WorldWideScience

Sample records for absorbed glandular dose

  1. Evaluation of the relation between breast glandular absorbed dose and radiographic quality in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Mammography is the main imaging method in breast cancer detection. Breast is one of the main radiological sensitive organs, hence it is important to evaluate absorbed dose to this organ especially to the glandular parts. It is the aim of this study to measure mean glandular dose and image contrast in terms of different mammographic parameters. Materials and Methods: In this study two mammography machines located at Said-al Shohada (Giotto) and Shahid Behesti (GE) hospitals were used. According to the recommendations of ACR and MQSA a breast phantoms were constructed and used for this study. For dose evaluation TLD dosimetry method were used. The TLD dosimeters were of LiF type and the reader was a Solaro TLD reader. Results and discussions: To obtain a constant contrast when increasing KVp from 22 to 24 it was necessary to reduce mAs by 12 percent. The obtained relation between these two parameters is: contrast=0.2829D-0.2427. It was also obtained that there is a linear relationship between contrast and image quality. The relation between these two parameters is: Image quality=28.117Contarst+20.134. Increasing KVp and hence decreasing mAs results a reduction to the glandular dose, especially in patients with large breast. Increasing KVp from 28 to 30 results in reduction of dose from 6.8mGy to 5mGy. (author)

  2. Media glandular dose in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to determine the media glandular dose of the patients group who most frequently are exposed at mammographic studies in the General Hospital of Zone No. 1 of IMSS in Zacatecas, later to compare this dose with the value that establishes the Mexican Official Standard and to know risk-benefit that a patient is exposed when it is realized studies of this nature. This with the purpose of to know if the patients who are realized this type of studies are exhibited to irradiations of unnecessary way. In order to obtain the media glandular dose, first it was choose the age group of feminine population that is predominant to this suffering. Of the classification of the age group it was determine the frequency of each thickness of mamma, and on the basis of the thickness of the compressed mamma the conditions were registered with it radiates the patient. When having the age and compressed mamma thickness of patient and the voltage, current, anode/filter that uses the mammography equipment for to radiate it was calculated the media glandular dose. The media glandular dose was calculated using two algorithms proposed in literature and thermoluminescent dosemeters. For the case of the thermoluminescent dosemeters were used two phantoms. In this study was detected that the limits, with that they radiate the patients who are exposed at mammographic studies it is by underneath of 3 mGy. Finally, it was detected that the Mexican Official Standard lacks of elements to offer radiological limits for the mammography area, because in this standard they are excluded the radiological limits for anode and filter of Mo/Rh and Rh/Rh. To know the dose applying these anodes and filters is of extreme importance because 85% of the population that is exposed to this studies type was radiated with anode and filter of Mo/Rh and Rh/Rh. (Author)

  3. Mammographic glandular dose: Definition of ''tissue at highest risk''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1979, various authors published data on ''mean glandular dose.'' In their study, the glandular dose was averaged across the entire breast parenchyma. But most breast cancers occur in glandular tissues situated centrally and laterally, that is, about 1-2 cm below the skin entrance of the beam. The authors calculated the mean dosage to this ''tissue at highest risk,'' assuming compressed fat and skin thickness of 0.25 cm, and actual compressed breast thickness. The data shows a substantial increase in absorbed dose in this tissue at highest risk. The potential effect on mammographic planning, patient education, and dose risk calculations are discussed

  4. Evaluation of depth dose and glandular dose for digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the depth dose and mean glandular dose for the latest digital mammography. Depth doses were measured using GR-200F thin-film TLDs comprising LiF:Mg,Cu,P over three kinds of composition of mammographic phantom (glandular/fat: 30/70; 50/50; 70/30) under automatic exposure control by a digital mammographic unit (Novation DR, Siemens). Mean glandular doses were derived from entrance surface doses which were measured according to the Mammography Quality Control Manual of American College of Radiology. Two types of mean glandular dose calculation system were used and compared in this study. The depth dose could be established with thin-film TLDs and fitted by the model considered the primary and scatter radiation. The 50% depth dose falls at a depth of between 0.62 and 1.71 cm, which can represent the beam quality of X-ray spectra. The MGD calculated by Dance's method is 9-21% higher than that by Wu's method. Therefore, the difference should be considered by the Taiwan's regulation for Novation DR digital mammographic units.

  5. Evaluation of depth dose and glandular dose for digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.Y. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chong, N.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei 220, Taiwan (China); Ho, Y.J. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Tyan, Y.S., E-mail: huiyutsai@gmail.co [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Sec.1, Jianguo N Rd., Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the depth dose and mean glandular dose for the latest digital mammography. Depth doses were measured using GR-200F thin-film TLDs comprising LiF:Mg,Cu,P over three kinds of composition of mammographic phantom (glandular/fat: 30/70; 50/50; 70/30) under automatic exposure control by a digital mammographic unit (Novation DR, Siemens). Mean glandular doses were derived from entrance surface doses which were measured according to the Mammography Quality Control Manual of American College of Radiology. Two types of mean glandular dose calculation system were used and compared in this study. The depth dose could be established with thin-film TLDs and fitted by the model considered the primary and scatter radiation. The 50% depth dose falls at a depth of between 0.62 and 1.71 cm, which can represent the beam quality of X-ray spectra. The MGD calculated by Dance's method is 9-21% higher than that by Wu's method. Therefore, the difference should be considered by the Taiwan's regulation for Novation DR digital mammographic units.

  6. Mean glandular dose for different angles of the X-ray tube using different glandularity phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a three-dimensional radiographic technique that is beginning to be used as part of an imaging diagnostic program in some of Brazilian clinical practices. Studies are needed to evaluate the performance and to determine the radiation dose of patients that are undergoing this new procedure. The aim of this work is to present results of the mean glandular dose (DG) for different angles of the X-ray tube using a computed radiography (CR) mammography unit and different glandularity standard breast phantoms. DG values were derived from measurements of the incident air kerma (Ki) and tabulated conversion coefficients that are dependent on the half-value layer (HVL) of the X-ray spectrum. Irradiations were done in a 3000 Nova model Siemens MAMMOMAT mammography unit with the X-ray tube angle ranging from ?30° to 30°. The protocol with 28 kV was used for Mo/Mo combination. The distance between focus and the 90×5–6 M model Radcal ionization chamber was 60.5 cm and the tube loading (PIt) used was 50 mA s. Exposures were done for DG determination using the semi-automatic exposure control mode and the 45 mm Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc phantoms which approximately simulate a standard breast with glandularities of 0, 30, 50, 70 and 100%. DG values ranged from 1.3±0.1 to 7.6±0.7 mGy. The results are in according to the reference level of 3 mGy established by the International Basic Safety Standards (BSS115) to breast with 45 mm of thickness, 50% of glandularity and for the X-ray tube positioned in 0°. The results showed that DG increases with the glandularity and with the rotation of the X-ray tube. This work contributes to begin in Brazil the dosimetry in DBT equipments using different protocols and target/filter combinations. - Highlights: ? Glandularity phantoms and a computed radiography mammography unit were used. ? Results were calculated from the incident air kerma and conversion coefficients. ? They are in according to the reference level established to a standard breast. ? Mean glandular dose increases with the glandularity and X-ray tube rotation. ? This work contributes to begin in Brazil the dosimetry in tomosynthesis

  7. Glandularity and mean glandular dose determined for individual women at four regional breast cancer screening units in The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoetelief, J.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Thijssen, M. A. O.; Jansen, J. T. M.

    2006-04-01

    The nationwide breast cancer screening programme using mammography has been in full operation in The Netherlands since 1997. There is concern that the mean glandular doses due to mammography might be differing between different regions of the country due to differences in glandularity and compressed breast thickness. To investigate regional differences, glandularity, compressed breast thickness and mean glandular dose were determined for individual breasts during screening at mammography units at four locations in The Netherlands. Differences in glandularity were observed, which could be related qualitatively to differences in age of the participants at the different locations. Mean glandular dose depends on compressed breast thickness, glandularity and technical conditions of screening. The lowest average value of the mean glandular dose was found for the unit in Amsterdam. This is most likely due to the use of the Mo/Rh anode/filter combination at this unit, in addition to the Mo/Mo combination. At the other three units, almost exclusively the Mo/Mo anode/filter combination was used. Differences in mean glandular dose averaged per unit could be related mainly to differences in tube-current exposure-time product values. Consequently, it is concluded that differences in mean glandular dose at different units are marginal.

  8. Glandularity and mean glandular dose determined for individual women at four regional breast cancer screening units in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nationwide breast cancer screening programme using mammography has been in full operation in The Netherlands since 1997. There is concern that the mean glandular doses due to mammography might be differing between different regions of the country due to differences in glandularity and compressed breast thickness. To investigate regional differences, glandularity, compressed breast thickness and mean glandular dose were determined for individual breasts during screening at mammography units at four locations in The Netherlands. Differences in glandularity were observed, which could be related qualitatively to differences in age of the participants at the different locations. Mean glandular dose depends on compressed breast thickness, glandularity and technical conditions of screening. The lowest average value of the mean glandular dose was found for the unit in Amsterdam. This is most likely due to the use of the Mo/Rh anode/filter combination at this unit, in addition to the Mo/Mo combination. At the other three units, almost exclusively the Mo/Mo anode/filter combination was used. Differences in mean glandular dose averaged per unit could be related mainly to differences in tube-current exposure-time product values. Consequently, it is concluded that differences in mean glandular dose at different units are marginal

  9. Media glandular dose in mammography;Dosis glandular media en mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran M, H. A.; Hernandez O, M.; Pinedo S, A.; Guerra M, J. A.; Gonzalez G, R.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada en Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J., E-mail: hduran20_1@hotmail.co [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    The objective of this work was to determine the media glandular dose of the patients group who most frequently are exposed at mammographic studies in the General Hospital of Zone No. 1 of IMSS in Zacatecas, later to compare this dose with the value that establishes the Mexican Official Standard and to know risk-benefit that a patient is exposed when it is realized studies of this nature. This with the purpose of to know if the patients who are realized this type of studies are exhibited to irradiations of unnecessary way. In order to obtain the media glandular dose, first it was choose the age group of feminine population that is predominant to this suffering. Of the classification of the age group it was determine the frequency of each thickness of mamma, and on the basis of the thickness of the compressed mamma the conditions were registered with it radiates the patient. When having the age and compressed mamma thickness of patient and the voltage, current, anode/filter that uses the mammography equipment for to radiate it was calculated the media glandular dose. The media glandular dose was calculated using two algorithms proposed in literature and thermoluminescent dosemeters. For the case of the thermoluminescent dosemeters were used two phantoms. In this study was detected that the limits, with that they radiate the patients who are exposed at mammographic studies it is by underneath of 3 mGy. Finally, it was detected that the Mexican Official Standard lacks of elements to offer radiological limits for the mammography area, because in this standard they are excluded the radiological limits for anode and filter of Mo/Rh and Rh/Rh. To know the dose applying these anodes and filters is of extreme importance because 85% of the population that is exposed to this studies type was radiated with anode and filter of Mo/Rh and Rh/Rh. (Author)

  10. Average glandular dose in patients submitted to mammographic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doses in mammography should be maintained as low as possible without reducing the high image quality needed to the early detection of the breast cancer. As the breast is composed of tissues with very soft composition and densities, it increases the difficulty to detect small changes in the normal anatomical structures that may be associated with breast cancer. To achieve the standards of resolution and contrast for mammography, the quality and intensity of the X-ray beam, the breast positioning and compression, the film screen system, and the film processing must be in optimal operational conditions. This study intended to evaluate the mean glandular dose of patients undergoing routine exams in one mammography unit. Patient image analyses were done by a radiologist doctor who took into account 10 evaluation criteria for each CC and MLO incidences. For estimating each patient glandular dose the radiographic technique parameters (kV and mAs) and the thickness of the compressed breast were recorded. European image quality criteria were adopted by the radiologist doctor to accept the image for diagnostic purpose. For breast densities of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissues the incident air-kerma was measured and the glandular dose calculated considering the x-ray output during the exam. In the study of 50 patients the mean glandular dose varied from 0.90 to 3.27 mGy with a mean value of 1.98 mGy for CC incidences. For MLO incidences the mean glandular doses ranged from 0.97 to 3.98 mGy and a mean value of 2.60 mGy. (author)

  11. Glandular dose in breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettivier, G.; Fedon, C.; Di Lillo, F.; Longo, R.; Sarno, A.; Tromba, G.; Russo, P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide an evaluation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) for breast computed tomography (CT) with synchrotron radiation in an axial scanning configuration with a partial or total organ volume irradiation, for the in vivo program of breast CT ongoing at the ELETTRA facility (Trieste, Italy). A Geant4 Monte Carlo code was implemented, simulating the photon irradiation from a synchrotron radiation source in the energetic range from 8 to 50 keV with 1 keV intervals, to evaluate the MGD. The code was validated with literature data, in terms of mammographic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) and with ad hoc experimental data, in terms of computed tomography dose index (CTDI). Simulated cylindrical phantoms of different sizes (diameter at phantom base 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16?cm, axial length 1.5 times the radius) and glandular fraction by weight (0%, 14.3%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) were implemented into the code. The validation of the code shows an excellent agreement both with previously published work and in terms of DgN and CDTI measurements. The implemented simulations show a dependence of the glandular dose estimate on the vertical dimension of the irradiated zone when a partial organ irradiation was implemented. Specific normalized coefficients for calculating the MGD to the whole breast or to the single irradiated slice were reported.

  12. Evaluation of glandular dose in conventional and digital mammography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey was conducted to estimate the average glandular dose (Dg) for patients undergoing mammography and to report the distribution of incident air kerma (Ki), patient age, compressed breast thickness and glandular tissue content. From 1183 cranio caudal mammograms clinical data were collected and doses were measured. The survey data included mammograms from six mammography equipment: two screen/film units (SFM), two computed radiography units (CR) and two full-field digital (DR). Mean value for patient age and compressed breast thickness were 57 +-12 y and 5.4 +-1.4 cm, respectively. To investigate the importance of technical characteristics of three different mammography systems and breast glandularity, Ki and Dg were measured for individual breast of 392 patients from the original sample with compressed breast thickness in the range of 5.5 cm to 6.5 cm using tissue-equivalent phantoms of different glandularities manufactured in this study to mimic both the attenuation and the density of breast tissues. Mean Ki value was 10.0 +-3.6 mGy for SFM systems, 12.0 +-3.6 mGy for CR systems and 4.9 +-1.3 mGy for DR systems. Mean Dg value was 1.4 +-0.5 mGy for S/F systems, 1.7 +-0.5 mGy for CR systems and 0.9 +-0.2 mGy for D R systems. Statistical analysis for differences in mean values of Ki and Dg between mammography systems showed significant effect of their technical characteristics (p i and Dg, it was observed statistically significant differences between the group of patients with 0 to 50% glandularity and the group of patients with 50 to 100% glandularity. (author)

  13. Mean glandular dose in a breast screening programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, H. A.; Pérez-Badillo, M. P.; Villaseñor, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Breast density has an important role in early detection of breast cancer, because has been reported the strong association between breast density and invasive breast cancer risk. Mammography is the gold standard to early detection of breast cancer, despite of this require ionizing radiation that may increase radio-induced cancer risk. This maybe limited with a quality control programme of mammographic units, with the main goal of achieving high quality images with low radiation dose. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published in 2011 the "Quality assurance programme for digital mammography", where glandular tissue quantity is an important parameter to compute mean glandular dose (MGD), which is necessary to reduce its associated risk. In this work we show the first results in our country applying this protocol and studying breast density in a small group. MGD complies with national and IAEA dose limits.

  14. Mean glandular dose in a breast screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvan, H. A.; Perez-Badillo, M. P.; Villasenor, Y. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col Seccion XVI, Mexico, D. F., C. P. 14080 (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Breast density has an important role in early detection of breast cancer, because has been reported the strong association between breast density and invasive breast cancer risk. Mammography is the gold standard to early detection of breast cancer, despite of this require ionizing radiation that may increase radio-induced cancer risk. This maybe limited with a quality control programme of mammographic units, with the main goal of achieving high quality images with low radiation dose. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published in 2011 the {sup Q}uality assurance programme for digital mammography{sup ,} where glandular tissue quantity is an important parameter to compute mean glandular dose (MGD), which is necessary to reduce its associated risk. In this work we show the first results in our country applying this protocol and studying breast density in a small group. MGD complies with national and IAEA dose limits.

  15. Development of an excel spreadsheet formean glandular dose in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to develop an Excel spreadsheet to calculate mean glandular dose (Dg) in mammography using clinical exposure data. Dg can be calculated as the product of incident air kerma (Ka) and DgN (i.e., Dg=Ka x DgN). According to the method of Klein et al (Phys Med Biol 1997; 42: 651-671), Ka was measured at the entrance surface with an ionization dosimeter. Normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients, taking into account breast glandularity, were computed using Boone's method (Med Phys 2002; 29: 869-875). DgN coefficients can be calculated for any arbitrary X-ray spectrum. These calculation procedures were input into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The resulting Excel spreadsheet is easy to use and is always applicable in the field of mammography. The exposure conditions concerning Dg in clinical practice were also investigated in 22 women. Four exposure conditions (target/filter combination and tube voltage) were automatically selected in this study. This investigation found that average Dg for each exposure was 1.9 mGy. Because it is recommended that quality control of radiation dose management in mammography is done using an American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom, information about patient dose is not obtained in many facilities. The present Excel spreadsheet was accordingly considered useful for optimization of exposure conditions and explanation of mammography to patients. (author)

  16. Preliminary results of the average glandular dose to the breast with TLDS measure is computed as the conversion factors; Resultados preliminares da dose glandular media na mama medida com TLDS e calculada atraves de fatores de conversao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardo, Luiz T.L.; Almeida, Claudio D.; Coutinho, Celia M.C., E-mail: ltsardo@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: claudio@ird.gov.br, E-mail: celia@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    At mammography exams there is a risk of a breast cancer induced from the absorbed dose by the glandular tissue. According to the National Institute of Cancer, INCA, breast cancer is the second type most frequent in the world and the most common among women, therefore the necessity of monitoring the mean glandular dose, D{sub G}. Measuring methods of D{sub G} were established by some authors. Among the established methods the method of Dance is one of the most known. In this study was utilized a measurement method realized with TL dosimeters inserted in a breast tissue equivalent phantom, BTE, with 46% of glandularity and exposed using Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh target/filter combination and 28kV. To ensure this measurement method the results were compared with a calculation method, used by Dance, of D{sub G} from the measurement of incident air kerma, K{sub i}, and conversion factors to consider mainly the beam quality, the compressed thickness and the glandularity of the breast. The results of the comparison of the D{sub G} measurement with the obtained dose by the method of Dance demonstrated that for the thickness of 4.0 and 6.0 cm the doses were consistent. For the thickness of 5.0 cm the difference was higher, indicating that the glandularity may influence, suggesting further investigation. (author)

  17. Estimation of mean glandular dose for mammography of augmented breasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, J. R.; Kotre, C. J.

    2000-11-01

    The standard quantity used to relate breast surface exposure to radiation risk is the mean dose received by the radiation sensitive tissue contained within the female breast, the mean glandular dose (MGD). At present, little is known about the MGD received by women with breast implants as there is no technique available to facilitate its calculation. The present work has involved modification of the conventional method for MGD estimation to make it applicable to women with augmented breasts. The technique was used to calculate MGDs for a cohort of 80 women with breast implants, which were compared with similar data calculated for a total of 1258 non-augmented women. Little difference was found in median MGD at low compressed breast thickness. At high breast thickness, however, the MGDs received by women with augmented breasts were found to be considerably lower than those relating to their non-augmented counterparts.

  18. Preliminary results of the average glandular dose to the breast with TLDS measure is computed as the conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At mammography exams there is a risk of a breast cancer induced from the absorbed dose by the glandular tissue. According to the National Institute of Cancer, INCA, breast cancer is the second type most frequent in the world and the most common among women, therefore the necessity of monitoring the mean glandular dose, DG. Measuring methods of DG were established by some authors. Among the established methods the method of Dance is one of the most known. In this study was utilized a measurement method realized with TL dosimeters inserted in a breast tissue equivalent phantom, BTE, with 46% of glandularity and exposed using Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh target/filter combination and 28kV. To ensure this measurement method the results were compared with a calculation method, used by Dance, of DG from the measurement of incident air kerma, Ki, and conversion factors to consider mainly the beam quality, the compressed thickness and the glandularity of the breast. The results of the comparison of the DG measurement with the obtained dose by the method of Dance demonstrated that for the thickness of 4.0 and 6.0 cm the doses were consistent. For the thickness of 5.0 cm the difference was higher, indicating that the glandularity may influence, suggesting further investigation. (author)

  19. Calculation of mean glandular dose for mammography practice in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of breast cancer in the western world is worryingly high now. The prognosis is best if the disease is detected early, whilst the tumour is small and before it has spread, As a consequence breast-screening programmes based upon X-ray mammography have been instigated in many countries. In Bangladesh the frequency of diagnosis by mammography is increasing day by day. Some of the examinations are repeated due to the low image contrast. This causes increase in personal dose as well as population dose. The technicians working in this field are concerned with the image quality but not about the dose that they impart to the patient. The radiation dose to breast from ionizing radiation varies with the examination types and machine types used for diagnosis. It varies with the technical parameters (kVp, mAs, source to skin distance) used during mammography examination. Many works regarding this field have been done in different countries in the world. They have a regular radiation dose assessment program but in Bangladesh, hardly any work has been done in this field. On this plea, mainly, the present work has been undertaken. The aim of this work was to evaluate the mean glandular dose to breast

  20. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olgar, T. [Ankara Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Kahn, T.; Gosch, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To determine the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital full-field mammography (2 D imaging mode) and in breast tomosynthesis (3 D imaging mode). Materials and Methods: Using the method described by Boone, the AGD was calculated from the exposure parameters of 2247 conventional 2 D mammograms and 984 mammograms in 3 D imaging mode of 641 patients examined with the digital mammographic system Hologic Selenia Dimensions. The breast glandular tissue content was estimated by the Hologic R2 Quantra automated volumetric breast density measurement tool for each patient from right craniocaudal (RCC) and left craniocaudal (LCC) images in 2 D imaging mode. Results: The mean compressed breast thickness (CBT) was 52.7 mm for craniocaudal (CC) and 56.0 mm for mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. The mean percentage of breast glandular tissue content was 18.0 % and 17.4 % for RCC and LCC projections, respectively. The mean AGD values in 2 D imaging mode per exposure for the standard breast were 1.57 mGy and 1.66 mGy, while the mean AGD values after correction for real breast composition were 1.82 mGy and 1.94 mGy for CC and MLO views, respectively. The mean AGD values in 3 D imaging mode per exposure for the standard breast were 2.19 mGy and 2.29 mGy, while the mean AGD values after correction for the real breast composition were 2.53 mGy and 2.63 mGy for CC and MLO views, respectively. No significant relationship was found between the AGD and CBT in 2 D imaging mode and a good correlation coefficient of 0.98 in 3 D imaging mode. Conclusion: In this study the mean calculated AGD per exposure in 3 D imaging mode was on average 34 % higher than for 2 D imaging mode for patients examined with the same CBT.

  1. Analysis of patient exposure dose for mammography: estimation of average glandular dose in 2007 questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the swift progress of digital mammography has resulted in variation in patient exposure doses during mammography in Japan. We therefore carried out a study in 2007 to determine the latest patient exposure dose by means of a nationwide questionnaire survey of Japan, and compared the average glandular dose with those of 1993, 1998, and 2001. The average glandular dose can be calculated from the product of the breast entrance skin exposure and DgN (the average glandular dose per unit entrance skin exposure). The 2007 breast entrance skin dose was estimated from doses at 434 institutions, calculated on the basis of tube voltages measured at 51 institutions in the Tokai and Hokuriku regions of Japan. The DgN was calculated by using a published table of 50% adipose-50% glandular breast composition and 4.2 cm breast thickness corresponding to the measured half-value layer (HVL) at each tube voltage. The patient exposure dose for mammography was then estimated from exposure conditions (tube voltage, mAs value) obtained from the 2007 questionnaire. The 2007 estimated dose of about 1.7 mGy had increased compared with 1.4 mGy in 1998 and 1.5 mGy in 2001, returning to a value close to that of 1.6 mGy in 1993. This is the result of the great popularity of digital mammography, in particular computed radiography (CR). Digital mammography is increasing, accounting for about 70% of all mammography in the current investigation in comparison with 28.3% in 2001, 24.0% in 1998 and 8.8% in 1993, when the first survey of patient exposure dose for mammography was carried out. The patient exposure dose during digital mammography, and for CR in particular, should therefore be reconsidered. (author)

  2. Nationwide survey of glandular tissue doses for the establishment of a breast cancer screening system using mammography. Analysis of technical parameters affecting the glandular tissue dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of technical parameters, such as screen-film combinations, antiscatter grids, processing conditions and X-ray beam qualities, on the average glandular tissue dose of radiation were analyzed under two exposure conditions: The standard radiographic condition for an RMI 156 phantom at each facility (Standard Radiographic Condition). The radiographic condition needed to obtain a radiographic density of 1.20 to 1.40 with an RMI 156 phantom (Canonical Radiographic Condition). The analysis included 208 dose measurements at 104 facilities. The results showed that the average glandular tissue dose depends strongly on the grid types and screen-film combinations used. There were also significant differences in radiographic density between the Standard Radiographic Condition and the Canonical Radiographic Condition. This analysis of the technical parameters affecting the glandular tissue dose will be useful in establishing a standardized mammographic breast cancer screening system. (author)

  3. Average glandular dose and phantom image quality in mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rua Prof. Mario Werneck, s/n Cidade Universitaria-Pampulha, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Superintendencia Estadual de Vigilancia Sanitaria, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nogueira, M.S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rua Prof. Mario Werneck, s/n Cidade Universitaria-Pampulha, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.br; Guedes, E. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rua Prof. Mario Werneck, s/n Cidade Universitaria-Pampulha, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Andrade, M.C. [Superintendencia Estadual de Vigilancia Sanitaria, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Peixoto, J.E. [Radiology Department, UFRJ, Av. Brig. Trompowisky, s/n Rio de Janeiro CEP 21941-590 (Brazil); Joana, G.S.; Castro, J.G. [Superintendencia Estadual de Vigilancia Sanitaria, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2007-09-21

    Doses in mammography should be maintained as low as possible without reducing the high image quality needed for early detection of the breast cancer. The breast is composed of tissues with very close composition and densities. It increases the difficulty to detect small changes in the normal anatomical structures which may be associated with breast cancer. To achieve the standards of definition and contrast for mammography, the quality and intensity of the X-ray beam, the breast positioning and compression, the film-screen system, and the film processing have to be in optimal operational conditions. This study sought to evaluate average glandular dose (AGD) and image quality on a standard phantom in 134 mammography units in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, between December 2004 and May 2006. AGDs were obtained by means of entrance kerma measured with TL LiF100 dosimeters on phantom surface. Phantom images were obtained with automatic exposure technique, fixed 28 kV and molybdenum anode-filter combination. The phantom used contained structures simulating tumoral masses, microcalcifications, fibers and low contrast areas. High-resolution metallic meshes to assess image definition and a stepwedge to measure image contrast index were also inserted in the phantom. The visualization of simulated structures, the mean optical density and the contrast index allowed to classify the phantom image quality in a seven-point scale. The results showed that 54.5% of the facilities did not achieve the minimum performance level for image quality. It is mainly due to insufficient film processing observed in 61.2% of the units. AGD varied from 0.41 to 2.73 mGy with a mean value of 1.32{+-}0.44 mGy. In all optimal quality phantom images, AGDs were in this range. Additionally, in 7.3% of the mammography units, the AGD constraint of 2 mGy was exceeded. One may conclude that dose level to patient and image quality are not in conformity to regulations in most of the facilities. This indicates that ongoing actions are needed to optimize image quality and radiation dose for early detection of the breast cancer.

  4. Average glandular dose and phantom image quality in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doses in mammography should be maintained as low as possible without reducing the high image quality needed for early detection of the breast cancer. The breast is composed of tissues with very close composition and densities. It increases the difficulty to detect small changes in the normal anatomical structures which may be associated with breast cancer. To achieve the standards of definition and contrast for mammography, the quality and intensity of the X-ray beam, the breast positioning and compression, the film-screen system, and the film processing have to be in optimal operational conditions. This study sought to evaluate average glandular dose (AGD) and image quality on a standard phantom in 134 mammography units in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, between December 2004 and May 2006. AGDs were obtained by means of entrance kerma measured with TL LiF100 dosimeters on phantom surface. Phantom images were obtained with automatic exposure technique, fixed 28 kV and molybdenum anode-filter combination. The phantom used contained structures simulating tumoral masses, microcalcifications, fibers and low contrast areas. High-resolution metallic meshes to assess image definition and a stepwedge to measure image contrast index were also inserted in the phantom. The visualization of simulated structures, the mean optical density and the contrast index allowed to classify the phantom image quality in a seven-point scale. The results showed that 54.5% of the facilities did not achieve the minimum performance level for image quality. It is mainly due to insufficient film processing observed in 61.2% of the units. AGD varied from 0.41 to 2.73 mGy with a mean value of 1.32±0.44 mGy. In all optimal quality phantom images, AGDs were in this range. Additionally, in 7.3% of the mammography units, the AGD constraint of 2 mGy was exceeded. One may conclude that dose level to patient and image quality are not in conformity to regulations in most of the facilities. This indicates that ongoing actions are needed to optimize image quality and radiation dose for early detection of the breast cancer

  5. Additional factors for the estimation of mean glandular breast dose using the UK mammography dosimetry protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK and European protocols for mammographic dosimetry use conversion factors that relate incident air kerma to the mean glandular dose (MGD) within the breast. The conversion factors currently used were obtained by computer simulation of a model breast with a composition of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissues by weight (50% glandularity). Relative conversion factors have been calculated which allow the extension of the protocols to breasts of varying glandularity and for a wider range of mammographic x-ray spectra. The data have also been extended to breasts of a compressed thickness of 11 cm. To facilitate the calculation of MGD in patient surveys, typical breast glandularities are tabulated for women in the age ranges 40-49 and 50-64 years, and for breasts in the thickness range 2-11 cm. In addition, tables of equivalent thickness of polymethyl methacrylate have been provided to allow the simulation for dosimetric purposes of typical breasts of various thicknesses. (author)

  6. Normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients for flat-panel CT breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Samta C; Glick, Stephen J

    2004-12-21

    The development of new digital mammography techniques such as dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis and CT breast imaging will require investigation of optimal camera design parameters and optimal imaging acquisition parameters. In optimizing these acquisition protocols and imaging systems it is important to have knowledge of the radiation dose to the breast. This study presents a methodology for estimating the normalized glandular dose to the uncompressed breast using the geometry proposed for flat-panel CT breast imaging. The simulation uses the GEANT 3 Monte Carlo code to model x-ray transport and absorption within the breast phantom. The Monte Carlo software was validated for breast dosimetry by comparing results of the normalized glandular dose (DgN) values of the compressed breast to those reported in the literature. The normalized glandular dose was then estimated for a range of breast diameters from 10 cm to 18 cm using an uncompressed breast model with a homogeneous composition of adipose and glandular tissue, and for monoenergetic x-rays from 10 keV to 120 keV. These data were fit providing expressions for the normalized glandular dose. Using these expressions for the DgN coefficients and input variables such as the diameter, height and composition of the breast phantom, the mean glandular dose for any spectra can be estimated. A computer program to provide normalized glandular dose values has been made available online. In addition, figures displaying energy deposition maps are presented to better understand the spatial distribution of dose in CT breast imaging. PMID:15724534

  7. Normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients for flat-panel CT breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new digital mammography techniques such as dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis and CT breast imaging will require investigation of optimal camera design parameters and optimal imaging acquisition parameters. In optimizing these acquisition protocols and imaging systems it is important to have knowledge of the radiation dose to the breast. This study presents a methodology for estimating the normalized glandular dose to the uncompressed breast using the geometry proposed for flat-panel CT breast imaging. The simulation uses the GEANT 3 Monte Carlo code to model x-ray transport and absorption within the breast phantom. The Monte Carlo software was validated for breast dosimetry by comparing results of the normalized glandular dose (DgN) values of the compressed breast to those reported in the literature. The normalized glandular dose was then estimated for a range of breast diameters from 10 cm to 18 cm using an uncompressed breast model with a homogeneous composition of adipose and glandular tissue, and for monoenergetic x-rays from 10 keV to 120 keV. These data were fit providing expressions for the normalized glandular dose. Using these expressions for the DgN coefficients and input variables such as the diameter, height and composition of the breast phantom, the mean glandular dose for any spectra can be estimated. A computer program to provide normalized glandular dose values has been made available online. In addition, figures displaying energy deposition maps are presented to better understand the spatial distribution of dose in CT breast imaging

  8. Investigation of mean glandular dose versus compressed breast thickness relationship for mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the compressed breast thickness (CBT) is commonly used for the presentation of mammographic dose survey results and could also be useful for the assessment of individual breast doses retrospectively in case of lack of necessary dosimetric instrumentation. The high data scattering from the best fit reduces the reliability of this technique. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of this relationship using the data collected from a patient survey and phantom experiment. Patients were divided into three different groups according to their breast glandularities, which were predicted from the inspection of previous mammograms. X-ray beam qualities that will be used in patient examinations were determined according to breast thickness and predicted glandularities. The MGD versus CBT relationship for all the examined patients resulted in a poor correlation (R2 = 0.28). This relationship was separately obtained for each glandularity group and also for sub-groups of specific beam qualities. The best correlation (R2 = 0.73) was obtained for the fatty breast group and Mo/Mo combination. A low correlation (R2 = 0.34) was observed in the mid-glandularity group due to inclusion of a wide range of glandularities in this group. In the case of the dense breast group, although the glandularity range was narrow, there were e still high data scattering (R2 = 0.25). This was probably due to the use of Mo/Rh and Mo/Mo combinations. This is validated by obtaining the MGD-CBT relationship specific to Mo/Mo combination (R2 = 0.61). (authors)

  9. Evaluation of subject contrast and normalized average glandular dose by semi-analytical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, two semi-analytical models are described to evaluate the subject contrast of nodules and the normalized average glandular dose in mammography. Both models were used to study the influence of some parameters, such as breast characteristics (thickness and composition) and incident spectra (kVp and target-filter combination) on the subject contrast of a nodule and on the normalized average glandular dose. From the subject contrast results, detection limits of nodules were also determined. Our results are in good agreement with those reported by other authors, who had used Monte Carlo simulation, showing the robustness of our semi-analytical method.

  10. Glandular radiation dose in tomosynthesis of the breast using tungsten targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; D'Orsi, Carl J

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of new detector technology, digital tomosynthesis imaging of the breast has, in the past few years, become a technique intensely investigated as a replacement for planar mammography. As with all other x-ray-based imaging methods, radiation dose is of utmost concern in the development of this new imaging technology. For virtually all development and optimization studies, knowledge of the radiation dose involved in an imaging protocol is necessary. A previous study characterized the normalized glandular dose in tomosynthesis imaging and its variation with various breast and imaging system parameters. This characterization was performed with x-ray spectra generated by molybdenum and rhodium targets. In the recent past, many preliminary patient studies of tomosynthesis imaging have been reported in which the x-ray spectra were generated with x-ray tubes with tungsten targets. The differences in x-ray distribution among spectra from these target materials make the computation of new normalized glandular dose values for tungsten target spectra necessary. In this study we used previously obtained monochromatic normalized glandular dose results to obtain spectral results for twelve different tungsten target x-ray spectra. For each imaging condition, two separate values were computed: the normalized glandular dose for the zero degree projection angle (DgN0), and the ratio of the glandular dose for non-zero projection angles to the glandular dose for the zero degree projection (the relative glandular dose, RGD(alpha)). It was found that DgN0 is higher for tungsten target x-ray spectra when compared with DgN0 values for molybdenum and rhodium target spectra of both equivalent tube voltage and first half value layer. Therefore, the DgN0 for the twelve tungsten target x-ray spectra and different breast compositions and compressed breast thicknesses simulated are reported. The RGD(alpha) values for the tungsten spectra vary with the parameters studied in a similar manner to that found for the molybdenum and rhodium target spectra. The surface fit equations and the fit coefficients for RGD(alpha) included in the previous study were also found to be appropriate for the tungsten spectra. PMID:19020492

  11. A Methodology for Obtaining the Mean Glandular Dose in Mammography Exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes to validate measurements of mean glandular dose quantity (DG) for a given thickness and glandularity of compressed breast based in a PMMA phantom. 10 exposures were made in an ionization chamber in conventional mammographic equipment for a research. It obtained an average value for the incident air kerma, Ka,I = 9.59 mGy leading to a DG = 1.82 mGy. Experimental results too were obtained for the acquisition of this quantity in other mammography clinics and these results were also reported and discussed. After the comparison of the results the methodology was validated

  12. Evaluation of average glandular dose in digital and conventional systems of the mammography; Avaliacao da dose glandular media em sistemas digitais e convencionais de mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, Aline C.S.; Barros, Vinicius S.M.; Khoury, Hellen J., E-mail: alinecx90@gmail.com, E-mail: vsmdbarros@gmail.com, E-mail: hjkhoury@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Mello, Francisca A. de, E-mail: francissamello@yahoo.com.br [Hospital das Clinicas do Recife (HCR/UFPE), PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Mammography is currently the most effective method of diagnosis and detection of breast pathologies. The main interest in this kid of exam comes from the high incidence rate of breast cancer and necessity of high quality images for accurate diagnosis. Digital mammography systems have several advantages compared to conventional systems, however the use of digital imaging systems is not always integrated to an image acquisition protocol. Therefore, it is questionable if digital systems truly reduce the dose received by the patient, because many times is introduced in the clinics without optimization of the image acquisition protocols. The aim of this study is to estimate the value of incident air Kerma and average glandular dose (AGD) in patients undergoing conventional and digital mammography systems in Recife. This study was conducted with 650 patients in three hospitals. The value of incident air Kerma was estimated from the measurement of the yield of equipment and irradiation parameters used for each patient. From these results and using the methodology proposed by Dance et al. the value of the average glandular dose was calculated. The results obtained show that the lowest value of AGD was found with conventional screen-film system, indicating that the parameters for image acquisition with digital systems are not optimized. It was also observed that the institutions with digital systems use lower breast compression values than the conventional. (author)

  13. Determination of average glandular dose with modern mammography units for two large groups of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently, for mammography Mo anode - Mo filter x-ray tube assemblies were almost exclusively used. Modern mammography units provide the possibility to employ a variety of anode - filter combinations with the aim of adapting the x-ray spectrum to compressed breast thickness and composition. The present contribution provides information on the radiation exposure of two large groups of patients (one of 1678 and one of 945 women) who were mammographed with modern x-ray equipment, and on the dosimetry necessary for the evaluation. For dosimetric purposes spectral information is essential. X-ray spectra have been determined for various anode-filter combinations from measurements with a Ge detector. Based on these spectra, conversion factors from air kerma free in air to average glandular dose (g actors) have been calculated for different anode-filter combinations, compressed breast thickness ranging from 2 to 9 cm and breast compositions varying from 0 to 100% glandular tissue. Determinations of various quantities, including entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), tube output, tube loading (TL), fraction of glandular tissue (FGL) and compressed breast thickness, were made during actual mammography. Average glandular dose (AGD) as determined using g factors corrected for tissue composition as well as g values for standard breast composition, i.e. 50% adipose tissue and 50% glandular tissue by mass. It is shown that, on average, the influence of the actual breast composition causes variations of the order of about 15%. For group 1 and group 2, the mean values of average glandular dose (using g actors corrected for tissue composition) were 1.59 and 2.07 mGy respectively. The number of exposures per woman was on average 3.4 and 3.6 respectively. The mean value of compressed breast thickness was 55.9 and 50.8 m respectively. The mean age of group 1 was 53.6 years (for group 2 the age as not recorded). The fraction by mass of glandular tissue FGL decreases with increasing compressed breast thickness and age of patient (from 75% at 5 mm to 20% at 80 mm, and from 65% at 20 years to 30% at 75 years). For a medium-sized breast, i.e. a compressed breast thickness of 55 mm, FGL is about 35%, indicating that the standard mix (FGL 50%) might need some modification, particularly because of additional evidence from another investigation with similar results on FGL. (author)

  14. Determination of a method for calculating mean glandular dose in conventional mammography exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the application of a numerical model to estimate the mean glandular dose for mammography.A General Electric mammography system, tube voltage of 20-35 kV with increments of 1 kV, tube current of 10-250 mAs, anode/filter combinations molybdenum/molybdenum was used. Over a period of two months, data from 162 scans with craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique projections in both breasts were recorded. The thickness of the compressed breast ranged from 2.5 to 6.5 cm. The mean glandular dose for each craniocaudal projection ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 mGy for a thickness of 2.5 cm and 1.9 to 2.8 mGy for a thickness of 6.5 cm. All average values of mean glandular dose estimated by cranio-caudal projection were found to be below the international reference dose value of 3 mGy recommended by the American College of Radiology

  15. Uncertainties involved in the estimation of mean glandular dose for women in the norwegian breast cancer screening program (NBCSP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to reflect on the estimation of the mean glandular dose for women in Norway aged 50-69 y. Estimation of mean glandular dose (MGD) has been conducted by applying the method of Dance et al. (1990, 2000, 2009). Uncertainties in the thickness of approximately ±10 mm adds uncertainties in the MGD of approximately ±10 %, and uncertainty in the glandularity of ±0 % will lead to an uncertainty in the MGD of ±4 %. However, the inherent uncertainty in the air kerma, given by the European protocol on dosimetry, will add an uncertainty of 12 %. The total uncertainty in the MGD is estimated to be ?20 %, taking into consideration uncertainties in compressed breast thickness (±10 %), the air kerma (12 %), change in HVL by 20.05 mm (29.0 %), uncertainty in the s-factor of ±2.1 % and changing the glandularity to an age-dependent glandularity distribution (18.4 %). (authors)

  16. The Study of Mean Glandular Dose in Mammography in Yazd and the Factors Affecting It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bouzarjomehri

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds/Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the mean glandular dose (MGD resulting from mammography examinations in Yazd, southeastern Iran and to identify the factors affecting it. Patients and Methods: This survey was conducted during May to December 2005 to estimate the MGD for women undergoing mammography and to report the distribution of dose, com-pressed breast thickness, glandular tissue content, and mammography technique used. The clinical data were collected from 946 mammograms taken from 246 women who were referred to four mammography centers. The mammography instruments in these centers were four modern units with a molybdenum anode and either molybdenum or rhodium filter. The exposure conditions of each mammogram were recorded. The breast glandular content of each mammogram was estimated by a radiologist. The MGD was calculated based on measuring the normalized entrance skin dose (ESD in air, Half Value Layer (HVL, kVp, mAs, breast thickness and glandular content. HVL, kVp and ESD were measured by a solid-state detector. The analytical method of Sobol et al. was used for calculation of MGD. Results: The mean±SD MGD per film was 1.2±0.6 mGy for craniocaudal and 1.63±0.9 mGy for mediolateral oblique views. The mean±SD MGD per woman was 5.57±3.1 mGy. A positive correlation was found between the beam HVL with MGD (r=0.38 and the breast thickness with MGD (r=0.5. Conclusion: The mean±SD MGD per film of 1.42±0.8 mGy in present study was lower than most of similar reports. However, the mean MGD per woman was higher than that in other studies.

  17. Estudo comparativo de dosimetria computacional entre modelos homogêneos e um modelo voxel em mamografia: uma discussão de aplicações em testes de constância e cálculo de dose glandular em pacientes / Comparative study of computational dosimetry involving homogeneous phantoms and a voxel phantom in mammography: a discussion on applications in constancy tests and calculation of glandular dose in patients

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Vagner Ferreira, Cassola; Gabriela, Hoff.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar dados de dosimetria e fluência de fótons entre diferentes modelos de mama, discutindo as aplicações em testes de constância e estudos dosimétricos aplicados à mamografia. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram simulados diferentes modelos homogêneos e um modelo antropomórfico de mama tipo vox [...] el, sendo contabilizadas: a dose total absorvida no modelo, a dose absorvida pelo tecido glandular/material equivalente, e a dose absorvida e a fluência de fótons em diferentes profundidades dos modelos. Uma câmara de ionização simulada coletou o kerma de entrada na pele. As combinações alvo-filtro estudadas foram Mo-30Mo e Mo-25Rh, para diferentes potenciais aceleradores de 26 kVp até 34 kVp. RESULTADOS: A dose glandular normalizada, comparada ao modelo voxel, resultou em diferenças entre -15% até -21% para RMI, -10% para PhantomMama e 10% para os modelos Barts e Keithley. A variação dos valores da camada semirredutora entre modelos foi geralmente inferior a 10% para todos os volumes sensíveis. CONCLUSÃO: Para avaliar a dose glandular normalizada e a dose glandular, em mamas médias, recomenda-se o modelo de Dance. Os modelos homogêneos devem ser utilizados para realizar testes de constância em dosimetria, mas eles não são indicados para estimar a dosimetria em pacientes reais Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To compare data regarding dosimetry and photons fluence in different breast phantoms, discussing constancy tests and dosimetry applied to mammography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Different homogeneous breast phantoms and one anthropomorphic voxel phantom were developed for collection of data r [...] egarding total absorbed dose in the phantom, absorbed dose in the glandular tissue material-equivalent, absorbed dose and photons fluence at different depths in the phantoms. A simulated ionization chamber collected the entrance skin kerma. Target-filter combinations (Mo-30Mo and Mo-25Rh) were studied for different accelerating potentials of 26 kVp to 34 kVp. RESULTS: As compared with the voxel phantom, the normalized glandular dose resulted in differences from -15% to -21% for RMI, -10% for PhantomMama, and 10% for the Barts and Keithley models. The half-value layer variation was generally

  18. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  19. DETERMINACIÓN DE UN MÉTODO DE CALCULO DE DOSIS GLANDULAR PROMEDIO EN EXAMENES DE MAMOGRAFIA CONVENCIONAL DETERMINATION OF A METHOD FOR CALCULATING MEAN GLANDULAR DOSE IN CONVENTIONAL MAMMOGRAPHY EXAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Ramos N

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos la aplicación de un modelo numérico para estimarla dosis glandular promedio en mamografía. Hemos utilizado un mamógrafo General Electric, tensión del tubo: 20-35 kV con incrementos de 1 kV; carga del tubo: 10-250 mAs; combinación ánodo-filtro de Molibdeno-Molibdeno. Durante dos meses datos de 162 exploraciones con proyecciones cráneo-caudal y medio lateral oblicua en ambas mamas. El espesor de mama comprimida se encuentra en el rango de 2,5 a 6,5 cm. Los rangos de dosis glandular promedio, por cada proyección cráneo-caudal, se encuentran de 0,4 a 0,7 mGy para un espesor de 2,5 cm y de 1,9 a 2,8 mGy para un espesor de 6,5 cm. Los valores medios de dosis glandular promedio estimados por proyección cráneo-caudal, en su totalidad resultan por debajo del valor de referencia dado por el Colegio Americano de Radiología (3 mGy.We present the application of a numerical model to estimate the mean glandular dose for mammography. A General Electric mammography system, tube voltaje of 20-35 kV with increments of 1 kV, tube current of 10-250 mAs, anode/filter combinations molybdenum/molybdenum was used. Over a period of two months, data from 162scans with craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique projections in both breasts were recorded. The thickness of the compressed breast ranged from 2.5 to 6.5 cm. The mean glandular dose for each craniocaudal projection ranged from 0.4 to 0.7mGy for a thickness of2.5 cm and 1.9 to 2.8 mGy for a thickness of 6.5 cm. All average values of mean glandular dose estimated by cranio-caudal projection were found to be below the international reference dose value of3 mGy recommended by the American College of Radiology.

  20. DETERMINACIÓN DE UN MÉTODO DE CALCULO DE DOSIS GLANDULAR PROMEDIO EN EXAMENES DE MAMOGRAFIA CONVENCIONAL / DETERMINATION OF A METHOD FOR CALCULATING MEAN GLANDULAR DOSE IN CONVENTIONAL MAMMOGRAPHY EXAMS

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Oswaldo, Ramos N; Manuel, Villarreal U.

    Full Text Available Presentamos la aplicación de un modelo numérico para estimarla dosis glandular promedio en mamografía. Hemos utilizado un mamógrafo General Electric, tensión del tubo: 20-35 kV con incrementos de 1 kV; carga del tubo: 10-250 mAs; combinación ánodo-filtro de Molibdeno-Molibdeno. Durante dos meses dat [...] os de 162 exploraciones con proyecciones cráneo-caudal y medio lateral oblicua en ambas mamas. El espesor de mama comprimida se encuentra en el rango de 2,5 a 6,5 cm. Los rangos de dosis glandular promedio, por cada proyección cráneo-caudal, se encuentran de 0,4 a 0,7 mGy para un espesor de 2,5 cm y de 1,9 a 2,8 mGy para un espesor de 6,5 cm. Los valores medios de dosis glandular promedio estimados por proyección cráneo-caudal, en su totalidad resultan por debajo del valor de referencia dado por el Colegio Americano de Radiología (3 mGy). Abstract in english We present the application of a numerical model to estimate the mean glandular dose for mammography. A General Electric mammography system, tube voltaje of 20-35 kV with increments of 1 kV, tube current of 10-250 mAs, anode/filter combinations molybdenum/molybdenum was used. Over a period of two mon [...] ths, data from 162scans with craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique projections in both breasts were recorded. The thickness of the compressed breast ranged from 2.5 to 6.5 cm. The mean glandular dose for each craniocaudal projection ranged from 0.4 to 0.7mGy for a thickness of2.5 cm and 1.9 to 2.8 mGy for a thickness of 6.5 cm. All average values of mean glandular dose estimated by cranio-caudal projection were found to be below the international reference dose value of3 mGy recommended by the American College of Radiology.

  1. Estimation of average glandular dose depending on the thickness of the breast; Estimativa da dose glandular media em funcao da espessura da mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da, E-mail: jessica.real@pucrs.br, E-mail: renata.luz@pucrs.br [Hospital Sao Lucas (HSL/PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fröhlich, Bruna D.; Pertile, Alessandra S.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: bruna.frohlich@acad.pucrs.br, E-mail: lessandra.pertile@acad.pucrs.br, E-mail: ana.marques@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women worldwide. Mammography is, to date, the most efficient method for detecting an abnormality in the patient's breast. It is a technique of imaging diagnostic that requires special care because radiographs without adequate quality may lead to a false diagnosis and lead to the need for a repeat examination, increasing the dose of radiation in the patient. This study aimed to evaluate the average glandular dose (AGD), depending on the breast thickness in patients undergoing routine tests, with a digital computer radiography processing system. Analyzed 30 exhibitions in patients aged (65 ± 12) years, in the right and left caudal skull projections, for breasts with thicknesses between 45 mm and 50 mm. The calculated value of the AGD for this track thickness was (1.600 ± 0.009) mGy. The performance of mammography quality control tests was satisfactory and the AGD values obtained for the chosen thickness range is acceptable, since the threshold achievable is 1.6 mGy and the acceptable is 2 mGy. In Brazil, it is only required the input dose calculation in skin for 45 mm breasts. However, the calculation of AGD is required for different thicknesses of the breast, to identify the best mammographic pattern aiming at better image quality at the lowest dose provided the patient.

  2. Effect of the glandular composition on digital breast tomosynthesis image quality and dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the image quality assessment for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a breast phantom with an average percentage of 50 % glandular tissue is seldom used, which may not be representative of the breast tissue composition of the women undergoing such examination. This work aims at studying the effect of the glandular composition of the breast on the image quality taking into consideration different sizes of lesions. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program PENELOPE to validate the image acquisition system of the DBT equipment as well as to calculate the mean glandular dose for each projection image and for different breast compositions. The integrated PENELOPE imaging tool (PenEasy) was used to calculate, in mammography, for each clinical detection task the X-ray energy that maximises the figure of merit. All the 2D cranial-caudal projections for DBT were simulated and then underwent the reconstruction process applying the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique. Finally, through signal-to-noise ratio analysis, the image quality in DBT was assessed. (authors)

  3. Effect of the glandular composition on digital breast tomosynthesis image quality and dose optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, T; Ribeiro, A; Di Maria, S; Belchior, A; Cardoso, J; Matela, N; Oliveira, N; Janeiro, L; Almeida, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    In the image quality assessment for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a breast phantom with an average percentage of 50 % glandular tissue is seldom used, which may not be representative of the breast tissue composition of the women undergoing such examination. This work aims at studying the effect of the glandular composition of the breast on the image quality taking into consideration different sizes of lesions. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program PENELOPE to validate the image acquisition system of the DBT equipment as well as to calculate the mean glandular dose for each projection image and for different breast compositions. The integrated PENELOPE imaging tool (PenEasy) was used to calculate, in mammography, for each clinical detection task the X-ray energy that maximises the figure of merit. All the 2D cranial-caudal projections for DBT were simulated and then underwent the reconstruction process applying the Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique. Finally, through signal-to-noise ratio analysis, the image quality in DBT was assessed. PMID:25836692

  4. Measurement of absorbed dose in whole body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The doses of radiation absorbed during computed tomography were measured with thermo-luminescence dosimeters (CaF2) in selected organs in the head, neck, chest, and in the gonads of a Rando woman phantom. The pituitary gland, eye lenses, parotid glands, submandibular glands, sublingual glands, thyroid glands, breast, ovaries, testis, and surface of skin at the scanning area were the sites for the measurement. The maximum absorbed dose for head scanning was 36988 ?Gy in the pituitary gland. The maximum absorbed dose for maxillary scanning was 16625 ?Gy in the parotid gland. The maximum absorbed dose for mandibular scanning was 39958 ?Gy in the parotid gland. The maximum absorbed dose for coronal and axial scanning of the maxilla was 23816 ?Gy in the sublingual glands. The maximum absorbed dose for neck scanning was 50227 ?Gy in the thyroid glands. The maximum absorbed dose for chest scanning was 7692 ?Gy in the breast. The maximum absorbed dose for abdominal scanning was 6496 ?Gy in the breast. (author)

  5. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  6. The MIRD method of estimating absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estimate of absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters provides the information required to assess the radiation risk associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) system of dose calculation provides a systematic approach to combining the biologic distribution data and clearance data of radiopharmaceuticals and the physical properties of radionuclides to obtain dose estimates. This tutorial presents a review of the MIRD schema, the derivation of the equations used to calculate absorbed dose, and shows how the MIRD schema can be applied to estimate dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

  7. Evaluation of average glandular dose in digital and conventional systems of the mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammography is currently the most effective method of diagnosis and detection of breast pathologies. The main interest in this kid of exam comes from the high incidence rate of breast cancer and necessity of high quality images for accurate diagnosis. Digital mammography systems have several advantages compared to conventional systems, however the use of digital imaging systems is not always integrated to an image acquisition protocol. Therefore, it is questionable if digital systems truly reduce the dose received by the patient, because many times is introduced in the clinics without optimization of the image acquisition protocols. The aim of this study is to estimate the value of incident air Kerma and average glandular dose (AGD) in patients undergoing conventional and digital mammography systems in Recife. This study was conducted with 650 patients in three hospitals. The value of incident air Kerma was estimated from the measurement of the yield of equipment and irradiation parameters used for each patient. From these results and using the methodology proposed by Dance et al. the value of the average glandular dose was calculated. The results obtained show that the lowest value of AGD was found with conventional screen-film system, indicating that the parameters for image acquisition with digital systems are not optimized. It was also observed that the institutions with digital systems use lower breast compression values than the conventional. (author)

  8. On the definition of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before. - Highlights: • A stringent definition of absorbed dose is given. • This requires the definition of an irradiation and a suitable probability space. • A stringent definition is important for an understanding of the concept absorbed dose

  9. Estimation of Absorbed Dose in Occlusal Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to estimate absorbed dose of each important anatomic site of phantom (RT-210 Head and Neck Section R, Humanoid Systems Co., U.S.A.) head in occlusal radiography. X-radiation dosimetry at 12 anatomic sites in maxillary anterior topography, maxillary posterior topography, mandibular anterior cross-section, mandibular posterior cross-section, mandibular anterior topographic, mandibular posterior topographic occlusal projection was performed with calcium sulfate thermoluminescent dosimeters under 70 Kvp and 15 mA, 1/4 second (8 inch cone ) and 1 second (16 inch cone) exposure time. The results obtained were as follows: Skin surface produced highest absorbed dose ranged between 3264 mrad and 4073 mrad but there was little difference between projections. In maxillary anterior topographic occlusal radiography, eyeballs, maxillary sinuses, and pituitary gland sites produced higher absorbed doses than those of other sites. In maxillary posterior topographic occlusal radiography, exposed eyeball site and exposed maxillary sinus site produced high absorbed doses. In mandibular anterior cross-sectional occlusal radiography, all sites were produced relatively low absorbed dose except eyeball sites. In Mandibular posterior cross-sectional occlusal radiography, exposed eyeball site and exposed maxillary sinus site were produced relatively higher absorbed doses than other sites. In mandibular anterior topographic occlusal radiography, maxillary sinuses, submandibular glands, and thyroid gland sites produced high absorbed doses than other sites. In mandibular posterior topographic occlusal radiography, submandibular gland site of the exposed side produced high absorbed dose than other sites and eyeball site of the opposite side produced relatively high absorbed dose.

  10. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C. Y.; Guzman G, K. A.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L. C., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  11. [Investigation of quality control and average glandular dose and image quality in digital mammography in Hokkaido].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowarabi, Kunio; Abe, Hiroko; Horita, Hiroshi; Kaneta, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire survey about mammography in Hokkaido was mailed to 121 facilities from August to September 2009. We surveyed the conditions of digital mammography with regard to quality control (QC) and average glandular dose at 79 facilities in Hokkaido in 2009, and the results of the survey were compared with those of 2004. We found that digital mammography techniques were widely used across Hokkaido and that computed radiography (CR) systems were quite widespread, with 70% of facilities having them. The average glandular dose ranged from 1.04 to 2.3 mGy (mean: 1.73 mGy) for digital equipment. The results revealed several problems. Although the use of 1-, 2-, and 3-megapixel (MP) liquid crystal displays (LCDs) was not uncommon, 5-MP LCDs were used in most cases when reading digital mammograms. Facilities that have mammography equipment are unlikely to have quality control instruments for mammography. Although daily QC is performed in most facilities, further quality control for digital mammography should be developed, including that for monitors. In a second study, we evaluated the 1 Shot Phantom M Plus (1 Shot Phantom), which enables objective evaluation by providing for one physical measurement rather than a subjective visual analysis. The results indicated that the 1 Shot Phantom was very useful for digital mammography systems in daily QC testing because it enabled objectivity. PMID:21532248

  12. Investigation of quality control and average glandular dose and image quality in digital mammography in Hokkaido

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A questionnaire survey about mammography in Hokkaido was mailed to 121 facilities from August to September 2009. We surveyed the conditions of digital mammography with regard to quality control (QC) and average glandular dose at 79 facilities in Hokkaido in 2009, and the results of the survey were compared with those of 2004. We found that digital mammography techniques were widely used across Hokkaido and that computed radiography (CR) systems were quite widespread, with 70% of facilities having them. The average glandular dose ranged from 1.04 to 2.3 mGy (mean: 1.73 mGy) for digital equipment. The results revealed several problems. Although the use of 1-, 2-, and 3-megapixel (MP) liquid crystal displays (LCDs) was not uncommon, 5-MP LCDs were used in most cases when reading digital mammograms. Facilities that have mammography equipment are unlikely to have quality control instruments for mammography. Although daily QC is performed in most facilities, further quality control for digital mammography should be developed, including that for monitors. In a second study, we evaluated the 1 Shot Phantom M Plus (1 Shot Phantom), which enables objective evaluation by providing for one physical measurement rather than a subjective visual analysis. The results indicated that the 1 Shot Phantom was very useful for digital mammography systems in daily QC testing because it enabled objectivity. (author)

  13. A mammographic phantom to measure mean glandular dose by thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have designed a phantom to evaluate mean glandular dose (MGD) as part of the regulatory dosimetry control for mammographic equipment. The phantom is constituted by TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) inserted within semicircular plates of acrylic. Different groups of TLDs are used to determine entrance surface air kerma and half-value layer (HVL). Calibration of both tasks has been performed using a Senographe 2000D system and an ionization chamber. The phantom has been tested in five clinical systems. The HVL and MGD obtained by this method agree, on average, within 3%, with those from standard procedures based on the use of ionization chambers. The phantom MGD measurements have a combined uncertainty better than 10% (k = 1). - Highlights: • We have designed a phantom to evaluate mean glandular dose (MGD). • We used TLD-100 dosemeters inserted within semicircular plates of acrylic. • The system has been tested in five clinical systems. • MGD obtained by this method agrees within 3% with ionization chambers. • MGD measurements have a combined uncertainty better than 10% (k = 1)

  14. A study on the image quality of mammography and the average glandular dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We came to the following conclusion as the results of experiment on the image quality of mammography and the average glandular dose using 4 apparatuses at 3 hospital in Seoul. Whereas the measurement of half value layer showed no differences among the apparatuses, the measurement by an attenuation curve method showed some differences by 5.9%. There were 9.1% differences in the measurement by aluminum conversion method. The basic density of an automatic exposure control unit must be D = 1.40, but there was no automatic exposure unit adjusted precisely at any hospital. The unit at the B hospital exceeded the allowable limit by ± 0.15. In the photographing using an automatic exposure control unit and the management of an automatic film processor using a sensitometer, most automatic film processors were well kept. But in some cases the mean value of a fluctuation coefficient exceeded the allowable limit. There is a need for more cautious management. The image quality of breast phantom photography was affected by the screen/film system among the hospital. The average glandular dose at a breast of 4.2 cm thickness depended on the tube voltage, In the case of Mo/Mo, it was measured 0.26 ? 1.39 mGy less than ACR standard 3.0 mGy

  15. Problems in measurement of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study surveyed theoretical or experimental problems in determining the absorbed dose of materials due to ionizing radiation. These are devided into four categories here. First, definition and meaning of ''absorbed dose'' are discussed. The word ''absorb'' is not still completely clear. Also ''dose'' itself has been used too broadly in Japan. Second, there is a problem in the absolute measurement of absorbed dose. The measurement includes three methods, i.e., calorimetry, ionometry and chemical method. The major theoretical problems are described. Third, problems in the practical relative measurement of absorbed dose are examined. The problems may be to obtain excellent accuracy and reproducibility. Last, other problems such as measuring absorbed neutron dose and improper use of the nomenclature ''dose'' are pointed out, and the addition of materials concerned should not be omitted for the unit ''rad''. However, even if only the above described problems were solved, it would advance considerably the research and application of the interaction of radiation with matters or the prevention of radiation hazard. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Measurement of absorbed skin dose in tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for the measurement of absorbed skin dose in tomography. This is assessed experimentally and the results are used to compare the tomographic technique with other forms of lumbar spine investigations. (author)

  17. Conformance of mean glandular dose from phantom and patient data in mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelaranta, A; Toroi, P; Timonen, M; Komssi, S; Kortesniemi, M

    2015-04-01

    In mammography dosimetry, phantoms are often used to represent breast tissue. The conformance of phantom- and patient-based mean glandular dose (MGD) estimates was evaluated mainly from the aspect of diagnostic reference levels. Patient and phantom exposure data were collected for eight diagnostic and three screening mammography devices. More extensive assessments were performed for two devices. The average breast thickness was close to the nationally used reference of 50 mm in diagnostic (50 mm, SD = 13 mm, n = 5342) and screening (47 mm, SD = 13 mm, n = 395) examinations. The average MGD for all breasts differed by 2% from the MGD determined for breasts in the limited compressed thickness range of 40-60 mm. The difference between phantom- and patient-based MGD estimations was up to 30%. Therefore, phantom measurements cannot replace patient dose data in MGD determination. PMID:25114321

  18. Absorbed dose standardization in clinical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apart from historical aspects, the dissertation deals with standardization in clinical dosimetry (the notion of standardization, accuracy and precision required in clinical dosimetry and how inaccuracy is expressed, primary and secondary dosimetric laboratory), absorbed dose determination in clinical dosimetry (calibration of ionization chambers in Co-60 gamma beams, determination of absorbed dose in water, inaccuracies in clinical dosimetry), and quality assurance in clinical dosimetry (international and national audit of clinical dosimetry) (P.A.)

  19. Acceptance of the EU regulations on mean doses of glandular on women's during mammographic examination in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnostic reference levels (further DRU) are on indications for medical irradiation regulation. DRU = 3 mGy per pictures and standard breast thickness 45 mm was used for cc projection during mammographic examination in the Czech Republic. However the examinations in EU country indicated that the mean glandular dose for standard breast thickness 45 mm was reduced to a Dg =2 mGy per picture. At the same time there was a change of standard breast thickness from 45 mm to 53 mm, new standard for glandular dose was set up to Dg = 2.5 mGy. The aim is to estimate, whether glandular dose measured during examinations in cz fulfil recommended levels for particular PMMA equivalent thickness as stated above. (authors)

  20. Determination of mean glandular dose on patients and phantom in X-ray mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statistics of breast cancer rate in Bulgaria show a tendency towards increase of the morbidity from this disease. Last years campaigns against breast cancer are organized yearly. This leads to an increased number of screening and diagnostic mammograms that are made in the country. The dose associated with the examination is very low but not slightingly small. The glandular tissue in the breast is considered to be the most sensitive in relation to the radiation exposure. Several publications propose different methods, measurement set up or conversion coefficients for the calculation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) delivered to the breast during the X-ray examination. The question about the standardization of the measurement procedures arises since the differences in the results obtained using different methodologies may be quite big. The aim of this work is to develop a standard procedure for the measurement of MGD based on the recommendations mentioned in the European protocol on dosimetry in mammography, the European protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of mammography screening and the Code of practice: TRS 457 of the IAEA. Five contemporary film-screen mammography units were included in this study. Attention should be paid to the measurement set up. The reference point is chosen 6 cm from the chest wall edge laterally centered. If an ionization chamber is used for dose measurements the compression plate should be placed in close contact with it. If solid state detectors are used the compression plate should be put away from the detector and the output recalculated like if the plate is near the detector. The conversion coefficients for age dependence are not used in this study as not appropriate for the population included in it. PMMA measurements for the determination of diagnostic reference levels could be used but more correct results would be obtained with patient measurements

  1. QC of direct radiography and computed radiography mammography systems: Image quality and average glandular dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, two technologies have emerged in digital mammography: direct radiology (DR) and computed radiology (CR). The introduction of these technologies leads to different measures and limitations in the quality control (QC) of these mammography systems. The objective of this work was to carry out QC tests on DR and CR mammography systems using the EUREF protocol about image quality and average glandular dose (AGD). These evaluations were made using the same test tools for both SIEMENS DR and CR mammography systems. Image quality was compared in terms of low contrast detectability, exposure time, and ghost factors. Exposure factors were selected clinically. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was calculated from the measured output for PMMA thickness of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 cm. The AGD was determined from ESAK and the measured half-value layer (HVL), and the respective conversion factors were obtained from the protocol. Test results indicated that DR mammography system selected a longer exposure time and a higher ghost image factor. CR mammography system yielded mean contrast-detail score higher than that of the DR system, for smaller details. The contrast-detail curves of both systems are shown. They indicate that the DR system has better low contrast detectability than the CR system, as seen from the contrast-detail curve that extends further to the left toward small detail. HVL of DR mammography system is higher than that of CR system. The entrance surface air kerma and average glandular dose of both systems: direct radiography and computed radiography is shown. For both systems, AGD decreases as PMMA thickness increases; AGD for DR is higher. To conclude, both DR and CR mammography systems performed well within the stated values of the EUREF protocol. However, we found that the DR mammography system operated with higher beam quality that resulted in higher dose and better low contrast detectability. Therefore, DR should not be considered equal to CR mammography system

  2. On the definition of absorbed dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before.

  3. Preliminary Studies into the Determination of Mean Glandular Dose During Diagnostic Mammography Procedure in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Nsiah-Akoto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project was to determine the mean glandular dose (MGD from Craniocaudal (CC and Mediolateral Oblique (MLO views to the breast during diagnostic mammography and the total dose per woman. The study was conducted at the Mammography Unit of Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital and Peace and Love Hospital, Oduom. Data such as age, weight, height, bust size, compressed breast thickness, time of exposure, milli-ampere second (mAs, kilovoltage peak (KVp and half value layer (HVL were recorded from 440 films from 110 women. The MGD per film was 1.17± 0.02 mGy and 1.25±0.03 mGy for the craniocaudal (CC and mediolateral oblique (MLO views, respectively. The mean MGD per woman was 1.80±0.03mGy. The only factors that were found to affect MGD were mAs and the compressed breast thickness. No significant relationships were seen between MGD per woman with respect to ethnicity and educational background. The dose values obtained fall within the internationally acceptable dose range of 1-3 mGy. This suggests mammography x-ray generators at the two hospitals are capable of achieving acceptable dose levels for patient safety and this prompted us to rule out the fact that all other factors considered, they are not at risk of induced cancer from mammography.

  4. Evaluation of mean glandular dose in a full-field digital mammography unit in Tabriz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh Riabi, Hamed; Mehnati, Parinaz; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2010-12-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the mean glandular dose (MGD) and affecting factors during mammography examinations by a full-field digital mammography unit. An extensive quality control program was performed to assure that the unit is properly working. Required information including compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast parenchymal pattern and technical factors used for imaging were recorded. An entrance skin exposure measurement was also performed using slabs of polymethylmethacrylate with 2-8 cm thickness. On the basis of recorded information and measured data, the MGD was estimated for 1145 mammography examinations obtained from 298 patients. Mean CBTs of 4.9 and 5.8 cm and MGDs of 2 and 2.4 mGy were observed for craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique views, respectively. Significant correlation was seen between MGD and CBT, breast parenchymal pattern and applied kVp and mAs. PMID:20823039

  5. Evaluation of mean glandular dose in a full-field digital mammography unit in Tabriz (IR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was aimed at evaluating the mean glandular dose (MGD) and affecting factors during mammography examinations by a full-field digital mammography unit. An extensive quality control program was performed to assure that the unit is properly working. Required information including compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast parenchymal pattern and technical factors used for imaging were recorded. An entrance skin exposure measurement was also performed using slabs of polymethylmethacrylate with 2-8 cm thickness. On the basis of recorded information and measured data, the MGD was estimated for 1145 mammography examinations obtained from 298 patients. Mean CBTs of 4.9 and 5.8 cm and MGDs of 2 and 2.4 mGy were observed for cranio-caudal and medio-lateral oblique views, respectively. Significant correlation was seen between MGD and CBT, breast parenchymal pattern and applied kVp and mAs. (authors)

  6. Optimizing the anode-filter combination in the sense of image quality and average glandular dose in digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjonen, Mari; Strömmer, Pekka

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the optimized image quality and average glandular dose in digital mammography, and provides recommendations concerning anode-filter combinations in digital mammography, which is based on amorphous selenium (a-Se) detector technology. The full field digital mammography (FFDM) system based on a-Se technology, which is also a platform of tomosynthesis prototype, was used in this study. X-ray tube anode-filter combinations, which we studied, were tungsten (W) - rhodium (Rh) and tungsten (W) - silver (Ag). Anatomically adaptable fully automatic exposure control (AAEC) was used. The average glandular doses (AGD) were calculated using a specific program developed by Planmed, which automates the method described by Dance et al. Image quality was evaluated in two different ways: a subjective image quality evaluation, and contrast and noise analysis. By using W-Rh and W-Ag anode-filter combinations can be achieved a significantly lower average glandular dose compared with molybdenum (Mo) - molybdenum (Mo) or Mo-Rh. The average glandular dose reduction was achieved from 25 % to 60 %. In the future, the evaluation will concentrate to study more filter combinations and the effect of higher kV (>35 kV) values, which seems be useful while optimizing the dose in digital mammography.

  7. Evaluation of absorbed dose and image quality in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammography refers to the X-ray examination of the human breast, and is considered the single most important diagnostic tool in the early detection of breast cancer, which is by far the most common cancer among women. There is good evidence from clinical trials, that mammographic screening can reduce the breast cancer mortality with about 30%. The side effects include a small and age related risk of carcinogenesis due to the exposure of the glandular tissues in the breast to ionising radiation. As for all X-ray examinations, and of special importance when investigating large populations of asymptomatic women, the relationship between radiation risk and diagnostic accuracy in mammography must be optimised. The overall objective of this thesis was to investigate and improve methods for average glandular dose (AGD) and image quality evaluation in mammography and provide some practical guidance. Dose protocols used for so-called reference dose levels in Sweden 1989 (Nordic) and 1998 (European) were compared in a survey of 32 mammography units. The study showed that the AGD values for a 'standard breast' became 5±2% (total variation 0-9%) higher at clinical settings, when estimated according to the European protocol. For the Sectra MDM, a digital mammography (DM) unit with a scanning geometry, it was impossible to follow procedures for characterisation of the X-ray beam (HVL=half value layer) specified in the European protocol. In an experimental setup, it was shown that non-invasive measurements of HVL can be performed accurately with a sensitive and well collimated semiconductor detector with simultaneous correction for the energy dependence. AGD values could then be estimated according to 3 different dose protocols. A dosimetry system based on radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence from Al2O3:C crystals was developed and tested for in vivo absorbed dose measurements. It was shown that both entrance and exit doses could be measured and that the dosemeters did not disturb the reading of the mammograms. A Monte Carlo study showed that the energy dependence could be reduced, primarily by reducing the diameter of the crystal. It is proposed that radiation scattered forward towards the breast from the compression paddle, a scanning device etc, should be considered with greater clarity in the breast dosimetry protocols, and be described with a forward-scatter factor, FSF, for the various geometries and conditions proposed. Low contrast-detail (CD) phantoms of simulated glandularity 30, 50 or 70%, and thickness 3, 5 or 7 cm, were used to compare three different mammography systems. The same number of perceivable objects was visible for the full-field DM system at 20-60% of the AGD necessary for the screen-film (SFM) system, with the largest dose reduction potential for the thickest phantoms with the highest glandularity. However, more recent research shows that CD phantoms with a homogeneous background, as used here, must be used with care due to the presence of 'anatomical noise' in the real clinical situation. Image quality criteria (IQC) recommended in a European Guideline 1996 for SFM were adjusted to be relevant also for DM images. The new set of IQC was tested in two different studies using clinical images from DM and SFM, respectively. The results indicate that the new set of IQC has a higher discriminative power than the old set. The results also suggest that AGD for the DM system used may be reduced

  8. Mean glandular dose in six digital mammography services in Santiago, Chile: preliminary reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper was to estimate mean glandular dose levels (DG) in six digital mammography systems in Santiago, Chile, and to propose preliminary reference levels to execute mammography in Chile. The study was carried out assessing two direct digital systems and four computer-based radiography (CR) systems. Estimates of DG were calculated for different thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate according to the quality control protocol in digital mammography of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics and NHSBSP Equipment Report 0604 Version 3. DG values ranged between 0.64 and 7.26 mGy for a range of 20- to 70-mm thickness, respectively. Thirty-six per cent of DG was higher than the acceptable dose level and 100 % of DG was higher than the desirable level. It is therefore necessary to optimise doses. The initial proposal to establish dose reference levels for DG would range between 0.90 and 6.40 mGy for a thickness range of 20 to 70 mm. (authors)

  9. Mean glandular dose in six digital mammography services in Santiago, Chile: preliminary reference levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria Do Socorro; Dantas, Marcelino; Duran, Maria Paz; Ubeda, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to estimate mean glandular dose levels (DG) in six digital mammography systems in Santiago, Chile, and to propose preliminary reference levels to execute mammography in Chile. The study was carried out assessing two direct digital systems and four computer-based radiography (CR) systems. Estimates of DG were calculated for different thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate according to the quality control protocol in digital mammography of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics and NHSBSP Equipment Report 0604 Version 3. DG values ranged between 0.64 and 7.26 mGy for a range of 20- to 70-mm thickness, respectively. Thirty-six per cent of DG was higher than the acceptable dose level and 100 % of DG was higher than the desirable level. It is therefore necessary to optimise doses. The initial proposal to establish dose reference levels for DG would range between 0.90 and 6.40 mGy for a thickness range of 20 to 70 mm. PMID:25833896

  10. Estimation of average glandular dose depending on the thickness of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women worldwide. Mammography is, to date, the most efficient method for detecting an abnormality in the patient's breast. It is a technique of imaging diagnostic that requires special care because radiographs without adequate quality may lead to a false diagnosis and lead to the need for a repeat examination, increasing the dose of radiation in the patient. This study aimed to evaluate the average glandular dose (AGD), depending on the breast thickness in patients undergoing routine tests, with a digital computer radiography processing system. Analyzed 30 exhibitions in patients aged (65 ± 12) years, in the right and left caudal skull projections, for breasts with thicknesses between 45 mm and 50 mm. The calculated value of the AGD for this track thickness was (1.600 ± 0.009) mGy. The performance of mammography quality control tests was satisfactory and the AGD values obtained for the chosen thickness range is acceptable, since the threshold achievable is 1.6 mGy and the acceptable is 2 mGy. In Brazil, it is only required the input dose calculation in skin for 45 mm breasts. However, the calculation of AGD is required for different thicknesses of the breast, to identify the best mammographic pattern aiming at better image quality at the lowest dose provided the patient

  11. Absorbed dose determination in water. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of new values of physical parameters as recommended by international organizations has consequences in radiotherapy, e.g. in the determination of absorbed doses in water based on ionometric measurements. A procedure is proposed for the determination of the conversion factor Kw,u between kerma in air and absorbed dose in water, and of the factor Cw,u between exposure measured and absorbed dose in water, for ionization chambers and high-energy photon beams. The conversion factors depend not only on the radiation quality but also on the dimensions and composition of the chamber and of the cup used in the calibrations. Numerical values are given for conventional kinds of ionization chambers. (author). 3 tabs., 16 refs

  12. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS), has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes an oncology patient that must be treated in a linear accelerator. Pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. Above 7 MV therapeutic beam is contaminated with photoneutrons that could damage the CMOS. Here, the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a CMOS cell was calculated, also the spectra were calculated in two point-like detectors in the room. Neutron spectrum in the CMOS cell shows a small peak between 0.1 to 1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, joined by epithermal neutrons, same features were observed in the point-like detectors. The absorbed dose in the CMOS was 1.522 x 10-17 Gy per neutron emitted by the source. (Author)

  13. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS), has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes an oncology patient that must be treated in a linear accelerator. Pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. Above 7 MV therapeutic beam is contaminated with photoneutrons that could damage the CMOS. Here, the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a CMOS cell was calculated, also the spectra were calculated in two point-like detectors in the room. Neutron spectrum in the CMOS cell shows a small peak between 0.1 to 1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, joined by epithermal neutrons, same features were observed in the point-like detectors. The absorbed dose in the CMOS was 1.522 x 10{sup -17} Gy per neutron emitted by the source. (Author)

  14. Characterization of contrast - to noise ration and mean glandular dose for digital mammography system in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the current exposure parameters in clinical use at sole CR mammography facility in Tanzania are optimal. For this purpose, the European protocol for quality control in mammography screening was applied to characterize the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (D) values of model iCR3600 with iCRco image plates (RADIEQ: South Korea). The characterization was performed at 30 kVp under manual mode exposure conditions for standard PMMA phantom thicknesses ranging from 20 to70 mm. The figure of merit (FOM) expressed in terms of CNR2/MGD was derived to assess the level of optimization. The results show that FOM was highest 30 cm PMMA thickness and roughly decreased with increasing 11 PMMA thickness as expected. The D values were 0.7, 0.81, 0.69, 0.7, 0.74, 0.64 and 0.56 mGy for 20, 30, 40, 45, 50, 60 and 70 mm PMMA respectively. The dose values were much lower than the European limiting values. Although there is no evidence for deteriorated image quality as a result of low dose levels, non use of automatic exposure control device suggest the need for improvement. As a starting point, the defective automatic exposure system should be repaired and put in practice followed by comprehensive optimization studies. Therefore further studies may be necessary for conclusive optimization status (author)

  15. Glandular dose and image quality control in mammography facilities with computerized radiography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and early detection is critical to its diagnosis and treatment. To date, the most effective method for early detection of breast cancer has been x-ray mammography for which the screen/film (SF) technique has been the gold standard. However, even though SF combinations have been improved and optimized over the years for breast imaging, there are some critical limitations, including a narrow exposure range, image artifacts, film processing problems, and inflexibility in image processing and film management. In recent years, digital mammography has been introduced in cancer screening programmes with the screen/film techniques gradually being phased out. Computed radiography (CR), also commonly known as photostimulable phosphor (PSP) imaging or storage phosphor, employs reusable imaging plates and associated hardware and software to acquire and to display digital projection radiographs. In this work, a protocol model was tested for performing image quality control and average glandular dose (AGD) evaluation in 19 institutions with computed radiography systems for mammography. The protocol was validated through tests at the Laboratorio de Radioprotecao Aplicada a Mamografia (LARAM) from the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN). The image quality visual evaluation of CDMAM phantom showed that 53% of the facilities were able to produce images of excellent quality. Furthermore, the automated evaluation of image quality, using the analyze software cdcom.exe, showed that 57% of the images were considered to be of good quality. The detector linearity test showed that the CR response is very linear, where 95% of facilities evaluated were considered to be compliant. For the image noise was found that only 20% of facilities are in agreement with the parameters established for this test. The average glandular doses, which patients may be getting to perform an examination, were below the action levels recommended by the European Protocol for Quality Assurance in Mammography Screening in 70% of the facilities. However, if acceptable levels were considered, the situation becomes complicated because more than half of the facilities have obtained doses above these levels. Moreover, for 50 mm PMMA thickness standard, the AGD was 87 % higher than in screen/film systems. (author)

  16. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work with a Swedish catalogue of radiation absorbed doses to patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations has continued. After the previous report in 1999, biokinetic data and dose estimates (mean absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and effective dose) have been produced for a number of substances: 11C- acetate, 11C- methionine, 18F-DOPA, whole antibody labelled with either 99mTc, 111In, 123I or 131I, fragment of antibody, F(ab')2 labelled with either 99mTc, 111In, 123I or 131I and fragment of antibody, Fab' labelled with either 99mTc, 111In, 123I or 131I. The absorbed dose estimates for these substances have been made from published biokinetic information. For other substances of interest, e.g. 14C-urea (children age 3-6 years), 14C-glycocholic acid, 14C-xylose and 14C-triolein, sufficient literature data have not been available. Therefore, a large number of measurements on patients and volunteers have been carried out, in order to determine the biokinetics and dosimetry for these substances. Samples of breast milk from 50 mothers, who had been subject to nuclear medicine investigations, have been collected at various times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the mother. The activity concentration in the breast milk samples has been measured. The absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the child who ingests the milk have been determined for 17 different radiopharmaceuticals. Based on these results revised recommendations for interruption of breast-feeding after nuclear medicine investigations are suggested

  17. Determination of absorbed doses in a computerized tomography scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed doses and the 'effective dose equivalent' resulting from computerized tomographic studies and in relevant radiodiagnostic techniques are reported. To determine the absorbed dose distribution a Rando phantom in lithium fluoride TLD-700 dosimeters were used. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of bismuth shielding effectiveness in reducing breast absorbed dose during thoracic CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T. C.; Mourao, A. P.; Santana, P. C.; Silva, T. A. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Program of Nuclear Science and Techniques, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Computed Tomography (CT) is an essential method for tracking neoplasia and efficiently diagnosing a wide variety of thoracic diseases. CT is generally considered the most accurate choice for lung examination. Due to the growing use of CT, breast and other superficial and radiosensitive organs are unnecessarily irradiated during radiological procedures, thus requiring the development of strategies appropriate to optimize and, if possible, to reduce the radiation dose. The use of bismuth shielding to reduce radiation dose absorbed by breast during thoracic CT examinations has been the subject of many studies recently published by Brazilian and foreign authors of various fields. The purpose of this paper is both to accurately determine the glandular dose when breast is exposed to radiation and to assess the reduction in absorbed dose during thoracic CT examinations, using a set of Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, an anthropomorphic phantom and bismuth shielding. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of bismuth shielding effectiveness in reducing breast absorbed dose during thoracic CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed Tomography (CT) is an essential method for tracking neoplasia and efficiently diagnosing a wide variety of thoracic diseases. CT is generally considered the most accurate choice for lung examination. Due to the growing use of CT, breast and other superficial and radiosensitive organs are unnecessarily irradiated during radiological procedures, thus requiring the development of strategies appropriate to optimize and, if possible, to reduce the radiation dose. The use of bismuth shielding to reduce radiation dose absorbed by breast during thoracic CT examinations has been the subject of many studies recently published by Brazilian and foreign authors of various fields. The purpose of this paper is both to accurately determine the glandular dose when breast is exposed to radiation and to assess the reduction in absorbed dose during thoracic CT examinations, using a set of Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, an anthropomorphic phantom and bismuth shielding. (Author)

  20. Estimates of Average Glandular Dose with Auto-modes of X-ray Exposures in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izdihar Kamal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the average glandular dose (AGD of radiation among different breast compositions of glandular and adipose tissue with auto-modes of exposure factor selection in digital breast tomosynthesis. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February 2012 and February 2013 using a tomosynthesis digital mammography X-ray machine. The entrance surface air kerma and the half-value layer were determined using a 100H thermoluminescent dosimeter on 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissue (50/50 and 20% glandular and 80% adipose tissue (20/80 commercially available breast phantoms (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA with auto-time, auto-filter and auto-kilovolt modes. Results: The lowest AGD for the 20/80 phantom with auto-time was 2.28 milliGray (mGy for two dimension (2D and 2.48 mGy for three dimensional (3D images. The lowest AGD for the 50/50 phantom with auto-time was 0.97 mGy for 2D and 1.0 mGy for 3D. Conclusion: The AGD values for both phantoms were lower against a high kilovolt peak and the use of auto-filter mode was more practical for quick acquisition while limiting the probability of operator error.

  1. A polystyrene absorbed-dose-rate calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple portable calorimeter was constructed by embedding a calibrated thermistor on the axis of a polystyrene rod. This instrument was positioned on the axis of a cylindrical array of 60Co rods. The duration of the measurements was ?70 s. Absorbed dose rates of ?70 Gy/min were measured to a daily precision of several tenths of a percent standard deviation. The results are in good agreement with earlier measurements made with a graphite calorimeter. An absorbed dose of 620 kGy resulted in no detectable change in thermistor sensitivity. The specific heat capacity of the polystyrene presumably increased ?0.0024%/kGy. The use of a chart recorder was not necessary. (orig.)

  2. TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations for glandular dose and scatter fraction assessment in mammography: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maria, S., E-mail: salvatore@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, EN 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Barros, S.; Bento, J.; Teles, P.; Figueira, C.; Pereira, M.; Vaz, P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, EN 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Paulo, G. [Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saude de Coimbra, rua 5 de Outubro, 3046-854 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2011-10-15

    The main purpose of this study was to validate and compare Mean Glandular Dose (MGD) values obtained using Monte Carlo simulations with experimental values obtained from Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) and depth dose measurements performed in a Hospital mammography unit. ESD and depth dose were measured using ThermoLuminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), and a tissue equivalent mammography phantom recommended by the American College of Radiology (ACR). Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations were also compared with the MGD calculated using the Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) system of the mammographic unit. In the simulations the Doppler energy broadening effect was also taken into account. The simulated ESD are about 5%-10% higher than the measured ESD values. The deviation between the measured and simulated MGD values in the phantom is of about 15%. The MGD evaluated using the AEC system is smaller both with respect to the Monte Carlo simulation and experimental result by a factor of about 15% and 25% respectively. Moreover the BackScatter Factor (BSF) estimated by Monte Carlo simulations was used for the MGD calculation according to the Wu's method. Finally the inclusion of the energy broadening effect on MGD calculation produces negligible variations on the simulated results. - Highlights: > Depth dose measurements in breast phantom with TLD and an X-ray mammography system. > Entrance surface dose measurements with TLD. > Monte Carlo assessment of mean glandular dose and comparison with experimental data. > Dose variation inside the breast from 12% to 230% of the mean glandular dose. > Monte Carlo estimation of backscatter factor and dose scatter fraction.

  3. Comparison of absorbed doses from cobalt sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorbed doses from medical cobalt beams were compared by all radiotherapeutic workplaces in Czechoslovakia using thermoluminiscence dosemeters. At most workplaces (58%), a the deviation from the reference primary standard at the Institute of Radiation Dosimetry of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences was below 3%. None of the workplaces exhibited a deviation greater than 5%, indicating a good clinical dosimetry standard. (author). 3 figs., 6 refs

  4. Results of a 2011 national questionnaire for investigation of mean glandular dose from mammography in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Y; Suzuki, S; Minami, K; Shirakawa, S

    2014-03-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for mammography have yet to be created in Japan. A national questionnaire investigation into radiographic conditions in Japan was carried out for the purpose of creating DRLs. Items investigated included the following: tube voltage; tube current; current-time product; source-image distance; craniocaudal view; automatic exposure control (AEC) settings; name of mammography unit; image receptor system (computed radiography (CR), flat panel detector (FPD), or film/screen (F/S)); and supported or unsupported monitor diagnosis (including monitor resolution). Estimation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) for mammography was performed and compared with previous investigations. The MGD was 1.58(0.48) mGy, which did not significantly differ from a 2007 investigation. In relation to image receptors, although no difference in average MGD values was observed between CR and FPD systems, F/S systems had a significantly decreased value compared to both CR and FPDs. Concerning digital systems (FPDs), the MGD value of the direct conversion system was significantly higher than the indirect conversion system. No significant difference in MGD value was evident concerning type of monitor diagnosis for either the CR or the FPD digital systems; however, hard copies were used more often in CR. No significant difference in the MGD value was found in relation to monitor resolution. This report suggests ways to lower the doses patients undergoing mammography receive in Japan, and serves as reference data for 4.2 cm compressed breast tissue of 50% composition DRLs. Furthermore, our findings suggest that further optimisation of FPD settings can promote a reduction in the MGD value. PMID:24334729

  5. Validation of mean glandular dose values provided by a digital breast tomosynthesis system in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beraldo O, B.; Paixao, L.; Donato da S, S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Post-graduation in Sciences and Technology of Radiations Minerals and Materials, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Araujo T, M. H. [Dr Maria Helena Araujo Teixeira Clinic, Guajajaras 40, 30180-100 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S., E-mail: bbo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality that provides quasi-three-dimensional structural information of the breast and has strong promise to improve the differentiation of normal tissue and suspicious masses reducing the tissue overlaps. DBT images are reconstructed from a sequence of low-dose X-ray projections of the breast acquired at a small number of angles over a limited angular range. The Ho logic Selen ia Dimensions system is equipped with an amorphous Selenium (a-Se) detector layer of 250 μm thickness and a 70 μm pixel pitch. Studies are needed to determine the radiation dose of patients that are undergoing this emerging procedure to compare with the results obtained in DBT images. The mean glandular dose (D{sub G}) is the dosimetric quantity used in quality control of the mammographic systems. The aim of this work is to validate D{sub G} values for different breast thicknesses provided by a Ho logic Selen ia Dimensions system using a DBT mode in comparison with the same results obtained by a calibrated 90 X 5-6M-model Radcal ionization chamber. D{sub G} values were derived from the incident air kerma (K{sub i}) measurements and tabulated conversion coefficients that are dependent on the half value layer (HVL) of the X-ray spectrum. Voltage and tube loading values were recorded in irradiations using W/Al anode/filter combination, automatic exposure control mode and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs which simulate different breast thicknesses. For K{sub i} measurements, the ionization chamber was positioned at 655 mm from the focus and the same radiographic technique values were selected with the manual mode. D{sub G} values for a complete procedure ranged from 0.9 ± 0.1 to 3.7 ± 0.4 mGy. The results for different breast thicknesses are in accordance with values obtained by DBT images and with acceptable levels established by the Commission of the European Communities (Cec) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This work contributes to determine the reliable radiation dose received by the patients and validate the values provided by this DBT system. (Author)

  6. Validation of mean glandular dose values provided by a digital breast tomosynthesis system in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality that provides quasi-three-dimensional structural information of the breast and has strong promise to improve the differentiation of normal tissue and suspicious masses reducing the tissue overlaps. DBT images are reconstructed from a sequence of low-dose X-ray projections of the breast acquired at a small number of angles over a limited angular range. The Ho logic Selen ia Dimensions system is equipped with an amorphous Selenium (a-Se) detector layer of 250 μm thickness and a 70 μm pixel pitch. Studies are needed to determine the radiation dose of patients that are undergoing this emerging procedure to compare with the results obtained in DBT images. The mean glandular dose (DG) is the dosimetric quantity used in quality control of the mammographic systems. The aim of this work is to validate DG values for different breast thicknesses provided by a Ho logic Selen ia Dimensions system using a DBT mode in comparison with the same results obtained by a calibrated 90 X 5-6M-model Radcal ionization chamber. DG values were derived from the incident air kerma (Ki) measurements and tabulated conversion coefficients that are dependent on the half value layer (HVL) of the X-ray spectrum. Voltage and tube loading values were recorded in irradiations using W/Al anode/filter combination, automatic exposure control mode and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs which simulate different breast thicknesses. For Ki measurements, the ionization chamber was positioned at 655 mm from the focus and the same radiographic technique values were selected with the manual mode. DG values for a complete procedure ranged from 0.9 ± 0.1 to 3.7 ± 0.4 mGy. The results for different breast thicknesses are in accordance with values obtained by DBT images and with acceptable levels established by the Commission of the European Communities (Cec) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This work contributes to determine the reliable radiation dose received by the patients and validate the values provided by this DBT system. (Author)

  7. Comparison of average glandular dose in screen-film and digital mammography using breast tissue-equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, mammography system is changed rapidly from conventional screen-film system to digital system for application to screening and diagnosis. Digital mammography system provides several advantages over screen-film mammography system. According to the information provided by the manufacturer, digital mammography system offers radiation dose reduction in comparison with screen-film mammography system, because of digital detector, particularly direct digital detector has higher x-ray absorption efficiency than screen-film combination or imaging plate (IP). We measured average glandular doses (ADG) in screen-film mammography (SFM) system with slow screen-film combination, computed mammography (CM) system, indirect digital mammography (IDM) system and direct digital mammography (DDM) system using breast tissue-equivalent phantom (glandularity 30%, 50% and 70%). The results were shown as follows: AGD values for DDM system were highest than those for other systems. Although automatic exposure control (AEC) mode was selected, the curve of the AGD values against thickness or glandularity increased significantly for the SFM system with the uniform target/filter (Mo/Mo) combination. Therefore, the AGD values for the high energy examinations were highest in the SFM system, and those for the low energy examinations were highest in the DDM system. But the curve of the AGD values against thickness and glandularity increased gently for CM system with the automatic selection of the target/filter combination (from Mo/Mo to Mo/Rh or from Mo/Rh to Rh/Rh), and the AGD values were lowest. Consequently, the parameters in mammography for each exposure besides detection efficiency play an important role in order to estimate a patient radiation dose

  8. SU-E-I-04: A Mammography Phantom to Measure Mean Glandular Dose and Image Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate mean glandular dose (MGD) and image quality in a selection of mammography systems using a novel phantom based on thermoluminescent dosemeters and the ACR wax insert. Methods: The phantom consists of two acrylic, 19 cm diameter, 4.5 cm thick, semicircular modules, used in sequence. The image quality module contains the ACR insert and is used to obtain a quality control image under automatic exposure conditions. The dosimetric module carries 15 TLD-100 chips, some under Al foils, to determine air kerma and half-value-layer. TL readings take place at our laboratory under controlled conditions. Calibration was performed using an ionization chamber and a Senographe 2000D unit for a variety of beam qualities, from 24 to 40 kV, Mo and Rh anodes and filters. Phantom MGD values agree, on the average, within 3% with ionization chamber data, and their precision is better than 10% (k=1). Results: MGD and image quality have been evaluated in a selection of mammography units currently used in Mexican health services. The sample includes analogic (screen/film), flexible digital (CR), and full-field digital image receptors. The highest MDG are associated to the CR technology. The most common image quality failure is due to artifacts (dust, intensifying screen scratches, and processor marks for film/screen, laser reader defects for CR). Conclusion: The developed phantom permits the MGD measurement without the need of a calibrated ionization chamber at the mammography site and can be used by a technician without the presence of a medical physicist. The results indicate the urgent need to establish quality control programs for mammography

  9. SU-E-I-04: A Mammography Phantom to Measure Mean Glandular Dose and Image Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Pineda, E; Ruiz-Trejo, C; E, Brandan M [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Mexico City, DF (Mexico)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mean glandular dose (MGD) and image quality in a selection of mammography systems using a novel phantom based on thermoluminescent dosemeters and the ACR wax insert. Methods: The phantom consists of two acrylic, 19 cm diameter, 4.5 cm thick, semicircular modules, used in sequence. The image quality module contains the ACR insert and is used to obtain a quality control image under automatic exposure conditions. The dosimetric module carries 15 TLD-100 chips, some under Al foils, to determine air kerma and half-value-layer. TL readings take place at our laboratory under controlled conditions. Calibration was performed using an ionization chamber and a Senographe 2000D unit for a variety of beam qualities, from 24 to 40 kV, Mo and Rh anodes and filters. Phantom MGD values agree, on the average, within 3% with ionization chamber data, and their precision is better than 10% (k=1). Results: MGD and image quality have been evaluated in a selection of mammography units currently used in Mexican health services. The sample includes analogic (screen/film), flexible digital (CR), and full-field digital image receptors. The highest MDG are associated to the CR technology. The most common image quality failure is due to artifacts (dust, intensifying screen scratches, and processor marks for film/screen, laser reader defects for CR). Conclusion: The developed phantom permits the MGD measurement without the need of a calibrated ionization chamber at the mammography site and can be used by a technician without the presence of a medical physicist. The results indicate the urgent need to establish quality control programs for mammography.

  10. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis: comparison of phantom and patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, R W; van Engen, R E; Young, K C; den Heeten, G J; Broeders, M J M; Schopphoven, S; Jeukens, C R L P N; Veldkamp, W J H; Dance, D R

    2015-10-21

    For the evaluation of the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) phantoms simulating standard model breasts are used. These phantoms consist of slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or a combination of PMMA and polyethylene (PE). In the last decades the automatic exposure control (AEC) increased in complexity and became more sensitive to (local) differences in breast composition. The question is how well the AGD estimated using these simple dosimetry phantoms agrees with the average patient AGD. In this study the AGDs for both dosimetry phantoms and for patients have been evaluated for 5 different x-ray systems in DM and DBT modes. It was found that the ratios between patient and phantom AGD did not differ considerably using both dosimetry phantoms. These ratios averaged over all breast thicknesses were 1.14 and 1.15 for the PMMA and PMMA-PE dosimetry phantoms respectively in DM mode and 1.00 and 1.02 in the DBT mode. These ratios were deemed to be sufficiently close to unity to be suitable for dosimetry evaluation in quality control procedures. However care should be taken when comparing systems for DM and DBT since depending on the AEC operation, ratios for particular breast thicknesses may differ substantially (0.83-1.96). Although the predictions of both phantoms are similar we advise the use of PMMA??+??PE slabs for both DM and DBT to harmonize dosimetry protocols and avoid any potential issues with the use of spacers with the PMMA phantoms. PMID:26407015

  11. Average glandular dose in digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis: comparison of phantom and patient data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, R. W.; van Engen, R. E.; Young, K. C.; den Heeten, G. J.; Broeders, M. J. M.; Schopphoven, S.; Jeukens, C. R. L. P. N.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Dance, D. R.

    2015-10-01

    For the evaluation of the average glandular dose (AGD) in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) phantoms simulating standard model breasts are used. These phantoms consist of slabs of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or a combination of PMMA and polyethylene (PE). In the last decades the automatic exposure control (AEC) increased in complexity and became more sensitive to (local) differences in breast composition. The question is how well the AGD estimated using these simple dosimetry phantoms agrees with the average patient AGD. In this study the AGDs for both dosimetry phantoms and for patients have been evaluated for 5 different x-ray systems in DM and DBT modes. It was found that the ratios between patient and phantom AGD did not differ considerably using both dosimetry phantoms. These ratios averaged over all breast thicknesses were 1.14 and 1.15 for the PMMA and PMMA-PE dosimetry phantoms respectively in DM mode and 1.00 and 1.02 in the DBT mode. These ratios were deemed to be sufficiently close to unity to be suitable for dosimetry evaluation in quality control procedures. However care should be taken when comparing systems for DM and DBT since depending on the AEC operation, ratios for particular breast thicknesses may differ substantially (0.83-1.96). Although the predictions of both phantoms are similar we advise the use of PMMA??+??PE slabs for both DM and DBT to harmonize dosimetry protocols and avoid any potential issues with the use of spacers with the PMMA phantoms.

  12. Image quality, threshold contrast and mean glandular dose in CR mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubiak, R. R.; Gamba, H. R.; Neves, E. B.; Peixoto, J. E.

    2013-09-01

    In many countries, computed radiography (CR) systems represent the majority of equipment used in digital mammography. This study presents a method for optimizing image quality and dose in CR mammography of patients with breast thicknesses between 45 and 75 mm. Initially, clinical images of 67 patients (group 1) were analyzed by three experienced radiologists, reporting about anatomical structures, noise and contrast in low and high pixel value areas, and image sharpness and contrast. Exposure parameters (kV, mAs and target/filter combination) used in the examinations of these patients were reproduced to determine the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD). The parameters were also used to radiograph a CDMAM (version 3.4) phantom (Artinis Medical Systems, The Netherlands) for image threshold contrast evaluation. After that, different breast thicknesses were simulated with polymethylmethacrylate layers and various sets of exposure parameters were used in order to determine optimal radiographic parameters. For each simulated breast thickness, optimal beam quality was defined as giving a target CNR to reach the threshold contrast of CDMAM images for acceptable MGD. These results were used for adjustments in the automatic exposure control (AEC) by the maintenance team. Using optimized exposure parameters, clinical images of 63 patients (group 2) were evaluated as described above. Threshold contrast, CNR and MGD for such exposure parameters were also determined. Results showed that the proposed optimization method was effective for all breast thicknesses studied in phantoms. The best result was found for breasts of 75 mm. While in group 1 there was no detection of the 0.1 mm critical diameter detail with threshold contrast below 23%, after the optimization, detection occurred in 47.6% of the images. There was also an average MGD reduction of 7.5%. The clinical image quality criteria were attended in 91.7% for all breast thicknesses evaluated in both patient groups. Finally, this study also concluded that the use of the AEC of the x-ray unit based on the constant dose to the detector may bring some difficulties to CR systems to operate under optimal conditions. More studies must be performed, so that the compatibility between systems and optimization methodologies can be evaluated, as well as this optimization method. Most methods are developed for phantoms, so comparative studies including clinical images must be developed.

  13. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C. Y.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The absorbed dose due to neutrons by a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes a patient that must be treated by radiotherapy with a linear accelerator; the pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. When the Linac is working in Bremsstrahlung mode an undesirable neutron field is produced due to photoneutron reactions; these neutrons could damage the CMOS putting the patient at risk during the radiotherapy treatment. In order to estimate the neutron dose in the CMOS a Monte Carlo calculation was carried out where a full radiotherapy vault room was modeled with a W-made spherical shell in whose center was located the source term of photoneutrons produced by a Linac head operating in Bremsstrahlung mode at 18 MV. In the calculations a phantom made of tissue equivalent was modeled while a beam of photoneutrons was applied on the phantom prostatic region using a field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}. During simulation neutrons were isotropically transported from the Linac head to the phantom chest, here a 1 {theta} x 1 cm{sup 2} cylinder made of polystyrene was modeled as the CMOS, where the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose were estimated. Main damages to CMOS are by protons produced during neutron collisions protective cover made of H-rich materials, here the neutron spectrum that reach the CMOS was calculated showing a small peak around 0.1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, both connected through epithermal neutrons. (Author)

  14. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose due to neutrons by a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes a patient that must be treated by radiotherapy with a linear accelerator; the pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. When the Linac is working in Bremsstrahlung mode an undesirable neutron field is produced due to photoneutron reactions; these neutrons could damage the CMOS putting the patient at risk during the radiotherapy treatment. In order to estimate the neutron dose in the CMOS a Monte Carlo calculation was carried out where a full radiotherapy vault room was modeled with a W-made spherical shell in whose center was located the source term of photoneutrons produced by a Linac head operating in Bremsstrahlung mode at 18 MV. In the calculations a phantom made of tissue equivalent was modeled while a beam of photoneutrons was applied on the phantom prostatic region using a field of 10 x 10 cm2. During simulation neutrons were isotropically transported from the Linac head to the phantom chest, here a 1 θ x 1 cm2 cylinder made of polystyrene was modeled as the CMOS, where the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose were estimated. Main damages to CMOS are by protons produced during neutron collisions protective cover made of H-rich materials, here the neutron spectrum that reach the CMOS was calculated showing a small peak around 0.1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, both connected through epithermal neutrons. (Author)

  15. Cistitis glandular Glandular cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Paula Piñera

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de cistitis glandular, enfermedad rara, generalmente asintomática, que consiste en un desorden proliferativo de las glándulas que producen moco dentro de la mucosa y submucosa del epitelio urinario de la vejiga. La irritación crónica constituye el factor de riesgo de mayor importancia en su aparición. La evolución hacia la malignidad (adenocarcinoma es excepcional y ocurre en caso de la persistencia del factor de predisposición. Para llegar a establecer el diagnóstico es necesario el examen clínico, radiológico e histológico. A este caso se le realizó ecografía vesical y se encontró tumoración pequeña de 3 cm en fondo vesical, que primeramente se le efectuó biopsia por cistoscopia y después se resecó totalmente. Confirmado el diagnóstico, el tratamiento fue esencialmente quirúrgico. La vigilancia anual por cistoscopia con biopsias de vejiga resulta necesaria en estos casos. La forma florida es mucho más rara e incapacitante pues precisa resección amplia de las lesiones.This is the case of glandular cystitis a uncommon disease generally asymptomatic consisted of a proliferative disorder of glands producing mucus within mucosa and submucosa of vesical urinary epithelium. Chronic irritation is the risk factor more significant in its appearance. Course to malignancy (adenocarcinoma is exceptional and occur in case of persistence of the predisposition factor. To made diagnosis it is necessary the clinical, radiological and histological examination. This case undergoes a vesical echography noting a 3 cm small tumor in vesical fundus and a biopsy by cystoscopy after a total resection. Diagnosis was confirmed and treatment was essentially surgical. Annual surveillance by cystoscopy with vesical biopsies is necessary in these cases. The progressive way is rarer and incapacitant since a wide resection of lesions is essential.

  16. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    C.G., Borja-Hernández; K.A., Guzmán-García; C., Valero-Luna; A., Bañuelos-Frías; L., Paredes-Gutiérrez; V.M., Hernández-Dávila; H.R., Vega-Carrillo.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available El espectro y la dosis absorbida, debida a neutrones, por un Semiconductor de Óxido Meta´lico Complementario ha sido estimada utilizando métodos Monte Carlo. Eventualmente, una persona con marcapasos se convierte en un paciente oncológico que debe ser tratado en un acelerador lineal. El marcapasos [...] contiene circuitos integrados como los CMOS que son sensibles a los campos de radiaci ón intensos y pulsados. El haz terapéutico de un LINAC operando a voltajes mayores a 7 MV está contaminado con fotoneutrones que pueden dañar el CMOS. En este trabajo se estimó el espectro de neutrones y la dosis absorbida por un CMOS; además, se calcularon los espectros de neutrones en dos detectores puntuales ubicados dentro de la sala. El espectro de neutrones en el CMOS tiene un pico entre 0.1 y 1 MeV y otro en la región de los térmicos, conectados mediante neutrones epitérmicos. Estas mismas características se observan en los otros detectores. La dosis absorbida por el CMOS es 1:522 x 10-17 Gy por cada neutrón emitido por el término fuente. Abstract in english The neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor, has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes an oncology patient that must be treated in a linear accelerator. Pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sen [...] sitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. Above 7 MV therapeutic beam is contaminated with photoneutrons that could damage the CMOS. Here, the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a CMOS cell was calculated, also the spectra were calculated in two point-like detectors in the room. Neutron spectrum in the CMOS cell shows a small peak between 0.1 to 1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, joined by epithermal neutrons, same features were observed in the point-like detectors. The absorbed dose in the CMOS was 1:522 x 10-17 Gy per neutron emitted by the source.

  17. Dose absorbed in adults and children thyroid due to the I123 using the dosimetry MIRD and Marinelli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the dosimetry MIRD, and representation Cristy-Eckerman in the thyroid gland and organs of their bio-kinetics when I123 (Iodine) is used, the study demonstrates that the absorbed dose by the gland of an adult, children, and newly born, is their auto-dose, independent of the compartments number of their bio-kinetics. The dosimetric contributions of the organs of their bio-kinetics are insignificant. Their results are not significantly different to those obtained by the formalism MARINELLI (auto-dose) when it uses a sphere like glandular representation. In consequence, the kinetic model corresponding to the glandular representation decreases to a compartment, where the gland can also be represented like a sphere. (Author)

  18. Determination of absorbed dose in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many areas in the use and operation of research reactors where the absorbed dose and the neutron fluence are required. These include work on the determination of the radiolytic stability of the coolant and moderator and on the determination of radiation damage in structural materials, and reactor experiments involving radiation chemistry and radiation biology. The requirements range from rough estimates of the total heating due to radiation to precise values specifying the contributions of gamma rays, thermal neutrons and fast neutrons. To meet all these requirements a variety of experimental measurements and calculations as well as a knowledge of reactor radiations and their interactions is necessary. Realizing the complexity and importance of this field, its development at widely separated laboratories and the need to bring the experts in this work together, the IAEA has convened three panel meetings. These were: 'In-pile dosimetry', held in July 1964 (published by the Agency as Technical Reports Series No. 46); 'Neutron fluence measurements', in October 1965; and 'In-pile dosimetry', in November 1966. The recommendations of these three panels led the Agency to form a Working Group on Reactor Radiation Measurements and to commission the writing of this book and a book on Neutron Fluence Measurements. The latter was published in May 1970 (Technical Reports Series No. 107). The material on neutron fluence and absorbed dose measurements is widely scattered in reports and reviews. It was considered that it was time for all relevant information to be evaluated and put together in the form of a practical guide that would be valuable both to experienced workers and beginners in the field

  19. Mean glandular dose coefficients (DgN) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z; Yaffe, Martin J; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2015-09-21

    To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients [Formula: see text] for a range of anode-filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems.Previously published mono-energetic [Formula: see text] values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute [Formula: see text] coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; molybdenum and rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial half value layer (HVL) calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, [Formula: see text] coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8?cm.Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose ([Formula: see text]) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 ?m Ag, W + 500 ?m Al, W + 700 ?m Al, W + 200 ?m Cu, W + 300 ?m Cu, W + 50 ?m Rh, Mo + 400 ?m Cu, Mo + 30 ?m Mo, Mo + 25 ?m Rh, Rh + 400 ?m Cu and Rh + 25 ?m Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published [Formula: see text] values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values.Over 200 pages of [Formula: see text] coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values. PMID:26348995

  20. Comparative evaluation of average glandular dose and image of digital mammography and film mammography in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and early detection is critical to its diagnosis and treatment. Mammography is the best method for breast-cancer screening and is capable of reducing mortality rates To date, the most effective method for early detection of breast cancer has been x-ray mammography for which the screen/film (SF) technique has been the gold standard. Digital mammography has been proposed as a substitute for film mammography given the benefits inherent to digital technology. The purpose of our study was to compare the technical performance of digital mammographic and screen-film mammography. A PMMA phantom with objects to simulate breast structures. For the screen/film (SF) technique the results showed that 54% mammography units did not achieve the minimum acceptable performance as far the image quality. Besides, 67% services showed inadequate performance in their processing systems, which had significant influence on the image quality. At the mean glandular dose only 44% of digital systems evaluated were compliant in all thicknesses of PMMA. The average glandular dose AGD was 90 % higher than in screen/film systems. (authors)

  1. The BIPM Graphite Calorimeter Standard for Absorbed Dose to Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BIPM has constructed a graphite calorimeter for use as a primary standard for absorbed dose. It is employed to measure absorbed dose to water in the BIPM 60Co reference beam and in accelerator photon beams. It is currently in use for a series of international comparisons of absorbed dose to water in the accelerator photon beams of national metrology institutes. The paper describes the BIPM calorimeter and presents some recent results. (author)

  2. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. Measurements of absorbed dose in graphite irradiated by a beam of cobalt-60 gamma rays from an Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) E1 Dorado 6 teletherapy unit are reported. The measurements were performed using a graphite calorimeter, which is the primary standard for absorbed dose. The measurements are used to calibrate a working standard ion chamber in terms of absorbed dose in graphite. Details of the methods, results and correction factors applied are given in Appendices. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs

  3. Absorbed dose measurements in mammography using Monte Carlo method and ZrO2+PTFE dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammography test is a central tool for breast cancer diagnostic. In addition, programs are conducted periodically to detect the asymptomatic women in certain age groups; these programs have shown a reduction on breast cancer mortality. Early detection of breast cancer is achieved through a mammography, which contrasts the glandular and adipose tissue with a probable calcification. The parameters used for mammography are based on the thickness and density of the breast, their values depend on the voltage, current, focal spot and anode-filter combination. To achieve an image clear and a minimum dose must be chosen appropriate irradiation conditions. Risk associated with mammography should not be ignored. This study was performed in the General Hospital No. 1 IMSS in Zacatecas. Was used a glucose phantom and measured air Kerma at the entrance of the breast that was calculated using Monte Carlo methods and ZrO2+PTFE thermoluminescent dosemeters, this calculation was completed with calculating the absorbed dose. (author)

  4. Comportamento da dose glandular versus contraste do objeto em mamografia: determinação de formalismo semi-empírico para diferentes combinações alvo-filtro / Behavior of subject contrast versus glandular dose in mammography: determination of a semi-empirical formalism for different target-filter combinations

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gabriela, Hoff; Carlos Eduardo de, Almeida; Gary T., Barnes.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar o efeito da mudança no contraste do objeto, tempo de exposição e dose de radiação quando diferentes espessuras de filtração de molibdênio (Mo) e ródio (Rh) são empregadas em mamógrafos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Realizaram-se medidas da exposição na entrada da pele com uma câmara de i [...] onização para diferentes espessuras para os filtros de Mo e Rh. Para determinar a dose glandular média foi utilizado simulador de BR12 (50% tecido adiposo e 50% tecido glandular) de diferentes espessuras (4 cm e 8 cm). Energias na faixa de 24 kVp a 34 kVp foram empregadas e filmes Kodak MinR 2000 foram utilizados. RESULTADOS: Os resultados evidenciaram dados de contraste do objeto, dose glandular e tempo de exposição para diferentes espessuras de filtros adicionais e diferentes tensões. Esses dados indicaram aumento nos valores de contraste do objeto e tempo de exposição, com o aumento da espessura dos filtros. A dose glandular apresentou comportamento com diferentes tendências para cada caso analisado. Equações foram definidas para possibilitar a estimativa do contraste do objeto, dose glandular e tempo de exposição para os casos estudados. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados possibilitaram a estimativa de equações que auxiliam na verificação do comportamento do contraste do objeto e da dose glandular para simuladores com espessura de 4 cm e 8 cm e para os filtros de Rh e Mo. Dessa forma, torna-se possível estimar a figura de mérito (razão entre o contraste do objeto e a dose glandular), podendo auxiliar na análise da relação risco-benefício dos casos estudados. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to verify the effect of changes in subject contrast, exposure time and radiation dose when different thicknesses of molybdenum (Mo) and rhodium (Rh) filters are used in mammography equipments. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Entrance skin exposure measurements were performed with a [...] n ionization chamber for different thicknesses of Mo and Rh filters. Average glandular dose was determined with a BR12 simulator (50% fat tissue and 50% glandular tissue) of different thicknesses (4 cm and 8 cm). Energies in the range of 24 to 34 kVp and Kodak MinR 2000 films were used. RESULTS: Results have evidenced data on subject contrast data, glandular dose and exposure time for different thicknesses of additional filters and different kVp values. These data have indicated an increase both in values of subject contrast and exposure time when filters thickness is increased. The glandular dose has presented a different behavior tendency for each case analyzed. Equations were defined to allow us to estimate subject contrast, glandular dose and exposure time for the cases studied. CONCLUSION: The results have made possible to define equations to assist with the evaluation of subject contrast and glandular dose behavior in simulators with 4 cm and 8 cm thicknesses and for Rh and Mo additional filters. In this way, it is possible to estimate the figure of merit (subject contrast/glandular dose ratio) to assist in the risk-benefit analysis of the cases studied.

  5. Comportamento da dose glandular versus contraste do objeto em mamografia: determinação de formalismo semi-empírico para diferentes combinações alvo-filtro Behavior of subject contrast versus glandular dose in mammography: determination of a semi-empirical formalism for different target-filter combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hoff

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar o efeito da mudança no contraste do objeto, tempo de exposição e dose de radiação quando diferentes espessuras de filtração de molibdênio (Mo e ródio (Rh são empregadas em mamógrafos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Realizaram-se medidas da exposição na entrada da pele com uma câmara de ionização para diferentes espessuras para os filtros de Mo e Rh. Para determinar a dose glandular média foi utilizado simulador de BR12 (50% tecido adiposo e 50% tecido glandular de diferentes espessuras (4 cm e 8 cm. Energias na faixa de 24 kVp a 34 kVp foram empregadas e filmes Kodak MinR 2000 foram utilizados. RESULTADOS: Os resultados evidenciaram dados de contraste do objeto, dose glandular e tempo de exposição para diferentes espessuras de filtros adicionais e diferentes tensões. Esses dados indicaram aumento nos valores de contraste do objeto e tempo de exposição, com o aumento da espessura dos filtros. A dose glandular apresentou comportamento com diferentes tendências para cada caso analisado. Equações foram definidas para possibilitar a estimativa do contraste do objeto, dose glandular e tempo de exposição para os casos estudados. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados possibilitaram a estimativa de equações que auxiliam na verificação do comportamento do contraste do objeto e da dose glandular para simuladores com espessura de 4 cm e 8 cm e para os filtros de Rh e Mo. Dessa forma, torna-se possível estimar a figura de mérito (razão entre o contraste do objeto e a dose glandular, podendo auxiliar na análise da relação risco-benefício dos casos estudados.OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to verify the effect of changes in subject contrast, exposure time and radiation dose when different thicknesses of molybdenum (Mo and rhodium (Rh filters are used in mammography equipments. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Entrance skin exposure measurements were performed with an ionization chamber for different thicknesses of Mo and Rh filters. Average glandular dose was determined with a BR12 simulator (50% fat tissue and 50% glandular tissue of different thicknesses (4 cm and 8 cm. Energies in the range of 24 to 34 kVp and Kodak MinR 2000 films were used. RESULTS: Results have evidenced data on subject contrast data, glandular dose and exposure time for different thicknesses of additional filters and different kVp values. These data have indicated an increase both in values of subject contrast and exposure time when filters thickness is increased. The glandular dose has presented a different behavior tendency for each case analyzed. Equations were defined to allow us to estimate subject contrast, glandular dose and exposure time for the cases studied. CONCLUSION: The results have made possible to define equations to assist with the evaluation of subject contrast and glandular dose behavior in simulators with 4 cm and 8 cm thicknesses and for Rh and Mo additional filters. In this way, it is possible to estimate the figure of merit (subject contrast/glandular dose ratio to assist in the risk-benefit analysis of the cases studied.

  6. Determination of Total Absorbed Dose Following Accidental and Chronic Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper proposes methods and formulae for calculating the dose absorbed by the critical organs following accidental and chronic (external and internal) exposure. The doses absorbed by the critical organs upon external exposure are calculated on the basis of the following measurements of internal exposure doses: (1) Concentration of radioactive aerosols and period of time during which they enter the body; (2) Activity of the excreta; (3) Activity of the body. Finally, an example is given illustrating the summation of absorbed doses accruing from external and internal exposure. (author)

  7. Digital breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography: A comparison of figures of merit for various average glandular doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Park, SuJin; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Jae-Gu; Choi, Young-Wook; Park, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jae-Jun

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies on the application of tomosynthesis to breast imaging have demonstrated the potential of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). DBT can improve the specificity of digital mammography (DM) through improved marginal visibility of lesions and early breast cancer detection for women with dense breasts. To investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of lesion detection with DBT systems as compared to DM, we conducted a quantitative evaluation by using simulated lesions embedded in a breast phantom. A prototype DBT and dedicated DM system were used in this study. For the DBT system, the average glandular dose (AGD) was calculated using a formalism that was a simple extension of mammography dosimetry. The DBT and the DM images were acquired with average glandular doses (AGDs) ranging from 1 to 4 mGy. To analyze the results objectively, we calculated metrics for in-plane lesion visibility in the form of the contrast-to-noise ratio for the in-focus plane from the DBT reconstruction image and from the craniocaudal (CC) image from the DM system. The imaging performance of DBT was quantitatively compared with that of DM in terms of the figure of merit. Although the DM showed better results in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the mass due to the reduced overlapping of tissue and lesion, an increase in breast thickness of over 3 cm increased the CNR of the mass with the DBT system. For microcalcification detection, the DBT system showed significantly higher CNR than the DM system and gave better predictions of the microcalcification size. We compared the performances of the DM and the DBT systems for various AGDs and breast thicknesses. In conclusion, the results indicate that the DBT systems can play an important role in the detection of masses or microcalcifications without severe compression.

  8. Glandular dose and image quality control in mammography facilities with computerized radiography systems; Dose glandular e controle de qualidade da imagem em servicos de mamografia com sistema de radiografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Marcelino Vicente de Almeida

    2010-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and early detection is critical to its diagnosis and treatment. To date, the most effective method for early detection of breast cancer has been x-ray mammography for which the screen/film (SF) technique has been the gold standard. However, even though SF combinations have been improved and optimized over the years for breast imaging, there are some critical limitations, including a narrow exposure range, image artifacts, film processing problems, and inflexibility in image processing and film management. In recent years, digital mammography has been introduced in cancer screening programmes with the screen/film techniques gradually being phased out. Computed radiography (CR), also commonly known as photostimulable phosphor (PSP) imaging or storage phosphor, employs reusable imaging plates and associated hardware and software to acquire and to display digital projection radiographs. In this work, a protocol model was tested for performing image quality control and average glandular dose (AGD) evaluation in 19 institutions with computed radiography systems for mammography. The protocol was validated through tests at the Laboratorio de Radioprotecao Aplicada a Mamografia (LARAM) from the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN). The image quality visual evaluation of CDMAM phantom showed that 53% of the facilities were able to produce images of excellent quality. Furthermore, the automated evaluation of image quality, using the analyze software cdcom.exe, showed that 57% of the images were considered to be of good quality. The detector linearity test showed that the CR response is very linear, where 95% of facilities evaluated were considered to be compliant. For the image noise was found that only 20% of facilities are in agreement with the parameters established for this test. The average glandular doses, which patients may be getting to perform an examination, were below the action levels recommended by the European Protocol for Quality Assurance in Mammography Screening in 70% of the facilities. However, if acceptable levels were considered, the situation becomes complicated because more than half of the facilities have obtained doses above these levels. Moreover, for 50 mm PMMA thickness standard, the AGD was 87 % higher than in screen/film systems. (author)

  9. An Investigation of Mean Glandular Dose from Routine Mammography in Urmia, Northwestern Iran and the Factors Affecting It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili rahmatnezhad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the Mean Glandular Dose (MGD resulting from Craniocaudal (CC and Mediolateral oblique (MLO views in one breast and the total dose per woman in Urmia, northwestern Iran and to identify the factors affecting it. This study was conducted during 9 months to estimate the MGD for women undergoing mammography and to report the distribution of dose. The clinical data were collected from 460 mammograms taken from 230 women who were referred to radiology center of Imam Reza hospital in Urmia. The piranha system version 3.8A was used for determining the MGD in this work. The MGD values are based on measurements of ESAK (entrance surface air krema and HVL. Significant differences were found between MGD from CC and MLO views. The mean±SD MGD per film was 1.18±0.38 mGy for craniocaudal and 1.39±0.51 mGy for mediolateral oblique views, (p<0.001. The mean±SD MGD per woman was 2.57±0.44 mGy. The mean± SD MGD per film in present study were lower than most of similar reports. The dose values obtained fall within the internationally acceptable dose range of 1-3mGy. This suggests mammography x-ray generators in this part of the country are capable of achieving acceptable dose levels for patient safety. Therefore, with considering the all other factors, the establishment of screening mammography program is achievable.

  10. Fetal absorbed doses by radiopharmaceutical administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author)

  11. Specification of absorbed dose for reporting a therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of dose specification in external beam therapy with photons and electrons has been dealt with in ICRU Report 29 (1978). This problem arises from the fact that the absorbed dose distribution is usually not uniform in the target volume and that for the purpose of treatment reporting a nominal absorbed dose - which will be called target absorbed dose - has to be selected. When comparing the clinical results obtained between radiotherapy centres, the differences in the reported target absorbed doses which can be introduced by differences in the methods of dose specification often are much larger than the differences related to the dosimetric procedures themselves. This shows the importance of the problem. In this paper, some definitions of terms and concepts currently used in radiotherapy are first recalled: tumour volume, target volume, treatment volume, etc. These definitions have been proposed in ICRU Report 29 for photon and electron beams; they can be extended to any kind of irradiation. For external beam therapy with photons and electrons, the target absorbed dose is defined as the absorbed dose at selected point(s) (specification point(s)) having a meaningful relation to the target volume and/or the irradiation beams. Examples are discussed for typical cases. As far as interstitial and intracavitary therapy is concerned, the problem is more complex and no recommendations have so far been made by the ICRU Commission. A major difficulty arises from the sharp dose gradient as a function of the distance to the sources. The particular case of the treatment of cervix carcinoma is considered and some possible methods of specification are discussed: (1) the indication of the sources (in adequate units) and the duration of the application, (2) the absorbed doses at selected reference points (bladder, rectum, bony structures) and (3) the description of the tissue volume (height, width, thickness) encompassed by a given isodose surface (60Gy). (author)

  12. Properties of absorbed dose distribution in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accuracy of calculation of the absorbed dose spatial distribution into patient body is an important task in the radiation treatment of cancer. The correct calculation determines radiotherapy effectiveness. Thus, researches are improving calculation methods permanently to achieve running speed and accuracy increasing of used algorithms of calculation routines. The algorithms of routines for calculations of absorbed dose radial distributions into homo- and heterogeneous medium irradiated by directional source of photons are described in the presented work [1, 2

  13. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an agent of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission is responsible for the maintenance of the Australian Commonwealth standard of absorbed dose. A graphite calorimeter was designed and built at the AAEC Research Establishment to provide such a standard for the dose absorbed in carbon from ? and X-ray beams with maximum photon energies above 500 keV. The calorimeter measures the dose averaged over the volume of a thermally insulated absorber disc of diameter 20 mm, thickness 3 mm and mass 1.7 g. The absorber and associated adiabatic and temperature controlled jackets are contained within a small graphite phantom of diameter 15 cm. The depth to the centre of the absorber is adjustable between 2.1 and 10 cm. By using a modified vacuum chamber window, the minimum depth can be reduced to 5 mm for use with high energy electron beams. The calorimeter has been in operation for more than 12 months and no change in its response to a 60Co source has been detected in that time. The precision of dose measurements is +- 0.3 per cent at a dose rate of 4.2 mGy s-1 (25 rad min-1). Graphite and water phantoms have been made to enable portable working standards of absorbed dose in carbon and water to be calibrated against the primary standard

  14. Absorbed dose depth distribution in irradiated objects at electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approximated method for calculating absorbed dose depth distribution in radiation-chemical technology objects located at different distances from the exhaust port of accelerators with scanning electron beam within 0.4-1.5 MeV energy range is developed. The approach is based on methods for calculating absorbed dose depth distribution semiinfinitive homogeneous absorber in the approximation of infinitive plain monodirected source. Agjustment of a monodirected finite source to an infinite plain form is performed using a transformation factor the value of which is determined by the electron energy and irradiation geometry

  15. Absorbed doses to patients from angioradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of study was to know patients doses exposes when three different procedures of angioradiology were carried out. The explorations considered were drainage biliary, varicocele embolization and dacriocistography made in the Radiodiagnostic Service at the University Hospital of Canary Islands, Tenerife (Spain). In total 14 patients were studied. The measurements were made using large area transmission ionisation chamber which gives the values of Dose Area Product (DAP). In addition, thermoluminescent dosimeters type TLD-100 were used in anthropomorphic phantom in order to obtain values of organ doses when the phantom was submitted to the same procedures rather than the actual patients. Furthermore, the Effdose program was used to estimate the effective doses in the procedures conditions. The values for DAP were in the range of 70-300 for drainage biliary, 43-180 for varicocele embolization and 1.4-9 for dacriocistography. The organ doses measured with TLD-100 were higher than the corresponding values estimated by Effdose program. The results for varicocele embolization were higher than other published data. In the case of drainage biliary procedure, the values were closed to other published results. It was not possible to find data for dacriocistography from other authors. (author)

  16. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish radiation protection authority, (SSI), has supported work on estimates of radiation doses to patients from nuclear medicine examinations since more than 20 years. A number of projects have been reported. The results are put together and published under the name 'Doskatalogen' which contains data on doses to different organs and tissues from radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics and research. This new report contains data on: 11C-labelled substances (realistic maximum model), amino acids labelled with 11C, 18F or 75Se, 99mTc-apcitide, 123I-labelled fatty acids (123I- BMIPP and 123I-IPPA) and revised models for previously reported 15O-labelled water, 99mTc-tetrofosmin (rest as well as exercise) and 201Tl-ion Data for almost 200 substances and radionuclides are included in the 'Doskatalogen' today. Since the year 2001 the 'Doskatalogen' is available on the authority's home page (www.ssi.se)

  17. Evaluation of the absorbed dose in odontological computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluated the absorbed dose at the surface entry known as 'cone beam computed tomography' (CBCT) in odontological computerized tomography. Examination were simulated with CBCT for measurements of dose. A phantom were filled with water, becoming scatter object of radiation. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were positioned on points correspondent to eyes and salivary glands

  18. Depth absorbed dose distributions for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confusion in the literature regarding the influence of energy spread on the depth dose distribution of high energy electrons is discussed. The question is complicated by different methods used in the specification of electron beam energy. It is emphasised that energy spread is only one of the factors that can influence the quality of an electron beam, and that beam geometrical factors are equally important When these are optimised, further improvements in beam quality can be obtained if the energy spread in the beam is decreased, preferably as low as 0.3 MeV to bring the loss in therapeutic range compared to a monoenergetic beam below 1 mm. (author)

  19. Absorbed dose from traversing spherically symmetric, Gaussian radioactive clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a large radioactive cloud is produced, sampling may require that an airplane traverse the cloud. A method to predict the absorbed dose to the aircrew from penetrating the radioactive cloud is needed. Dose rates throughout spherically symmetric Gaussian clouds of various sizes, and the absorbed doses from traversing the clouds, were calculated. Cloud size is a dominant parameter causing dose to vary by orders of magnitude for a given dose rate measured at some distance. A method to determine cloud size, based on dose rate readings at two or more distances from the cloud center, was developed. This method, however, failed to resolve the smallest cloud sizes from measurements made at 1,000 m to 2,000 m from the cloud center

  20. Electron absorbed dose measurements in LINACs by thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, electron absorbed doses measurements in radiation therapy (RT) were obtained. Radiation measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters of calcium sulfate doped with dysprosium (CaSO4:Dy) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2). TL response calibration was obtained by irradiating TLDs and a Farmer cylindrical ionization chamber PTW 30013 at the same time. Each TL material showed a typical glow curve according to each material. Both calcium sulfate doped with dysprosium and zirconium oxide exhibited better light intensity to high energy electron beam compared with lithium fluoride. TL response as a function of absorbed dose was analyzed. TL response as a function of high energy electron beam was also studied. - Highlights: • Experimental results of ZrO2 irradiated by high energy electron beam. • Dosimetric characteristics of CaSO4:Dy were obtained under high energy electron effect. • Absorbed dose in electron beam was determined by TL phosphors. • Absorbed dose could be measured by TL phosphors and the results suggest that phosphors are good candidate for absorbed dose determining

  1. Quality control, mean glandular dose estimate and room shielding calculation in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses in the importance of Radiation Protection in mammography. A good control of the radiological risk depends on the dose optimization, room shielding calculation and the quality of equipment. The work was carried out in the three private medical centers called A, B, and C. Dosimetry estimates were made on the equipment of the three centers. Values has been compared with the Diagnostic Reference Levels established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Conformity control of the radiological devices has also been done with the Mammographic Quality Control Kit of the INSTN-Madagascar. Verifications of shields of the room containing the mammography equipment were done by theoretical calculations using the method provided by NCRP 147.

  2. Patient absorbed radiation doses estimation related to irradiation anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developed a direct equation to estimate the absorbed dose to the patient in x-ray examinations, using electric, geometric parameters and filtering combined with data from irradiated anatomy. To determine the absorbed dose for each examination, the entrance skin dose (ESD) is adjusted to the thickness of the patient's specific anatomy. ESD is calculated from the estimated KERMA greatness in the air. Beer-Lambert equations derived from power data mass absorption coefficients obtained from the NIST / USA, were developed for each tissue: bone, muscle, fat and skin. Skin thickness was set at 2 mm and the bone was estimated in the central ray of the site, in the anteroposterior view. Because they are similar in density and attenuation coefficients, muscle and fat are treated as a single tissue. For evaluation of the full equations, we chose three different anatomies: chest, hand and thigh. Although complex in its shape, the equations simplify direct determination of absorbed dose from the characteristics of the equipment and patient. The input data is inserted at a single time and total absorbed dose (mGy) is calculated instantly. The average error, when compared with available data, is less than 5% in any combination of device data and exams. In calculating the dose for an exam and patient, the operator can choose the variables that will deposit less radiation to the patient through the prior analysis of each combination of variables, using the ALARA principle in routine diagnostic radiology sector

  3. Time improvement of photoelectric effect calculation for absorbed dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation therapy is a very useful tool in cancer treatment. It is very important to determine absorbed dose in human tissue to accomplish an effective treatment. A mathematical model based on affected areas is the most suitable tool to estimate the absorbed dose. Lately, Monte Carlo based techniques have become the most reliable, but they are time expensive. Absorbed dose calculating programs using different strategies have to choose between estimation quality and calculating time. This paper describes an optimized method for the photoelectron polar angle calculation in photoelectric effect, which is significant to estimate deposited energy in human tissue. In the case studies, time cost reduction nearly reached 86%, meaning that the time needed to do the calculation is approximately 1/7 th of the non optimized approach. This has been done keeping precision invariant

  4. Absorbed gamma radiation dose in the Fricke dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fricke dosimetry is used for accurate measurement of the absorbed dose in water irradiated with x- or gamma rays or high-energy electrons. The method is based on the process of oxidation of ferrous to ferric ions by ionizing radiation and can be used accurately for absorbed dose determination in the range from 0.2 x 104 to 4 x 104 rad, using spectrophotometric measurement of the ferric ion concentration. The method covers the preparation and procedure for the use of the Fricke dosimeter and includes a discussion of interferences, apparatus, reagents, calibration and standardization, dosimetry procedure, calculation, precision, and accuracy

  5. Method of direct measurement of ?-ray absorbed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and an instrument for measuring directly the ?-ray absorbed dose rate almost independent of ?-ray energy were developed. For obtaining a constant dose sensitivity(counting rate per absorbed dose rate), a thin plastic scintillator was used as a detector and the pulses selected by a single channel analyzer (SCA) were counted. A desirable pulse height distribution in obtaining a constant dose sensitivity was obtained with a 2 mm thick scintillator. The lower level of discrimination and the window width of the SCA were chosen according to the epidermal thickness of tissue. The dose sensitivity of instrument was constant at 50 cps/(mrad/hr)+-15% for ?-rays with maximum energy 0.4 -- 3.5 MeV (epidermal thickness, 7mg/cm2) and 0.3 -- 3.5 MeV (epidermal thickness, 40 mg/cm2). The absorbed dose rate is given by multiplying the counting rate by a constant factor 2.0x10-2 (mrad/hr)/cps. The lower limit of dose rate measurement was 1.7x10-2 mrad/hr.(7 mg/cm2) and 9.4x10-3 mrad/hr.(40 mg/cm2). (auth.)

  6. A proposal concerning the absorbed dose conversion factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New definitions of the absorbed dose conversion factors Csub(lambda) and Csub(E) are proposed. The absorbed dose in water is given by the product of absorbed dose conversion factor, exposure calibration factor, ionisation chamber reading, cap displacement correction factor and perturbation correction factor. At exposure calibration the material of the build-up cap must be the same as that of the chamber wall. An ionisation chamber of which the wall material is water-equivalent or air-equivalent may be used. In the latter case the wall must be thin. For these two cases absorbed dose conversion factors are introduced and it is recommended that either of the two sets should be adopted. Furthermore, if the chamber wall is neither water- nor air-equivalent, the factor by which these currently defined values should be multiplied is also given: again the wall must be thin. The ICRU definitions of Csub(lambda) and Csub(E) are inconsistent, as recently pointed out, while the definitions presented here are consistent. (author)

  7. Standardization of high-dose measurement of electron and gamma ray absorbed doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense electron beams and gamma radiation fields are used for sterilizing medical devices, treating municipal wastes, processing industrial goods, controlling parasites and pathogens, and extending the shelf-life of foods. Quality control of such radiation processes depends largely on maintaining measurement quality assurance through sound dosimetry procedures in the research leading to each process, in the commissioning of that process, and in the routine dose monitoring practices. This affords documentation as to whether satisfactory dose uniformity is maintained throughout the product and throughout the process. Therefore, dosimetry at high doses and dose rates must in many radiation processes be standardized carefully, so that 'dosimetry release' of a product is verified. This standardization is initiated through preliminary dosimetry intercomparison studies such as those sponsored recently by the IAEA. This is followed by establishing periodic exercises in traceability to national or international standards of absorbed dose and dose rate. Traceability is achieved by careful selection of dosimetry methods and proven reference dosimeters capable of giving sufficiently accurate and precise 'transfer' dose assessments: (1) they must be calibrated or have well-established radiation-yield indices; (2) their radiation response characteristics must be reproducible and cover the dose range of interest; (3) they must withstand the rigours of back-and-forth mailing between a central standardizing laboratory and radiation processing facilities, without excessive errors arising due to instabilities, dosimeter batch non-uniformities, and environmental and handling stresses. (author)

  8. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine; Doskatalogen foer nukleaermedicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Nosslin, Bertil [Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmoe (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik; Johansson, Lennart [Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeaa (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik

    2004-09-01

    The work with a Swedish catalogue of radiation absorbed doses to patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations has continued. After the previous report in 1999, biokinetic data and dose estimates (mean absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and effective dose) have been produced for a number of substances: {sup 11}C- acetate, {sup 11}C- methionine, {sup 18}F-DOPA, whole antibody labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I, fragment of antibody, F(ab'){sub 2} labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I and fragment of antibody, Fab' labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I. The absorbed dose estimates for these substances have been made from published biokinetic information. For other substances of interest, e.g. {sup 14}C-urea (children age 3-6 years), {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid, {sup 14}C-xylose and {sup 14}C-triolein, sufficient literature data have not been available. Therefore, a large number of measurements on patients and volunteers have been carried out, in order to determine the biokinetics and dosimetry for these substances. Samples of breast milk from 50 mothers, who had been subject to nuclear medicine investigations, have been collected at various times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the mother. The activity concentration in the breast milk samples has been measured. The absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the child who ingests the milk have been determined for 17 different radiopharmaceuticals. Based on these results revised recommendations for interruption of breast-feeding after nuclear medicine investigations are suggested.

  9. Problems in radiation absorbed dose estimation from positron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron emitters commonly used in clinical imaging studies for the most part are short-lived, so that when they are distributed in the body the radiation absorbed dose is low even though most of the energy absorbed is from the positrons themselves rather than the annihilation radiation. These considerations do not apply to the administration pathway for a radiopharmaceutical where the activity may be highly concentrated for a brief period rather than distributed in the body. Thus, high local radiation absorbed doses to the vein for an intravenous administration and to the upper airways during administration by inhalation can be expected. For these geometries, beta point source functions (FPS's) have been employed to estimate the radiation absorbed dose in the present study. Physiologic measurements were done to determine other exposure parameters for intravenous administration of O-15 and Rb-82 and for administration of O-15-CO2 by continuous breathing. Using FPS's to calculate dose rates to the vein wall from O-15 and Rb-82 injected into a vein having an internal radius of 1.5 mm yielded dose rates of 0.51 and 0.46 (rad x g/?Ci x h), respectively. The dose gradient in the vein wall and surrounding tissues was also determined using FPS's. Administration of O-15-CO2 by continuous breathing was also investigated. Using ultra-thin thermoluninescent dosimeters (TLD's) having the effective thickness of normal tracheal mucosa, experiments were performed in which 6 dosimeters were exposed to known concentrations of O-15 positrons in a hemicylindrical tracheal phantom having an internal radius of 0.96 cm and an effective length of 14 cm. The dose rate for these conditions was 3.4 (rads/h)/(?Ci/cm3). 15 references, 7 figures, 6 tables

  10. General problems on accurate determination of the absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various problems concerning the accurate determination of absorbed dose are described. Generally speaking, there are two kinds of the methods of practical measurements, the one is the absolute measurement and the other is the relative method. Three kinds of the method of absolute dose measurement can be considered. Those are the ionometric, calorimetric and chemical methods. Uncertainties of the measurement are affected by the condition of interest such as dose, dose rate and so on. The factors, which are important to make the uncertainties small, are presented and discussed in this paper. The correction factors for ion combination, humidity of air, impurity in gas and stem effect are important for the ionometry. In case of calorimetry, the important thing is that all of the absorbed energy do not usually appear as thermal energy and the so-called heat defect should be carefully inspected for the material and radiation under consideration. The G value in the chemical method is considerably affected by the LET value, and must be determined after the calibration in relation to other methods. In the practical methods of the absorbed dose measurements, it is necessary to make some pertinent calibration for detection devices. (Kato, T.)

  11. Study of absorbed dose distribution to high energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depth absorbed dose distribution by electron beams was studied. The influence of the beam energy, the energy spread, field size and design characteristics of the accelerator was relieved. Three accelerators with different scattering and collimation systems were studied leading todifferent depth dose distributions. A theoretical model was constructed in order to explain the increase in the depth dose in the build-up region with the increase of the energy. The model utilizes a three-dimensional formalism based on the Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, with the introduction of modifications that takes into account the criation of secondary electrons. (Author)

  12. Calculation of absorbed dose distributions from dynamic wedges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storchi, Pascal; Woudstra, Evert; Verlinde, Philip [Dr Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, PO Box 5201, 3008 AE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Johansson, Karl-Axel; Samuelsson, Anna [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 413 45 Goetenborg (Sweden)

    1998-06-01

    In radiotherapy with photon beams, the use of dynamic wedges, which are obtained by the movement of one of the jaws, offers an increasing flexibility relative to the traditional use of metal wedges. But it is a disadvantage for the measurement of absorbed dose distributions, because the absorbed dose at each measurement point can only be obtained after a complete movement of the jaw. Consequently, for radiotherapy planning, an algorithm should be available that does not require measurements for any specific dynamically wedged beam, but is based on only a modest number of measurements. In this paper, an algorithm for the calculation of the dose distribution from dynamic wedges is described. This algorithm uses the convolution of pencil beam kernels with a non-uniform field function. These pencil beam kernels are derived from empirical dataresulting from measurements of the open beam only. (author)

  13. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose-rate predictions are 20% lower than the observations. Assuming that the trapped-belt models lead to a correct orbit-averaged energy spectrum, the measurements of dose rates inside the phantom cannot be fully understood. Passive measurements using 6Li- and 7Li-based detectors on the astronauts and inside the brain and thyroid of the phantom show the presence of a significant contribution due to thermal neutrons, an area requiring additional study.

  14. The absorbed dose to blood from blood-borne activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation absorbed dose to blood and organs from activity in the blood is relevant for nuclear medicine dosimetry and for research in biodosimetry. The present study provides coefficients for the average absorbed dose rates to the blood from blood-borne activity for radionuclides frequently used in targeted radiotherapy and in PET diagnostics. The results were deduced from published data for vessel radius-dependent dose rate coefficients and reasonable assumptions on the blood-volume distribution as a function of the vessel radius. Different parts of the circulatory system were analyzed separately. Vessel size information for heart chambers, aorta, vena cava, pulmonary artery, and capillaries was taken from published results of morphometric measurements. The remaining blood not contained in the mentioned vessels was assumed to reside in fractal-like vascular trees, the smallest branches of which are the arterioles or venules. The applied vessel size distribution is consistent with recommendations of the ICRP on the blood-volume distribution in the human. The resulting average absorbed dose rates to the blood per nuclear disintegration per milliliter (ml) of blood are (in 10?11?Gy·s?1·Bq?1·ml) Y-90: 5.58, I-131: 2.49, Lu-177: 1.72, Sm-153: 2.97, Tc-99m: 0.366, C-11: 4.56, F-18: 3.61, Ga-68: 5.94, I-124: 2.55. Photon radiation contributes 1.1–1.2·10?11?Gy·s?1·Bq?1·ml to the total dose rate for positron emitters but significantly less for the other nuclides. Blood self-absorption of the energy emitted by ß-particles in the whole blood ranges from 37% for Y-90 to 80% for Tc-99m. The correspondent values in vascular trees, which are important for the absorbed dose to organs, range from 30% for Y-90 to 82% for Tc-99m. (paper)

  15. Absorbed dose optimization in the microplanar beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate, small divergence and sharply defined microbeam margins permit investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microbeams for radiotherapy. The proposed technique takes advantage of the repair mechanism hypothesis of capillary endothelial cells between alternate microbeam zones, which regenerates the lethally irradiated capillaries. Unlike a pencil beam, more accurate dose calculation, beam width and spacing are essential to minimise radiation damage to normal tissue cells outside the target. The absorbed dose between microbeam zones should be kept below the threshold for irreversible radiation damage. Thus the peak-to-valley ratio for the dose distribution should be optimized. The absorbed dose profile depends on the energy of the incident beam and the composition and density of the medium. Using Monte Carlo computations, the radial absorbed dose of single 24 x 24 ?m2 cross-section X-ray beams of different energies in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom was investigated. The results indicated that at 100 keV, closely spaced square cross-sectional microbeams can be applied to the lung. A bundle of parallel 24 ?m-wide planar microbeams spaced at 200 ?m intervals provides much more irradiation coverage of tissue than is provided by a bundle of parallel, square cross-sectional microbeam, although the former is associated with much smaller Peak (maximum absorbed dose on the beam axis) -to-Valley ( minimum interbeam absorbed dose ) ratios than the latter. In this study the lateral and depth dose of single and multiple microplanar beams with beam dimensions of width 24 ?m and 48 ?m and height 2-20 cm with energy of 100 keV in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom are investigated. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code is used to calculate dose profiles at different depths and bundles of beams (2 x 2 cm2 to 20 x 20 cm2 square cross section) with a 150 ?m 200 ?m and 300 ?m beam spacing. The peak-to-valley ratios are compared at different depths, bundles, heights, widths and beam spacing to determine the optimum parameters for irradiation

  16. Absorbed dose measurements in mammography using Monte Carlo method and ZrO{sub 2}+PTFE dosemeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran M, H. A.; Hernandez O, M. [Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Col. Centro, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Salas L, M. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Pinedo S, A.; Ventura M, J.; Chacon, F. [Hospital General de Zona No. 1, IMSS, Interior Alameda 45, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F.(Mexico)], e-mail: hduran20_1@hotmail.com

    2009-10-15

    Mammography test is a central tool for breast cancer diagnostic. In addition, programs are conducted periodically to detect the asymptomatic women in certain age groups; these programs have shown a reduction on breast cancer mortality. Early detection of breast cancer is achieved through a mammography, which contrasts the glandular and adipose tissue with a probable calcification. The parameters used for mammography are based on the thickness and density of the breast, their values depend on the voltage, current, focal spot and anode-filter combination. To achieve an image clear and a minimum dose must be chosen appropriate irradiation conditions. Risk associated with mammography should not be ignored. This study was performed in the General Hospital No. 1 IMSS in Zacatecas. Was used a glucose phantom and measured air Kerma at the entrance of the breast that was calculated using Monte Carlo methods and ZrO{sub 2}+PTFE thermoluminescent dosemeters, this calculation was completed with calculating the absorbed dose. (author)

  17. Natural penetrating radiation level and population absorbed dose in Tibet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mean outdoor and indoor absorbed dose rates in air from ?-radiation are 9.53 x 10-8 Gy.h-1 and 12.6 x 10-8 Gy.h-1 respectively, and the average dose rate from cosmic rays is 11.01 x 10-8 Gy.h-1. The annual effective dose equivalent from natural penetrating radiation to population is 1.70 mSv, in which 0.736 mSv is from ?-radiation and 0.964 mSv from cosmic rays. The annual collective effective dose equivalent from natural penetrating radiation to the population in Tibet is 3,283 man.Sv, and the mean annual effective dose equivalent to the gonad is 1.708 mSv

  18. Problems in internally absorbed dose measurement by MIRD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation of internally absorbed dose by MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) method assumes that the following items are known and invariable: (1) the time variation of radioactivity in every internal portion, of body (2) weight, size, shape and position of a source and a target region. But, the clinical data to satisfy such assumption are extremely lacking. It is necessary to clarify tracer kinetics for obtaining accurate values which permit to produce a biological model. And it is obvious that its accuracy determines that of calculated value of the absorbed dose in a target region. The problems in clinical inspection methods employed at present are given below: inversely correlated sensitivity and measurement accuracy, significant degradation of sensitivity in the whole body activity measurement with ? sources and whole body counters, limitation of number of measurement in clinical inspection, limited types of the organs and tissues capable to be the object of inspection, calibration methods for non-standard men (specifically for patients) and others. It is recommended that in the future, internally absorbed dose should be calculated by the MIRD method and the documents based on should be forwarded in case of developing new radioactive pharmaceuticals, and that the balance of administrated amount of radio-nuclides by metabolism is to be clarified in clinical inspection. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. Specific absorbed fractions and S-factors for calculating absorbed dose to embryo and fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation of specific absorbed fractions from maternal tissues to embryo/fetus is investigated for four different target masses and geometries. S-factors are calculated for selected radionuclides assumed to be distributed uniformly in fetal tissues represented by spheres from 1 mg to 4 kg. As an example, the dose to fetal tissues for iodine-131 and iron-59 is estimated based on human biokinetic data for various stages of pregnancy. 24 references, 4 tables

  20. Some comments on the concept of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main physical quantity for the evaluation of the induced effects by radiation ionizing is absorbed dose. ICRU report 51 defines this concept as quantity dε divided by dm, where dε is the mean energy imparted by radiation ionizing to matter of mass dm. However, nothing is said about the average operation concerning the stochastic energy imparted ε. Nevertheless, because considers the sum of all changes of rest mass of the involved nuclei and elementary particles in all interactions which occur within the mass (i.e. nuclear reactions and transformations of elementary particles), the average operation can not be done with an equilibrium statistical operator, rather, this has to be defined with a non-equilibrium statistical operator, therefore, absorbed dose is a function dependent on time. Furthermore, we present a discussion to clarify the equilibrium radiation and charged particle equilibrium within the context of thermodynamic equilibrium. (Author)

  1. International comparison of calibration standards for exposure and absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison was performed of the primary calibration standards for 60Co gamma radiation dose from Czechoslovakia (UDZ CSAV, Prague), Austria (OEFZS/BEV Seibersdorf) and Hungary (OMH Budapest) using ND 1005 (absolute measurement) and V-415 (by means of Nx) graphite ionization chambers. BEV achieved agreement better than 0.1%, OMH 0.35%. Good agreement was also achieved for the values of exposure obtained in absolute values and those obtained via Nx, this for the ND 1005/8105 chamber. The first ever international comparison involving Czechoslovakia was also performed of the unit of absorbed gamma radiation in a water and/or graphite phantom. The participants included Czechoslovakia (UDZ CSAV Prague), the USSR (VNIIFTRI Moscow) and Austria (OEFZS/BEV Seibersdorf). In all measurements, the agreement was better than 1%, which, in view of the differences in methodologies (VNIIFTRI, BEV: calorimetry, UDZ, UVVVR: ionometry) and the overall inaccuracies in determining the absorbed dose values, is a good result. (author)

  2. Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Pulse Radiolysis Optical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    When a liquid solution in an optical cell is irradiated by an intense pulsed electron beam, it may be important in the chemical analysis of the solution to know the distribution of energy deposited throughout the cell. For the present work, absorbed dose distributions were measured by thin radiochromic dye film dosimeters placed at various depths in a quartz glass pulse radiolysis cell. The cell was irradiated with 30 ns pulses from a field-emission electron accelerator having a broad spectrum w...

  3. Sensors of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation based on mosfet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perevertaylo V. L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The requirements to technology and design of p-channel and n-channel MOS transistors with a thick oxide layer designed for use in the capacity of integral dosimeters of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are defined. The technology of radiation-sensitive MOS transistors with a thick oxide in the p-channel and n-channel version is created.

  4. Analysis of absorbed dose to tooth enamel for ESR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorbed dose to tooth enamel was quantitatively correlated to organ doses by Monte Carlo calculations using the Electron Gamma Shower Code Version 4 for the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dosimetry using teeth. A region for teeth was newly added to a mathematical human model. Kerma coefficients for whole tooth and enamel part were prepared to estimate the dose to tooth enamel. Experiments were also carried out with a physical head phantom, which is made of tissue equivalent materials. Tooth samples and thermo-luminescence dosimeters (TLDs) of CaSO4 crystal were set at the teeth position in the head phantom. Addition Monte Carlo calculations were performed to verify the results of the experiments by using a Voxel-type phantom reconstructed from computed tomographic (CT) images of the physical phantom. The obtained data are to be useful for retrospective dose assessments in past radiation events by the ESR dosimetry with teeth. (author)

  5. Use of osseoequivalent mixtures to measure absorbed doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of osseoequivalent mixtures composed of thermoluminophore LiF holds out promise in radiotherapy for the dosimetry of compact bone tissue. The distribution of absorbed doses in the vertebral column, and thyroid has been compared for two methods of irradiation of thyroid cancer patients using a Rokus-M unit. A shaped anterior cervical-thoracic field was used and irradiation procedure was performed from two postero-lateral fields at an angle of 120 deg to the saggital plane. The second method is preferable as in this case the absorped dose for bone tissue of vertebrae is less and the decrease of the dose along the vertebrae longitudinal axis is strongly expressed. Measured dose values in osseous tissue were higher than those calculated according to the atlas of the isodose fields by 10-70% probably because of the contribution of scattered radiation. This fact should be taken into consideration particularly when the bone is a critical system

  6. Estimates of radiation absorbed doses from radioxenons in lung imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed-dose estimate is given in rads per millicurie of administered activity. This was obtained for each target organ by considering the lungs and total body as source organs, the former consisting of Compartments 1 and 2, and the latter of 3, 4, and 5. In each case the component compartments are regarded as being coextensive. Tissues with high fat content concentrate xenon more than do the other tissues. As a working hypothesis we may assume that Compartment 5, with the slowest turnover rate constant, represents fatty tissues. The measured half-life for washout from this compartment averages 10.5 hr. Therefore, during buildup in the studies under discussion, only a minimal amount of radioxenon enters into fatty tissue. Because of unequal blood perfusion rates, the distribution of xenon among the fatty tissues will not be uniform, and a somewhat higher ratio will be attained in organs such as the brain, adrenals, and gonads; these having relatively high blood perfusion rates. The contribution from the 5th compartment to the total-body radiation dose from Xe-127 is about 28%. About 55% of the total-body radiation dose is from the activity in the lungs, and this will not be greatly affected by changes in local tissue xenon concentration ratios. The listed absorbed dose estimates for the contaminants, Xe-129m and Xe-131m, must be multiplied by appropriate factors depending on the fraction of the contaminant present at the time of administration of Xe-127. Despite different assumptions, there is satisfactory agreement between previously published absorbed-dose estimates and those of this report

  7. Abdominal Pediatric Cancer Surveillance using Serial CT: Evaluation of Organ Absorbed Dose and Effective Dose

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Diana; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; John P. McGahan; Stern, Robin; Boone, John M

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used extensively in cancer diagnosis, staging, evaluation of response to treatment, and in active surveillance for cancer reoccurrence. A review of CT technology is provided, at a level of detail appropriate for a busy clinician to review. The basis of x-ray CT dosimetry is also discussed, and concepts of absorbed dose and effective dose are distinguished. Absorbed dose is a physical quantity (measured in milliGray) equal to the x-ray energy deposited in a mass of ...

  8. Radon concentrations and absorbed dose measurements in a Pleistocenic cave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon concentration measurements were carried out using solid-state nuclear track-etch detectors (SSNTDs) type CA 80-15 cellulose nitrate films, in a Pleistocenic cave at Petralona, in Halkidiki, Northern Greece, at 55 km from the city of Thessaloniki. Radon levels as high as 88 kBqxm-3 (2.38 nCi x l-1) have been recorded inside the cave equivalent to 11.90 WL in terms of occupational exposure to radon and its decay products. Absorbed dose rates were performed using TL dosimeters, type TLD-200 (CaF2-Dy) in a continuous monitoring program (integrated measurements). Dose rate levels as high as 110 nGy x h-1 were recorded inside the cave. In interpreting the high levels of radiation doses, radioactivity measurements regarding the naturally occurring 238U, 232Th and 40K radionuclides were carried out in various speleothems found at different sites in the cave. (author)

  9. Absorbed dose by thyroid in case of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes of iodine are produced in abundance in nuclear fission reactions, and great amounts of radioiodine may be released into the environment in case of a nuclear reactor accident. Thyroid gland is among the most radiosensitive organs due to its capacity to concentrate iodine. The aim of this work was to evaluate the importance of contributions of internally deposited iodines (131I, 132I, 133I, 134I and 135I) to the dose absorbed to thyroid follicle and to the whole organ, after internal contamination by those isotopes. For internal dose calculation, the code of particles transport MCNP4C was employed. The results showed that, in case of nuclear accidents, the contribution of short-lived iodines for total dose is about 45% for thyroid of newborn and about 40% for thyroid of adult. Thus, these contributions should not be neglected in a prospective evaluation of risks associated to internal contamination by radioactive iodine. (author)

  10. Concept of radiation dose. Pt.1. Is the absorbed dose a well-defined quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry is a common basis to all sciences treating with effects of ionizing radiation on matter. Radiation dose is introduced as the measure of causes of radiation effects. The absorbed dose being used as the most fundamental quantity in the current system of radiation dosimetry, it is worth while to check rigidity of its concept and adequacy of its definition from various points of view. In this presentation it is shown that the concept of the absorbed dose contains ambiguity related to its physical entities, and the definition given by ICRU contains deficiencies related to the emerging radiant energies, Rout, and to changes in the rest energies, ?Q. It is also pointed out that the dosimetric quantities, including the absorb dose, are generally not independent of time, and their values are not uniquely determined unless the elapsed time after irradiation is assigned

  11. Variations in absorbed doses from 59Fe in different diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals administered in vivo may vary considerably with changes in organ functions. They studied the variations in absorbed doses from 59Fe in 207 patients with different diseases, in whom ferrokinetic investigations were performed for diagnostic purposes. Radiation doses to the bone marrow were highest in patients with deserythropoietic anemias (mean 38 nSv/Bq, range 19 - 57 nSv/Bq) and in hemolytic anemias (mean 21 nSv/Bq, range 7 - 35 nSv/Bq), whereas lower and rather constant values were found in other diseases (mean values between 9 and 13 nSv/Bq). The highest organ doses, the greatest differences with respect to diagnosis and also the largest variations within each group of patients were found for liver and spleen (e. g. in aplastic anemia; liver: 66 nSv/Bq, range 29 - 104 nSv/Bq; spleen: 57 nSv/Bq, range 34 - 98 nSv/Bq. In iron deficiency; liver: 13 nSv/Bq range 12 - 14 nSv/q; spleen: 19 nSv/Bq, range 18 - 20 nSv/Bq). Lower organ doses and smaller variations within and between the groups of patients were found for the gonads (means 3 - 7 nSv/Bq), the kidneys (means 10 - 13 nSv/Bq), the bone (means 4 - 7 nSv/Bq), the lung (means 8 - 12 nSv/Bq), and the total body (means 6 - 8 nSv/Bq). In patients with chronic bleeding absorbed doses decrease concomitantly to the extent of blood loss. The D/sub E/ is not markedly affected by the variations in organ doses but is fairly constant for different diseases. 16 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  12. Estimation of absorbed organ doses and effective dose based on body mass index in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the introduction of digital radiography, patients undergoing radiographic procedures are subject to being overexposed to radiation. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate the absorbed organ dose and the effective dose, which are significant for patient health, along with body type. During chest radiographic examinations conducted in 899 patients for screening, the absorbed dose of the 13 major organs, the average whole-body dose, and two effective doses weighted by factors published in ICRP 60 and ICRP 103 were calculated on the basis of patient information such as height, weight and examination condition, including kilovolt potential, focus-skin distance and entrance surface dose (ESD), using a PC-based Monte Carlo program simulation. It was found that dose per unit ESD had a tendency to decrease with body mass index (BMI). In particular, the absorbed dose for most organs was larger at high voltages (140 kVp) than at low voltages (120 kVp, 100 kVp). In addition, the effective dose which was based on ICRP 60 and ICRP 103 also represented the same tendency in respect of BMI and tube voltage. (authors)

  13. Absorbed dose determination in photon fields using the tandem method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to develop an alternative method to determine the absorbed dose and effective energy of photons with unknown spectral distributions. It includes a 'tandem' system that consists of two thermoluminescent dosemeters with different energetic dependence. LiF: Mg, Ti, CaF2: Dy thermoluminescent dosemeters and a Harshaw 3500 reading system are employed. Dosemeters are characterized with 90Sr-90Y, calibrated with the energy of 60Co and irradiated with seven different qualities of x-ray beams, suggested by ANSI No. 13 and ISO 4037. The answers of each type of dosemeter are adjusted to a function that depends on the effective energy of photons. The adjustment is carried out by means of the Rosenbrock minimization algorithm. The mathematical model used for this function includes five parameters and has a gauss and a straight line. Results show that the analytical functions reproduce the experimental data of the answers, with a margin of error of less than 5%. The reason of the answers of the CaF2: Dy and LiF: Mg, Ti, according to the energy of the radiation, allows us to establish the effective energy of photons and the absorbed dose, with a margin of error of less than 10% and 20% respectively

  14. Determination of the Absorbed Doses in Shanks of Interventional Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complicated procedures of interventional radiology require usually a much longer investigation time, comparing to the conventional radiography. Moreover, interventional radiology procedures require the presence of the medical staff next to the patient in order to perform the procedure. This results in higher risk for health professionals. Even though these persons reasonably keep away from the primary X ray beam, they are under the effects of scatter radiation due to the interaction of the primary beam with the patient. The protection aprons, thyroid protectors and shielding glasses are used in order to minimize the doses for the staff, but lower parts of legs remain usually unprotected and the absorbed doses in shanks are not recorded. The paper presents the measured values of the absorbed dose in lower extremities of medical staff, involved in the procedures of interventional radiology, completed with the measurements of air kerma under the patient table. Measurements were performed in one of big hospitals in Warsaw during all the procedures performed in six weeks. Majority of the procedures constituted angioplasty or angioplasty with vascular stenting, uterine fibroid embolization and cholangiography. In the angioplasty procedure, imaging techniques are used to guide a balloon-tipped catheter into an artery and advance it to where the vessel is narrow or blocked. The balloon is then inflated to open the vessel, deflated and removed. In vascular stenting, which is often performed with angioplasty, a small wire mesh tube (a stent) is permanently placed in the newly opened artery to help it remain open. In a uterine fibroid embolization procedure, the image guidance is used in order to place an embolic agent (synthetic material) inside one or more of the blood vessels that supply the fibroid tumors with blood. As a result, these vessels become occluded, or closed off, and the fibroid tissue shrinks. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography is a way of examining the bile duct system in the liver. During the exam, a thin needle is inserted through the skin (percutaneous) and through the liver (transhepatic) into a bile duct. Then dye is injected, and the bile duct system is outlined on x-rays. Our measurements consist of three parts: Measurements of kerma in air, under the patient table, in dependence on the dose rate and the distance from the X-ray tube, along the table; Measurements of kerma in air under the table during real interventions and comparison with the DAP values; measurements of the individual doses in shanks of medical personnel, using TLD dosemeters

  15. 'In vivo' average glandular dose evaluation: one-to-one comparison between digital breast tomosynthesis and full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnetto, Francesca; Taccini, Gianni; Rosasco, Raffaella; Bampi, Rossana; Calabrese, Massimo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    We analysed 300 patients X rayed with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and 'COMBO' (single view both in FFDM and DBT in a single breast compression)-Hologic Selenia Dimension-W/Rh-Ag-Al: three different anode-filter combinations-automatic exposure control modalities. Examination parameter data collection (EPDC) and 'in vivo' dosimetry using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) were utilised to determine and compare entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) and average glandular dose (AGD) from a radioprotection viewpoint in the DBT and COMBO modalities. MOSFET has been tested to be introduced in clinical routine. EPDC of DBT underlines increase in ESAK and AGD compared with FFDM (p 15 %. DBT increases ESAK and AGD, due to the 3D acquisition modality. MOSFET may be considered in DBT as a routine check. PMID:23734057

  16. 'In vivo' average glandular dose evaluation: One-to-one comparison between digital breast tomosynthesis and full-field digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analysed 300 patients X rayed with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and 'COMBO' (single view both in FFDM and DBT in a single breast compression)-Hologic Selenia Dimension-W/Rh-Ag- Al: three different anode-filter combinations-automatic exposure control modalities. Examination parameter data collection (EPDC) and 'in vivo' dosimetry using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) were utilised to determine and compare entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) and average glandular dose (AGD) from a radioprotection viewpoint in the DBT and COMBO modalities. MOSFET has been tested to be introduced in clinical routine. EPDC of DBT underlines increase in ESAK and AGD compared with FFDM (p 15 %. DBT increases ESAK and AGD, due to the 3D acquisition modality. MOSFET may be considered in DBT as a routine check. (authors)

  17. Absorbed Dose to Water Intercomparison Programme for Radiotherapy Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of intercomparison programme for radiation therapy dose delivery at radiotherapy centres (RC) has widely been reported. We at Nuclear Malaysia Agency (NM) intend to develop a national level intercomparison programme in terms of absorbed dose to water Dw. We started with one RC which has volunteered to participate in the programme in the dose delivery of 6 MV X-ray beam. Two types of comparison were made to get the accuracy. Type I is based on the measured value of the Dw at reference depth, Dw(zref)mea: RC results was compared with NM, in which NM results was taken as a standard. Type II is based on calculated value the Dw(zref), Dw(zref)cal : both NM and RC results were compared with Dw(zref)cal, in which Dw(zref)cal was taken as a standard. Two on-site measurements were made at this centre to check for results consistency and to get the average accuracy. Results obtained were consistent for the two measurements and the average values in the accuracy are within the acceptable accuracy limit of ±3 %, namely Type I: 1.10 ± 0.58 % for the RC, and Type II: 0.99 ± 0.60 % and - 0.11 ± 0.26 % respectively for the RC and NM. (author)

  18. Dose absorbed in adults and children thyroid due to the I{sup 123} using the dosimetry MIRD and Marinelli; Dosis absorbida en tiroides de adultos y ninos debido al I{sup 123} utilizando las dosimetrias MIRD y Marinelli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M.; Castillo, C.; Cabrera, C.; Sarachaga, R.; Castaneda, J. [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Av. Juan Pablo II s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Trujillo (Peru); Diaz, E., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Paulo Gamma 110, Bairro Farropilhas, Porto Alegre, RS 90040-060 (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Using the dosimetry MIRD, and representation Cristy-Eckerman in the thyroid gland and organs of their bio-kinetics when I{sup 123} (Iodine) is used, the study demonstrates that the absorbed dose by the gland of an adult, children, and newly born, is their auto-dose, independent of the compartments number of their bio-kinetics. The dosimetric contributions of the organs of their bio-kinetics are insignificant. Their results are not significantly different to those obtained by the formalism MARINELLI (auto-dose) when it uses a sphere like glandular representation. In consequence, the kinetic model corresponding to the glandular representation decreases to a compartment, where the gland can also be represented like a sphere. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of absorbed dose and image quality in mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Hemdal, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Mammography refers to the X-ray examination of the human breast, and is considered the single most important diagnostic tool in the early detection of breast cancer, which is by far the most common cancer among women. There is good evidence from clinical trials, that mammographic screening can reduce the breast cancer mortality with about 30%. The side effects include a small and age related risk of carcinogenesis due to the exposure of the glandular tissues in the breast to ionising radiatio...

  20. Absorbed dose to water: Standards and traceability for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the need for appropriate quantities and units for ionizing radiation has existed since shortly after discovery of X-rays, the quantities and units in general use today were not completely formalized until about 15 years ago. The development of appropriate national and international standards have also been ongoing. For many years the quantity, exposure, measured in units of roentgen was the national standard and they were also the quantity and units in which radiotherapy was described. With the introduction of megavoltage X-ray and electron-beam equipment and the adoption of the quantity open-quotes absorbed-doseclose quotes measured in units of rad (or gray) different approaches to calibrating these beams were needed. This was especially the case since the national standard in terms of exposure at a maximum photon energy for 60Co gamma rays was only available. Since the late 1960s various machine calibration protocols have been published. These protocols have to accommodate changes in modality, energy, quantities and units between the national standard and the user. Because of this, a new definition of traceability is proposed to accommodate the present system. By recording all intercomparisons and parameters used, an auditable calibration chain can be maintained. Even with the introduction of calibration protocols based upon national absorbed dose standards, the proposed traceability definition will still be needed

  1. Influence of radioactive contaminants on absorbed dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several popular radiopharmaceutical products contain low levels of radioactive contaminants. These contaminants increase the radiation absorbed dose to the patient without any increased benefit and, in some cases, with a decrease in image quality. The importance of a contaminant to the radiation dosimetry picture is a function of 1) the contaminant level, 2) the physical half-life of the contaminant, 3) the organ uptake and the biological half-time of the contaminant in the various body systems, and 4) the decay mode, energy, etc. of the contaminant. The general influence of these parameters is discussed in this paper; families of curves are included that reflect the changing importance of contaminant dosimetry with respect to the primary radionuclide as a function of these variables. Several specific examples are also given of currently used radiopharmaceutical products which can contain radioactive contaminants (I-123, In-111, Tl-201, Ir-191m, Rb-82, Au-195m). 7 references, 8 figures, 4 tables

  2. Influence of radioactive contaminants on absorbed dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several popular radiopharmaceutical products contain low levels of radioactive contaminants. These contaminants increase the radiation absorbed dose to the patient without any increased benefit and, in some cases, with a decrease in image quality. The importance of a contaminant to the radiation dosimetry picture is a function of (1) the contaminant level, (2) the physical half-life of the contaminant, (3) the organ uptake and the biological half-time of the contaminant in the various body systems, and (4) the decay mode, energy, etc. of the contaminant. The general influence of these parameters is discussed in this paper; families of curves are included that reflect the changing importance of contaminant dosimetry with respect to the primary radionuclide as a function of these variables. Several specific examples are also given of currently used radiopharmaceutical products which can contain radioactive contaminants (I-123, In-111, Tl-201, Ir-191m, Rb-82, Au-195m). 7 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Effect of gamma background on the dose absorbed by human embryon and foetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is proposed for calculation of absorbed radiation dose in different stages of human foetus development under normal or increased gamma background. On the base of ICRP-data for critical organ's mass (foetus, placenta, blood, uterus) a formula is given for absorbed dose evaluation of gonads. It is concluded that increased gamma background is insignificant compared to internal irradiation from absorbed radionuclides

  4. Evaluation of absorbed doses in cattle received for the first year after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorbed doses of incorporated iodine and cesium radionuclides were evaluated in cattle animals which were within the Chernobyl accident spilling-out zone during the first year after the accident. The absorbed doses in animal thyroids were determined to range from 25 to 320 Gy. Some endemic features of this region promoted high absorbed dose accumulation in cattle thyroid. The dose per the whole body did not exceed 0.2 Gy. The absorbed doses in liver, kidneys or spleen were about several cGy. 16 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Absorbed dose determination with plane-parallel chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austerlitz, C

    2003-07-01

    According to IAEA TRS 398 recommendations the determination of absorbed dose with plane-parallel ionisation chambers calibrated in terms of N{sub K},Q{sub 0} can be done using N{sub D},W,Q{sub 0} (M{sub Q0}{sup freeair}/M{sub Q0}{sup surface}) N{sub K,}Q{sub 0}[({mu}{sub en}/rho)w,{sub air}]{sub Q0}{sup freeair}P. This equation takes into account only the scattering from the stem of the soft ionisation chamber, not the total scattering published in the scientific literature. That makes it difficult to perform dosimetry with field sizes different from those used in the standardisation laboratory to calibrate the chamber. This paper describes a method to calculate D{sub W,Q0} by using either N{sub K,Q0} or N{sub D,W,Q0} for different radiation field sizes. (author)

  6. Absorbed dose determination in photon fields using the tandem method

    CERN Document Server

    Marques-Pachas, J F

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an alternative method to determine the absorbed dose and effective energy of photons with unknown spectral distributions. It includes a 'tandem' system that consists of two thermoluminescent dosemeters with different energetic dependence. LiF: Mg, Ti, CaF sub 2 : Dy thermoluminescent dosemeters and a Harshaw 3500 reading system are employed. Dosemeters are characterized with sup 9 sup 0 Sr- sup 9 sup 0 Y, calibrated with the energy of sup 6 sup 0 Co and irradiated with seven different qualities of x-ray beams, suggested by ANSI No. 13 and ISO 4037. The answers of each type of dosemeter are adjusted to a function that depends on the effective energy of photons. The adjustment is carried out by means of the Rosenbrock minimization algorithm. The mathematical model used for this function includes five parameters and has a gauss and a straight line. Results show that the analytical functions reproduce the experimental data of the answers, with a margin of error of less than ...

  7. A comparison of mean glandular dose diagnostic reference levels within the all-digital irish national breast screening programme and the Irish symptomatic breast services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on image quality, compression and radiation dose were collected from symptomatic breast units within the Republic of Ireland. Quantitative and qualitative data were analysed using SPSS. Recommendations of mean glandular dose (MGD) diagnostic reference levels were made at various levels for film-screen and full field digital mammography units to match levels published worldwide. MGDs received by symptomatic breast patients within Ireland are higher than those received in the all-digital Irish Breast Screening service; 55-65 mm breast: 1.75 mGy (screening) vs. 2.4 mGy (symptomatic) at the 95. percentile; various reasons are proposed for the differences. MGDs achieved in the screening service may be lower because of the exacting requirements for radiographer training, characteristics of the patients and equipment quality assurance levels. More precise imaging guidelines, standards and training of symptomatic radiographers performing mammography are suggested to remediate MGDs delivered to the breasts of Irish women attending the symptomatic breast services. (authors)

  8. Estimation of mean-glandular dose from monitoring breast entrance skin air kerma using a high sensitivity metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter system in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of mean-glandular dose (MGD) has been investigated in recent years due to the potential risks of radiation-induced carcinogenesis associated with the mammographic examination for diagnostic radiology. In this study, a new technique for immediate readout of breast entrance skin air kerma (BESAK) using high sensitivity MOSFET dosimeter after mammographic projection was introduced and a formula for the prediction of tube output with exposure records was developed. A series of appropriate conversion factors was applied to the MGD determination from the BESAK. The study results showed that signal response of the high sensitivity MOSFET exhibited excellent linearity within mammographic dose ranges, and that the energy dependence was less than 3% for each anode/filter combination at the tube potentials 25-30 kV. Good agreement was observed between the BESAK and the tube exposure output measurement for breasts thicker than 30 mm. In addition, the air kerma estimated from our prediction formula provided sufficient accuracy for thinner breasts. The average MGD from 120 Asian females was 1.5 mGy, comparable to other studies. Our results suggest that the high sensitivity MOSFET dosimeter system is a good candidate for immediately readout of BESAK after mammographic procedures

  9. Mean glandular dose estimation using MCNPX for a digital breast tomosynthesis system with tungsten/aluminum and tungsten/aluminum+silver x-ray anode-filter combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer screening with x-ray mammography, using one or two projection images of the breast, is an indispensible tool in the early detection of breast cancer in women. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D imaging technique that promises higher sensitivity and specificity in breast cancer screening at a similar radiation dose to conventional two-view screening mammography. In DBT a 3D volume is reconstructed with anisotropic voxels from a limited number of x-ray projection images acquired over a limited angle. Although the benefit of early cancer detection through screening mammography outweighs the potential risks associated with radiation, the radiation dosage to women in terms of mean glandular dose (MGD) is carefully monitored. This work studies the MGD arising from a prototype DBT system under various parameters. Two anode/filter combinations (W/Al and W/Al+Ag) were investigated; the tube potential ranges from 20 to 50 kVp; and the breast size varied between 4 and 10 cm chest wall-to-nipple distance and between 3 and 7 cm compressed breast thickness. The dosimetric effect of breast positioning with respect to the imaging detector was also reviewed. It was found that the position of the breast can affect the MGD by as much as 5% to 13% depending on the breast size.

  10. Referent 3D solid tumour model and absorbed dose calculations at cellular level in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An average absorbed dose of the tumour calculated by the MIRD formalism has not always a good correlation with the clinical response. The basic assumption of the MIRD schema is that a uniform spatial dose distribution is opposite to heterogeneity of intratumoral distribution of the administered radionuclide which can lead to a spatial nonuniformity of the absorbed dose. Therefore, in clinical practice, an absorbed dose of the tumour at the cellular level has to be calculated. The aim of this study is to define a referent 3D solid tumour model and using the direct Monte Carlo radiation transport method to calculate: a) absorbed fraction, b) spatial 3D absorbed dose distribution, c) absorbed dose and relative absorbed dose of cells or clusters of cells, and d) differential and accumulated dose volume histograms. A referent 3D solid tumour model is defined as a sphere which is randomly filled with cells and necrosis with defined radii and volumetric density. Radiolabelling of the tumour is defined by intracellular to extracellular radionuclide concentration and radio-labelled cell density. All these parameters are input data for software which generates a referent 3D solid tumour model. The modified FOTELP Monte Carlo code was used on this model for simulation study with beta emitters which were applied on the tumour. The absorbed fractions of Cu-67, I- 131, Re-188 and Y-90 were calculated for different tumour sphere masses and radii. Absorbed doses of cells and spatial distributions of the absorbed doses in the referent 3D solid tumour were calculated for radionuclides I-131 and Y-90. Dose scintigram or voxel presentation of absorbed dose distributions showed higher homogeneity for Y-90 than for I-131. A differential dose volume histogram, or spectrum, of the relative absorbed dose of cells, was much closer to the average absorbed dose of the tumour for Y-90 than I-131. An accumulated dose volume histogram showed that most tumour cells received a lower dose than average, or prescribed, tumour absorbed dose. Those discrepancies between conventional and cellular approach show that dosimetry on the cellular level is necessary for a better selection of the radionuclide and optimal calculation of administered activity in the radionuclide therapy. (author)

  11. Calibration procedure for thermoluminescent dosemeters in water absorbed doses for Iridium-192 high dose rate sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters are used in brachytherapy services quality assurance programs, with the aim of guaranteeing the correct radiation dose supplied to cancer patients, as well as with the purpose of evaluating new clinical procedures. This work describes a methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water for 192Ir high dose rate sources. The reference dose used is measured with an ionization chamber previously calibrated for 192Ir energy quality, applying the methodology proposed by Toelli. This methodology aims to standardizing the procedure, in a similar form to that used for external radiotherapy. The work evolves the adaptation of the TRS-277 Code of the International Atomic Energy Agency, for small and big cavities, through the introduction for non-uniform experimental factor, for the absorbed dose in the neighborhood of small brachytherapy sources. In order to simulate a water medium around the source during the experimental work, an acrylic phantom was used. It guarantees the reproducibility of the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeter's location in relation to the radiation source. The values obtained with the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeters, exposed to a 192Ir high dose rate source, were compared and correction factors for different source-detector distances were determined for the thermoluminescent dosimeters. A numeric function was generated relating the correction factors and the source-detector distance. These correction factors are in fact the thermoluminescent dosimeter calibration factors for the 192Ir source considered. As a possible application of this calibration methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters, a practical range of source-detector distances is proposed for quality control of 192Ir high dose rate sources. (author)

  12. Advances in absorbed dose measurement standards at the australian radiation laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of ionising radiation in the medical and industrial fields require both an accurate knowledge of the amount of ionising radiation absorbed by the medium in question and the capability of relating this to National and International standards. The most useful measure of the amount of radiation is the absorbed dose which is defined as the energy absorbed per unit mass. For radiotherapy, the reference medium is water, even though the measurement of the absorbed dose to water is not straightforward. Two methods are commonly used to provide calibrations in absorbed dose to water. The first is the calibration of the chamber in terms of exposure in a Cobalt-60 beam, followed by the conversion by a protocol into dose to water in this and higher energy beams. The other route is via the use of a graphite calorimeter as a primary standard device, where the conversion from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose in water is performed either by theoretical means making use of cavity ionisation theory, or by experiment where the graphite calorimeter and secondary standard ionisation chamber are placed at scaled distances from the source of the radiation beam (known as the Dose-Ratio method). Extensive measurements have been made at Cobalt-60 at ARL using both the exposure and absorbed dose to graphite routes. Agreement between the ARL measurements and those based on standards maintained by ANSTO and NPL is within ± 0.3%. Absorbed dose measurements have also been performed at ARL with photon beams of nominal energy 16 and 19 MeV obtained from the ARL linac. The validity of the protocols at high photon energies, the validity of the methods used to convert from absorbed dose in graphite to absorbed dose in water and the validity of the indices used to specify the beams are discussed. Brief mention will also be made of the establishment of a calibration facility for neutron monitors at ARL and of progress in the development of ERP dosimetry

  13. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: gas@cdtn.br, e-mail: pls@cdtn.br, e-mail: fcp@cdtn.br, e-mail: lcmb@cdtn.br, e-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  14. Absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Hosoda, M; Fukushi, M; Furukawa, M; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    The monitoring of absorbed dose rate in air has been carried out continually at various locations in metropolitan Tokyo after the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. While the data obtained before the accident are needed to more accurately assess the effects of radionuclide contamination from the accident, detailed data for metropolitan Tokyo obtained before the accident have not been reported. A car-borne survey of the absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo was carried out during August to September 2003. The average absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo was 49±6 nGy h(-1). The absorbed dose rate in air in western Tokyo was higher compared with that in central Tokyo. Here, if the absorbed dose rate indoors in Tokyo is equivalent to that outdoors, the annual effective dose would be calculated as 0.32 mSv y(-1). PMID:25944962

  15. Absorbed and effective dose in direct and indirect digital panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the absorbed doses to the organs and calculated the effective doses when using the digital panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose averages in major organs of oral and maxillofacial region were measured using the Dental head phantom (CIRS Co., USA), nLi2B4O7 TLD chip and UD-716AGL dosimeter (Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., JPN) when performing indirect and direct digital panoramic radiography. Effective doses were calculated from correspond to ICRP 2007 recommendations for two panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose average on indirect and direct digital panoramic radiography was highest in parotid glands as measured 1259.6 mGy and 680.7 mGy respectively. Absorbed dose average in another organs were high in order of esophagus, submandibular gland, tongue and thyroid gland on both types of digital panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose average was higher on indirect type than direct one (p?0.05). The effective dose was higher on indirect type than direct one as measured 13.28 mSv and 8.70 mSv respectively. The absorbed doses in salivary gland and oral mucosa were high. However, thyroid gland also demands the attention on radiography due to high tissue weighting factor in spite of the low absorbed dose.

  16. Absorbed and effective dose in direct and indirect digital panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gun Sun; Kim, Jin Soo; Kim, Jae Duk [Department of Oral and Maxilloficial Radiology School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    We evaluated the absorbed doses to the organs and calculated the effective doses when using the digital panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose averages in major organs of oral and maxillofacial region were measured using the Dental head phantom (CIRS Co., USA), nLi2B4O7 TLD chip and UD-716AGL dosimeter (Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., JPN) when performing indirect and direct digital panoramic radiography. Effective doses were calculated from correspond to ICRP 2007 recommendations for two panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose average on indirect and direct digital panoramic radiography was highest in parotid glands as measured 1259.6 mGy and 680.7 mGy respectively. Absorbed dose average in another organs were high in order of esophagus, submandibular gland, tongue and thyroid gland on both types of digital panoramic radiography. The absorbed dose average was higher on indirect type than direct one (p?0.05). The effective dose was higher on indirect type than direct one as measured 13.28 mSv and 8.70 mSv respectively. The absorbed doses in salivary gland and oral mucosa were high. However, thyroid gland also demands the attention on radiography due to high tissue weighting factor in spite of the low absorbed dose.

  17. X-ray absorbed doses evaluation on patients under radiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The skin absorbed doses were evaluated on patient submitted to the following x-ray exams : chest, facial sinus, lumbar spine. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was used and a variety of irradiation techniques performed. The results shown considerable differences on the absorbed dose for the various alternative technical conditions

  18. Uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose from a brain receptor imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydogan, B.; Miller, L.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Sparks, R.B. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Stubbs, J.B. [Radiation Dosimetry Systems of Oak Ridge, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Absorbed dose estimates are known to contain uncertainties. A recent literature search indicates that prior to this study no rigorous investigation of uncertainty associated with absorbed dose has been undertaken. A method of uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose calculations has been developed and implemented for the brain receptor imaging agent {sup 123}I-IPT. The two major sources of uncertainty considered were the uncertainty associated with the determination of residence time and that associated with the determination of the S values. There are many sources of uncertainty in the determination of the S values, but only the inter-patient organ mass variation was considered in this work. The absorbed dose uncertainties were determined for lung, liver, heart and brain. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the organ absorbed dose distributions for each patient and for a seven-patient population group were determined by the ``Latin Hypercube Sampling`` method. For an individual patient, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose was found to be about 2.5 times larger than the estimated mean absorbed dose. For the seven-patient population the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose distribution was around 45% more than the estimated population mean. For example, the 95% confidence interval of the population liver dose distribution was found to be between 1.49E+0.7 Gy/MBq and 4.65E+07 Gy/MBq with a mean of 2.52E+07 Gy/MBq. This study concluded that patients in a population receiving {sup 123}I-IPT could receive absorbed doses as much as twice as large as the standard estimated absorbed dose due to these uncertainties.

  19. Application of European protocol in the evaluation of contrast-to-noise ratio and mean glandular dose for two digital mammography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of two digital mammography systems, Agfa CR75 and CRMM3 computed radiography (CR) and IMS Giotto MD direct digital radiography (DR), was assessed by applying a method recommended in the European protocol for quality control in mammography screening. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD) values were measured and contrast detail (CD) analysis was performed. The CNRs for system CR were 21.9, 12.9, 9.5, 8.8, 7.4, 5.5 and 4.4 for 2, 3, 4, 4.5, 5, 6 and 7-cm polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thickness, respectively. The respective CNRs for system DR were 10.4, 8.8, 6.3, 7.3, 7.2, 6.4 and 6.54. For the same phantom thickness sequence, the MGDs were 0.7, 1.1, 1.3, 1.6, 1.9, 2.5 and 3.4 mGy for system CR, whereas they were 0.7, 1.2, 1.1, 1.3, 1.8, 3.5 and 3.9 mGy for system DR. The CNR and MGD results satisfactorily correlate with CD analysis results. The MGD values compare well with the values recommended in the European protocol. Despite being simple, CNR and MGD can provide an effective system for performance assessment and constancy checks for related optimisations. (authors)

  20. Application of European protocol in the evaluation of contrast-to-noise ratio and mean glandular dose for two digital mammography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhogora, W E; Devetti, A; Padovani, R; Msaki, P; Bonutti, F

    2008-01-01

    The performance of two digital mammography systems, Agfa CR75 and CRMM3 computed radiography (CR) and IMS Giotto MD direct digital radiography (DR), was assessed by applying a method recommended in the European protocol for quality control in mammography screening. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean glandular dose (MGD) values were measured and contrast detail (CD) analysis was performed. The CNRs for system CR were 21.9, 12.9, 9.5, 8.8, 7.4, 5.5 and 4.4 for 2, 3, 4, 4.5, 5, 6 and 7-cm polymenthylmethacrylate (PMMA) thickness, respectively. The respective CNRs for system DR were 10.4, 8.8, 6.3, 7.3, 7.2, 6.4 and 6.54. For the same phantom thickness sequence, the MGDs were 0.7, 1.1, 1.3, 1.6, 1.9, 2.5 and 3.4 mGy for system CR, whereas they were 0.7, 1.2, 1.1, 1.3, 1.8, 3.5 and 3.9 mGy for system DR. The CNR and MGD results satisfactorily correlate with CD analysis results. The MGD values compare well with the values recommended in the European protocol. Despite being simple, CNR and MGD can provide an effective system for performance assessment and constancy checks for related optimisations. PMID:18283065

  1. A Survey On Mean Glandular Dose From Full-Field Digital Mammography Systems, Operate Using Mo/ Mo And W/Rh Target/ Filter Combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We had conducted a survey on Mean Glandular Dose (MGD) from Full-Field Digital Mammography systems (FFDM) operate using Molybdenum/ Molybdenum (Mo/ Mo) and Tungsten/ Rhodium (W/ Rh) target/ filter combinations. A survey was carried out at two randomly selected mammography centres in Malaysia, namely National Cancer Society and International Islamic University of Malaysia. The first centre operates using a W/ Rh, while the second centre operates using an Mo/ Mo target/ filter combinations. On the basis of recorded information, data on mammographic views, MGD, age and Compressed Breast Thickness (CBT) were recorded for 100 patients, for each mammographic centre respectively. The MGD data were analyzed for variation with age group, with 5 years increment. The MGD data were also analyzed for variation with CBT, with 5 mm increment. We found that for both CC and MLO views, FFDM systems operated using Mo/ Mo and W/ Rh target/ filter combinations present the same trend on MGD. The average MGD decreases as age increases. While average MGD increases with the increasing of CBT. However, FFDM system operates using Mo/ Mo gives higher MGD as compared with FFDM system operates using W/ Rh. (author)

  2. Status of air kerma and absorbed dose standards in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Radiation Safety Systems Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India maintains Primary and Secondary Standards of various parameters of radiation measurements and provides calibration services to various users of radiation in the country. This is an apex laboratory in India and plays a pivotal role in ensuring accurate radiological measurements. The laboratory coordinates national intercomparisons of radiation measurements to maintain their uniformity and traceability and is linked through various programmes with the other International organizations such as Bureau Internationale des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) Paris, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Vienna, Asia Pacific Metrology Programme (APMP) Taiwan. It is the recognized Regional Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) of IAEA/WHO (World Health Organisation). This paper brings out the status of various primary and secondary standards for radiological measurements maintained at BARC. 1. Primary Exposure/Air-kerma standard at Co-60 energy (therapy level): The primary standard for exposure/ air-kerma measurements maintained at BARC is a graphite cavity chamber of volume 4.362 cc with an internal diameter of 1.8 cm, internal height of 1.78 cm and wall thickness of 704.3mg/cm2. Correction factors for the difference between electron stopping powers, photon mass energy absorption coefficients of air and graphite wall, correction for recombination, radiation field non-uniformity, stem scatter and polarity effect are applied and the maximum overall uncertainty in the realisation of exposure/air-kerma is around ±1%. This standard has been intercompared with IAEA and BIPM through transfer standard and the agreement in the results are better than ±1%. An intercomparison under the APMP programme is to be held during May, 2002. 2. Primary Exposure/Air-kerma standard at protection and brachytherapy level: A set of three spherical graphite-walled cavity chambers of different air-volumes are maintained as primary standards for protection level and brachytherapy measurements of Ir-192, Cs-137 and Co-60 sources. These chambers are made of high purity reactor-grade graphite of density 1700 kg/m3. The three chambers have different wall thickness, the external diameters of all the chambers being equal. A reference standard in the form of a re-entrant chamber developed at BARC, calibrated against this primary standard was intercompared with a reference standard from M.D Anderson Centre, Houston, U.S.A and the results showed a good agreement. Recently one of the chambers was used for the Cs-137 intercomparison with IAEA and showed an agreement of better than ± 1%. 3. Primary Standard for X-rays - the free air chamber (FAC): This facility is utilized in conjunction with a Philips RT-250 X-ray machine for calibrating secondary standard dosemeters at different X-ray qualities in the 75 to 250 kV range. The total uncertainty in the realization of air kerma is around ±1% using the free air chamber. Accuracy of calibration of the secondary standards is estimated to be better than ±2%. The FAC has been intercompared via transferable transfer standards with FACs at BIPM (1971), BNM (France) RCL (Canada) and Kriss (Korea), which showed good agreement within ±1% after necessary correction for the spectral differences in X-ray beams. BARC is just now taking part in intercomparisons of X-ray air kerma calibration factors organised by Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Taiwan under Asia Pacific Metrology Programme. In addition to the above-mentioned primary standards, the SSDL is also maintaining the following secondary standards. For air kerma measurements at Co-60 gamma energy, ionisation chambers of Exradin A3, NE2571, NE2577 and Victoreen 415 types are calibrated and maintained. For Co-60 radiation dose to water measurements, NE 2571 and NE 2577 chambers calibrated at BIPM in terms of ND,W are maintained. For air kerma at medium energy x-rays, chambers of the type Exradin A2, NE 2571, NE2577, Victoreen 415 B, Victoreen 415, Exradin A3 and NE 2581 are maintained. These chambers have been calibrated against the primary standards and have been used in the international intercomparison experiments. The future programme of development of standards include i) Development of graphite/water calorimeters as absorbed dose standards, ii) Establishment of extrapolation chamber as primary standard for absorbed dose for beta and soft x-ray beams and iii) Development of energy-independent plastic scintillators as reference standard for low energy low activity brachytherapy sources. (author)

  3. Absorbed dose to the skin in radiological examinations of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorbed doses to the skin in radiological examinations of the upper and lower gastronintestinal tract in conventional and digital radiology are evaluated and compared. Absorbed doses were measured with LiF thermoluminescence dosemeters placed on the lower pelvis, umbilicus and forehead of the patient to evaluate the absorbed dose in and outside the primary beam. On 10 patients a reduction in absorbed dose of about 34% for double contrast barium enema and of 66% for upper gastrointestinal tract examinations was revealed with digital radiography equipment. In our working conditions the lower dose requirement for digital radiography is mainly due to image intensifiers and television chains and also, due to our equipment settings, to the dose reduction with digital spot fluorography compared with conventional spot film radiography. (Author)

  4. Absorbed doses on patients undergoing tomographic exams for pre-surgery planning of dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry was used to measure entrance skin absorbed doses at anatomical points close to critical organs of patients undergoing tomographic techniques as part of a pre-surgery planning for dental implants. The dosimetric procedure was applied in 19 patients, and absorbed doses could be measured with a combined uncertainty down to 14%. Results showed that patient doses may be increased by a factor of 20 in the helical computed tomography compared to panoramic and spiral conventional tomographic exams

  5. Variation of absorbed doses onboard of ISS Russian Service Module as measured with passive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic radiation represents possible risk for the astronauts. For estimation of the radiation onboard the spacecraft in space flights, it is necessary to obtain the data on dose distribution in real space flight conditions. This contribution deals with the study of absorbed dose and dose equivalent due to space radiation in different compartments of the International Space Station (ISS) using passive detectors. Luminescent detectors (LD) and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) were exposed onboard of Russian Service Module on ISS from August 2004 to October 2005 (425 days); they were placed at SPD boxes and positioned at 6 various locations inside the Russian Service Module. LD were used to measure absorbed doses, particularly from low-LET particles and photons, PNTDs were used to measure the spectra of linear energy transfer (LET), absorbed dose, and dose equivalents from particles with LET?H2O >5 keV/?m. Results from both types of detectors (LD and PNTD) were then combined together to obtain total values of absorbed doses and dose equivalents. Distribution of absorbed doses and dose equivalents measured with passive detectors, as well as LET spectra of registered particle fluxes, are presented as the function of position of SPD boxes (shielding thickness). Also the influence of position of detectors inside the SPD boxes (top and bottom wall) will be discussed. The dose characteristics depend on the location inside the Service Module; their variation has been observed to be up to factor of almost 2.

  6. Isoeffective dose: a concept for biological weighting of absorbed dose in proton and heavier-ion therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Wambersie, A; Menzel, H G; Gahbauer, R; DeLuca, P M; Hendry, J H; Jones, D T L

    2011-01-01

    When reporting radiation therapy procedures, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) recommends specifying absorbed dose at/in all clinically relevant points and/or volumes. In addition, treatment conditions should be reported as completely as possible in order to allow full understanding and interpretation of the treatment prescription. However, the clinical outcome does not only depend on absorbed dose but also on a number of other factors such as dose per fraction, overall treatment time and radiation quality radiation biology effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, weighting factors have to be applied when different types of treatments are to be compared or to be combined. This had led to the concept of `isoeffective absorbed dose', introduced by ICRU and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The isoeffective dose D(IsoE) is the dose of a treatment carried out under reference conditions producing the same clinical effects on the target volume as those of the actual treatment. It i...

  7. Dose estimates when electrons strike a copper absorber during injection at the Canadian Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose estimates are undertaken when injected electrons strike a tapered copper absorber of the insertion device beamline during injection at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). A model consisting of a tapered copper absorber, a wiggler vessel, a stainless steel beam pipe and a concrete ratchet and side wall is constructed. The doses immediately behind the ratchet wall are estimated by calculating the energy depositions in a water phantom that encloses the entire structure. Also estimated are the doses along the side wall and near the inner edge of the ratchet wall. The accumulated doses are calculated assuming various injection efficiencies to the storage ring and the number of electrons lost at the tapered copper absorber during injection. From these values, the dose rates are obtained with or without a local shield. - Highlights: ? Electrons striking the absorber are considered responsible for high radiation. ? A model is constructed to estimate the dose when the absorber is hit by electrons. ? The dose rates are obtained assuming the number of electrons lost at the absorber. ? Dose rates are also examined for various injection efficiencies

  8. Primary standard of absorbed dose to water in high-energy photon beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiotherapy, accurate dose evaluation must be made. One of the most important things in dose evaluation is the measurement of absorbed dose to water. National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology developed the primary standard of absorbed dose to water in high-energy photon beam irradiation, and enabled the calibration of ionization chamber dosimeters, using the photon beam with nearly the same beam quality as high-energy photon beam used in the medical front. Firstly, this paper explains the principle of the measurement of absorbed dose to water using an ionization chamber dosimeter, as well as the purpose and significance of the calibration of ionization chamber dosimeters based on the standard for the 60Co-? beam measurement of absorbed dose to water. Secondly, it introduces graphite calorimeter as the primary standard of absorbed dose to water in high-energy photon beam irradiation, which was newly developed for enabling the calibration of ionization chamber dosimeters using high-energy photon beam, while omitting the necessity of correction with the beam quality transformation coefficient. The greater part of graphite calorimeter is an acrylic phantom, and three graphite elements as calorie absorption body are installed in its central part. Finally, it describes the future prospects for the standard for absorbed dose to water. (A.O.)

  9. Absorbed Dose Distributions in Irradiated Plastic Tubing and Wire Insulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    Plastic tubing and wire insulation were simulated by radiochromic dye dosimeter films having electron absorbing properties similar to the materials of interest (polyethylene and PVC). A 400-keV electron accelerator was used to irradiate from 1, 2, 3 and 4 sides simulating possible industrial...

  10. Absorbed dose evaluations in retrospective dosimetry: Methodological developments using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailiff, I.K.; BØtter-Jensen, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dose evaluation procedures based on luminescence techniques were applied to 50 quartz samples extracted from bricks that had been obtained from populated or partly populated settlements in Russia and Ukraine downwind of the Chernobyl NPP. Determinations of accrued dose in the range similar to 30-300 mGy were obtained using TL (210 degreesC TL and pre-dose) and OSL (single and multiple aliquot) procedures. Overall, good inter-laboratory concordance of dose evaluations was achieved, with a variance (1 sigma) of similar to+/-10 mGy for the samples examined. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Absorbed dose evaluations in retrospective dosimetry: Methodological developments using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Correcher, V.; Delgado, A.; Goksu, H.Y.; Jungner, H.; Petrov, S.A.

    Dose evaluation procedures based on luminescence techniques were applied to 50 quartz samples extracted from bricks that had been obtained from populated or partly populated settlements in Russia and Ukraine downwind of the Chernobyl NPP. Determinations of accrued dose in the range similar to 30......-300 mGy were obtained using TL (210 degreesC TL and pre-dose) and OSL (single and multiple aliquot) procedures. Overall, good inter-laboratory concordance of dose evaluations was achieved, with a variance (1 sigma) of similar to+/-10 mGy for the samples examined. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All...... rights reserved....

  12. Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Pulse Radiolysis Optical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    in dose at the largest penetration depths in the cell and at the extreme lateral edges of the cell interior near the optical windows. This method of measurement was convenient because of the high spatial resolution capability of the detector and the linearity and absence of dose-rate dependence of...

  13. Development of methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power for low energy conversion electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of absorbed dose in the case of external and internal contamination due to radionuclides is sometimes hard, because of the difficulties in the assessment of the absorbed dose caused by electrons with energy less than 100 KeV in mucous membrane. In this work, a methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power in VYNS (co-polymer of polivinyl chloride - acetate) absorbers, for the 62.5 KeV and 84-88 KeV energy 109 Cd conversion electrons, working with a 4 ? proportional pressurized detector, is presented. In order to assure the reproducibility of measurement conditions, one of the detector halves has been used to obtain a spectrum of a thin 109 Cd source, without absorber. The other half of the detector was used in concomitance to obtain spectra with different thicknesses if absorber. The absorbed energy was obtained subtracting each spectrum with absorber from the spectrum without absorber, which were stored in a microcomputer connected to signal processing systems by ACE type interface. The VYNS weight and thickness were evaluated using common radionuclide metrology procedures. As VYNS has characteristics similar to a tissue equivalent material, the results obtained are consistent with dosimetric concepts and have a good agreement with those of the literature. (author)

  14. Metabolic kinetics and absorbed doses of 137Cs in lactating rats and progeny during suckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer of 137Cs with maternal milk to progeny was studied in rats The rats were administered with 25 kBq/g of 137Cs nitrate (pH = 6) in a single oral dose immediately after delivery. Nonpregnant females served as control. Absorbed doses per activity unit to lactating rats were 23 % lover than to nonlactating ones. Over the suckling period absorbed doses to young rats amounted to about 35 % of the absorbed dose to the nursing female. For nonlactating females the internal dose approximately equalled the sum of doses to the nursing female and young rats. Lactating is the effective way for removal of 1'37Cs from organism of the rats. Content of 1'37Cs in lactating rat becomes on 42.9 % lower than in organism of nonlactating rat during period of lactating (near 20 days)

  15. Measurement of absorbed dose-rate in skin for low-level beta-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of beta-ray absorbed dose-rate meter is described which evaluates absorbed dose in skin at a depth of 7 mg/cm2 from the dose rate on the surface of a contaminated sandy beach. Based on the response energy spectra measured for various point and surface sources of radionuclides with different beta-ray energy spectra, such as 90Y, 204Tl, and 137Cs, the discrimination level and the window width were determined so that the instrument response may be best correlated with the absorbed dose-rate. The measured and calculated dose rates for the actual sample of beach sands were compared. With this instrument the dose rate of about 1 ?rad/hr surface contamination can be measured by 90 minutes counting. (H.K.)

  16. Comparison study of the organ absorbed doses per unit exposure in external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose absorbed in an organ due to external radiation depends on the photon energy and incident direction to the body. The results of organ absorbed dose measured by C. Zeow et al. were revised into the absorbed dose in the organ per unit exposure (rad/R); these values are tabulated for each organ, photon energy and incident direction to the body. The gonadal doses are compared with those reported by other workers in energy dependence at a typical incident direction, and problems in conversion factor (rad/R) to the organ dose are described. The results for the tests agree with those by other workers for anterior and horizontal rotational irradiations. There is disagreement, however, for posterior and left-side irradiations. This may be due to the differences in shape of the phantom and position of the organ. On the other hand, the ovary dose for all the incident directions is in good agreement with that by other workers. (auth.)

  17. Estimation of terrestrial air-absorbed dose rate from the data of regional geochemistry database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an estimation of air-absorbed dose rate from the data of K2O, U and Th content from Chinese regional geochemical database. A total of 421 group original data of combined samples in Zhongshan City (ZSC), Guangdong Province and south China were extracted from the national geochemical database. Estimated average value of air-absorbed dose rate is 139.4 nGy h-1 in the granite area and 73.7 nGy h-1 in the sedimentary area. The level of air-absorbed dose rate is closely related with the surface lithology. Estimated mean air-absorbed dose rate approximates to the measured average value by a portable plastic scintillator dosemeter in Zhuhai City were bordered with ZSC. The results show that the pre-evaluation of ionizing radiation level using regional geochemical data is feasible. (author)

  18. Absorbed dose to the patient by computerized whole body X-ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patient absorbed dose distributions arising from multiple scan investigation of the brain and abdomen by computerized X-ray tomography (CT) were measured. An Alderson phantom mounted with LiF-TLD was irradiated with a Delta-Scan (Ohio-Nuclear, 120 kV, 30 mamp). The integral dose from one standard brain investigation (six scans, filtration 3 mm Al) was measured to 0.05 joule (1 rad gm = 10-5 joule). The absorbed dose at the entrance was found to be 3.2 rad. The absorbed dose to the eyes is 0.7 rad and in the region of the thyroid gland the dose due to scattered radiation amounts to 25 mrad. The integral dose to the trunk (nine scans in the region of the liver and kidneys, filtration 6 mm Al) was measured to 0.1 joule. The absorbed dose at the entrance was found to be 2.0 rad. The absorbed doses to the gonads originating from scattered radiation have been measured at 20 mrad for the ovaries and to 4 mrad for the testis. The beam profile of a single scan (FWHM = 3.5 to 4 cm) is broader than the distance between additional scans (2.6 cm). This leads to dose peaks in the overlapping regions at the entrance side, the values of which are more than twice as high as the dose of a single scan. The absorbed dose by a standard CT investigation is at least as high as by conventional radiography (eg, angiography or abdominal contrast medium examination) caused by the lower dose gradient in tissue and the enhancement factor by multiple scan investigations. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB

  19. Biological indicators for radiation absorbed dose: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry has an important role to play in assessing the cumulative radiation exposure of persons working with radiation and also in estimating the true dose received during accidents involving external and internal exposure. Various biodosimetric methods have been tried to estimate radiation dose for the above purposes. Biodosimetric methods include cytogenetic, immunological and mutational assays. Each technique has certain advantages and disadvantages. We present here a review of each technique, the actual method used for detection of dose, the sensitivity of detection and its use in long term studies. (author)

  20. Genetic effects induced by neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster I. Determination of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to obtain the absorbed dose in Drosophila melanogaster irradiated in the thermal column facility of the Triga Mark III Reactor has been developed. The method is based on the measurements of neutron activation of gold foils produced by neutron capture to obtain the neutron fluxes. These fluxes, combined with the calculations of kinetic energy released per unit mass, enables one to obtain the absorbed doses in Drosophila melanogaster

  1. Absorbed dose in molecular radiotherapy: a comparison study of Monte Carlo, dose voxel kernels and phantom based dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: the aim of this study was to perform a critical comparison of 3 dosimetric approaches in Molecular Radiotherapy: phantom based dosimetry, Dose Voxel Kernels (DVKs) and full Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry. The objective was to establish the impact of the absorbed dose calculation algorithm on the final result. Materials and Methods: we calculated the absorbed dose to various organs in six healthy volunteers injected with a novel 18F-labelled PET radiotracer from GE Healthcare. Each patient underwent from 8 to 10 whole body 3D PET/CT scans. The first 8 scans were acquired dynamically in order to limit co-registration issues. Eleven organs were segmented on the first PET/CT scan by a physician. We analysed this dataset using the OLINDA/EXM software taking into account actual patient's organ masses; the commercial software Stratos by Philips implementing a DVK approach; and performing full MC dosimetry on the basis of a custom application developed with Gate. The calculations performed with these three techniques were based on the cumulated activities calculated at the voxel level by Stratos. Results: all the absorbed doses calculated with Gate were higher than those calculated with OLINDA. The average ratios between the Gate absorbed dose and OLINDA's was 1.38±0.34 ? (from 0.93 to 2.23) considering all patients. The discrepancy was particularly high for the thyroid, with an average Gate/OLINDA ratio of 1.97±0.83 ? for the 6 patients. The lower absorbed doses in OLINDA may be explained considering the inter-organ distances in the MIRD phantom. These are in general overestimated, leading to lower absorbed doses in target organs. The differences between Stratos and Gate resulted to be the highest. The average ratios between Gate and Stratos absorbed doses were 2.51±1.21 ? (from 1.09 to 6.06). The highest differences were found for lungs (average ratio 4.76±2.13 ?), as expected, since Stratos considers unit density material. The high discrepancies observed also depend on the relative small size of the DVK matrix implemented in Stratos, that underestimates the photon contribution to the absorbed dose. Conclusions: though OLINDA and Stratos can produce reliable absorbed doses for beta emitting radionuclides, they may be too approximate for photon dosimetry. For target organs, whose dose mainly depends on photon irradiation, the stylized geometry of the MIRD phantom is not able to reproduce realistic photon ballistics. At the same time, the reduced size of the Stratos DVK matrix prevents the propagation of photons from the source organs to the targets. (authors)

  2. Plastic film materials for dosimetry of very large absorbed doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Abdel-Rahim, F.; Preisinger, T.

    Most plastic films have limited response ranges for dosimetry because of radiation-induced brittleness, degradation, or saturation of the signal used for analysis (e.g. spectrophotometry) at high doses. There are, however, a few types of thin plastic films showing linearity of response even up to...... doses as high as 2 × 106 Gy (200 Mrad) without severe loss of mechanical properties. Among many candidate film types tested, those showing such resistance to radiation damage and continued response at such high doses are polyethylene terephthalate, high-density polyethylene, dyed polyvinylchloride...... polyhalostyrenes have essentially rate-independent and moderately temperature-dependent responses to such large doses of ionizing radiation. While radiation-induced optical absorption in the ultraviolet for polystyrene is unstable following irradiation, thus leading to an intrinsic low-intensity rate dependence...

  3. Absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall for different radiopharmaceuticals using dynamic S-values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim and background: the urinary bladder wall is a radiosensitive organ that can receive a high absorbed dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Current dynamic models estimate the photon and electron absorbed dose at the inner surface of the bladder wall. The aim of this work has been to create a more realistic estimation of the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall from different radiopharmaceuticals. This calculation also uses dynamic specific absorption fractions (SAF) that changes with bladder volume and are gender specific. Materials and Methods: the volume of the urinary bladder content was calculated using a spherical approximation with a urinary inflow of 1.0 ml/min and 0.5 ml/min during day and night time, respectively. The activity in the bladder content was described using a bi-exponential extraction from the body. The absorbed dose to the bladder wall was estimated using linear interpolation of SAF values from different bladder volumes, ranging from 10 ml to 800 ml. Administration of the activity was assumed to start at 09:00 with an initial voiding after 40 minutes and a voiding interval of 3.5 hours during the day. A six hour night gap, starting at midnight, with a voiding right before and after the night period, was used. Calculations were made, with the same assumptions, for an earlier dynamic bladder model and with a static SAF value from the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms for a bladder containing 200 ml. Values for the absorbed dose per unit administered activity for 19 commonly used radiopharmaceuticals were calculated, e.g. 18F-FDG, 99mTc-pertechnetate, 99mTc-MAG3 and 123I-NaI. Results and conclusion: the results of the estimates of the absorbed doses to the inner bladder wall were a factor of ten higher than the estimates mean absorbed doses. The mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were slightly higher for females than males, due to a smaller female bladder wall. Calculations with a constant SAF value for 200 ml bladder content resulted in an average of 50% lower absorbed dose for all radiopharmaceuticals when compared to calculations using dynamic SAF values, indicating that the 200 ml approximation is not optimal for static calculations. The new dynamic model that calculates the mean absorbed dose to the bladder wall instead of the dose to its inner surface will give a more realistic dose estimate. The use of Monte Carlo simulated electron SAF values also improves the accuracy of the estimates. (authors)

  4. Absorbed dose from 14C xylose and 14C mannose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue distribution and excretion studies have been performed in rats and mice for up to 1 week after oral administration of 14C xylose and 14C mannose. The effective dose-equivalent is calculated to be 15 ?Sv/MBq for xylose and 120 ?Sv/MBq for mannose. Since there was no clearance of mannose during the period of the study, the effective dose-equivalent for mannose is almost entirely dependent upon the assumptions made about expected lifetime exposure. (author)

  5. Plastic film materials for dosimetry of very large absorbed doses

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Abdel-Rahim, F.; Preisinger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Most plastic films have limited response ranges for dosimetry because of radiation-induced brittleness, degradation, or saturation of the signal used for analysis (e.g. spectrophotometry) at high doses. There are, however, a few types of thin plastic films showing linearity of response even up to doses as high as 2 × 106 Gy (200 Mrad) without severe loss of mechanical properties. Among many candidate film types tested, those showing such resistance to radiation damage and continued response a...

  6. Absorbed dose simulations in near-surface regions using high dose rate Iridium-192 sources applied for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy treatment with Iridium-192 high dose rate (HDR) sources is widely used for various tumours and it could be developed in many anatomic regions. Iridium-192 sources are inserted inside or close to the region that will be treated. Usually, the treatment is performed in prostate, gynaecological, lung, breast and oral cavity regions for a better clinical dose coverage compared with other techniques, such as, high energy photons and Cobalt-60 machines. This work will evaluate absorbed dose distributions in near-surface regions around Ir-192 HDR sources. Near-surface dose measurements are a complex task, due to the contribution of beta particles in the near-surface regions. These dose distributions should be useful for non-tumour treatments, such as keloids, and other non-intracavitary technique. For the absorbed dose distribution simulations the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with the general code penEasy was used. Ir-192 source geometry and a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube, for beta particles shield were modelled to yield the percentage depth dose (PDD) on a cubic water phantom. Absorbed dose simulations were realized at the central axis to yield the Ir-192 dose fall-off along central axis. The results showed that more than 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth but with slower rate at higher distances. Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements and with proper clinical technique and accessories should apply as an alternative for treatment of lesions where only beta sources were used. - Highlights: ? A PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) tube was used to surround the HDR Ir-192 to shield the beta particles. ? 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth. ? Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements

  7. Evaluation of the absorbed dose in odontological computerized tomography; Avaliacao da dose absorvida em tomografia computadorizada odontologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legnani, Adriano; Schelin, Hugo R.; Rocha, Anna Silvia P.S. da, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: anna@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper evaluated the absorbed dose at the surface entry known as 'cone beam computed tomography' (CBCT) in odontological computerized tomography. Examination were simulated with CBCT for measurements of dose. A phantom were filled with water, becoming scatter object of radiation. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were positioned on points correspondent to eyes and salivary glands

  8. Estimation of the absorbed dose in gamma irradiated food containing bone by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to accurately evaluate the absorbed dose to radiationprocessed bones (and thus meats) is examined. The exposure of foodstuffs containing bone to a dose of ionizing radiation results in the formation of long lived free radicals which give rise to characteristics ESR signals. The yield of radicals was found to be proportional to absorbed dose. Additive re-irradiation of previously irradiated bone was used to estimate the absorbed dose in the irradiated chicken bone. Simple non-linear rational equation was found to fit to the data and yields good dose estimates for irradiated bone in the range of doses (1.0 - 5.0 kGy). Decay of the ESR signal intensity was monitored at different dose levels (2.0 and 7.0 kGy) up to 22 days. The absorbed dose in irradiated chicken (2.Om 3.0 and 6.0 kGy) was assessed at 2, 6 and 12 days after irradiation. Relatively good results were obtained when measurements were made within the following days (up to 12 days) after irradiation. The ability of the dose additive method to provide accurate dose assessments is tested here

  9. Plastic film materials for dosimetry of very large absorbed doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne

    1985-01-01

    Most plastic films have limited response ranges for dosimetry because of radiation-induced brittleness, degradation, or saturation of the signal used for analysis (e.g. spectrophotometry) at high doses. There are, however, a few types of thin plastic films showing linearity of response even up to doses as high as 2 × 106 Gy (200 Mrad) without severe loss of mechanical properties. Among many candidate film types tested, those showing such resistance to radiation damage and continued response at such high doses are polyethylene terephthalate, high-density polyethylene, dyed polyvinylchloride, polystyrene, dyed and undyed polyhalostyrenes, dyed aromatic polyamides, and polyvinylidene fluoride. Although most of these systems have fairly stable absorption spectra after irradiation, tests of dependence on dose rate and on temperature during irradiation show that only polystyrene and some of the polyhalostyrenes have essentially rate-independent and moderately temperature-dependent responses to such large doses of ionizing radiation. While radiation-induced optical absorption in the ultraviolet for polystyrene is unstable following irradiation, thus leading to an intrinsic low-intensity rate dependence, the dyed polychlorostyrenes show essentially the same response to radiation-processing gamma-ray fields and to very high-intensity electron beams, and a relatively stable absorption spectrum at wavelengths for dosimetry analysis in the visible spectral region of ?430 nm.

  10. Plastic film materials for dosimetry of very large absorbed doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most plastic films have limited response ranges for dosimetry because of radiation-induced brittleness, degradation, or saturation of the signal used for analysis (e.g. spectrophotometry) at high doses. There are, however, a few types of thin plastic films showing linearity of response even up to doses as high as 2 x 106 Gy (200 Mrad) without severe loss of mechanical properties. Among many candidate film types tested, those showing such resistance to radiation damage and continued response at such high doses are polyethylene terephthalate, high-density polyethylene, dyed polyvinylchloride, polystyrene, dyed and undyed polyhalostyrenes, dyed aromatic polyamides, and polyvinylidene fluoride. Although most of these systems have fairly stable absorption spectra after irradiation, tests of dependence on dose rate and on temperature during irradiation show that only polystyrene and some of the polyhalostyrenes have essentially rate-independent and moderately temperature-dependent responses to such large doses of ionizing radiation. While radiation-induced optical absorption in the ultraviolet for polystyrene is unstable following irradiation, thus leading to an intrinsic lowintensity rate dependence, the dyed polychlorostyrenes show essentially the same response to radiation-processing gamma-ray fields and to very high-intensity electron beams, and a relatively stable absorption spectrum at wavelengths for dosimetry analysis in the visible spectral region of about 430 nm

  11. Plastic film materials for dosimetry of very large absorbed doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most plastic films have limited response ranges for dosimetry because of radiation-induced brittleness, degradation, or saturation of the signal used for analysis at high doses. There are, however, a few types of thin plastic films showing linearity of response even up to doses as high as 2 x 106 Gy without severe loss of mechanical properties. Among many candidate film types tested, those showing such resistance to radiation damage and continued response at such high doses are polyethylene terephthalate, high-density polyethylene, dyed polyvinylchloride, polystyrene, dyed and undyed polyhalostyrenes, dyed aromatic polyamides, and polyvinylidene fluoride. Although most of these systems have fairly stable absorption spectra after irradiation, tests of dependence on dose rate and on temperature during irradiation show that only polystyrene and some of the polyhalostyrenes have essentially rate-independent and moderately temperature-dependent responses to such large doses of ionizing radiation. While radiation-induced optical absorption in the ultraviolet for polystyrene is unstable following irradiation, the dyed polychlorostyrenes show essentially the same response to radiation-processing gamma-ray fields and to very high-intensity electron beams, and a relatively stable absorption spectrum at wavelengths for dosimetry analysis in the visible spectral region of approx. 430 nm. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the lungs due to Xe133 and Tc99m (MAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose in lungs of an adult patient has been evaluated using the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing Xe133 or Tc99m (MAA). The absorbed dose was calculated using the MIRD formalism, and the Cristy-and Eckerman lungs model. The absorbed dose in the lungs due to 133Xe is 0.00104 mGy/MBq. Here, the absorbed dose due to remaining tissue, included in the 133Xe biokinetics is not significant. The absorbed dose in the lungs, due Tc99m (MAA), is 0.065 mGy/MBq. Approximately, 4.6% of the absorbed dose is due to organs like liver, kidneys, bladder, and the rest of tissues, included in the Tc99m biokinetics. Here, the absorbed dose is very significant to be overlooked. The dose contribution is mainly due to photons emitted by the liver. (Author)

  13. Effects of body and organ size on absorbed dose: there is no standard patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of estimating the absorbed dose to organs and tissues of the human body due to the presence of a radiopharmaceutical in one or more organs is discussed. Complications are introduced by the fact that the body is not homogeneous and in many cases the organ shapes are not regular. Publications of the MIRD Committee have provided a direct means of estimating the absorbed dose (or absorbed fraction) for a number of radioisotopes. These estimates are based on Monte Carlo calculations for monoenergetic photons distributed uniformly in organs of an adult phantom. The medical physicist finds that his patient does not resemble the adult phantom. In addition, the absorbed fractions for the adult are not reasonable values for the child. This paper examines how these absorbed fraction estimates apply to a nonstandard patient

  14. Absorbed dose by crystalline in middle ear tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the incident dose on the eye have been taken during the tomographic examinations of the middle ear. These measurements have been effectuated without any protection of the eye, and with a Pb-diagram protection, thickness 2mm. The tomograph which has been used is an Italian one (Eurostrator-Zuder, Genoa) provided with complex radiation movements (circular, spiral) and which gives technical results such as the Polytom (generally used for these researches) but which has a focus-film distance of 1m instead of 1.40m. The average incident dose on the crystalline lens is high (11.7R); the use of the Pb-diaphragm reduces the dose considerably (0.65R) without any significant imperfections on the radiological image

  15. Absorbed dose measurement on disprin tablets by ESR technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this investigation an attempt has been made to measure the dose from free radicals induced in medicine tables by ESR. About 60mg of powdered irradiated Disprin tablets (acetyl salicylic acid 72% calcium carbonate 21% anhydrous citric acid 7%) was loaded into quartz tube and free radical density was measured using Bruker ESP-300 spectrometer. A linear response of dose with peak to peak height was obtained in the range of 1Gy to 700Gy at g=1.9975. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig

  16. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari-Dizaji, M.; Sharafi, A. A.; Larijani, B.; Mokhlesian, N.; Hasanzadeh, H. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods : An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Result : There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 {mu}Gy and 1.81 Gy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 Gy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion : We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry.

  17. Air kerma and absorbed dose on the torso of a patient during a mammography study;Kerma en aire y dosis absorbida en el torso de una paciente durante un estudio mastografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernadez O, M.; Duran M, H. A.; Pinedo S, A.; Gonzalez G, R.; Guerra M, J. A.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J., E-mail: mar_h2o@hotmail.co [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    Two dosimetric magnitudes, due to the dispersed radiation, have been determined during a mammography study. The magnitudes that were determined are the kerma at the entrance of the torso and the absorbed dose by the torso. This determination was made in a paraffin phantom and with thermoluminescent dosemeters. One of the important parameters in the radiological protection of a patient to which is practiced a mammography is the value of the media glandular dose. However, during the taking of the X-ray a radiation portion that impacts on the mammary gland it is dispersed toward the patient's torso. In this work thermoluminescent dosemeters of ZrO{sub 2} has been used to determine the kerma at the entrance of the torso like the absorbed dose. The dosemeters was placed on the surface of the torso phantom while to the mamma phantom was made the mammography. As mamma phantom was used glucose serum to 5%. Of the obtained results we find that 3% of the air kerma at the entrance of the mamma it corresponds at the air kerma that receives the torso and 3.2% of the media glandular dose it is the absorbed dose of the same one. Another important result is the percentage value of the air kerma on the entrance of the thyroid area during a mammography, due to the dispersed radiation, it is 4% of the kerma at the entrance of the mamma. The air kerma at the entrance of the thyroid is of 0.41 +-0.07 mGy, 10% of this value corresponds to the absorbed dose by the thyroid. Therefore, it is observed that the media glandular dose and the air kerma at the entrance of the mamma they influence on the dispersed radiation toward the torso. Also, the superior part of the torso has less attenuation capacity to the dispersed radiation that those located in the inferior part. Therefore, the thyroid receives the major quantity of air kerma at the entrance. (Author)

  18. measurement of absorbed dose in mix-dp phantom irradiated by x and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been done of x-rays dan gamma rays absorbed dose measurement of mix-dp phantom of 70 kVp.90kvp and 110 kvp x rays kxo-12 medical exposure and cobalt-60 gamma (50 ci) by UD-170A BeO-TLD. Ionization chamber 12 cc NIRS-R2 as reference dosemeter, which was calibrated on primer dosemeter. In X-rays energy used, it was done of absorbed dose measurement on Mix-Dp phantom surface and depth (d= 10cm) beam field area 10 x 10 cm, focus distance (FSD), s=80 cm dose measurement of 90 kvp X-rays on Mix-Dp phantom surface, depth and scattering (d=15 cm) beam field area 12 x 12 cm, focus distance (FSD),s=79 cm and measurement of absorbed dose Co-60 gamma: 5 R, 10R, 20 R, 30R, 40R and 50R by dose rate 0.434 R/min. It was shown that in clinical, effective energy range of X-rays relative lower than dose range Co-60 gamma. BeO-TLD characteristic on energy dependence is low based on TI sensitivity ± 1.3 for energy below 100 keV. Relation between absorbed dose and TL response to 90 kVp X-rays shown that rperm=0.990, r ber=0.995 and r sact=0.962. In measurement of Co-60 gamma absorbed dose by BeO-TLD shown TI sensitivity decrease ± 0.900. The result still needed corrections to achieve optimum measurement of absorbed dose X-rays and gamma by UD-170A BeO-TLD, which were performed optimum fading time and anealling temperature

  19. Absorbed dose and operation time as parameters of the P.I.BA operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangussi, M.J. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Tucuman (Argentina); Graino, Jorge C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro Atomico Ezeiza

    1997-10-01

    The PIBA (BArros Irradiation Plant), a sewage irradiation plant has being built at Tucuman (Argentina) the National Commission of Atomic Energy. It is designed for insure an absorbed dose of 2 kGy (3 kGy without oxygenation) to 140 m{sup 3}/day of sludge by gamma irradiation from {sup 60} Co sources. To guarantee that almost all the volume of the irradiate sludge had absorbed at least the fixed dose is more important that its volume uniformity since the desired effect of the treatment is to produce a harmless sewage in respect to the risk diseases. The objective of this work is the calculation if the absorbed dose related to the irradiation time, the operation time and the sources geometry and activity. Mathematical models are developed for obtaining the volume distribution of the absorbed dose. An absorbed dose {>=} 2 kGy is required for the 99.8% of the irradiated sludge volume. Achieving the threshold dose depends upon the total activity which determines the daily time of operation. A numerical set of the major interrelated parameters is given for the efficient operation of the PIBA. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Radiation absorbed dose estimate for rubidium-82 determined from in vivo measurements in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation absorbed doses from rubidium-82 injected intravenously were determined in two young men, aged 23 and 27, using a dynamic conjugate counting technique to provide data for the net organ integrated time-activity curves in five organs: kidneys, lungs, liver, heart, and testes. This technique utilized a tungsten collimated Anger camera and the accuracy was validated in a prestwood phantom. The data for each organ were compared with conjugate count rates of a reference Ge-68/Ga-68 standard which had been calibrated against the Rb-82 injected. The effects of attenuation in the body were eliminated. The MIRD method was used to calculate the organ self absorbed doses and the total organ absorbed doses. The mean total absorbed doses were as follows (mrads/mCi injected): kidneys 30.9, heart walls 7.5, lungs 6.0, liver 3.0, testes 2.0 (one subject only), red marrow 1.3, remainder of body 1.3 and, extrapolating to women, ovaries 1.2. This absorbed dose to the kidney is significantly less than the pessimistic estimate of 59.4 mrads/mCi, made assuming instantaneous uptake and complete extraction of activity with no excretion by the kidneys, which receive 20% of the cardiac output. Further, in a 68 year old man the renal self absorbed dose was approximately 40% less than the mean renal self absorbed dose of the younger men. This decrease is probably related to the decline in renal blood flow which occurs with advancing age but other factors may also contribute to the observed difference. 14 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  1. Patient absorbed radiation doses estimation related to irradiation anatomy; Estimativa de dose absorvida pelo paciente relacionada a anatomia irradiada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Flavio Augusto Penna; Soares, Amanda Anastacio; Kahl, Gabrielly Gomes, E-mail: prof.flavio@gmail.com, E-mail: amanda-a-soares@hotmail.com, E-mail: gabriellygkahl@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Eduacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Developed a direct equation to estimate the absorbed dose to the patient in x-ray examinations, using electric, geometric parameters and filtering combined with data from irradiated anatomy. To determine the absorbed dose for each examination, the entrance skin dose (ESD) is adjusted to the thickness of the patient's specific anatomy. ESD is calculated from the estimated KERMA greatness in the air. Beer-Lambert equations derived from power data mass absorption coefficients obtained from the NIST / USA, were developed for each tissue: bone, muscle, fat and skin. Skin thickness was set at 2 mm and the bone was estimated in the central ray of the site, in the anteroposterior view. Because they are similar in density and attenuation coefficients, muscle and fat are treated as a single tissue. For evaluation of the full equations, we chose three different anatomies: chest, hand and thigh. Although complex in its shape, the equations simplify direct determination of absorbed dose from the characteristics of the equipment and patient. The input data is inserted at a single time and total absorbed dose (mGy) is calculated instantly. The average error, when compared with available data, is less than 5% in any combination of device data and exams. In calculating the dose for an exam and patient, the operator can choose the variables that will deposit less radiation to the patient through the prior analysis of each combination of variables, using the ALARA principle in routine diagnostic radiology sector.

  2. Measurement of the absorbed dose received by patients undergoing lung X-ray examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work concentrates on the radioprotection aspect in the use of a Siemens triomat type X-ray generator for lung radiography. A first set of measurements of the absorbed dose received by patients undergoing lung X-ray examinations was used to compare the values observed during radiographic operations and when standard plates are obtained. The absorbed dose received for the radiophotographs seemed too high, so the various working parameters were reviewed; the new measurements carried out showed a factor 10 gain on the absorbed dose for a 'standard' 70 kg man, the quality of the image remaining acceptable. This report gives the results of all the measurements performed. The doses received with standard plates remain the lowest. Experience acquired at the time of these measurements brings out the absolute necessity for a periodic check on the accuracy of the parameters displayed on the X-ray generator control panels

  3. Absorbed dose simulations in near-surface regions using high dose rate Iridium-192 sources applied for brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, E. S.; Zeituni, C. A.; Sakuraba, R. K.; Gonçalves, V. D.; Cruz, J. C.; Júnior, D. K.; Souza, C. D.; Rostelato, M. E. C. M.

    2014-02-01

    Brachytherapy treatment with Iridium-192 high dose rate (HDR) sources is widely used for various tumours and it could be developed in many anatomic regions. Iridium-192 sources are inserted inside or close to the region that will be treated. Usually, the treatment is performed in prostate, gynaecological, lung, breast and oral cavity regions for a better clinical dose coverage compared with other techniques, such as, high energy photons and Cobalt-60 machines. This work will evaluate absorbed dose distributions in near-surface regions around Ir-192 HDR sources. Near-surface dose measurements are a complex task, due to the contribution of beta particles in the near-surface regions. These dose distributions should be useful for non-tumour treatments, such as keloids, and other non-intracavitary technique. For the absorbed dose distribution simulations the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with the general code penEasy was used. Ir-192 source geometry and a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube, for beta particles shield were modelled to yield the percentage depth dose (PDD) on a cubic water phantom. Absorbed dose simulations were realized at the central axis to yield the Ir-192 dose fall-off along central axis. The results showed that more than 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth but with slower rate at higher distances. Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements and with proper clinical technique and accessories should apply as an alternative for treatment of lesions where only beta sources were used.

  4. Three dimensional measurements of absorbed dose in BNCT by Fricke-gel imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been studied for absorbed dose imaging and profiling in a phantom exposed to thermal or epithermal neutron fields, also discriminating between various contributions to the absorbed dose. The proposed technique is based on optical imaging of FriXy-gel phantoms, which are proper tissue-equivalent phantoms acting as continuous dosimeters. Convenient modifications in phantom composition allow, from differential measurements, the discrimination of various contributions to the absorbed dose. The dosimetry technique is based on a chemical dosimeter incorporated in a tissue-equivalent gel (Agarose). The chemical dosimeter is a ferrous sulphate solution (which is the main component of the standard Fricke dosimeter) added with a metal ion indicator (Xylenol Orange). The absorbed dose is measured by analysing the variation of gel optical absorption in the visible spectrum, imaged by means of a CCD camera provided with a suitable filter. The technique validity has been tested by irradiating and analysing phantoms in the thermal facility of the fast research reactor TAPIRO (ENEA, Casaccia, Italy). In a cylindrical phantom simulating a head, we have imaged the therapy dose from thermal neutron reactions with 10B and the dose in healthy tissue not containing boron. In tissue without boron, we have discriminated between the two main contributions to the absorbed dose, which comes from the 1H(n,?)2H and 14N(n,p)14C reactions. The comparison with the results of other experimental techniques and of simulations reveals that the technique is very promising. A method for the discrimination of fast neutron contribution to the absorbed dose, still in an experimental stage, is proposed too. (author)

  5. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the CTDIair measurement.

  6. The Relationship between Blood Injury and Absorbed Dose in Criticality Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron and gamma doses to individuals exposed in criticality accidents have been recalculated to yield the surface-absorbed dose to the trunk of the body. The relationship is examined between this dose estimate and blood-count profile scores that are based on the scoring system of N. Wald and G. E. Thoma for deviations from the normal of the lymphocyte, neutrophil and platelet-peripheral blood counts. It is shown that a quantity based on the surface-absorbed gamma dose and the Na24 activity in the blood shows a better correlation with the blood-count profile score and is a better prognostic guide for the degree of radiation injury than any of the conventional dose estimates. The R. B. E's of the heavy-particle recoil doses deduced from these observations are consistent in general with values obtained from experiments on dogs. (author)

  7. Calculation of absorbed doses in an organ using the MIRD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the application of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear diagnostics, it is necessary to know the absorbed dose the patient is subjected to. An accurate estimation is very important if one wants to weigh the risks against the profits of the examination. In this report, the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) method is described so as to calculate the absorbed dose in some organ. In doing so, the author distinguishes source organs in which nuclides are doped and target organs the dose of which is calculated. The target organ can be irradiated from one or more source organs. After a description of the dosimetric model, the way the results of dose calculations have been presented is dealt with. Intermediate results are cast in tables from which observed doses are easy to derive. As an instance of the MIRD method, a full calculation is figured out. (Auth.)

  8. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W. L.; Poston, J. W.; Warner, G. G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms.

  9. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms

  10. Potentiometric determination of absorbed doses in the ceric/cerous dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most commonly applied spectrophotometric dose determination in the ceric/cerous dosimeter was replaced by potentiometric measurement to eliminate the disadvantages of spectrophotometry (dilution) and to test a more simple and more reliable method in rountine use. Results are presented for two different concentration ranges, covering doses from 0.5 to 40 kGy. No continuous dilution is required, the electromotive forces can be measured with a simple electrometer and the absorbed doses are determined with high accuracy. (authors)

  11. Measurement of absorbed dose to water for low and medium energy X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For low energy and medium energy X rays, that is for tube voltages of up to 100 kV or starting at 100 kV, the dosimetric quantity of interest in the paper is the absorbed dose to water at the surface of a water phantom or at a depth of 2 cm, sometimes 5 cm, in a water phantom, respectively. In the first part of the paper the principal methods by which these quantities can be determined with the aid of calibrated ionization chambers are described.The second part is devoted to an absolute measurement of the absorbed dose to water for medium energy X rays.The method is based on the use of an extrapolation chamber inside a graphite phantom. The steps for converting the electrical charge collected in the measuring volume to the absorbed dose to graphite are outlined, together with the steps leading from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water in a water phantom. The method presented is used for determining what is known in X ray dosimetry as the ionization chamber replacement effect. (author)

  12. National absorbed dose to water references for radiotherapy medium energy X-rays by water calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LNE-LNHB current references for medium energy X-rays are established in terms of air kerma. Absorbed dose to water, which is the quantity of interest for radiotherapy, is obtained by transfer dosimetric techniques following a methodology described in international protocols. The aim of the thesis is to establish standards in terms of absorbed dose to water in the reference protocol conditions by water calorimetry. The basic principle of water calorimetry is to measure the absorbed dose from the rise in temperature of water under irradiation. A calorimeter was developed to perform measurements at a 2 cm depth in water according to IAEA TRS-398 protocol for medium energy x-rays. Absorbed dose rates to water measured by calorimetry were compared to the values established using protocols based on references in terms of air kerma. A difference lower than 2.1% was reported. Standard uncertainty of water calorimetry being 0.8%, the one associated to the values from protocols being around 3.0%, results are consistent considering the uncertainties. Thanks to these new standards, it will be possible to use IAEA TRS-398 protocol to determine absorbed dose to water: a significant reduction of uncertainties is obtained (divided by 3 by comparison with the application of the IAEA TRS-277 protocol). Currently, none of the counterparts' laboratories own such an instrument allowing direct determination of standards in the reference conditions recommended by the international radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  13. Absorbed Doses to Embryo from Intravenous Urography at Selected Radiological Departments in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actual legislation used in radiological protection requires quality assurance program for decreasing radiation load of patients from radiological examinations. The information about irradiation of pregnant women is very important, because the embryo is more radiosensitive as adult organism. On the basis of absence of unified calculations or measurements of absorbed doses to embryo from various radiological examinations in Slovakia we present in this study the values of absorbed doses to embryo from intravenous urography at selected radiological departments in Slovakia. Absorbed doses to embryo were obtained by measurement and calculation using the simulation of irradiation of pregnant woman by intravenous urography. The results of our study indicate, that absorbed doses to embryo were at various radiological departments considerably different, depending on type of X-ray machine and different settings of technical parameters of X-ray machine. In accordance with worldwide trend it is necessary to decrease radiation load of patients as low as possible level. Differences in radiation load between radiological departments indicate, that it is necessary to continue in solving of this problem and perform measurements and calculations of absorbed doses to embryo at different types of X-ray machines and at different examinations, where the embryo is in direct beam of X-ray. (author)

  14. Distribution of Absorbed Doses to the Important Organs of Head and Neck Region in Panoramic Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the distribution of absorbed doses of each important organs of head and neck region in panoramic radiography. Radiation dosimetry at internal anatomic sites and skin surfaces of phantom (RT-210 Humanoid Head and Neck Section R) was performed with lithium fluoride (TLD-100R) thermoluminescent dosimeters according to change of kilovoltage (65 kVp, 75 kVp and 85 kVp) with 4 miliamperage and 20 second exposure time. The results obtained were as follows; Radiation absorbed doses of internal anatomic sites were presented the highest does of 1.04 mGy, 1.065 mGy and 2.09 mGy in nasopharynx, relatively high doses of 0.525 mGy, 0.59 mGy and 1.108 mGy in deep lobe of parotid gland, 0.481 mGy, 0.68 mGy and 1.191 mGy in submandibular gland. But there were comparatively low doses of 0.172 mGy and 0.128 mGy in eyes and thyroid gland that absorbed dose was estimated at 85kVp. Radiation absorbed doses of skin surfaces were presented the highest doses of 1.263 mGy, 1.538 mGy and 2.952 mGy in back side of first cervical vertebra and relatively high doses of 0.267 mGy, 0.401 mGy and 0.481 mGy in parotid gland. But there were comparatively low doses of 0.057 mGy, 0.068 mGy and 0.081 mGy in philtrum and 0.059 mGy in middle portion of chin that absorbed dose was estimated at 85 kVp. According to increase of kilovoltage, the radiation absorbed doses were increased 1.1 times when kilovoltage changes from 65 kVp to 75 kVp and 1.9 times when kilovoltage changes from 75 kVp to 85 kVp at internal anatomic sites. According to increase of kilovoltage, the radiation absorbed doses were increased 1.3 times when kilovoltage changes from 65 kVp to 75 kVp and 1.6 times when kilovoltage changes from 75 kVp to 85 kVp at skin surfaces.

  15. The Norwegian system for implementing the IAEA code of practice based on absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) SSDL recommended in 2000 the use of absorbed dose to water as the quality for calibration and code of practice in radiotherapy. The absorbed dose to water standard traceable to BIPM was established in Norway in 1995. The international code of practice, IAEA TRS 398 was under preparation. As a part of the implementation of the new dosimetry system the SSDL went to radiotherapy departments in Norway in 2001. The aim of the visit was to: Prepare and support the users in the implementation of TRS 398 by teaching, discussions and measurements on-site; Gain experience for NRPA in the practical implementation of TRS 398 and perform comparisons between TRS 277 and TRS 398 for different beam qualities; Report experience from implementation of TRS 398 to IAEA. The NRPA 30x30x30 cm3 water phantom is equal to the BIPM calibration phantom. This was used for the photon measurements in 16 different beams. NRPA used three chambers: NE 2571, NE 2611 and PR06C for the photon measurements. As a quality control the set-up was compared with the Finnish site-visit equipment at University Hospital of Helsinki, and the measured absorbed dose to water agreed within 0.6%. The Finnish SSDL calibrated the Norwegian chambers and the absorbed dose to water calibration factors given by the two SSDLs for the three chambers agreed within 0.3%. The local clinical dosimetry in Norway was based on TRS 277. For the site-visit the absorbed dose to water was determined by NRPA using own equipment including the three chambers and the hospitals reference chamber. The hospital determined the dose the same evening using their local equipment. For the 16 photon beams the deviations between the two absorbed dose to water determinations for TRS 277 were in the range -1,7% to +4.0%. The uncertainty in the measurements was 1% (k=1). The deviation was explained in local implementation of TRS 277, the use of plastic phantoms, no resent calibration of thermometers, barometers and electrometers. A new roundtrip was done for electron beams. The aim of this visit was to cross-calibrate the hospital plan-parallel chambers in a high energy electron beam and measure absorbed dose to water in different high energy electron beams. The measurements were performed in the local water tank for beam data measurements. The absorbed dose was this time compared to the treatment units monitor calibration. Results from absorbed dose to water measurements for high energy electron beams showed that compared to TRS 398 the electron beams was off in the range -2,3 to + 4,6%. The uncertainty of the electron measurements was 1.5 % (k=1). The absorbed dose to water calculated from the former air kerma 60Co standard is at the Norwegian SSDL 0.5% lower than absorbed dose to water 60Co standard. From calculation one can see that the CoP TRS 277 give 0.5% to 1.0% higher dose than CoP TRS 398 in high energy photon beams depending on beam quality. For electrons this deviation is in the range - 0.3% to + 0.1%. The air kerma standard and TRS 277 CoP give in Norway 1.0 % to 1.5 % too high doses for high energy photons, while the dose change for electron beams is smaller than the uncertainty. On site measurements show higher deviations because of local implementation of a code of practice. The medical physicists welcomed the visit and requested more visits. This research was done in cooperation with IAEA, Agreement No. 11627

  16. A study on absorbed dose in the breast tissue using geant4 simulation for mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the breast cancer rate is increasing fast in Korean women, people pay more attention to mammography and number of mammography have been increasing dramatically over the last few years. Mammography is the only means to diagnose breast cancer early, but harms caused by radiation exposure shouldn't be overlooked. Therefore, it is important to calculate the radiation dose being absorbed into the breast tissue during the process of mammography for a protective measure against radiation exposure. Because it is impossible to directly measure the radiation dose being absorbed into the human body, statistical calculation methods are commonly used, and most of them are supposed to simulate the interaction between radiation and matter by describing the human body internal structure with anthropomorphic phantoms. However, a simulation using Geant4 Code of Monte Carlo Method, which is well-known as most accurate in calculating the absorbed dose inside the human body, helps calculate exact dose by recreating the anatomical human body structure as it is through the DICOM file of CT. To calculate the absorbed dose in the breast tissue, therefore, this study carried out a simulation using Geant4 Code, and by using the DICOM converted file provided by Geant4, this study changed the human body structure expressed on the CT image data into geometry needed for this simulation. Besides, this study attempted to verify if the dose calculation of Geant4 interlocking with the DICOM file is useful, by comparing the calculated dose provided by this simulation and the measured dose provided by the PTW ion chamber. As a result, under the condition of 28kVp/190mAs, the Difference(%) between the measured dose and the calculated dose was found to be 0.08 %?0.33 %, and at 28 kVp/70 mAs, the Difference(%) of dose was 0.01 %?0.16 %, both of which showed results within 2%, the effective difference range. Therefore, this study found out that calculation of the absorbed dose using Geant4 Simulation is useful in measuring the absorbed dose in the breast tissue for mammography

  17. Extension of the Commonwealth standard of absorbed dose from cobalt-60 energy to 25 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the introduction of high energy linear accelerators in hospitals, there is a need for direct measurement of absorbed dose for energies to 25 MV for photons and 20 MeV electrons. The present Australian standard for absorbed dose at cobalt-60 energy is a graphite micro-calorimeter maintained at the AAEC Lucas Heights Research Laboratories. A thorough theoretical analysis of calorimeter operation suggests that computer control and monitoring techniques are appropriate. Solution of Newton's law of cooling for a four-body calorimeter allows development of a computer simulation model. Different temperature control algorithms may then be run and assessed using this model. In particular, the application of a simple differencer is examined. Successful implementation of the calorimeter for energies up to 25 MV could lead to the introduction of an Australian absorbed dose protocol based on calorimetry, therby reducing the uncertainties associated with exposure-based protocols

  18. Absorbed dose in the full-mouth periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and zonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the possibility of substitution of the zonography for the full-mouth periapical radiography in aspect of radiation protection. Rando phantom and LiF TLD chips were used for dosimetry. The absorbed doses at brain, skin above the TMJ, parotid gland, bone marrow in the mandibular body, and thyroid gland during the full-mouth periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and zonography were measured. From the zonography, the absorbed doses to the brain, the skin over the TMJ, and the parotid gland were relatively high, but the absorbed doses to the bone marrow in the mandibular body and, especially, the thyroid gland were very low. The zonography can be an alternative to the full-mouth periapical radiography in aspect of radiation protection.

  19. The effect of latex maturity on the absorbed dose for preparing RVNRL of optimum tensile strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper present the results of the studies on the effects of using latex of different maturity periods, between 0 to 15 weeks on gamma irradiation dose require to prepare RVNRL of optimum tensile strength. Absorbed dose to prepare RVNRL of optimum tensile strength, molecular weight between cross-links and cross-link density were found to be influenced by the maturity of the latex used in the studies. With respect to optimum tensile strength and absorbed dose, latex of about six weeks maturity was found most suitable and economical for radiation vulcanization process. Using latex either with or without added secondary preservative the optimum tensile strength was determined at an absorbed of 8 kGy. However, the optimum tensile strength of RVNRL prepared from latex contained added secondary preservative was found to be higher than the optimum tensile strength of RVNRL prepared from latex without secondary preservative

  20. Comparison between the IAEA's protocols (TRS-277 and TRS-398) for absorbed dose determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to compare between two IAEA's Protocols [IAEA-TRS-277 (1987) and IAEA-TRS-398 (2000)] for Absorbed Dose Determination. Five types (5 Chamber) of commonly used cylindrical ionization chambers (Farmer type, 0.6 cc) were used to check the difference in absorbed dose to water determination for Co-60 beams under reference condition. TLD dosimeter was also used for inter-comparison with IAEA's SSDL. The mean values of the measured absorbed dose were found to be similar in both cases and the relative error D (TRS-398)/D (TRS-277) is found to be approximately less than 0.5% for all chambers used in this study. (authors)

  1. On the Influence of Patient Posture on Organ and Tissue Absorbed Doses Caused by Radiodiagnostic Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtual human phantoms, frequently used for organ and tissue absorbed dose assessment in radiology, normally represent the human body either in standing or in supine posture. This raises the question as to whether it matters dosimetrically if the postures of the patient and of the phantom do not match. This study uses the recently developed FASH2sta (Female Adult meSH) and FASH2sup phantoms which represent female adult persons in standing and supine posture. The effect of the posture on organ and tissue absorbed doses will be studied using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code for simulating abdominal radiographs and special attention will be directed to the influence of body mass on the results. For the exposure conditions considered here, posture-dependent absorbed dose differences by up to a factor of two were found. (author)

  2. Contribution to the determination of a standard of absorbed dose in water for cobalt 60 photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new standard, expressed in terms of absorbed dose at a depth of 5g/cm2 in a water phantom irradiated by cobalt 60 gamma photons, is determined. The procedure developed is based on a transfer method using two dosimetric techniques: Fricke dosimetry and ionometry (0.6 cm3 NE 2571 radiotherapy ionization chamber). Their calibration is performed with the primary calibration standard of absorbed dose: the graphite calorimeter. The relative discrepancy between the values of absorbed dose in water determined by the chemical dosimeter and the ionization chamber is equal to 1%. The ionization chamber has been also calibrated near the Cobalt 60 reference beam characterized in terms of air kerma

  3. Comparision between the IAEA's protocols (TRS-277 and TRS-398) for absorbed dose determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to compare between two IAEA's Protocols [IAEA-TRS-277 (1987) and IAEA-TRS-398 (2000)] for Absorbed Dose Determination. Five types (5 Chamber) of commonly used cylindrical ionization chambers (Farmer type, 0.6 cc) were used to check the difference in absorbed dose to water determination for Co-60 beams under reference condition. TLD dosimeter was also used for inter-comparison with IAEA's SSDL. The mean values of the measured absorbed dose were found to be similar in both cases and the relative error D (TRS-398)/D (TRS-277) is found to be approximately less than 0.5% for all chambers used in this study.(authors)

  4. A study on the absolute measurement of ?-ray absorbed dose in the skin depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute measurement of ? ray absorbed dose in the skin depth located at the certain distance from the radiation source (90Sr + 90Y, 204TI, 147Pm) recommended by the International Standardization Organization is performed by using an extrapolation chamber in the range of several mGy/h. Since one of critical points in measuring of absorbed dose is to make the environment in chamber similar to tissue, a new approach to the measurement of absorbed dose is proposed. The attenuation difference is minimized by deciding a window thickness such as the attenuation effect in chamber window becomes similar to that in the skin depth. A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, whose structure and density is very similar to tissue, is used for back material. The back scattering effect of both media is measured using the proposed method to calibrate the difference in back scattering effect between back material and tissue. For the measurement of back scattering effect of each material, an ionization chamber, whose structure is very similar to the extrapolation chamber and back material is replaceable, is made. Based on the results, ? ray absorbed dose in the skin depth of 70 ?m was measured as follows : 0.759 ?Gy/s (±3.78% ) for 90Sr + 90Y, 0.173 ?Gy/s (±4.17%) for 204TI and 0.088 ?Gy/s (±7.70%) for 147Pm. In order to evaluate the reliability of the proposed method, the absorbed dose measured in this study is compared to that measured in PTB (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt) for the same ? ray source. Although the proposed method gives slightly higher value, the difference is within 1%. In conclusion, the proposed method seems to make the measuring environment closer to tissue, even though the calibration factor yielded by the proposed method has a little effect on evaluation of absorbed dose

  5. Measuring the absorbed dose in critical organs during low rate dose brachytherapy with 137 Cs using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracavitary Brachytherapy is one of the most used methods for the treatment of the cervical-uterine cancer. This treatment consists in the insertion of low rate dose 137Cs sources into the patient. The most used system for the treatment dose planning is that of Manchester. This planning is based on sources, which are considered fixed during the treatment. However, the experience has shown that, during the treatment, the sources could be displaced from its initial position, changing the dose from that previously prescribed. For this reason, it is necessary to make measurements of the absorbed dose to the surrounding organs (mainly bladder and rectum). This paper presents the results of measuring the absorbed dose using home-made LiF: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Measurements were carried out in-vivo during 20 minutes at the beginning and at the end of the treatments. Results showed that the absorbed dose to the critical organs vary significantly due to the movement of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  6. Determination of maximum/minimum ratio of absorbed dose of dried figs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of an FAO/IAEA project, the ECB dosimeter and STERIN-125 and STERIN-300 dosimeters have been used for dose measurement in the dried figs packs. They were irradiated in our Gamma Irradiation Plant and were given 6 kGy dose. It was observed that all Sterin label dose indicators became very dark after a 6 kGy dose and the absorbance could not be measured with UV spectrophotometer. Therefore these label dose indicators were separately irradiated between 10-700 Gy doses by gamma rays to establish the dose sensitive curve of these indicators. After the irradiation of ECB dosimeter which is located in dried fig packs, we found the Dose Uniformity Ratio as 1.4 according to bulk density of 0.62 gr/cc. (author)

  7. The 1997 determination of the Australian standards of exposure and absorbed dose at {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, R.B.; Boas, J.F. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Van der Gaast, H. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1998-05-01

    The arrangements for the maintenance of the Australian standards for {sup 60}Co are described in detail. The primary standards are a graphite cavity chamber for exposure/air kerma and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose. These secondary standards are described and their responses in corresponding {sup 90}Sr reference sources are reported. Accurate ratios between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO) {sup 90}Sr reference sources are derived for use in future calibrations. The value of 28.8 years for the half-life of {sup 90}Sr is confirmed. The usefulness of {sup 90}Sr reference source measurements in quality assurance is discussed. The charge sensitivity and linearity of the ANSTO electrometers are reported by two different methods and are compared with previous results. Calibration factors for all the secondary standard ionization chambers are given, in terms of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to water. Calibration factors are also given for most of the chambers in terms of absorbed dose to graphite. The methods of deriving the calibration factors are explained in detail, including all the corrections applied to both the primary and secondary standard measurements. Three alternative methods of deriving the absorbed dose to water calibration factors are compared. The reported calibration factors are compared with previous results. Changes in the Australian units of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to graphite and water are derived from changes in the corresponding calibration factors. The Australian units of exposure and air kerma have not changed significantly since 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to graphite is now 1.1 % smaller than in 1993 and 1.3 % smaller than in 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to water is now 1.4 % smaller than in 1993, but is only 0.9 % smaller than in 1990. Comparisons of the Australian standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose with those of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) were performed in 1997 and show that the Australian units fall within the range of those of other countries. (authors) 31refs., 19 tabs., 8 figs.

  8. Optical fibre temperature sensor technology and potential application in absorbed dose calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical fibre based sensors are proposed as a potential alternative to the thermistors traditionally used as temperature sensors in absorbed dose calorimetry. The development of optical fibre temperature sensor technology over the last ten years is reviewed. The potential resolution of various optical techniques is assessed with particular reference to the requirements of absorbed dose calorimetry. Attention is drawn to other issues which would require investigation before the development of practical optical fibre sensors for this purpose could occur. 192 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs

  9. Model of the absorbed dose on a small sphere into a gamma irradiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several models of the absorbed dose calculated as the energy deposited by the secondary electrons on a small volume sphere are presented. The calculations use the Compton scattering of a uniform photon beam in water, the photon attenuation and the electron stopping power are included. The sphere total absorbed dose is due to the stopping of the electrons generated in three regions: into the sphere volume, ahead and behind the sphere volume. Calculations are performed for spheres of different radius and placed at various depth of the vacuum - water interface. (author)

  10. Average fetal depth in utero: data for estimation of fetal absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate fetal absorbed dose from radiographic examinations, the depth from the anterior maternal surface to the midline of the fetal skull and abdomen was measured by ultrasound in 97 pregnant women. The relationships between fetal depth, fetal presentation, and maternal parameters of height, weight, anteroposterior (AP) thickness, gestational age, placental location, and bladder volume were analyzed. Maternal AP thickness (MAP) can be estimated from gestational age, maternal height, and maternal weight. Fetal midskull and abdominal depths were nearly equal. Fetal depth normalized to MAP was independent or nearly independent of maternal parameters and fetal presentation. These data enable a reasonable estimation of absorbed dose to fetal brain, abdomen, and whole body

  11. The 1997 determination of the Australian standards of exposure and absorbed dose at 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arrangements for the maintenance of the Australian standards for 60Co are described in detail. The primary standards are a graphite cavity chamber for exposure/air kerma and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose. These secondary standards are described and their responses in corresponding 90Sr reference sources are reported. Accurate ratios between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO) 90Sr reference sources are derived for use in future calibrations. The value of 28.8 years for the half-life of 90Sr is confirmed. The usefulness of 90Sr reference source measurements in quality assurance is discussed. The charge sensitivity and linearity of the ANSTO electrometers are reported by two different methods and are compared with previous results. Calibration factors for all the secondary standard ionization chambers are given, in terms of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to water. Calibration factors are also given for most of the chambers in terms of absorbed dose to graphite. The methods of deriving the calibration factors are explained in detail, including all the corrections applied to both the primary and secondary standard measurements. Three alternative methods of deriving the absorbed dose to water calibration factors are compared. The reported calibration factors are compared with previous results. Changes in the Australian units of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to graphite and water are derived from changes in the corresponding calibration factors. The Australian units of exposure and air kerma have not changed significantly since 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to graphite is now 1.1 % smaller than in 1993 and 1.3 % smaller than in 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to water is now 1.4 % smaller than in 1993, but is only 0.9 % smaller than in 1990. Comparisons of the Australian standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose with those of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) were performed in 1997 and show that the Australian units fall within the range of those of other countries. (authors)

  12. Neutron absorbed dose rate with 252Cf sources for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 252Cf brachytherapy reduces the effect caused by the tumor hypoxia in photon radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The AAPM T G-43 modified formalism was used for the calculation of the fast neutron absorbed dose rate of 252Cf brachytherapy sources for normal tissues and malignant tumors. Three models of Hdr 252Cf sources; At, Vari Source and ?Selectron were simulated using spherical geometry, Watt fission spectrum and the MCNPX code. The results show that small variations in the elemental composition between the normal tissues and malignant tumors, produce variations in the reference fast neutron absorbed dose rate up to 14%. (Author)

  13. Neutron absorbed dose rate with 252 Cf sources for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Paredes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The 252 Cf brachytherapy reduces the effect caused by the tumor hypoxia in photon radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The AAPM TG-43 modified formalism was used for the calculation of the fast neutron absorbed dose rate of 252 Cf brachytherapy sources for normal tissues and malignant tumors. Three models of HDR 252 Cf sources; AT, VariSource and ?Selectron were simulated using spherical geometry, Watt fission spectrum and the MCNPX code. The results show that small variations in the elemental composition between the normal tissues and malignant tumors, produce variations in the reference fast neutron absorbed dose rate up to 14%.

  14. Evaluation of the absorbed doses in conditions of external and internal contamination with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experimental conditions of contamination with radionuclides of the skin and skin injuries, an evaluation of the degree of local irradiation in decontamined region and doses absorbed in organs of selective accumulating was carried out by use of mathematical models and tissue-equivalent thermoluminescent dosemeters. The evaluation of the absorbed doses based on conception, that in adequate analyses of decontamination effect, as a most efficient medico-prophilactic measure from local and total irradiation, should be taken into account the total body burden of the penetrated radionuclide, selective accumulating in critical organs or tissues, as well as the residual radioactivity in decontaminated region. (author)

  15. Absorbed doses of lungs from radon retained in airway lumens of mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Takahiro; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro

    2013-08-01

    This paper provides absorbed doses arising from radon gas in air retained in lung airway lumens. Because radon gas exposure experiments often use small animals, the calculation was performed for mice and rats. For reference, the corresponding computations were also done for humans. Assuming that radon concentration in airway lumens is the same as that in the environment, its progeny's production in and clearance from airways were simulated. Absorbed dose rates were obtained for three lung regions and the whole lung, considering that secretory and basal cells are sensitive to radiation. The results showed that absorbed dose rates for all lung regions and whole lung generally increase from mice to rats to humans. For example, the dose rates for the whole lung were 25.4 in mice, 41.7 in rats, and 59.9 pGy (Bq m?³)?¹ h?¹ in humans. Furthermore, these values were also compared with lung dose rates from two other types of exposures, that is, due to inhalation of radon or its progeny, which were already reported. It was confirmed that the direct inhalation of radon progeny in the natural environment, which is known as a cause of lung cancer, results in the highest dose rates for all species. Based on the present calculations, absorbed dose rates of the whole lung from radon gas were lower by a factor of about 550 (mice), 200 (rats), or 70 (humans) than those from radon progeny inhalation. The calculated dose rate values are comparatively small. Nevertheless, the present study is considered to contribute to our understanding of doses from inhalation of radon and its progeny. PMID:23771436

  16. Assessment of absorbed dose in critical organs in OPG: a phantom study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Eftekhari Moghadam1

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Orthopantomography is a well-established imaging technique in dental diagnosis. Although its exposure to individuals is relatively low compared to other diagnostic radiology examinations, it is still the most frequent X-ray examination. So it is important to estimate absorbed dose to critical organs in this examination. The present study was designed to determine the radiation doses to eyes, parotid, thyroid, submandibular gland and brain using Gafchromic films in an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom in three imaging centers, one digital and the remainders analogue. The absorbed dose to brain was measured globally with two vertically and horizontally embedded films in the phantom and submandibular, parotid and thyroid glands were also measured at their correct position in the phantom. The dose to the eyes was measured at the surface.Each measurement was triplicated and results were presented as mean (SD. After calibration of the films, they were embedded in the phantom and it was exposed with similar conditions for an adult patient. Absorbed doses were from 0.97-3.12 mGyfor brain, 1.23-3.02 mGy forleft parotid, 1.19-4.54 mGy for right parotid, 1.27-4.46 mGy left thyroid, 1.56-3.88 mGy for right thyroid, 1.45-2.83 mGy for Submandibular, 1.55-2.38 for right eye and 1.39-3.77 mGy for left eye.Our results showed similar depth and surface doses at all. Due to the direction of X-ray tube rotation, in the analogue devices in which the direction of rotation was right to left, doses of left sided organs were higher, and in the digital device that the direction was left to right, doses of right sided organs were higher. The absorbed doses in digital device were significantly lower than the analogue devices (p-value?0.05.

  17. Uncertainties of organ-absorbed doses to patients from 18f-choline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. B.; Janzen, T.; Zankl, M.; Giussani, A.; Hoeschen, C.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation doses of radiopharmaceuticals to patients in nuclear medicine are, as the standard method, estimated by the administered activity, medical imaging (e.g. PET imaging), compartmental modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of radiation with reference digital human phantoms. However, in each of the contributing terms, individual uncertainty due to measurement techniques, patient variability and computation methods may propagate to the uncertainties of the calculated organ doses to the individual patient. To evaluate the overall uncertainties and the quality assurance of internal absorbed doses, a method was developed within the framework of the MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations) to quantitatively analyze the uncertainties in each component of the organ absorbed doses after administration of 18F-choline to prostate cancer patients undergoing nuclear medicine diagnostics. First, on the basis of the organ PET and CT images of the patients as well as blood and urine samples, a model structure of 18F-choline was developed and the uncertainties of the model parameters were determined. Second, the model parameter values were sampled and biokinetic modeling using these sampled parameter values were performed. Third, the uncertainties of the new specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values derived with different phantoms representing individual patients were presented. Finally, the uncertainties of absorbed doses to the patients were calculated by applying the ICRP/ICRU adult male reference computational phantom. In addition to the uncertainty analysis, the sensitivity of the model parameters on the organ PET images and absorbed doses was indicated by coupling the model input and output using regression and partial correlation analysis. The results showed that the uncertainty factors of absorbed dose to patients are in most cases less than a factor of 2 without taking into account the uncertainties caused by the variability and uncertainty of individual human phantoms. The sensitivity study showed that the metabolic transfer parameter from the blood to soft tissues has a strong influence on blood sample collection from the beginning until 500 min. post administration; the transfer pathways between blood and liver impact strongly the liver imaging during the time course. The results of this study suggest that organ image acquisition of liver and kidneys after 100 min. as well as blood and urine sample collection are necessary for the reduction of uncertainties of absorbed dose estimates to patients.

  18. Evaluation of the measurement uncertainty of absorbed dose for ECB dosimetry system at IRASM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: ECB dosimetric system is used for evaluating absorbed dose in the gamma irradiated product at irradiation facility IRASM. In order to use it in process validation and in process control for radiation treatment of products, the calculation of the uncertainty associated with the dose measurement is required. In this paper, the identification of specific sources of uncertainty and the evaluation of their contributions to the combined standard uncertainty of measured absorbed dose are presented, using analysis of variance ANOVA. The dose range was determined using one-way ANOVA with equal group sizes, the uncertainty components associated with the variability in readout oscillometric equipment and with the dosimeter-to-dosimeter scatter for (10. . . 50) kGy. The uncertainty due to polynomial fit to actual dosimetry calibration data was evaluated by using the 95 % confidence interval about the fit. The combined relative uncertainty for the dosimetric system is dose dependent. For the specific dose range, the relative combined standard uncertainty of the calibrated system varies from 2.0 % (Dx=30.0 kGy) to 3.3 % (Dx=10.0 kGy), and the combined relative uncertainty of measured absorbed dose value Dx, from 2.2 % (Dx=30.0 kGy) to 3.4 % (Dx=10.0 kGy). (author)

  19. Determination of absorbed dose in the experimental animal irradiated on the Leksell gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and quantify inaccuracy of Leksell GammaPlan relative and absolute dose calculations for the experimental animal and to determine necessary corrections that must be applied. Both TLD and semiconductor detectors appeared to be suitable for measurement of absorbed dose in the rat brain irradiated on the Leksell gamma knife. Both detectors, due to their size, measured mean doses, nay doses to maximum. The Leksell GammaPlan treatment planning system can be employed for the calculation of absorbed doses even in such an extreme condition like irradiation of experimental animals. However, in our concrete case, it was necessary to apply correction factor of 1.0779 for the absolute absorbed dose to obtain reliable results. Comparison of dose profiles in all three axis calculated by the treatment planning system and measured ones by polymer gel dosimeter showed acceptable agreement. Results presented in this study are strictly related to the Leksell GammaPlan treatment planning system and the special fixation device developed in Na Homolce Hospital. (authors)

  20. Identification and absorbed dose determination in irradiated kiwi by electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for identification and absorbed dose determination in irradiated Kiwi with doses between 200 and 1000 Gy is present. Measurement are performed by Electron Paramagetic Resonance (ESR) in the flesh of the fruit after alcohol extration that removes water and soluble substances. The signal used is the radial produced in cellulose by radiation that shows to be stable during the usefull life of the fruit and that is not present in non-irradiated samples. Reference samples are not necessary to dose determination and the results shows that 85% of the calculated values are found to be within ± 15% of the applied initial dose. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Absorbed dose estimation and prediction irradiation effects in tumor-bearing mice under radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As the sizes of mouse organ are comparable with the range of the high-energy beta particles emitted by the radionuclides commonly used in radionuclide therapy a significant amount of beta radiation emitted could be imparted to the adjacent tissues. The often assumption that beta particles are fully-absorbed at the emission site is not satisfied and cross-irradiation should be included into the dose estimation formulas. Keeping in mind that the radiation effects are correlated with the absorbed dose in the target the inclusion of cross-irradiation in the dose estimation must be evaluated. The MIRD's formulation was used to perform absorbed dose calculation in mice using absorbed fractions previously reported for 131I, 90Y and 177Lu. Two approaches were considered: a) cross irradiation when a fraction of beta particles emitted can escape from the organ source and, b) full self- irradiation when the beta particles are considered fully absorbed at the emission site. The formulation of linear-quadratic model was readapted to be used in the radionuclide therapy. Treatment with a single administration in mice was simulated and radiation effects on tumor, bone marrow and kidneys under the assumption of cross-irradiation were predicted. A biphasic repair kinetics was considered in the calculation of irradiation effects on kidneys. Typical published biokinetic data for radiopharmaceutical assayed in mice and radiobiological parameters were used in the calculations. The influence of cross irradiation condition was diverse for the tissues analyzed here. The absorbed dose values in kidneys calculated for both methods were no significantly different for low energies, but variations around to 40-50% (over or under-estimation) in absorbed dose were obtained for high energies. Approximately a 30% of the beta radiation emitted from bone will cross irradiates the bone marrow. For injected activities values higher than 10MBq (300?Ci), as a single injection, the absorbed dose in BM exceeds the tolerable limits (2Gy). The formulation presented here could be used in the design of refined experiments for radionuclide therapy with mice model where the radio myelotoxicity and/or toxicity in kidneys needs to be controlled. (author)

  2. EDMULT-6.4, Electron Depth Dose Distribution in Multilayer Slab Absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: EDMULT evaluates depth-dose distributions produced by plane-parallel electron beams normally incident on one- to six-layer slab absorbers. The information produced by EDMULT are differential and integral energy-deposition by an electron beam as a function of the depth in the absorber. 2 - Method of solution: EDMULT is based on an analytic expression of the depth-dose curve in semi-infinite medium and a simple model of electron penetration through a multilayer absorber. The effect of the different medium beyond an interface is accounted for by the difference of backscattering, which is evaluated by considering the branching of electron beam into transmitted and backscattered components. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: EDMULT is valid for incident-electron energies from 0.1 to 20 MeV and for absorbers consisting of slabs of atomic numbers from about 4.75 (polyethylene) to 92. When the absorber consists of six layers, the last layer should be thick enough to stop essentially all the electrons incident on it. Treatment of the Bremsstrahlung component of energy deposition in multilayer absorbers is yet incomplete

  3. Radiation absorbed dose to bladder walls from positron emitters in the bladder content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to calculate absorbed doses at depths in the walls of a static spherical bladder from a positron emitter in the bladder content has been developed. The beta ray dose component is calculated for a spherical model by employing the solutions to the integration of Loevinger and Bochkarev point source functions over line segments and a line segment source array technique. The gamma ray dose is determined using the specific gamma ray constant. As an example, absorbed radiation doses to the bladder walls from F-18 in the bladder content are presented for static spherical bladder models having radii of 2.0 and 3.5 cm, respectively. Experiments with ultra-thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) were performed to verify the results of the calculations. Good agreement between TLD measurements and calculations was obtained

  4. Depth distribution of absorbed dose on the external surface of Cosmos 1887 biosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, J. W., Jr.; Parnell, T. A.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Significant absorbed dose levels exceeding 1.0 Gy day(exp -1) have been measured on the external surface of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite as functions of depth in stacks of thin thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's) made in U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. The dose was found to decrease rapidly with increasing absorber thickness, thereby indicating the presence of intensive fluxes of low-energy particles. Comparison between the U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. results and calculations based on the Vette Model environment are in satisfactory agreement. The major contribution to the dose under thin shielding thickness is shown to be from electrons. The fraction of the dose due to protons and heavier charged particles increases with shielding thickness.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of conversion of absorbed dose in different medium for gamma-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code was used to calculate the converting factor of absorbed dose to water to absorbed dose to silicon. The factor is useful in the study of irradiation effects in semiconductor devices. The irradiation source, water and silicon phantom were simulated by EGSnrc code. The electron equilibrium thickness were calculated for water and silicon irradiated by 60Co gamma-ray. The factor was calculated in two ways, one is average of energy fluence of photon, the other is ratio of dose. The results showed that the factor from tow ways agreed with the result from the national standard GB/T 15447-2008. This calculating methed can be used to determinate the dose conversion of two medium that they have very different atomic number. (authors)

  6. Depth distribution of absorbed dose on the external surface of Cosmos 1887 biosatellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, J.W. Jr.; Parnell, T.A.; Akatov, Yu.A.; Dudkin, V.E.; Kovalev, E.E.; Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L. [Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[San Francisco Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Significant absorbed dose levels exceeding 1.0 Gy day(exp {minus}1) have been measured on the external surface of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite as functions of depth in stacks of thin thermoluminescent detectors (TLD`s) made in U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. The dose was found to decrease rapidly with increasing absorber thickness, thereby indicating the presence of intensive fluxes of low-energy particles. Comparison between the U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. results and calculations based on the Vette Model environment are in satisfactory agreement. The major contribution to the dose under thin shielding thickness is shown to be from electrons. The fraction of the dose due to protons and heavier charged particles increases with shielding thickness.

  7. Depth distribution of absorbed dose on the external surface of COSMOS 1887 biosatellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akatov, Yu.A.; Dudkin, V.E.; Kovalev, E.E. (Ministry of Public Health, Moscow (USSR). Inst. of Biomedical Problems); Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L. (San Francisco Univ., CA (USA)); Watts, J.W. Jr.; Parnell, T.A. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL (USA). George C. Marshall Space Flight Center)

    1990-01-01

    Significant absorbed dose levels exceeding 1.0 Gy day{sup -1} have been measured on the external surface of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite as functions of depth in stacks of thin thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) of U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. manufacture. The dose was found to decrease rapidly with increasing absorber thickness, thereby indicating the present of intensive fluxes of low-energy particles. Comparison between the U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. results and calculations based on the Vette Model environment are in satisfactory agreement. The major contribution to the dose under thin shielding thickness is shown to be from electrons. The fraction of the dose due to protons and heavier charged particles increases with shielding thickness. (author).

  8. Depth distribution of absorbed dose on the external surface of COSMOS 1887 biosatellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant absorbed dose levels exceeding 1.0 Gy day-1 have been measured on the external surface of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite as functions of depth in stacks of thin thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) of U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. manufacture. The dose was found to decrease rapidly with increasing absorber thickness, thereby indicating the present of intensive fluxes of low-energy particles. Comparison between the U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. results and calculations based on the Vette Model environment are in satisfactory agreement. The major contribution to the dose under thin shielding thickness is shown to be from electrons. The fraction of the dose due to protons and heavier charged particles increases with shielding thickness. (author)

  9. Determination of Absorbed Dose to Water for Leksell Gamma Knife Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of geometry of photon beams in Leksell Gamma Knife Unit (LGK), there are several technical problems in applying standard protocols for determination of absorbed dose to water (Dw). Currently, Dw in LGK unit, measured at the center of spherical plastic phantom, is used for dose calculation in LGK radiosurgery. Treatment planning software (LGP TPS) accepts this value as a measurement in water and since plastic phantom has higher electron density than water, this leads to systematic errors in dose calculation. To reduce these errors, a photon attenuation correction (PAC) method was applied. For that purpose, measurements of absorbed dose in a center of three different plastic phantoms with 16 cm diameter (ABS - acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, PMMA - polymethyl metacrylate, PMMA + teflon - polytetrafluoroethylene 5 mm shell) were made with ionization chamber (Semiflex, PTW Freiburg). For measured dose values, PAC to water was applied based on electron density (ED) and equivalent water depths (EWD) of the plastic phantoms. The relation between CT number and ED was determined by measuring CT number of standard CT to ED phantom (CIRS Model 062 Phantom). Absorbed dose in plastic phantoms was 2.5 % lower than calculated dose in water for ABS phantom and more than 5.5 % lower for PMMA and PMMA+teflon phantom. Calculated dose in water showed more consistent values for all three phantoms (max. difference 2.6 %). EWD for human cranial bones and brain has value close to the EWD of ABS phantom, which makes this phantom most suitable for dose measurements in clinical application. In LGK radiosurgery determination of errors related to the difference of phantom materials should not be neglected and measured dose should be corrected before usage for patient treatment dose calculation.(author)

  10. Estimation of eye absorbed doses in head & neck radiotherapy practices using thermoluminescent detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh Bagheri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Determination of eye absorbed dose during head & neck radiotherapy is essential to estimate the risk of cataract. Dose measurements were made in 20 head & neck cancer patients undergoing 60Co radiotherapy using LiF(MCP thermoluminescent dosimeters. Head & neck cancer radiotherapy was delivered by fields using SAD & SSD techniques. For each patient, 3 TLD chips were placed on each eye. Head & neck dose was about 700-6000 cGy in 8-28 equal fractions. The range of eye dose is estimated to be (3.49-639.1 mGy with a mean of maximum dose (98.114 mGy, which is about 3 % of head & neck dose. Maximum eye dose was observed for distsnces of about 3 cm from edge of the field to eye.

  11. 3D-RECONSTRUCTION of Absorbed Dose Obtained from Gel-Dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarinl, G.; Carrara, M.; Valente, M.

    2006-04-01

    An experimental method for obtaining images and volume reconstruction of in-phantom absorbed dose is described. The method utilises layers of a tissue-equivalent gel matrix in which a proper chemical dosimeter has been incorporated (gel dosimeter). From the images of visible light transmittance, detected with a CCD camera before and after exposure, suitably developed software gives dose images and 3D representations.

  12. Radiation-Induced Color Centers in LiF for Dosimetry at High Absorbed Dose Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Ellis, S. C.; Lucas, A. C.; Kaspar, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    Color centers formed by irradiation of optically clear crystals of pure LiF may be analyzed spectrophotometrically for dosimetry in the absorbed dose range from 102 to 107 Gy. Routine monitoring of intense electron beams is an important application. Both 6LiF and 7LiF forms are commercially available, and when used with filters as albedo dosimeters in pairs, they provide discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray doses.

  13. A method of evaluating absorbed doses in patient tissues during tomodensitometry investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to present a method of evaluation of absorbed dose to patient during an investigation by computerized X-ray tomography (CT). Study and experiments in collaboration with C.G.R. were carried out on a ND 8000 CT cranial scanner. Photographic films, thermoluminescents dosimeters and skull phantom in tissue equivalent material were used for measurements. Results have allowed to define a phantom for dose measurements on installed CT scanners

  14. A system for 3-D absorbed dose measurements with tissue-equivalence for thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ferrous sulphate gel with a proper composition to thermalise epithermal neutrons with tissue equivalence with brain tissue gives the possibility of making phantoms which act as a continuous dosimeter for the gamma radiation, with the possibility of 3-D dose determination. If in the phantom a volume of gel containing 10B (in the amount typical for BNCT) is set, information on the absorbed dose in the tumour site may also be drawn. ((orig.))

  15. Axial distribution of absorbed doses in fast neutron field at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupled fast thermal system CFTS at the RB reactor is created for obtaining fast neutron fields. The axial distribution of fast neutron flux density in its second configuration (CFTS-2) is measured. The axial distribution of absorbed doses is computed on the basis of mentioned experimental results. At the end these experimental and computed results are given. (Author)

  16. Comparison of the NPL and PTB absorbed dose rate standards for beta radiation at protection levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) operate primary standard ionization chambers for the measurement of protection-level absorbed dose rates for beta radiation. Both standards are intended to measure or derive the absorbed dose rate to tissue, at a specified depth below the skin surface, from a source of beta radiation. A report has been submitted which describes the NPL primary standard, its construction, operation and performance; it also presents the results of a comparison of the NPL and PTB primary standards carried out at each laboratory using its standard to measure the absorbed dose rates from a number of NPL secondary standard sources of the radionuclides Sr + Y-90, Tl-204 and Pm-147. The agreement between NPL and PTB for Sr + Y-90 is very good, for Tl-204 is good and for Pm-147 is satisfactory. For Pm-147 the agreement between the absorbed dose rates to both air and tissue at the tissue surface is well within the claimed uncertainties but at a depth in tissue the agreement is about the same as the claimed uncertainties. (U.K.)

  17. Cartography of absorbed doses by dosimetric textile. Testing in (n,?) or ?,?) mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When an accident due to ionising radiations occurs, it is very important to be able to map the surface cartography and to have an estimation of the dose absorbed by the irradiated persons. Since the importance of these informations, a cotton textile coated with a dosimetric alumina has been settled and studied by thermoluminescence. (author)

  18. Measurement of let distribution and absorbed dose from secondary particles on board the spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental technique for the measurement of linear energy transfer (LET) distribution and absorbed dose from the secondary particles of space radiation is considered. High sensitive nuclear emulsion detector is used for identification of nuclear fragments produced in nuclear interactions and recoil protons from elastic (n, p) scattering. The contribution of secondaries of different origin to the total LET spectrum is estimated. (authors)

  19. Acquisition of quantitative biologic data in humans for radiation absorbed dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelines are presented for the collection in humans of quantitative in vivo biokinetic data suitable for the estimation of radiation absorbed doses. Technique and instrumentation are discussed. Internal checks built into the procedures are described which assure accountability for 100 percent of the radioactivity

  20. Simulation of absorbed dose in human blood with MCNP 4C code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry, based on the analysis of solid stained dicentric chromosomes, has been used since the mid 1960s. The intervening years have seen great improvements bringing the technique to a point where dicentric analysis has become a routine component of the radiological protection programs of many countries. Experience of its application in thousands of cases of actual or suspected overexposures has proved the worth of the method. The aberrations scored in the lymphocytes are interpreted in terms of absorbed dose by reference to a dose response calibration curve. This curve will have been produced by exposure of blood in vitro to doses of the appropriate quality of radiation. The doses given to the specimens should be traceable via a physical instrument such as an ionization chamber, to a primary or secondary standard. An alternative to obtain the information about absorbed dose in a specific blood volume is through the Monte Carlo method. The use of such technique is worldwide when physical measurements are inconvenient or impossible, and particularly useful for the solution of complex problems that cannot be modeled by codes that use deterministic methods. It is applied to particle systems as neutrons and electrons, as well as photons or still in mixed systems. Due to difficulties that involve the use of neutrons, this technique has shown extreme importance for preliminary research and experimental arrangements with neutron sources. In this study, the main objective was to simulate the dose absorbed by a blood sample in an experimental arrangement through the irradiation with sources of 241AmBe. It was used the code Monte Carlo N-Particle version 4C (MCNP 4C) whose data had been processed parallel in a computational structure in a cluster. This method allowed estimating the absorbed dose in a specific blood volume, making possible the experimental setup arrangement. (author)

  1. Comparison of absorbed and effective dose from two dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research compared the field of view with the tissue absorbed dose and effective doses using the two dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Two CBCT devices, an Alphard VEGA and 3DX multi-image micro CT MCT-1, were used. Measurements were made using an Alderson RANDO phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). The calculation of the effective dose was carried out according to ICRP Publication 60 and 103. The effective doses for Alphard VEGA D mode, I mode, P mode, and C mode were 86, 238, 413, and 323 ?Sv, respectively. The effective doses using 3DX for the maxillary incisor, maxillary molar, mandibular incisor, mandibular molar, TMJ, and mandibular molar scout images were 27, 30, 48, 60, 14, and 1 ?Sv, respectively. Both Alphard VEGA and 3DX values revealed salivary gland and oral mucosa doses much higher than those required for other tissues. It is necessary to select a small mode suitable in order to realize optimization. (author)

  2. Measurement of absorbed dose with a bone-equivalent extrapolation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) made of Solid Water trade mark sign and bone-equivalent material was used for determining absorbed dose in a bone-equivalent phantom irradiated with clinical radiation beams (cobalt-60 gamma rays; 6 and 18 MV x rays; and 9 and 15 MeV electrons). The dose was determined with the Spencer-Attix cavity theory, using ionization gradient measurements and an indirect determination of the chamber air-mass through measurements of chamber capacitance. The collected charge was corrected for ionic recombination and diffusion in the chamber air volume following the standard two-voltage technique. Due to the hybrid chamber design, correction factors accounting for scatter deficit and electrode composition were determined and applied in the dose equation to obtain absorbed dose in bone for the equivalent homogeneous bone phantom. Correction factors for graphite electrodes were calculated with Monte Carlo techniques and the calculated results were verified through relative air cavity dose measurements for three different polarizing electrode materials: graphite, steel, and brass in conjunction with a graphite collecting electrode. Scatter deficit, due mainly to loss of lateral scatter in the hybrid chamber, reduces the dose to the air cavity in the hybrid PEEC in comparison with full bone PEEC by 0.7% to ?2% depending on beam quality and energy. In megavoltage photon and electron beams, graphite electrodes do not affect the dose measurement in the Solid Water trade mark sign PEEC but decrease the cavity dose by up to 5% in the bone-equivalent PEEC even for very thin graphite electrodes (<0.0025 cm). In conjunction with appropriate correction factors determined with Monte Carlo techniques, the uncalibrated hybrid PEEC can be used for measuring absorbed dose in bone material to within 2% for high-energy photon and electron beams

  3. Absorbed 18F-FDG Dose to the Fetus During Early Pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a rare case of a woman who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT during early pregnancy (fetus age, 10 wk). The fetal absorbed dose was calculated by taking into account the 18F-FDG fetal self-dose, photon dose coming from the maternal tissues, and CT dose received by both mother and fetus. Methods: The patient (weight, 71 kg) had received 296 MBq of 18F-FDG. Imaging started at 1 h, with unenhanced CT acquisition, followed by PET acquisition. From the standardized uptake value measured in fetal tissues, we calculated the total number of disintegrations per unit of injected activity. Monte Carlo analysis was then used to derive the fetal 18F-FDG self-dose, including positrons and self-absorbed photons. Photon dose from maternal tissues and CT dose were added to obtain the final dose. Results: The maximum standardized uptake value in fetal tissues was 4.5. Monte Carlo simulation showed that the fetal self-dose was 3.0 * 10-2 mGy/MBq (2.7 * 10-2 mGy/MBq from positrons and 0.3 * 10-2 mGy/MBq from photons). The estimated photon dose to the fetus from maternal tissues was 1.04*10-2 mGy/MBq. Accordingly, the specific 18F-FDG dose to the fetus was about 4.0 *10-2 mGy/MBq (11.8 mGy in this patient). The CT scan added a further 10 mGy. Conclusion: The dose to the fetus during early pregnancy can be as high as 4.0*10-2 mGy/MBq of 18F-FDG. Current dosimetric standards in early pregnancy may need to be revised. (authors)

  4. The METAS absorbed dose to water calibration service for high energy photon and electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation (METAS) provides an absorbed dose to water calibration service for reference dosimeters. The calibration service uses 60Co gamma radiation, ten high energy photon beam qualities between TPR20,10 = 0.639 and 0.802 and ten electron beam qualities between R50 = 1.75 g/cm2 and 8.54 g/cm2. The METAS absorbed dose calibration service for high energy photons is based on a primary standard sealed water calorimeter used to calibrate several METAS NE 2611A and NE 2571A type ionization chamber working standards in terms of absorbed dose to water in the energy range of 60Co to TPR20,10 = 0.802. The users' reference dosimeters are compared with the working standards to give calibration factors in absorbed dose to water with an uncertainty of 1.0% for 60Co radiation and 1.4% for higher energies (coverage factor k = 2). The calibration service was launched in 1997. The calibration factors measured by METAS have been compared with those derived from the IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 398 (TRS 398) code of practice and from Recommendations No. 4 of the Swiss Society of Radiobiology and Medical Physics (SSRMP). The comparisons showed a maximum difference of 1.2% for the NE 2561A and NE 2571A chambers. At 60Co gamma radiation the METAS primary standard of absorbed dose to water was bilaterally compared with the primary standards of the Bureau international des poids et mesures.The standards were in agreement within the comparison uncertainties. The METAS absorbed dose calibration service for high energy electron beams is based on a primary standard chemical dosimeter. A monoenergetic electron beam of known particle energy and beam charge is totally absorbed in Fricke solution. The experiment was carried out in the energy range of 5.3 MeV to 22.4 MeV, which allows the determination of the response of the Fricke dosimeter. Finally, the users' dosimeters are compared with the METAS working standards. The overall uncertainty in the calibration factor of a user's dosimeter is 2% (coverage factor k = 2). The calibration factors measured by METAS have been compared with those derived from TRS 398 and from Recommendations No. 4 of the SSRMP. The comparison showed a maximum difference of 1.2% and 2.5%, respectively, for the NACP-02 chamber. (author)

  5. Simple dynamic model for calculating radiation absorbed dose to the bladder wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model of estimating the radiation absorbed dose to the inner surface of the bladder wall has been developed. This model assumes a spherical bladder shape and takes into account the dynamic nature of the bladder filling and emptying processes. The model also allows for variable voiding schedules and a residual fraction after each voiding. Formulas for estimating the radiation absorbed dose to the bladder wall are derived analytically using classical dose calculation approaches. Two commonly used radiopharmaceuticals, F-18 labeled 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (F-18-FDG) for positron imaging and Tc-99m labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Tc-99m-DTPA) for single-photon renal imaging, are employed to demonstrate the utility of this simple model in determining optimal strategies to achieve dose reduction. Computer simulation studies have been performed to investigate the effects of various initial bladder volumes, urine production rates, residual fractions, and voiding schedules. A general recommendation is a comfortably large initial bladder volume, a high urine production rate, and voiding after most of the activity has accumulated in the bladder, when possible. After the first few voidings at their strategically chosen times, more frequent voidings and smaller residual fractions sometimes can also reduce the radiation absorbed dose. 15 references, 14 figures, 1 table

  6. Skin Absorbed Doses from Full Mouth Standard Intraoral Radiography in Bisecting Angle and Paralleling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to measure the skin absorbed doses from full mouth standard intraoral radiography(14 exposures) in bisecting angle and paralleling techniques. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a phantom. Circular tube collimator (60 mm in diameter, 20 cm in length) and rectangular collimator (35 mm X 44 mm, 40 cm in length) were set for bisecting angle and paralleling techniques respectively. All measurement sites were classified into 8 groups according to distance from each point of central rays. The results were as follows: 1. The skin absorbed doses from the paralleling technique were significantly decreased than those from the bisecting technique in both points at central ray and points away from central ray. The percentage rats of decrease were greater at points away from central ray than those at central ray. 2. The skin absorbed doses at the lens of eye, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid region were significantly decreased in paralleling technique, but those of the midline of palate remained similar in both techniques. 3. The highest doses were measured at the site 20 mm above the point of central ray for the mandibular premolars in bisecting angle technique and at the point of central ray for the mandibular premolars in paralleling techniques. The lowest doses were measured at the thyroid region in both techniques.

  7. evaluation of the products yields-absorbed dose relationship for benzene -carbon tetrachloride gamma irradiated system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    gas chromatographic peak areas of the major products yields of γ- irradiated carbon tetrachloride - benzene system (chlorobenzene: PhCl, hexachloroethane: C2Cl6, trichloromethyl benzene: CCl3Ph, biphenyl: Ph2) was found to be linearly dependent on absorbed radiation dose from 0 kGy to 236 kGy. the linearity of the curves were evaluated according to regression coefficients (R2), and were found to be 0.9873, 09865,0.9735 and 0.9815 for PhCl, C2Cl6, CCl3Ph, and Ph2 respectively. statistical analysis of GC peak area measurements such as standard deviation, standard error, 95 %, 99 % confidences and % relative standard deviation (RSD) were calculated for each product. the uncertainty associated with products peaks areas as a response of the adsorbed dose was expressed in the term of coefficient of variation (CV %) . reproducibility of the readings at different absorbed doses as well as reliability was discussed. precision was also evaluated, according to CV % values of each product model. moreover, the knowledge of G-value of chlorobenzene in γ-irradiated carbon tetrachloride - benzene system, presents this model as a good candidate for the direct measurement of absorbed dose within the studied dose range.

  8. An absorbed dose due to examination on the VolumeScope x-ray device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, V. N.; Zaytsev, M. Y.

    2005-07-01

    An absorbed dose in a patient due to an X-ray examination by the VôlumeScope Compton scatter tomographic scanner was calculated and measured. The calculation model takes into account the energy spectrum of incident photons, the attenuation of primary and scattered radiation in the surrounding medium, multiple scattering and detector/collimator efficiency. The measurements were performed in various parts of a tissue-equivalent human phantom by LiF thermoluminescent detectors. Typical measured dose per examination was 1-3 mGy, the calculated dose was 1.95-2.2 mGy.

  9. Absorbed dose in a tumor and the efficacy of radiation therapy in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of therapy of patients with cervical cancer are analysed. It has been established that doses of 50-70 Gy ensure high 5-year survival rates of patients with Stage 1 cervical cancer. In patients with Stage 2 and Stage 3 cervical cancer survival rates were the highest within the range of 50-70 Gy. A further increase in the absorbed dose level deteriorated the survival rates of the patients, the frequency of local tumor control was not elevated. It is recommended that optimum dose levels be adhered to even during treatment of patients with disseminated carvical cancer

  10. Calculation of ?-ray absorbed dose rate for 131I applied to the inflorescence of Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of 131I applied to the inflorescence on the induction of somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were previously investigated, and the doubling dose (activity) was estimated to be 4 nCi. In the present paper, the absorbed dose rate in stamen hairs of Tradescantia for ? rays from the applied 131I was calculated. The doubling dose for the 131I (4 nCi) applied to the inflorescence was estimated to be higher than 0.3 rad (assuming uniform distribution of 131I on the surface of the buds and assuming that the shape of the buds was a sphere) and lower than 1.0 rad

  11. Absorbed doses received by infants subjected to panoramic dental and cephalic radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Report No. 115 recommends that each country or region can establish levels of absorbed doses for each radiographic technique employed in diagnostic. assuming the extended and expensive of this purpose, we have been to begin in a first step with the dentistry area, in order to estimate the dose levels received at crystalline and thyroid level in infants that go to an important public institution in our country to realize panoramic and cephalic radiographs. This work will serve to justify and impel a quality assurance program in Venezuela on the dentistry area which includes aspects such as training for the medical lap referring the justification of the radiological practice, optimization of X-ray units to produce an adequate image quality that delivers to patient an absorbed dose as much lower as reasonably it can be reached without diagnostic detriment. (Author)

  12. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  13. Pain and Mean Absorbed Dose to the Pubic Bone After Radiotherapy Among Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between mean absorbed dose to the pubic bone after pelvic radiotherapy for gynecological cancer and occurrence of pubic bone pain among long-term survivors. Methods and Materials: In an unselected, population-based study, we identified 823 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic radiotherapy during 1991-2003. For comparison, we used a non-radiation-treated control population of 478 matched women from the Swedish Population Register. Pain, intensity of pain, and functional impairment due to pain in the pubic bone were assessed with a study-specific postal questionnaire. Results: We analyzed data from 650 survivors (participation rate 79%) with median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2.3-15.0 years) along with 344 control women (participation rate, 72 %). Ten percent of the survivors were treated with radiotherapy; ninety percent with surgery plus radiotherapy. Brachytherapy was added in 81%. Complete treatment records were recovered for 538/650 survivors, with dose distribution data including dose-volume histograms over the pubic bone. Pubic bone pain was reported by 73 survivors (11%); 59/517 (11%) had been exposed to mean absorbed external beam doses <52.5 Gy to the pubic bone and 5/12 (42%) to mean absorbed external beam doses ?52.5 Gy. Thirty-three survivors reported pain affecting sleep, a 13-fold increased prevalence compared with control women. Forty-nine survivors reported functional impairment measured as pain walking indoors, a 10-fold increased prevalence. Conclusions: Mean absorbed external beam dose above 52.5 Gy to the pubic bone increases the occurrence of pain in the pubic bone and may affect daily life of long-term survivors treated with radiotherapy for gynecological cancer.

  14. Uncertainty evaluation in absorbed dose to water calibration with high energy photon beams at ARPANSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Based on tumour control probability data ICRU report No.24 claims the need for 5% accuracy in dose delivery. As the calibration of ionization chamber used in clinics is the starting point in the chain of processes leading to final dose delivery to the patients, a stringent requirement of accuracy better than I % in the calibration of ion chambers is required. This paper reports the uncertainty evaluation in the calibration of ion chambers for photon beams in the range of energies 6, 10 and 18 MV at ARPANSA. The evaluation of uncertainties presented here follows the guidelines given by the International Standards organization. The calibration procedure is based on the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. The steps in the calibration procedure involve calorimetry measurements of absorbed dose in graphite, conversion of graphite absorbed dose to absorbed dose in water, calibration of an ARPANSA reference chamber in water phantom against the calorimeter and finally calibration of a user chamber against the ARPANSA reference chamber. Results and Discussion It is estimated that a total relative uncertainty of 0.58% with 2(7 confidence level in absorbed dose to water calibration factors for photon beams of 6, 10 and 18 MV. The uncertainty values given are for the ARPANSA reference chambers of type NE 2561, which are reference-class chambers. The uncertainty is expected to be larger for other chambers. Also an uncertainty due to the difference in spectrum between ARPANSA Linac photon beams and user photon beams (up to ?0.5%) is not included.

  15. Fetus absorbed dose evaluation in head and neck radiotherapy procedures of pregnant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each year a considerable amount of pregnant women needs to be submitted to radiotherapeutic procedures to combat malignant tumors. Radiation therapy is often a treatment of choice for these patients. It is possible to use shielding and beam positioning such that the potential dose to the fetus can be minimized. In this work the head and neck cancer treatment of a pregnant patient was experimentally simulated. The patient was simulated by an anthropomorphic Alderson phantom and the absorbed dose to the fetus was evaluated using micro-rod TLD-100 detectors in two conditions, namely protecting the patients abdomen with a 7 cm lead layer and using no abdomen shielding. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the efficiency of the abdomen protection in reducing the fetus absorbed dose. Irradiations were performed with a Trilogy linear accelerator using x-rays of 6 MV. A total dose of 50 Gy to the target volume was delivered. The fetus doses evaluated with and without the lead shielding were, respectively, 0.52±0.039 and (0.88±0.052) c Gy, corresponding to a dose reduction of 59%. The dose (0.52±0.039) c Gy is within the zone of biological tolerance for the fetus. (Author)

  16. Fetus absorbed dose evaluation in head and neck radiotherapy procedures of pregnant patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo da C, E.; Ribeiro da R, L. A.; Santos B, D. V., E-mail: etieli@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria / CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Barra de Tijuca, 22783-127 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Each year a considerable amount of pregnant women needs to be submitted to radiotherapeutic procedures to combat malignant tumors. Radiation therapy is often a treatment of choice for these patients. It is possible to use shielding and beam positioning such that the potential dose to the fetus can be minimized. In this work the head and neck cancer treatment of a pregnant patient was experimentally simulated. The patient was simulated by an anthropomorphic Alderson phantom and the absorbed dose to the fetus was evaluated using micro-rod TLD-100 detectors in two conditions, namely protecting the patients abdomen with a 7 cm lead layer and using no abdomen shielding. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the efficiency of the abdomen protection in reducing the fetus absorbed dose. Irradiations were performed with a Trilogy linear accelerator using x-rays of 6 MV. A total dose of 50 Gy to the target volume was delivered. The fetus doses evaluated with and without the lead shielding were, respectively, 0.52±0.039 and (0.88±0.052) c Gy, corresponding to a dose reduction of 59%. The dose (0.52±0.039) c Gy is within the zone of biological tolerance for the fetus. (Author)

  17. Dose absorbed by technologists in positron emission tomography procedures with FDG

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ademir, Amaral; Christian, Itié; Bernard, Bok.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi o de avaliar doses absorvidas por profissionais de saúde em diferentes tarefas relacionadas à tomografia por emissão de pósitrons com [18F]-FDG (fluordesoxiglicose). Esta pesquisa foi realizada em dois centros de medicina nuclear na França, os quais apresentavam diferen [...] ças significativas em sua organização e radioproteção. Esses centros aplicavam aproximadamente 300 MBq por exame PET/CT, embora apenas um deles correspondesse a um serviço de medicina nuclear dedicado a exames por PET. A dose equivalente (Hp(10)) e a dose na pele Hp(0,07) foram medidas usando dosímetros eletrônicos (Siemens). Para avaliação da dose nas mãos do tecnologista durante a preparação do radiofármaco e durante injeção no paciente, um dosímetro tipo relógio de pulso (Polimaster) foi empregado. A dose absorvida e o tempo empregado durante cada tarefa foram registrados para um total de 180 exames de corpo inteiro através da PET. Neste trabalho, a metodologia empregada, os resultados e suas conseqüências na dose absorvida para o profissional de saúde são apresentados e discutidos. Abstract in english The objective of this work was to evaluate radiation doses delivered to technologists engaged in different tasks involving positron emission tomography (PET) studies with FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose). This investigation was performed in two French nuclear medicine departments, which presented significan [...] t differences in their arrangements and radiation safety conditions. Both centers administered about 300 MBq per PET/CT study, although only one of them is a dedicated clinical PET center. Dose equivalent Hp(10) and skin dose Hp(0.07) were measured using Siemens electronic personnel dosimeters. For assessment dose absorbed by hands during drawing up of tracer and injection into the patient, a Polimaster wristwatch gamma dosimeter was employed. Absorbed dose and the time spent during each investigated task were recorded for a total of 180 whole-body PET studies. In this report, the methodology employed, the results and their radioprotection issues are presented as well as discussed.

  18. A new approach for standardizing absorbed dose from beta radioactive wires used for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for standardising of absorbed dose from beta radioactive sources (in form of the wires or seeds) used in intravascular brachytherapy of coronary disease has been devised and investigated. The method is based on the use of a new type of an ionization chamber, called Ring lonisation Chamber, RIC. The RIC is a design which encompasses both a phantom and an ionization chamber. It has cylindrical shape and a catheter housing the source (wire or seeds) passes through it along its axis. Due to its similarity to a cylindrical ionization chamber the well-known dosimetric protocol can be applied for determining the absorbed dose to air chamber (and to water) calibration factors, ND as well as ND,w. Due to this approach the overall uncertainty of absorbed dose in water determination at reference point from beta radioactive sources used in intravascular brachytherapy could be substantially reduced as compared to presently achieved. A model of a RIC, which was tested, had an air-vented sensitive volume in the form of a 10 mm long wall cylinder, with a distance of 0.4 mm between the walls-electrodes. The inner diameter of sensitive volume is of 3.8 mm. The hole in the inner electrode for a catheter based radioactive source is of 1 mm in diameter. The external chamber dimensions: 35 mm long and 19 mm diameter. The model of RIC's was made of PMMA. The conducting part of the RIC is made by graphite coating. In the next step a water solid material will be used for RIC's body. The inner electrode of a RIC chamber was adjusted in such way to obtain the equivalent depth in water close to 2 mm, which is the recommended reference point. The depth doses in water and in PMMA for 32P and 90Y radioactive line sources were calculated by MC method. The equivalent depth in water for a given depth in PMMA was derived from these calculations. The ND factor for the RIC's model has been derived from calibration in 60CO beam at SSDL (traceable to a national standard). The ND,w values for 60Co and 32P (90Y) derived from ND are seen together with the relevant interaction coefficients. As can be seen, the values of the ND,w for PMMA (and water) for 60C and 32P (90Y) sources differ only by 1%. This creates a very comfortable situation that the absorbed dose to water calibration factor for beta radioactive sources is within 1% equal to calibration factor for 60C. Absorbed dose rate at 2 mm depth in water from 32P source (Guidant certified, traceable to NIST standard) was estimated based on the measurements by presented method and compared with the certified value. The Guidant certificate estimates the uncertainty of absorbed dose rate to be ? 16%. The ratio of the measured to certified dose rate is equal to 0.91. The total uncertainty of the estimated dose rate in water with presented approach is actually evaluated. One of the advantages of the new method (over the up to date in use) is very good geometrical reproducibility - source - detector which in turn gives the excellent reproducibility of the dose readings. The described method is equally acceptable for standardisation of absorbed dose from 192lr sources used for brachytherapy. In conclusions: the proposed method opens a new way for improving the quality of cardiovascular brachytherapy procedures with respect to dose estimation

  19. Radiation absorbed doses from iron-52, iron-55, and iron-59 used to study ferrokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, J.S.; Price, R.R.; Budinger, T.F.; Fairbanks, V.F.; Pollycove, M.

    1983-04-01

    Biological data obtained principally with Fe-59 citrate are used with physical data to calculate radiation absorbed doses for ionic or weak chelate forms of Fe-52, Fe-55, and Fe-59, administered by intravenous injection. Doses are calculated for normal subjects, primary hemochromatosis (also called idiopathic or hereditary hemochromatosis), pernicious anemia in relapse, iron-deficiency anemia, and polycythemia vera. The Fe-52 doses include the dose from the Mn-52m daughter generated after injection of Fe-52. Special attention has been given to the dose to the spleen, which has a relatively high concentration of RBCs and therefore of radioiron, and which varies significantly in size in both health and disease.

  20. Simulations of variability in the luminescence characteristics of natural quartz and its implications for estimates of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations of natural quartz suggest significant variation in luminescence behaviour can be obtained with only minor variations in the concentrations of certain recombination centres. The effect of this variation in behaviour on estimates of absorbed dose are investigated. The novel single-aliquot method of estimating absorbed dose, using radioluminescence to correct for sensitivity changes, is suggested. (author)

  1. Relationships between absorbed dose to water rate and field size for electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the relationships between absorbed dose to water rate and field sizes for electron beams with nominal energies of 10, 12 and 15 MeV from an elektra S/N 15614 linear accelerator machine owned by Adam Malik hospital. Measurement of percentage depth doses for every electron beam energy was carried out inside a water phantom using a PTW Tandem dosemeter with a 0.125 cc ionization chamber at a constant source to surface distance of 100 cm. Measurement of ionization to determine absorbed dose to water rate and ion recombination correction factor has been carried out by using a 0.6 cc ionization chamber type of NE 2571 serial number 2491 connected to a Farmer electrometer type of 2570/1 B serial number 1182 at the source to the phantom surface distance of 100 cm with field sizes defined by 6 cm x 6 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm, 14 cm x 14 cm and 20 cm x 20 cm applicators. The measurement results were calculated based on the IAEA publication Technical Reports Series No. 277. The result obtained showed that the absorbed doses rate changed of 4% with the field sizes. (author)

  2. Comparison of cone beam CT and conventional CT in absorbed and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides comparative measurements of absorbed and effective doses for newly developed cone beam computed tomography (CT) in comparison with these doses for conventional CT. Thermoluminescent dosimeter rods (TLD rod: GR-200, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Waltham, MA, USA) were placed at 25 sites throughout the layers of Male ART Head and Neck Phantom (Radiology Support Devices Inc., Long Beach, USA) for dosimetry. Implagraphy, DCT Pro (Vatech Co., Hwasung, Korea) units, SCT-6800TXL (Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto, Japan), and Cranex 3+ (Soredex Orion Corp., Helsinki, Finland) were used for radiation exposures. Absorption doses were measured with Harshaw 3500TLD reader (Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Waltham, MA, USA). Radiation weighted doses and effective doses were measured and calculated by 2005 ICRP tissue weighting factors. Absorbed doses in Rt. submandibular gland were 110.57 mGy for SCT 6800TXL (Implant), 24.56 mGy for SCT 6800TXL (3D), 22.39 mGy for Implagraphy3, 7.19 mGy for DCT Pro, 5.96 mGy for Implagraphy1, 0.70 mGy for Cranex 3+. Effective doses (E2005draft) were 2.551 mSv for SCT 6800TXL (Implant), 1.272 mSv for SCT 6800TXL (3D), 0.598 mSv for Implagraphy3, 0.428 mSv for DCT Pro and 0.146 mSv for Implagraphy1. These are 108.6, 54.1, 25.5, 18.2 and 6.2 times greater than panoramic examination (Cranex 3+) doses (0.023 mSv). Cone beam CT machines recently developed in Korea, showed lower effective doses than conventional CT. Cone beam CT provides a lower dose and cost motive to conventional CT, promising to revolutionize the practice of oral and maxillofacial radiology.

  3. External Auditing on Absorbed Dose Using a Solid Water Phantom for Domestic Radiotherapy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Kim, Jung In; Park, Jong Min; Park, Yang Kyun; Ye, Sung Joon [Medical Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kun Woo; Cho, Woon Kap [Radiation Research, Korean Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chun Il [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We report the results of an external audit on the absorbed dose of radiotherapy beams independently performed by third parties. For this effort, we developed a method to measure the absorbed dose to water in an easy and convenient setup of solid water phantom. In 2008, 12 radiotherapy centers voluntarily participated in the external auditing program and 47 beams of X-ray and electron were independently calibrated by the third party's American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group (TG)-51 protocol. Even though the AAPM TG-51 protocol recommended the use of water, water as a phantom has a few disadvantages, especially in a busy clinic. Instead, we used solid water phantom due to its reproducibility and convenience in terms of setup and transport. Dose conversion factors between solid water and water were determined for photon and electron beams of various energies by using a scaling method and experimental measurements. Most of the beams (74%) were within {+-}2% of the deviation from the third party's protocol. However, two of 20 X-ray beams and three of 27 electron beams were out of the tolerance ({+-}3%), including two beams with a >10% deviation. X-ray beams of higher than 6 MV had no conversion factors, while a 6 MV absorbed dose to a solid water phantom was 0.4% less than the dose to water. The electron dose conversion factors between the solid water phantom and water were determined: The higher the electron energy, the less is the conversion factor. The total uncertainty of the TG-51 protocol measurement using a solid water phantom was determined to be {+-}1.5%. The developed method was successfully applied for the external auditing program, which could be evolved into a credential program of multi-institutional clinical trials. This dosimetry saved time for measuring doses as well as decreased the uncertainty of measurement possibly resulting from the reference setup in water.

  4. External Auditing on Absorbed Dose Using a Solid Water Phantom for Domestic Radiotherapy Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of an external audit on the absorbed dose of radiotherapy beams independently performed by third parties. For this effort, we developed a method to measure the absorbed dose to water in an easy and convenient setup of solid water phantom. In 2008, 12 radiotherapy centers voluntarily participated in the external auditing program and 47 beams of X-ray and electron were independently calibrated by the third party's American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group (TG)-51 protocol. Even though the AAPM TG-51 protocol recommended the use of water, water as a phantom has a few disadvantages, especially in a busy clinic. Instead, we used solid water phantom due to its reproducibility and convenience in terms of setup and transport. Dose conversion factors between solid water and water were determined for photon and electron beams of various energies by using a scaling method and experimental measurements. Most of the beams (74%) were within ±2% of the deviation from the third party's protocol. However, two of 20 X-ray beams and three of 27 electron beams were out of the tolerance (±3%), including two beams with a >10% deviation. X-ray beams of higher than 6 MV had no conversion factors, while a 6 MV absorbed dose to a solid water phantom was 0.4% less than the dose to water. The electron dose conversion factors between the solid water phantom and water were determined: The higher the electron energy, the less is the conversion factor. The total uncertainty of the TG-51 protocol measurement using a solid water phantom was determined to be ±1.5%. The developed method was successfully applied for the external auditing program, which could be evolved into a credential program of multi-institutional clinical trials. This dosimetry saved time for measuring doses as well as decreased the uncertainty of measurement possibly resulting from the reference setup in water.

  5. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of inhaled radon to calculate absorbed doses in mice, rats, and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first report to provide radiation doses, arising from inhalation of radon itself, in mice and rats. To quantify absorbed doses to organs and tissues in mice, rats, and humans, we computed the behavior of inhaled radon in their bodies on the basis of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. It was assumed that radon dissolved in blood entering the gas exchange compartment is transported to any tissue by the blood circulation to be instantaneously distributed according to a tissue/blood partition coefficient. The calculated concentrations of radon in the adipose tissue and red bone marrow following its inhalation were much higher than those in the others, because of the higher partition coefficients. Compared with a previous experimental data for rats and model calculation for humans, the present calculation was proved to be valid. Absorbed dose rates to organs and tissues were estimated to be within the range of 0.04-1.4 nGy (Bqm-3)-1 day-1 for all the species. Although the dose rates are not so high, it may be better to pay attention to the dose to the red bone marrow from the perspective of radiation protection. For more accurate dose assessment, it is necessary to update tissue/blood partition coefficients of radon that strongly govern the result of the PBPK modeling. (author)

  6. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for [1-carbon-11]-glucose in adults: The effects of hyperinsulinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As preparation for studies of blood-brain glucose transport in diabetes mellitus, radiation absorbed dose estimates from intravenous administration of [1-11C]-glucose for 24 internal organs, lens, blood and total body were calculated for three physiologic conditions: euinsulinemic euglycemia, hyperinsulinemic euglycemia and hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemia. Cumulated activities in blood, insulin-independent and insulin-dependent compartments were calculated from blood time-activity curves in normal human volunteers and macaques. Apportionment of cumulated activity to individual organs in insulin-dependent and insulin-independent compartments was based on previously published data. Absorbed doses were calculated with the computer program MIRDOSE 3 for the 70-kg adult phantom. S for blood was calculated separately. The heart wall, lungs and spleen were the organs receiving the highest dose. The effect of hyperinsulinemia was demonstrated by the increase in adsorbed dose to the muscle, heart and blood with a decrease to other internal organs. This effect was more pronounced during hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemia. Hyperinsulinemia produced a decrease in effective dose due to the decrease in cumulated activity in organs with specified weighting factors greater than 0.05. The effective dose per study for [1-11C]-glucose is comparable to that reported for 2-deoxy-[2-18F]-glucose. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  7. Total body irradiation with 6MVX-rays. Absorbed dose distribution in a humanoid phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose distribution in a humanoid phantom irradiated with total body irradiation of long SAD techniques by 6MV x-rays are discussed. Absorbed dose are measured by x-ray films or TLDs set in slice of the phntom. Uniformity of dose distribution is compared among the results of irradiations by anterior-posterior opposing two beams, lateral opposing two beams, and these combination (four beams). In the cases of lateral opposing two beams irradiation, irradiation is done with and without water boluses at head and neck region. In the case of four beams (anterior-posterior and bilateral), the uniformity is best among the three irradiation techniques, and the uniformity is within ±10%. In the case of anterior posterior opposing two beams irradiation, the uniformity is rather good, but exceeds ±10%. Lateral opposing two beam irradiation results the worst uniformity. But an application of boluses shows improvent of uniformity of midline of a humanoid phantom. In thoracicregion, as lung is irradiated over high absorbed dose, lung compensator is sufficiently nesessary for dose homogeneous and dose reduction. (author)

  8. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,?0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380?MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250?kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3?mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at the reference position for TG-43 (1?cm from the source on the transverse axis, in a water phantom) was estimated to be 0.8% with the dominant uncertainty coming from the determination of the G-value. A comparison with absorbed dose to water obtained using the product of air-kerma strength and the dose rate constant gave agreement within 1.5% for three different Ir-192 sources, which is within the combined standard uncertainties of the two methods. PMID:25988983

  9. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,?0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380?MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250?kV x-rays. An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength. Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3?mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%. Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%. The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at the reference position for TG-43 (1?cm from the source on the transverse axis, in a water phantom) was estimated to be 0.8% with the dominant uncertainty coming from the determination of the G-value. A comparison with absorbed dose to water obtained using the product of air-kerma strength and the dose rate constant gave agreement within 1.5% for three different Ir-192 sources, which is within the combined standard uncertainties of the two methods.

  10. Deterministic absorbed dose estimation in computed tomography using a discrete ordinates method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Organ dose estimation for a patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scanning is very important. Although Monte Carlo methods are considered gold-standard in patient dose estimation, the computation time required is formidable for routine clinical calculations. Here, the authors instigate a deterministic method for estimating an absorbed dose more efficiently. Methods: Compared with current Monte Carlo methods, a more efficient approach to estimating the absorbed dose is to solve the linear Boltzmann equation numerically. In this study, an axial CT scan was modeled with a software package, Denovo, which solved the linear Boltzmann equation using the discrete ordinates method. The CT scanning configuration included 16 x-ray source positions, beam collimators, flat filters, and bowtie filters. The phantom was the standard 32 cm CT dose index (CTDI) phantom. Four different Denovo simulations were performed with different simulation parameters, including the number of quadrature sets and the order of Legendre polynomial expansions. A Monte Carlo simulation was also performed for benchmarking the Denovo simulations. A quantitative comparison was made of the simulation results obtained by the Denovo and the Monte Carlo methods. Results: The difference in the simulation results of the discrete ordinates method and those of the Monte Carlo methods was found to be small, with a root-mean-square difference of around 2.4%. It was found that the discrete ordinates method, with a higher order of Legendre polynomial expansions, underestimated the absorbed dose near the center of the phantom (i.e., low dose region). Simulations of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions proved to be the most efficient computation method in the authors’ study. The single-thread computation time of the deterministic simulation of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions was 21 min on a personal computer. Conclusions: The simulation results showed that the deterministic method can be effectively used to estimate the absorbed dose in a CTDI phantom. The accuracy of the discrete ordinates method was close to that of a Monte Carlo simulation, and the primary benefit of the discrete ordinates method lies in its rapid computation speed. It is expected that further optimization of this method in routine clinical CT dose estimation will improve its accuracy and speed

  11. Deterministic absorbed dose estimation in computed tomography using a discrete ordinates method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Edward T.; Liu, Xin, E-mail: xinliu@mst.edu [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Hsieh, Jiang [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Organ dose estimation for a patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scanning is very important. Although Monte Carlo methods are considered gold-standard in patient dose estimation, the computation time required is formidable for routine clinical calculations. Here, the authors instigate a deterministic method for estimating an absorbed dose more efficiently. Methods: Compared with current Monte Carlo methods, a more efficient approach to estimating the absorbed dose is to solve the linear Boltzmann equation numerically. In this study, an axial CT scan was modeled with a software package, Denovo, which solved the linear Boltzmann equation using the discrete ordinates method. The CT scanning configuration included 16 x-ray source positions, beam collimators, flat filters, and bowtie filters. The phantom was the standard 32 cm CT dose index (CTDI) phantom. Four different Denovo simulations were performed with different simulation parameters, including the number of quadrature sets and the order of Legendre polynomial expansions. A Monte Carlo simulation was also performed for benchmarking the Denovo simulations. A quantitative comparison was made of the simulation results obtained by the Denovo and the Monte Carlo methods. Results: The difference in the simulation results of the discrete ordinates method and those of the Monte Carlo methods was found to be small, with a root-mean-square difference of around 2.4%. It was found that the discrete ordinates method, with a higher order of Legendre polynomial expansions, underestimated the absorbed dose near the center of the phantom (i.e., low dose region). Simulations of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions proved to be the most efficient computation method in the authors’ study. The single-thread computation time of the deterministic simulation of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions was 21 min on a personal computer. Conclusions: The simulation results showed that the deterministic method can be effectively used to estimate the absorbed dose in a CTDI phantom. The accuracy of the discrete ordinates method was close to that of a Monte Carlo simulation, and the primary benefit of the discrete ordinates method lies in its rapid computation speed. It is expected that further optimization of this method in routine clinical CT dose estimation will improve its accuracy and speed.

  12. Absorbed dose assessment in particle-beam irradiated metal-oxide and metal-nonmetal memristors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kneževi? Ivan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbed dose was estimated after Monte Carlo simulation of proton and ion beam irradiation on metal-oxide and metal-nonmetal memristors. A memristive device comprises two electrodes, each of a nanoscale width, and a double-layer active region disposed between and in electrical contact with electrodes. Following materials were considered for the active region: titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, hafnium dioxide, strontium titanium trioxide and galium nitride. Obtained results show that significant amount of oxygen ion - oxygen and nonmetal ion - nonmetal vacancy pairs is to be generated. The loss of such vacancies from the device is believed to deteriorate the device performance over time. Estimated absorbed dose values in the memristor for different constituting materials are of the same order of magnitude because of the close values of treshold displacement energies for the investigated materials.

  13. Fundamental relationships between linear energy transfer, absorbed dose, kerma, and exposure. Application to changes of mediums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After briefly defining the quantities used in dosimetry and presenting them with a view to their simple adaptation to health physics problems, the authors establish simple mathematical relationships to express the absorbed dose, kerma and exposure in the case of electrons and photons, and also relationships between these various quantities considered in air. They then proceed to study the variations in these quantities at the interface between the air and the soft tissues of the organism and in depth in the tissues. They give the numerical values of the discontinuities liable to appear at the interface and the values obtained, relative to air, after electronic equilibrium is established in depth in the tissues. An example of application to dosimetry is also given in the case of an aluminium-walled ionization chamber. To conclude, the conditions to be fulfilled in order to make a direct measurement of the absorbed dose in the tissues are presented and discussed. (authors)

  14. Measurement of absorbed dose by 7-GeV bremsstrahlung in a PMMA phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Job, P K; Semones, E

    1999-01-01

    High-energy electron storage rings generate energetic bremsstrahlung photons through radiative interaction of the particle beam with the residual gas molecules and other components inside the storage ring. At synchrotron radiation facilities, where beamlines are channeled out of the storage ring, a continuous bremsstrahlung spectrum, with a maximum energy of the stored particle beam, will be present. At the advanced photon source (APS), where the stored beam energy is 7 GeV, bremsstrahlung generated in the straight sections of the insertion device beamlines, which are a total of 15.38 m in length, can be significant. The contribution from each bremsstrahlung interaction adds up to produce a narrow mono-directional bremsstrahlung beam that comes down through the insertion device beamlines. The resulting absorbed dose distributions by this radiation in a 300 mmx300 mmx300 mm tissue substitute cube phantom were measured with LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-700) thermoluminescent dosemeters. The normalized absorbed dose, in a cro...

  15. Estimation of skin absorbed doses due to subcutaneous leakage of radioactive pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin absorbed doses due to subcutaneous leakage of radioactive pharmaceuticals were estimated by three calculating methods. The radioactive pharmaceuticals used in calculation were 67Ga-citrate, 99mTc-HMDP, 111In-Cl, 123I-IMP, 131I-Adosterol, 201Tl-Chloride which are used frequently and in large amount in the daily examination. Time taken to remove contamination, range of contamination and ratio of leakage were assumed to be 30 minutes, 10 cm2 and 30% respectively. The skin absorbed doses calculated on this assumption were less than the threshold value that is found to cause skin disorders by Yamaguchi method. We confirmed the misprints of ICRU report 56 in the process of this calculation. (author)

  16. On the absorbed dose determination method in high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose determination method in water, based on standards of air kerma or exposure in high energy photon beams generated by electron with energies in the range of 1 MeV to 50 MeV is presented herein. The method is based on IAEA-398, AAPM TG-51, DIN 6800-2, IAEA-381, IAEA-277 and NACP-80 recommendations. The dosimetry equipment is composed of UNIDOS T 10005 electrometer and different ionization chambers calibrated in air kerma method in a Co60 beam. Starting from the general formalism showed in IAEA-381, the determination of absorbed dose in water, under reference conditions in high energy photon beams, is given. This method was adopted for the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) in NILPRP-Bucharest

  17. Absorbed dose from 7-GeV bremsstrahlung in a PMMA phantom.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Job, P. K.; Pisharody, M.; Semones, E.

    1999-08-04

    Electron storage rings generate energetic bremsstrahlung photons through radiative interaction of the particle beam with the residual gas molecules and other components inside the storage ring. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), where the stored beam energy is 7 GeV, bremsstrahlung generated in the straight sections of the insertion devices comes down through the beamlines. The resulting absorbed dose distributions by, this radiation in a 300 mm x 300 mm x 300 mm tissue substitute phantom were measured with LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-700) thermoluminescent dosimeters. The average normalized absorbed dose, in a cross sectional area of 100 mm{sup 2} at a depth of 150 mm of the PMMA phantom, was measured as 3.3 x 10{sup 6} mGy h{sup {minus}1}W{sup {minus}1} for a 7-GeV bremsstrahhmg spectrum.

  18. Methodology for determination of absorbed dose by individuals irradiated with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work an innovating methodology is proposed to estimate the absorbed dose received by individuals irradiated with neutrons. The method combines measurements of 24Na and 32P activated in the human body. A detailed study of papers published in the literature reporting neutron measurements in different facilities was combined to the results obtained after irradiation of an anthropomorphic phantom in the Argonauta reactor at the Institute de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The results demonstrate that it is possible to correlate the measurements of those two activated elements (24Na e 32P) in order to assess the absorbed dose due to neutrons. A methodology was developed in which it is not necessary to know the neutron spectra inciding over the irradiated person or to use models to treat results of 32P measurements, as occurs with other theoretical and experimental proposed methods. (author)

  19. Distribution of absorbed dose in human eye simulated by SRNA-2KG computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapidly increasing performances of personal computers and development of codes for proton transport based on Monte Carlo methods will allow, very soon, the introduction of the computer planning proton therapy as a normal activity in regular hospital procedures. A description of SRNA code used for such applications and results of calculated distributions of proton-absorbed dose in human eye are given in this paper. (author)

  20. Measurement of absorbed doses in a homogeneous ? rays fields with an extrapolation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main characteristics of a variable cavity ionization chamber are described. Using the ionization current of the detector irradiated in homogeneous ? rays fields, the tissue absorbed dose is determined. The corrective factors required to compute this quantity are analysed. Finally, international recommandations (ISO standards) relating to ? rays reference fields are given, with the characteristics of ? sources required for the energy response study of radiation protection instruments

  1. Simulations of absorbed dose on the phantom surface of MATROSHKA-R experiment at the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolísková (Mrázová), Z.; Sihver, L.; Ambrožová, I.; Sato, T.; Spurný, F.; Shurshakov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    The health risks associated with exposure to various components of space radiation are of great concern when planning manned long-term interplanetary missions, such as future missions to Mars. Since it is not possible to measure the radiation environment inside of human organs in deep space, simulations based on radiation transport/interaction codes coupled to phantoms of tissue equivalent materials are used. However, the calculated results depend on the models used in the codes, and it is therefore necessary to verify their validity by comparison with measured data. The goal of this paper is to compare absorbed doses obtained in the MATROSHKA-R experiment performed at the International Space Station (ISS) with simulations performed with the three-dimensional Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS). The absorbed dose was measured using passive detectors (packages of thermoluminescent and plastic nuclear track detectors) placed on the surface of the spherical tissue equivalent phantom MATROSHKA-R, which was exposed aboard the ISS in the Service Zvezda Module from December 2005 to September 2006. The data calculated by PHITS assuming an ISS shielding of 3 g/cm2 and 5 g/cm2 aluminum mass thickness were in good agreement with the measurements. Using a simplified geometrical model of the ISS, the influence of variations in altitude and wall mass thickness of the ISS on the calculated absorbed dose was estimated. The uncertainties of the calculated data are also discussed; the relative expanded uncertainty of absorbed dose in phantom was estimated to be 44% at a 95% confidence level.

  2. On the absorbed dose determination method in high energy electrons beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose determination method in water for electron beams with energies in the range from 1 MeV to 50 MeV is presented herein. The dosimetry equipment for measurements is composed of an UNIDOS.PTW electrometer and different ionization chambers calibrated in air kerma in a Co60 beam. Starting from the code of practice for high energy electron beams, this paper describes the method adopted by the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) in NILPRP - Bucharest

  3. Analyse of the international recommendations on the calculation of absorbed dose in the biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the recommendations of ICRP which has as objective the environmental radioprotection. It was analysed the recommendations 26, 60, 91, 103 and 108 of the ICRP. The ICRP-103 defined the concept of animal and plant of reference (APR) to be used in the RAP based on the calculation of absorbed dose based on APR concept. This last view allows to build a legal framework of environmental protection with a etic, moral and scientific visualization, more defensible than the anthropomorphic concept

  4. Measurement of absorbed doses received by people subjected to tomodensitometric examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to measure absorbed doses delivered by tomodensitometric examinations is presented here. This method uses thermoluminescent and photographic dosemeters and is based on a film-pellet set-up. In the light of experience acquired in this field we show the advantage of this combination by which a satisfactory general dosimetry is possible in a very short time, and different characteristics of the tomodensitometer may be checked in addition

  5. Method of measuring absorbed doses and prediction of delayed effect of skin, accidental irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of estimation and prediction of the degree of skin radiation injury as a results of accidental or planned single irradiation based on determination of quantitative relations between the absorbed dose depth distribution and the number of clonogenic basal cells, survived in epiderm and its derivatives after irradiation, are described. The given method of determination of ionizing radiation effect on skin permits to assess quantitatively the radiological effect - decrease of basal cells - using the results of absorbrd dose measurements. This permits to predict kinetics and state of acute radiation skin injury, thus settling the problem of medical care to personnel, to optimize maintenance and decontamination measures, to present foundation for radiotherapy

  6. Absorbed dose by thyroid in case of nuclear accidents; Dose absorvida pela tireoide em casos de acidentes nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Laelia; Attie, Marcia Regina Pereira [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Amaral, Ademir [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Radioisotopes of iodine are produced in abundance in nuclear fission reactions, and great amounts of radioiodine may be released into the environment in case of a nuclear reactor accident. Thyroid gland is among the most radiosensitive organs due to its capacity to concentrate iodine. The aim of this work was to evaluate the importance of contributions of internally deposited iodines ({sup 131}I, {sup 132}I, {sup 133}I, {sup 134}I and {sup 135}I) to the dose absorbed to thyroid follicle and to the whole organ, after internal contamination by those isotopes. For internal dose calculation, the code of particles transport MCNP4C was employed. The results showed that, in case of nuclear accidents, the contribution of short-lived iodines for total dose is about 45% for thyroid of newborn and about 40% for thyroid of adult. Thus, these contributions should not be neglected in a prospective evaluation of risks associated to internal contamination by radioactive iodine. (author)

  7. Calculation of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies were carried out using the MCNPX code, to simulate two models of a patient's head: one spherical and another more realistic ellipsoidal. Both head models had concentric shells to describe the scalp skin, the cranium and the brain. The tumor was located at the center of the head and it was a 1 cm-radius sphere. The MCNPX code was run for different energies. Results showed that the fluence decreases as the photons pass through the different head tissues. It can be observed that, although the fluence into the tumor is different for both head models, absorbed dose is the same. - Highlights: • A Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate the passage of photons through a homogeneous material was developed. • Two models of a patient's head, one spherical and another more realistic ellipsoidal model, were simulated using the Monte Carlo code. • The fluence into the tumor is different for both head models, but absorbed dose in the tumor is the same

  8. Experimental studies on absorbed dose in radiation sterilization of pharmaceutical preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For radiation sterilization, it is necessary to decide the irradiation conditions considering a balance between sterilization efficiency and chemical changes of samples by irradiation. These effects may be estimated by the product of two factors (D10 and G value) and absorbed dose. In this work, it has been found experimentally by using Fricke dosimeter that the absorbed doses of the samples in vessels different in size, material, volume, etc. are not equal under the same gamma-ray irradiation condition. The correction factor from exposure to absorbed dose was estimated to be 6-7% for organic vessels (a polyethylene bag and a polystyrene vial) and a 20-ml glass vial, 9% for a 10-ml glass vial, and 10% for the 5-ml glass vial. These values of the correction factor were confirmed by using the changes of enzymic activity of saccharated powder pepsin preparation. In the cases of using organic vessels and the 10-ml glass vial, G-values for the change of the enzymic activity were calculated to show similar values in the range from 0.79 to 0.82. However, in the case of a small glass vial (5-ml), the value was 0.93. (author)

  9. Comparison of theoretical and experimental values of TRS 398 absorbed dose to water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal ACAR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In this study, experimentally and theoretically determined absorbed dose to water calibration factors were compared. We used 6 MV photon and 12 MeV electron energies to compare experimentally and theoretically determined beam quality dependence factors. METHODS:Measurements were made at SSD=100 cm distance (LINAC, 10x10 cm standard field size and reference depth. Five different cylindrical and three parallel plate chambers were used. RESULTS: For absorbed dose to water calibration factor, the max difference between theoretical and experimental values was 2.8% for Marcus chamber. Beam quality dependence factors for 6 MV theoretical values of PTW 30001 (a (-0.816%, NE 2571 (-0.1107% were greater than their experimental values. For 12 MeV, the difference was 1.2371% for PTW 30001 (a, 1.6774% for PTW 30001 (b, 0.8758% for NE 2571, 0.8363% for NE 2581, 0.6071% for PTW 30002, and 0.6245% for Marcus ion chamber. CONCLUSION: As the protocol suggests, obtaining absorbed dose to water calibration factor directly from SSDL produces more accurate results.

  10. Utilization of radiation protection gear for absorbed dose reduction: an integrative literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Flavio Augusto Penna; Flor, Rita de Cassia [Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Pereira, Aline Garcia, E-mail: aalinegp@gmail.co [Sinan Project - Sistema de Informacao de Agravos de Notificacao, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the relation between the use of radiation protection gear and the decrease in absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, thereby reinforcing the efficacy of its use by both the patients and occupationally exposed personnel. Materials and Methods: The integrative literature review method was utilized to analyze 21 articles, 2 books, 1 thesis, 1 monograph, 1 computer program, 4 pieces of database research (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica and Departamento de Informatica do Sistema Unico de Saude) and 2 sets of radiological protection guidelines. Results: Theoretically, a reduction of 86% to 99% in the absorbed dose is observed with the use of radiation protection gear. In practice, however, the reduction may achieve 88% in patients submitted to conventional radiology, and 95% in patients submitted to computed tomography. In occupationally exposed individuals, the reduction is around 90% during cardiac catheterization, and 75% during orthopedic surgery. Conclusion: According to findings of several previous pieces of research, the use of radiation protection gear is a low-cost and effective way to reduce absorbed dose both for patients and occupationally exposed individuals. Thus, its use is necessary for the implementation of effective radioprotection programs in radiodiagnosis centers. (author)

  11. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an agent for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is responsible for maintenance of the Australian Commonwealth standard of absorbed dose. This standard of measurement has application in radiation therapy dosimetry, which is required for the treatment of cancer patients. This report is the first in a series of reports documenting the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. The Urquhart graphite micro-calorimeters, which is used for the determination of absorbed dose under high energy photon beams, has been now placed under computer control. Accordingly, a complete upgrade of the calorimeter systems was performed to allow operation in the hospital. In this report, control and monitoring techniques have been described, with an assessment of the performance achieved being given for 6 and 18 MeV bremsstrahlung beams. Random errors have been reduced to near negligible proportions, while systematic errors have been minimized by achieving true quasi-adiabatic operation. 16 refs., 9 tabs., 11 figs

  12. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Michely C. da [FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sampaio, Francisco G.A., E-mail: francisampaio@pg.ffclrp.usp.br [FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Petchevist, Paulo C.D., E-mail: petchevist12@yahoo.com.br [FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Radioterapia e Megavoltagem, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, Andre L. de [Servico de Radioterapia do Hospital das Clinicas da Unicamp, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Almeida, Adelaide de, E-mail: dalmeida@ffclrp.usp.br [FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  13. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Michely C.; Sampaio, Francisco G. A.; Petchevist, Paulo C. D.; de Oliveira, André L.; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2011-12-01

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  14. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  15. Utilization of radiation protection gear for absorbed dose reduction: an integrative literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the relation between the use of radiation protection gear and the decrease in absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, thereby reinforcing the efficacy of its use by both the patients and occupationally exposed personnel. Materials and Methods: The integrative literature review method was utilized to analyze 21 articles, 2 books, 1 thesis, 1 monograph, 1 computer program, 4 pieces of database research (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica and Departamento de Informatica do Sistema Unico de Saude) and 2 sets of radiological protection guidelines. Results: Theoretically, a reduction of 86% to 99% in the absorbed dose is observed with the use of radiation protection gear. In practice, however, the reduction may achieve 88% in patients submitted to conventional radiology, and 95% in patients submitted to computed tomography. In occupationally exposed individuals, the reduction is around 90% during cardiac catheterization, and 75% during orthopedic surgery. Conclusion: According to findings of several previous pieces of research, the use of radiation protection gear is a low-cost and effective way to reduce absorbed dose both for patients and occupationally exposed individuals. Thus, its use is necessary for the implementation of effective radioprotection programs in radiodiagnosis centers. (author)

  16. Absorbed dose intercomparison studies for Co-60 therapy units by the SSDL, Istanbul, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1989, CNAEM Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) undertook a TLD intercomparison programme using the IAEA/WHO method for the user of Co-60 teletherapy units to raise the dosimetric accuracy in radiotherapy. For this purpose, the radiotherapy centres in Turkey are sent plastic capsules containing LiF by post and are asked to irradiate these capsules to an absorbed dose of 2.0 Gy at a depth of 5 cm in water. The irradiated TLD capsules are returned to the SSDL by the radiotherapy centres. The given dose to the capsule is determined by SSDL and this measured dose is compared with stated dose by the radiotherapy centre. In this intercomparison were found that the 9 radiotherapy centres have less than ±5% deviation and 3 radiotherapy centres have higher than ±5% deviation. 6 refs, 1 tab

  17. Standard Guide for Absorbed-Dose Mapping in Radiation Processing Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This document provides guidance in determining absorbed-dose distributions in products, materials or substances irradiated in gamma, X-ray (bremsstrahlung) and electron beam facilities. Note 1—For irradiation of food and the radiation sterilization of health care products, other specific ISO and ISO/ASTM standards containing dose mapping requirements exist. For food irradiation, see ISO/ASTM 51204, Practice for Dosimetry in Gamma Irradiation Facilities for Food Processing and ISO/ASTM 51431, Practice for Dosimetry in Electron and Bremsstrahlung Irradiation Facilities for Food Processing. For the radiation sterilization of health care products, see ISO 11137: 1995, Sterilization of Health Care Products Requirements for Validation and Routine Control Radiation Sterilization. In those areas covered by ISO 11137, that standard takes precedence. ISO/ASTM Practice 51608, ISO/ASTM Practice 51649, and ISO/ASTM Practice 51702 also contain dose mapping requirements. 1.2 Methods of analyzing the dose map data ar...

  18. Basic evaluation of absorbed dose in the 'mantle' field in radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgkin's disease is one of the radiocurable disease. Avoiding overlap of dose from adjacent fields, megavoltage beams can be utilized at a treatment distance of 100 to 160 cm, making in possible to encompass all of the lymph node chains above the diaphragm in a single treatment field-the 'mantle' field. In the mantle field, we use a set of lead blocks designed individually to spare lager parts of normal lung tissue. We made blocks with beam divergence from low melting lead alloy using lead shot. With these blocks, we measured the absorbed dose in the mantle field in a human phantom, using a thermoluminescent dosimetry system. The results demonstrate that the absorbed dose distribution calculated by the computer system in the axial slices at + 60, 0 and -70 mm from the middle of the radiation field were in good agreements with our dosimetric results in the same slices. An integral dose volume histogram (DVH) obtained from the axial slice in the middle of the radiation field showed quantitatively the irradiated normal lung tissue. In conclusion: first, a dose calculation system using a computer was available in the large irregular shaped field utilizing a long treatment distance such as the 'mantle' field. Second, the DVH may be useful in the quantitative evaluation of lung injury resulting from radiotherapy using the 'mantle' field. (author)

  19. Regression models in the determination of the absorbed dose with extrapolation chamber for ophthalmological applicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose for equivalent soft tissue is determined,it is imparted by ophthalmologic applicators, (90 Sr/90 Y, 1850 MBq) using an extrapolation chamber of variable electrodes; when estimating the slope of the extrapolation curve using a simple lineal regression model is observed that the dose values are underestimated from 17.7 percent up to a 20.4 percent in relation to the estimate of this dose by means of a regression model polynomial two grade, at the same time are observed an improvement in the standard error for the quadratic model until in 50%. Finally the global uncertainty of the dose is presented, taking into account the reproducibility of the experimental arrangement. As conclusion it can infers that in experimental arrangements where the source is to contact with the extrapolation chamber, it was recommended to substitute the lineal regression model by the quadratic regression model, in the determination of the slope of the extrapolation curve, for more exact and accurate measurements of the absorbed dose. (Author)

  20. Investigation of magnevist pharmacokinetics for calculation of absorbed dose at neutron-capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The neutron-capture therapy with use of gadolinium-containing pharmacological preparations is one of perspective and not enough investigated directions of application of neutron irradiation in medicine. At definition of the absorbed dose of neutron-capture therapy one of important questions is definition of concentration gadolinium and pharmacokinetics in irradiated tumour. In the given study has been investigated pharmacokinetics of gadolinium-containing preparation 'Magnevist' at intratumoral injection in inoculated tumours of sarcoma C180 at mice. For 'Magnevist' detection its property of radioopacity has been used. In experiments to mice with inoculated tumours C180 the various doses of 'Magnevist' (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 ml) were injected into tumour centre. X-ray images were made before 'Magnevist' injection (control) and after preparation injection every 5 minutes within one hour. It has been shown that at dose 0.1 ml 'Magnevist' eliminated from tumour within 10 minutes. At higher doses of preparation more slow elimination of 'Magnevist' from injection site was observed. Obtained results allow with sufficient accuracy to calculate the time of presence of optimum concentration of 'Magnevist' in tumour at intratumoral injection. It in turn gives the chance to calculate precisely the absorbed dose at irradiation by beam of epi-thermal neutrons. (author)

  1. Quantification of micronuclei in blood lymphocytes of patients exposed to gamma radiation for dose absorbed assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose assessment in an important step to evaluate biological effects as a result of individual exposure to ionizing radiation. The use of cytogenetic dosimetry based on the quantification of micronuclei in lymphocytes is very important to complement physical dosimetry, since the measurement of absorbed dose cannot be always performed. In this research, the quantification of micronuclei was carried out in order to evaluate absorbed dose as a result of radiotherapy with 60Co, using peripheral blood samples from 5 patients with cervical uterine cancer. For this purpose, an aliquot of whole blood from the individual patients was added in culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with fetal calf serum and phytohaemagglutinin. The culture was incubated for 44 hours. Henceforth, cytochalasin B was added to block the dividing lymphocytes in cytokinesis. The culture was returned to the incubator for further of 28 hours. Thus, cells were harvested, processed and analyzed. Values obtained considering micronuclei frequency after pelvis irradiation with absorption of 0,08 Gy and 1,8 Gy were, respectively, 0,0021 and 0,052. These results are in agreement with some recent researches that provided some standard values related to micronuclei frequency induced by gamma radiation exposure in different exposed areas for the human body. The results presented in this report emphasizes biological dosimetry as an important tool for dose assessment of either total or partial-body exposure to ionizing radiation, mainly in retrospective dose investigation. (author)

  2. Absorbed dose/melting heat dependence studies for the PVDF homopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Gual, Maritza R.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: adriananuclear@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) of gamma irradiated Poly (vinylidene Fluoride) [PVDF] homopolymer has been studied in connection with the use of material in industrial high gamma dose measurement. Interaction between gamma radiation and PVDF leads to the radio-induction of C=O and conjugated C=C bonds, as it can be inferred from previous infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometric data. These induced defects result in a decrease of the polymer crystallinity that can be followed with DSC scans, by measuring the latent heat during the melting transition (Hmelt). After a systematic investigation, we have found that Hmelt is unambiguously related to the delivered doses ranging from 100 to 2,000 kGy of gamma radiation. One the other hand, further fading investigation analysis has proved that the Hmelt x Dose relationship can be fitted by an exponential function that remains constant for several months. Both the very large range of dose measurement and also the possibility of evaluating high gamma doses until five months after irradiation make PVDF homopolymers very good candidates to be investigated as commercial high gamma dose dosimeters. The high gamma dose irradiation facilities in Brazil used to develop high dose dosimeters are all devoted to industrial and medical purposes. Therefore, in view of the uncertainties involved in the dose measurements related to the electronic equilibrium correction factors and backscattering in the isodose curves used at the irradiation setup, a validation process is required to correctly evaluate the delivered absorbed doses. The sample irradiations were performed with a Co-60 source, at 12kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h, in the high gamma dose facilities at Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The comparison of the curve of the Hmelt vs Dose is presented in this paper. (author)

  3. Absorbed dose/melting heat dependence studies for the PVDF homopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) of gamma irradiated Poly (vinylidene Fluoride) [PVDF] homopolymer has been studied in connection with the use of material in industrial high gamma dose measurement. Interaction between gamma radiation and PVDF leads to the radio-induction of C=O and conjugated C=C bonds, as it can be inferred from previous infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometric data. These induced defects result in a decrease of the polymer crystallinity that can be followed with DSC scans, by measuring the latent heat during the melting transition (Hmelt). After a systematic investigation, we have found that Hmelt is unambiguously related to the delivered doses ranging from 100 to 2,000 kGy of gamma radiation. One the other hand, further fading investigation analysis has proved that the Hmelt x Dose relationship can be fitted by an exponential function that remains constant for several months. Both the very large range of dose measurement and also the possibility of evaluating high gamma doses until five months after irradiation make PVDF homopolymers very good candidates to be investigated as commercial high gamma dose dosimeters. The high gamma dose irradiation facilities in Brazil used to develop high dose dosimeters are all devoted to industrial and medical purposes. Therefore, in view of the uncertainties involved in the dose measurements related to the electronic equilibrium correction factors and backscattering in the isodose curves used at the irradiation setup, a validation process is required to correctly evaluate the delivered absorbed doses. The sample irradiations were performed with a Co-60 source, at 12kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h, in the high gamma dose facilities at Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The comparison of the curve of the Hmelt vs Dose is presented in this paper. (author)

  4. Calibration of therapy level dosimeters in terms of direct absorbed dose to water at SSDL-BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce the uncertainties in the dose delivered during the treatment of cancer patients, standardisation laboratories around the world switched over from air kerma based calibration to direct absorbed dose to water calibration of the therapy level dosimeters.This paper brings out the calibration data of various types of chambers that have been calibrated in terms of direct absorbed dose to water as well as in terms of air kerma in the last two years

  5. Calculation of absorbed doses in sphere volumes around the Mammosite using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to investigate the changes observed in the absorbed doses in mammary gland tissue when irradiated with a equipment of high dose rate known as Mammosite and introducing material resources contrary to the tissue that constitutes the mammary gland. The modeling study is performed with the code MCNPX, 2005 version, the equipment and the mammary gland and calculating the absorbed doses in tissue when introduced small volumes of air or calcium in the system. (Author)

  6. Clinical dosimetry with plastic scintillators - Almost energy independent, direct absorbed dose reading with high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical dosimetry is still far behind the goal to measure any spatial or temporal distribution of absorbed dose fast and precise without disturbing the physical situation by the dosimetry procedure. NE 102A plastic scintillators overcome this border. These tissue substituting dosemeter probes open a wide range of new clinical applications of dosimetry. This versatile new dosimetry system enables fast measurement of the absorbed dose to water in water also in regions with a steep dose gradient, close to interfaces, or in partly shielded regions. It allows direct reading dosimetry in the energy range of all clinically used external photon and electron beams, or around all branchytherapy sources. Thin detector arrays permit fast and high resolution measurements in quality assurance, such as in-vivo dosimetry or even afterloading dose monitoring. A main field of application is the dosimetric treatment planning, the individual optimization of brachytherapy applicators. Thus, plastic scintillator dosemeters cover optimally all difficult fields of clinical dosimetry. An overview about its characteristics and applications is given here. 20 refs, 1 fig

  7. Determination of Absorbed and Effective Dose from Natural Background Radiation around a Nuclear Research Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Musa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study presents result of outdoor absorbed dose rate and estimated effective dose from the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th and 238U series 40K, around a Nuclear Research Reactor at the Centre for Energy Research and Training (CERT, Zaria, Nigeria. Approach: A high-resolution in situ ?-ray spectrometry was used to carry out the study. CERT houses a 30Kw Research Reactor and other neutron and gamma sources for Research and Training. Results: The values of absorbed dose rate in air for 232Th, 238U and 40K range from 8.2 ± 2.5-24.5 ± 3.6 nGy h?1, 1.9 ± 1.2-4.6 ± 2.5 nGy h?1 and 12.2 ± 5-38 ± 6.7n Gy h?1 respectively . The estimated total annual effective dose outdoor for the sites range from 27.3-79.9 ?Sv y?1.Conclusions: This showed that radiation exposure level for the public is lower than the recommended value of 1 mSv y?1.Hence, the extensive usage of radioactive materials within and around CERT does not appear to have any impact on the radiation burden of the environment.

  8. Outdoor absorbed dose rate in air in relation to airborne natural radioactivity and meteorological conditions at Bucharest (Romania)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of environmental absorbed dose rate measurements performed over a 3-year period (1996-1999) at the Bucharest Environmental Radioactivity Surveillance Station are presented. The outdoor absorbed dose rate levels were analyzed in connection to airborne natural radioactivity and meteorological parameters, such as precipitation, air temperature and pressure.The minimum values were recorded in winter and the maximum values at the end of summer or beginning of autumn, mainly as a consequence of changes in weather and soil conditions (rain, ground moisture, snow cover).Significant statistical correlations were obtained between the outdoor absorbed dose rate and the air temperature and atmospheric pressure, respectively. (author)

  9. Comparison of the standards for absorbed dose to water of the ARPANSA and the BIPM for 60Co ? radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the standards for absorbed dose to water of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) has been carried out in 60Co gamma radiation. The Australian standard is based on a graphite calorimeter and the subsequent conversion from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water using the photon fluence scaling theorem. The BIPM standard is ionometric using a graphite-walled cavity ionization chamber. The comparison result is 1.0024 (standard uncertainty 0.0029). (authors)

  10. Evaluation of variation of voltage (kV) absorbed dose in chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most important diagnostic techniques images today. The increasing utilization of CT implies a significant increase of population exposure to ionizing radiation. Optimization of practice aims to reduce doses to patients because the image quality is directly related to the diagnosis. You can decrease the amount of dose to the patient, and maintain the quality of the image. There are several parameters that can be manipulated in a CT scan and these parameters can be used to reduce the energy deposited in the patient. Based on this, we analyzed the variation of dose deposited in the lungs, breasts and thyroid, by varying the supply voltage of the tube. Scans of the thorax were performed following the protocol of routine chest with constant and variable current for the same applied voltage. Moreover, a female phantom was used and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100), model bat, were used to record the specific organ doses. Scans were performed on a GE CT scanner, model 64 Discovery channels. Higher doses were recorded for the voltage of 120 kV with 200 mAs in the lungs (22.46 mGy) and thyroid (32.22 mGy). For scans with automatic mAs, variable between 100 and 440, this same tension contributed to the higher doses. The best examination in terms of the dose that was used with automatic 80 kV mAs, whose lungs and thyroid received lower dose. For the best breast exam was 100 kV. Since the increase in the 80 kV to 100 kV no impact so much the dose deposited in the lungs, it can be concluded that lowering the applied voltage to 100 kV resulted in a reduction in the dose absorbed by the patient. These results can contribute to optimizing scans of the chest computed tomography

  11. Calculation of absorbed doses to water pools in severe accident sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology is presented for calculating the radiation dose to a water pool from the decay of uniformly distributed nuclides in that pool. Motivated by the need to accurately model radiolysis reactions of iodine, direct application is made to fission product sources dissolved or suspended in containment sumps or pools during a severe nuclear reactor accident. Two methods of calculating gamma absorption are discussed - one based on point-kernal integration and the other based on Monte Carlo techniques. Using least-squares minimization, the computed results are used to obtain a correlation that relates absorbed dose to source energy and surface-to-volume ratio of the pool. This correlation is applied to most relevant fission product nuclides and used to actually calculate transient sump dose rate in a pressurized-water reactor (PWR) severe accident sequence

  12. Error in assessing the absorbed dose from the EPR signal from dental enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose measurements from EPR signals from dental enamel were analyzed in a random sampling of 100 teeth extracted in liquidators of the Chernobyl accident aftermath and the EPR spectra of dental enamel of 80 intact teeth from children studied. The mean square deviation of enamel sensitivity to ionizing radiation in some teeth is approximately 0.3 of the mean sensitivity value. The variability of the nature EPR spectrum of dental enamel limits in principle the lower threshold of EPR-measured 60 mGy doses. When assessing the individual absorbed doses from the EPR signal from dental enamel without additional exposure it is necessary to bear in mind the extra error of approximately 6-% at a confidence probability P=0.95 caused by the variability of enamel sensitivity to radiation in some teeth. This additional error may be ruled out by graduated additional exposure of the examined enamel samples

  13. Quality control of diagnostic radiology to reduce absorbed dose of patients in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce absorbed dose, to increase the image quality and to reduce the numbers of rejected films various quality control parameters were applied to X ray machines. These parameter are Kilo Volt peak, Milli Ampere, Exposure Time Focal Film Distance, Inherent Filters, Additional Filters Half Value Layer, Processor Condition, Cassettes. To evaluate and to apply these parameters in diagnostic radiological centers, ten hospitals were selected and a total number of 12 X ray machines were kept under quality control program. Considering different kinds of diagnostic radiology examination and to compare the dose before and after implementation of a quality control program, two kinds of examinations include in chest and abdomen examinations were considered. For each X ray machine, ten patients and for all selected centers, 120 patients were selected for chest examination and 120 patients for abdomen examinations; before and after implementation of quality control program, a total of 480 patients were selected randomly to be controlled. Base on different examinations carried out, it was concluded that both exposure conditions and general situations in radiological centers were not acceptable. The dosimetry results show that the average ski dose for chest and abdomen examinations were 0.28 m Gy and 4.23 Gy respectively. Before implementation of quality control step to reduce the surface skin dose, quality control parameters were applied and the exposure conditions were imposed. On average the absorbed doses for chest and abdomen examination were decreased to 79% and 61% respectively after the implementation of the program. From dose reduction point of view, the results of a part of this project which made by co-operation of International Atomic Energy Agency showed that Iran acquired the first grade for chest examination and second grade for abdomen examination. Base on the results obtained, the number of patients under chest and abdomen examination were 4041588 and 1534148 persons respectively

  14. Estimation of the dose absorbed by new-born children whose blood volume is studied by 51Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red cells have been labelled with 51Cr (0,3?Ci) and injected to prematured infants for red cell volume measurement. Gonadal radiation dose has been evaluated to about 2mrad and splenic dose of about 50mrad. These absorbed doses are comparable with those of routine radiological examinations of the prematured infants

  15. Assessment of absorbed dose to the ovaries of patients undergoing pelvic CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: Although Computed Tomography (CT) procedures constitute about 5% of the total diagnostic radiology procedures but are responsible for about 40% of the total ionizing radiation dose to the general population. As the dose is high especially in the CT of female pelvis, genetic radiation risk is also considerable. Materials and Methods: Radiation doses to the ovaries of the patients undergoing CT examination of the pelvis were measured from 9 different CT scanners available in Isfahan city. For each CT scanner 20 patients were selected. Measurement of organ dose was performed using TLD method. Results and Discussions: Mean and S.D. of absorbed dose to the ovaries from Shimadzo 2500 were 56.6 2.8; from GE Max 640 were 36.8 1.7; from GE Sytec 3000 were 36.6 1.8; from GE Sytec 4000 were 36.6 2.6; from Piker were 38.4 2.1; from Shimadzo 4500 were 36.4 1.2 and from Shimadzo 7800TE 28.2 1.5. Associated risks due to the measured dose are discussed. (author)

  16. New method for generating breast models featuring glandular tissue spatial distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, L.; Oliveira, B. B.; Oliveira, M. A.; Teixeira, M. H. A.; Fonseca, T. C. F.; Nogueira, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    Mammography is the main radiographic technique used for breast imaging. A major concern with mammographic imaging is the risk of radiation-induced breast cancer due to the high sensitivity of breast tissue. The mean glandular dose (DG) is the dosimetric quantity widely accepted to characterize the risk of radiation induced cancer. Previous studies have concluded that DG depends not only on the breast glandular content but also on the spatial distribution of glandular tissue within the breast. In this work, a new method for generating computational breast models featuring skin composition and glandular tissue distribution from patients undergoing digital mammography is proposed. Such models allow a more accurate way of calculating individualized breast glandular doses taking into consideration the glandular tissue fraction. Sixteen breast models of four patients with different glandularity breasts were simulated and the results were compared with those obtained from recommended DG conversion factors. The results show that the internationally recommended conversion factors may be overestimating the mean glandular dose to less dense breasts and underestimating the mean glandular dose for denser breasts. The methodology described in this work constitutes a powerful tool for breast dosimetry, especially for risk studies.

  17. Method for determination of the mean fraction of glandular tissue in individual female breasts using mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, J. T. M.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Thijssen, M. A. O.; van Woudenberg, S.; Zoetelief, J.

    2005-12-01

    The nationwide breast cancer screening programme using mammography has been in full operation in the Netherlands since 1997. Quality control of the screening programme has been assigned to the National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening. Limits are set to the mean glandular dose and the centre monitors these for all facilities engaged in the screening programme. This procedure is restricted to the determination of the entrance dose on a 5 cm thick polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. The mean glandular dose for a compressed breast is estimated from these data. Individual breasts may deviate largely from this 5 cm PMMA breast model. Not only may the compressed breast size vary from 2 to 10 cm, but breast composition varies also. The mean glandular dose is dependent on the fraction of glandular tissue (glandularity) of the breast. To estimate the risk related to individual mammograms requires the development of a method for determination of the glandularity of individual breasts. A method has been developed to derive the glandularity using the attenuation of mammography x-rays in the breast. The method was applied to a series of mammograms at a screening unit. The results, i.e., a glandularity of 93% within the range of 0 to 1, were comparable with data in the literature. The glandularity as a function of compressed breast thickness is similar to results from other investigators using differing methods.

  18. Method for determination of the mean fraction of glandular tissue in individual female breasts using mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nationwide breast cancer screening programme using mammography has been in full operation in the Netherlands since 1997. Quality control of the screening programme has been assigned to the National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening. Limits are set to the mean glandular dose and the centre monitors these for all facilities engaged in the screening programme. This procedure is restricted to the determination of the entrance dose on a 5 cm thick polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. The mean glandular dose for a compressed breast is estimated from these data. Individual breasts may deviate largely from this 5 cm PMMA breast model. Not only may the compressed breast size vary from 2 to 10 cm, but breast composition varies also. The mean glandular dose is dependent on the fraction of glandular tissue (glandularity) of the breast. To estimate the risk related to individual mammograms requires the development of a method for determination of the glandularity of individual breasts. A method has been developed to derive the glandularity using the attenuation of mammography x-rays in the breast. The method was applied to a series of mammograms at a screening unit. The results, i.e., a glandularity of 93% within the range of 0 to 1, were comparable with data in the literature. The glandularity as a function of compressed breast thickness is similar to results from other investigators using differing methods

  19. [Influence of thermoplastic masks on the absorbed skin dose for head and neck tumor radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halm, E Amiel; Tamri, A; Bridier, A; Wibault, P; Eschwège, F

    2002-09-01

    The influence of thermoplastic masks used in clinical routine for patient immobilization in head and neck radiotherapy treatment on the absorbed skin dose has been investigated at Gustave-Roussy Institute. The measurements were performed in 60Co gamma-rays, 4 and 6MV X-rays and in 8 and 10MeV electron beams. Initially, the measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF) and a NACP chamber on a polystyrene phantom in order to study the influence of physical parameters (distance, field size, energy...) on first millimeters depth variation dose. The study was completed with in vivo measurements on 14 patients using various dosimeters (thermoluminescent detectors, diodes) in order to assess the increase of dose on first millimeters depth and to verify the delivered dose during treatment sessions (quality control). In treatment conditions, masks lead to an important increase of dose on the first millimeter in 60Co gamma-rays beams (dose value normalized to maximum of dose increase from 57.1% to 77.7% for 0.5 mm-water depth and from 78.5% to 88% for 1 mm-water depth); its contribution is less important in 4 and 6 MV X-rays beams (dose value normalized to maximum of dose increase from 49.5% to 63.2% for 0.5 mm-water depth and from 59% to 70.1% for 1 mm-water depth). Concerning 8 and 10 MeV electron beams, the normalized dose value increase respectively from 78.4% to 81.7% and from 82.2% to 86.1% for 0.5 mm-water depth. In vivo dosimetry enabled the quality control of delivered dose during treatment. Measured dose is in agreement within +/- 5% with the prescribed dose for 92.3% of cases. In routine, in vivo dosimetry allowed to quantify the increase of skin dose induced by thermoplastic masks for various energies of photon and electron beams as well as quality control. PMID:12412370

  20. Influence of thermoplastic masks on absorbed skin dose for head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of thermoplastic masks used in clinical routine for patient immobilization in head and neck radiotherapy treatment on the absorbed skin dose has been investigated at Gustave-Roussy Institute. The measurements were performed in 60Co ?-rays, 4 and 6 MV X-rays and in 8 and 10 MeV electron beams. Initially, the measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF) and a NACP chamber on a polystyrene phantom in order to study the influence of physical parameters (distance, field size, energy...) on first millimeters depth variation dose. The study was completed with in vivo measurements on 14 patients using various dosimeters (thermoluminescent detectors, diodes) in order to assess the increase of dose on first millimeters depth and to verify the delivered dose during treatment sessions (quality control). In treatment conditions, masks lead to an important increase of dose on the first millimeter in 60Co ?-rays beams (dose value normalized to maximum of dose increase from 57.1% to 77.7% for 0.5 mm-water depth and from 78.5% to 88% for l mm-water depth); its contribution is less important in 4 and 6 MV X-rays beams (dose value normalized to maximum of dose increase from 49.5% to 63.2% for 0.5 mm-water depth and from 59% to 70.1 % for 1 mm-water depth). Concerning 8 and 10 MeV electron beams, the normalized dose value increase respectively from 78.4% to 81.7% and from 82.2% to 86.1% for 0.5 mm-water depth. In vivo dosimetry enabled the quality control of delivered dose during treatment. Measured dose is in agreement within ± 5% with the prescribed dose for 92.3% of cases. In routine, in vivo dosimetry allowed to quantify the increase of skin dose induced by thermoplastic masks for various energies of photon and electron beams as well as quality control. (authors)

  1. Results of photon absorbed-dose measurements using the AAPM TG-21 protocol for accelerating potentials up to 26 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AAPM Task Group 21 protocol for the calibration of high-energy photon and electron beams was produced to accomplish essentially two goals: (1) incorporate the latest physical data available for calculating absorbed dose from ionization measurements and (2) to eliminate inconsistencies in absorbed dose measurements made with various ion chamber and phantom combinations. The ability of the protocol was assessed to consistently determine x-ray absorbed dose from measurements made with four Farmer-type chambers and one parallel-plate chamber in water, polystyrene, and acrylic phantoms. The measurements were performed using seven high-energy x-ray beams from 60Co to 26-MV nominal accelerating potential. The absorbed dose to water calculated from measurements made with the various chamber and phantom combinations were found to be consistent. The doses calculated for the two most common phantom materials, water and polystyrene, were found to be in excellent agreement. This resolved a 1.6% discrepancy in the absorbed dose determined from the two phantoms using the SCRAD protocol. The doses for acrylic phantoms were found to be approximately 1.2%, low for nominal accelerating potentials less than 8.8 MV. For accelerating potentials of 8.8 MV or greater the agreement was considerably better. The mean dose determined for the parallel-plate chamber from measurements in polystyrene was found to be within 0.7% of the mean dose determined using Farmer-type ion chambers in all phantom materials

  2. Integral absorbed dose at optimal exposure condition in spiral CT for the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to optimize exposure condition on spiral CT for the temporomandibular joint and to calculate patient radiation dose under optimal exposure conditions. For measurement of exposure, a chamber was fixed on the detector of the spiral CT apparatus. The tube voltages used were 100 kV, 120 kV and 130 kV, and the tube currents were 25 mA, 50 mA, 1 mA, 200 mA and 300 mA. Exposure time was 1 second. The integral absorbed dose was calculated by the Energy Fluence method. The temporomandibular joint region of the phantom was scanned by CT at tube voltages of 100 kV, 120 kV and 130 kV, and tube currents of 25 mA, 50 mA, 75 mA, 100 mA, 125 mA and 150 mA. Table feed speed was fixed at 1 mm per rotation. Sagittal image of the temporomandibular joint was reconstructed from axial images. These images were assessed for their image quality using a five-point scale. The lowest exposure condition in clinical application was 120 kV, 75 mA and 1 mm per rotation. The integral absorbed dose during CT examination of the temporomandibular joint was 104 mJ under this condition. This was approximately three times greater than that of tomographic examination of the same region. (author)

  3. Technique-dependent decrease in thyroid absorbed dose for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A LiF thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system, calibrated in the tissue of interest with the beam used for experimentation, was employed to investigate dosages (muGy) to the thyroid region of an anthropomorphic phantom resultant from two dental complete-mouth radiographic procedures. Both techniques were compared in terms of dosages associated with combinations of lead apron and thyroid collar shielding while using a 70-kVp or 90-kVp x-ray beam for a 20-film complete-mouth series. Lead shielding significantly decreased the dose to the thyroid using both techniques (p less than 0.05). The use of the 90-kVp beam resulted in a significant reduction in the thyroid absorbed dose when using the bisecting angle technique (p less than 0.05) but caused a significant increase in the thyroid absorbed dose when the paralleling technique was used (p less than 0.05). The implementation of higher kilovoltage techniques in dental offices must therefore be dependent on the radiographic technique employed

  4. Selective fallopian tube catheterisation in female infertility: clinical results and absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical results of fluoroscopic fallopian tube catheterisation and absorbed radiation doses during the procedure were evaluated in 30 infertility patients with unilateral or bilateral tubal obstruction documented on hysterosalpingography. The staged technique consisted of contrast injection through an intrauterine catheter with a vacuum cup device, ostial salpingography with the wedged catheter, and selective salpingography with a coaxial microcatheter. Of 45 fallopian tubes examined, 35 (78 %) were demonstrated by the procedure, and at least one tube was newly demonstrated in 26 patients (87 %). Six of these patients conceived spontaneously in the follow-up period of 1-11 months. Four pregnancies were intrauterine and 2 were ectopic. This technique provided accurate and detailed information in the diagnosis and treatment of tubal obstruction in infertility patients. The absorbed radiation dose to the ovary in the average standardised procedure was estimated to be 0.9 cGy. Further improvement in the X-ray equipment and technique is required to reduce the radiation dose. (orig.). With 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from photon irradiation—an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Perry B.; Bahadori, Amir A.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-04-01

    A comprehensive set of photon fluence-to-dose response functions (DRFs) is presented for two radiosensitive skeletal tissues—active and total shallow marrow—within 15 and 32 bone sites, respectively, of the ICRP reference adult male. The functions were developed using fractional skeletal masses and associated electron-absorbed fractions as reported for the UF hybrid adult male phantom, which in turn is based upon micro-CT images of trabecular spongiosa taken from a 40 year male cadaver. The new DRFs expand upon both the original set of seven functions produced in 1985, and a 2007 update calculated under the assumption of secondary electron escape from spongiosa. In this study, it is assumed that photon irradiation of the skeleton will yield charged particle equilibrium across all spongiosa regions at energies exceeding 200 keV. Kerma coefficients for active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone and spongiosa at higher energies are calculated using the DRF algorithm setting the electron-absorbed fraction for self-irradiation to unity. By comparing kerma coefficients and DRF functions, dose enhancement factors and mass energy-absorption coefficient (MEAC) ratios for active marrow to spongiosa were derived. These MEAC ratios compared well with those provided by the NIST Physical Reference Data Library (mean difference of 0.8%), and the dose enhancement factors for active marrow compared favorably with values calculated in the well-known study published by King and Spiers (1985 Br. J. Radiol. 58 345-56) (mean absolute difference of 1.9 percentage points). Additionally, dose enhancement factors for active marrow were shown to correlate well with the shallow marrow volume fraction (R2 = 0.91). Dose enhancement factors for the total shallow marrow were also calculated for 32 bone sites representing the first such derivation for this target tissue.

  6. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from photon irradiation-an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Perry B; Bahadori, Amir A [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Eckerman, Keith F [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Lee, Choonsik [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [Nuclear and Radiological/Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-04-21

    A comprehensive set of photon fluence-to-dose response functions (DRFs) is presented for two radiosensitive skeletal tissues-active and total shallow marrow-within 15 and 32 bone sites, respectively, of the ICRP reference adult male. The functions were developed using fractional skeletal masses and associated electron-absorbed fractions as reported for the UF hybrid adult male phantom, which in turn is based upon micro-CT images of trabecular spongiosa taken from a 40 year male cadaver. The new DRFs expand upon both the original set of seven functions produced in 1985, and a 2007 update calculated under the assumption of secondary electron escape from spongiosa. In this study, it is assumed that photon irradiation of the skeleton will yield charged particle equilibrium across all spongiosa regions at energies exceeding 200 keV. Kerma coefficients for active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone and spongiosa at higher energies are calculated using the DRF algorithm setting the electron-absorbed fraction for self-irradiation to unity. By comparing kerma coefficients and DRF functions, dose enhancement factors and mass energy-absorption coefficient (MEAC) ratios for active marrow to spongiosa were derived. These MEAC ratios compared well with those provided by the NIST Physical Reference Data Library (mean difference of 0.8%), and the dose enhancement factors for active marrow compared favorably with values calculated in the well-known study published by King and Spiers (1985 Br. J. Radiol. 58 345-56) (mean absolute difference of 1.9 percentage points). Additionally, dose enhancement factors for active marrow were shown to correlate well with the shallow marrow volume fraction (R{sup 2} = 0.91). Dose enhancement factors for the total shallow marrow were also calculated for 32 bone sites representing the first such derivation for this target tissue.

  7. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from photon irradiation-an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive set of photon fluence-to-dose response functions (DRFs) is presented for two radiosensitive skeletal tissues-active and total shallow marrow-within 15 and 32 bone sites, respectively, of the ICRP reference adult male. The functions were developed using fractional skeletal masses and associated electron-absorbed fractions as reported for the UF hybrid adult male phantom, which in turn is based upon micro-CT images of trabecular spongiosa taken from a 40 year male cadaver. The new DRFs expand upon both the original set of seven functions produced in 1985, and a 2007 update calculated under the assumption of secondary electron escape from spongiosa. In this study, it is assumed that photon irradiation of the skeleton will yield charged particle equilibrium across all spongiosa regions at energies exceeding 200 keV. Kerma coefficients for active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone and spongiosa at higher energies are calculated using the DRF algorithm setting the electron-absorbed fraction for self-irradiation to unity. By comparing kerma coefficients and DRF functions, dose enhancement factors and mass energy-absorption coefficient (MEAC) ratios for active marrow to spongiosa were derived. These MEAC ratios compared well with those provided by the NIST Physical Reference Data Library (mean difference of 0.8%), and the dose enhancement factors for active marrow compared favorably with values calculated in the well-known study published by King and Spiers (1985 Br. J. Radiol. 58 345-56) (mean absolute difference of 1.9 percentage points). Additionally, dose enhancement factors for active marrow were shown to correlate well with the shallow marrow volume fraction (R2 = 0.91). Dose enhancement factors for the total shallow marrow were also calculated for 32 bone sites representing the first such derivation for this target tissue.

  8. Absorbed and effective dose from spiral and computed tomography for the dental implant planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Beong Hee; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-15

    To evaluate the absorbed and effective doses of spiral and computed tomography for the dental implant planning. For radiographic projection. TLD chips were placed in 22 sites of humanoid phantom to record the exposure to skin and the mean absorbed dose to bone marrow, thyroid, pituitary, parotid and submandibular glands and nesophages. Effective dose was calculated, using the method suggested by Frederiksen at al.. Patient situations of a single tooth gap in upper and lower midline region, edentulous maxilla and mandible were simulated for spiral tomography. 35 axial slices (maxilla) and 40 axial slices (mandible) with low and standard dose setting were used for computed tomography. All the radiographic procedures were repeated three times. The mean effective dose in case of maxilla was 0.865 mSv, 0.452 mSv, 0.136 mSv and 0.025 mSv, in spiral tomography of complete edentulous maxilla, computed tomography with standard mAs, computed tomography with low mAs and spiral tomography of a single tooth gap (p<0.05). That in case of mandible was 0.614 mSv, 0.448 mSv, 0.137 mSv and 0.036 mSv, in spiral tomography of complete edentulous mandible, computed tomography with standard mAs, computed tomography with low mAs and spiral tomography of a single tooth gap (p<0.05). Based on these results, it can be concluded that low mAs computed tomography is recommended instead of spiral tomography for the complete edentulous maxilla and mandible dental implant treatment planning.

  9. Absorbed and effective dose from spiral and computed tomography for the dental implant planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the absorbed and effective doses of spiral and computed tomography for the dental implant planning. For radiographic projection. TLD chips were placed in 22 sites of humanoid phantom to record the exposure to skin and the mean absorbed dose to bone marrow, thyroid, pituitary, parotid and submandibular glands and nesophages. Effective dose was calculated, using the method suggested by Frederiksen at al.. Patient situations of a single tooth gap in upper and lower midline region, edentulous maxilla and mandible were simulated for spiral tomography. 35 axial slices (maxilla) and 40 axial slices (mandible) with low and standard dose setting were used for computed tomography. All the radiographic procedures were repeated three times. The mean effective dose in case of maxilla was 0.865 mSv, 0.452 mSv, 0.136 mSv and 0.025 mSv, in spiral tomography of complete edentulous maxilla, computed tomography with standard mAs, computed tomography with low mAs and spiral tomography of a single tooth gap (p<0.05). That in case of mandible was 0.614 mSv, 0.448 mSv, 0.137 mSv and 0.036 mSv, in spiral tomography of complete edentulous mandible, computed tomography with standard mAs, computed tomography with low mAs and spiral tomography of a single tooth gap (p<0.05). Based on these results, it can be concluded that low mAs computed tomography is recommended instead of spiral tomography for the complete edentulous maxilla and mandible dental implant treatment planning

  10. Ionization current measurements using and extrapolation chamber for the determination of the absorbed dose from β emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain the beta response of survey instruments, the working group no.5 of the C.E.A. Radiation Offices has studied an extrapolation chamber as reference apparatus. The value of the different correcting factors which modify the number of ions pairs collected per mass of air, in other words, the absorbed dose in the air of the cavity is reported. Then, the physical constants (transmission, back-scattering...) which are necessary to pass from the absorbed dose in the air of the cavity, to the absorbed dose in the tissue for a semi-infinite medium below a thickness of 7.5mg/cm2 are given. The absorbed dose in tissue, to within an error of about 4%, can be estimated

  11. Evaluation of the absorbed dose, half-thickness layer and the yield of X-ray an diagnostic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work develops parametrization methods for evaluation the absorbed doses, the half-thickness and the effectiveness of a X-ray beams from a Shimadzu Radiotex and a SRO 2550 Philips models equipment

  12. The 1998 calibration of Australian secondary standards of exposure and absorbed dose at 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New calibration factors are reported for several of the ionization chambers maintained at the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) as Australian secondary standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose at 60Co. These calibration factors supplement or replace the calibration factors given in earlier reports. Updated 90Sr reference source data are given for the ARL chambers, and for two of the ANSTO chambers. These results confirm the stability of the secondary standards. A re-calibration of the ANSTO reference electrometer is reported. This was carried out using an improved method, which is fully described

  13. Quantification of radiation absorbed dose and DNA damages in subjects undergoing computer tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-rays are extensively used in medical field for imaging, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy. Irrespective of the application, the procedures deliver a significant amount of dose to the subject, while undergoing the procedure, which vary from imaging (low dose in the order mGy) and therapy (high doses in the order of several Gy). Of the various imaging modalities, the computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to diagnose many health alignments, in all age groups. Though the personals involved in performing the procedures are monitored for the levels of exposure, it is uncommon to monitor the patient after the examination, as the benefits outweigh the risk. However an enhanced concern on the risk associated due to the exposure of low dose X-radiation in CT has been reported. Therefore, we aim to quantify the absorbed dose to the eye, thyroid and forehead using thermo luminescence dosimeter of Lithium Manganese Borate doped with Terbium (LMB:Tb) in subjects undergoing CT examination (n= 27), as a methodology to investigate the effects of low dose ionizing radiation. Further, the DNA damages was measured using chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) assay, from the blood samples obtained from the study subjects before and after the procedures. The overall measured organ dose ranged between 1.92 and 520.14 mGy for eye, 0.84 and 210.33 mGy for forehead and 1.79-185 mGy for thyroid, with an average of 128.861137.16, 78.25169.02 and 48.86163.60 respectively. The DNA damages measured using CA and MN assay, showed an extreme statistically significant (p<0.0001) increase in CA and significant increase (p<0.001) in MN frequency in post exposure when compared to that of unexposed control. The significance of the estimated dose and the DNA damages will be discussed. (author)

  14. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. 4. EPR measurements on eggshell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresh whole eggs were treated with ionizing radiation for Salmonellae control testing. The eggshell was then removed and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine if EPR could be used to (1) distinguish irradiated from unirradiated eggs and (2) assess the absorbed dose. No EPR signals were detected in unirradiated eggs, while strong signals were measurable for more than 200 days after irradiation. Although a number of OPR signals were measured,the most intense resonance (g = 2.0019) was used for dosimetry throughout the study. This signal was observed to increase linearly with dose (up to approximately 6 kGy), which decayed approximately 20 % within the first 5 days after irradiation and remained relatively constant thereafter. The standard added-dose method was used to assess, retrospectively, the dose to eggs processed at 0.2, 0.7, and 1.4 kGy. Relatively good results were obtained when measurement was made on the day the shell was reradiated; with this procedure estimates were better for shell processed at the lower doses

  15. Absorbed dose distribution of brachytherapy sources through Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    brachytherapy techniques used throughout the world is derived, or has as a principle the method Paterson-Parker (PP), which ensures the homogeneity of 10% of the treatment plan (target volume), the distance 'h' from the plane formed the source distribution brachytherapy irradiation. Thus, the method ensures that the maximum dose does not exceed 10% of the dose set to satisfy the criteria for uniformity. In this study, we evaluated the method PP measures in dose distribution, having as the Fricke Xylenol Gel dosimeter (FXG), which was irradiated with an orderly distribution of sources of treatment. The distribution was made with eight sources of 137Cs, distributed in the rules of the PP method, with h = 5.75 mm. The phantom was a distribution of 5 x 5 cm2 standard spectrophotometer cuvettes (each 1.25 x 1.25 x 3.5 cm3 optical path length) FXG filled with a total volume of 5 x 5 x 3.5 cm3. The phantom was irradiated in a time of 3.3 h resulting in an absorbed dose of 10 Gy in the treatment plan. Then, the FXG was read in a monospectrophotometer and their results were processed in a routine MATLAB ® thereby obtaining the dose distribution. The homogeneity was calculated at 7.8% in the treatment plan, which is in accordance with the protocols of IAEA-TECDOC-602. (author)

  16. Estimate of organ radiation absorbed doses in clinical CT using the radiation treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ absorbed doses in computed tomography (CT) scans can be measured with anatomical phantoms but not inside the human body. In this study, a straightforward method was investigated to estimate organ doses in clinical CT using the radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and compared them with experimental results of photoluminescence dosemeters (PLD). In a heterogeneous phantom, the average difference between PLD and RTPS values were 25.0% for the body and 7.1% for the lung. Using CT data, organ doses in 30 clinical cases were then calculated. There was a significant inverse correlation between the calculated values of organ doses and body mass index (BMI, correlation coefficients (r)520.69 (whole body), 20.80 (right lung), 20.81 (left lung), 20.76 (spinal cord), 20.74 (vertebra bone), 20.74 (heart), and 20.79 (oesophagus), all p < 0.01). An RTPS can be a simple and useful tool for estimating equivalent doses inside the human body, during whole-body CT scans. (authors)

  17. Analysis of absorbed dose to tooth enamel against external photon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorbed dose to tooth enamel was examined against external photon exposure by measurements with thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) and Monte Carlo calculations. TLDs were placed in a realistic physical phantom to measure dose to the teeth region in a head. A voxel-type phantom was constructed from computed tomography (CT) images of the physical phantom. Monte Carlo calculations with this voxel-type phantom were performed to analyse the results of the experiments. The data obtained were compared to the enamel doses, which were calculated with a modified MIRD-type phantom and already given in a previous paper. It was confirmed that the data derived with the MIRD-type phantom are applicable for retrospective individual dose assessments by electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry using teeth for the photon energy region above 300 keV. The analysis, however, indicated that the configuration of the head can affect the enamel dose relative to external exposure to photons with energy below 100 keV. (author)

  18. Irradiation of ferrous ammonium sulfate for its use as high absorbed dose and low-temperature dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, we study the response of crystalline ammonium ferrous sulfate as a function of the irradiation dose and temperature. The dose studied ranged from 33.5 to 546 kGy. The temperature regimen varied from 77 K (liquid nitrogen) to 311 K. The analysis of the samples was made by UV spectroscopy and EPR. The results show that the change in absorbance of the dosimeter was linear with respect to the absorbed dose in the range studied. There is a small influence of the irradiation temperature in the response of the iron salt. The dose rate and storage time after irradiation was of no importance in this application

  19. Absorbed doses to the main parts of eyeball due to use 90Sr + 90Y ophthalmic applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ophthalmic radiotherapy dosimetry and some affecting factors are introduced. The distributions of absorbed doses to the main parts of a fresh eyeball such as the cornea, sclera, lens and anterior chamber, during the radiotherapy by using a 90Sr + 90Y ophthalmic applicator are presented. An tissue-equivalent extrapolation ionization chamber was used in the dose measurement. The reasonable doses during ophthalmic radiotherapy for different depths have been obtained. Therefore, the absorbed dose to the lens, the most sensitive organ, can be given. These data are useful for radiation protection in ophthalmic radiotherapy

  20. CALDoseX: a software tool for absorbed dose calculations in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients (CCs) between absorbed dose to organs and tissues at risk and measurable quantities commonly used in X-ray diagnosis have been calculated for the last 30 years mostly with mathematical MIRD5-type phantoms, in which organs are represented by simple geometrical bodies, like ellipsoids, tori, truncated cylinders, etc. In contrast, voxel-based phantoms are true to nature representations of human bodies. The purpose of this study is therefore to calculate CCs for common examinations in X-ray diagnosis with the recently developed MAX06 (Male Adult voXel) and FAX06 (Female Adult voXel) phantoms for various projections and different X-ray spectra and to make these CCs available to the public through a software tool, called CALDoseX (CALculation of Dose for X-ray diagnosis). (author)

  1. The dose absorbed by lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method of irradiating cells in vitro with beta particles is to add the ?-emitter to a cell suspension; various dosimetric aspects of this procedure have been investigated. Is is shown that, due to the different water content of the various constituents of a blood cell suspension, the average dose Dsub(?) absorbed by a certain type of cells for a tritium nominal concentration C0 and an irradiation time t is given by Dsub(?)(t) = KEnC0etat. Typical values of the factor eta are calculated for lymphocytes. A series of experiments has demonstrated that whilst the uptake phase has negligible effect on the dose, a significant error may arise during washing-out because a proportion of the activity remains in the cells. (author)

  2. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  3. Absorbed dose measurement of photon beam with Farmer-type ionization chambers in Japanese dosimetry protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Society of Medical Physics (JSMP) have published a new dosimetry protocol ''JSMP-01'' (standard dosimetry of absorbed dose in external beam radiotherapy) which conforms to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA TRS-398) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM TG-51) protocols for the calibration of radiotherapy beams. Since the new protocol offers the physical data for the Famer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials, the user can measure the absorbed dose at reference point (D?) using most of the commercially available Famer-type ionization chambers. In this paper, the six Famer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials is examined for photon beam by two ways. To verify the JSMP-01 protocol as the first way, D? was cross-measured based on the JSMP-01 protocol using a Farmer-type ionization chamber of the acrylic wall material which is called ''JARP-chamber'' and the Farmer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials, and compared. To compare the basic data in previous and new protocols as the second way, D? was measured based on the previous protocol (JSMP-86) and the JSMP-01 protocol using the Farmer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials. Dose calculation was made using common exposure calibration factor for 60Co gamma-rays (Nc) for each of the Farmer-type ionization chambers. Measurements was made with each ionization chamber for 6 and 10 MV photon beams in two facilities. D? were found to agree to that of JARP-chamber within about ±1% despite significant differences of ratio of calibration factor (?D,X) and beam quality conversion factor (?Q) for photon beams. The ratios JSMP-01/JSMP-86 of the reference dose were found to lie on between 0.999 and 1.004 for 6 MV and on between 0.999 and 1.005 for 10 MV depending upon the Farmer-type ionization chambers used. The largest discrepancies between the previous and new protocols arise from the use of different data of ?D,X x ?Q and C? for the absorbed dose conversion factors of each ionization chamber. (author)

  4. Measurement of absorbed dose to water for low and medium energy x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Over the last decade, the treatment of superficial or intercavitary malignancies with medium-energy x-rays has regained popularity. This development puts renewed and increased emphasis on the importance of accurate dosimetry in this energy range. An appreciable number of publications dealing with various aspects of dosimetry in medium-energy x-ray beams has appeared and several protocols for the dosimetry of medium-energy x-ray appeared which led to the publication of a comparison between the various protocols. Attempts were made to model x-ray radiotherapy units by Monte Carlo methods, a method originally developed for high-energy treatment systems. In-phantom dosimetry for medium-energy x-rays suffers from the lack of a primary standard which would allow direct determination of the water absorbed dose. Attempts at a direct measurement of the water absorbed dose were made employing water calorimetry. These attempts suffered from the unknown energy dependence of the chemical yield for ferrous sulfate dosimetry, or from insufficient knowledge of the calorimetric heat defect. In the absence of a direct method, two different approaches have mainly been made. In one of these an ionisation chamber calibrated in free air in terms of air kerma is positioned at reference depth inside the water phantom. The absorbed dose to water is obtained by conversion of the air kerma measured in the water phantom to water kerma or, which is essentially equivalent in this energy range, to absorbed dose to water. When this method is used, correction factors have to be applied, which have to take into account i) the differences in the properties of the radiation field used for calibration in free air and of that inside the phantom and ii) the modification of the in-phantom radiation field caused by the presence of the ionisation chamber with its air cavity and with non water-equivalent walls and chamber stem. The other approach is to start with the measurement of absorbed dose to graphite in a graphite phantom. A measurement of absorbed dose to graphite, traceable to the physical base quantities of length and charge, can be accomplished by means of a graphite extrapolation chamber. In the energy range considered and under conditions of secondary electron equilibrium, the absorbed dose to graphite is numerically identical to the graphite collision kerma. Thus, by making use of the spectral distribution of the photon fluence at the point of measurement, which can be obtained by Monte Carlo calculations, the graphite collision kerma can be converted to water collision kerma by means of the ratio of the mass-energy absorption coefficients averaged over the photon energy fluence spectrum. This allows the calibration of a transfer ionisation chamber in terms of water collision kerma inside the graphite phantom. This transfer chamber is then positioned at the reference point of a water phantom. On the assumption that the angular and spectral distributions of the photon fluence in the graphite and the water phantom are reasonably similar to each other, the ionisation chamber measures water collision kerma inside the water phantom, which, again under the conditions prevailing, is numerically identical to absorbed dose to water. Each of the two methods outlined above has its 'critical' steps. For the measurement based on air kerma calibration there are significant differences between the calibration conditions (essentially mono directional radiation) and the conditions of measurement characterised by abundant scattered radiation. This makes it difficult to find reliable values for the correction factors which have to be applied to take the difference in the response to the two radiation fields into account. On the other hand, for the measurements with the graphite extrapolation chamber the ratio of the mass-energy absorption coefficients graphite to water is to be determined. This factor depends quite strongly on photon energy. The accuracy of the results of the accompanying Monte Carlo calculations therefore plays a decisive role in the uncer

  5. SSDL BARC APMP key comparison for absorbed dose to water for 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL BARC has participated in the APMP.RI(I). K4 key comparison of absorbed dose to water for 60Co between 2009 and 2010 conducted under the auspices of The APMP/TCRI Dosimetry Working Group. SSDL Bhabha Atomic Research Centre was one among the fourteen national metrology institutes (NMIs) that participated in the intercomparison. The main objective of the intercomparison programme under the aegis of Asia Pacific Metrological Programme (APMP) is to establish a degree of equivalence of national standards and to support the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) of ionization chamber calibration used in radiotherapy for the participants. Three of the participating laboratories (ARPANSA, PTB and NMIJ) maintain primary standard for absorbed dose to water. Three ionization chambers were used as transfer chambers to indirectly compare the national standard of the participating laboratory. Participation of the primary laboratories in the intercomparison programme allows the results to be linked to the key comparison data base (KCDB) of the CIPM MRA, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan was the pilot laboratory

  6. Thyroid absorbed dose for people at Rongelap, Utirik, and Sifo on March 1, 1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was undertaken to reexamine thyroid absorbed dose estimates for people accidentally exposed to fallout at Rongelap, Sifo, and Utirik Islands from the Pacific weapon test known as Operation Castle BRAVO. The study included: (1) reevaluation of radiochemical analysis, to relate results from pooled urine to intake, retention, and excretion functions; (2) analysis of neutron-irradiation studies of archival soil samples, to estimate areal activities of the iodine isotopes; (3) analysis of source term, weather data, and meteorological functions used in predicting atmospheric diffusion and fallout deposition, to estimate airborne concentrations of the iodine isotopes; and (4) reevaluation of radioactive fallout, which contaminated a Japanese fishing vessel in the vicinity of Rongelap Island on March 1, 1954, to determine fallout components. The conclusions of the acute exposure study were that the population mean thyroid absorbed doses were 21 gray (2100 rad) at Rongelap, 6.7 gray (670 rad) at Sifo, and 2.8 gray (280 rad) at Utirik. The overall thyroid cancer risk we estimated was in agreement with results published on the Japanese exposed at Nagasaki and Hiroshima. We now postulate that the major route for intake of fallout was by direct ingestion of food prepared and consumed outdoors. 66 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs

  7. Thyroid absorbed dose for people at Rongelap, Utirik, and Sifo on March 1, 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessard, E.T.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Conrad, R.A.; Musoline, S.V.; Naidu, J.R.; Moorthy, A.; Schopfer, C.J.

    1985-03-01

    A study was undertaken to reexamine thyroid absorbed dose estimates for people accidentally exposed to fallout at Rongelap, Sifo, and Utirik Islands from the Pacific weapon test known as Operation Castle BRAVO. The study included: (1) reevaluation of radiochemical analysis, to relate results from pooled urine to intake, retention, and excretion functions; (2) analysis of neutron-irradiation studies of archival soil samples, to estimate areal activities of the iodine isotopes; (3) analysis of source term, weather data, and meteorological functions used in predicting atmospheric diffusion and fallout deposition, to estimate airborne concentrations of the iodine isotopes; and (4) reevaluation of radioactive fallout, which contaminated a Japanese fishing vessel in the vicinity of Rongelap Island on March 1, 1954, to determine fallout components. The conclusions of the acute exposure study were that the population mean thyroid absorbed doses were 21 gray (2100 rad) at Rongelap, 6.7 gray (670 rad) at Sifo, and 2.8 gray (280 rad) at Utirik. The overall thyroid cancer risk we estimated was in agreement with results published on the Japanese exposed at Nagasaki and Hiroshima. We now postulate that the major route for intake of fallout was by direct ingestion of food prepared and consumed outdoors. 66 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs.

  8. ESR spectroscopy for detecting gamma-irradiated dried vegetables and estimating absorbed doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of an increasing demand for food irradiation technology, the development of a reliable means of detection for the control of irradiated foods has become necessary. Various vegetable food materials (dried cabbage, carrot, chunggyungchae, garlic, onion, and green onion), which can be legally irradiated in Korea, were subjected to a detection study using ESR spectroscopy. Correlation coefficients (R2) between absorbed doses (2.5-15 kGy) and their corresponding ESR signals were identified from ESR signals. Pre-established threshold values were successfully applied to the detection of 54 coded unknown samples of dried clean vegetables (chunggyungchae, Brassica camestris var. chinensis), both non-irradiated and irradiated. The ESR signals of irradiated chunggyungchae decreased over a longer storage time, however, even after 6 months of ambient storage, these signals were still distinguishable from those of non-irradiated samples. The most successful estimates of absorbed dose (5 and 8 kGy) were obtained immediately after irradiation using a quadratic fit with average values of 4.85 and 8.65 kGy being calculated. (author)

  9. Measurement of absorbed dose by 7-GeV bremsstrahlung in a PMMA phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Job, P.K.; Pisharody, M.; Semones, E

    1999-12-11

    High-energy electron storage rings generate energetic bremsstrahlung photons through radiative interaction of the particle beam with the residual gas molecules and other components inside the storage ring. At synchrotron radiation facilities, where beamlines are channeled out of the storage ring, a continuous bremsstrahlung spectrum, with a maximum energy of the stored particle beam, will be present. At the advanced photon source (APS), where the stored beam energy is 7 GeV, bremsstrahlung generated in the straight sections of the insertion device beamlines, which are a total of 15.38 m in length, can be significant. The contribution from each bremsstrahlung interaction adds up to produce a narrow mono-directional bremsstrahlung beam that comes down through the insertion device beamlines. The resulting absorbed dose distributions by this radiation in a 300 mmx300 mmx300 mm tissue substitute cube phantom were measured with LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-700) thermoluminescent dosemeters. The normalized absorbed dose, in a cross-sectional area of 100 mm{sup 2} at a depth of 150 mm of the PMMA phantom, was measured as 3.3x10{sup 6} mGy h{sup -1}W{sup -1} for 7-GeV bremsstrahlung spectrum.

  10. The relationship between absorbed dose and T2 in radiation dosimetry polymer gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Changes in spin-spin relaxation times (T2) with absorbed radiation dose form the basis of polymer gel dosimetry. The detailed nature of those changes are still unknown. It is believed that this information will help in the design of new gel dosimeter formulations having desired characteristics. Radiation-sensitive polyacrylamide gels (PAG) were prepared under a nitrogen atmosphere in a glove box and kept in sealed glass vials. The composition of the PAG was acrylamide (AA) 3%, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS) 3%, gelatin 5% and water 89%, by weight. The PAGs were irradiated with ?-rays from 60Co in a Gammacell-200. NMR spectroscopy at 300 MHz, FT-Raman spectroscopy and MRI (64 MHz) were used. Three proton pools in fast exchange of magnetization are considered. The mobile pool initially contains protons from water and AA and BIS. As irradiation proceeds, AA and BIS co-polymerize and protons are transferred to the initially empty polymer pool. The third pool contains the gelatin protons and remains unchanged. The amount of protons in the polymer pool is determined with FT-Raman spectroscopy and the amount of monomers remaining was monitored by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The model closely fits the non-linear variations of T2 (and R2 =1/T2) with absorbed dose. The model presented helps understanding the changes of T2 in PAG dosimeters. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  11. Assessment of the absorbed dose to organs from bone mineral density scan by using TLDS and the Monte Carlo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry is used in bone mineral density systems to assess the amount of osteoporosis. The purpose of this research is to evaluate patient organ doses from dual X-ray absorptiometry by thermoluminescence dosimeters chips and Monte Carlo method. To achieve this goal, in the first step, the surface dose of the cervix, kidney, abdomen region, and thyroid were measured by using TLD-GR 200 at various organ locations. Then, to evaluate the absorbed dose by simulation, the BMD system, patient's body, X-ray source and radiosensitive tissues were simulated by the Monte Carlo method. The results showed, for the spine (left femur bone mineral density scan by using thermoluminescence dosimeters, the absorbed doses of the cervix and kidney were 4.5 (5.64 and 162.17 (3.99(mGy, respectively. For spine (left femur bone mineral density scan in simulation, the absorbed doses of the cervix and kidney were 4.19 (5.88 and 175 (3.68(mGy, respectively. The data obtained showed that the absorbed dose of the kidney in the spine scan is noticeable. Furthermore, because of the small relative difference between the simulation and experimental results, the radiation absorbed dose may be assessed by simulation and software, especially for internal organs, and at different depths of otherwise inaccessible organs which is not possible in experiments.

  12. Absorbed Dose Measurement by the MIRD System in the I-131 Treated Thyroid Cancer patients 61-7254-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical Internal Radiation Dose(MIRD) schema was developed for calculating the absorbed dose from the administered radiopharmaceuticals. With the biological distribution data and the physical properties of the radionuclide we can estimate the absorbed dose by the MIRD schema. For the thyroid cancer patients received I-131 therapy, the absorbed dose to the bone marrow is the limiting factor to the administered dose, and the duration of admission is determined by the retained activity in the whole body. To monitor the whole body radioactivity, we used Eberline Smart 200 system using ionization chamber as a detector. With the time activity curve of the whole body, total body residence time was obtained. From the ICRP publication 53, the residence times of the source organs, such as kidney, urinary bladder content and stomach, were, used to calculate the absorbed doses of the target organs, such as stomach, red marrow, bladder wall and remainder total body. In 8 thyroid cancer patients with 175 mci of I-131 administered orally, the mean absorbed dose in the bladder wall was 375.1 in the stomach 285.1, red marrow 25.4 and total body 22.4 rad respectively. For the monitoring of the large administered activity, this method seemed to be quite useful.

  13. Secondary absorbed doses from light ion irradiation in anthropomorphic phantoms representing an adult male and a 10 year old child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Martha; Gudowska, Irena

    2010-11-01

    Secondary organ absorbed doses were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations with the SHIELD-HIT07 code coupled with the mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms CHILD-HIT and ADAM-HIT. The simulated irradiations were performed with primary 1H, 4He, 7Li, 12C and 16O ion beams in the energy range 100-400 MeV/u which were directly impinging on the phantoms, i.e. approximating scanned beams, and with a simplified beamline for 12C irradiation. The evaluated absorbed doses to the out-of-field organs were in the range 10-6 to 10-1 mGy per target Gy and with standard deviations 0.5-20%. While the contribution to the organ absorbed doses from secondary neutrons dominated in the ion beams of low atomic number Z, the produced charged fragments and their subsequent charged secondaries of higher generations became increasingly important for the secondary dose delivery as Z of the primary ions increased. As compared to the simulated scanned 12C ion beam, the implementation of a simplified beamline for prostate irradiation with 12C ions resulted in an increase of 2-50 times in the organ absorbed doses depending on the distance from the target volume. Comparison of secondary organ absorbed doses delivered by 1H and 12C beams showed smaller differences when the RBE for local tumor control of the ions was considered and normalization to the RBE-weighted dose to the target was performed.

  14. Secondary absorbed doses from light ion irradiation in anthropomorphic phantoms representing an adult male and a 10 year old child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary organ absorbed doses were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations with the SHIELD-HIT07 code coupled with the mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms CHILD-HIT and ADAM-HIT. The simulated irradiations were performed with primary 1H, 4He, 7Li, 12C and 16O ion beams in the energy range 100-400 MeV/u which were directly impinging on the phantoms, i.e. approximating scanned beams, and with a simplified beamline for 12C irradiation. The evaluated absorbed doses to the out-of-field organs were in the range 10-6 to 10-1 mGy per target Gy and with standard deviations 0.5-20%. While the contribution to the organ absorbed doses from secondary neutrons dominated in the ion beams of low atomic number Z, the produced charged fragments and their subsequent charged secondaries of higher generations became increasingly important for the secondary dose delivery as Z of the primary ions increased. As compared to the simulated scanned 12C ion beam, the implementation of a simplified beamline for prostate irradiation with 12C ions resulted in an increase of 2-50 times in the organ absorbed doses depending on the distance from the target volume. Comparison of secondary organ absorbed doses delivered by 1H and 12C beams showed smaller differences when the RBE for local tumor control of the ions was considered and normalization to the RBE-weighted dose to the target was performed.

  15. Determination of the optimal statistical uncertainty to perform electron-beam Monte Carlo absorbed dose estimation in the target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of study Monte Carlo based treatment planning system are known to be more accurate than analytical methods for performing absorbed dose estimation, particularly in and near heterogeneities. However, the required computation time can still be an issue. The present study focused on the determination of the optimum statistical uncertainty in order to minimise computation time while keeping the reliability of the absorbed dose estimation in treatments planned with electron-beams. Materials and methods Three radiotherapy plans (medulloblastoma, breast and gynaecological) were used to investigate the influence of the statistical uncertainty of the absorbed dose on the target volume dose-volume histograms (spinal cord, intra-mammary nodes and pelvic lymph nodes, respectively). Results The study of the dose-volume histograms showed that for statistical uncertainty levels (1 S.D.) above 2 to 3%, the standard deviation of the mean dose in the target volume calculated from the dose-volume histograms increases by at least 6%, reflecting the gradual flattening of the dose-volume histograms. Conclusions This work suggests that, in clinical context, Monte Carlo based absorbed dose estimations should be performed with a maximum statistical uncertainty of 2 to 3%. (authors)

  16. Absorbed dose measurements using TLDS in biological samples from beta radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Manzoli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation of samples in peculiar experimental apparatus, subject to radiation spread, requires a special evaluation of absorbed dose implanted to the sample. Indirect calibration of the irradiation source, obtained in a different apparatus, and the spread, usually of very difficult theoretical evaluation, can cause very serious measurement errors, sometimes reaching 50%. In this work, the procedure for dose evaluation in an apparatus for beta irradiation of samples, usually biological ones,is presented, making use of calibration curves, obtained by irradiation in advance of thermoluminescent detectors in air, and so irradiating them in the same position of the sample. An application in blood sample irradiation is also presented.A irradiação de amostras em arranjos experimentais peculiares sujeitos a espalhamento necessita de uma determinação própria da dose absorvida que a amostra irá receber. A calibração indireta da fonte de irradiação, que ocorre em arranjo diferente, e o espalhamento, geralmente de difícil estimativa teórica, podem causar erros de medição muito elevados, não raro atingindo 50%. Neste trabalho é apresentado o procedimento para determinação da dose absorvida em um arranjo para irradiação beta de amostras, normalmente biológicas, utilizando curvas de calibração obtidas pela irradiação de dosímetros termoluminescentes no ar, e os irradiando na mesma posição das amostras. É apresentado um exemplo de aplicação para amostra irradiada de sangue.

  17. Comparison of different dosimetric methods for red marrow absorbed dose calculation in thyroid cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several dosimetric methods have been proposed for estimating red marrow absorbed dose (RMAD) when radionuclide therapy is planned for differentiated thyroid cancer, although to date, there is no consensus as to whether dose calculation should be based on blood-activity concentration or not. Our purpose was to compare RMADs derived from methods that require collecting patients' blood samples versus those involving OLINDA/EXM software, thereby precluding this invasive procedure. This is a retrospective study that included 34 patients under treatment for metastatic thyroid disease. A deviation of <10 % between RMADs was found, when comparing the doses from the most usual invasive dosimetric methods and those from OLINDA/EXM. No statistical difference between the methods was discovered, whereby the need for invasive procedures when calculating the dose is questioned. The use of OLINDA/EXM in clinical routine could possibly diminish data collection, thus giving rise to a simultaneous reduction in time and clinical costs, besides avoiding any kind of discomfort on the part of the patients involved. (authors)

  18. Radioimmunoscintigraphic localization of inflammatory lesions. Pt. 3. Pharmacokinetics and estimated absorbed radiation dose in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasler, P.H.; Andres, R.Y.; Schubiger, P.A.; Seybold, K.; Locher, J.T.

    1988-02-01

    Five patients with inflammatory lesions received anti granulocytes murine monoclonal antibody (Mab/sub gc/) infused over 5 to 15 min at doses between 3.4 and 5.4 mCi /sup 123/I (120 ..mu..g antibody). Clearance of /sup 123/I from blood pool closely fits a biexponential mathematical model with the two effective half lives 0.77 h and 31.5 h. The spontaneous release of /sup 123/I was found to be relatively low in the blood pool. The cumulative urinary excretion of the /sup 123/I label over 120 h was in the range of 63% of the totally administered dose and is assumed to represent only a low molecular compound or /sup 123/I alone as iodide. Analysis of the label in spleen, liver and red marrow showed that the concentration of label in these tissues remains more or less constant over a period of 20 h after infusion. With data of liver, spleen, red marrow and whole body activity over a period of 24 h, an estimated radiation dose was calculated. Compared with /sup 111/In labelled leucocytes, especially in spleen, the absorbed dose is lower by factor of ten per examination.

  19. Control letters and uncertainties of the kerma patterns in air, dose absorbed in water and dose absorbed in air of the LSCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose of characterizing the component of uncertainty of long term of the patron ionization chambers of the LSCD, for the magnitudes: speed of kerma in air Κα·, dose speed absorbed in water Dα·, and speed absorbed dose in air Dα·, it use the technique of letters of control l-MR/S. This statistical technique it estimates the component of uncertainty of short term by means of the deviation standard inside groups σω and that of long term by means of the standard deviation among groups σβ, being this it finishes an estimator of the stability of the patterns.The letters of control l-MR/S it construct for: i) Κα·, in radiation field of 60Co for patterns: primary CC01 series 131, secondary NE 2611 series 176, secondary PTW TN30031 series 578 and Third PTW W30001 series 365. ii) Dα),en radiation field of 60Co for patterns: primary CC01 series 131, Secondary PTW TN30031 series 578 and tertiary PTW W30001 series 365. iii) I-MR/S with extrapolation chamber PTW primary pattern, measurement realizes in secondary patron fields of 90Sr-90Y. The expanded uncertainty U it is calculated of agreement with the Guide of the ISO/BIPM being observed the following thing: a. In some the cases σβ, is the component of the U that more contributed to this. Therefore, it is necessary to settle down technical of sampling in those mensurations that allow to reduce the value of σβ. For example with sizes of subgroup η∼ 30 data, or with a number of subgroups κ≥. That which is achieved automating the mensuration processes. b.The component of the temperature is also one of those that but they contribute to the U, of there the necessity of: to recover the tracking for this magnitude of it influences and to increase the precision in the determinations of the temperature to diminish their influence in the U. c. The percentage difference of the magnitudes dosemeters carried out by it patterns are consistent with U certain. However, it is necessary to diminish the uncertainty in the physical factors different to κτ and σβ for the one case of the primary patterns; because these they should be those of smaller value of U. d. In the case of the secondary patterns and tertiary for the realization of theκα· is necessary to determine the corrections explicitly for recombination and polarization; and to analyze their contribution in the U. e. It is necessary to recover the tracking for the mensurations of the humidity. f. It is recommended to continue the control mensurations for each pattern, taking its the least a measure every fifteen days, that it corresponds at two measured for month and 24 at the year. g. The operation of the air conditioned perturb the measurement for such as it recommends not to use it, and alone to leave in balance the chamber with the air of the engine room. (Author)

  20. Effect of large absorbed doses on degree of conversion of the CO2-H2S mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolysis of the CO2-H2S mixture (25 vol. %) with high absorbed doses of radiation was studied. It was shown that for a 5 MGy dose, 16% of the initial product is transformed into synthesis gas sulfur. The mechanism of the radiolytic transformations was discussed

  1. Determining of the absorbed doses in central air holes of fast neutron fields at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of fast experimental neutron fields is created at the RB reactor. The intermediate and fast neutron spectra are measured by activation technique. The intermediate and fast neutron absorbed doses are compared at the basis of these experimental results. At the end the obtained doses are compared. (author)

  2. Distributions of absorbed dose from isotropic and half-space isotropic irradiation by monoenergetic neutrons and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo transport codes were used to calculate distributions of absorbed dose from isotropic and half-space isotropically incident cloud sources of monoenergetic neutrons and photons. Coordinates and direction cosines of individual source particles, incident on a cylindrical phantom, were simulated from algorithms. The resulting depth-dose distributions are intended primarily for use in radiation protection and risk analyses

  3. Verification of absorbed dose to the lung SBRT treatments; Verificacion de dosis absorbida en los tratamientos de SBRT de pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, J.; Modolell Farre, I.

    2011-07-01

    The hypo fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy technique applied to the lung, also known as lung SBRT is a technique that small volumes irradiated to high doses using photon beams, usually not coplanar, with energies of 6 and 15 MV. Because of the uncertainties associated with the small field dosimetry calculation in heterogeneous media comes the need to verify the absorbed dose.

  4. Comparative evaluation of average glandular dose and breast cancer detection between single-view digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus single-view digital mammography (DM) and two-view DM: correlation with breast thickness and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the average glandular dose (AGD) and diagnostic performance of mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus cranio-caudal (CC) digital mammography (DM) with two-view DM, and to evaluate the correlation of AGD with breast thickness and density. MLO and CC DM and DBT images of both breasts were obtained in 149 subjects. AGDs of DBT and DM per exposure were recorded, and their correlation with breast thickness and density were evaluated. Paired data of MLO DBT plus CC DM and two-view DM were reviewed for presence of malignancy in a jack-knife alternative free-response ROC (JAFROC) method. The AGDs of both DBT and DM, and differences in AGD between DBT and DM (?AGD), were correlated with breast thickness and density. The average JAFROC figure of merit (FOM) was significantly higher on the combined technique than two-view DM (P = 0.005). In dense breasts, the FOM and sensitivity of the combined technique was higher than that of two-view DM (P = 0.003) with small ?AGD. MLO DBT plus CC DM provided higher diagnostic performance than two-view DM in dense breasts with a small increase in AGD. (orig.)

  5. Comparative evaluation of average glandular dose and breast cancer detection between single-view digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus single-view digital mammography (DM) and two-view DM: correlation with breast thickness and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Ui; Chang, Jung Min; Bae, Min Sun; Lee, Su Hyun; Cho, Nariya; Seo, Mirinae; Kim, Won Hwa; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    To compare the average glandular dose (AGD) and diagnostic performance of mediolateral oblique (MLO) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) plus cranio-caudal (CC) digital mammography (DM) with two-view DM, and to evaluate the correlation of AGD with breast thickness and density. MLO and CC DM and DBT images of both breasts were obtained in 149 subjects. AGDs of DBT and DM per exposure were recorded, and their correlation with breast thickness and density were evaluated. Paired data of MLO DBT plus CC DM and two-view DM were reviewed for presence of malignancy in a jack-knife alternative free-response ROC (JAFROC) method. The AGDs of both DBT and DM, and differences in AGD between DBT and DM (?AGD), were correlated with breast thickness and density. The average JAFROC figure of merit (FOM) was significantly higher on the combined technique than two-view DM (P = 0.005). In dense breasts, the FOM and sensitivity of the combined technique was higher than that of two-view DM (P = 0.003) with small ?AGD. MLO DBT plus CC DM provided higher diagnostic performance than two-view DM in dense breasts with a small increase in AGD. (orig.)

  6. A mathematical model for calculation of 90Sr absorbed dose in dental tissues: elaboration and comparison to EPR measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model for calculation of the 90Sr absorbed doses in dental tissues is presented. The results of the Monte-Carlo calculations are compared to the data obtained by EPR measurements of dental tissues. Radiometric measurements of the 90Sr concentrations, TLD and EPR dosimetry investigations were performed in animal (dog) study. The importance of the irregular 90Sr distribution in the dentine for absorbed dose formation has been shown. The dominant dose formation factors (main source-tissues) were identified for the crown dentine and enamel. The model has shown agreement with experimental data which allows to determine further directions of the human tooth model development

  7. Supplementary comparison CCRI(I)-S2 of standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co gamma radiation at radiation processing dose levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, D. T.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Desrosiers, M. F.; Sharpe, P. H. G.; Pimpinella, M.; Lourenço, V.; Zhang, Y. L.; Miller, Arne; Generalova, V.; Sochor, V.

    Eight national standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co gamma radiation at the dose levels used in radiation processing have been compared over the range from 1 kGy to 30 kGy using the alanine dosimeters of the NIST and the NPL as the transfer dosimeters. The comparison was organized by the...

  8. Uncertainties in Monte Carlo-based absorbed dose calculations for an experimental benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, F.; Wulff, J.; Kapsch, R.-P.; Zink, K.

    2015-10-01

    There is a need to verify the accuracy of general purpose Monte Carlo codes like EGSnrc, which are commonly employed for investigations of dosimetric problems in radiation therapy. A number of experimental benchmarks have been published to compare calculated values of absorbed dose to experimentally determined values. However, there is a lack of absolute benchmarks, i.e. benchmarks without involved normalization which may cause some quantities to be cancelled. Therefore, at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt a benchmark experiment was performed, which aimed at the absolute verification of radiation transport calculations for dosimetry in radiation therapy. A thimble-type ionization chamber in a solid phantom was irradiated by high-energy bremsstrahlung and the mean absorbed dose in the sensitive volume was measured per incident electron of the target. The characteristics of the accelerator and experimental setup were precisely determined and the results of a corresponding Monte Carlo simulation with EGSnrc are presented within this study. For a meaningful comparison, an analysis of the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulation is necessary. In this study uncertainties with regard to the simulation geometry, the radiation source, transport options of the Monte Carlo code and specific interaction cross sections are investigated, applying the general methodology of the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement. Besides studying the general influence of changes in transport options of the EGSnrc code, uncertainties are analyzed by estimating the sensitivity coefficients of various input quantities in a first step. Secondly, standard uncertainties are assigned to each quantity which are known from the experiment, e.g. uncertainties for geometric dimensions. Data for more fundamental quantities such as photon cross sections and the I-value of electron stopping powers are taken from literature. The significant uncertainty contributions are identified as the energy of the radiation source and the underlying photon cross sections as well as the I-value of media involved in the simulation. The combined standard uncertainty of the Monte Carlo calculation yields 0.78% as a conservative estimation. The result of the calculation is close to the experimental result and with each combined standard uncertainty??Monte Carlo codes for the calculation of absorbed dose in radiotherapy.

  9. Optimization of Parameters in 16-slice CT-??scan Protocols for Reduction of the Absorbed Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Naseri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In computed tomography (CT technology, an optimal radiation dose can be achieved via changing radiation parameters such as mA, pitch factor, rotation time and tube voltage (kVp for diagnostic images. Materials and Methods In this study, the brain, abdomen, and thorax scaning was performed using Toshiba 16-slice scannerand standard AAPM and CTDI phantoms. AAPM phantom was used for the measurement of image-related parameters and CTDI phantom was utilized for the calculation of absorbed dose to patients. Imaging parameters including mA (50-400 mA, pitch factor (1 and 1.5 and rotation time (range of 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5 and 2 seconds were considered as independent variables. The brain, abdomen and chest imaging was performed multi-slice and spiral modes. Changes in image quality parameters including contrast resolution (CR and spatial resolution (SR in each condition were measured and determined by MATLAB software. Results After normalizing data by plotting the full width at half maximum (FWHM of point spread function (PSF in each condition, it was observed that image quality was not noticeably affected by each cases. Therefore, in brain scan, the lowest patient dose was in 150 mA and rotation time of 1.5 seconds. Based on results of scanning of the abdomen and chest, the lowest patient dose was obtained by 100 mA and pitch factors of 1 and 1.5. Conclusion It was found that images with acceptable quality and reliable detection ability could be obtained using smaller doses of radiation, compared to protocols commonly used by operators.

  10. Absorbed dose distributions in a tissue-equivalent absorber for Bremsstrahlung produced at the beamlines of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed-dose distributions for Bremsstrahlung, incident on a tissue-equivalent phantom, were measured with LiF : Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters at two insertion device beamlines of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The measurements were carried out for two different electron beam energies of 4 and 6 GeV. The corresponding Bremsstrahlung spectra and power were measured using a high-resolution lead glass total absorption calorimeter. The results are compared with similar measurements carried out at other facilities. The normalized Bremsstrahlung absorbed dose in a cross-sectional area of 100 mm2, at a depth of 150 mm of the phantom, was measured as 6.1 and 3.6 kGy h-1 W-1 for the corresponding Bremsstrahlung spectra of 4 and 6 GeV.

  11. Absorbed dose distributions in a tissue-equivalent absorber for Bremsstrahlung produced at the beamlines of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Pisharody, M; Berkvens, P; Colomp, P

    2000-01-01

    The absorbed-dose distributions for Bremsstrahlung, incident on a tissue-equivalent phantom, were measured with LiF : Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters at two insertion device beamlines of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The measurements were carried out for two different electron beam energies of 4 and 6 GeV. The corresponding Bremsstrahlung spectra and power were measured using a high-resolution lead glass total absorption calorimeter. The results are compared with similar measurements carried out at other facilities. The normalized Bremsstrahlung absorbed dose in a cross-sectional area of 100 mm sup sup 2 , at a depth of 150 mm of the phantom, was measured as 6.1 and 3.6 kGy h sup sup - sup sup 1 W sup sup - sup sup 1 for the corresponding Bremsstrahlung spectra of 4 and 6 GeV.

  12. The sensitivity analysis of tooth enamel to the absorbed dose for the application to EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is one of the methods applicable to retrospective dosimetry. The retrospective dosimetry is a process that is a part of dose reconstruction for estimation of exposed dose occurred years before the estimation. Many techniques can be used to the retrospective dosimetry. As a physical method, EPR analysis of biological material measures the quantity of free radicals generated in the material from the interaction of radiation and material. Since the later 80s, in many countries, EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel has been studied and applied for the retrospective dosimetry. In the consideration of the biological materials for EPR dosimetry, human fingernail, hair, bone and tooth are generally considered. The tooth can be separated as enamel, dentine and cementum. Among the three parts, enamel shows the best sensitivity to the absorbed dose and is most widely used. In this study, the characteristics of tooth enamel for EPR dosimetry is examined and experimented. At the experiment, for easy separation, tooth was cut into 4 parts and then each part is treated by ultrasonic vibration in NaOH liquid to reduce mechanically induced noise in the corresponding signal. After the separation of the enamel from dentine, background EPR signal is measured and then radiation-induced EPR spectrum is estimated

  13. Measurements of spatial distribution of absorbed dose in proton therapy with Gafchromic EBT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Regazzoni, V.; Grisotto, S.; Artuso, E.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M.; Pignoli, E. [Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, Medical Physics Unit, via Giacomo Venezian 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mirandola, A.; Ciocca, M., E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it [Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica, Medical Physics Unit, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    A study of the response of EBT3 films has been carried out. Light transmittance images (around 630 nm) were acquired by means of a Ccd camera. The difference of optical density was assumed as dosimeter response. Calibration was performed by means of {sup 60}Co photons, at a radiotherapy facility. A study of the response variation during the time after exposure has been carried out. EBT3 films were exposed, in a solid-water phantom, to proton beams of various energies and the obtained depth-dose profiles were compared with those measured with a ionization chamber. As expected, in the Bragg peak region the values obtained with EBT3 films were lower than those obtained with the ionization chamber. The ratio of such values was evaluated, along dose profiles, for each utilized energy. A method for correcting the data measured with EBT3 has been proposed and tested. The results confirm that the method can be advantageously applied for obtaining spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in proton therapy. (author)

  14. Spatial accuracy of 3D reconstructed radioluminographs of serial tissue sections and resultant absorbed dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many agents using tumour-associated characteristics are deposited heterogeneously within tumour tissue. Consequently, tumour heterogeneity should be addressed when obtaining information on tumour biology or relating absorbed radiation dose to biological effect. We present a technique that enables radioluminographs of serial tumour sections to be reconstructed using automated computerized techniques, resulting in a three-dimensional map of the dose-rate distribution of a radiolabelled antibody. The purpose of this study is to assess the reconstruction accuracy. Furthermore, we estimate the potential error resulting from registration misalignment, for a range of beta-emitting radionuclides. We compare the actual dose-rate distribution with that obtained from the same activity distribution but with manually defined translational and rotational shifts. As expected, the error produced with the short-range 14C is much larger than that for the longer range 90Y; similarly values for the medium range 131I are between the two. Thus, the impact of registration inaccuracies is greater for short-range sources. (author)

  15. An assessment of absorbed dose and radiation hazard index from natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as 40K, 226Ra and 228Ra which emit gamma radiation through their decaying process could reach the human in vicinity. The study area was chosen for its variety of surface conditions such as slope, flat land catchments and also forest area, which is used as a reference place. Soil samples were collected using hand auger, and the sampling positions were determined using a Global Positioning System (GPS). The amount of radioactivity concentration of these radionuclides is the important factor in assessing whether it is harmful or otherwise. In this study, the surface doses rate measurements were done in-situ using dose rate meter, and the radioactivity concentration levels were done by counting the soil samples using gamma spectrometer with HPGe detector in the laboratory. The amount of uranium, thorium and potassium in soil were determined using neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique. The results show a reasonably low radiation absorb dose and radiation hazard index, which is a good indication for the farmers to work in the area. (author)

  16. Measurements of 2D distributions of absorbed dose in protontherapy with Gafchromic EBT3 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarini, G; Regazzoni, V; Artuso, E; Giove, D; Mirandola, A; Ciocca, M

    2015-10-01

    A study of the response of EBT3 films to protons has been carried out with the aim of finding a simple modality to achieve dose images in which the effect of the film sensitivity dependence on radiation LET is amended. Light transmittance images (around 630 nm) were acquired by means of a CCD camera and the difference of optical density was assumed as dosimeter response. The calibration of EBT3 film was performed by means of protons of 173.61 MeV. Some EBT3 films were exposed, in a solid-water phantom, to proton beams of three different energies (89.17 MeV, 110.96 MeV and 130.57 MeV) and the obtained depth-dose profiles were compared with the calculated profiles. From the ratios of calculated and measured Bragg peaks, a trend of the decrease in EBT3 sensitivity with increasing peak depth has been deduced. A method for correcting the data measured with EBT3 films, utilizing the file of irradiation planning data, has been proposed and tested. The results confirm that the method can be advantageously applied for obtaining spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in proton therapy. PMID:26188464

  17. Measurements of spatial distribution of absorbed dose in proton therapy with Gafchromic EBT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the response of EBT3 films has been carried out. Light transmittance images (around 630 nm) were acquired by means of a Ccd camera. The difference of optical density was assumed as dosimeter response. Calibration was performed by means of 60Co photons, at a radiotherapy facility. A study of the response variation during the time after exposure has been carried out. EBT3 films were exposed, in a solid-water phantom, to proton beams of various energies and the obtained depth-dose profiles were compared with those measured with a ionization chamber. As expected, in the Bragg peak region the values obtained with EBT3 films were lower than those obtained with the ionization chamber. The ratio of such values was evaluated, along dose profiles, for each utilized energy. A method for correcting the data measured with EBT3 has been proposed and tested. The results confirm that the method can be advantageously applied for obtaining spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in proton therapy. (author)

  18. Verification of absorbed dose calculation with XIO Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern radiotherapy relies on computerized treatment planning systems (TPS) for absorbed dose calculation. Most TPS require a detailed model of a given machine and therapy beams. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends acceptance testing for the TPS (IAEA-TECDOC-1540). In this study we present customization of those tests for measurements with the purpose of verification of beam models intended for clinical use in our department. Elekta Synergy S linear accelerator installation and data acquisition for Elekta CMS XiO 4.62 TPS was finished in 2011. After the completion of beam modelling in TPS, tests were conducted in accordance with the IAEA protocol for TPS dose calculation verification. The deviations between the measured and calculated dose were recorded for 854 points and 11 groups of tests in a homogenous phantom. Most of the deviations were within tolerance. Similar to previously published results, results for irregular L shaped field and asymmetric wedged fields were out of tolerance for certain groups of points.(author)

  19. Simulation of secondary particle production and absorbed dose to tissue in light ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During radiation therapy with an ion beam, the production of secondary particles like neutrons, protons and heavier ions contribute to the dose delivered to tumour and healthy tissues outside the treated volume. Also, the secondary particles leaving the patient are of interest for radiation background around the ion-therapy facility. Calculations of secondary particle production and the dose absorbed by water, soft tissue and a multi-material phantom simulating the heterogeneous media of the patient body were performed for protons, helium, lithium and carbon ions in the energy range up to 400 MeV u-1. The Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT for transport of protons and light ions in tissue-like media was used in these studies. The neutron ambient dose-equivalent, H*(10), was determined for neutrons leaving the water phantom irradiated with different light ion beams. The comparison of calculated secondary particle production in the water and PMMA phantoms irradiated with helium and carbon ions shows satisfactory agreement with experimental data. (authors)

  20. Validation of a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining the absorbed and effective radiation doses in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, A-L; Kotiaho, A; Nikkinen, J; Nieminen, M T

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to validate a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining absorbed and effective doses (EDs) in the dose and energy range used in diagnostic radiology. Energy dependence, dose linearity and repeatability of the dosemeter were examined. The absorbed doses (ADs) were compared at anterior-posterior projection and the EDs were determined at posterior-anterior, anterior-posterior and lateral projections of thoracic imaging using an anthropomorphic phantom. The radiation exposures were made using digital radiography systems. This study revealed that the MOSFET system with high sensitivity bias supply set-up is sufficiently accurate for AD and ED determination. The dosemeter is recommended to be calibrated for energies 80 kVp. The entrance skin dose level should be at least 5 mGy to minimise the deviation of the individual dosemeter dose. For ED determination, dosemeters should be implanted perpendicular to the surface of the phantom to prevent the angular dependence error. PMID:25213263

  1. Validation of a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining the absorbed and effective radiation doses in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to validate a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining absorbed and effective doses (EDs) in the dose and energy range used in diagnostic radiology. Energy dependence, dose linearity and repeatability of the dosemeter were examined. The absorbed doses (ADs) were compared at anterior-posterior projection and the EDs were determined at posterior-anterior, anterior-posterior and lateral projections of thoracic imaging using an anthropomorphic phantom. The radiation exposures were made using digital radiography systems. This study revealed that the MOSFET system with high sensitivity bias supply set-up is sufficiently accurate for AD and ED determination. The dosemeter is recommended to be calibrated for energies <60 and >80 kVp. The entrance skin dose level should be at least 5 mGy to minimise the deviation of the individual dosemeter dose. For ED determination, dosemeters should be implanted perpendicular to the surface of the phantom to prevent the angular dependence error. (authors)

  2. Comparison of skin absorbed radiation dose in thyroid gland area during panoramic radiography and spiral tomography techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Akhlaghi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thyroid gland is one of the critical organs during radiation in the head and neck region. The aim of this study was to compare absorbed radiation dose by skin in the thyroid area during spiral tomography and panoramic radiography by means of thermoluminance dosimetry (TLD.Materials and Methods: Thirty-six LiF (TLD-100 thermoluminescence dosimetry chips were utilized in this experimental in vitro study. One TLD chip was placed on the tube side and another was placed on the opposite side of the thyroid gland of a sliced anatomic Alderson head and neck phantom during panoramic radiography and spiral tomography. The dosimeters were read by a SOLARO 2A TLD reader twice followed by calculation of the absorbed dose. The results were analyzed by Wilcoxon’s test at a confidence interval of 95%.Results: The mean dose for screen-film panoramic radiographs was 34 µGy in the left thyroid and 39 on the right side. With spiral tomography the thyroid gland received a mean dose of 30?71 µGy. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean thyroid doses between anterior and posterior spiral tomography and panoramic examination (p value > 0.05.Conclusion: Skin absorbed radiation dose of a tomographic examination, which includes four sections with a specific thickness, are almost comparable to that with a panoramic radiographic technique. Key words: Absorbed dose, Spiral tomography, Panoramic radiography.

  3. Evaluation of absorbed dose-distribution in the X-ray or gamma-irradiator for blood products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of blood products abrogates the proliferation of lymphocytes present in cellular component, which is currently the only accepted methodology to prevent transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD). A range of irradiation dose levels between 15 Gy and 50 Gy is being used, but the majority of facilities are employing 15 Gy. It should, however, be recognized that the delivered dose in the instrument canister might differ from the actual dose absorbed by the blood bag. This study have evaluated the actual dose distribution under practical conditions where a container was loaded with blood products or water bags, or filled with distilled water. This approach provides data that the maximum attenuation occurred when the container was completely filled with a blood-compatible material. Thus, an error of approximately 20 percent should be considered in the dose measured in the in-air condition. A dose calibration in an in-air condition may lead to substantial underexposure of the blood products. A dose distribution study using adequately prearranged exposure period verified that the absorbed dose of 15 Gy was attained at any point in the container for both linear accelerator and gamma-irradiator. The maximal difference in the absorbed dose between measured points was 1.5- and 1.6-fold for linear accelerator and gamma-irradiator, respectively. In conclusion, using blood-compatible materials, a careful dose calibration study should be employed in which the absorbed dose of 15 Gy is obtained at the point where the lowest dose could be expected. (author)

  4. Traceability of metrologic references of dose absorbed to water used in a Dosimetry Quality Assurance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to present the solidly established traceability structure for ionometric standards and for thermoluminescent dosimetry system that ensures reliability of the Dosimetry Quality Assurance Program and is aimed to certify the highest level of accuracy of the measurements. Materials and methods: thermoluminescent powder dosimeters (DTL 937) placed into plastic capsules and packed in specific kits for each intended application were mailed to the participant centers. Results: the results of the intercomparisons performed between 'Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas da Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro' and EQUAL-ESTRO for the beam of 60Co gamma rays, expressed for (1?), and the results of the dose absorbed measurements obtained with the chambers of the Program EQUAL and the chambers of the Dosimetry Quality Assurance Program were lower than 0.5%. Conclusion: based on these results we concluded that the Dosimetry Quality Assurance Program reached the desired level of reliability to allow its implementation. (author)

  5. Estimated absorbed doses from exposure to a cyclotron used in production of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy use radiopharmaceuticals, which are pharmaceuticals with radionuclides attached to the biologically active chemical compound with the purpose of marking it in order to follow its metabolism in a living organism. The basic advantage of using radiopharmaceuticals is that they can be monitored by nuclear methods and their deposition in a particular organ or metabolic processes followed over time. Unlike classical radiology, which shows only morphological changes in an organ, with radiopharmaceuticals we can follow their functional changes. This article discusses estimated occupational exposure of three workers to a cyclotron IBA Cyclone 18/9 at Rudjer Medikol Cyclotron Ltd. (RMC). The total absorbed annual dose is estimated to between 2.95 mSv and 6.77 mSv. The requirement of minimal exposure to any form of radiation - ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable.), recommended by Croatian legislation, is fully met. (authors)

  6. Absorbed dose in ion beams: comparison of ionisation- and fluence-based measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinga, Julia-Maria; Brons, Stephan; Bartz, James A; Akselrod, Mark S; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2014-10-01

    A direct comparison measurement of fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) and a thimble ionisation chamber is presented. Irradiations were performed using monoenergetic protons (142.66 MeV, ?=3×10(6) cm(-2)) and carbon ions (270.55 MeV u(-1), ?=3 × 10(6) cm(-2)). It was found that absorbed dose to water values as determined by fluence measurements using FNTDs are, in case of protons, in good agreement (2.4 %) with ionisation chamber measurements, if slower protons and Helium secondaries were accounted for by an effective stopping power. For carbon, however, a significant discrepancy of 4.5 % was seen, which could not be explained by fragmentation, uncertainties or experimental design. The results rather suggest a W-value of 32.10 eV ± 2.6 %. Additionally, the abundance of secondary protons expected from Monte-Carlo transport simulation was not observed. PMID:24497551

  7. Radioactive caesium in a boreal forest ecosystem and internally absorbed dose to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different aspects dealing with water-soil, soil-plant and plant-herbivore interactions are studied. The study area is located to the Forest Research Station at Svartberget 50 km west of Umea in Vaesterbotten. An important topic in this study concerns the transport of caesium in food chains to man. Consumption of forest products by man i.e. game (primarily moose) and berries constitutes the major pathway of radioactive caesium to man. Moose meat contributes to about 30% of the total meat consumption in Vaesterbotten and the average over the Swedish population has remained at the level of 5-10% during the present decade. In order to assess the absorbed dose resulting from intake via these food products over a long period of time, knowledge about the long term behaviour of caesium in the biotic community is studied. (orig./HP)

  8. Concentration activities of natural radionuclides in three fish species in Brazilian coast and their contributions to the absorbed doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A., E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.b, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios. Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica; Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: kelecom@uol.com.b [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Curso de Pos-Graduacao em Biologia Marinha

    2009-07-01

    Activity concentrations of U-238, Ra-226, Pb-210, Th-232 e Ra-228 were analysed in three fish species at the Brasilian Coast. The fish 'Cubera snapper' (Lutjanus cyanopterus, Cuvier, 1828), in the region of Ceara and 'Whitemouth croaker' (Micropogonias furnieri, Desmarest, 1823) and 'Lebranche mullet' (Mugil liza, Valenciennes, 1836) in the region of Rio de Janeiro. These concentrations were transformed in absorbed dose rate using a dose conversion factor in unit of gray per year (muGy y{sup -1}), per becquerel per kilogram (Bq kg{sup -1}). Only the absorbed dose due to intake of radionuclides was examined, and the contributions due to radionuclides present in water and sediment were disregarded. The radionuclides were considered to be uniformly distributed in the fish body. The limit of the dose rate used, proposed by the Department of Energy of the USA, is equal to 3.65 10{sup 03} mGy y{sup -1}. The average dose rate due to the studied radionuclides is equal to 6.09 10{sup 00} muGy y{sup -1}, a value minor than 0.1% than the limits indicated by DOE, and quite similar to that found in the literature for 'benthic' fish. The most important radionuclides were the alpha emitters Ra-226 having 61 % of absorbed dose rate. U-238 and Th-232, each contributes with approximately 20 % of the absorbed dose rate. These three radionuclides are responsible for almost 100% of the dose rate received by the studied organisms. The beta emitters Ra-228 and Pb-210 account for approximately 1 % of the absorbed dose rate. (author)

  9. Concentration activities of natural radionuclides in three fish species in Brazilian coast and their contributions to the absorbed doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activity concentrations of U-238, Ra-226, Pb-210, Th-232 e Ra-228 were analysed in three fish species at the Brasilian Coast. The fish 'Cubera snapper' (Lutjanus cyanopterus, Cuvier, 1828), in the region of Ceara and 'Whitemouth croaker' (Micropogonias furnieri, Desmarest, 1823) and 'Lebranche mullet' (Mugil liza, Valenciennes, 1836) in the region of Rio de Janeiro. These concentrations were transformed in absorbed dose rate using a dose conversion factor in unit of gray per year (?Gy y-1), per becquerel per kilogram (Bq kg-1). Only the absorbed dose due to intake of radionuclides was examined, and the contributions due to radionuclides present in water and sediment were disregarded. The radionuclides were considered to be uniformly distributed in the fish body. The limit of the dose rate used, proposed by the Department of Energy of the USA, is equal to 3.65 1003 mGy y-1. The average dose rate due to the studied radionuclides is equal to 6.09 1000 ?Gy y-1, a value minor than 0.1% than the limits indicated by DOE, and quite similar to that found in the literature for 'benthic' fish. The most important radionuclides were the alpha emitters Ra-226 having 61 % of absorbed dose rate. U-238 and Th-232, each contributes with approximately 20 % of the absorbed dose rate. These three radionuclides are responsible for almost 100% of the dose rate received by the studied organisms. The beta emitters Ra-228 and Pb-210 account for approximately 1 % of the absorbed dose rate. (author)

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Radiation-Absorbed Dose Estimation of {sup 166}Ho Microspheres in Liver Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seevinck, Peter R., E-mail: p.seevinck@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Maat, Gerrit H. van de [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wit, Tim C. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vente, Maarten A.D.; Nijsen, Johannes F.W. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bakker, Chris J.G. [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for accurate assessment of the three-dimensional {sup 166}Ho activity distribution to estimate radiation-absorbed dose distributions in {sup 166}Ho-loaded poly (L-lactic acid) microsphere ({sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS) liver radioembolization. Methods and Materials: MRI, computed tomography (CT), and single photon emission CT (SPECT) experiments were conducted on an anthropomorphic gel phantom with tumor-simulating gel samples and on an excised human tumor-bearing liver, both containing known amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS. Three-dimensional radiation-absorbed dose distributions were estimated at the voxel level by convolving the {sup 166}Ho activity distribution, derived from quantitative MRI data, with a {sup 166}Ho dose point-kernel generated by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code) and from Medical Internal Radiation Dose Pamphlet 17. MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions were qualitatively compared with CT and autoradiography images and quantitatively compared with SPECT-based dose distributions. Both MRI- and SPECT-based activity estimations were validated against dose calibrator measurements. Results: Evaluation on an anthropomorphic phantom showed that MRI enables accurate assessment of local {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS mass and activity distributions, as supported by a regression coefficient of 1.05 and a correlation coefficient of 0.99, relating local MRI-based mass and activity calculations to reference values obtained with a dose calibrator. Estimated MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS in an ex vivo human liver visually showed high correspondence to SPECT-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions. Quantitative analysis revealed that the differences in local and total amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS estimated by MRI, SPECT, and the dose calibrator were within 10%. Excellent agreement was observed between MRI- and SPECT-based dose-volume histograms. Conclusions: Quantitative MRI was demonstrated to provide accurate three-dimensional {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS activity distributions, enabling localized intrahepatic radiation-absorbed dose estimation by convolution with a {sup 166}Ho dose point-kernel for liver radioembolization treatment optimization and evaluation.

  11. Comparison of the standards for absorbed dose to water of the PTB, Germany and the BIPM for 60Co ? rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the standards for absorbed dose to water of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) has been made in 60Co gamma radiation under the auspices of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for three transfer standards and expressed as a ratio of the PTB and the BIPM standards for absorbed dose to water, is 0.9961 (0.0037). This result replaces the earlier PTB value in this key comparison. The degrees of equivalence between the PTB and the other participants in this comparison have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a matrix for the twelve national metrology institutes (NMIs) that have taken part in the ongoing comparison for absorbed dose to water. A graphical presentation is also given. (authors)

  12. Dosimetry audits based on NCS report 18: Assessment of absorbed dose to water in external beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2008 the Netherlands Commission for Radiation Dosimetry (NCS) published a new code of practice (NCS-18) for the absorbed dose determination in high energy photon and electron beams. NCS-18 replaces NCS-2 and NCS-5 for absolute dosimetry of clinical photon and electron beams, respectively. In contrast to NCS-2 and -5, it is based on absorbed dose to water calibration coefficients in 60Co beams. Most radiotherapy centres in Belgium and the Netherlands are currently implementing NCS-18. To monitor and verify the implementation of NCS-18, the Dutch Association of Medical Physics Engineers (NVKFM) in collaboration with the NCS established the NCS-subcommittee Dosimetry Audits. The aim of the audit is to verify local measurements of absorbed dose under reference conditions. Initially only clinical photon beams are being audited. In total 26 radiotherapy centres have been audited before the summer of 2010. In this study preliminary results of the audits until April 2010 are reported

  13. The analyses of the absorbed dose by the red marrow brain of wild hunting hoofed animals from incorporated 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After research work has been valued the absorbed dose by the red marrow brain of wild hunting hoofed animals on the territory with different level of radioactive pollution was shown that the absorbed annual doses of incorporated Sr 90 by the red marrow brain on the territory of eviction and alienation zones formed for wild boar 19,5-28,3 mGy/year, roe deer european 8,0-24,2 mGy/year, and for elk 16,1-55,0 mGy/year. The absorber doses by the red marrow brain of wild hunting hoofed taken in the control regions fluctuated from 0,6 mGy/year roe deer european to 1,4 mGy/year wild boar. (authors)

  14. A numerical analysis of aspects of absorbed dose in the vicinity of the interface of different materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the measurement and/or evaluation of the absorbed dose where the charged particle distribution is far from equilibrium, knowledge on the microscopic spatial distribution of the charged particle fluence is important. Spatial distribution of secondary electrons in the vicinity of an interface of materials and the values of the absorbed dose in these regions are investigated with a monte-Carlo simulation code EGS 4. There were experiments on spatial variation of the absorbed dose in the vicinity of an interface of materials. However, the behaviour of secondary electrons were discussed only broadly and qualitatively. In this study, behaviour of the secondary electrons was analysed to clarify contribution of ruling interactions to generate secondary electrons, and influence of the interface on the energy spectra of secondary electrons. 11 figs

  15. Absorbed doses profiles vs Synovia tissue depth for the Y-90 and P-32 used in radiosynoviortesis treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiosynoviortesis treatment has been used during more of 40 years as an alternative to the chemical and surgical synovectomy to alleviate the pain and to reduce the inflammation in suffered patients of rheumatic arthropathies, haemophilic arthropathies and other articulation disorders. It consists on the injection of radioactive isotopes inside a synovial cavity. For to evaluate the dosimetry of the radiosynoviortesis treatment is of great interest to know the absorbed dose in the volume of the target (synovia). The precise calculation of the absorbed dose in the inflamed synovia it is difficult, for numerous reasons, since the same one will depend on the thickness of the synovial membrane, the size of the articular space, the structure of the synovial membrane, the distribution in the articulation, the nature of the articular liquid, etc. Also the presence of the bone and the articular cartilage, components also of the articulation, it even complicated more the calculations. The method used to evaluate the dosimetry in radioactive synovectomy is known as the Monte Carlo method. The objective of our work consists on estimating with the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B the absorbed dose of the Y-90 and the P-32 in the depth of the synovial tissue. The results are presented as absorbed dose for injected millicurie (Gy/mCi) versus depth of synovial tissue. The simulation one carries out keeping in mind several synovia areas, of 50 cm2 to 250 cm2 keeping in mind three states of progression of the illness. Those obtained values of absorbed dose using the MCNP4B code will allow to introduce in our country an optimized method of dose prescription to the patient, to treat the rheumatic arthritis in medium and big articulations using the Y-90 and the P-32, eliminating the fixed doses and fixed radionuclides for each articulation like it happens in many clinics of Europe, as well as the empiric doses. (Author)

  16. Secondary neutron dose measurement for proton eye treatment using an eye snout with a borated neutron absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We measured and assessed ways to reduce the secondary neutron dose from a system for proton eye treatment. Methods Proton beams of 60.30 MeV were delivered through an eye-treatment snout in passive scattering mode. Allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) etch detectors were used to measure the neutron dose in the external field at 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm depths in a water phantom. Secondary neutron doses were measured and compared between those with and without a high-hydrogen–boron-containing block. In addition, the neutron energy and vertices distribution were obtained by using a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation. Results The ratio of the maximum neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose (H(10)/D) at 2.00 cm from the beam field edge was 8.79?±?1.28 mSv/Gy. The ratio of the neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose with and without a high hydrogen-boron containing block was 0.63?±?0.06 to 1.15?±?0.13 mSv/Gy at 2.00 cm from the edge of the field at depths of 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm. Conclusions We found that the out-of-field secondary neutron dose in proton eye treatment with an eye snout is relatively small, and it can be further reduced by installing a borated neutron absorbing material. PMID:23866307

  17. Monte Carlo Analysis of Pion Contribution to Absorbed Dose from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghara, S.K.; Battnig, S.R.; Norbury, J.W.; Singleterry, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction, particle production and transport is necessary to estimate the radiation damage to equipment used on spacecraft and the biological effects of space radiation. For long duration astronaut missions, both on the International Space Station and the planned manned missions to Moon and Mars, the shielding strategy must include a comprehensive knowledge of the secondary radiation environment. The distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is a function of the type, energy and population of these secondary products. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) comprised of protons and heavier nuclei have energies from a few MeV per nucleon to the ZeV region, with the spectra reaching flux maxima in the hundreds of MeV range. Therefore, the MeV - GeV region is most important for space radiation. Coincidentally, the pion production energy threshold is about 280 MeV. The question naturally arises as to how important these particles are with respect to space radiation problems. The space radiation transport code, HZETRN (High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport), currently used by NASA, performs neutron, proton and heavy ion transport explicitly, but it does not take into account the production and transport of mesons, photons and leptons. In this paper, we present results from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended), showing the effect of leptons and mesons when they are produced and transported in a GCR environment.

  18. Influence of high absorbed irradiation doses on conversion of CO2-H2S mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was investigated the CO2-H2S mixture radiolysis at large absorbed irradiation doses. The observed high yield of final products in this system (Gpr.?10.0) gives the possibility to consider the radiolytic hydrogen sulphide decomposition as one of the variants of purification of hydrogen sulphide containing residues of natural gas with a simultaneous production of sulphur and synthesis-gas (CO2). It has been show that at dose MGy?16 % of initial product convert into synthesis-gas and sulfur. The mechanism of radiolytic conversion is discussed and the observed yield of hydrogen made G0(H2)=11.0±0.8 that considerably excesses G0(H2) at radiolysis of pure H2S(G0(H2)=7.5±0.5). Accumulation of carbon monoxide is described with 5 % accuracy with parabola of the second order: [CO] (-0.00082+0.359D-0.0013D2)·1019 mol/cm3 the initial yield of CO production for the given mixture is equal 3.59 which is G0(CO) = 4.5 in recalculation upon pure carbon dioxide. It has been established that the radiolytic reprocessing of acidic components of natural gas (CO2, H2S) gives the possibility to product sulphur and synthesis gas with yield to 30 vol.% (D=10 MGy), and the opportunity of simultaneous decision of ecological problems

  19. Measurement of ionization chamber absorbed dose k{sub Q} factors in megavoltage photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, Malcolm R. [Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Absorbed dose beam quality conversion factors (k{sub Q} factors) were obtained for 27 different types of ionization chamber. The aim was to obtain objective evidence on the performance of a wide range of chambers currently available, and potentially used for reference dosimetry, and to investigate the accuracy of the k{sub Q} calculation algorithm used in the TG-51 protocol. Methods: Measurements were made using the {sup 60}Co irradiator and Elekta Precise linac facilities at the National Research Council of Canada. The objective was to characterize the chambers over the range of energies applicable to TG-51 and determine whether each chamber met the requirements of a reference-class instrument. Chamber settling, leakage current, ion recombination and polarity, and waterproofing sleeve effects were investigated, and absorbed dose calibration coefficients were obtained for {sup 60}Co and 6, 10, and 25 MV photon beams. Only thimble-type chambers were considered in this investigation and were classified into three groups: (i) Reference chambers (''standard''0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer-type chambers and their derivatives traditionally used for beam output calibration); (ii) scanning chambers (typically 0.1 cm{sup 3} volume chambers used for beam commissioning with 3-D scanning phantoms); and (iii) microchambers (very small volume ion chambers ({<=}0.01 cm{sup 3}) used for small field dosimetry). Results: As might be expected, 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble chambers showed the most predictable performance and experimental k{sub Q} factors were obtained with a relative uncertainty of 0.1%. The performance of scanning and microchambers was somewhat variable. Some chambers showed very good behavior but others showed anomalous polarity and recombination corrections that are not fully explained at present. For the well-behaved chambers, agreement between measured and calculated k{sub Q} factors was within 0.4%; for some chambers, differences of more than 1% were seen that may be related to the recombination/polarity results. Use of such chambers could result in significant errors in the determination of reference dose in the clinic. Conclusions: Based on the experimental evidence obtained here, specification for a reference-class ionization chamber could be developed that would minimize the error in using a dosimetry protocol with calculated beam quality conversion factors. The experimental k{sub Q} data obtained here for a wide range of thimble chambers can be used when choosing suitable detectors for reference dosimetry and are intended to be used in the upcoming update/addendum to the AAPM TG-51 dosimetry protocol.

  20. Mathematical models of tumor growth: translating absorbed dose to tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The dose-rate in internal emitter therapy is low and time-dependent as compared to external beam radiotherapy. Once the total absorbed dose delivered to a target tissue is calculated, however, most dosimetric analyses of radiopharmaceuticals are considered complete. To translate absorbed dose estimates obtained for internal emitter therapy to biologic effect, the growth characteristics, repair capacity, and radiosensitivity of the tumor must be considered. Tumor growth may be represented by the Gompertz equation in which tumor cells increase at an exponential growth rate that is itself decreasing at an exponential rate; as the tumor increases in size, the growth rate diminishes. The empirical Gompertz expression for tumor growth may be derived from a mechanistic model in which growth is represented by a balance between tumor-cell birth and loss. The birth rate is assumed to be fixed, while the cell loss rate is time-dependent and increases with tumor size. The birth rate of the tumors may be related to their potential doubling time. Multiple biopsies of individual tumors have demonstrated a heterogeneity in the potential doubling time of tumors. By extending the mechanistic model described above to allow for sub-populations of tumor cells with different birth rates, the effect of kinetic heterogeneity within a tumor may be examined. Model simulations demonstrate that the cell kinetic parameters of a tumor are predicted to change over time and measurements obtained using a biopsy are unlikely to reflect the kinetics of the tumor throughout its growth history. A decrease in overall tumor mass, in which each sub-population is reduced in proportion to its cell number, i.e., the log-kill assumption, leads to re-growth of a tumor that has a greater proliferation rate. Therapy that is linked to the potential doubling time or to the effective proliferation rate of the tumor may lead to re-growth of a tumor that is kinetically unchanged. The simplest model of cell loss due to irradiation, the log-kill model, therefore, predicts that incomplete treatment of a kinetically heterogeneous tumor will yield a more proliferative tumor. The probability of tumor control in such a simulation may be obtained from the nadir in tumor cell number. If the nadir is not sufficiently low to yield a high probability of tumor control, then the tumor will re-grow. Since tumors in each sub-population are assumed lost at the same rate, cells comprising the sub-population with the shortest potential doubling time will re-grow the fastest, yielding a recurrent tumor that is more proliferative. A number of assumptions and simplifications are both implicitly and explicitly made in converting absorbed dose to tumor control probability. The modeling analyses described above must, therefore, be viewed in terms of understanding and evaluating different treatment approaches with the goal of treatment optimization rather than outcome prediction

  1. Long-term stability of liquid ionization chambers with regard to their qualification as local reference dosimeters for low dose-rate absorbed dose measurements in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term sensitivity and calibration stability of liquid ionization chambers (LICs) has been studied at a local and a secondary standards dosimetry laboratory over a period of 3 years. The chambers were transported several times by mail between the two laboratories for measurements. The LICs used in this work are designed for absorbed dose measurements in the dose rate region of 0.1-100 mGy min-1 and have a liquid layer thickness of 1 mm and a sensitive volume of 16.2 mm3. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers are mixtures of isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4) in different proportions (about 2 to 1). Operating at a polarizing voltage of 300 V the leakage current of the chambers was stable and never exceeded 3% of the observable current at a dose rate of about 1 mGy min-1. The volume sensitivity of the chambers was measured to be of the order of 10-9 C Gy-1 mm-3. No systematic changes in the absorbed dose to water calibration was observed for any of the chambers during the test period (?<0.2%). Variations in chamber dose response with small changes in the polarizing voltage as well as sensitivity changes with accumulated absorbed dose were also investigated. Measurements showed that the LIC response varies by 0.15% per 1% change in applied voltage around 300 V. No significant change could be observed in the LIC sensitivity after a single absorbed dose of 15 kGy. The results indicate that the LIC can be made to serve as a calibration transfer instrument and a reference detector for absorbed dose to water determinations providing good precision and long-term reproducibility. (author)

  2. Comparison of the standards of absorbed dose to water of the METAS and the BIPM for 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the standards of absorbed dose to water of the Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation (METAS), Switzerland and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) has been made in 60Co gamma radiation. The results show that the METAS and the BIPM standards for absorbed dose to water are in agreement, yielding a comparison result of 1.0001 for the mean ratio of the calibration coefficients for the transfer chambers, the difference from unity being within the combined standard uncertainty (0.0054). (authors)

  3. 90Y/90 Sr electron induced damages in an essential eucalyptus oil related to the absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A good irradiation geometry was achieved in order to carry out the irradiation of an essential eucalyptus oil with a 90Y/90 Sr electron source. The Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP-4C was employed to determine the absorbed doses in this particular experimental configuration. It also helped us to understand which electrons (from an energetic point of view) were responsible for the damages. In order to identify the induced damages, the irradiated samples were studied by mass spectrometry. The obtained results were related to the absorbed doses determined by the computational simulation

  4. Decomposition of the absorbed dose by LET in tissue-equivalent materials within the SHIELD-HIT transport code

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolevsky, N; Buyukcizmeci, N; Ergun, A; Latysheva, L; Ogul, R

    2015-01-01

    The SHIELD-HIT transport code, in several versions, has been used for modeling the interaction of therapeutic beams of light nuclei with tissue-equivalent materials for a long time. All versions of the code include useful option of decomposition of the absorbed dose by the linear energy transfer (LET), but this option has not been described and published so far. In this work the procedure of decomposition of the absorbed dose by LET is described and illustrated by using the decomposition of the Bragg curve in water phantom, irradiated by beams of protons, alpha particles, and of ions lithium, carbon and oxygen.

  5. Some views concerning the absorbed dose in the gamma-ray irradiation of traditional Chinese medicines and staple crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several problems concerning the computation of absorbed dose from ionizing photon interactions with different organic materials have been studied. The mass energy-absorption coefficients for several traditional Chinese medicines and staple crops are reported. The linear relation between the percent by weight of hydrogen in animal and plant tissues and other organic materials and the mass energy-absorption coefficients values are tabulated, with a correlation coefficient 0.9999. The elemental constituents in organic ash content are analyzed quantitatively and their ?en/? values are computed, so that the simple cavity theory correction to absorbed doses due to x and ?-radiation may be applied. (author)

  6. Radiation doses from mammography in Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, A.F.; Rocha, M.P.; Alves, J.G.; Carreiro, J.V.; Galvao, J.P. (Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Sacavem (Portugal). Dept. de Proteccao e Seguranca Radiologica)

    1991-01-01

    A survey of patient doses in mammography was conducted during 1988/1989 in Portugal. Information on frequency and techniques of mammography as well as on technical specifications of X ray units and imaging systems was collected from 46 centres in hospitals, private clinics and practices. Radiation measurements were carried out in every X ray unit to assess entrance and exit absorbed doses and average glandular doses for a compressed breast 5 cm thick with a standard composition. Large inter-centre variations in dose were analysed in terms of the technical specifications of the X ray units and 'speed' of individual components of the imaging system. The annual frequency of mammographies was estimated as 16.5 per thousand inhabitants, yielding patient breast glandular dose per image of 1.42 mGy and a collective breast dose equivalent per million inhabitants of 49.9 Sv. (author).

  7. Radiation doses from mammography in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of patient doses in mammography was conducted during 1988/1989 in Portugal. Information on frequency and techniques of mammography as well as on technical specifications of X ray units and imaging systems was collected from 46 centres in hospitals, private clinics and practices. Radiation measurements were carried out in every X ray unit to assess entrance and exit absorbed doses and average glandular doses for a compressed breast 5 cm thick with a standard composition. Large inter-centre variations in dose were analysed in terms of the technical specifications of the X ray units and 'speed' of individual components of the imaging system. The annual frequency of mammographies was estimated as 16.5 per thousand inhabitants, yielding patient breast glandular dose per image of 1.42 mGy and a collective breast dose equivalent per million inhabitants of 49.9 Sv. (author)

  8. Dental-CT: image quality and absorbed radiation dose of different scan protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a scan protocol for dental-CT which guarantees good image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose. Methods: In an experimental investigation Dental-CT (HSA, GE, Milwaukee, USA) of the mandible of two human skeletons positioned in a water tank were performed in order to define the most advantageous scan protocol. Tube currents ranged from 40 to 200 mA and the scan technique was modified (axial mode or helical mode with pitches of 1 to 3 and corresponding increments of 0.4 to 1.0 mm). 39 patients underwent a dental-CT with decreased current (80 mA) in the helical scan mode (pitch 2, slice thickness 1 mm). Dose measurements were performed for two different scan protocols (A: axial, 130 mAs, B: helical, 80 mA, pitch 2). Results: The preliminary investigations of image quality showed only a minor effect of the applied current. For the helical scan mode, pitches of more than 2 impaired image quality. A low increment had no advantages. There were no disadvantages in clinical practice using protocol B with decreased tube current. Absorbed radiation dose of dental CT performed with protocol B was decreased to one third in comparison to protocol A. Conclusions: A scan protocol with a low tube current (e.g., 80 mA, for a rotation time of 1 s) and a helical scan mode (e.g., for a slice thickness of 1 mm with a pitch of 2 and an increment of 1 mm) is recommended for performing dental-CT. (orig.)

  9. Monte Carlo evaluation of the relationship between absorbed dose and contrast-to-noise ratio in coherent scatter breast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghammraoui, B.; Popescu, L. M.; Badal, A.

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the advantages and shortcomings associated with Coherent Scatter Computed Tomography (CSCT) systems for breast imaging and study possible alternative configurations. The relationship between dose in a breast phantom and a simple surrogate of image quality in pencil-beam and fan-beam CSCT geometries was evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation, and an improved pencil-beam setup was proposed for faster CSCT data acquisition. CSCT projection datasets of a simple breast phantom have been simulated using a new version of the MC-GPU code that includes an improved model of x-ray coherent scattering using experimentally measured molecular interference functions. The breast phantom was composed of an 8 cm diameter cylinder of 50/50 glandular/adipose material and nine rods with different diameters of cancerous, adipose and glandular tissues. The system performance has been assessed in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in multiple regions of interest within the reconstructed images, for a range of exposure levels. The enhanced pencil-beam setup consisted of multiplexed pencil beams and specific post-processing of the projection data to calculate the scatter intensity coming from each beam separately. At reconstruction spatial resolution of 1×1×1 mm3 and from 1 to 10 mGy of received breast dose, fan-beam geometry showed higher statistical noise and lower CNR than pencil-beam geometry. Conventional CT acquisition had the highest CNR per dose. However, the CNR figure of merit did not combine yet all the information available at different scattering angles in the CSCT, which has potential for increased discrimination of materials with similar attenuation properties. Preliminary evaluation of the multiplexed pencil-beam geometry showed that the scattering profiles simulated with the new approach are similar to those of the single pencil-beam geometry. Conclusion: It has been shown that the GPU-accelerated MC-GPU code is a practical tool to simulate complete CSCT scans with different acquisition geometries and exposure levels. The simulation showed better performance in terms of the received dose and CNR with pencil-beam geometry in comparison to the fan-beam geometry. Finally, we demonstrated that the proposed multiplexed-beam geometry might be useful for faster acquisition of CSCT while providing comparable image quality as the pencil-beam geometry.

  10. Analysis of the Body Distribution of Absorbed Dose in the Organs of Three Species of Fish from Sepetiba Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The body distribution of Polonium-210 in three fishes from the Sepetiba Bay (Macrodon ancylodon, Micropogonias furnieri and Mugil curema) has been studied under the approach of the Department of Energy of the United States of America (DOE) that set the limit of absorbed dose rate in biota equal to 3.5x103 ?Gy/y, and that also established the relation between dose rate (D) and radionuclide concentration (c) on a fish muscle fresh weight basis, as follows: D = 5.05 ExNxC, assuming that the radionuclide distribution is homogenous among organs. Two hypotheses were tested here, using statistical tools: 1) is the body distribution of absorbed dose homogenous among organs? and 2) is the body distribution of absorbed dose identical among studied fishes? It was concluded, as expected, that the distribution among organs is heterogeneous; but, unexpectedly, that the three fishes display identical body distribution pattern, although they belong to different trophic levels. Hence, concerning absorbed dose calculation, the statement that data distribution is homogenous must be understood merely as an approximation, at least in the case of Polonium-210

  11. Analysis of the Body Distribution of Absorbed Dose in the Organs of Three Species of Fish from Sepetiba Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Kelecom, Alphonse; dos Santos Gouvea, Rita de Cássia; Py Júnior, Delcy de Azevedo

    2008-08-01

    The body distribution of Polonium-210 in three fishes from the Sepetiba Bay (Macrodon ancylodon, Micropogonias furnieri and Mugil curema) has been studied under the approach of the Department of Energy of the United States of America (DOE) that set the limit of absorbed dose rate in biota equal to 3.5×103 ?Gy/y, and that also established the relation between dose rate (D) and radionuclide concentration (c) on a fish muscle fresh weight basis, as follows: D = 5.05 E×N×C, assuming that the radionuclide distribution is homogenous among organs. Two hypotheses were tested here, using statistical tools: 1) is the body distribution of absorbed dose homogenous among organs? and 2) is the body distribution of absorbed dose identical among studied fishes? It was concluded, as expected, that the distribution among organs is heterogeneous; but, unexpectedly, that the three fishes display identical body distribution pattern, although they belong to different trophic levels. Hence, concerning absorbed dose calculation, the statement that data distribution is homogenous must be understood merely as an approximation, at least in the case of Polonium-210.

  12. Absorbed dose calibration factors for parallel-plate chambers in high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out into the performance of parallel-plate chambers in 60Co and MV photon beams. The aim was to derive calibration factors, investigate chamber-to-chamber variability and provide much-needed information on the use of parallel-plate chambers in high-energy X-ray beams. A set of NE2561/NE2611 reference chambers, calibrated against the primary standard graphite calorimeter is used for the dissemination of absorbed dose to water. The parallel-plate chambers were calibrated by comparison with the NPL reference chambers in a water phantom. Two types of parallel-plate chamber were investigated - the NACP -02 and Roos and measurements were made at 60C0 and 6 linac photon energies (6-19 MV). Calibration factors were derived together with polarity corrections. The standard uncertainty in the calibration of a chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water is estimated to be ±0.75%. The results of the polarity measurements were somewhat confusing. One would expect the correction to be small and previous measurements in electron beams have indicated that there is little variation between chambers of these types. However, some chambers gave unexpectedly large polarity corrections, up to 0.8%. By contrast the measured polarity correction for a NE2611 chamber was less than 0.13% at all energies. The reason for these large polarity corrections is not clear, but experimental error and linac variations have been ruled out. By combining the calibration data for the different chambers it was possible to obtain experimental kQ factors for the two chamber types. It would appear from the data that the variations between chambers of the same type are random and one can therefore define a generic curve for each chamber type. These are presented in Figure 1, together with equivalent data for two cylindrical chamber types - NE2561/NE2611 and NE2571. As can be seen, there is a clear difference between the curves for the cylindrical chambers and those for the parallel-plate chambers, which is discussed below. The small difference (around 0.3%) between the NACP and Roos chambers at the highest photon energies is within the measurement uncertainties but may indicate a slight difference in chamber response. A number of chambers were recalibrated six months later to investigate chamber stability. It was found that the repeatability was generally better than 0.5% and the variations in time appear to be random. These differences are larger than for thimble chambers, where we have found stability at better than the 0.3% level over several years. Parallel-plate chambers in electron beams have also showed high stability (McEwen et al, 2001), which would indicate that parallel-plate chambers are sensitive to small variations in the beam quality of photon beams that do not affect thimble chambers. This data can also be used to derive relative wall correction factors for the Roos and NACP. Good agreement (within 0.3%) was found with previous data (Palm et al, 2000; Nystrom et al, 1993). These measurements would seem to confirm that pwall for the Roos chamber given in TRS-381 is too low by around 0.5%. Parallel-plate chambers can be calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, but with an uncertainty larger than for thimble chambers. Chamber stability also appears to be worse than for thimble chambers. Polarity corrections must always be measured and applied, as the polarity effect for a particular chamber is difficult to predict

  13. Study of the influence of gold particles on the absorbed dose in soft tissue using polymer gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of high-Z material adjacent to soft tissue, when submitted to irradiation, enhances locally the absorbed dose in these soft tissues. Such effect occurs due to the outscattering of photoelectrons from the high-Z material. Polymer gel dosimeters have been used to investigate this effect. Analytic calculations to estimate the dose enhancement and Monte Carlo simulations have been performed. Samples containing polymer gel (PG) with 0.005 gAu/gPG and pure polymer gel have been irradiated using an X-rays beam produced by 150 kV, filtered with 4 mm Al and 5 mm Cu, which resulted in an approximately 20% higher absorbed dose in the samples with gold in comparison to those with pure polymer gel. The analytic calculations and the Monte Carlo simulation resulted in a dose enhancement factor of approximately 30%. (author)

  14. Methods of Assessing Absorbed Neutron and Gamma-Ray Dose in Accidents with a Graphite Critical Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the elaboration of methods of dose determination and personnel dosimetry for use in accidents experienced with a graphite critical assembly. This involves measuring neutron doses and gamma-ray doses in air, at the surface of and inside phantoms representing the human trunk, and also the measurement of 24 Na radioactivity in a liquid phantom. The measurements were made with standard dosimetric equipment including an IDN apparatus, an IFKNG personnel dosimeter and activation detectors such as indium, manganese, sodium, copper, phosphor and sulphur. The results of the measurements are given in the tables and graphs. The experimental results show that to determine the exposure of a worker involved in an accident with a graphite critical assembly it is sufficient to determine the absorbed gamma-radiation dose averaged over the whole body, the absorbed gamma-radiation dose and the dose to the crystalline lens and gonads, due to charged particles formed by neutrons. Since the distribution of neutron fluxes in the vicinity of the critical assembly is uniform in the vertical direction, the absorbed dose to the crystalline lens and gonads can be determined by a personnel dosimeter, affixed to the chest, regardless of the position of the wearer relative to the direction of the incident flux. The average gamma-ray dose to the body can be assessed from the data provided by these personnel dosimeters and from measurements of sodium activity in the blood, using the formulae given in the paper. Finally, there is a table summarizing the methods of determining gamma-ray dose, and dose due to charged particles from neutrons at the surface, and the average dose over the entire body for a person exposed to an accident. (author)

  15. Correlation between radiolysis of 111In- or 177Lu-labelled methionine containing regulatory peptides and absorbed dose (Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: radio-peptides in small volumes are prone to radiation damage with initial dose rates ? 10 Gy/h. High specific activities (high activity (MBq) and at low peptide mass (n moles)) are needed for optimal imaging and therapy in preclinical studies of receptor-mediated processes with peptides, like mini gastrin (MG) and bombesin. These small methionine-containing regulatory peptides oxidise rapidly. Radiolysis of radio-peptide means decreased radiochemical purity (RCP). Radiolysed radio-peptide has lost receptor affinity with subsequent decreased imaging quality and therapeutic effect. Here, we present our method how to measure RCP and quantify radiolysis of these radiolabelled peptides by using reversed phase HPLC C18 gradient. Absorbed doses were calculated in the reaction vial during radiolabelling and storage of radio-peptides. We investigated the relation of the absorbed dose (Gy) and RCP of 111In- or 177Lu-labelled methionine-containing peptides. Materials and methods: absorbed dose rates were determined assuming a spherical geometry as obtained in the reaction vials. RCP of these peptides was measured without quenchers and relation between radiation dose and radiolysis established. The presence of quenchers will underestimate the influence radiolysis. DOTA-MG11 and DOTA-Tyr4-bombesin was used as models for methionine-containing regulatory peptides. Results: according to our calculations, 110 MBq 111In and 23 MBq 177Lu in a final volume of 200 ?l have similar dose rates (4.3 mGy/s vs. 4.2 mGy/s), leading to doses at 24 hours of 255 Gy and 209 Gy, respectively. If under these conditions no radiolysis can be detected, HPLC-separation need optimization. We found a linear correlation between RCP and absorbed dose during these 24 hours. This provides the possibility to predict RCP of radio-peptides, using the absorbed dose as indicator. Conclusions: radiation induced radiolysis of radio-peptides shows a linear relation with absorbed dose. High activities of radiolabelled peptides in small volumes, should always be combined with quenchers to maintain high RCP. (authors)

  16. The provision of national standards of absorbed dose for radiation processing. The role of NPL in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system of national and international standardization is examined, particularly with respect to the problems of standardizing high absorbed dose measurements required in processing with photons from cobalt-60 and electrons. The need for development of primary standards specifically dedicated to this application versus the possibility of extrapolation from standards in use at lower dose levels is considered together with means for dissemination and intercomparison. The present status of standards at NPL and the future programme are outlined. (author)

  17. Preclinical Studies of 68Ga-DOTATOC: Biodistribution Assessment in Syrian Rats and Evaluation of Absorbed Dose in Human Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mojdeh naderi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Gallium-68 DOTA-DPhe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (68Ga-DOTATOC has been applied by several European centers for the treatment of a variety of human malignancies. Nevertheless, definitive dosimetric data are yet unavailable. According to the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, researchers are investigating the safety and efficacy of this radiotracer to meet Food and Drug Administration requirements. The aim of this study was to introduce the optimized procedure for 68Ga-DOTATOC preparation, using a novel germanium-68 (68Ge/68Ga generator in Iran and evaluate the absorbed doses in numerous organs with high accuracy. Methods: The optimized conditions for preparing the radiolabeled complex were determined via several experiments by changing the ligand concentration, pH, temperature and incubation time. Radiochemical purity of the complex was assessed, using high-performance liquid chromatography and instant thin-layer chromatography. The absorbed dose of human organs was evaluated, based on biodistribution studies on Syrian rats via Radiation Absorbed Dose Assessment Resource Method. Results: 68Ga-DOTATOC was prepared with radiochemical purity of >98% and specific activity of 39.6 MBq/nmol. The complex demonstrated great stability at room temperature and in human serum at 37°C at least two hours after preparation. Significant uptake was observed in somatostatin receptor-positive tissues such as pancreatic and adrenal tissues (12.83 %ID/g and 0.91 %ID/g, respectively. Dose estimations in human organs showed that the pancreas, kidneys and adrenal glands received the maximum absorbed doses (0.105, 0.074 and 0.010 mGy/MBq, respectively. Also, the effective absorbed dose was estimated at 0.026 mSv/MBq for 68Ga-DOTATOC. Conclusion: The obtained results showed that 68Ga-DOTATOC can be considered as an effective agent for clinical PET imaging in Iran.

  18. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadori, Amir A; Johnson, Perry; Bolch, Wesley E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Jokisch, Derek W [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC (United States); Eckerman, Keith F, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-11-07

    Spongiosa in the adult human skeleton consists of three tissues-active marrow (AM), inactive marrow (IM) and trabecularized mineral bone (TB). AM is considered to be the target tissue for assessment of both long-term leukemia risk and acute marrow toxicity following radiation exposure. The total shallow marrow (TM{sub 50}), defined as all tissues lying within the first 50 {mu}m of the bone surfaces, is considered to be the radiation target tissue of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. For irradiation by sources external to the body, kerma to homogeneous spongiosa has been used as a surrogate for absorbed dose to both of these tissues, as direct dose calculations are not possible using computational phantoms with homogenized spongiosa. Recent micro-CT imaging of a 40 year old male cadaver has allowed for the accurate modeling of the fine microscopic structure of spongiosa in many regions of the adult skeleton (Hough et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309-46). This microstructure, along with associated masses and tissue compositions, was used to compute specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for protons originating in axial and appendicular bone sites (Jokisch et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6857-72). These proton SAFs, bone masses, tissue compositions and proton production cross sections, were subsequently used to construct neutron dose-response functions (DRFs) for both AM and TM{sub 50} targets in each bone of the reference adult male. Kerma conditions were assumed for other resultant charged particles. For comparison, AM, TM{sub 50} and spongiosa kerma coefficients were also calculated. At low incident neutron energies, AM kerma coefficients for neutrons correlate well with values of the AM DRF, while total marrow (TM) kerma coefficients correlate well with values of the TM{sub 50} DRF. At high incident neutron energies, all kerma coefficients and DRFs tend to converge as charged-particle equilibrium is established across the bone site. In the range of 10 eV to 100 MeV, substantial differences are observed among the kerma coefficients and DRF. As a result, it is recommended that the AM kerma coefficient be used to estimate the AM DRF, and that the TM kerma coefficient be used to estimate the TM{sub 50} DRF below 10 eV. Between 10 eV and 100 MeV, the appropriate DRF should be used as presented in this study. Above 100 MeV, spongiosa kerma coefficients apply well for estimating skeletal tissue doses. DRF values for each bone site as a function of energy are provided in an electronic annex to this article available at http://stacks.iop.org/0031-9155/56/6873/mmedia.

  19. Excess radiation absorbed doses from non-optimised radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine therapy is often the method of choice for treatment of hyperthyroidism because it is considered safe, is relatively inexpensive, and is convenient for the patient and except for occasional hypothyroidism, almost without side effects. Even though radioiodine treatment has been performed for over 50 years, the method of treatment differs from country to country and even from hospital to hospital within the same country. To illuminate such differences 187 radioiodine treatments for Graves' disease at Malmoe Univ. Hospital in Sweden have been analysed. Comparative dose calculations were carried out assuming that the individual patients had also been treated according to a number of other protocols in current use. The results show that the protocol used for calculating the administered activity in radioiodine therapy is far from optimised in many hospitals. Following the protocols where the absorbed dose to the thyroid is calculated without any uptake measurements after administration of a test activity, most of the patients were treated with an unnecessarily high activity, as a mean factor of 2.5 times too high and in individual patients up to eight times too high, leading to an unnecessary radiation exposure both for the patient, the family and the public. This is not in accordance with generally accepted radiation protection principles. Using higher activity than necessary will also prolong the patient's stay at the hospital and thus increase the costs for the care. Unnecessarily high activity will also necessitate more long-lasting radiation protection restriction relative to family members when the patient is back home. (authors)

  20. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynaldo, S. R. [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology, Posgraduate Course in Science and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Benavente C, J. A.; Da Silva, T. A., E-mail: sirr@cdtn.br [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (Bss 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, metrology laboratories are required to verify the reliability of the Bss-2 system by performing additional verification measurements. In the CDTN Calibration Laboratory, the absorbed dose rates and their angular variation in the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 85}Kr beta radiation fields were studied. Measurements were done with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. In comparison to the certificate values provided by the Bss-2, absorbed dose rates measured with the extrapolation chamber differed from -1.4 to 2.9% for the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and -0.3% for the {sup 85}Kr fields; their angular variation showed differences lower than 2% for incidence angles up to 40-degrees and it reached 11% for higher angles, when compared to ISO values. Measurements with the radiochromic film showed an asymmetry of the radiation field that is caused by a misalignment. Differences between the angular variations of absorbed dose rates determined by both dosimetry systems suggested that some correction factors for the extrapolation chamber that were not considered should be determined. (Author)

  1. Hematological toxicity in radioimmunotherapy is predicted both by the computed absorbed whole body dose (cGy) and by the administered dose (mCi)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has yielded encouraging response rates in patients with recurrent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, but myelotoxicity remains the dose limiting factor. Dose optimization is theoretically possible, since a pretreatment biodistribution study with tracer doses allows for a fairly accurate estimate of the whole body (and by implication the bone marrow) dose in patients. It has been shown that the radiation dose as a function of the administered dose varies widely from patient to patient. The pretreatment study could therefore be used to determine the maximum tolerable dose for each individual patient. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the administered dose or the estimated whole body absorbed radiation dose were indeed predictors of bone marrow toxicity. Materials and Methods: We studied two cohorts of patients to determine if the computed integral whole body or marrow dose is predictive of myelotoxicity. The first cohort consisted of 13 patients treated with Yttrium-90 labeled anti-CD20 (2B8) monoclonal antibody. Those patients were treated in a dose escalation protocol, based on the administered dose, without correction for weight or body surface. The computed whole body dose varied from 41 to 129 cGy. The second cohort (6 patients) were treated with Iodine-131 labeled anti-CD20 (B1) antibody. In this group the administered dose was tailored to deliver an estimated 75 cGy whole body dose. The administered dose varied from 54 to 84 mCi of Iodine-131. For each patient, white blood cell count with differential, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet levels were measured before and at regular intervals after RIT was administered. Using linear regression analysis, a relationship between administered dose, absorbed dose and myelotoxicity was determined for each patient cohort. Results: Marrow toxicity was measured by the absolute decrease in white blood cell (DWBC), platelet (DPLAT), and neutrophil (DN) values. In the Yttrium-90 anti-CD20 antibody treated group, in which the estimated whole body dose varied (D(cGy)), the decrease in these values was predicted by the linear (zero intercept) equations: DWBC = 0.01158 D(cGy) + 0.05247 D(mCi), DPLAT = 0.1476 D(cGy) + 3.043 D(mCi), and DN=0.0047 D(cGy)+0.0507D(mCi). In the Iodine-131 anti-CD20 antibody treated group, where D(cGy) was constant and equal to 75 cGy, the variation in toxicity was predicted by the linear equation DPLAT = -241 + 5.53 D(mCi), with F=12.184 (p<0.01) and DWBC = -2.62 + 0.0757 D (mCi), with F=3.14 (NS). Conclusion: The results suggest that the total absorbed dose is not an absolute predictor of effect, but in this restricted data set a significant predominant effect of the administered dose on toxicity could not be demonstrated either. The data however do not invalidate the theoretical view that 1) with internal radionuclides a large fraction of the total absorbed dose is delivered at very low dose rates, which may be too low for any appreciable effect, and 2) if variation in the kinetics of the agents lead to an adaptation of the administered dose, the initial dose rate is affected. The therapeutic and toxic effects of RIT are probably a function of both the total dose and the dose rate. Further optimization of this therapy needs to take this into consideration

  2. Gamma-Absorbed Dose Rate and Distribution of Natural Radionuclides in Songkhla Beach Sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Specific activities and distribution of natural radionuclide ?-ray activities, produced by 40K, 226Ra and 232Th, were determined in 80 sand samples collected along Chalatat and Samila beaches in Songkhla province. The derivation of 40K, 226Ra and 232Th gamma-ray specific activities of sand samples was performed using the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, gamma spectroscopy analysis system and the Eu-152 radioactive standard source at the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP) laboratory. The beach sand specific activity ranges from 89 to 963 Bq/kg for 40K, 0 to 120 Bq/kg for 226Ra and 0 to 319 Bq/kg for 232Th with mean values of 248 ± 44 Bq/kg, 41 ± 5 Bq/kg and 64 ± 7 Bq/kg, respectively. The specific activities of these radionuclides were compared with some global radioactivity measurements and evaluations. Moreover, gamma to absorbed dose rates and radium equivalent activities were calculated for the analyzed samples to assess the radiation hazards arising. All the beach sand samples had the mean value of radium equivalent activities lower than 370 Bq/kg, which is the limit set by OECD

  3. OEDIPE, a software for personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in nuclear medicine: absorbed dose and biologically effective dose considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For targeted radionuclide therapies, treatment planning usually consists of the administration of standard activities without accounting for the patient-specific activity distribution, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry to organs at risk. The OEDIPE software is a user-friendly interface which has an automation level suitable for performing personalized Monte Carlo 3D dosimetry for diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclide administrations. Mean absorbed doses to regions of interest (ROIs), isodose curves superimposed on a personalized anatomical model of the patient and dose-volume histograms can be extracted from the absorbed dose 3D distribution. Moreover, to account for the differences in radiosensitivity between tumoral and healthy tissues, additional functionalities have been implemented to calculate the 3D distribution of the biologically effective dose (BED), mean BEDs to ROIs, isoBED curves and BED-volume histograms along with the Equivalent Uniform Biologically Effective Dose (EUD) to ROIs. Finally, optimization tools are available for treatment planning optimization using either the absorbed dose or BED distributions. These tools enable one to calculate the maximal injectable activity which meets tolerance criteria to organs at risk for a chosen fractionation protocol. This paper describes the functionalities available in the latest version of the OEDIPE software to perform personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in targeted radionuclide therapies. (authors)

  4. Visible photoluminescence of color centers in LiF crystals for absorbed dose evaluation in clinical dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Barajas, J. E.; Piccinini, M.; Vincenti, M. A.; Bonfigli, F.; Khan, R. F.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    Among insulating materials, lithium fluoride (LiF) has been successfully used as ionizing radiation dosemeter for more than 60 years. Thermoluminescence (TL) has been the most commonly used reading technique to evaluate the absorbed dose. Lately, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of visible emitting color centers (CCs) has also been explored in pure and doped LiF. This work focuses on the experimental behaviour of nominally pure LiF crystals dosemeters for 6 MV x rays at low doses based on photoluminescence (PL) of radiation induced CCs. Polished LiF crystals were irradiated using 6 MV x rays produced by a clinical linear accelerator. The doses (absorbed dose to water) covered the 1-100 Gy range. Optical absorption spectra show stable formation of primary F defects up to a maximum concentration of 2×1016 cm-3, while no significant M absorption band at around 450 nm was detected. On the other hand, under Argon laser excitation at 458 nm, PL spectra of the irradiated LiF crystals clearly exhibited the characteristic F2 and F+3 visible broad emission bands. Their sum intensity is linearly proportional to the absorbed dose in the investigated range. PL integrated intensity was also measured using a conventional fluorescence optical microscope under blue lamp illumination. The relationship between the absorbed dose and the integrated F2 and F+3 PL intensities, represented by the net average pixel number in the optical fluorescence images, is also fairly linear. Even at the low point defect densities obtained at the investigated doses, these preliminary experimental results are encouraging for further investigation of CCs PL in LiF crystals for clinical dosimetry.

  5. Absorbed dose calculation of the energy deposition close to bone, lung and soft tissue interfaces in molecular radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: for voxel-based dosimetry in molecular radiotherapy (MRT) based on tabulated voxel S-values these values are usually obtained only for soft tissue. In order to study the changes in the dose deposition patterns at interfaces between different materials we have performed Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: the deposited energy patterns were obtained using the Monte-Carlo radiation code MCNPX v2.7 for Lu177 (medium-energy) and Y90 (high-energy). The following interfaces were studied: soft tissue-bone and soft tissue-lungs. For this purpose a volume of soft tissue homogeneously filled with Lu177 or Y90 was simulated at the interface to 3 different volumes containing no activity: soft tissue, lungs and bone. The emission was considered to be isotropic. The dimensions were chosen to ensure that the energy deposited by all generated particles was scored. The materials were defined as recommended by ICPR46; the decay schemes of Eckerman and Endo were used. With these data the absorbed dose patterns normalized to the maximum absorbed dose in the source region (soft tissue) were calculated. Results: the absorbed dose fractions in the boundary with soft tissue, bone and lungs are 50%, 47% and 57%, respectively, for Lu177 and 50%, 47% and 51% for Y90. The distances to the interface at which the absorbed fractions are at 0.1% are 1.0, 0.6 and 3.0 mm for Lu177 and 7.0, 4.0 and 24 mm for Y90, for soft tissue, bone and lungs respectively. Conclusions: in MRT, the changes in the absorbed doses at interfaces between soft tissue and bone/lungs need to be considered for isotopes emitting high energy particles. (authors)

  6. Estimation of absorbed doses from paediatric cone-beam CT scans: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to establish a dose estimation tool with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A 5-y-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned to create a voxelised phantom and used as an input for the abdominal cone-beam CT in a BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system. An X-ray tube model of the Varian On-Board ImagerR was built in the MC system. To validate the model, the absorbed doses at each organ location for standard-dose and low-dose modes were measured in the physical phantom with MOSFET detectors; effective doses were also calculated. In the results, the MC simulations were comparable to the MOSFET measurements. This voxelised phantom approach could produce a more accurate dose estimation than the stylised phantom method. This model can be easily applied to multi-detector CT dosimetry. (authors)

  7. Absorbed dose distributions in patients with bone metastases from hormone refractory prostate cancer treated with Re-186 HEDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: intravenous administration of Re-186 hydroxyethylidene-diphosphonate (HEDP) is used for metastatic bone pain palliation in hormone refractory prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for bone seeking radionuclides is challenging due to the complex structure with osteoblastic, osteolytic and mixed lesions. The aim of this study was to perform image-based patient-specific 3D convolution dosimetry to obtain a distribution of the absorbed doses to each lesion and estimate inter- and intra-patient variations. Materials and methods: 28 patients received a fixed 5 GBq activity of Re-186 HEDP followed by peripheral blood stem cell rescue at 14 days in a phase II trial. A FORTE dual-headed gamma camera was used to acquire sequential Single-Photon-Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) data of the thorax and pelvis area at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 hours following administration. The projection data were reconstructed using filtered-back projection and were corrected for attenuation and scatter. Voxelised cumulated activity distributions were obtained with two different methods. First, the scans were co-registered and the time-activity curves were obtained on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Second, the clearance curve was obtained from the mean number of counts in each individual lesion and used to scale the uptake distribution taken at 24 hours. The calibration factors required for image quantification were obtained from a phantom experiment. An in-house developed EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used for the calculation of dose voxel kernels for soft-tissue and cortical/trabecular bone used to perform convolution dosimetry. Cumulative dose-volume histograms were produced and mean absorbed doses calculated for each spinal and pelvic lesion. Results: preliminary results show that the lesion mean absorbed doses ranged from 25 to 55 Gy when the medium was soft tissue and decreased by 40% if bone was considered. The use of the cumulated activity distribution obtained from the scan acquired at 24 hours following administration reduced the number of artefacts introduced by the registration and voxelised cumulated activity calculations. Conclusion: patient-specific convolution dosimetry calculations show that the absorbed dose to each lesion changes significantly depending on the medium density considered. This suggests that specific lesion and surrounding tissue compositions should be considered to overcome the limitations of convolution dosimetry, which could explain the range of absorbed doses observed. Future work will include the correlation of absorbed dose with patient outcome. (authors)

  8. Measurements of X ray absorbed doses to dental patients in two dental X ray units in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of absorbed doses from radiographic examinations to various anatomical sites in the head and neck of patients with an average age of 45 years using intra-oral dental radiography have been carried out. LiF (TLD-100) dosemeters were used for the measurements of the absorbed dose. The measured absorbed doses to the various anatomical sites in the two units are reported, discussed and compared with results from the literature. Quality control measurements were also performed using a Victoreen quality control test device on the X ray units. The tube voltage accuracies for the two units were found to be within acceptable limits (less than ±10%). On the other hand the exposure time accuracies for these units have large deviations (>20%). These results and those that have been reported in the literature may be an indication that high patient doses are common in most dental X ray centres and countries. As a result of this, regular compliance and performance checks of dental diagnostic X ray equipment are essential in order to ensure proper performance and to minimise unnecessary patient and operator doses. (author)

  9. Polymer gel - TPS radiotherapy dosimetry GeVero software for ionizing radiation absorbed dose 3D distribution calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implementation of polymer gel dosimetry in radiotherapy departments calls for: easily manufactured gel dosimeters of required physical-chemical properties, set-up procedures of irradiation, adaptation of three-dimensional scanning procedures and instruments as well as fast tool for calculation of 3D absorbed dose distribution in the polymer gel dosimeters and comparison with another treatment planning system calculated dose distribution. These challenges resulted in several propositions in polymer gel dosimetry area. In this work, however, a summary of results on construction of polymer gel dosimetry software facilitating usually laborious 3D dose distributions data processing is provided.

  10. Polymer gel - TPS radiotherapy dosimetry GeVero software for ionizing radiation absorbed dose 3D distribution calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozicki, Marek; Karwowski, Andrzej C [Institute of Architecture of Textiles, Faculty of Material Technologies and Textile Design, Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Maras, Piotr [Medical Physics Department, Copernicus Hospital, Pabianicka 62, 93-513 Lodz (Poland); Jankowski, Jacek [Department of Strength of Materials and Structures, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)], E-mail: mkozicki@mitr.p.lodz.pl

    2009-05-01

    Implementation of polymer gel dosimetry in radiotherapy departments calls for: easily manufactured gel dosimeters of required physical-chemical properties, set-up procedures of irradiation, adaptation of three-dimensional scanning procedures and instruments as well as fast tool for calculation of 3D absorbed dose distribution in the polymer gel dosimeters and comparison with another treatment planning system calculated dose distribution. These challenges resulted in several propositions in polymer gel dosimetry area. In this work, however, a summary of results on construction of polymer gel dosimetry software facilitating usually laborious 3D dose distributions data processing is provided.

  11. Characterization of an absorbed dose standard in water through ionometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the unit of absorbed dose at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) of Mexico, is characterized by means of the development of a primary standard of absorbed dose to water, Dagua. The main purpose is to diminish the uncertainty in the service of dosimetric calibration of ionization chambers (employed in radiotherapy of extemal beams) that offers this laboratory. This thesis is composed of seven chapters: In Chapter 1 the position and justification of the problem is described, as well as the general and specific objectives. In Chapter 2, a presentation of the main quantities and units used in dosimetry is made, in accordance with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) that establish the necessity to have a coherent system with the international system of units and dosimetric quantities. The concepts of equilibrium and transient equilibrium of charged particles (TCPE) are also presented, which are used later in the quantitative determination of Dagua. Finally, since the proposed standard of Dagua is of ionometric type, an explanation of the Bragg-Gray and Spencer-Attix cavity theories is made. These theories are the foundation of this type of standards. On the other hand, to guarantee the complete validity of the conditions demanded by these theories it is necessary to introduce correction factors. These factors are determined in Chapters 5 and 6. Since for the calculation of the correction factors Monte Carlo (MC) method is used in an important way, in Chapter 3 the fundamental concepts of this method are presented; in particular the principles of the code MCNP4C [Briesmeister 2000] are detailed, making emphasis on the basis of electron transport and variance reduction techniques used in this thesis. Because a phenomenological approach is carried out in the development of the standard of Dagua, in Chapter 4 the characteristics of the Picker C/9 unit, the ionization chamber type CC01, series 131, built by Osterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf, and the experimental conditions are shown. The characteristics of the complementary instrumentation employed in the experimental part of the work, are also presented. In Chapter 5, two ionometric methods for the calculation of the correction factors are presented: that of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) and that of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In the BIPM method emphasis is made in the MC simulation of the spectral fluence of the photons that emits the unit (using a realistic geometry and an equivalent one) as well as its validation by means of the air-kerma output factors and the percent depth doses in water, with the aid of the condition of TCPE that apply to the CC01-131 chamber. In particular, it is presented how the factor kcav is determined, employing MC simulation of two positions of the chamber (with the chamber axis parallel or perpendicular to the beam axis), and by means of a semi-analytic approach that uses the energy dissipation functions of Spencer for the parallel position. Finally the factor kp is determined for both orientations. In the case of the IAEA method, the expressions of the correction factors in the protocols TRS-277 and TRS-398 are shown. Chapter 6 presents results and discussion, and Chapter 7 presents conclusions and recommendations. In Chapter 6, the protocol of the BIPM/ISO/TAG [ISO 1992] for the calculation of the uncertainties is detailed, later the results and its discussion is made. The main conclusion obtained of these results is that the value of the Dagua and its U for the BIPM method is bigger than that for the IAEA method. This conclusion has at least three meanings: First: The correction factors calculated using the BIPM method are overestimated, regarding the IAEA method. Second: The possible overestimation is consistent with the order of uncertainty with which are calculated, that is with the infrastructure that at the moment the SSDL-Mexico possesses to carry out the unit of absorbed dose to water (instrumentation, traceability of the electrometers, barometers, thermometers, calculation algorithms, time of machine, etc). Third: In this work it was shown the necessity to solve, if it exists, the ambiguity [Alvarez et al. 2002] of the models of the IAEA and the BIPM methods, when applying them to the design of the CC01-131 chamber. It was determined that, within the order of uncertainty with which the correction factors and the Dagua were obtained, none of the two models presents the problem of ambiguity. (Author)

  12. Influence of thyroid volume reduction on absorbed dose in 131I therapy studied by using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaur, Rahman; Sikander, M. Mirza; Waheed, Arshed; Nasir, M. Mirza; Waheed, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    A simulation study has been performed to quantify the effect of volume reduction on the thyroid absorbed dose per decay and to investigate the variation of energy deposition per decay due to ?- and ?-activity of 131I with volume/mass of thyroid, for water, ICRP- and ICRU-soft tissue taken as thyroid material. A Monte Carlo model of the thyroid, in the Geant4 radiation transport simulation toolkit was constructed to compute the ?- and ?-absorbed dose in the simulated thyroid phantom for various values of its volume. The effect of the size and shape of the thyroid on energy deposition per decay has also been studied by using spherical, ellipsoidal and cylindrical models for the thyroid and varying its volume in 1-25 cm3 range. The relative differences of Geant4 results for different models with each other and MCNP results lie well below 1.870%. The maximum relative difference among the Geant4 estimated results for water with ICRP and ICRU soft tissues is not more than 0.225%. S-values for ellipsoidal, spherical and cylindrical thyroid models were estimated and the relative difference with published results lies within 3.095%. The absorbed fraction values for beta particles show a good agreement with published values within 2.105% deviation. The Geant4 based simulation results of absorbed fractions for gammas again show a good agreement with the corresponding MCNP and EGS4 results (±6.667%) but have 29.032% higher values than that of MIRD calculated values. Consistent with previous studies, the reduction of the thyroid volume is found to have a substantial effect on the absorbed dose. Geant4 simulations confirm dose dependence on the volume/mass of thyroid in agreement with MCNP and EGS4 computed values but are substantially different from MIRD8 data. Therefore, inclusion of size/mass dependence is indicated for 131I radiotherapy of the thyroid.

  13. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of 192Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results indicate an under dosage of the target volume of about 20%. (author)

  14. Estimation of kidney depth effective renal plasmatic flux and absorbed dose, from a radio isotopic renogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for the estimation of kidney depth is described. It is based on a comparison between the measurements obtained in a radioisotopic renogram carried out for two specific energies and the same measurements made with a phanto-kidney at different depths. Experiments performed with kidney and abdomen phantoms provide calibration curves which are obtained by plotting the photopeak to scatter ratio for 131I pulse height spectrum against depth. Through this technique it is possible to obtain the Hippuran-131I kidney uptake with external measurements only. In fact it introduces a correction in the measurements for the depth itself and for the attenuation and scattering effects due to the tissues interposed between the kidney and the detector. When the two kidneys are not equidistant from the detector, their respective renograms are different and it is therefore very important to introduce a correction to the measurements according to the organ depth in order to obtain the exact information on Hippuran partition between the kidneys. The significative influence of the extrarenal activity is analyzed in the renogram by monitoring the praecordial region after 131I-human serum albumin injection and establishing a calibration factor relating the radioactivity level of this area to that present in each kidney area. It is shown that it is possible to obtain the values for the clearance of each kidney from the renogram once the alteration in efficiency due to the organ depth and to non-renal tissue interference in the renal area is considered. This way, values for the effective renal plasma flow were obtained, which are comparable to those obtained with other techniques, estimating the total flow of the kidneys. Finally the mean absorbed dose of the kidneys in a renography is also estimated. (Author)

  15. Calculation of absorbed dose in target tissue and equivalent dose in sensitive tissues of patients treated by BNCT using MCNP4C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Today BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) is used for treatment of many diseases, including brain tumors, in many medical centers. In this method, a target area (e.g. head of patient) is irradiated by using some optimized and suitable neutron fields such as research reactors. Due to the importance of healthy tissues which are located in the vicinity of irradiated tissue, and based on the ALARA principle, it is required to prevent unnecessary exposure of these vital organs. In this study, by using stimulation method (MCNP4C Code), the absorbed dose in target tissue and the equivalent dose in different tissues of a patient treated by BNCT are calculated. For this purpose, we have used the MIRD Standard Phantom. Equivalent dose in 11 sensitive organs, located in the vicinity of the target, and the total equivalent dose in whole body was calculated. The results show that the absorbed dose in tumor tissue is equal to 1.52 Gy and the total equivalent dose in 11 sensitive organs is equal to 14 mGy. The maximum equivalent dose in organs, other than brain and tumor, belongs to the tissues of lungs and thyroid and are equal to 7.36 mSv and 3.00 mSv, respectively. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the absorbed dose of the thyroid gland in conventional spiral and spiral computed tomography techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Badrian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: The use of sophisticated radiographic techniques is absolutely necessary in dentistry. The use of these techniques exposes the sensitive organs of head and neck to x-rays. The aim of the present study was to investigate the absorbed dose of the thyroid gland in conventional spiral and spiral computed tomography techniques. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 10 TLD GR-200 circular dosimeters (Thermoluminans Detector were used in male RANDO-like phantom (head and neck segment, i.e. the first 10 segments in order to determine the radiation dose absorbed by the thyroid gland. Then spiral computed tomographies were provided from the anterior and posterior regions of the maxilla and mandible along with a lateral Scout view as a guide. Conventional spiral tomographies were prepared from the maxilla, mandible and both jaws with a panoramic radiograph as a guide. Data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests using SPSS 11.5 (a = 0.05. Results: The highest and lowest thyroid gland absorbed doses were observed with computed tomography of both jaws and conventional spiral tomography of the anterior maxilla, respectively (5.92 ± 0.01 and 0.79 ± 0.01 mSiv. The mean amount of the absorbed dose by the thyroid gland was lower in the conventional spiral tomography compared to computed tomography. The two techniques revealed significant differences in the absorbed doses except for conventional spiral tomography in the posterior and anterior regions of the mandible (p value = 0.276.Conclusion: According to results of the present study, the absorbed dose of the thyroid gland in the conventional spiral tomography in different regions of the jaws was less than CT scan techniques. As a result, it appears the use of conventional spiral tomography is preferred over CT scans in limited regions where three-dimensional and cross-sectional views are required.Key words: Thyroid gland, Film dosimetry, Spiral Computed Tomography.

  17. Renal function affects absorbed dose to the kidneys and haematological toxicity during 177Lu-DOTATATE treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has become an important treatment option in the management of advanced neuroendocrine tumours. Long-lasting responses are reported for a majority of treated patients, with good tolerability and a favourable impact on quality of life. The treatment is usually limited by the cumulative absorbed dose to the kidneys, where the radiopharmaceutical is reabsorbed and retained, or by evident haematological toxicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate how renal function affects (1) absorbed dose to the kidneys, and (2) the development of haematological toxicity during PRRT treatment. The study included 51 patients with an advanced neuroendocrine tumour who received 177Lu-DOTATATE treatment during 2006 - 2011 at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg. An average activity of 7.5 GBq (3.5 - 8.2 GBq) was given at intervals of 6 - 8 weeks on one to five occasions. Patient baseline characteristics according to renal and bone marrow function, tumour burden and medical history including prior treatment were recorded. Renal and bone marrow function were then monitored during treatment. Renal dosimetry was performed according to the conjugate view method, and the residence time for the radiopharmaceutical in the whole body was calculated. A significant correlation between inferior renal function before treatment and higher received renal absorbed dose per administered activity was found (p < 0.01). Patients with inferior renal function also experienced a higher grade of haematological toxicity during treatment (p = 0.01). The residence time of 177Lu in the whole body (range 0.89 - 3.0 days) was correlated with grade of haematological toxicity (p = 0.04) but not with renal absorbed dose (p = 0.53). Patients with inferior renal function were exposed to higher renal absorbed dose per administered activity and developed a higher grade of haematological toxicity during 177Lu-DOTATATE treatment. The study confirms the tolerability of PRRT in patients with an advanced neuroendocrine tumour but indicates that patients with inferior renal function are at risk of being exposed to higher absorbed