven sources were observed for H i 21 cm absorption at their photometric or spectroscopic redshifts with only six detections (five definite and one tentative). However, five of these were from a small subset of six CSOs with pure galaxy optical/NIR spectra (i.e., any AGN emission is obscured) and for which accurate spectroscopic redshifts place the redshifted 21 cm line in a radio frequency intereference (RFI)-free spectral “window” (i.e., the percentage of H i 21 cm absorption-line detections could be as high as ∼90% in this sample). It is likely that the presence of ubiquitous RFI and the absence of accurate spectroscopic redshifts preclude H i detections in similar sources (only 1 detection out of the remaining 22 sources observed, 13 of which have only photometric redshifts); that is, H i absorption may well be present but is masked by the RFI. Future searches for

  16. Effect of refraction index and thickness of the light guide in the position-sensitive gamma-ray detector using compact PS-PMTs

    Inoue, K; Nagashima, Y; Hyodo, T; Nagai, Y; Muramatsu, S; Nagai, S

    2000-01-01

    We constructed a position-sensitive gamma-ray detector consisting of an array of BGO scintillators, a light guide and compact PS-PMTs. The effects of refractive index and thickness of the light guide of a glass plate on the detector performance were investigated. A light guide with higher refractive index and smaller thickness is found better for a good spatial resolution.

  17. Development of a self-absorption correction method used for a HPGe detector by means of a Monte Carlo simulation

    Quantitative analysis for food products and natural samples, to determine the activity of each radionuclide, can be made by using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer system. The analysis procedure is, in general, based upon the guidelines established by the Nuclear Safety Division of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan (JP MEXT). In the case of gamma-ray spectrum analysis for large volume samples, re-entrant (marinelli) containers are commonly used. The effect of photon attenuation in a large-volume sample, so-called “self-absorption”, should be corrected for precise determination of the activity. As for marinelli containers, two accurate geometries are shown in the JP MEXT guidelines for 700 milliliter and 2 liter volumes. In the document, the functions to obtain the self-absorption coefficients for these specific shapes are also shown. Therefore, self-absorption corrections have been carried out only for these two containers with practical media. However, to measure radioactivity for samples in containers of volumes other than those described in the guidelines, the self-absorption correction functions must be obtained by measuring at least two standard multinuclide volume sources, which consist of different media or different linear attenuation coefficients. In this work, we developed a method to obtain these functions over a wide range of linear attenuation coefficients for self-absorption in various shapes of marinelli containers using a Monte Carlo simulation. This method was applied to a 1-liter marinelli container, which is widely used for the above quantitative analysis, although its self-absorption correction function has not yet been established. The validity of this method was experimentally checked through an analysis of natural samples with known activity levels. (author)

  18. MCNP modelling of scintillation-detector gamma-ray spectra from natural radionuclides

    Hendriks, Peter; Maucec, M; de Meijer, RJ

    2002-01-01

    gamma-ray spectra of natural radionuclides are simulated for a BGO detector in a borehole geometry using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All gamma-ray emissions of the decay of K-40 and the series of Th-232 and U-238 are used to describe the source. A procedure is proposed which excludes the time-consumi

  19. Range-energy relation, range straggling and response function of CsI(Tl), BGO and GSO(Ce) scintillators for light ions

    Avdeichikov, V; Jakobsson, B; Rodin, A M; Ter-Akopian, G M

    2000-01-01

    Range-energy relations and range straggling of sup 1 sup , sup 2 sup , sup 3 H and sup 4 sup , sup 6 He isotopes with the energy approx 50A MeV are measured for the CsI(Tl), BGO and GSO(Ce) scintillators with an accuracy better than 0.2% and 5%, respectively. The Si-Sci/PD telescope was exposed to secondary beams from the mass separator ACCULINNA. The experimental technique is based on the registration of the 'jump' in the amplitude of the photodiode signal for ions passing through the scintillation crystal. Light response of the scintillators for ions 1<=Z<=4 is measured in energy range (5-50)A MeV, the results are in good agreement with calculations based on Birks model. The energy loss straggling for particles with DELTA E/E=0.01-0.50 and mass up to A=10 in 286 mu m DELTA E silicon detector is studied and compared with theoretical prescriptions. The results allow a precise absolute calibration of the scintillation crystal and to optimize the particle identification by the DELTA E-E(Sci/PD) method.

  20. Gamma-ray detectors for intelligent, hand-held radiation monitors

    Small radiation detectors based on HgI2, bismuth germanate (BGO), plastic, or NaI(Tl) detector materials were evaluated for use in small, lighweight radiation monitors. The two denser materials, HgI2 and BGO, had poor resolution at low-energy and thus performed less well than NaI(Tl) in detecting low-energy gamma rays from bare, enriched uranium. The plastic scintillator, a Compton recoil detector, also performed less well at low gamma-ray energy. Two small NaI(Tl) detectors were suitable for detecting bare uranium and sheilded plutonium. One became part of a new lightweight hand-held monitor and the other found uses as a pole-mounted detector for monitoring hard-to-reach locations

  1. The effect of radiation damage on optical and scintillation properties of BGO crystals grown by the LTG Cz technique

    Gusev, V A; Kupriyanov, I N; Kuznecov, G N; Shlegel, V N; Antsygin, V D; Vasiliev, Y V

    2002-01-01

    BGO crystals grown by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique (LTG Cz) exhibit two distinct types of behavior upon radiation damage and recovery. The crystals termed as of L-type remain colorless after gamma-radiation doses as high as 10 Mrad. As the irradiation dose increases the scintillation light output shows a weak monotonous degradation to 15-25%, saturating at around several hundreds krad doses. The crystals termed as of N-type attain yellow coloration after irradiation. The light output drops abruptly for 35-50% as early as after 1 krad and does not change further on. The present work is devoted to the study of radiation damage effects, self-recovery, optically stimulated recovery and thermo-stimulated current in the L- and N-type BGO crystals produced by LTG Cz.

  2. Calorimetry of the CMD-3 detector

    Shebalin, V. E.; Akhmetshin, R. R.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Ignatov, F. V.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-07-01

    CMD-3 is a general purpose detector designed to study e+e- annihilation into hadrons. It is mounted at VEPP-2000 collider which operates in the wide energy range, E c . m . s = 0.32 - 2 GeV. The calorimetry at the detector is based on three subsystems: closest to the beam pipe barrel Liquid Xenon calorimeter, outer barrel calorimeter based on CsI scintillation crystals and the endcap calorimeter made of BGO scintillation crystals. We describe the structure of the calorimeters, their electronics and the energy calibration procedures.

  3. Geometry dependence of the light collection efficiency of BGO crystal scintillators read out by avalanche photo diodes

    Light collection efficiency from BGO crystal scintillators of various sizes and shapes was measured by reading them using 1×1 cm2 avalanche photo diodes. When the crystals have simple geometry, the light collection efficiency was found to depend on their size, shape and the read-out position through a rather well-defined empirical scaling relation. The light collection efficiency of tapered crystals was seen to depend on both the position of γ-ray irradiation, and the read-out position of the avalanche photo diodes. Using optical Monte-Carlo simulations, the relation was reproduced assuming plausible proper parameters for surface conditions and the attenuation length. This results were reproduced with a reasonable accuracy by optical Monte-Carlo simulations. Simple physical explanations are given to these geometrical effects. -- Highlights: • We studied light output of different shapes and size BGO crystals with an APD. • With a Monte-Carlo simulation, we successfully reproduced measured light outputs of BGO. • We derived a scaling law of a rectangle crystal volume and surface area APD attached. • We measured a dependence of the light output on a position with non-rectangle crystal

  4. GEANT4 Simulation of Neutron Detector for DAMPE

    He, M.; Ma, T.; Chang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, Y. Y.; Zang, J. J.; Wu, J.; Dong, T. K.

    2016-01-01

    During recent tens of years dark matter has gradually become a hot topic in astronomical research field, and related theory researches and experiment projects change with each passing day. The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) of our country is proposed under this background. As the probing object involves high energy electrons, appropriate methods must be taken to distinguish them from protons in order to reduce the event probability of other charged particles (e.g. a proton) being mistaken as electrons. The experiments show that, the hadronic shower of high energy proton in BGO electromagnetic calorimeter, which is usually accompanied by the emitting of large number of secondary neutrons, is significantly different from the electromagnetic shower of high energy electron. Through the detection of secondary neutron signal emitting from the bottom of BGO electromagnetic calorimeter and the shower shape of incident particles in BGO electromagnetic calorimeter, we can effectively distinguish whether the incident particles are high energy protons or electrons. This paper introduces the structure and detecting principle of DAMPE neutron detector. We use Monte-Carlo method with GEANT4 software to simulate the signal emitting from protons and electrons at characteristic energy in the neutron detector, and finally summarize the neutron detector's ability to distinguish protons and electrons under different electron acception efficiencies.

  5. Monte-Carlo optimisation of a Compton suppression system for use with a broad-energy HPGe detector

    Britton, R., E-mail: r.britton@surrey.ac.uk [University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Burnett, J.L.; Davies, A.V. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Regan, P.H. [University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-21

    Monte-Carlo simulations are used to evaluate and optimise multiple components of a Compton Suppression System based upon a Broad-energy HPGe primary detector. Several materials for the secondary crystal are evaluated, including NaI(Tl), BGO and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce). BGO was found to be the most effective across the required energy range, with the sizes of the proposed veto detector then optimised to extract the maximum performance for a given volume of material. Suppression factors are calculated for a range of nuclides (both single and cascade emitters) with improvements of 2 for the Compton Suppression Factors, and 10 for the continuum reduction when compared to the Compton suppression system currently in use. This equates to a reduction in the continuum by up to a factor of ∼240 for radionuclides such as {sup 60}Co, which is crucial for the detection of low-energy, low-activity γ emitters typically swamped by such a continuum. -- Highlights: •Monte Carlo simulations utilised to design and optimise a Compton Suppression system. •NaI(Tl), LaBr(Ce), and BGO materials are evaluated for their effectiveness as veto. •Photon tracking routine is developed to identify where photons typically scatter. •A 3 component BGO based veto is optimised for use with a planar HPGe detector. •Continuum of Co-60 reduced by <240 times, a 10 fold improvement on existing design.

  6. Studying the relationship of working condition of neutron generator and selection of detector specification

    The contents of main elements were determined by prompt γ neutron activation analysis with neutron generator, when the analyzing samples, the multi-channel analyzer and the testing time are all under the same condition, compare the measurement between the BGO detectors with different specifications, the resolution and detective efficiency are different due to the different specifications detectors. In the ordinary conditions, the smaller the size has the higher resolution and the lower detective efficiency, on the contrary, the bigger one has the higher detective efficiency and the lower resolution. And use the higher resolution, need the less neutron flux. So the higher resolution BGO detector could prolong service life of neutron generator. (authors)

  7. Systematics in the light response of BGO, CsI(Tl) and GSO(Ce) scintillators to charged particles

    Avdeichikov, V; Nikitin, V A; Nomokonov, V P; Wegner, A

    2002-01-01

    The light response of a BGO crystal has been measured for particles Z=1-8, A=1-16 in the energy range approx 2-60 A MeV. The reaction products are identified by a DELTA E(Si)-E(Sci/PD) telescope. The position of the jump in the value of the signal from the PD at the punch-through points is used to calibrate both the DELTA E(Si) and E(Sci/PD) scales in MeV. The dependence of the light output on the energy E, ion atomic number Z and mass A is parameterized by the power law relation, L(Z,A,E)=a sub 1 (Z,A)E sup a sup sub 2 sup ( sup Z sup , sup A sup ). The parameters a sub 1 and a sub 2 have a smooth dependence on Z for all three crystals. The mass dependence of a sub 1 ,a sub 2 is deduced as a simple analytical expression. The systematics of these parameters is presented for BGO, CsI(Tl) and GSO(Ce) scintillators as a function of Z,A. Calculations of the response function, based on the Murray-Mayer model provide an excellent description of the shape of L(Z,A,E) versus E dependence, but show some deviations in ...

  8. Design of New Complex Detector Used for Gross Beta Measuring

    The level of gross β for radioactive aerosol in the containment of nuclear plants can indicate how serious the radioactive pollution is in the shell, and it can provide evidence which shows whether there is the phenomenon of leak in the boundaries of confined aquifer of the primary coolant circuit equipment.In the process of measuring, the counting of gross β is influenced by γ. In order to avoid the influence of γ, a new method was introduced and a new detector was designed using plastic scintillator as the major detecting component and BGO as the sub-component. Based on distinctive difference of light attenuation time, signal induced in them can be discriminated. γ background in plastic scintillator was subtracted according to the counting of γ in BGO. The functions of absolute detection efficiency were obtained. The simulation for Monte-Carlo method shows that the influence of γ background is decreased about one order of magnitude. (authors)

  9. Development of whole energy absorption spectrometer for decay heat measurement on fusion reactor materials

    Maekawa, Fujio; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    To measure decay heat on fusion reactor materials irradiated by D-T neutrons, a Whole Energy Absorption Spectrometer (WEAS) consisting of a pair of large BGO (bismuth-germanate) scintillators was developed. Feasibility of decay heat measurement with WEAS for various materials and for a wide range of half-lives (seconds - years) was demonstrated by experiments at FNS. Features of WEAS, such as high sensitivity, radioactivity identification, and reasonably low experimental uncertainty of {approx} 10 %, were found. (author)

  10. Optimization of scintillation-detector timing systems using Monte Carlo analysis

    Monte Carlo analysis is used to model statistical noise associated with scintillation-detector photoelectron emissions and photomultiplier tube operation. Additionally, the impulse response of a photomultiplier tube, front-end amplifier, and constant-fraction discriminator (CFD) is modeled so the effects of front-end bandwidth and constant-fraction delay and fraction can be evaluated for timing-system optimizations. Such timing-system analysis is useful for detectors having low photo-electron-emission rates, including Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors used in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems. Monte Carlo timing resolution for a BGO / photomultiplier scintillation detector, CFD timing system is presented as a function of constant-fraction delay for 511-keV coincident gamma rays in the presence of Compton scatter. Monte Carlo results are in good agreement with measured results when a tri-exponential BGO scintillation model is used. Monte Carlo simulation is extended to include CFD energy-discrimination performance. Monte Carlo energy-discrimination performance is experimentally verified along with timing performance (Monte Carlo timing resolution of 3.22 ns FWHM versus measured resolution of 3.30 ns FWHM) for a front-end rise time of 10 ns (10--90%), CFD delay of 8 ns, and CFD fraction of 20%

  11. 133Xenon absorption into rubber-protected portable cadmium telluride (CdTe(Cl)) detectors invalidating the 133Xenon washout method for measurement of cutaneous and subcutaneous blood flow rates in man.

    Sørensen, J L

    1991-01-01

    The importance of 133Xenon absorption into rubber detector caps during cutaneous and subcutaneous blood flow measurement was investigated in 46 experiments involving 38 persons. 133Xenon was administered atraumatically. Cutaneous and subcutaneous washout rates were registered by portable Cadmium Telluride detectors without rubber caps, with rubber caps, and with rubber caps with Mylar membranes interposed between the rubber and the tissue investigated. No difference in rate constants obtained by means of various detector types was detected. The accumulation of 133Xenon in the rubber caps was found to take place within the first few minutes after the detectors had been brought into position. The 133Xenon then diffused back into the tissue exhibiting a great variation regarding rate constants. The 133Xenon diffused form rubber into air and perfused tissue tracing a monoexponential course; and again the rate constants would vary considerably. No correlation was found between elimination rates obtained with detectors with and without 133Xenon polluted caps, and no way of correcting for the 133Xenon content in the rubber caps was found. Relative changes in rate constants could still be recognized, but absolute values were not obtainable. PMID:1789123

  12. Choice of detectors for in vivo elemental analysis by counting natural and neutron-induced gamma rays for medical applications

    Body fat is measured by detecting C and O in vivo through fast neutron inelastic scattering. A sealed D-T neutron generator is used for the pulsed (4-10 kHz) production of fast neutrons. Carbon and oxygen are detected by counting the 4.44 and 6.13 MeV gamma rays resulting from the inelastic scattering of the fast neutrons from 12C and 16O. Large Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystal detectors (127x76 mm) are used for the gamma ray detection during the 10 μs neutron burst. BGO detectors improved the signal to background ratio for the carbon detection by a factor of six compared to 152x152 mm NaI (Tl) detectors. Exposure to scattered neutrons did not affect the gain stability of the BGOs. Thermal neutrons from a moderated 238Pu-Be source are used for the measurement of total body nitrogen (and thus protein). The resulting high energy prompt gamma rays from nitrogen (10.83 MeV) are detected simultaneously with the irradiation. BGO detectors have superior stability operating in an environment of variable neutron exposure and high counting rates. However, the presence of neutrons creates a 10.2 MeV gamma ray peak from 73Ge in the BGO detector which interferes with the nitrogen peak. Whole body gamma ray counters, consisting of NaI(Tl) crystal detectors in a shielded room, are used to measure the natural radioactivity of the body due to 40K. They are also used to measure body Ca, P, Na and Cl, following total body exposure to thermal neutrons. ((orig.))

  13. A Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Array Spectrometer as a Selective Detector for Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography: Concept and First Results.

    Gröger, Thomas; Gruber, Beate; Harrison, Dale; Saraji-Bozorgzad, Mohammad; Mthembu, Makhosazana; Sutherland, Aimée; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-03-15

    Fast and selective detectors are very interesting for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC). This is particularly true if the detector system can provide additional spectroscopic information on the compound structure and/or functionality. Other than mass spectrometry (MS), only optical spectroscopic detectors are able to provide selective spectral information. However, until present the application of optical spectroscopy technologies as universal detectors for GC × GC has been restricted mainly due to physical limitations such as insufficient acquisition speed or high detection limits. A recently developed simultaneous-detection spectrometer working in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of 125-240 nm overcomes these limitations and meets all the criteria of a universal detector for GC × GC. Peak shape and chromatographic resolution is preserved and unique spectral information, complementary to mass spectrometry data, is gained. The power of this detector is quickly recognized as it has the ability to discriminate between isomeric compounds or difficult to separate structurally related isobaric species; thus, it provides additional selectivity. A further promising feature of this detector is the data analysis concept of spectral filtering, which is accomplished by targeting special electronic transitions that allows for a fast screening of GC × GC chromatograms for designated compound classes. PMID:26810390

  14. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm3, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm3, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization

  15. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    Krimmer, J., E-mail: j.krimmer@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ley, J.-L. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, 13288 Marseille (France); Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Freud, N. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Létang, J.M. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Magne, M. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); and others

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm{sup 3}, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm{sup 3}, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  16. Performance evaluation of continuous blood sampling system for PET study. Comparison of three detector-systems

    Matsumoto, Keiichi; Shinoda, Masaki; Sakamoto, Setsu; Senda, Michio [Inst. of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Kobe City Coll. of Technology (Japan); Tarutani, Kazumasa; Minato, Kotaro [Nara Inst. of Science and Technology, Ikoma (Japan). Graduate School of Information Science

    2002-11-01

    To measure cerebral blood flow with {sup 15}O PET, it is necessary to measure the time course of arterial blood radioactivity. We examined the performance of three different types of continuous blood sampling system. Three kinds of continuous blood sampling system were used: a plastic scintillator-based beta detector (conventional beta detector (BETA)), a bismuth germinate (BGO)-based coincidence gamma detector (Pico-count flow-through detector (COINC)) and a Phoswich detector (PD) composed by a combination of plastic scintillator and BGO scintillator. Performance of these systems was evaluated for absolute sensitivity, count rate characteristic, sensitivity to background gamnra photons, and reproducibility for nylon tube geometry. The absolute sensitivity of the PD was 0.21 cps/Bq for {sup 68}Ga positrons at the center of the detector. This was approximately three times higher than BETA, two times higher than COINC. The value measured with BETA was stable, even when background radioactivity was increased. The count rate characteristic of the PD and COINC was linear up to 8 kcps. The reproducibility of sensitivity for nylon tube geometry of COINC was the smallest (coefficient of variation (C.V.)=1.00%) among the three. PD was the weights the least (3.5 kg) among the three, which is convenient for clinical use. Each detector has unique characteristics derived from its own structure. Although the performance of all three detectors meets clinical requirement, PD had the highest physical performance. (author)

  17. Monte-Carlo optimisation of a Compton suppression system for use with a broad-energy HPGe detector

    Britton, R.; Burnett, J. L.; Davies, A. V.; Regan, P. H.

    2014-10-01

    Monte-Carlo simulations are used to evaluate and optimise multiple components of a Compton Suppression System based upon a Broad-energy HPGe primary detector. Several materials for the secondary crystal are evaluated, including NaI(Tl), BGO and LaBr3(Ce). BGO was found to be the most effective across the required energy range, with the sizes of the proposed veto detector then optimised to extract the maximum performance for a given volume of material. Suppression factors are calculated for a range of nuclides (both single and cascade emitters) with improvements of 2 for the Compton Suppression Factors, and 10 for the continuum reduction when compared to the Compton suppression system currently in use. This equates to a reduction in the continuum by up to a factor of ~240 for radionuclides such as 60Co, which is crucial for the detection of low-energy, low-activity γ emitters typically swamped by such a continuum.

  18. Development of high performance Avalanche Photodiodes and dedicated analog systems for HXI/SGD detectors onboard the Astro-H mission

    Hard X-ray Imager and Soft Gamma-ray Detector are being developed as onboard instruments for the Astro-H mission, which is scheduled for launch in 2014. In both detectors, BGO scintillators play key roles in achieving high sensitivity in low Earth orbit (LEO), by generating active veto signals to reject cosmic-ray events and gamma-ray backgrounds from radio-activated detector materials. In order to maximize background rejection power, it is also important to minimize the energy threshold of this shield. As a readout sensor of weak scintillation light from a number of BGO crystals in a complicated detector system, high performance, reverse-type Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs), with an effective area of 10×10mm2 are being employed, instead of bulky photomultiplier tubes (PMTs).Another advantage of using APDs is their low power consumption, although the relatively low gain of APDs (compared to conventional PMTs) requires dedicated analog circuits for noise suppression. In this paper, we report on the development and performance of APD detectors specifically designed for the Astro-H mission. In addition to APD performance, various environmental tests, including radiation hardness and qualification thermal cycling, will be described in detail. Moreover, a dedicated charge sensitive amplifier and analog filters are newly developed and tested here to optimize the performance of APDs to activate fast veto signals within a few μs from the BGO trigger. We will also report on overall performance testing of a prototype BGO detector system that mimics the data acquisition system onboard Astro-H.

  19. A comparison of PET detector modules employing rectangular and round photomultiplier tubes

    The authors have compared the high resolution BGO detector blocks from the EXACT HR PET system which use two dual-cathode rectangular photomultiplier (PM) tubes with a new block design, the EXACT HR PLUS, which uses four round PM tubes. Despite the lower coupling area between photocathode and scintillator, the HR PLUS block compares favorably with the HR block. The energy resolution averages 20% for the HR PLUS block and 23% for the HR block, with efficiency variations of 17% in both blocks. Additional measurements were carried out on the HR PLUS block to characterize depth of interaction effects and cross-talk between elements. Coincidence line spread function measurements had a FWHM of 3.0 mm in the axial direction and 2.9 mm in the transaxial direction. In light of these results, limitations of the BGO block design are discussed and some solutions proposed

  20. Description of the Role of Shot Noise in Spectroscopic Absorption and Emission Measurements with Photodiode and Photomultiplier Tube Detectors: Information for an Instrumental Analysis Course

    McClain, Robert L.; Wright, John C.

    2014-01-01

    A description of shot noise and the role it plays in absorption and emission measurements using photodiode and photomultiplier tube detection systems is presented. This description includes derivations of useful forms of the shot noise equation based on Poisson counting statistics. This approach can deepen student understanding of a fundamental…

  1. A DOI Detector With Crystal Scatter Identification Capability for High Sensitivity and High Spatial Resolution PET Imaging

    Gu, Z; Prout, D. L.; Silverman, R W; Herman, H; Dooraghi, A.; Chatziioannou, A F

    2015-01-01

    A new phoswich detector is being developed at the Crump Institute, aiming to provide improvements in sensitivity, and spatial resolution for PET. The detector configuration is comprised of two layers of pixelated scintillator crystal arrays, a glass light guide and a light detector. The annihilation photon entrance (top) layer is a 48 × 48 array of 1.01 × 1.01 × 7 mm3 LYSO crystals. The bottom layer is a 32 × 32 array of 1.55 × 1.55 × 9 mm3 BGO crystals. A tapered, multiple-element glass ligh...

  2. A study on the technique of a new type of neutron detector prototype with a high detection efficiency

    Based on that the neutron detectors used now have some disadvantages such as low detection efficiency, long response time, etc, studied the new development of neutron detection a new type of neutron detector prototype using plastic scintillator BC454 and inorganic scintillator BGO as the detection medium was proposed. Simulation of its detection efficiency and other parameters was done using Monte Carlo general code MCNP (Version 4B). This new kind of portable neutron detector with high detection efficiency and sensitivity is strongly needed. (authors)

  3. Performance evaluation of continuous blood sampling system for PET study. Comparison of three detector-systems

    Matsumoto, K; Sakamoto, S; Senda, M; Yamamoto, S; Tarutani, K; Minato, K

    2002-01-01

    To measure cerebral blood flow with sup 1 sup 5 O PET, it is necessary to measure the time course of arterial blood radioactivity. We examined the performance of three different types of continuous blood sampling system. Three kinds of continuous blood sampling system were used: a plastic scintillator-based beta detector (conventional beta detector (BETA)), a bismuth germinate (BGO)-based coincidence gamma detector (Pico-count flow-through detector (COINC)) and a Phoswich detector (PD) composed by a combination of plastic scintillator and BGO scintillator. Performance of these systems was evaluated for absolute sensitivity, count rate characteristic, sensitivity to background gamnra photons, and reproducibility for nylon tube geometry. The absolute sensitivity of the PD was 0.21 cps/Bq for sup 6 sup 8 Ga positrons at the center of the detector. This was approximately three times higher than BETA, two times higher than COINC. The value measured with BETA was stable, even when background radioactivity was incre...

  4. PoGOLino: a scintillator-based balloon-borne neutron detector

    Kole, Merlin; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    PoGOLino is a balloon-borne scintillator-based experiment developed to study the largely unexplored high altitude neutron environment at high geomagnetic latitudes. The instrument comprises two detectors that make use of LiCAF, a novel neutron sensitive scintillator, sandwiched by BGO crystals for background reduction. The experiment was launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Centre, Northern Sweden (geomagnetic latitude of $65^\\circ$), for a three hour flight during which the instrument took data up to an altitude of 30.9 km. The detector design and ground calibration results are presented together with the measurement results from the balloon flight.

  5. PoGOLino: A scintillator-based balloon-borne neutron detector

    Kole, Merlin, E-mail: merlin@particle.kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Chauvin, Maxime [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Fukazawa, Yasushi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito [Tokuyama Corporation, Shunan, Yamaguchi (Japan); Jackson, Miranda [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kamae, Tune [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, 113-0033 Tokyo (Japan); Kawaguchi, Noriaki [Tokuyama Corporation, Shunan, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kawano, Takafumi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kiss, Mózsi; Moretti, Elena; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Takahashi, Hiromitsu [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yanagida, Takayuki [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-01-11

    PoGOLino is a balloon-borne scintillator-based experiment developed to study the largely unexplored high altitude neutron environment at high geomagnetic latitudes. The instrument comprises two detectors that make use of LiCAF, a novel neutron sensitive scintillator, sandwiched by BGO crystals for background reduction. The experiment was launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Centre, Northern Sweden (geomagnetic latitude of 65°), for a three hour flight during which the instrument took data up to an altitude of 30.9 km. The detector design and ground calibration results are presented together with the measurement results from the balloon flight.

  6. Robust and economical multi-sample, multi-wavelength UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detector for biological and chemical contamination

    Lu, Peter J; Macarthur, James B; Sims, Peter A; Ma, Hongshen; Slocum, Alexander H

    2012-01-01

    We present a portable multi-channel, multi-sample UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detection device, which has no moving parts, can operate wirelessly and on batteries, interfaces with smart mobile phones or tablets, and has the sensitivity of commercial instruments costing an order of magnitude more. We use UV absorption to measure the concentration of ethylene glycol in water solutions at all levels above those deemed unsafe by the United States Food and Drug Administration; in addition we use fluorescence to measure the concentration of d-glucose. Both wavelengths can be used concurrently to increase measurement robustness and increase detection sensitivity. Our small robust economical device can be deployed in the absence of laboratory infrastructure, and therefore may find applications immediately following natural disasters, and in more general deployment for much broader-based testing of food, agricultural and household products to prevent outbreaks of poisoning and disease.

  7. Robust and economical multi-sample, multi-wavelength UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detector for biological and chemical contamination

    Lu, Peter J.; Hoehl, Melanie M.; Macarthur, James B.; Sims, Peter A.; Ma, Hongshen; Slocum, Alexander H.

    2012-09-01

    We present a portable multi-channel, multi-sample UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detection device, which has no moving parts, can operate wirelessly and on batteries, interfaces with smart mobile phones or tablets, and has the sensitivity of commercial instruments costing an order of magnitude more. We use UV absorption to measure the concentration of ethylene glycol in water solutions at all levels above those deemed unsafe by the United States Food and Drug Administration; in addition we use fluorescence to measure the concentration of d-glucose. Both wavelengths can be used concurrently to increase measurement robustness and increase detection sensitivity. Our small robust economical device can be deployed in the absence of laboratory infrastructure, and therefore may find applications immediately following natural disasters, and in more general deployment for much broader-based testing of food, agricultural and household products to prevent outbreaks of poisoning and disease.

  8. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of the fissile isotope $^{235}$U with the CERN n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter and a fission tagging based on micromegas detectors

    Mendoza, E; Cano-Ott, D; Guerrero, C; Berthoumieux, E; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Becvár, F; Belloni, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kawano, T; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krticka, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lampoudis, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Massimi, C; Meaze, M; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Stetcu, I; Sabaté, M; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T; Zugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Actual and future nuclear technologies require more accurate nuclear data on the (n, $\\gamma$) cross sections and $\\alpha$-ratios of fissile isotopes. Their measurement presents several difficulties, mainly related to the strong fission $\\gamma$-ray background competing with the weaker $\\gamma$-ray cascades used as the experimental signature of the (n, $\\gamma$) process. A specific setup has been used at the CERN n_TOF facility in 2012 for the measurement of the (n,$\\gamma$ ) cross section and $\\alpha$- ratios of fissile isotopes and used for the case of the $^{235}$U isotope. The setup consists in a set of micromegas fission detectors surrounding $^{235}$U samples and placed inside the segmented BaF$_2$ Total Absorption Calorimeter.

  9. Measurement of the Neutron Capture Cross Section of the Fissile Isotope 235U with the CERN n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter and a Fission Tagging Based on Micromegas Detectors

    Balibrea, J; Cano-Ott, D; Guerrero, C; Berthoumieux, E; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kawano, T; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lampoudis, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Massimi, C; Meaze, M; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Stetcu, I; Sabaté, M; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    Current and future nuclear technologies require more accurate nuclear data on (n,γ) cross sections and the α-ratios of fissile isotopes. Their measurement presents several difficulties, mainly related to the strong fission γ-ray background competing with the weaker γ-ray cascades used as the experimental signature of the (n,γ) process. A specific setup was used at the CERN n_TOF facility in 2012 for the measurement of the (n,γ) cross section and α-ratios of fissile isotopes and used for the case of the 235U isotope. The setup consists of a set of micromegas fission detectors surrounding the 235U samples all placed inside a segmented BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter.

  10. A depth-encoded PET detector

    This paper reports on radial blurring in high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) can be reduced by measuring the PET photon's depth of interaction within a detector crystal. Simulations show that dividing the crystal into two equi-probable regions of interaction almost eliminates this blurring. This has been done using a black band placed around a 3 cm BGO crystal, 1 cm from the front. A PMT collects light from the rear of the crystal for energy and timing measurement. Another PMT collects light through a light guide from the top-front of the crystal to find the depth of interaction. Gamma rays interacting in the front of the crystal produce a strong, signal in the depth-sending PMT, while interactions behind the band produced (<10%) signal. The intensity of the light recorded by the energy PMT is almost constant (within ±3%) for interactions at any depth in the crystal

  11. Design studies for a PET detector module using a PIN photodiode to measure depth of interaction

    The authors present design studies of a multi-layer PET detector module that uses an 8x8 array of 3 mm square PIN photodiodes to both identify the crystal of interaction and measure the depth of interaction. Each photodiodes coupled to one end of a 3x3x30 mm BGO crystal, with the opposite ends of 64 such crystals attached to a single 1 inch square photomultiplier tube that provides a timing signal and energy discrimination. Each BGO crystal is coated with a lossy reflector, so the ratio of light detected in the photodiode and photomultiplier tube depends on the interaction depth in the crystal, and is used to determine this depth of interaction on an event by event basis. A test module with one 3x3x30 mm BGO crystal, one 3 mm square PIN photodiode, and one photomultiplier tube is operated at -20 C with an amplifier peaking time of 4 μs, and a depth of interaction resolution of 5 to 8 mm fwhm measured. Simulations predict that this virtually eliminates radial elongation in a 60 cm diameter BGO tomograph. The photodiode signal corresponding to 511 keV energy deposit varies linearly with excitation position, ranging from 1,250 electrons (e-) at the end closest to the photodiode to 520 e- at the opposite end. The electronic noise is a position independent 330 e- fwhm, so the signal to noise ratio is sufficient to reliably identify the crystal of interaction in a 64 element module

  12. A position-sensitive scintillation detector for two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation using metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    Inoue, K; Saito, H; Nagashima, Y; Hyodo, T; Muramatsu, S; Nagai, S

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed and tested a prototype of a new position sensitive gamma-ray detector which consists of an array of 2.6x2.6x18 mm sup 3 BGO scintillator blocks, a light guide, and four metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (R5900-00-C8) recently developed by Hamamatsu Photonics Co. Ltd. Scalability of the detector of this type makes it possible to construct a larger detector using many PS-PMTs, which will be useful for the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation apparatus.

  13. A position-sensitive scintillation detector for two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation using metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    We have constructed and tested a prototype of a new position sensitive γ-ray detector which consists of an array of 2.6x2.6x18 mm3 BGO scintillator blocks, a light guide, and four metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (R5900-00-C8) recently developed by Hamamatsu Photonics Co. Ltd. Scalability of the detector of this type makes it possible to construct a larger detector using many PS-PMTs, which will be useful for the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation apparatus

  14. Performance characteristics of a silicon photomultiplier based compact radiation detector for Homeland Security applications

    A next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and for improvement of detector reliability for the purpose of developing radiation protection technology and military applications. The previously used radiation detector had some limitations due to its bulky size, limited range and its environment for radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector examined in this study utilizes a silicon photomultiplier which appears to be more suitable for this application because of its physical superiority characterized by its small size, high sensitivity, and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based scintillation detector has been developed as part of this basic study of military radiation detectors. The detector has been tested for its ability to obtain the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variations of parameter values and for efficiency of detection in accordance with its ability to measure radiation in the environment. Two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators were developed and the detectors were analyzed by a number of operating characteristics such as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field, that depend on environmental changes in radiation measurement. The Photon count rate and spectra were compared for these three scintillators. We found that there were variations in the radiation detection which were characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. It was also found that there was an 11.9% energy resolution for the LYSO, 15.5% for BGO and 13.5% for CsI:Tl using Array SiPM, and 18% for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for 22Na. These results demonstrate the potential widespread use of SiPM based compact radiation detectors for Homeland Security applications

  15. Design of a Silicon Photomultiplier Based Compact Radiation Detector for Homeland Security Screening

    Next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and improvement of reliability of the detector with purpose of developing of radiation protection technology and military application. The radiation detector which was used previously had some limitations due to the bulky size, limited range and the environment of radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector under this study which has adopted the silicon photomultiplier seems to be suitable for the application because of its physical excellence which are characterized by its small size, high sensitivity and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based Scintillation detector has been made as a part of basic study of military radiation detector development. The detector has been tested for obtaining the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variation of parameter values and the efficiency of detection in accordance with the factor of measurement environment of radiation. The two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with the LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillator were made and the detectors were analyzed with the variation of operating characteristics as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field that are depend on environmental changes of radiation measurement. The results of three scintillators for a photon count rate and spectra were compared with each other. It was found that there are variations of radiation detection which are characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. Also, It was found that there were the 11.9 % for the LYSO, 15.5 % for BGO and 13.5 % for CsI:Tl energy resolution using array SiPM, and 18 % for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM, respectively when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for 22Na. The results demonstrate the potential of SiPM based compact radiation detector to be used widely for Homeland Security applications. (authors)

  16. Performance characteristics of a silicon photomultiplier based compact radiation detector for Homeland Security applications

    Park, Hye Min, E-mail: ramilab2011@gmail.com; Joo, Koan Sik

    2015-05-01

    A next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and for improvement of detector reliability for the purpose of developing radiation protection technology and military applications. The previously used radiation detector had some limitations due to its bulky size, limited range and its environment for radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector examined in this study utilizes a silicon photomultiplier which appears to be more suitable for this application because of its physical superiority characterized by its small size, high sensitivity, and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based scintillation detector has been developed as part of this basic study of military radiation detectors. The detector has been tested for its ability to obtain the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variations of parameter values and for efficiency of detection in accordance with its ability to measure radiation in the environment. Two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators were developed and the detectors were analyzed by a number of operating characteristics such as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field, that depend on environmental changes in radiation measurement. The Photon count rate and spectra were compared for these three scintillators. We found that there were variations in the radiation detection which were characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. It was also found that there was an 11.9% energy resolution for the LYSO, 15.5% for BGO and 13.5% for CsI:Tl using Array SiPM, and 18% for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for {sup 22}Na. These results demonstrate the potential widespread use of SiPM based compact radiation detectors for Homeland Security applications.

  17. Particle detectors

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  18. Luminosity measurement in the L3 detector at LEP

    Brock, I. C.; Engler, A.; Ferguson, T.; Filthaut, F.; Kraemer, R. W.; Merk, M.; Rippich, C.; Shi, X.; Shukla, J.; Sutton, R. B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Vogel, H.; You, J.; Lecoq, P.; Bobbink, G. J.; Buskens, J.; Cerjak, I.; Groenstege, H.; Koffeman, E.; Linde, F. L.; Raven, G.; Rewiersma, P.; Schuijlenberg, H. W. A.; de Waard, A.; Commichau, V.; Hangarter, K.; Schmitz, P.

    1996-02-01

    One of the limiting factors in the determination of the electroweak parameters from cross section measurements of e +e - annihilation close to the Z pole is the precision of the luminosity measurement. The luminosity monitor of the L3 detector at LEP and the analysis of its data are described. Using a combination of a BGO calorimeter and a 3-layer silicon tracker, the absolute luminosity has been measured with an experimental precision of 0.08% in 1993 and 0.05% in 1994. The measurement relies on a detailed understanding of small-angle elastic e +e - (Bhabha) scattering from the experimental and theoretical point of view, as well as an excellent knowledge of the detector geometry.

  19. Luminosity Measurement in the L3 Detector at LEP

    Brock, I C; Ferguson, T; Filthaut, Frank; Krämer, R W; Merk, M; Rippich, C; Shi, X; Shukla, J; Sutton, R B; Tsipolitis, G; Vogel, H; You, J; Lecoq, P; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Buskens, J; Cerjak, I; Groenstege, H L; Koffeman, E; Linde, Frank L; Raven, G; Rewiersma, P A M; Schuijlenburg, H; De Waard, A; Commichau, V; Hangarter, K; Schmitz, P

    1996-01-01

    One of the limiting factors in the determination of the electroweak parameters from cross section measurements of e+e- annihilation close to the Z pole is the precision of the luminosity measurement. The luminosity monitor of the L3 detector at LEP and the analysis of its data are described. Using a combination of a BGO calorimeter and a 3-layer silicon tracker, the absolute luminosity has been measured with an experimental precision of 0.08% in 1993 and 0.05% in 1994. The measurement relies on a detailed understanding of small-angle elastic e+e-(Bhabha) scattering from the experimental and theoretical point of view, as well as an excellent knowledge of the detector geometry.

  20. Luminosity measurement in the L3 detector at LEP

    Brock, I.C.; Engler, A.; Ferguson, T.; Filthaut, F.; Kraemer, R.W.; Merk, M.; Rippich, C.; Shi, X.; Shukla, J.; Sutton, R.B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Vogel, H.; You, J.; Lecoq, P.; Bobbink, G.J.; Buskens, J.; Cerjak, I.; Groenstege, H.; Koffeman, E.; Linde, F.L.; Raven, G.; Rewiersma, P.; Schuijlenberg, H.W.A.; Waard, A. de; Commichau, V.; Hangarter, K.; Schmitz, P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[CERN, Geneve (Switzerland)]|[Nat. Inst. for High Energy Phys., NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]|[RWTH Aachen (Germany). 3. Phys. Inst.

    1996-11-01

    One of the limiting factors in the determination of the electroweak parameters from cross section measurements of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation close to the Z pole is the precision of the luminosity measurement. The luminosity monitor of the L3 detector at LEP and the analysis of its data are described. Using a combination of a BGO calorimeter and a 3-layer silicon tracker, the absolute luminosity has been measured with an experimental precision of 0.08% in 1993 and 0.05% in 1994. The measurement relies on a detailed understanding of small-angle elastic e{sup +}e{sup -} (Bhabha) scattering from the experimental and theoretical point of view, as well as an excellent knowledge of the detector geometry. (orig.).

  1. Luminosity measurement in the L3 detector at LEP

    One of the limiting factors in the determination of the electroweak parameters from cross section measurements of e+e- annihilation close to the Z pole is the precision of the luminosity measurement. The luminosity monitor of the L3 detector at LEP and the analysis of its data are described. Using a combination of a BGO calorimeter and a 3-layer silicon tracker, the absolute luminosity has been measured with an experimental precision of 0.08% in 1993 and 0.05% in 1994. The measurement relies on a detailed understanding of small-angle elastic e+e- (Bhabha) scattering from the experimental and theoretical point of view, as well as an excellent knowledge of the detector geometry. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of Anger camera and BGO mosaic position-sensitive detectors for 'Super ACAR'. Precision electron momentum densities via angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    We discuss the relative merits of Anger cameras and Bismuth Germanate mosaic counters for measuring the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation at a facility such as the proposed Positron Factory at Takasaki. The two possibilities appear equally cost effective at this time. (author)

  3. Comparison of Anger camera and BGO mosaic position-sensitive detectors for `Super ACAR`. Precision electron momentum densities via angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    Mills, A.P. Jr. [Bell Labs. Murray Hill, NJ (United States); West, R.N.; Hyodo, Toshio

    1997-03-01

    We discuss the relative merits of Anger cameras and Bismuth Germanate mosaic counters for measuring the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation at a facility such as the proposed Positron Factory at Takasaki. The two possibilities appear equally cost effective at this time. (author)

  4. Plasmonically enhanced light absorption in graphene nanoribbons

    Woessner, Achim

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] Light absorption plays a crucial role in both optical detectors and photovoltaics. In order to improve the light absorption properties of materials different measures can be taken. This thesis considers light absorption of graphene in the mid infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A numerical study of light absorption and of localized plasmons in nanostructured graphene is presented and discussed. We show that for nanostructured graphene in the mid infrared region of the sp...

  5. Silicon detectors

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  6. Crystal detectors in particle physics

    The authors review the principal characteristics driving the design of precision calorimeters composed of inorganic crystal scintillators now in operation (L3, CLEO 2) or developed for the next generation of particle physics experiments. The unique discovery potential of these detectors (1.5 to 50 m3 of crystals; 104 to > 105 elements) is the result of their high electron and photon energy resolution over a wide energy range, uniform hermetic acceptance and fine granularity. Experiments at CERN's multi-TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will search for the Higgs particles thought to be responsible for mass, and for many other new physics processes. In order to exploit the intrinsically high resolution of crystal detectors, exceptionally high speed (1 to 30 ns decay time) and radiation resistance are required. BaF2 and CeF3 are currently the preferred choices, and higher density alternatives such as PbWO4 are under investigation. Lower energy, high luminosity experiments that will measure rare particle decays, and explore the violation of the fundamental ''CP'' symmetry that may be related to the predominance of matter over antimatter in their universe, have chosen Cesium Iodide for its combination of high light output, speed, and radiation resistance. Recent developments by Caltech include the use of photons generated by an H- beam from an RFQ accelerator to calibrate and provide sub-percent resolution in the L3 BGO calorimeter, and an in situ optical bleaching technique that renders large BaF2 crystals now mass produced in China radiation hard up to dose levels approx-gt 10 MegaRads. 65 refs

  7. Experimental Comparison between High Purity Germanium and Scintillator Detectors for Determining Burnup, Cooling Time and Decay Heat of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Jansson, Peter; Grape, Sophie; Tobin, Steve; Liljenfeldt, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A experimental study of the gamma-ray energy spectra from used nuclear fuel has been performed. Four types of detectors were used to measure spectra from three PWR used fuel assemblies stored at the interim storage for used fuel in Sweden, CLAB: HPGe, LaBr3, NaI and BGO. The study was performed in the context of used fuel characterization for the back end of the fuel cycle in Sweden. Specifically, the purpose was to evaluate the behaviour of the different scintillator detectors (LaBr3, NaI an...

  8. Absorption studies

    Absorption studies were once quite popular but hardly anyone does them these days. It is easier to estimate the blood level of the nutrient directly by radioimmunoassay (RIA). However, the information obtained by estimating the blood levels of the nutrients is not the same that can be obtained from the absorption studies. Absorption studies are primarily done to find out whether some of the essential nutrients are absorbed from the gut or not and if they are absorbed, to determine how much is being absorbed. In the advanced countries, these tests were mostly done to detect pernicious anaemia where vitamin B12 is not absorbed because of the lack of the intrinsic factor in the stomach. In the tropical countries, ''malabsorption syndrome'' is quire common. In this condition, several nutrients like fat, folic acid and vitamin B12 are not absorbed. It is possible to study absorption of these nutrients by radioisotopic absorption studies

  9. A gamma- and X-ray detector for cryogenic, high magnetic field applications

    Cooper, R L; Bales, M J; Bass, C D; Beise, E J; Breuer, H; Byrne, J; Chupp, T E; Coakley, K J; Dewey, M S; Fu, C; Gentile, T R; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; O'Neill, B; Pulliam, K; Thompson, A K; Wietfeldt, F E

    2012-01-01

    As part of an experiment to measure the spectrum of photons emitted in beta-decay of the free neutron, we developed and operated a detector consisting of 12 bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The detector was operated near liquid nitrogen temperature in the bore of a superconducting magnet and registered photons with energies from 5 keV to 1000 keV. To enlarge the detection range, we also directly detected soft X-rays with energies between 0.2 keV and 20 keV with three large area APDs. The construction and operation of the detector is presented, as well as information on operation of APDs at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. Ionization detector

    A novel ionization detector for use in X-ray tomography is described in detail. To achieve the ultimate resolution, the use of small detectors is necessary and, for ionization detectors, this implies using xenon gas at high pressure. Conventional small detectors can suffer from ''bowing'' but the present design overcomes their problems. (U.K.)

  11. Recent developments in photomultipliers for nuclear radiation detectors

    One of the recent developments in Hamamatsu photomultipliers for nuclear radiation detectors is a small photomultiplier developed for positron CT in nuclear medicine having excellent timing properties; the time resolution with BGO and CsF scintillators was observed for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays to be 2.24 ns and 0.34 ns, respectively. Two types of new photomultipliers having special structures have recently been developed. One is a photomultiplier for high pressure use capable of withstanding up to 600 atm pressure while another is a 'large-angle-of-view' photomultiplier for a proton decay experiment having a 20' diameter hemispherical photocathode. A newly developed proximity focus type of microchannel plate photomultiplier provides a very fast time response of 130 ps and is usable in strong magnetic fields such as in calorimeters. (orig.)

  12. A Study of Active Shielding Optimized for 1-80 keV Wide-Band X-ray Detector in Space

    Furuta, Yoshihiro; Hiraga, Junko S; Sasano, Makoto; Murakami, Hiroaki; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Active shielding is an effective technique to reduce background signals in hard X-ray detectors and to enable observing darker sources with high sensitivity in space. Usually the main detector is covered with some shield detectors made of scintillator crystals such as BGO (Bi$_4$Ge$_3$O$_{12}$), and the background signals are filtered out using anti-coincidence among them. Japanese X-ray observing satellites "Suzaku" and "ASTRO-H" employed this technique in their hard X-ray instruments observing at > 10 keV. In the next generation X-ray satellites, such as the NGHXT proposal, a single hybrid detector is expected to cover both soft (1-10 keV) and hard (> 10 keV) X-rays for effectiveness. However, present active shielding is not optimized for the soft X-ray band, 1-10 keV. For example, Bi and Ge, which are contained in BGO, have their fluorescence emission lines around 10 keV. These lines appear in the background spectra obtained by ASTRO-H Hard X-ray Imager, which are non-negligible in its observation energy b...

  13. Detector, shielding and geometric design factors for a high-resolution PET system

    The authors have evaluated the resolution, efficiency and scatter rejection on a new high resolution PET system designed for animal studies which is based on a 2-D modular detector system. A digital positioning system was evaluated by testing different encoding methods. Tungsten inter-plane septa of different thicknesses and geometries were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. The detector system consists of a 6 x 8 array of BGO crystals coupled to 2 dual photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The crystals are 3.5 mm wide with 4 mm spacing transaxially and are 6.25 mm long with 6.75 mm spacing axially. PMT outputs are digitized and Anger camera type logic is used to determine the X and Y location of the scintillation event

  14. Compton background suppression with a multi-element scintillation detector using high speed data acquisition and digital signal processing

    A multi-element scintillation detector, consisting of eight NaI(Tl)/BGO scintillators surrounding a single NaI(Tl)/CsI(Tl) scintillator, was initially developed for locating and measuring concealed special nuclear materials that emit primarily low energy photons. Signal digitizers and LabView virtual instrument (VI) subroutines process and analyze pulses from each of the dual scintillators to suppress Compton interactions occurring in the central detector and discriminate between low and high energy photon events occurring within NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) crystals, respectively. Digital signal processing significantly improved the signal-to-noise ratio of the central detector and greatly reduced the analog electronic equipment required in the same time. (author)

  15. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy

  16. Silicon as an unconventional detector in positron emission tomography

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a widely used technique in medical imaging and in studying small animal models of human disease. In the conventional approach, the 511 keV annihilation photons emitted from a patient or small animal are detected by a ring of scintillators such as LYSO read out by arrays of photodetectors. Although this has been successful in achieving ∼5mm FWHM spatial resolution in human studies and ∼1mm resolution in dedicated small animal instruments, there is interest in significantly improving these figures. Silicon, although its stopping power is modest for 511 keV photons, offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional approaches including the potential for high intrinsic spatial resolution in 3D. To evaluate silicon in a variety of PET “magnifying glass” configurations, an instrument was constructed that consists of an outer partial-ring of PET scintillation detectors into which various arrangements of silicon detectors are inserted to emulate dual-ring or imaging probe geometries. Measurements using the test instrument demonstrated the capability of clearly resolving point sources of 22Na having a 1.5 mm center-to-center spacing as well as the 1.2 mm rods of a 18F-filled resolution phantom. Although many challenges remain, silicon has potential to become the PET detector of choice when spatial resolution is the primary consideration. -- Highlights: ► We examine the use of position-sensitive silicon detectors in magnifying PET geometries. ► A demonstrator using silicon detectors and BGO scintillation detectors was constructed. ► Both single-slice and volume PET configurations were tested. ► For a 4.5 cm field-of-view, resolutions <1mm were achievable. ► Resolution will improve further with higher resolution silicon detectors.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of determining porosity by using dual gamma detectors

    Current formation elements spectroscopy logging technology utilize 241Am-Be neutron source and single BGO detector to determine elements contents. It plays an important role in mineral analysis and lithology identification of unconventional oil and gas exploration, but information measured is relatively ld. Measured system based on 241Am-Be neutron and dual detectors can be developed to realize the measurement of elements content as well as determine neutron gamma porosity by using ratio of gamma count between near and far detectors. Calculation model is built by Monte Carlo method to study neutron gamma porosity logging response with different spacing and shields. And it is concluded that measuring neutron gamma have high counts and good statistical property contrasted with measuring thermal neutron, but the sensitivity of porosity decrease. Sensitivity of porosity will increase as the spacing of dual detector increases. Spacing of far and near detectors should be around 62 cm and 35 cm respectively. Gamma counts decrease and neutron gamma porosity sensitivity increase when shield is fixed between neutron and detector. The length of main shield should be greater than 10 cm and associated shielding is about 5 cm. By Monte Carlo Simulation study, the result provides technical support for determining porosity in formation elements spectroscopy logging using 241Am-Be neutron and gamma detectors. (authors)

  18. Neutron detectors and their application in the high-energy and elementary particle physics

    Neutron detectors are described in this review: position neutron detectors, sampling total absorption counters, neutron detectors which allow neutron time-of-flight measurements. Methods of measuring the value and energy dependence of the detection efficiency, spatial and energy resolution of neutron detectors are reported. Some programme for determining different parameters of neutron detectors are described as well

  19. Study of large area Hamamatsu avalanche photodiode in a γ-ray scintillation detector

    We have carried out study of a large area (10x10mm2), reverse-type avalanche photodiode (APD) recently developed by Hamamatsu photonics. It has low dark current of 3nA at room temperature, and the gain stability was almost the same as prototypical APDs reported in our previous paper. We studied the performance as a γ-ray detector with four scintillators, CsI(Tl), BGO, GSO(Ce), and YAP(Ce) crystals. For example we obtained the best energy resolution of 4.9±0.2% (FWHM) for 662keV γ-rays, as measured with a 10x10x10mm3 CsI(Tl) crystal. The minimum detectable energy was as low as 10keV at 20-bar C and 3.1keV at -20-bar C. Thanks to its large effective area, this APD can effectively read out photons from larger size scintillators. When coupling to a 300x48mm2 BGO plate of 3mm thickness, an FWHM energy resolution of 20.9±0.2% was obtained for 662keV γ-rays, with the minimum detectable energy of about 60keV at -150C. These results suggest that our prototype APD can be a promising device for various applications replacing traditional PMTs such as use in space for Japan's future X-ray astronomy mission NeXT

  20. Metal Detectors.

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  1. Gaseous detectors

    Fischer, Hans Gerhard

    1996-01-01

    Detector physics and operational aspects of gaseous detectors will be discussed. Topics such as ionization processes, gas amplification and its limitations, pulse formation and decoupling, related electronics constraints, operational stability and ageing phenomena will be touched with the aim at some quantitative understanding.

  2. Transmutation detectors

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Klupák, V.; Sus, F.; Kučera, Jan; Kůs, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 632, č. 1 (2011), s. 109-111. ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Transmutation detector * Activation method * Neutron detector * Neutron fluence Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  3. Measurement of the L/K electron capture ratio of the {sup 207}Bi decay to the 1633 keV level of {sup 207}Pb with a BGO scintillating bolometer

    Coron, N.; Gironnet, J.; Marcillac, P. de; Martinez, M.; Redon, T.; Torres, L. [Universite Paris-Sud 11 et CNRS (UMR 8617), Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay (France); Cuesta, C.; Garcia, E.; Ginestra, C.; Ortigoza, Y.; Pobes, C.; Puimedon, J.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M.L. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Watrin, A. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Universite Louis Pasteur, Ecole nationale superieure de physique de Strasbourg (ENSPS), Illkirch (France)

    2012-06-15

    The ROSEBUD Collaboration has dedicated several underground runs to study different types of bolometers, mainly for the search of dark matter. Some of these runs, profiting from the good energy resolution of one bolometer of BGO and the ultra-low background of the underground laboratory of Canfranc (LSC), allowed the measurement of the L/K electron capture ratio of the {sup 207}Bi decay to the 1633 keV level of {sup 207}Pb. This paper constitutes the first published measurement of this magnitude. (orig.)

  4. Balloon Flight Background Measurement with Actively-Shielded Planar and Imaging CZT Detectors

    Bloser, P F; Jenkins, J A; Perrin, M; Murray, R; Grindlay, J E

    2001-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as ``CZT1,'' consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, ``CZT2,'' comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Products high pressure Bridgman material and the other of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman material, each fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch. The pixellated detectors were flip-chip-mounted side by side and read out by a 32-channel ASIC. This detector was also shielded by a passive/plastic collimator in the front, but used only additional passive/plastic shielding in the rear. Both experiments were flown from Ft. Sumner, NM on September 19, 2000 on a 24 hour balloon flight. CZT1 recorded a non-vetoed backgro...

  5. MS Detectors

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  6. Photon detectors

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  7. Photon detectors

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF2 windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission

  8. Assessment of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2-D image acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array to be used coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD), through a fiber optic plate. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits a 2-dimensional imaging acquisition of a cell thyroid tissue application with high resolution and detection efficiency in order to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A point or volumetric source - detector simulation by using a MCNP4B general code, considering different source energies, detector materials and geometry including pixel sizes and reflector types was performed. In this study, simulations were performed for 7 x 7 and 127 x 127 arrays using CsI(Tl) and BGO scintillation crystals with pixel size ranging from 1 x 1 cm2 to 10 x 10 μm2 and radiation thickness ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The effect of all these parameters was investigated to find the best source-detector system that result in an image with the best contrast details. The results showed that it is possible to design a specific imaging system that allows searching for in-vitro studies, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology. (author)

  9. Assessment of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2-D image acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    Silva, Carlos Borges da; Santanna, Claudio Reis de [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: borges@ien.gov.br; santanna@ien.gov.br; Braz, Delson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br; Carvalho, Denise Pires de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Fisiologia Endocrina]. E-mail: dencarv@ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array to be used coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD), through a fiber optic plate. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits a 2-dimensional imaging acquisition of a cell thyroid tissue application with high resolution and detection efficiency in order to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A point or volumetric source - detector simulation by using a MCNP4B general code, considering different source energies, detector materials and geometry including pixel sizes and reflector types was performed. In this study, simulations were performed for 7 x 7 and 127 x 127 arrays using CsI(Tl) and BGO scintillation crystals with pixel size ranging from 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} to 10 x 10 {mu}m{sup 2} and radiation thickness ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The effect of all these parameters was investigated to find the best source-detector system that result in an image with the best contrast details. The results showed that it is possible to design a specific imaging system that allows searching for in-vitro studies, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology. (author)

  10. Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on Board Suzaku

    Takahashi, T; Endo, M; Endo, Y; Ezoe, Y; Fukazawa, Y; Hamaya, M; Hirakuri, S; Hong, S; Horii, M; Inoue, H; Isobe, N; Itoh, T; Iyomoto, N; Kamae, T; Kasama, D; Kataoka, J; Kato, H; Kawaharada, M; Kawano, N; Kawashima, K; Kawasoe, S; Kishishita, T; Kitaguchi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Kokubun, M; Kotoku, J; Kouda, M; Kubota, A; Kuroda, Y; Madejski, G; Makishima, K; Masukawa, K; Matsumoto, Y; Mitani, T; Miyawaki, R; Mizuno, T; Mori, K; Mori, M; Murashima, M; Murakami, T; Nakazawa, K; Niko, H; Nomachi, M; Okada, Y; Ohno, M; Oonuki, K; Ota, N; Ozawa, H; Sato, G; Shinoda, S; Sugiho, M; Suzuki, M; Taguchi, K; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, I; Takeda, S; Tamura, K; Tamura, T; Tanaka, T; Tanihata, C; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Tominaga, S; Uchiyama, Y; Watanabe, S; Yamaoka, K; Yanagida, T; Yonetoku, D

    2006-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board Suzaku covers a wide energy range from 10 keV to 600 keV by combination of silicon PIN diodes and GSO scintillators. The HXD is designed to achieve an extremely low in-orbit back ground based on a combination of new techniques, including the concept of well-type active shield counter. With an effective area of 142 cm^2 at 20 keV and 273 cm2 at 150 keV, the background level at the sea level reached ~1x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 30 keV for the PI N diodes, and ~2x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 100 keV, and ~7x10^{-6} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 200 keV for the phoswich counter. Tight active shielding of the HXD results in a large array of guard counters surrounding the main detector parts. These anti-coincidence counters, made of ~4 cm thick BGO crystals, have a large effective area for sub-MeV to MeV gamma-rays. They work as an excellent gamma-ray burst monitor with limited angular resolution (~5 degree). The on-board signal-processing system and th...

  11. UV/VUV high sensitivity absorption spectroscopy

    High sensitivity absorption spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic technique for reactive glow discharges plasmas. Absolute column densities of many chemical radicals have been measured in both deposition and etching plasmas. Modern photodiode or charge-coupled device (CCD) detector arrays vastly increase the sensitivity of traditional absorption experiments enabling one to observe fractional absorptions of ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation less than 0.0001. Stable arc lamps provide a continuum source in some experiments, but experiments at very high spectral resolution or at VUV wavelengths require the greater spectral radiance of synchrotron radiation. High sensitivity absorption spectroscopy has been applied to intense glow discharges used for lighting, for diamond film deposition, and for both depositing and etching Si films. Absorption spectroscopy provides absolute column densities, is useful for transitions that do not fluoresce, and approaches the sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in glow discharges under some conditions

  12. Cosmic-ray muons as a calibration source for high-energy gamma-ray detectors

    In this paper a measurement of the directional distribution of cosmic-ray muons, at the latitude of Stockholm, is reported. In fitting the measured flux to a simple analytical expression, the distribution was found to be symmetric around a line approximately to the northwest at 4.2±0.7 degrees from zenith. The east-west asymmetry amounted to a difference in the total intensity of 20±4% at the zenith angle of 45 degrees. The spectra of energies deposited by the muons in a BGO-detector orientated at different angles, are obtained through a Monte Carlo-simulation, where the muon distribution is used as a weight function for sampling muons in different directions. (author)

  13. Development of position sensitive γ-ray detectors for 2D-ACAR apparatus

    We report a development of two kinds of position-sensitive γ-ray detectors using position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT) for 2D-ACAR apparatus; (1) a 5 mm thick, 50 mm diameter Gd2SiO5 (GSO) single crystal disc coupled to a PS-PMT (Hamamatsu R2487), (2) an 2D-array of small Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystal blocks off sizes 2.2 mm x 2.2 mm x 15 mm (25 x 21 pieces in 2.4 mm pitch) coupled to a PS-PMT (Hamamatsu R3941). We employed the type (2) for our new 2D-ACAR. The method of the analysis of the data obtained by the new apparatus and the results are reported. (orig.)

  14. Calorimeter detectors

    de Barbaro, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Although the instantaneous and integrated luminosity in HL-LHC will be far higher than the LHC detectors were originally designed for, the Barrel calorimeters of the four experiments are expected to continue to perform well  throughout the Phase II program. The conditions for the End-Cap calorimeters are far more challenging and whilst some detectors will require relatively modest changes, others require far more substantial upgrades. We present the results of longevity and performance studies for the calorimeter systems of the four main LHC experiments and outline the upgrade options under consideration. We include a discussion of the R&D required to make the final technology choices for the upgraded detectors.

  15. Pixel detectors

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  16. MAMA Detector

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  17. Ionization detector

    The objects of the invention are, first, to provide an ionization detector having a three chamber structure characterised by a built-in feedback path that regeneratively stabilizes the operating point of the detector. Secondly, to provide a specially designed chamber construction including electrodes shaped so as to enhance the efficiency of the chamber and reduce ion recombination. The ionization chamber described has a chamber structure with a first closed chamber and a second chamber able to receive gases from outside. These two chambers have a common boundary including a common electrode. One electrode associated with the second chamber, and one within the first chamber, define a third chamber within the first chamber allowing an ionization path between. A radioactive source provides ionizing radiation for all three chambers and establishes an ionization current. There is a detector coupled to the common electrode for detecting changes in this current. (U.K.)

  18. BES detector

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e+e- annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  19. Performance of a PET detector module utilizing an array of silicon photodiodes to identify the crystal of interaction

    The authors initial performance results for a new multi-layer PET detector module consisting of an array of 3 mm square by 30 mm deep BGO crystals coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube and on the opposite end to an array of 3 mm square silicon photodiodes. The photomultiplier tube provides an accurate timing pulse and energy discrimination for all the crystals in the module, while the silicon photodiodes identify the crystal of interaction. When a single BGO crystal at +25 C is excited with 511 keV photons, the authors measure a photodiode signal centered at 700 electrons (e-) with noise of 375 e- fwhm. When a four crystal/photodiode module is excited with a collimated line source of 511 keV photons, the crystal of interaction is correctly identified 82% of the time. The misidentification rate can be greatly reduced and an 8 x 8 crystal/photodiode module constructed by using thicker depletion layer photodiodes or cooling to 0 C

  20. A Study on Determination of an Optimized Detector for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak; Mardanshahi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    The detector is a critical component of the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for giving accurate information from the exact pattern of radionuclide distribution in the target organ. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was utilized for the simulation of a Siemen's dual head variable angle SPECT imaging system with a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator. The Planar and SPECT scans for a (99m)Tc point source and a Jaszczak Phantom with the both experiment and simulated systems were prepared and after verification and validation of the simulated system, the similar scans of the phantoms were compared (from the point of view of the images' quality), namely, the simulated system with the detectors including bismuth germanate (BGO), yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), Cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), yttrium aluminum perovslite (YAP:Ce), lutetium aluminum garnet (LuAG:Ce), cerium activated lanthanum bromide (LaBr3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), and sodium iodide activated with thallium [NaI(Tl)]. The parameters of full width at half maximum (FWHM), energy and special resolution, sensitivity, and also the comparison of images' quality by the structural similarity (SSIM) algorithm with the Zhou Wang and Rouse/Hemami methods were analyzed. FWHMs for the crystals were calculated at 13.895, 14.321, 14.310, 14.322, 14.184, and 14.312 keV and the related energy resolutions obtained 9.854, 10.229, 10.221, 10.230, 10.131, and 10.223 %, respectively. Finally, SSIM indexes for comparison of the phantom images were calculated at 0.22172, 0.16326, 0.18135, 0.17301, 0.18412, and 0.20433 as compared to NaI(Tl). The results showed that BGO and LuAG: Ce crystals have high sensitivity and resolution, and better image quality as compared to other scintillation crystals. PMID:26912973

  1. Asymmetric spin absorption across a low-resistance oxide barrier

    An unconventional method of nonlocal spin detection is demonstrated in mesoscopic lateral spin valves at room temperature. Clear nonlocal spin signals are detected between the two ends of an extended ferromagnetic spin detector. This is different from the conventional method in which the nonlocal voltage is measured between the spin detector and the nonmagnetic channel. The results can be understood as spatially non-uniform absorption of a pure spin current into the spin detector across a low-resistance oxide interface

  2. DUAL-BAND INFRARED DETECTORS

    2000-01-01

    As the infrared technology continues to advance, there is a growing demand for multispectral detectors for advanced IR systems with better target discrimination and identification. Both HgCdTe detectors and quantum well GaAs/AlGaAs photodetectors offer wavelength flexibility from medium wavelength to very long wavelength and multicolor capability in these regions. The main challenges facing all multicolor devices are more complicated device structtures, thicker and multilayer material growth, and more difficult device fabrication, especially when the array size gets larger and pixel size gets smaller. In the paper recent progress in development of two-color HgCdTe photodiodes and quantum well infrared photodetectors is presented.More attention is devoted to HgCdTe detectors. The two-color detector arrays are based upon an n-P-N (the capital letters mean the materials with larger bandgap energy) HgCdTe triple layer heterojunction design. Vertically stacking the two p-n junctions permits incorporation of both detectros into a single pixel. Both sequential mode and simultaneous mode detectors are fabricated. The mode of detection is determined by the fabrication process of the multilayer materials.Also the performances of stacked multicolor QWIPs detectors are presented. For multicolor arrays, QWIP's narrow band spectrum is an advantage, resulting in low spectral crosstalk. The major challenge for QWIP is developing broadband or multicolor optical coupling structures that permit efficient absorption of all required spectral bands.

  3. Determination of the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter

    Cheng, Jia-Hua; Wang, Zhe; Lebanowski, Logan; Lin, Guey-Lin; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-08-01

    A physically motivated function was developed to accurately determine the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter and to overcome biases present in many commonly used methods. The function is the convolution of a detector resolution function with the sum of a delta function, which represents the complete absorption of energy, and a tail function, which describes the partial absorption of energy and depends on the detector materials and structures. Its performance was tested with the simulation of three typical cases. The accuracy of the extracted peak value, resolution, and peak area was improved by an order of magnitude on average, relative to the Crystal Ball function.

  4. Determination of the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter

    Cheng, Jia-Hua; Lebanowski, Logan; Lin, Guey-Lin; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-01-01

    A physically-motivated function was developed to accurately determine the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter and to overcome biases present in many commonly used methods. The function is the convolution of a detector resolution function with the sum of a delta function, which represents the complete absorption of energy, and a tail function, which describes the partial absorption of energy and depends on the detector materials and structures. Its performance was tested with the simulation of three typical cases. The accuracy of the extracted peak value, resolution, and peak area was improved by an order of magnitude on average, relative to the Crystal Ball function.

  5. A new 64-channel area detector for neutrons and gamma rays

    The multi-channel photomultiplier (Philips XP 1702) can be utilized as a high resolution area detector for thermal neutrons and high energy gamma rays. This detector type is needed e.g. for special neutron scattering experiments and for the PET method applied to small animals. In various test measurements this will be demonstrated by coupling suitable scintillators (NaI, BGO, and 6LiI single crystals and 6Li-glass) and disperse to the photocathode and by feeding the 64 output signals of the PM into a resistor network via voltage-to-current converters. The final interpolated position per event is determined by pulse height division of he four amplified signals taken from the corners of the network. Experimental results concerning the achievable spatial resolution, the homogeneity and the linearity of the detector response and of the quantum efficiencies will be presented. Light experiments with well collimated pulsed rays and with beams of different spot sizes at the photocathode are helpful to explain the measured properties of this new neutron and gamma ray detector

  6. The effect of the rotational orientation of circular photomultipliers in a PET camera block detector design

    This is a study of the effects of geometric asymmetries in circular photomultipliers (PMT) on the design of PET position-sensitive block detectors. The dynodes of linear-focus circular PMT's are asymmetric relative to the axis of the photocathode, despite the rotational symmetry of the photocathode. Hence, there are regional photocathode differences in the anode signal, which affect the decoding characteristics of position sensitive block detectors. This orientation effect, as well as the effect of introducing light diffusers, are studied in a block detector design (BGO) using the PMT-quadrant-sharing configuration. The PMT studied is the Philips XP-1911 (19mm diameter). Seven symmetrical and representative orientations of the four decoding PMT were investigated, as well as one asymmetric orientation. The measurements performed include block-composite pulse-height spectra and crystal decoding maps. Two orientation effects were observed: (A) distortion variation in decoding maps, and (B) decoding resolution variation. The introduction of circular plastic pieces, used as light diffusers, prove to be useful by improving the decoding of crystals on the periphery of the detector block and minimizing distortion in the decoding map. These measurements have shown optimal PMT orientations for the PMT-quadrant-sharing design, as well as for conventional block designs

  7. Graphene vertical hot-electron terahertz detectors

    We propose and analyze the concept of the vertical hot-electron terahertz (THz) graphene-layer detectors (GLDs) based on the double-GL and multiple-GL structures with the barrier layers made of materials with a moderate conduction band off-set (such as tungsten disulfide and related materials). The operation of these detectors is enabled by the thermionic emissions from the GLs enhanced by the electrons heated by incoming THz radiation. Hence, these detectors are the hot-electron bolometric detectors. The electron heating is primarily associated with the intraband absorption (the Drude absorption). In the frame of the developed model, we calculate the responsivity and detectivity as functions of the photon energy, GL doping, and the applied voltage for the GLDs with different number of GLs. The detectors based on the cascade multiple-GL structures can exhibit a substantial photoelectric gain resulting in the elevated responsivity and detectivity. The advantages of the THz detectors under consideration are associated with their high sensitivity to the normal incident radiation and efficient operation at room temperature at the low end of the THz frequency range. Such GLDs with a metal grating, supporting the excitation of plasma oscillations in the GL-structures by the incident THz radiation, can exhibit a strong resonant response at the frequencies of several THz (in the range, where the operation of the conventional detectors based on A3B5 materials, in particular, THz quantum-well detectors, is hindered due to a strong optical phonon radiation absorption in such materials). We also evaluate the characteristics of GLDs in the mid- and far-infrared ranges where the electron heating is due to the interband absorption in GLs.

  8. Neutron detector

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  9. Particle detectors

    Joram, Christian

    1998-01-01

    The lecture series will present and overview of the basic techniques and underlying physical principles of particle detectors, applied to current and future high energy physics experiments. Illustrating examples, mainly from the field of collider experiments, will demonstrate the performance and limitations of the various techniques. After and introduction we shall concentrate on particle tracking. Wire chambers, drift chambers, micro gaseous tracking devices and solid state trackers will be discussed. It follows and overview of scintillators, photon detection, fiber tracking and nuclear emulsions. One lecture will deal with the various techniques of calorimetry. Finally we shall focus on methods developed for particle identification. These comprise specific energy loss, time of flight Cherenkov and transition radiation detectors.

  10. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  11. Moving Detectors in Cavities

    Obadia, N

    2007-01-01

    We consider two-level detectors, coupled to a quantum scalar field, moving inside cavities. We highlight some pathological resonant effects due to abrupt boundaries, and decide to describe the cavity by switching smoothly the interaction by a time-dependent gate-like function. Considering uniformly accelerated trajectories, we show that some specific choices of non-adiabatic switching have led to hazardous interpretations about the enhancement of the Unruh effect in cavities. More specifically, we show that the emission/absorption ratio takes arbitrary high values according to the emitted quanta properties and to the transients undergone at the entrance and the exit of the cavity, {\\it independently of the acceleration}. An explicit example is provided where we show that inertial and uniformly accelerated world-lines can even lead to the same ``pseudo-temperature''.

  12. How noise affects quantum detector tomography

    Wang, Q., E-mail: wang@physics.leidenuniv.nl; Renema, J. J.; Exter, M. P.van; Dood, M. J. A. de [Huygens Kamerlingh-Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Gaggero, A.; Mattioli, F.; Leoni, R. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (IFN), CNR, via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy)

    2015-10-07

    We determine the full photon number response of a NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detector via quantum detector tomography, and the results show the separation of linear, effective absorption efficiency from the internal detection efficiencies. In addition, we demonstrate an error budget for the complete quantum characterization of the detector. We find that for short times, the dominant noise source is shot noise, while laser power fluctuations limit the accuracy for longer timescales. The combined standard uncertainty of the internal detection efficiency derived from our measurements is about 2%.

  13. Barrier infrared detector

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  14. A new hybrid photomultiplier tube as detector for scintillating crystals

    In this work, we have attentively studied the performance of a new hybrid photomultiplier tube (HPMT) as detector for photons from scintillating crystals. The HPMT is equipped with a YAP window in order to improve light collection and increase measured light response from scintillating crystals. Several measurements have been performed on BGO, LSO, CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) planar crystals having three different surface treatments as well as on YAP : Ce and CsI(Tl) matrices. Such crystals have been coupled to two HPMTs, one equipped with a YAP window (Y-HPMT) and the other with a conventional quartz window (Q-HPMT). Measurements on crystals coupled to the Y-HPMT have shown a consistent improvement of the light response, thanks to the presence of the YAP window. Indeed, the light response measured with the Y-HPMT was on average equal to 1.5, 2.1 and 2.6 times that obtained with the Q-HPMT for planar crystals with white painted (diffusive), fine ground and polished rear surfaces, respectively. With regards to crystal matrices, we measured a light response increase of about 1.2 times

  15. New TL detectors for personal neutron dosimetry

    One of the main objectives in the application of TL detectors to neutron dosimetry is to obtain a high ratio of neutron to gamma response for a better separation of the neutron component. In the case of 6LiF, one may reduce the effective thickness of the detector in order to exploit the difference between neutron and gamma absorption, either by making the sensitive layer of TL chip thinner or by reducing its transparency to TL light. Two new types of sintered 6LiF:Mg,Ti detectors have been developed: a sandwich detector with a non-thermoluminescent LiF base, and a detector in which the phosphor is mixed with graphite. Three thicknesses of the sensitive layer (45, 60, 80 mg.cm-2) and two carbon concentrations (1%, 4%) were tested. The detectors were irradiated by moderated neutrons from Pu-Be and 252Cf sources and by thermal neutrons from a nuclear research reactor. Results of measurements indicate that for the detector of thickness 45 mg.cm-2 the ratio of neutron to gamma response increases 2-4 times, compared with the Harshaw TLD-600 while the neutron sensitivity is maintained. Other dosimetric characteristics of the detector remain unchanged, making it possible to use standard annealing and readout procedures. The new detectors will be applied in a personal neutron albedo dosemeter with a detection limit better than 100 μSv in a gamma background of the range of several mSv. (author)

  16. X-ray imaging with the PILATUS 100k detector

    Bech, Martin; Bunk, O.; David, C.;

    2008-01-01

    We report on the application of the PILATUS 100K pixel detector for medical imaging. Experimental results are presented in the form of X-ray radiographs using standard X-ray absorption contrast and a recently developed phase contrast imaging method. The results obtained with the PILATUS detector...

  17. A position-sensitive gamma-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    Inoue, K; Nagashima, Y; Hyodo, T; Nagai, Y; Muramatsu, S; Nagai, S; Masuda, K

    2002-01-01

    A new position-sensitive gamma-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi sub 4 Ge sub 3 O sub 1 sub 2 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mmx2.6 mmx18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV gamma-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mmx160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the gamma-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation gamma-rays.

  18. A position-sensitive γ-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    Inoue, Koji; Saito, Haruo; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Muramatsu, Shinichi; Nagai, Shota; Masuda, Keisuke

    2002-07-01

    A new position-sensitive γ-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi 4Ge 3O 12 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mm×2.6 mm×18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mm×160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the γ-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays.

  19. A position-sensitive γ-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    A new position-sensitive γ-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mmx2.6 mmx18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mmx160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the γ-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays

  20. D-xylose absorption

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  1. D-xylose absorption

    D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine how well the intestines absorb a simple sugar (D-xylose). The test ... test is primarily used to determine if nutrient absorption problems are due to a disease of the ...

  2. Department of Detectors and Nuclear Electronics - Overview

    The basic activities of the Department of Nuclear Electronics in 2005 were concentrated on following areas: · studies of new scintillation techniques and their application in nuclear medicine and border monitoring, · contribution to the FWVI European projects, · scientific contracts with European industry in respect to detection techniques · electronics for experiments in High Energy Physics, · development of γ-ray spectrometry apparatus, · development of new generation State of the Art USB based and PCI based multi-channel analysers, · development, investigation and production of silicon detectors · normalisation activities. Most of the scientific achievements of the Department were summarized in 24 publications (released or being in press) and 6 publications submitted. The papers were published mainly in IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. and Nucl. Instr. Methods. Besides that, our scientists presented 11 contributions at international conferences - 5 presentations on IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging 2005 in Puerto Rico. It should also be stressed that prof. M. Moszynski was honoured with the title of IEEE Fellow and M. Kapusta has received PhD degree. There also were normalization activities in preparation of polish versions of European Standards in the field of electronics Studies on new scintillation techniques were addressed mainly to their application in a nuclear medicine and a border monitoring, induced by the European projects, realized within FWVI. The study of new prospects for a Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography, carried out within BioCare project, strongly suggested that the time-of-flight PET, based on LSO crystals, is a realistic proposition for the further development. Moreover, the comparative study of several scintillators allowed selecting LaBr3 crystal as a potential candidate to a common PET/CT detector. A comparative study of a large NaI(Tl) and BGO crystals allowed, in turn, selecting the 5''x 5''x 10'' Na

  3. Principle and applications of Controlled-Drift Detectors

    The Controlled-Drift Detector is a fully depleted silicon detector that allows 2D position sensing and energy spectroscopy of X-rays in the range 0.5-30 keV with imaging capability up to 100 kframe/s, event timing of few ns and limited readout channels. In this paper we review the Controlled-Drift Detector operating principle and we present its applications in X-ray absorption imaging and in Compton electrons tracking

  4. Performance test of large BaF2 detector

    The γ total absorption facility (GTAF) was being built in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). It was composed of 40 BaF2 detector modules. The performance of every single module, such as detector construction, choosing of crystal packaging condition, energy resolution, time resolution, and long time stability were tested. From the energy resolution and time resolution test, it shows that the detector modules are good for using in neutron capture cross section measurement. (authors)

  5. Annealing studies of detector materials for uncooled thermal imaging

    Donohue, P.P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncooled thermal imaging is a key technology for military applications. The sensors used are thermal detectors which respond to changes in temperature resulting from absorption of infrared radiation, generally in the 8-14?m waveband. In the UK these have been principally based on the pyroelectric effect in ferroelectric materials which have been incorporated into hybrid detectors where the detector elements are machined from bulk ceramic, either lead zirconate titanate (PZT) or lead scandium ...

  6. PHAROS A pluri-detector, high-resolution, analyser of radiometric properties of soil

    Rigollet, C

    2002-01-01

    PHAROS is a new type of core logger, designed to measure activity concentrations of sup 4 sup 0 K, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs in sediment and rock cores with a spatial resolution of a few centimetres along the core. PHAROS has been developed as a non-destructive alternative to the traditional slicing of cores into sub-samples and their analysis on an HPGe detector. The core is scanned at fixed increments by three BGO scintillation detectors and the spectra analysed by the full spectrum analysis method. The core logger is also equipped with a collimated lead castle and a sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source for transmission measurements. In this paper, we report on the properties of the core logger and its detectors, and on the analysis techniques used for the determination of the radionuclides activity concentrations. Results from initial measurements are presented and discussed.

  7. Nutrition and magnesium absorption.

    Brink, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various nutrients present in dairy products and soybean-based products on absorption of magnesium has been investigated. The studies demonstrate that soybean protein versus casein lowers apparent magnesium absorption in rats through its phytate component. However, true magnesium absorption was neither affected by soybean protein in the diet nor by supplemental phytate. The inhibitory influence of soybean protein and phytate on apparent magnesium absorption was found to be cau...

  8. Radiation absorption properties of different plaster samples

    Although the plaster is one of the oldest known synthetic building materials, nowadays, it is used as interior coating of walls and ceilings of buildings. Thus measuring its radiation shielding properties is vital. For this purpose, radiation absorption properties of different plaster samples in this study. The measurements have been performed using gamma spectrometer system which connected to 3'' × 3''NaI (TI) detector.

  9. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  10. Measuring partial fluorescence yield using filtered detectors.

    Boyko, T D; Green, R J; Moewes, A; Regier, T Z

    2014-07-01

    Typically, X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements aim to probe the linear attenuation coefficient. These measurements are often carried out using partial fluorescence yield techniques that rely on detectors having photon energy discrimination improving the sensitivity and the signal-to-background ratio of the measured spectra. However, measuring the partial fluorescence yield in the soft X-ray regime with reasonable efficiency requires solid-state detectors, which have limitations due to the inherent dead-time while measuring. Alternatively, many of the available detectors that are not energy dispersive do not suffer from photon count rate limitations. A filter placed in front of one of these detectors will make the energy-dependent efficiency non-linear, thereby changing the responsivity of the detector. It is shown that using an array of filtered X-ray detectors is a viable method for measuring soft X-ray partial fluorescence yield spectra without dead-time. The feasibility of this technique is further demonstrated using α-Fe2O3 as an example and it is shown that this detector technology could vastly improve the photon collection efficiency at synchrotrons and that these detectors will allow experiments to be completed with a much lower photon flux reducing X-ray-induced damage. PMID:24971965

  11. A novel depth-of-interaction block detector for positron emission tomography using a dichotomous orthogonal symmetry decoding concept

    Zhang, Yuxuan; Yan, Han; Baghaei, Hossain; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2016-02-01

    Conventionally, a dual-end depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detector readout requires two two-dimensional silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, one on top and one on the bottom, to define the XYZ positions. However, because both the top and bottom SiPM arrays are reading the same pixels, this creates information redundancy. We propose a dichotomous orthogonal symmetric (DOS) dual-end readout block detector design, which removes this redundancy by reducing the number of SiPMs and still achieves XY and DOI (Z) decoding for positron emission tomography (PET) block detector. Reflecting films are used within the block detector to channel photons going to the top of the block to go only in the X direction, and photons going to the bottom are channeled along the Y direction. Despite the unidirectional channeling on each end, the top readout provides both X and Y information using two one-dimensional SiPM arrays instead of a two-dimensional SiPM array; similarly, the bottom readout also provides both X and Y information with just two one-dimensional SiPM arrays. Thus, a total of four one-dimensional SiPM arrays (4  ×  N SiPMs) are used to decode the XYZ positions of the firing pixels instead of two two-dimensional SiPM arrays (2  ×  N  ×  N SiPMs), reducing the number of SiPM arrays per block from 2N2 to 4 N for PET/MR or PET/CT systems. Moreover, the SiPM arrays on one end can be replaced by two regular photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), so that a block needs only 2 N SiPMs  +  2 half-PMTs; this hybrid-DOS DOI block detector can be used in PET/CT systems. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to study the performance of our DOS DOI block detector design, including the XY-decoding quality, energy resolution, and DOI resolution. Both BGO and LSO scintillators were studied. We found that 4 mm pixels were well decoded for 5  ×  5 BGO and 9  ×  9 LSO arrays with 4 to 5 mm DOI resolution and 16-20% energy resolution. By

  12. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    Yu, Weilin [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The HERMES Collaboration at HERA constructed and installed a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the existed spectrometer. This detector is designed to measure recoil protons in hard exclusive processes which provide access to the orbital angular momentum of quarks. The Recoil Detector consists of a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fiber tracker and a photon detector. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnet which provides a 1 T longitudinal magnetic field. The Recoil Detector was installed in January 2006 and data taking lasted until the end of HERA operation in June 2007. Results on the detector performance will be presented here.

  13. Improved germanium well detectors

    Germanium well detectors with metal surface barrier contact are comparable for general use with conventional germanium coaxial detectors. They offer very high sensitivity, the highest presently available

  14. MUON DETECTOR

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  15. Fluid systems for RICH detectors

    Ullaland, O

    2005-01-01

    The optical properties of the radiator media are of prime importance in Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors. The main requirements for the radiator fluid are a stable refractive index and a photon absorption as low as possible. We will in this note cover some of the cleaning procedures which are required together with distillation and similar separation procedures. Thin film membranes have been introduced during the last decade. They have proven particularly interesting in separating air from some Cherenkov fluids. We will also discuss the use of molecular sieves.

  16. Variability of calcium absorption

    Variability in calcium absorption was estimated in three groups of normal subjects in whom Ca absorption was measured by standard isotopic-tracer methods at interstudy intervals ranging from 1 to 4 mo. Fifty absorption tests were performed in 22 subjects. Each was done in the morning after an overnight fast with an identical standard breakfast containing a Ca load of approximately 250 mg. Individual fractional absorption values were normalized to permit pooling of the data. The coefficient of variation (CVs) for absorption for the three groups ranged from 10.57 to 12.79% with the size of the CV increasing with interstudy duration. One other published study presenting replicate absorption values was analyzed in a similar fashion and was found to have a CV of absorption of 9.78%. From these data we estimate that when the standard double-isotope method is used to measure Ca absorption there is approximately 10% variability around any given absorption value within an individual human subject and that roughly two-thirds of this represents real biological variability in absorption

  17. DPZ-1M rhodium neutron detector performance

    The characteristics of the DPZ-1M rhodium self-powered neutron detector based on the calculational technique using corrected experimental data are given. These detectors are used for power distribution monitoring in the WWER reactors. For calculating neutron absorption in an emitter incident neutron flux is specified, while the probability of β-particles escape is determined on the base of empirical dependence of extrapolated electron path on its energy. In addition correction by the emither radius of the probability distribution of β-particles escape by experimental data is performed. The results obtained permit to conclude that the rhodium detector possesses high sensitivity to epithermal neutrons Which depends on the neutron spectrum form; current relation of burned-up and non burned- up detector seightly depends on the spectrum form, neutron gas temperature and average neutron spectral hardness

  18. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers

  19. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  20. Development of a positron-imaging detector with background rejection capability

    Intra-operative probes have recently become important instruments in nuclear medicine. In such an application, the radiopharmaceutical F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is promising. For the FDG-guided surgery, we developed and tested a positron-imaging detector with background rejection capability. The detector consists of an array of phoswich scintillators, a multi-channel position-sensitive photo-multiplier tube (PSPMT) and an electronic circuit. The scintillators and the PSPMT are encased in a tungsten shield and replaceable collimators are mounted on the top of the detector. Positrons are detected by the plastic scintillators while annihilation photons are detected by the bismuth germanates (BGOs). By employing a pulse-shape analysis, we can distinguish the true events (positrons) from background gamma events. The dimensions of each plastic scintillator are 2 mm x 2 mm x 3 mm and those of the BGO are 2 mm x 2 mm x 15 mm. These scintillators are optically coupled to each other and combined in an 8 x 8 array, which is optically coupled to a 1-inch square 8 x 8 multi-channel PSPMT via optical fibers. Position determination of the positrons is performed by 64-channel threshold circuits while the pulse shape analysis is applied for the summing signal. The spatial resolution was measured by positioning an F-18 point source onto one pixel of the detector and found than the spillover to the neighbor pixel was less than 20%. The background count rate was less than 2 cps for a 20-cm diameter, 20-cm long cylinder phantom containing 3.7 MBq of F-18. These results indicated that the developed positron-imaging detector will be useful for FDG-guided surgery. (author)

  1. Testing General Relativity with Spherical Resonant Mass Detectors

    Sylvester, Alex J.

    Gravitational waves in f(R) gravity excite monopole and m = 0+/-2 quadrupole resonance modes of a spherical detector. This document reviews the basic ideas of general relativity and gravitational waves, and then applies those concepts to an f( R) gravitational wave. The acoustic response of a GW incident with a spherical detector is reviewed in detail, and the absorption cross section for an f(R) GW impinging on the spherical detector is calculated. Minimum detectable scalar wave amplitudes are explored for the Mario Schenberg detector. The mass of the scalar mode affects its detectability.

  2. A novel approach towards two-photon absorption based detectors

    Krug, T; Folliot, H.; Lynch, Michael; Bradley, Ann Louise; Donegan, John Francis; Barry, Liam P.; Roberts, J.S.; Hill, G.

    2003-01-01

    Summary: We have demonstrated that the inherent inefficiency of the TPA process in semiconductors can be overcome by incorporating the semiconductor in a microcavity structure. Proof of concept devices with a 0.27μm Ga0.7Al0.3As active region and two Bragg reflectors with the cavity resonance of 890 nm were fabricated. We measured the TPA photocurrent of these devices and have demonstrated a factor of 12000 enhancement over a nonmicrocavity device at 890 nm. Our active length of 0.27 nm is as...

  3. Solid state detector design

    Much has been charged particle detector radiation detector made by the industry, especially those engaged in the development of detection equipment and components. The development and further research will be made solid state detector with silicon material. To be able to detect charged particles (radiation), required the processing of silicon material into the detector material. The method used to make silicon detector material is a lithium evaporations. Having formed an intrinsic region contactor installation process, and with testing. (author)

  4. Resonance absorption of nuclear gamma radiation

    Recoilless emission and absorption of nuclear radiation, as demonstrated by Moessbauer, provides a simple means of studying the interaction of nuclei with electromagnetic radiation and, of greater importance, provides an extremely sensitive tool for the investigation of a large number of physical problems. A very favourable situation arises with the Fe57 nucleus where resonance absorption may be used as a very sensitive detector of the frequency change of electromagnetic radiation. Resonance absorption in Fe57 has been studied in detail. The strength of the absorption, the line shape, and line shift have all been observed as a function of temperature. The polarization of the radiation has been examined by means of experiments with magnetized sources and absorbers. The hyperfine spectrum of the resonance radiation has been analysed with and without polarization. These studies have led to an interpretation of the hyperfine structure in terms of the properties of the nuclear states and the hyperfine interaction in iron. The effect of an external magnetic field on the hyperfine structure has also been investigated. The resonance absorption in Fe57 has been used to study the connexion between the time development of the decay of a nuclear state and the spectrum of the observed radiation. Detailed observations are made of the time spectrum of filtered resonance radiation for a variety of conditions. (author)

  5. A high resolution animal PET scanner using compact PS-PMT detectors

    A new high resolution PET scanner dedicated to animal studies has been designed, built and tested. The system utilizes 240 block detectors, each of which consists of a new compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT) and an 8 x 4 BGO array. A total number of 7,680 crystals (480 per ring) are positioned to form a 508 mm diameter of 16 detector rings with 7.2 mm pitch and 114 mm axial field of view (FOV). The system is designed to perform activation studies using a monkey in a sitting position. The data can be acquired in either 2D or 3D mode, where the slice collimators are retracted in 3D mode. The transaxial resolution is 2.6 mm FWHM at the center of the FOV, and the average axial resolution on the axis of the ring is 3.3 mm FWHM in the direct slice and 3.2 mm FWHM in the cross slice. The scatter fraction, sensitivity and count rate performance were evaluated for a 10 cm diameter cylindrical phantom. The total system sensitivity is 2.3 kcps/kBq/ml in 2D mode and 22.8 kcps/kBq/ml in 3D mode. The noise equivalent count rate with 3D mode is equivalent to that with 2D mode at five times higher radioactivity level. The applicable imaging capabilities of the scanner was demonstrated by animal studies with a monkey

  6. Nutrition and magnesium absorption.

    Brink, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various nutrients present in dairy products and soybean-based products on absorption of magnesium has been investigated. The studies demonstrate that soybean protein versus casein lowers apparent magnesium absorption in rats through its phytate component. However, true magnesium abs

  7. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  8. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    Levy, Matthew C; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B; Baring, Matthew G

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt ($10^{15}\\ \\mathrm{W}$) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light $f$, and even the range of $f$ is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that $f$ exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  9. Optical fiber readout of scintillator arrays using a multi-channel PMT: A high resolution PET detector for animal imaging

    The authors report the results from a new high resolution gamma ray imaging detector designed for use in a positron emission tomography (PET) system dedicated to small animal imaging. The detectors consist of an 8 x 8 array of 2 x 2 x 10 mm bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled by 2 mm diameter double clad optical fibers to a 64 pixel multi-channel photomultiplier tube (MC-PMT). A charge division readout board is used to convert the 64 output channels into four position sensitive signals which determine the crystal of interaction. Measurements with a pair of these detectors demonstrate an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.4 mm, a coincidence timing resolution of 15 ns and an energy resolution ranging between 35 and 60%. Based on these encouraging results, the design for a dedicated animal PET tomograph is proposed and simulations of this system project a reconstructed resolution of less than 2 mm within a 5 cm diameter transaxial field of view

  10. Quasar Absorption Studies

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  11. A New Brain Positron Emission Tomography Scanner With Semiconductor Detectors for Target Volume Delineation and Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Purpose: We compared two treatment planning methods for stereotactic boost for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC): the use of conventional whole-body bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator positron emission tomography (PETCONVWB) versus the new brain (BR) PET system using semiconductor detectors (PETNEWBR). Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with NPC were enrolled in this study. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET images were acquired using both the PETNEWBR and the PETCONVWB system on the same day. Computed tomography (CT) and two PET data sets were transferred to a treatment planning system, and the PETCONVWB and PETNEWBR images were coregistered with the same set of CT images. Window width and level values for all PET images were fixed at 3000 and 300, respectively. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was visually delineated on PET images by using either PETCONVWB (GTVCONV) images or PETNEWBR (GTVNEW) images. Assuming a stereotactic radiotherapy boost of 7 ports, the prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) was set to 2000 cGy in 4 fractions. Results: The average absolute volume (±standard deviation [SD]) of GTVNEW was 15.7 ml (±9.9) ml, and that of GTVCONV was 34.0 (±20.5) ml. The average GTVNEW was significantly smaller than that of GTVCONV (p = 0.0006). There was no statistically significant difference between the maximum dose (p = 0.0585) and the mean dose (p = 0.2748) of PTV. The radiotherapy treatment plan based on the new gross tumor volume (PLANNEW) significantly reduced maximum doses to the cerebrum and cerebellum (p = 0.0418) and to brain stem (p = 0.0041). Conclusion: Results of the present study suggest that the new brain PET system using semiconductor detectors can provide more accurate tumor delineation than the conventional whole-body BGO PET system and may be an important tool for functional and molecular radiotherapy treatment planning.

  12. Production of silicon modified to have enhanced infrared absorption

    Weld, E.; Ayachitula, R.; de La Harpe, K.; Brandt, L.; Chilton, M.; Knize, R. J.; Patterson, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced optical properties of silicon microstructures formed by irradiation of a silicon wafer by a modulated continuous wave (CW) laser beam in the presence of SF6. The microstructures are doped with about 0.6% sulfur, which extends the absorption well below the 1.1um bandgap of crystalline silicon and results in a 60% increase in the absorption of infrared radiation. The microstructured silicon produced using microsecond pulses of CW light demonstrates comparable infrared absorption enhancement to black silicon made using more expensive and complicated laser systems. This enhanced absorption as a result of these microstructures has been studied over the past decade in an effort to create high responsivity detectors and night vision goggles and improve the efficiency of solar cells. We will also discuss additional methods that allow tunability and scalability in the production of silicon modified to demonstrate increased infrared absorption.

  13. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  14. The MINOS Detectors

    Grashorn, A H E W

    2005-01-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment's primary goal is the precision measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the atmospheric neutrino sector. This long-baseline experiment uses Fermilab's NuMI beam, measured with a Near Detector at Fermilab, and again 735 km later using a Far Detector in the Soudan Mine Underground Lab in northern Minnesota. The detectors are magnetized iron/scintillator calorimeters. The Far Detector has been operational for cosmic ray and atmospheric neutrino data from July of 2003, the Near Detector from September 2004, and the NuMI beam started in early 2005. This poster presents details of the two detectors.

  15. An optimized ultrasound detector for photoacoustic breast tomography

    Xia, Wenfeng; Van Hespen, Johan; Van Veldhoven, Spiridon; Prins, Christian; Van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has proven to be able to detect vascularization-driven optical absorption contrast associated with tumors. In order to detect breast tumors located a few centimeter deep in tissue, a sensitive ultrasound detector is of crucial importance for photoacoustic mammography. Further, because the expected photoacoustic frequency bandwidth (a few MHz to tens of kHz) is inversely proportional to the dimensions of light absorbing structures (0.5 to 10+ mm), proper choices of materials and their geometries, and proper considerations in design have to be made for optimal photoacoustic detectors. In this study, we design and evaluate a specialized ultrasound detector for photoacoustic mammography. Based on the required detector sensitivity and its frequency response, a selection of active material and matching layers and their geometries is made leading to a functional detector models. By iteration between simulation of detector performances, fabrication and experimental characterization of functional...

  16. Development of mercuric iodide detectors for XAS and XRD measurements

    A prototype element for an energy dispersive detector (EDD) array was constructed using a Mercuric Iodide detector. Both detector and front end FET could be thermoelectrically cooled. Tested at SSRL, the detector had 250 eV electronic noise and 315 eV resolution at 5.9 keV. K line fluorescence spectra were collected for selected elements between Cl (2622 eV) and Zn (8638 eV). Count rate capability to 60,000 cps was demonstrated. Several detector parameters were measured, including energy linearity, resolution vs. shaping time, and detector dead time. An EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) spectrum was recorded and compared to simultaneously collected transmission data

  17. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  18. Infrared detector materials research - A viewpoint

    The goal of DARPA's research program in Infrared Detector Materials is to develop a science base for production of affordable large area high performance focal plane arrays. Intrinsic materials (HgCdTe and related Hg-based alloys) are preferred, principally because of their large absorption coefficient. A summary of progress and issues in bulk and epitaxial growth of II-VI materials, II-VI superlattices, contacts, ion implantation, and low frequency noise is given

  19. Ultraviolet absorption detection of DNA in gels

    A method and apparatus for the detection and quantification of large fragments of unlabelled deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in agarose gels is presented. The technique is based on ultra-violet (UV) absorption by nucleotides. A deuterium lamp was used to illuminate regions of an electrophoresis gel. As DNA bands passed through the illuminated region of the gel the amount of UV light transmitted was reduced due to DNA absorption. Two detection systems were investigated. In the first system, synthetic chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond strip detectors were used to locate regions of DNA in the gels by detecting the transmitted light. CVD diamond has a high indirect band gap of 5.45 eV and is therefore sensitive to UV photons of wavelengths < 224 nm. A number of CVD diamond samples were characterised to investigate their suitability as detectors for this application. The detectors' quantum efficiency, UV response and time response were measured. DNA bands containing as little as 20 ng were detected by the diamond. In a second system, a deuterium lamp was used to illuminate individual sample lanes of an electrophoresis gel via an array of optical fibres. During electrophoresis the regions of DNA were detected with illumination at 260 nm, using a UV-sensitive charge coupled device (CCD). As the absorption coefficient of a DNA sample is approximately proportional to its mass, the technique is inherently quantitative. This system had a detection limit of 0.25 ng compared with 2-10 ng for the most popular conventional technique, ethidium bromide (EtBr) staining. Using this detection technique, the DNA sample remains in its native state. The removal of carcinogenic dyes from the detection procedure greatly reduces associated biological hazards. (author)

  20. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given

  1. The next generation of crystal detectors

    Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Crystal detectors have been used widely in high energy and nuclear physics experiments, medical instruments and homeland security applications. Novel crystal detectors are continuously being discovered and developed in academia and in industry. In high energy and nuclear physics experiments, total absorption electromagnetic calorimeters (ECAL) made of inorganic crystals are known for their superb energy resolution and detection efficiency for photon and electron measurements. A crystal ECAL is thus the choice for those experiments where precision measurements of photons and electrons are crucial for their physics missions. For future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers, however, the crystal detectors used in the above mentioned ECALs are either not bright and fast enough, or not radiation hard enough. Crystal detectors have also been proposed to build a Homogeneous Hadron Calorimeter (HHCAL) to achieve unprecedented jet mass resolution by duel readout of both Cherenkov and scintillation light, where development of cost-effective crystal detectors is a crucial issue because of the huge crystal volume required. This paper discusses several R&D directions for the next generation of crystal detectors for future HEP experiments.

  2. Metal-semiconductor, composite radiation detectors

    In 1989, Naruse and Hatayama of Toshiba published a design for an increased efficiency x-ray detector. The design increased the efficiency of a semiconductor detector by interspersing layers of high-z metal within it. Semiconductors such as silicon make good, high-resolution radiation detectors, but they have low efficiency because they are low-z materials (z = 14). High-z metals, on the other hand, are good absorbers of high-energy photons. By interspersing high-z metal layers with semiconductor layers, Naruse and Hatayama combined the high absorption efficiency of the high-z metals with the good detection capabilities of a semiconductor. This project is an attempt to use the same design to produce a high-efficiency, room temperature gamma ray detector. By their nature, gamma rays require thicker metal layers to efficiently absorb them. These thicker layers change the behavior of the detector by reducing the resolution, compared to a solid state detector, and shifting the photopeak by a predictable amount. During the last year, the authors have procured and tested a commercial device with operating characteristics similar to those of a single layer of the composite device. They have modeled the radiation transport in a multi-layered device, to verify the initial calculations of layer thickness and composition. They have modeled the electrostatic field in different device designs to locate and remove high-field regions that can cause device breakdown. They have fabricated 14 single layer prototypes

  3. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  4. Forward tracking detectors

    Klaus Mönig

    2007-11-01

    Forward tracking is an essential part of a detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The requirements for forward tracking are explained and the proposed solutions in the detector concepts are shown.

  5. Universal Zero Conductivity Condition for Optical Absorption

    Guo, Yu; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    Harnessing information and energy from light within a nanoscale mode volume is a fundamental challenge for nanophotonic applications ranging from solar photovoltaics to single photon detectors. Here, we show the existence of a universal condition in materials that sheds light on fundamental limits of electromagnetic to matter energy conversion (transduction). We show that the upper limit of absorption rate (transduction rate) in any nanoscale absorber converting light to matter degrees of freedom is revealed by the zero of optical conductivity at complex frequencies ($\\sigma(\\omega^\\prime + i\\omega^{\\prime\\prime})= 0$). We trace the origin of this universal zero conductivity condition to causality requirements on any passive linear response function and propose an experiment of absorption resonances using plasmonic nanoparticles to experimentally verify this universal zero conductivity condition. Our work is widely applicable to linear systems across the electromagnetic spectrum and allows for systematic opti...

  6. Self-absorption correction for β-γ coincidence measurement of xenon samples

    In xenon activity measurements,the self-absorption diversity among different samples should be well corrected. In this regard, MCNP simulation was performed with a β-γ coincidence detector model. The detection efficiencies were obtained for xenon samples in different volumes, and self-absorption coefficients were calculated using the efficiencies. (authors)

  7. JADE muon detector

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-08-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.).

  8. Gas filled detectors

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  9. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  10. Radiative Processes of the DeWitt-Takagi Detector

    Díaz, D E

    2003-01-01

    We examine the excitation of a uniformly accelerated DeWitt-Takagi detector coupled quadratically to a Majorana-Dirac field. We obtain the transition probability from the ground state of the detector and the vacuum state of the field to an excited state with the emission of a Minkowski pair of quanta, in terms of elementary processes of absorption and scattering of Rindler quanta from the Fulling-Davies-Unruh thermal bath in the co-accelerated frame.