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Sample records for absolute radioactivity measurements

  1. Recent Progress in Liquid Scintillation Counting System for Absolute Radioactivity Measurement

    2011-01-01

    The triple to double coincidence ratio (TDCR) method is an absolute activity measurement method in liquid scintillation counting, especially developed for pure β- and EC-emitters activity standardization. Such a liquid scintillation counting system is now

  2. Measuring the absolute disintegration rate of a radioactive gas with a moveable endplate discharge counter (MEP) and theoretical calculation of wall effect

    A precision built moveable endplate Geiger-Mueller counter was used to measure the absolute disintegration rate of a beta-emitting radioactive gas. A Geiger-Mueller counter used for measuring gaseous radioactivity has 85Kr (beta energy, 0.67 MeV). The wall effect calculation is readily extendable to other beta energies

  3. Calibrated radioactive sources - absolute measurements using a 4π β-γ apparatus

    In this paper, the principle of the standardization of the radioisotopes by the 4π β - γ coincidence method is reminded. Some theoretical examples are given emphasizing on instrumental coincidences and their corrections. The experimental apparatus is described: one discusses the choice of the experimental conditions for the many isotopes measured. Results are given and discussed. In appendix we describe the preparation of the sources. (authors)

  4. Calculations of wall effect in proportional counter for absolute radioactivity measurements of gaseous radioisotopes

    Count loss by wall effect was calculated with EGS4 code. Calculated results agreed well with experimental results measured with pressure extrapolation method. In this calculation AE, AP and ECUT, PCUT are better to be set at lower values. Because EGS4 code is not so suited for very low energy of beta-ray, for those samples which emit beta-rays with lower energy than 14C, EGS4 is unsuited to be used for calculation of wall effect. (J.P.N.)

  5. Measurement of the absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring product nuclei (daughter) activity increase or by studing its radioactive decay

    A new method for determining absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring daughter product radioactive decay is presented. The separation method of UX from hexahydrated uranyl nitrate UO2(NO3)2 6H2O based on its dissolution in ethyl ether is described and the accuracy of this method is shown. The factors which accuate on total efficiency of a Geiger Mueller detector for beta particles are determined. The possibility to determine the mass of precursor element by daughter nuclei activity is shown. The results are compared with the one obtained by direct measurement of the mass (or number of atoms) of precursor radioactive substance and with theoretical values calculated for isotopes in secular equilibrium. (Author)

  6. Measurement of the absolute \

    Aunion, Jose Luis Alcaraz; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2010-07-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies around 1 GeV. This measurement has two main physical motivations. On one hand, the neutrino-nucleon interactions at few GeV is a region where existing old data are sparse and with low statistics. The current measurement populates low energy regions with higher statistics and precision than previous experiments. On the other hand, the CCQE interaction is the most useful interaction in neutrino oscillation experiments. The CCQE channel is used to measure the initial and final neutrino fluxes in order to determine the neutrino fraction that disappeared. The neutrino oscillation experiments work at low neutrino energies, so precise measurement of CCQE interactions are essential for flux measurements. The main goal of this thesis is to measure the CCQE absolute neutrino cross section from the SciBooNE data. The SciBar Booster Neutrino Experiment (SciBooNE) is a neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering off experiment. The neutrino energy spectrum works at energies around 1 GeV. SciBooNE was running from June 8th 2007 to August 18th 2008. In that period, the experiment collected a total of 2.65 x 10{sup 20} protons on target (POT). This thesis has used full data collection in neutrino mode 0.99 x 10{sup 20} POT. A CCQE selection cut has been performed, achieving around 70% pure CCQE sample. A fit method has been exclusively developed to determine the absolute CCQE cross section, presenting results in a neutrino energy range from 0.2 to 2 GeV. The results are compatible with the NEUT predictions. The SciBooNE measurement has been compared with both Carbon (MiniBoonE) and deuterium (ANL and BNL) target experiments, showing a good agreement in both cases.

  7. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  8. Measuring the absolute disintegration rate of a radioactive gas with a moveable endplate discharge counter (MEP) and theoretical calculation of wall effect

    Jaffey, A.H.; Gray, J.; Bentley, W.C.; Lerner, J.L.

    1987-09-01

    A precision built moveable endplate Geiger-Mueller counter was used to measure the absolute disintegration rate of a beta-emitting radioactive gas. A Geiger-Mueller counter used for measuring gaseous radioactivity has <100% counting efficiency owing to two factors: (1) ''end effect,'' due to decreased and distorted fields at the ends where wire-insulator joints are placed, and (2) ''wall effect,'' due to non-ionization by beta particles emitted near to and heading into the wall. The end effect was evaluated by making one end of the counter movable and measuring counting rates at a number of endplate positions. Much of the wall effect was calculated theoretically, based on known data for primary ionization of electrons as a function of energy and gas composition. Corrections were then made for the ''shakeoff'' effect in beta decay and for backscattering of electrons from the counter wall. Measurements and calculations were made for a sample of /sup 85/Kr (beta energy, 0.67 MeV). The wall effect calculation is readily extendable to other beta energies.

  9. Measuring radioactivity

    Research work at University College Dublin uses brown fucus seaweed as an indicator of contamination levels of iodine, caesium, ruthenium and plutonium. 20 sites around the Irish coast are regularly monitored, and the effect of discharges from the Sellafield reprocessing plant can thus be assessed. High resolution alpha spectroscopy is used to measure plutonium levels, which have been found to be considerably higher in the Irish Sea and along the Atlantic seaboard than those found along the Galician coast of Spain. This work now serves as a baseline against which the effects of fallout due to the Chernobyl fire can be measured

  10. Measurement of the absolute speed is possible?

    Sergey V. Shevchenko; Tokarevsky, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    One of popular problems, which  are experimentally studied in physics in a long time, is the testing of the special relativity theory, first of all – measurements of isotropy and constancy of light speed; as well as attempts to determine so called “absolute speed”, i.e. the Earth speed in the absolute spacetime (absolute reference frame), if this spacetime (ARF) exists.  Corresponding experiments aimed at the measuring of proper speed of some reference frame in oth...

  11. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  12. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs

  13. Radioactivity and its measurement

    Mann, W B; Garfinkel, S B

    1980-01-01

    Begins with a description of the discovery of radioactivity and the historic research of such pioneers as the Curies and Rutherford. After a discussion of the interactions of &agr;, &bgr; and &ggr; rays with matter, the energetics of the different modes of nuclear disintegration are considered in relation to the Einstein mass-energy relationship as applied to radioactive transformations. Radiation detectors and radioactivity measurements are also discussed

  14. Absolute radioactivity measurements of sup 1 sup 5 sup 3 Sm, sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re, sup 8 sup 9 Sr and national comparisons

    Wang Jian Qing; Yao Yan Ling; Jia Xue Wen

    2003-01-01

    sup 1 sup 5 sup 3 Sm and sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re are short half-life nuclides and sup 8 sup 9 Sr is one of pure beta-decay nuclide, these nuclides have being applied to nuclear medicine. It's very important to carry out comparisons for radioactivity standardization of these nuclides. Several laboratories in China including our laboratory took part in the comparisons. The results from our laboratory are in good agreement with the mean values

  15. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Fluorescence Yield

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P. Facal; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the absolute yield of fluorescence emission in atmospheric gases. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with a variety of beam particles and gases. Absolute calibration of the fluorescence yield to 5% level was achieved by comparison with two known light sources--the Cherenkov light emitted by the beam particles, and a calibrated nitrogen laser. The uncertainty of the energy scale of current Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays experiments will be significantly improved by the AIRFLY measurement.

  16. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE GANIL BEAM ENERGY

    CASANDJIAN, JM; MITTIG, W; BEUNARD, R; GAUDARD, L; LEPINESZILY, A; VILLARI, ACC; AUGER, G; BIANCHI, L; CUNSOLO, A; FOTI, A; LICHTENTHALER, R; PLAGNOL, E; SCHUTZ, Y; SIEMSSEN, RH; WIELECZKO, JP

    1993-01-01

    The energy of the GANIL cyclotron beam was measured on-line during the Pb-208 + Pb-208 elastic scattering experiment ''Search for Color van der Waals Force in the Pb-208 + Pb-208 Mott scattering'' with an absolute precision of 7 x 10(-5) at approximately 1.0 GeV, which represents an improvement of o

  17. An absolute measure for a key currency

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  18. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    M. de Angelis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy. In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0 μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0 μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  19. Determination of Corrections in the Absolute Measurement of 137Cs

    A method, of determining corrections in absolute measurements of 137Cs by 4π proportional counter is described. The correction for self-absorption of 137Cs beta particles from sources formed by vacuum deposition of CsCl on standard carrier films was determined. These samples, which had negligible self-absorption, were measured by 4π counter. The radioactive substance on the film was then dissolved, and by the addition of carrier was converted to a form similar to that of sources usually used for absolute measurement. The correction determined for self-absorption was higher than the value expected from comparison with other radionuclides having near Eβmax. The correction for internal conversion coefficient and gamma efficiency of the beta detector was determined with 137mBa samples. Barium was separated as BaSO4 precipitate and deposited on a standard carrier film used for absolute measurement with a layer thickness of about 1 mg/cm2. These samples were simultaneously measured by means of a 4π beta proportional counter and a Nal(Tl) scintillation counter. From corresponding counting rates in both counters, and from both known efficiencies, the value for a correction appropriate to one disintegration of 137mBa was calculated. The values measured were used further for computation of the internal conversion coefficient and the half-life of 137'mBa, which was ascertained to be 155 ± 3 s. (author)

  20. An All Fiber White Light Interferometric Absolute Temperature Measurement System

    Jeonggon Harrison Kim

    2008-01-01

    Recently the author of this article proposed a new signal processing algorithm for an all fiber white light interferometer. In this article, an all fiber white light interferometric absolute temperature measurement system is presented using the previously proposed signal processing algorithm. Stability and absolute temperature measurement were demonstrated. These two tests demonstrated the feasibility of absolute temperature measurement with an accuracy of 0.015 fringe and 0.0005 fringe, resp...

  1. Absolute Distance Measurements with Tunable Semiconductor Laser

    Mikel, Břetislav; Číp, Ondřej; Lazar, Josef

    T118, - (2005), s. 41-44. ISSN 0031-8949 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAB2065001 Keywords : tunable laser * absolute interferometer Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.661, year: 2004

  2. On The Absolute Measurement of Some Nuclear Material Samples

    A state with nuclear activities should establish a system capable of controlling all nuclear material (NM) under its authority. Continuous improvement of a measuring system is an essential mandate such controlling system. Measurements of NM using absolute methods could eliminate the dependency on NM standards, which are necessary for other relative or semi-absolute methods. In this work, an absolute method was used to estimate uranium contents in some NM samples. NM was measured by an absolute method through combination of experimental measurements and Monte Carlo calculations

  3. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    The low-level radioactivity measurements service performs measurements of alpha or beta emitters on various types of low-radioactivity samples (biological and environmental) from internal and external clients. to maintain and develop techniques concerning the measurement of low-level radioactivity of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in environmental or biological samples; to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters and alpha-spectrometers); to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination or low level radioactivity measurements; to maintain the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard for which we obtained the Beltest accreditation in 1998; to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides for workers of the nuclear industry;

  4. Radioactivity measurements principles and practice

    Mann, W B; Spernol, A

    2012-01-01

    The authors have addressed the basic need for internationally consistent standards and methods demanded by the new and increasing use of radioactive materials, radiopharmaceuticals and labelled compounds. Particular emphasis is given to the basic and practical problems that may be encountered in measuring radioactivity. The text provides information and recommendations in the areas of radiation protection, focusing on quality control and the precautions necessary for the preparation and handling of radioactive substances. New information is also presented on the applications of both traditiona

  5. Neutronic measurements of radioactive waste

    This document presents the general matters involved in the radioactive waste management and the different non destructive assays of radioactivity. The neutronic measurements used in the characterization of waste drums containing emitters are described with more details, especially the active neutronic interrogation assays with prompt or delayed neutron detection: physical principle, signal processing and evaluation of the detection limit. (author)

  6. High-precision absolute coordinate measurement using frequency scanned interferometry

    We reported previously on measurements of absolute distance with frequency scanned interferometry (FSI) method [1, 2]. In this paper, we extend the FSI method into 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional high-precision absolute coordinate measurements using a single laser. Absolute position is determined by several related absolute distances measured simultaneously. The achieved precision on X and Y in 2- and in 3-dimensional measurements is confirmed to be below 1 μm, while the precision in Z (in 3D case) is found to be about 2 μm. The last one is limited by the accuracy of the available translational stage used in the tests. A much more powerful laser and a better real-time data acquirement system will be required in case of measurements of larger absolute distances

  7. Environmental radioactivity measurements in Switzerland

    The survey of the environmental radioactivity in Switzerland is the responsibility of the Swiss Federal Radioactivity Surveillance Commission KUeR. All laboratories specializing in environmental radioactivity measurements in Switzerland take part in the KUeR-sampling and measurement program. This program includes measurements of air, water, soil, grass, important food sources as well as the body radioactivity of human beings. Special environmental sampling and measurement programs are implemented in the vicinity of the operating Nuclear Power Stations (NPS) and those under construction. To confirm compliance with the licensing requirements the various activities include all measurements to assess any radiological consequences of NPS operation. Such requirements are drawn up for each power-station by the Nuclear Safety Division of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (ASK) and the KUeR. (author)

  8. Absolute measurement of β activities and application to the determination of neutronic densities

    M. Berthelot, to my entrance to the ''Commissariat a l 'Energie Atomique'', proposed me to study the absolute measurement of neutron densities. Very quickly the problem of the absolute activity of β sources became the central object of this work. In a first part, we will develop the methods of absolute determination for β activities. The use of a 4π counter permits to get the absolute activity of all beta radioactive source, susceptible to be put as thin leaf and of period superior than some minutes. The method is independent of the spectra of the measured radioelement. we will describe in the second part some applications which use neutron densities measurement, neutron sources intensities and ratio of cross sections of capture of thermal neutrons. (M.B.)

  9. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be fn∼4.1x10-4 with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 108 neutrons per discharge.

  10. Measuring the absolute magnetic field using high-Tc SQUID

    SQUID normally can only measure the change of magnetic field instead of the absolute value of magnetic field. Using a compensation method, a mobile SQUID, which could keep locked when moving in the earth's magnetic field, was developed. Using the mobile SQUID, it was possible to measure the absolute magnetic field. The absolute value of magnetic field could be calculated from the change of the compensation output when changing the direction of the SQUID in a magnetic field. Using this method and the mobile SQUID, we successfully measured the earth's magnetic field in our laboratory

  11. No-arbitrage conditions and absolutely continuous changes of measure

    Claudio Fontana

    2013-01-01

    We study the stability of several no-arbitrage conditions with respect to absolutely continuous, but not necessarily equivalent, changes of measure. We first consider models based on continuous semimartingales and show that no-arbitrage conditions weaker than NA and NFLVR are always stable. Then, in the context of general semimartingale models, we show that an absolutely continuous change of measure does never introduce arbitrages of the first kind as long as the change of measure density pro...

  12. Measurement of radioactivity in Norway

    A nation-wide network of 20 monitoring stations for continuous registration of radioactivity in the air has been established in Norway. Via the telecommunication network collected data are dayly automatically transmitted to the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). High radiation levels trigger an alarm for immediate transmission. The monitoring system and experiences in connection with its operation are described, and results from measurements in 1991 are presented. No unnormal radioactivity has been recorded in the period. 24 figs

  13. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 2.1-mm wavelength

    Ulich, B. L.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Sun, new Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, and of the flux density of DR21 at 2.1-mm wavelength are reported. Relative measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength are also preented which resolve the absolute calibration discrepancy between The University of Texas 16-ft radio telescope and the Aerospace Corporation 15-ft antenna. The use of the bright planets and DR21 as absolute calibration sources at millimeter wavelengths is discussed in the light of recent observations.

  14. Absolute Quantum Yield Measurement of Powder Samples

    Moreno, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of fluorescence quantum yield has become an important tool in the search for new solutions in the development, evaluation, quality control and research of illumination, AV equipment, organic EL material, films, filters and fluorescent probes for bio-industry.

  15. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    M. Rapp

    Full Text Available In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.

    Key words. Middle atmosphere (composition and chemistry; pressure, density, and temperature; instruments and techniques

  16. Radioactivity

    This educative booklet give a general overview of radioactivity: history, structure of matter, radiations, radioactivity law, origin of radioactivity, radioactivity uses, radioprotection and measurement units. (J.S.)

  17. Measurement of radioactivity in steel

    Even after the control of scrap deliveries, there remains a small risk that the radioactive contaminated scrap passes the detecting devices. Therefore, the chemical laboratory takes a role to measure each heat for the absence of artificial radioactive nuclides with a gamma spectrometer equipped with NaI-detector. As the measurement must be performed in sequence with the steel production process, the allowable time for the measurement is quite limited. On the other hand, there could be still some possibility that background radiation might be present as the samples may contain some natural radioactivity. The task is how to differentiate the nature of radioactivity between naturally remaining radioactivity within safe limit and artificial nuclides present in the sample at a low level even though a very small amount of radioactivity could be detected in short time in both cases. We have set the alarm limit to 0.1 Bq/g for Co-60 as indicating nuclide. This limit is set more than 4 s (s = standard deviation) from the average background radiation. Therefore, false alarms are quite improbable. Strategy: The NaI gamma spectrometer performs a gross gamma measurement but it can not differentiate the nature of the nuclides present. If the alarm limit is hurt, the sample is measured on a high resolution gamma spectrometer with Ge-detector for identification of the gamma emitting nuclides. Calibration: Even though no appropriate international standards are adapted and no commercial measuring equipment is commercially available, the desired standard should contain Co-60 in the order of 1 to 100 Bq/g. The presence of other gamma emitting nuclides is desirable. In the Workshop we will present how to surmount this difficulty. (author)

  18. Absolute small-angle measurement based on optical feedback interferometry

    Jingang Zhong; Xianhua Zhang; Zhixiang Ju

    2008-01-01

    We present a simple but effective method for small-angle measurement based on optical feedback inter-ferometry (or laser self-mixing interferometry). The absolute zero angle can be defined at the biggest fringe amplitude point, so this method can also achieve absolute angle measurement. In order to verify the method, we construct an angle measurement system. The Fourier-transform method is used to analysis the interference signal. Rotation angles are experimentally measured with a resolution of 10-6 rad and a measurement range of approximately from -0.0007 to +0.0007 rad.

  19. Statistical aspects in radioactivity measurements

    This report contains a summary of basic concepts and formulae important for the treatment of errors and for calculating lower limits of detection in radioactivity measurements. Special attention has been paid to practical application and examples which are of interest for scientists working in this field. (orig./HP)

  20. Environmental radioactivity intercomparison measurements

    In the context of the North Cotentin radioecological group set up in 1997 by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Secretariat d'Etat a la Sante, the Swiss Federal Office of Public health, a national organization of independent status with respect to nuclear energy, conducted a series of measurements in the north Cotentin in 1998. Some sites proposed by local association 'Angry mothers' were examined in particular. This association has now taken the initiative to organize a large scale international intercomparison, ' North Cotentin 2000', in the vicinity of local nuclear installations. Besides the scientific aspect of the intercomparison, a specific aim of this intercomparison consists in providing to the local population with a real opportunity for direct exchange with participating international teams. The primary concern of the workshop is the determination, by in situ gamma spectrometry, of both natural and artificial concentrations and resulting ambient dose rates at selected marine ( beach) and terrestrial sites. A particular aim of the workshop also is to test the capacity of mobile teams to produce reliable results in the field of low level measurements on trace of special radionuclides (I129, Sr90, H3, C14, and alpha emitters) from environmental samples, using both direct ( in situ) and differed ( laboratory methods). an overview of the results obtained will be prepared for the benefit of the public. (N.C.)

  1. Apparatus for measuring radioactive emissions

    Apparatus for measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material comprises at least one radiation detector in a housing serving as a first radiation shield and in which at least one groove is formed to expose at least a portion of a receptor surface of the detector. The groove extends transverse to the direction of movement of the material over the detector. A second radiation shield may be located between at least a portion of the first shield and the detector. The material of the second shield is inherently less contaminated and emits secondary excitation radiation of lower energy than the first material. (author)

  2. On the Absolute Continuity of the Blackwell Measure

    Bárány, Balázs; Kolossváry, István

    2015-04-01

    In 1957, Blackwell expressed the entropy of hidden Markov chains using a measure which can be characterised as an invariant measure for an iterated function system with place-dependent weights. This measure, called the Blackwell measure, plays a central role in understanding the entropy rate and other important characteristics of fundamental models in information theory. We show that for a suitable set of parameter values the Blackwell measure is absolutely continuous for almost every parameter in the case of binary symmetric channels.

  3. A simplified method of absolute measurement for liquid scintillation counter

    A absolute measurement for simplified determining the activities of LS. sample is described. The total uncertainty of 2.0% and confidence level of 99.7% are given by the method, and as a example, three samples of 14C (n-hexadecane) are measured

  4. Mathematical Model for Absolute Magnetic Measuring Systems in Industrial Applications

    Fügenschuh, Armin; Fügenschuh, Marzena; Ludszuweit, Marina; Mojsic, Aleksandar; Sokół, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    Scales for measuring systems are either based on incremental or absolute measuring methods. Incremental scales need to initialize a measurement cycle at a reference point. From there, the position is computed by counting increments of a periodic graduation. Absolute methods do not need reference points, since the position can be read directly from the scale. The positions on the complete scales are encoded using two incremental tracks with different graduation. We present a new method for absolute measuring using only one track for position encoding up to micrometre range. Instead of the common perpendicular magnetic areas, we use a pattern of trapezoidal magnetic areas, to store more complex information. For positioning, we use the magnetic field where every position is characterized by a set of values measured by a hall sensor array. We implement a method for reconstruction of absolute positions from the set of unique measured values. We compare two patterns with respect to uniqueness, accuracy, stability and robustness of positioning. We discuss how stability and robustness are influenced by different errors during the measurement in real applications and how those errors can be compensated.

  5. Measurement of radioactivity in Norway

    A nation-wide network of 11 monotoring stations for continuous registration of radioactivity in the air has been established in Norway. Via the telecommunication network, collected data are dayly automatically transmitted to the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). High radiation levels trigger an alarn for immediate transmission. The monotoring system and experiences in connection with its operation are described, and results from measurements in 1988 are presented. 14 figs

  6. Testing and evaluation of thermal cameras for absolute temperature measurement

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof; Fischer, Joachim; Matyszkiel, Robert

    2000-09-01

    The accuracy of temperature measurement is the most important criterion for the evaluation of thermal cameras used in applications requiring absolute temperature measurement. All the main international metrological organizations currently propose a parameter called uncertainty as a measure of measurement accuracy. We propose a set of parameters for the characterization of thermal measurement cameras. It is shown that if these parameters are known, then it is possible to determine the uncertainty of temperature measurement due to only the internal errors of these cameras. Values of this uncertainty can be used as an objective criterion for comparisons of different thermal measurement cameras.

  7. Absolute luminosity measurements with the LHCb detector at the LHC

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Brisbane, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Caicedo Carvajal, J M; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Constantin, F; Conti, G; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Almagne, B; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Deissenroth, M; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Eames, C; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; d'Enterria, D G; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hofmann, W; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koblitz, S; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kukulak, S; Kumar, R; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Luisier, J; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Mclean, C; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nardulli, J; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Nies, S; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B; Palacios, J; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilar, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; du Pree, T; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shao, B; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skottowe, H P; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Styles, N; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Vervink, K; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wacker, K; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    Absolute luminosity measurements are of general interest for colliding-beam experiments at storage rings. These measurements are necessary to determine the absolute cross-sections of reaction processes and are valuable to quantify the performance of the accelerator. LHCb has applied two methods to determine the absolute scale of its luminosity measurements for proton-proton collisions at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In addition to the classic ``van der Meer scan'' method a novel technique has been developed which makes use of direct imaging of the individual beams using beam-gas and beam-beam interactions. This beam imaging method is made possible by the high resolution of the LHCb vertex detector and the close proximity of the detector to the beams, and allows beam parameters such as positions, angles and widths to be determined. The results of the two methods have comparable precision and are in good agreement. Combining the two methods, an overall precision of 3.5\\% in the absolute lumi...

  8. Beam energy absolute measurement using K-edge absorption spectrometers

    A method is presented of absolute energy measurement with an accuracy of triangle Ε ∼ 10-4Εo by direct measurement of the bend angle in a high-precision magnetic dipole using two opposite-direction short (about 2 mm long) high-field-intensity magnets (bar Β dipole much-lt Βshortmag) installed at each end and two K-edge absorption spectrometers. Using these spectrometers and the hard x-ray synchrotron radiation created by the short magnets, a bend angle of 4.5 arc deg for the CEBAF energy bandwidth can be measured with an accuracy of a few units of 10-6 rad, and the main sources of systematic errors are the absolute measurement of the field integral and the determination of the centroid of the synchrotron beam at a wavelength equal to the K-edge absorption of the chosen substance

  9. BMO solvability and absolute continuity of harmonic measure

    Hofmann, Steve; Le, Phi

    2016-01-01

    We show that for a uniformly elliptic divergence form operator $L$, defined in an open set $\\Omega$ with Ahlfors-David regular boundary, BMO-solvability implies scale invariant quantitative absolute continuity (the weak-$A_\\infty$ property) of elliptic-harmonic measure with respect to surface measure on $\\partial \\Omega$. We do not impose any connectivity hypothesis, qualitative or quantitative; in particular, we do not assume the Harnack Chain condition, even within individual connected comp...

  10. Spectrometry techniques for radioactivity measurements

    The energy of the radiation emission following the nuclear decay is unique and the characteristic of the radio nuclide which undergoes decay. Thus measurement of the energy of the radiation offers a method of identifying the radio nuclides. The prime requirement of the energy measurement is a suitable detector which shows response proportional to the energy of the radiation rather than the presence of the radiation. The response from such detectors are suitably processed and distributed with respect to the signal strength which is proportional to incident energy. This distribution is normally referred as energy spectrum and is recorded in the multichannel analyser. The measurement of energy and intensity of radiation from the spectrum is called radiation spectrometry. Thus the radiation spectrometry allows the identification and quantification of radioactive isotopes in variety of matrices. The radiation spectrometry has now become a popular radioanalytical technique in wide area of nuclear fuel cycle programs. The popular spectrometry techniques commonly used for the radioactivity measurement and analysis are Alpha spectrometry, Gamma ray spectrometry and Beta spectrometry

  11. Effects of natural radioactivity on food radioactivity measurement

    Since the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Company, groups and individuals including local governments, food manufacturers, distribution circles, retail circles, and citizens are eager to measure the radioactivity of food, in order to confirm the safety of food from the concerns about radioactive contamination. The measurement of radioactivity of food is done by quantitatively determining gamma rays due to radioactive cesium that was incorporated into the biosphere cycle after having been released into the environment. As for the radioactivity measurement of food using gamma-ray spectrometry with a potassium iodide scintillation detector, which is very commonly used, this paper describes the handling method of obtained data, the principle of erroneous detection of radioactive cesium and iodine interrupted by natural radionuclides, and countermeasures for it. Major natural radioactivity sources are uranium series and thorium series. This paper explains gamma rays, which are characteristic in the decay process of uranium series and often affect the measurement of radioactive cesium in food and water. (O.A.)

  12. Radioactivity measurements and control solutions

    In our department, in the last years, a new line of production has been developed devoted to the radioactivity measurements (portal monitor, gamma source detector, neutron monitor). Instruments of different design (hand-held, portals or steady-state) are intended for detection and locating of radioactive sources. Monitors are intended to detect radioactive and special nuclear materials in vehicles, pedestrians, luggage, as well as for illegal traffic prevention of radioactive sources. Monitors provide audio and visual alarm signals when radioactive and/or special nuclear materials are detected. Neutron dosimeters are designed for the determination of dose equivalent rate around neutron generators or sources. All devices can be recommended for use to officers of customs, border guard and emergency services, civil defense, fire brigades, police and military departments, nuclear research or power facilities. Incorporating micro controllers and new design, our products span almost all the spectra of radioactivity detection (gamma, beta, X and neutrons). No special knowledge is needed to operate these instruments as all service functions are performed automatically (self-tests, background updating and threshold calculation). The Portal monitor is intended to be a checkpoint in contamination control or in unauthorized traffic of radioactive materials. The portal monitor can be installed both in open, unprotected to environmental conditions areas or in enclosed areas. It may be used at pedestrian cross border points, at check points of Nuclear Power Plants, enterprises of nuclear industry, weapons manufacturing and storage plants, nuclear waste disposal and storage sites, at the entrances to steel plants, the post-offices and airports, the governmental offices, banks, private companies etc. The monitor provides audio alarming signals when radioactive and/or special nuclear materials are detected. The monitor consists in a portal frame, which sustains 5 detectors. Each

  13. An absolute measurement of #-v# of Cf252

    An absolute measurement of v of Cf252. An absolute determination of the average number of neutrons, #-v#, emitted in the spontaneous fission of Cf252 has been made by counting the fission neutrons in a large liquid scintillator. The detection efficiency of this counter was measured as a function of neutron energy. Well-collimated neutrons were scattered into the scintillator by an anthracene crystal, which detected the corresponding recoil protons. Pulse-shape discrimination was employed to eliminate γ-ray background. The detection efficiency for Cf252 fission neutrons was found to be 0.703 ± 0.007, giving a value of 3.78 ± 0.04 for the average number of prompt neutrons emitted per Cf252 fission. (author)

  14. Measurement of the absolute branching fraction of the Ds+- meson

    Abe, K; Dragic, J; Fujii, H; Gershon, T; Haba, J; Hazumi, M; Higuchi, T; Igarashi, Y; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Katayama, N; Kichimi, H; Krokovnyi, P P; Limosani, A; Nakamura, I; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nishida, S; Nozaki, T; Ozaki, H; Ronga, F J; Saitoh, S; Sakai, Y; Stamen, R; Sumisawa, K; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Ushiroda, Y; Yamauchi, M; Zhang, J; Hoshi, Y; Neichi, K; Aihara, H; Hastings, N C; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, K; Iwasaki, M; Kakuno, H; Kusaka, A; Nakahama, Y; Tanabe, K; Anipko, D; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Bedny, I; Bondar, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D A; Gabyshev, N; Kuzmin, A; Poluektov, A; Root, N; Shwartz, B; Sidorov, V; Usov, Yu; Zhilich, V; Aoki, K; Enari, Y; Hara, K; Hayasaka, K; Hokuue, T; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Kishimoto, N; Kozakai, Y; Kubota, T; Miyazaki, Y; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Sato, N; Senyo, K; Yoshino, S; Arakawa, T; Kawasaki, T; Miyata, H; Tamura, N; Watanabe, M; Asano, Y; Aso, T; Aushev, T; Bay, A; Hinz, L; Jacoby, C; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Villa, S; Wicht, J; Zürcher, D; Aziz, T; Banerjee, S; Gokhroo, G; Majumder, G; Bahinipati, S; Drutskoy, A; Goldenzweig, P; Kinoshita, K; Kulasiri, R; Sayeed, K; Schwartz, A J; Somov, A; Bakich, A M; Cole, S; McOnie, S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Stöck, H; Varvell, K E; Yabsley, B D; Balagura, V; Chistov, R; Danilov, M; Liventsev, D; Medvedeva, T; Mizuk, R; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Tikhomirov, I; Uglov, T; Tian, Y BanX C; Barberio, E; Dalseno, J; Dowd, R; Moloney, G R; Sevior, M E; Taylor, G N; Tse, Y F; Urquijo, P; Barbero, M; Browder, T E; Guler, H; Jones, M; Li, J; Nishimura, K; Olsen, S L; Peters, M; Rorie, J; Sahoo, H; Uchida, K; Varner, G; Belous, K S; Shapkin, M; Sokolov, A; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Fratina, S; Gorisek, A; Pestotnik, R; Staric, M; Zupanc, A; Blyth, S; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Hou, S; Kuo, C C; Bozek, A; Kapusta, P; Lesiak, T; Matyja, A; Natkaniec, Z; Ostrowicz, W; Palka, H; Rózanska, M; Wiechczynski, J; Bracko, M; Korpar S; Brodzicka, J; Chang, M C; Kikuchi, N; Mikami, Y; Nagamine, T; Schonmeier, P; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Lee, Y J; Lin, C Y; Lin, S W; Shen, Y T; Tsai, Y T; Ueno, K; Wang, C C; Wang, M Z; Wu, C H; Cheon, B G; Choi, J H; Ha, H; Kang, J S; Won, E; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Park, C W; Park, K S; Chuvikov, A; Garmash, A; Marlow, D; Ziegler, T; Dash, M; Mohapatra, D; Piilonen, L E; Yusa, Y; Fujikawa, M; Hayashii, H; Imoto, A; Kataoka, S U; Miyabayashi, K; Noguchi, S; Krizan, P; Golob, B; Seidl, R; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Hara, T; Heffernan, D; Miyake, H; Hasegawa, Y; Satoyama, N; Takada, N; Nitoh, O; Hoshina, K; Ishino, H; Khan, H R; Kibayashi, A; Mori, T; Ono, S; Watanabe, Y; Iwabuchi, M; Kim, Y J; Liu, Y; Sarangi, T R; Uchida, Y; Kang, J H; Kim, T H; Kwon, Y J; Kurihara, E; Kawai, H; Park, H; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Lee, J; Lee, S E; Yang He Young; Kumar, R; Singh, J B; Soni, N; Lange, J S; Leder, G; MacNaughton, J; Mandl, F; Mitaroff, W A; Pernicka, M; Schwanda, C; Widhalm, L; Matsumoto, T; Nakagawa, T; Seki, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yamamoto, S; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Sugiyama, A; Suzuki, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nakano, E; Sakaue, H; Teramoto, Y; Ogawa, A; Shibuya, H; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Sakamoto, H; Wang, C H; Schümann, J; Stanic, S; Xie, Q L; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zhang, C C; Yamashita, Y; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P

    2006-01-01

    The Ds+- -> K+-K-+pi+- absolute branching fraction is measured using e+e- -> Ds*+- Ds1-+(2536) events collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB e+e- asymmetric energy collider. Using the ratio of yields when either the Ds1 or Ds* is fully reconstructed, we find Br(Ds+- -> K+-K-+pi+-)= (4.0+-0.4(stat)+-0.4(sys))%.

  15. Absolute Bunch Length Measurements by Incoherent Radiation Fluctuation Analysis

    Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC; Zolotorev, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Filippetto, D.; /INFN, Rome; Jagerhofer, L.; /Vienna, Tech. U.

    2009-12-09

    By analyzing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations of the radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of the spectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatial distribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and successfully tested a simple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolute measurement of the rms bunch length. A description of the method and the experimental results are presented.

  16. Absolute Measurement of Quantum-Limited Interferometric Displacements

    Thiel, Valérian; Treps, Nicolas; Roslund, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A methodology is introduced that enables an absolute, quantum-limited measurement of sub-wavelength interferometric displacements. The technique utilizes a high-frequency optical path modulation within an interferometer operated in a homodyne configuration. All of the information necessary to fully characterize the resultant path displacement is contained within the relative strengths of the various harmonics of the phase modulation. The method, which is straightforward and readily implementable, allows a direct measurement of the theoretical Cram\\'er-Rao limit of detection without any assumptions on the nature of the light source.

  17. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 1010 n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 108 n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  18. Absolute orientations from EBSD measurements - as easy as it seems?

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Bestmann, Michel; Heilbronner, Renée

    2016-04-01

    In structural geology, some problems can be addressed by inspecting the crystal orientation of grains in a rock. Deriving shear senses, kinematics of flow, information on deformation processes and recrystallization are some examples. Usually, oriented samples are taken in the field and, if inspected in an universal stage, the researcher has full control over the procedure and can make sure that the derived orientation is related to our geographic reference frame - that it is an absolute orientation. Nowadays, usage of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) has greatly improved the information in the derived data (fully crystal orientations, mappings, etc…), and the speed of data acquisition. However, this comes to the price of having to rely on the vendor supplied software and machine setup. Recent benchmarks and comparison of reference data revealed that for various EBSD setups around the world, the orientation data defaults to the wrong absolute orientation. The absolute orientation is not correctly derived - it commonly suffer a 180 degree rotation around the normal of the sample surface. In this contribution we will discuss the implications of such erroneous measurements and what kind of interpretations derived by orientation and texture data will be affected.

  19. Absolute and specific measures of research group excellence

    Mryglod, O; Holovatch, Yu; Berche, B

    2012-01-01

    A desirable goal of scientific management is to introduce, if it exists, a simple and reliable way to measure the scientific excellence of publicly-funded research institutions and universities to serve as a basis for their ranking and financing. While citation-based indicators and metrics are easily accessible, they are far from being universally accepted as way to automate or inform evaluation processes or to replace evaluations based on peer review. Here we consider absolute measurements of research excellence at an amalgamated, institutional level and specific measures of research excellence as performance per head. Using biology research institutions in the UK as a test case, we examine the correlations between peer-review-based and citation-based measures of research excellence on these two scales. We find that citation-based indicators are very highly correlated with peer-evaluated measures of group strength but are poorly correlated with group quality. Thus, and almost paradoxically, our analysis indi...

  20. Deflectometric systems for absolute flatness measurements at PTB

    Recently, two new scanning deflectometric flatness reference (DFR) measurement systems were installed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. These instruments are aimed at measurements of the absolute flatness of optical surfaces with sub-nanometre uncertainties. System 1 is mainly designed for horizontal specimens with sizes up to 1 m and weights up to 120 kg. The other setup, i.e. system 2, is designed for vertical specimens. The two DFR systems use three different deflectometric procedures, which are based on scanning a pentaprism or the so-called double mirror unit (DMU) across the specimen. These 90° beam deflectors eliminate—to a great extent—residual guidance errors of the scanning stages, which is required to attain topography measurements with sub-nanometre uncertainty. The setups of the two new systems, the principles of the three different measurement modes, the alignment procedures, simulation results and first measurements are presented. (paper)

  1. On Absolute Measurements of β-Emitting Radionuclides

    4 π GM detectors are described and some of their characteristics presented. The absence of spurious pulses is shown by the measurement of the rate of arrival of intervals between pulses. Some problems related to the foil absorption and source absorption are considered using Sr90 and Y90. Aiming at correcting the counting losses in the foil and in a certain extent also the source absorption an experimental method which uses paired sources is presented. The preparation of standards of Bi210 (RaE) is described. A note is presented on the problem of foil absorption losses in scintillation absolute counting. (author)

  2. Absolute Measurement Fiber-optic Sensors in Large Structural Monitoring

    2003-01-01

    The security of civil engineering is an important task due to the economic, social and environmental significance. Compared with conventional sensors, the optical fiber sensors have their unique characteristics.Being durable, stable and insensitive to external perturbations,they are particular interesting for the long-term monitoring of civil structures.Focus is on absolute measurement optical fiber sensors, which are emerging from the monitoring large structural, including SOFO system, F-P optical fiber sensors, and fiber Bragg grating sensors. The principle, characteristic and application of these three kinds of optical fiber sensors are described together with their future prospects.

  3. High-precision absolute measurement of CEBAF beam mean energy

    The absolute measurement of the beam mean energy with an accuracy of one part in 104 or higher is an important demand of the CEBAF Hall A physics program. This accuracy may reduce the uncertainty in the d(e, e'p)p cross section δσ/σ to 1%. The need for such an accurately calibrated beam is not particular to CEBAF; at other electron facilities uncertainty in the incident energy has proven to be among the dominant sources of systematic error. The following methods for solving the problem were considered at both CEBAF and the Yerevan Physics Institute during 1990--1991: Backscattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by the relativistic electron beam. Calculations show that the intensity of the backscattered radiation in a bandwidth of 10-4 near the maximum frequency is about 1 photon per second at 4 GeV and 0.3 mA. Magnetic spectrometers performing as three- and four-magnet chicanes with appropriate detector systems. Such a system was used at SLAC for absolute measurement of the SLC beams energy, where a maximum accuracy of 5 x 10-4 was achieved. Calculations show that a similar accuracy can be achieved for the CEBAF beam in both proposed systems. Measurement of the vertical distribution of synchrotron radiation. Calculations indicate that precision of about 2.5 x 10-5 is achievable for CEBAF

  4. Measured and modelled absolute gravity changes in Greenland

    Nielsen, Jens Emil; Forsberg, René; Strykowski, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    study ofGIA is important since it acts as an error source. GIA consists of three signals as seen by a gravimeter onthe surface of the Earth. These signals are investigated in this study. The ICE-5G ice history and recentlydeveloped ice models of present day changes are used to model the gravity change...... in Greenland. Theresult is compared with the initial measurements of absolute gravity (AG) change at selected GreenlandNetwork (GNET) sites.We find that observations are highly influenced by the direct attraction from the ice and ocean. Thisis especially evident in the measurements conducted at the...... GNET station near the Helheim Glacier.The effect of the direct attraction diminishes at sites that are more than one degree from the source.Here, the dominant signal is the effect of the elastic signal from present day ice mass changes. We findagreement between the measured and modelled gravity changes...

  5. Measurement of gamma radioactivity in steel

    The steel industry is being confronted increasingly with radioactive scrap from dismantled nuclear facilities. The clearance and release regulations that exist around the world differ very greatly and are difficult to implement. A 'radioactivity measurement' working group has therefore been set up at VDEh to clarify how radioactive measurements can be integrated into the day-to-day production routine. Operating results obtained at Thyssen Krupp Stahl AG with a gamma-ray spectrometer indicate a possibility for the simple detection of radioactive contamination. (orig.)

  6. Absolute measurement of neutron fluxes inside the reactor core

    The subject of this work is the development and study of two methods of neutron measurements in nuclear reactors, the new method of high neutron flux measurements and the Li6-semiconductor neutron spectrometer. This work is presented in four sections: Section I. The introduction explains the need for neutron measurements in reactors. A critical survey is given of the existing methods of high neutron flux measurement and methods of fast neutron spectrum determination. Section II. Theoretical basis of the work of semiconductor counters and their most important characteristics are given. Section III. The main point of this section is in presenting the basis of the new method which the author developed, i.e., the long-tube method, and the results obtained by it, with particular emphasis on absolute measurement of high neutron fluxes. Advantages and limitations of this method are discussed in details at the end of this section. Section IV. A comparison of the existing semiconductor neutron spectrometers is made and their advantages and shortcomings underlined. A critical analysis of the obtained results with the Li6-semiconductor spectrometer with plane geometry is given. A new type of Li6-semiconductor spectrometer is described, its characteristics experimentally determined, and a comparison of it with a classical Li6-spectrometer made (author)

  7. Absolute Thermal SST Measurements over the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Good, W. S.; Warden, R.; Kaptchen, P. F.; Finch, T.; Emery, W. J.

    2010-12-01

    Climate monitoring and natural disaster rapid assessment require baseline measurements that can be tracked over time to distinguish anthropogenic versus natural changes to the Earth system. Disasters like the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill require constant monitoring to assess the potential environmental and economic impacts. Absolute calibration and validation of Earth-observing sensors is needed to allow for comparison of temporally separated data sets and provide accurate information to policy makers. The Ball Experimental Sea Surface Temperature (BESST) radiometer was designed and built by Ball Aerospace to provide a well calibrated measure of sea surface temperature (SST) from an unmanned aerial system (UAS). Currently, emissive skin SST observed by satellite infrared radiometers is validated by shipborne instruments that are expensive to deploy and can only take a few data samples along the ship track to overlap within a single satellite pixel. Implementation on a UAS will allow BESST to map the full footprint of a satellite pixel and perform averaging to remove any local variability due to the difference in footprint size of the instruments. It also enables the capability to study this sub-pixel variability to determine if smaller scale effects need to be accounted for in models to improve forecasting of ocean events. In addition to satellite sensor validation, BESST can distinguish meter scale variations in SST which could be used to remotely monitor and assess thermal pollution in rivers and coastal areas as well as study diurnal and seasonal changes to bodies of water that impact the ocean ecosystem. BESST was recently deployed on a conventional Twin Otter airplane for measurements over the Gulf of Mexico to access the thermal properties of the ocean surface being affected by the oil spill. Results of these measurements will be presented along with ancillary sensor data used to eliminate false signals including UV and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR

  8. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  9. Measurement of environmental radioactivity. Ispra 1976

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1976 by the site survey group of the Protection Division of the Euratom Joint Research Centre - Ispra Establisment. Data are given on the concentrations of 90Sr, 137Cs and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly world-wide fall out

  10. Measurement of the absolute separation for atomic force microscopy measurements in the presence of adsorbed polymer

    McKee, C. T.; Mosse, W. K. J.; Ducker, W. A.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate that the absolute separation between an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and a solid substrate can be measured in the presence of an irreversibly adsorbed polymer film. The separation is obtained from the analysis of a scattered evanescent wave that is generated at the surface of the solid. By comparing our scattering measurements to conventional AFM measurements, we also show an example where a conventional AFM measurement gives the incorrect force-distance profile. We valida...

  11. A proposal to measure absolute environmental sustainability in lifecycle assessment

    Bjørn, Anders; Margni, Manuele; Roy, Pierre-Olivier;

    2016-01-01

    sustainable are therefore increasingly important. Such absolute indicators exist, but suffer from shortcomings such as incomplete coverage of environmental issues, varying data quality and varying or insufficient spatial resolution. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that life cycle assessment (LCA...... study evaluating emission scenarios for personal residential electricity consumption supplied by production from 45 US coal fired electricity plant. Median values of derived CFs are 0.16–0.19 ha year kg−1 for common acidifying compounds. CFs are generally highest in Northern Europe, Canada and Alaska...... supporting decisions aimed at simultaneously reducing environmental impacts efficiently and maintaining or achieving environmental sustainability. We have demonstrated that LCA indicators can be modified from being relative to being absolute indicators of environmental sustainability. Further research should...

  12. Radioactivity monitoring network: Measurements 1987

    Four papers are presented: radionuclide concentration measurement in aerosols, surface water and the wastes of the Vienna Central Clarification Plant respectively, and on tritium in Austrian lakes and rivers. (qui)

  13. Environmental radioactivity measurement intercomparison exercise 1990

    In a recent national intercomparison exercise, 49 laboratories involved in making environmental radioactivity measurements took part in the analysis of samples supplied by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the United Kingdom. There were two sets of samples; one containing pure β-emitters and one containing β/γ-emitters. Two thirds of the participants measured the β/γ-emitter sample only, the remainder measured both. The results are presented. (author)

  14. Radioactivity measurements on live Bewick's Swans

    Measurements made on 46 live swans at Slimbridge using portable high resolution hyperpure germanium gamma ray spectrometry equipment are described. Laboratory measurements are also reported on two swans which died of natural causes or of flying accidents. The implications of the measured radioactivity levels are discussed in relation to the suggestion that they might have been affected by the Chernobyl accident on their migration. (UK)

  15. Portable laboratories for radioactivity measurements

    The portable radiometric laboratories LARA-10, LARA-GS, LARA-86 and ALARA-10 designed, developed and produced at the Boris Kidric Institute are described. Earlier models (LARA-1, LARA-1D, LARA-2 and LARA-5) are presented in brief. The basic characteristics of the devices and methods of measurements are given. All the instruments are battery operated and almost all can also use 220V/50Hz supply. They are a very suitable facility for radiological monitoring of soil, water, food, clothes etc., when working in field conditions (author)

  16. Measurement of environmental radioactivities, (1)

    The specific beta activities in rice and cigarette samples have been measured by a low background beta-spectrometer. The maximum energies of the beta-rays and the specific activities for cigarette samples were almost the same, independent of their species. On the other hand, specific activities for rice sample depended on the growing districts. The activities for rices and cigarettes were 27 -- 29 pCi per piece of cigarette and 0.50 -- 1.27 pCi per gram of rice, respectively. (author)

  17. Measurement of alpha emitters in radioactive waste

    The alpha emitters measurement in radioactive waste (10-2Ci/T) is essential for a good fissil materials management. This paper describes 3 classes of devices: device using a neutronic passive counting, device using a neutronic activation and detection of fission gamma, device using a neutronic activation and detection of prompt neutrons fission

  18. System for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers

    A system is described for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers, comprising: a set of containers adapted for receiving aqueous solutions of biological samples containing biopolymers which are subsequently precipitated in said containers on particles of diatomite in the presence of a coprecipitator, then filtered, dissolved, and mixed with a scintillator; radioactivity measuring means including a detection chamber to which is fed the mixture produced in said set of containers; an electric drive for moving said set of containers in a stepwise manner; means for proportional feeding of said coprecipitator and a suspension of diatomite in an acid solution to said containers which contain the biological sample for forming an acid precipitation of biopolymers; means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers; precipitated biopolymer filtering means for successively filtering the precipitate, suspending the precipitate, dissolving the biopolymers mixed with said scintillator for feeding of the mixture to said detection chamber; a system of pipelines interconnecting said above-recited means; and said means for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers including, a measuring cell arranged in a detection chamber and communicating with said means for filtering precipitated biopolymers through one pipeline of said system of pipelines; a program unit electrically connected to said electric drive, said means for acid precipatation of biopolymers, said means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers, said filtering means, and said radioactivity measuring device; said program unit adapted to periodically switch on and off the above-recited means and check the sequence of the radioactivity measuring operations; and a control unit for controlling the initiation of the system and for selecting programs

  19. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    Saiba Shuntaro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days, Cs-134 (2.1 years, Cs-137 (30 years, Sr-89 (51 days, and Sr-90 (29 years. We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  20. Radioactivity measurements as tool for physics dissemination

    In general people associate environmental radioactivity with the artificial radioactivity and knows very little about natural radioactivity. Thus there is a critical need to improve nuclear physics public education. From 2005 in Italy two programs were promoted from Ministry of Education and University and National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) for scientific dissemination in the field of environmental radioactivity. High school students in many Italian regions were involved in particular in indoor radon measurements. With this program students acquired awareness about the risks of inhalation of radon and its progeny and at the same time contributed to carry out radon monitoring, participating to all the experimental phases, from detectors set-up to data analysis. In particular we report about the activities carried out at Catania University and INFN division regarding a survey in the eastern Sicily. The overall monitoring, spanned over a period of 5 years, was carried out using passive nuclear track detection technique, through CR-39 dosimeters. In total about 500 detectors were placed in dwellings and schools in 57 locations. The investigated area have shown medium-high indoor radon concentrations, higher than the Italian average (70 Bq/m3). From the evaluation of the participating teachers and students, this kind of activities represents a successful strategy to enhance dissemination of physics, in particular in radioactivity topics. (author)

  1. Measurement of environmental radioactivity in Toki district

    When the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, expressed the hope to move into Toki district, the environmental problems accompanying the movement were discussed. The effect of the radioactivity leaking from the nuclear facility on human bodies must be far smaller than that of natural radiation, and for the purpose, the amount and fluctuation range of the natural radiation in the district must be known. The initial objectives of this cooperative research were to study on environmental radiation and to make a Geiger counter for the measurement. In 1981, a scintillation counter will be completed, and using a multi-channel pulse height analyzer, the nuclides which are the source of environmental radiation emission will be identified, and the tritium in natural water will be detected. Thus, the evaluation of environmental radiation can be carried out, and the situation before the movement of the research facility can be grasped. In this paper, the natural radioactivity in earth, atmosphere and water and cosmic ray, artificial radioactivity, and environmental radiation exposure dose are reported. Also, the manufacture of a GM counter measuring instrument and the measurements of cosmic ray background, typical earth samples and environmental radioactivity with the GM counter are reported. The related data are attached. (Kako, I.)

  2. Residual radioactivity measurements at Indus accelerator complex

    Indus-1 and Indus-2 are two Synchrotron Radiation Sources (SRS) operational at RRCAT, Indore. Indus-1 and Indus-2 are designed for maximum electron beam energy of 450 MeV and 2.5 GeV respectively. During shut down of these accelerators for maintenance purpose, residual radioactivity measurements were carried out. The residual radioactivity formation in various parts of the high energy electron accelerators is due to the beam loss taking place at these locations. The present paper describes the recent residual radioactivity measurements carried out at the electron accelerators of Indus Accelerator Complex and the radio-isotopes identified. The maximum dose rate due to induced activity obtained is 30 μSv/h, near dipole-5 of booster synchrotron after 12 h of cooling time. In case of Indus-1 and Indus-2 SRS the dose rate due to induced radioactivity is found to be of the order of 2 - 3 μSv/h. The radio isotopes identified at these beam loss locations are beta emitters that do not pose serious external hazard to the working personnel. However, precautions are to be observed while doing maintenance on activated components. The paper describes the measurements in detail with the results. (author)

  3. Radioactivity measurements in potassium enriched vegetation

    Measurements of radioactivity in food stuffs/vegetation is important because radiation dose to human population due to inhalation and ingestion (external and internal exposure) poses health hazard and contribute significantly to the total dose from natural sources. The radium and thorium isotopes always present in the body are measured in units of a millionth or a billionth of a gram, but when it comes to potassium we are talking about grams of material. The 2.5 g of potassium ingested each day contains 80 Becquerel (Bq) (or 2100 pCi) of 40K that quantity which produces 80 radioactive decays each second. The 140 g of potassium in a normal male contains about 4400 Bq (or 120,000 pCi) of 40K; that quantity produces a decay rate of about 4400 disintegrations per second. That means that 4400 radioactive 40K atoms decay and emit radiation in our bodies each second for as long as we live. Since potassium is found in the intracellular fluids, about 98 % of the potassium in the body is within cells. Thus at least 98 % of these disintegrations take place within body cells, and are potentially capable of altering the cell's DNA. Therefore, it is very essential to measure the activity concentration in the potassium enriched food stuffs. Knowledge of radioactivity present in potassium enriched food stuffs enables one to assess any possible radiological hazard to mankind by the use of such materials. In the light of the above mentioned facts, it is, therefore, fundamental to assess the radioactivity in commonly available potassium enriched foods. (author)

  4. The absolute gravity measurement by FG5 gravimeter at Great Wall Station, Antarctica

    2007-01-01

    Gravity measurement is of great importance to the height datum in Antarctica.The absolute gravity measurement was carried out at Great Wall Station, Antarctica, using FG5 absolute gravity instrument.The gravity data was processed with corrections of earth tide, ocean tide, polar motion and the atmospher, and the RMS is within +3 x 10 -s ms-2.The vertical and horizontal gravity gradients were measured using 2 LaCoaste & Romberg (LCR) gravimeters.The absolute gravity measurement provides the fundamental data for the validation and calibration of the satellite gravity projects such as CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE, and for the high accuracy geoid model.

  5. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural material of the fission chamber, etc

  6. Measurement and analysis of radioactive substances

    Here are gathered the abstracts presented to the 3. summer university of the year 2001 whose main themes were the destructive (5 conferences) and nondestructive (8 conferences) analyses applied to nuclear industry. The points of view of different organisms (as DSIN: Directorate for the Safety of Nuclear Installations, IPSN: Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety, OPRI: Office of Protection against Ionizing Radiations, TUI: Institute for Transuranium Elements, COGEMA, EDF: Electric Utilities, ANDRA: French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management, CRLC Val d'Aurelle, France) concerning the needs involved in nuclear facilities control, the methods of radionuclide speciation in use internationally, the measurements and analyses of radioactive substances are given too as well as some general concepts concerning 1)the laser-matter interaction 2)the ions production 3)the quality applied to the measurements and analyses 4)the standard in activity metrology. (O.M.)

  7. Error calculations statistics in radioactive measurements

    Basic approach and procedures frequently used in the practice of radioactive measurements.Statistical principles applied are part of Good radiopharmaceutical Practices and quality assurance.Concept of error, classification as systematic and random errors.Statistic fundamentals,probability theories, populations distributions, Bernoulli, Poisson,Gauss, t-test distribution,Ξ2 test, error propagation based on analysis of variance.Bibliography.z table,t-test table, Poisson index ,Ξ2 test

  8. Absolute Fluorescence Spectrum and Yield Measurements for a wide range of experimental conditions

    Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Gorodetzky, P.; Moretto, C; Blaksley, C.; Dagoret-Campagne, D.; Gonnin, A.; Miyamoto, H.; Monard, H.; Wicek, F.

    2013-01-01

    For the JEM-EUSO Collaboration The fluorescence yield is a key ingredient in cosmic ray energy determination. It is sensitive to pressure, temperature and humidity. Up to now the fluorescence yield of the brightest line at 337 nm has been measured in an absolute way in one set of conditions, whereas fluorescence yields at the other wavelengths have been relatively measured for different conditions. Thus, absolute calibration for all the lines is unclear. We will do all measurements at once...

  9. Cross-section measurements for radioactive samples

    The measurement of (n,p), (n,α) and (n,γ) cross sections for radioactive nuclei is of interest to both nuclear physics and astrophysics. For example, using these reactions, properties of levels in nuclei at high excitation energies, which are difficult or impossible to study using other reactions, can be investigated. Also, reaction rates for both big-bang and stellar nucleosynthesis can be obtained from these measurements. In the past, the large background associated with the sample activity limited these types of measurements to radioisotopes with very long half-lives. The advent of the low-energy, high-intensity neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE) has greatly increased the number of nuclei which can be studied. Examples of (n,p) measurements on samples with half lives as short as fifty-three days will be given. The nuclear physics and astrophysics to be learned from these data will be discussed. Additional difficulties are encountered when making (n,γ) rather than (n,p) or (n,α) measurements. However, with a properly-designed detector, and the high peak neutron intensities now available, (n,γ) measurements can be made for nuclei with half lives as short as several months. Progress on the Los Alamos (n,γ) cross-section measurement program for radioactive samples will be discussed. 39 refs., 7 figs

  10. National network of radioactivity measurement in environment

    This document constitutes the report of management for the year 2006 of the national network of measurement of radioactivity in environment, instituted by the article R.1333-11 of the Public Health code. According to the 5. of the decree of 27. june 2005, the Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (I.R.S.N.) has for mission to write every year a report of management of the national network of radioactivity measurement in environment. This report has for principal objectives: to do an evaluation on organisation and functioning of the piloting committee; to realize a synthesis on the different tasks lead by the working groups; as well as on the human and financial resources devoted to this project; to debrief on the development project of the national network information system. This report must allow to the network actors, as to the professional people and the public, to understand the functioning of the national network and the process implemented for the development of centralization, management and public diffusion tools, of the radioactivity data in environment. The year 2006 was marked by the opening of an Internet gate of the national network. (N.C.)

  11. Combining Near-Subject Absolute and Relative Measures of Longitudinal Hydration in Hemodialysis

    Chan, Cian; McIntyre, Christopher; Smith, David; Spanel, Patrik; Davies, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The feasibility and additional value of combining bioimpedance analysis (BIA) with near-subject absolute measurement of total body water using deuterium dilution (TBWD) in determining longitudinal fluid status was investigated.

  12. Radioactivity measurement with a plastic scintillation vial

    Introduction: Liquid scintillation counting method is commonly used to measure radioactivity especially for beta emitters because of its high sensitivity. However, since the sample should be mixed with scintillation cocktail of organic liquid, there are problems that the sample could not be recovered and radioactive organic liquid waste is produced. The radioactive waste is usually burned with a specially designed incinerator, so that it needs costs and labor. To resolve the problems, I tried to develop a novel method to measure radioactivity using liquid scintillation counter without scintillation cocktail, and investigated the feasibility of the method. Method: A cylindrical plastic scintillator with well was installed in a counting vial, which is named 'ScintiVial' Sample contained in a 1500 μL microtube was put in the ScintiVial, and was measured with a liquid scintillation counter. Samples including 200-800 Bq of 32P in 25-1300 μL of solution and 900 Bq of 125I in 100 μL solution were measured using the ScintiVial. Results and Discussion: The counting efficiency for 25-1300 μL of 32P was 28-10%, and that for 100 μL of 125I was 3%. The counting efficiency was decreased with the increase of the sample volume. The pulse height distribution of the ScintiVial was similar to that of usual liquid scintillation of the nuclide in question. The microtube, commonly known as 'Eppendorf tube', for containing the sample is widely used for experiments of chemistry etc., and also used to contain most of labeled compounds. Using the ScintiVial made them possible that the sample on an experiment may be measured as it is and the sample may be recovered and reused. In addition, the method will not produce any radioactive organic liquid waste. Not producing the active organic liquid will eliminate the load for its incineration, and then CO2 with the incineration will not be generated. Therefore, the method will potentially assist the resolution of the environmental problem

  13. Absolute dose measurement Gafchromic R EBT2 movies. Case Study of Kaposis sarcoma

    Because of its high spatial resolution, low energy dependence and good response over a wide energy range, EBT2 Gafchromic films are widely used in many applications in radiotherapy for measuring relative dose. Despite being the most common use can be used to measure absolute dose. This text is an example of using films as EBT2 for in vivo absolute dose in a Kaposis sarcoma.

  14. Absolute measurements of neutron cross sections. Progress report

    In the photoneutron laboratory, we have completed a major refurbishing of experimental facilities and begun work on measurements of the capture cross section in thorium and U-238. In the 14 MeV neutron experimental bay, work continues on the measurement of 14 MeV neutron induced reactions of interest as standards or because of their technological importance. First results have been obtained over the past year, and we are extending these measurements along the lines outlined in our proposal of a year ago

  15. ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY FOR INTERACTING MEASURE-VALUED BRANCHING BROWNIAN MOTIONS

    ZHAOXUELEI

    1997-01-01

    The moments and absohite continuity of measure-valued branching Brownian motions with bounded interacting intensity are hivestigated. An estimate of higher order moments is obtained. The ahsolute continuity is verified in the one dimension case. This therehy verifies the conjecture of Méléard and Roelly in [5].

  16. Absolute Oxygenation Metabolism Measurements Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    An, Hongyu; Liu, Qingwei; Eldeniz, Cihat; Lin, Weili

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral oxygen metabolism plays a critical role in maintaining normal function of the brain. It is the primary energy source to sustain neuronal functions. Abnormalities in oxygen metabolism occur in various neuro-pathologic conditions such as ischemic stroke, cerebral trauma, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and shock. Therefore, the ability to quantitatively measure tissue oxygenation and oxygen metabolism is essential to the understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of various diseases. T...

  17. Absolute measurements with a 4 π-counter

    Measurements on standardized p-emitters have been made in a 4 it proportional flow-counter. The counter efficiency is found to be near 100 %. Absorption curves have been determined with plastic foils and aluminium. A comparison is made between the self-absorption arising in different methods of source preparation which include precipitates and the use of wetting agents The most reliable results have been obtained with sources on aluminium foils, where the foil absorption is calculated from the absorption curves and the self-absorption is supposed to be negligible for isotopes with end point energy above 0.5 MeV. The β-emitters studied have energies ranging from 1.71 MeV (32P) to 0.167 MeV (35S). Most of them have been obtained from National Physical Laboratory and Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, England. The agreement between their calibration and our measurements is very good except in the case of Co 60

  18. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and non-expert observers. For 132 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, three experts and two trained observers determined thrombus density by placing three standardized regions of interest (ROIs) in the thrombus and corresponding contralateral arterial segment. Subsequently, absolute and relative thrombus densities were determined using either one or three ROIs. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed to evaluate interobserver and intermethod agreement. Accuracy of the trained observer was evaluated with a reference expert observer using the same statistical analysis. The highest interobserver agreement was obtained for absolute thrombus measurements using three ROIs (ICCs ranging from 0.54 to 0.91). In general, interobserver agreement was lower for relative measurements, and for using one instead of three ROIs. Interobserver agreement of trained non-experts and experts was similar. Accuracy of the trained observer measurements was comparable to the expert interobserver agreement and was better for absolute measurements and with three ROIs. The agreement between the one ROI and three ROI methods was good. Absolute thrombus density measurement has superior interobserver agreement compared to relative density measurement. Interobserver variation is smaller when multiple ROIs are used. Trained non-expert observers can accurately and reproducibly assess absolute thrombus densities using three ROIs. (orig.)

  19. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Santos, Emilie M.M. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Yoo, Albert J. [Texas Stroke Institute, Plano, TX (United States); Beenen, Ludo F.; Majoie, Charles B. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berkhemer, Olvert A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Blanken, Mark D. den; Wismans, Carrie [AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, Wiro J. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Marquering, Henk A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the MR CLEAN investigators

    2016-02-15

    Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and non-expert observers. For 132 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, three experts and two trained observers determined thrombus density by placing three standardized regions of interest (ROIs) in the thrombus and corresponding contralateral arterial segment. Subsequently, absolute and relative thrombus densities were determined using either one or three ROIs. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed to evaluate interobserver and intermethod agreement. Accuracy of the trained observer was evaluated with a reference expert observer using the same statistical analysis. The highest interobserver agreement was obtained for absolute thrombus measurements using three ROIs (ICCs ranging from 0.54 to 0.91). In general, interobserver agreement was lower for relative measurements, and for using one instead of three ROIs. Interobserver agreement of trained non-experts and experts was similar. Accuracy of the trained observer measurements was comparable to the expert interobserver agreement and was better for absolute measurements and with three ROIs. The agreement between the one ROI and three ROI methods was good. Absolute thrombus density measurement has superior interobserver agreement compared to relative density measurement. Interobserver variation is smaller when multiple ROIs are used. Trained non-expert observers can accurately and reproducibly assess absolute thrombus densities using three ROIs. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of radioactivity in volcanic products

    Sato, Jun

    1988-10-01

    Radioactivity in volcanic products was measured for obtaining new knowledge about volcano. A distribution map of /sup 2//sup 2//sup 8/Ra//sup 2//sup 2//sup 6/Ra in the volcanic products of Japanese Islands volcanic front was prepared. From the map, it was understood that only Izu-Mariana Arc was different from other series of vocanos. Concerning Volcano Sakurajima, /sup 2//sup 2//sup 2/Rn//sup 2//sup 2//sup 0/Rn ratio in the pumice produced by the eruption was measured for studying its change with days after creation. Regarding the lava of Miyake Island, change of /sup 2//sup 1//sup 4/Bi with time was measured. 3 figures.

  1. Absolute Measurement of 14C Activity by Internal Proportional Counters

    14CO22 was obtained by decomposing carbonate with sulphuric acid heated to boiling point, after which it was mixed with CH4 in a reserve flask. Three brass internal proportional counters, differing only in length, were filled with this mixture. The counters were connected to the electronic equipment in the usual arrangement. The equipment dead time was determined by means of a modified two-source method, and the total volume of the equipment was obtained from the isothermic expansion of methane from a flask whose volume, together with that of the counters, had been determined by weighing a water filling. The wall effect was determined by measuring a 14CO2 + CH4 mixture at different pressures and by extrapolation to reciprocal pressure zero value; it was discovered that the wall-effect correction did not differ significantly from zero. The end effect was compensated for by using counters of different lengths so that the difference in plateau slope also did not differ significantly from zero. By the t-test power function it was estimated that the maximal error on a 0.01 significance level, caused by neglecting the wall-effect correction, amounted to ± 0.85% due to the end-effect correction (± 0.62% for the equipment used) having been neglected. The relation between wall, end and discrimination effects is discussed, and, in conclusion, the maximal errors from other sources are estimated; the total maximal error on a 0.01 significance level of the standard solution activity is computed as equal to ± 1.1%. (author)

  2. Absolute measurements of the thermal neutron flux by the foil activation method using the 4πβ-γ coincidence technique

    An analysis of the correction factors required for the β-γ coincidence method is presented together with a listing of the various formulae involved in the determination of radioactive sources. The detection system including the activation detectores are described and the results are shown for the absolute measurements of thermal neutron flux carried out in the core of the Argonaut Reactor, at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Brazil. (Author)

  3. The Implications for Higher-Accuracy Absolute Measurements for NGS and its GRAV-D Project

    Childers, V. A.; Winester, D.; Roman, D. R.; Eckl, M. C.; Smith, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Absolute and relative gravity measurements play an important role in the work of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS). When NGS decided to replace the US national vertical datum, the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project added a new dimension to the NGS gravity program. Airborne gravity collection would complement existing satellite and surface gravity data to allow the creation of a gravimetric geoid sufficiently accurate to form the basis of the new reference surface. To provide absolute gravity ties for the airborne surveys, initially new FG5 absolute measurements were made at existing absolute stations and relative measurements were used to transfer those measurements to excenters near the absolute mark and to the aircraft sensor height at the parking space. In 2011, NGS obtained a field-capable A10 absolute gravimeter from Micro-g LaCoste which became the basis of the support of the airborne surveys. Now A10 measurements are made at the aircraft location and transferred to sensor height. Absolute and relative gravity play other roles in GRAV-D. Comparison of surface data with new airborne collection will highlight surface surveys with bias or tilt errors and can provide enough information to repair or discard the data. We expect that areas of problem surface data may be re-measured. The GRAV-D project also plans to monitor the geoid in regions of rapid change and update the vertical datum when appropriate. Geoid change can result from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), tectonic change, and the massive drawdown of large scale aquifers. The NGS plan for monitoring these changes over time is still in its preliminary stages and is expected to rely primarily on the GRACE and GRACE Follow On satellite data in conjunction with models of GIA and tectonic change. We expect to make absolute measurements in areas of rapid change in order to verify model predictions. With the opportunities presented by rapid, highly accurate

  4. Precise measurements of the absolute γ-ray emission probabilities of 223Ra and decay progeny in equilibrium

    Precise measurements of the absolute γ-ray emission probabilities have been made of radiochemically pure solutions of 223Ra in equilibrium with its decay progeny, which had been previously standardised by 4π(liquid scintillation)-γ digital coincidence counting techniques. Two high-purity germanium γ-ray spectrometers were used which had been accurately calibrated using a suite of primary and secondary radioactive standards. Comparison of the activity concentration determined by the primary technique against γ-ray spectrometry measurements using the nuclear data evaluations of the Decay Data Evaluation Project exhibited a range of ~18% in the most intense γ-ray emissions (>1% probability) of the 223Ra decay series. Absolute γ-ray emission probabilities and standard uncertainties have been determined for the decay of 223Ra, 219Rn, 215Po, 211Pb, 211Bi and 207Tl in equilibrium. The standard uncertainties of the measured γ-ray emission probabilities quoted in this work show a significant improvement over previously reported γ-ray emission probabilities. Correlation coefficients for pairs of the measured γ-ray emission probabilities from the decays of the radionuclides 223Ra, 219Rn and 211Pb have been determined and are presented. The α-transition probabilities of the 223Ra have been deduced from P(γ+ce) balance using the γ-ray emission probabilities determined in this work with some agreement observed with the published experimental values of the α-emission probabilities. - Highlights: • Discrepancies found within currently published γ-ray emission probabilities. • Absolute γ-ray emission probabilities of decay series in equilibrium determined. • Significant improvement in precision of measured values. • Closer agreement between deduced and experimental α transition probabilities. • Correlation coefficients presented for γ-emissions of 223Ra, 219Rn and 211Pb

  5. Radioactivity measurements for some ophthalmic glasses

    The main aim of the present work is to implant the latest ICRP/IAEA recommendations related to exemption and clearness to the Ophthalmic Glass. As consumer product, glass lenses may contain trace quantities of uranium, thorium and potassium. Glass lenses under investigation were monitored for the detection of gamma rays and beta particles using radiation measuring devices. Using high purity germanium detector radioactivity concentration was estimated in Bq/kg. Activity concentration of 226 Ra, Th-232 and K-40 were determined using the energy gamma lines of 2l4Pb (352 keV), 212Pb (238 keV) and 1460 keV gamma line for 40K respectively .Experimental results showed that radioactivity concentration for radium -226 varies from 0.19 to 4.98 Bq/kg of radium-226, from to 0.18 to 2.83 Bq/kg for thorium -232 and from 0.8 to 1.13 Bq/kg for potassium. Implementing new ICRP recommendation of exemption and clearness indicated that several Ophthalmic Glass should not be in use

  6. Ethernet-based automation in radioactivity measurements

    The paper describes an integrated radioactivity measurements laboratory involved in a New York State program of monitoring environmental radioactivity and bioassay samples. The laboratory is set up as a comprehensive Ethernet network that integrates radiation detectors, electronics hardware components as well as software automation and communications. Two DEC VAXstations 3100 and 3200 are central to the system. The VAXstation 3100 runs the Canberra/Nuclear Data Genie data-acquisition program. The Acquisition Interface Modules interface the ADCs to the Ethernet. Using the DEC Pathworks, the VAXstation 3100 is also a server for the Ethernet-based network of several 486 and 386 PCs. A designated PC can display the Genie acquisition window, in addition to the main window at VAXstation 3100. Another PC collects data from several NaI detectors using the Oxford/Nucleus DMR-II program. The paper also describe the plans for the future upgrades such as installation of VAXstation 4000/90 as well as interfacing the proportional counters and surface barrier detectors to the network

  7. Calibrating the absolute amplitude scale for air showers measured at LOFAR

    Nelles, A.; Hörandel, J. R.; Karskens, T.; Krause, M.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Erdmann, M.; Falcke, H.; Haungs, A.; Hiller, R.; Huege, T.; Krause, R.; Link, K.; Norden, M. J.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; Schröder, F. G.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Trinh, T. N. G.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Anderson, J.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Carbone, D.; Ciardi, B.; de Gasperin, F.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kohler, J.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Schwarz, D.; Serylak, M.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Tasse, C.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2015-11-01

    Air showers induced by cosmic rays create nanosecond pulses detectable at radio frequencies. These pulses have been measured successfully in the past few years at the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and are used to study the properties of cosmic rays. For a complete understanding of this phenomenon and the underlying physical processes, an absolute calibration of the detecting antenna system is needed. We present three approaches that were used to check and improve the antenna model of LOFAR and to provide an absolute calibration of the whole system for air shower measurements. Two methods are based on calibrated reference sources and one on a calibration approach using the diffuse radio emission of the Galaxy, optimized for short data-sets. An accuracy of 19% in amplitude is reached. The absolute calibration is also compared to predictions from air shower simulations. These results are used to set an absolute energy scale for air shower measurements and can be used as a basis for an absolute scale for the measurement of astronomical transients with LOFAR.

  8. Calibrating the absolute amplitude scale for air showers measured at LOFAR

    Air showers induced by cosmic rays create nanosecond pulses detectable at radio frequencies. These pulses have been measured successfully in the past few years at the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and are used to study the properties of cosmic rays. For a complete understanding of this phenomenon and the underlying physical processes, an absolute calibration of the detecting antenna system is needed. We present three approaches that were used to check and improve the antenna model of LOFAR and to provide an absolute calibration of the whole system for air shower measurements. Two methods are based on calibrated reference sources and one on a calibration approach using the diffuse radio emission of the Galaxy, optimized for short data-sets. An accuracy of 19% in amplitude is reached. The absolute calibration is also compared to predictions from air shower simulations. These results are used to set an absolute energy scale for air shower measurements and can be used as a basis for an absolute scale for the measurement of astronomical transients with LOFAR

  9. Measures of radioactivity: a tool for understanding statistical data analysis

    Montalbano, Vera; Quattrini, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    A learning path on radioactivity in the last class of high school is presented. An introduction to radioactivity and nuclear phenomenology is followed by measurements of natural radioactivity. Background and weak sources are monitored for days or weeks. The data are analyzed in order to understand the importance of statistical analysis in modern physics.

  10. Measurement of statistical evidence on an absolute scale following thermodynamic principles

    Vieland, V J; Hodge, S E; Seok, S -C

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis is used throughout biomedical research and elsewhere to assess strength of evidence. We have previously argued that typical outcome statistics (including p-values and maximum likelihood ratios) have poor measure-theoretic properties: they can erroneously indicate decreasing evidence as data supporting an hypothesis accumulate; and they are not amenable to calibration, necessary for meaningful comparison of evidence across different study designs, data types, and levels of analysis. We have also previously proposed that thermodynamic theory, which allowed for the first time derivation of an absolute measurement scale for temperature (T), could be used to derive an absolute scale for evidence (E). Here we present a novel thermodynamically-based framework in which measurement of E on an absolute scale, for which "one degree" always means the same thing, becomes possible for the first time. The new framework invites us to think about statistical analyses in terms of the flow of (evidential) i...

  11. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    Leeper R.J.; Bleuel D. L.; Frenje J.A.; Eckart M.J.; Hartouni E.; Kilkenny J.D.; Casey D.T.; Chandler G.A.; Cooper G.W.; Glebov V.Yu.; Hagmann C.; Johnson M. Gatu; Knauer J.P.; Knittel K.M.; Linden-Levy L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF.

  12. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    Leeper R.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF.

  13. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF. (authors)

  14. A technique for the absolute measurement of the W-value for X-rays in counting gases

    Vinagre, F.L.R. E-mail: fleonor@saturno.fis.uc.pt; Conde, C.A.N

    2000-08-11

    A technique was developed for the absolute measurement of the W-value (the mean energy for the production of an electron-ion pair) for low-energy X-rays in a wide range of gases at atmospheric pressures, with a standard uncertainty better than 1%. This technique is based on the absolute measurement of the primary ionization charge produced by X-ray photons from a constant intensity monoenergetic X-ray source, e.g. a long lifetime radioactive source. The ionization charge is calibrated by the number of X-ray photons absorbed in the gas, counted with a photon detector. For this purpose, a hybrid detector system was tested and its use in W-value measurements was investigated. The technique was applied to pure xenon at 825 Torr with 5.9 keV X-rays and a W-value of 21.61{sub -0.10}{sup +0.14} eV was obtained for a 68% confidence level. The required corrections and the different factors contributing to the accuracy of the results are discussed. The advantages and limitations of this technique are explored and future developments are discussed.

  15. Absolute frequency measurement of the 1S0 - 3P0 transition of 171Yb

    Pizzocaro, Marco; Rauf, Benjamin; Bregolin, Filippo; Milani, Gianmaria; Clivati, Cecilia; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We report the absolute frequency measurement of the unperturbed transition 1S0 - 3P0 at 578 nm in 171Yb realized in an optical lattice frequency standard. The absolute frequency is measured 518 295 836 590 863.55(28) Hz relative to a cryogenic caesium fountain with a fractional uncertainty of 5.4x10-16 . This value is in agreement with the ytterbium frequency recommended as a secondary representation of the second in the International System of Units.

  16. First Absolutely Calibrated Localized Measurements of Ion Velocity in the MST in Locked and Rotating Plasmas

    Baltzer, M.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Munaretto, S.

    2015-11-01

    An Ion Doppler Spectrometer (IDS) is used on MST for high time-resolution passive and active measurements of impurity ion emission. Absolutely calibrated measurements of flow are difficult because the spectrometer records data within 0.3 nm of the C+5 line of interest, and commercial calibration lamps do not produce lines in this narrow range . A novel optical system was designed to absolutely calibrate the IDS. The device uses an UV LED to produce a broad emission curve in the desired region. A Fabry-Perot etalon filters this light, cutting transmittance peaks into the pattern of the LED emission. An optical train of fused silica lenses focuses the light into the IDS with f/4. A holographic diffuser blurs the light cone to increase homogeneity. Using this light source, the absolute Doppler shift of ion emissions can be measured in MST plasmas. In combination with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, localized ion velocities can now be measured. Previously, a time-averaged measurement along the chord bisecting the poloidal plane was used to calibrate the IDS; the quality of these central chord calibrations can be characterized with our absolute calibration. Calibration errors may also be quantified and minimized by optimizing the curve-fitting process. Preliminary measurements of toroidal velocity in locked and rotating plasmas will be shown. This work has been supported by the US DOE.

  17. Physical Measure and Absolute Continuity for One-Dimensional Center Direction

    Viana, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    For a class of partially hyperbolic $C^k$, $k>1$ diffeomorphisms with circle center leaves we prove existence and finiteness of physical (or Sinai-Ruelle-Bowen) measures, whose basins cover a full Lebesgue measure subset of the ambient manifold. Our conditions contain an open and dense subset of all $C^k$ partially hyperbolic skew-products on compact circle bundles. Our arguments blend ideas from the theory of Gibbs states for diffeomorphisms with mostly contracting center direction together with recent progress in the theory of cocycles over hyperbolic systems that call into play geometric properties of invariant foliations such as absolute continuity. Recent results show that absolute continuity of the center foliation is often a rigid property among volume preserving systems. We prove that this is not at all the case in the dissipative setting, where absolute continuity can even be robust.

  18. Radioactivity measurements using storage phosphor technology

    Cheng, Y.T. [NeuTek, Darnestown, MD (United States); Hwang, J. [Advanced Technologies and Labs. International, Rockville, MD (United States); Hutchinson, M.R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    We propose to apply a recently developed charged particle radiation imaging concept in bio-medical research for fast, cost-effective characterization of radionuclides in contaminated sites and environmental samples. This concept utilizes sensors with storage photostimulable phosphor (SPP) technology as radiation detectors. They exhibit high sensitivity for all types of radiation and the response is linear over a wide dynamic range (>10{sup 5}), essential for quantitative analysis. These new sensors have an Active area of up to 35 cm x 43 cm in size and a spatial resolution as fine as 50 {mu}m. They offer considerable promise as large area detectors for fast characterization of radionuclides with an added ability to locate and identify hot spots. Tests with SPP sensors have found that a single alpha particle effect can be observed and an alpha field of 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} or a beta activity of 0.1 dpm/mm{sup 2} or gamma radiation of few {mu}R/hr can all be measured in minutes. Radioactive isotopes can further be identified by energy discrimination which is accomplished by placing different thicknesses of filter material in front of the sensor plate. For areas with possible neutron contamination, the sensors can be coupled to a neutron to charged particle converter screen, such as dysprosium foil to detect neutrons. Our study has shown that this approach can detect a neutron flux of 1 n/cm{sup 2}s or lower, again with only minutes of exposure time. The utilization of these new sensors can significantly reduce the time and cost required for many site characterization and environmental monitoring tasks. The {open_quotes}exposure{close_quotes} time for mapping radioactivity in an environmental sample may be in terms of minutes and offer a positional resolution not obtainable with presently used counting equipment. The resultant digital image will lend itself to ready analysis.

  19. Measurement Technology on 200 Liters Barrels of Radioactive Waste

    BAI; Lei; SHAO; Jie-wen; LIU; Da-ming; LIU; Hong-bin; CHENG; Yi-mei; HE; Li-xia; ZHU; Li-qun

    2012-01-01

    <正>The measurement device on 200 liters barrel of radioactive waste is designed following the rule of orderly measurement automatically, by using the technology of non-destructive to measure the mass of radioactive waste produced from fuel cycle. Device objects as shown in Fig. 1, which consists of the

  20. Perfusion measurements with radioactively labelled microspheres

    The technique and the evaluation of the microsphere-method are comprehensively represented in theory and practice. Some changes and new concepts are discussed, besides the known foundations and techniques, that assure an essential methodic improvement resp. practical simplifications. Two new formulas are derived within the frame of the theoretical principles, by which the absolute flux of shorts can be calculated, i.e. on the one hand in the case of known and on the other hand in the case of unknown applied amount of indicator. The determination of the optimal indicator dose is defined and formulated mathematically with respect to the experimental conditions to be expected. The matrix method was designed for the analysis of complex gamma spectra. Hereby there is no selective error accumulation in the case of low energy radio nuclids contrary to the so far exclusively used stripping technique. The number of possible error quantities was reduced by one resp. two variables. The error of particular radio nuclid components is quantitatively computed as standard deviation by means of the theory of approximated systems of linear equations. The external measurement of distance was developed. This technique is less susceptible for errors as the aliquota i.e. whole body measurement technique. Additionally less measurement time is needed. A flexible computer program for a desk top computer was developped for the evaluation. The data from the gamma spectrometer are recorded on tipe and automatically read in by the computer. The manual input are limited to the weights of the organs and some control parameter. The output is made by a clearly arranged table by means of a lineprinter. (orig./MG)

  1. Absolute calibration of a wideband antenna and spectrometer for sky noise spectral index measurements

    Rogers, Alan E E

    2012-01-01

    A new method of absolute calibration of sky noise temperature using a three-position switched spectrometer, measurements of antenna and low noise amplifier impedance with a vector network analyzer, and ancillary measurements of the amplifier noise waves is described. The details of the method and its application to accurate wideband measurements of the spectral index of the sky noise are described and compared with other methods.

  2. Measurement of the absolute branching fraction of $D^{+}\\rightarrow\\bar K^0 e^{+}\

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Dou, Z L; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Farinelli, R; Fava, L; Fedorov, O; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, L; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, X Z; Huang, Y; Huang, Z L; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kupsc, A; Kühn, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q Y; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y B; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y M; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, H R; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, M; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing 2.93 fb$^{-1}$ data collected at the center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt s=3.773$ GeV with the BESIII detector, we measure the absolute branching fraction of the semileptonic decay $D^+\\rightarrow\\bar K^0 e^{+}\

  3. Measurements of the absolute branching fractions for $D_{s}^{+}\\rightarrow\\eta e^{+}\

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Dou, Z L; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Farinelli, R; Fava, L; Fedorov, O; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, L; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, X Z; Huang, Y; Huang, Z L; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kupsc, A; Kühn, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q Y; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y B; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y M; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, H R; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, M; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing 482 pb$^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ collision data collected at $\\sqrt s=4.009$ GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring, we measure the absolute branching fractions for the semileptonic decays $D_{s}^{+}\\to\\eta e^{+}\

  4. Low geometry counter for the absolute measurement of the activity of alpha-emitting sources

    A low-geometry counter is described which allows the absolute determination of the activity for alpha-emitting sources. A Si implanted detector is used to obtain the spectrum of the sample. Two samples are measured with this counter and a 2 π gridded ion chamber. The results an their uncertainties for both instruments are discussed. (Author)

  5. Superharp: A wire scanner with absolute position readout for beam energy measurement at CEBAF

    Superharp is an upgrade CEBAF wire scanner with absolute position readout from shaft encoder. As high precision absolute beam position probe (Δx ∼ 10μm), three pairs of superharps are installed at the entrance, the mid-point, and the exit of Hall C arc beamline in beam switch yard, which will be tuned in dispersive mode as energy spectrometer performing 10-3 beam energy measurement. With dual sensor system: the direct current pickup and the bremsstrahlung detection electronics, beam profile can be obtained by superharp at wide beam current range from 1 μA to 100 μA

  6. Re-creating Gauss's method for non-electrical absolute measurements of magnetic fields and moments

    Van Baak, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    In 1832, Gauss made the first absolute measurements of magnetic fields and of magnetic moments in experiments that are straightforward and instructive to replicate. We show, using rare-earth permanent magnets and a variation of Gauss's technique, that the horizontal component of the ambient geomagnetic field, as well as the size of the magnetic moments of such magnets, can be found. The method shows the connection between the SI and cgs emu unit systems for these quantities and permits an absolute realization of the Ampere with considerable precision.

  7. Methods of measuring radioactivity in the environment

    A variety of sampling methods have been utilized to assess the amount of deposited activity, mainly from 137Cs, from the Chernobyl accident and from nuclear weapons tests. Starting with the Chernobyl accident in 1986 sampling of air and rain was used to determine the composition and amount of radioactive debris from this accident. The resulting deposition and its removal from urban areas was then studied through measurements on sewage sludge and water. The main part of the thesis considers methods of determining the amount of radiocesium in the ground through soil sampling. In connection with soil sampling a method of optimizing the sampling procedure has been developed and tested in the areas of Sweden with high amounts of 137Cs from the Chernobyl accident. This method was then used in a survey of the activity in soil in Scania (south Sweden) with fallout activity from nuclear weapons and Chernobyl. By comparing the results from this survey with deposition calculated from precipitation measurements it was found possible to predict the deposition pattern over Scania for both nuclear weapons and Chernobyl fallout. In addition, the vertical distribution of 137Cs has been modelled and the temporal variation of the depth distribution has been described. 65 refs

  8. Absolute phase retrieval for defocused fringe projection three-dimensional measurement

    Zheng, Dongliang; Da, Feipeng

    2014-02-01

    Defocused fringe projection three-dimensional technique based on pulse-width modulation (PWM) can generate high-quality sinusoidal fringe patterns. It only uses slightly defocused binary structured patterns which can eliminate the gamma problem (i.e. nonlinear response), and the phase error can be significantly reduced. However, when the projector is defocused, it is difficult to retrieve the absolute phase from the wrapped phase. A recently proposed phase coding method is efficient for absolute phase retrieval, but the gamma problem leads this method not so reliable. In this paper, we use the PWM technique to generate fringe patterns for the phase coding method. The gamma problem of the projector can be eliminated, and correct absolute phase can be retrieved. The proposed method only uses two grayscale values (0's and 255's), which can be used for real-time 3D shape measurement. Both simulation and experiment demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  9. Present status and prospects of ultralow level radioactivity measurements (3). Environmental radioactivity monitoring in Japan

    The environmental radioactivity survey in Japan is explained. There are two kinds of surveys such as monitoring around nuclear facilities and the environmental radioactivity survey. On monitoring around the nuclear facilities, its objects, monitoring at ordinary times and in an emergency, the measurement items, radioactive materials analysis, evaluation and open to the public of monitoring results and guarantee of monitoring quality are reported. On environmental radioactivity survey in wide area, its objects, environmental radioactivity survey, working organizations, fallout measurement, concentration of radon in foods, neutron dose, natural radionuclide and nuclides in relation to reprocessing plants are measured. The measurement results are opened on Web site; http://www.kankyo-hoshano.go.jp/ and http://www.search.kankyo-hoshano.go.jp/. (S.Y.)

  10. Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of D_s Mesons

    Adam, N; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Ernst, J; Severini, H; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Savinov, V; Aquines, O; Li, Z; López, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Briere, R A; Brock, I; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L

    2006-01-01

    We report preliminary measurements of absolute hadronic branching fractions of Ds mesons determined using a double tag technique. These measurements are from 195 pb^{-1} of e+e- collisions recorded at center of mass energies near 4.17 GeV with the CLEO-c detector at CESR. We obtain absolute branching fractions for Ds+ decays to KS0 K+, K- K+ pi+, K- K+ pi+ pi-, pi+ pi+ pi-, pi+ eta, and pi+ etaprime. We discuss the problems inherent in measuring accurately the branching fraction for Ds+ to phi pi+, which is often used as a reference mode for measurement of other Ds+ branching fractions, and provide a measurement of a branching fraction that may be useful for this purpose.

  11. Radioactivity

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  12. Demonstrating the Error Budget for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory Through Solar Irradiance Measurements

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as a method to determine the accuracy of climate change. A CLARREO objective is to improve the accuracy of SI-traceable, absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths to reach on-orbit accuracies required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps and observe climate change at the limit of natural variability. Such an effort will also demonstrate National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) approaches for use in future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the results of laboratory and field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. SOLARIS allows testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. Results of laboratory calibration measurements are provided to demonstrate key assumptions about instrument behavior that are needed to achieve CLARREO's climate measurement requirements. Absolute radiometric response is determined using laser-based calibration sources and applied to direct solar views for comparison with accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  13. Natural radioactivity measurements in Pahang State, Malaysia.

    Gabdo, Hamman Tukur; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Sanusi, Mohamad

    2016-06-01

    This study was aimed at providing the baseline data of terrestrial gamma dose rates and natural radioactivity to assess the corresponding health risk in the ambient environment of the Pahang State. Terrestrial gamma radiation (TGR) from 640 locations was measured with the mean value found to be 176 ± 5 nGy h(-1). Ninety-eight soil samples were analysed using a high-purity germanium detector (HPGe), and the mean concentrations of the radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K are 110 ± 3, 151 ± 5 and 542 ± 51 Bq kg(-1), respectively.(226)Ra and (232)Th concentrations were found to be three times the world average, while that of (40)K is quite higher than the world average value. The acid-intrusive geological formation has the highest mean concentrations for (226)Ra (215 ± 6 Bq kg(-1)), (232)Th (384 ± 12 Bq kg(-1)) and (40)K (1564 ± 153 Bq kg(-1)). The radium equivalent activities (Req) and the external hazard index (Hex) for the various soil types were also calculated. Some of the soil types were found to have values exceeding the internationally recommended levels of 370 Bq kg(-1) and the unity value, respectively. PMID:26999725

  14. Absolute Neutron Fluence Measurements at the NIST Center for Neutron Research

    Yue, A.; Dewey, M.; Gilliam, D.; Nico, J.; Anderson, E.; Snow, M.; Greene, G.; Laptev, A.

    2015-10-01

    Precise, absolute fluence measurements of cold and thermal neutron beams are of primary importance to beam-type determinations of the neutron lifetime, measurements of standard neutron cross sections, and the development of standards for neutron dosimetry. At the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a totally absorbing neutron detector based on absolute counting of the 10B(n,α1)7Li reaction 478 keV gamma ray has been used to perform fluence measurements with a precision of 0.06%. This detector has been used to improve the neutron fluence determination in the 2000 NIST beam neutron lifetime by a factor of five, significantly reducing the uncertainty in the lifetime result. Ongoing and possible future uses of the Alpha-Gamma device include 1) Calibration of the neutron fluence monitors that will be used in the upcoming NIST beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2; 2) The first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t)4He neutron cross section at sub-thermal neutron energy; 3) Measurements of the 10B(n, γ)11B and 235U(n,f) neutron cross sections; 4) A re-calibration of the national neutron standard NBS-1. The apparatus, measurement technique, and applications will be discussed.

  15. Frequency-scanning interferometry for dynamic absolute distance measurement using Kalman filter.

    Tao, Long; Liu, Zhigang; Zhang, Weibo; Zhou, Yangli

    2014-12-15

    We propose a frequency-scanning interferometry using the Kalman filtering technique for dynamic absolute distance measurement. Frequency-scanning interferometry only uses a single tunable laser driven by a triangle waveform signal for forward and backward optical frequency scanning. The absolute distance and moving speed of a target can be estimated by the present input measurement of frequency-scanning interferometry and the previously calculated state based on the Kalman filter algorithm. This method not only compensates for movement errors in conventional frequency-scanning interferometry, but also achieves high-precision and low-complexity dynamic measurements. Experimental results of dynamic measurements under static state, vibration and one-dimensional movement are presented. PMID:25503050

  16. A novel method for the absolute fluorescence yield measurement by AIRFLY

    Ave, M

    2008-01-01

    One of the goals of the AIRFLY (AIR FLuorescence Yield) experiment is to measure the absolute fluorescence yield induced by electrons in air to better than 10% precision. We introduce a new technique for measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm line that has the advantage of reducing the systematic uncertainty due to the detector calibration. The principle is to compare the measured fluorescence yield to a well known process - the Cerenkov emission. Preliminary measurements taken in the BFT (Beam Test Facility) in Frascati, Italy with 350 MeV electrons are presented. Beam tests in the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator at the Argonne National Laboratory, USA with 14 MeV electrons have also shown that this technique can be applied at lower energies.

  17. Hilbertian sine as an absolute measure of Bayesian inference in ISR, homeland security, medicine, and defense

    Jannson, Tomasz; Wang, Wenjian; Hodelin, Juan; Forrester, Thomas; Romanov, Volodymyr; Kostrzewski, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, Bayesian Binary Sensing (BBS) is discussed as an effective tool for Bayesian Inference (BI) evaluation in interdisciplinary areas such as ISR (and, C3I), Homeland Security, QC, medicine, defense, and many others. In particular, Hilbertian Sine (HS) as an absolute measure of BI, is introduced, while avoiding relativity of decision threshold identification, as in the case of traditional measures of BI, related to false positives and false negatives.

  18. Polarized H- Jet Polarimeter For Absolute Proton Polarization Measurements in RHIC

    Status of the H-jet polarimeter development is reviewed. A number of design issues are discussed including vacuum system, integration into the RHIC storage ring, scattering chamber, and uniform vertical holding field magnet design. The absolute proton polarization of the atomic hydrogen-jet target will be measured to 3% accuracy by a Breit- systematic error contribution to the jet-target polarization measurements is also discussed

  19. Laser induced deflection (LID) method for absolute absorption measurements of optical materials and thin films

    Mühlig, Christian; Bublitz, Simon; Paa, Wolfgang

    2011-05-01

    We use optimized concepts to measure directly low absorption in optical materials and thin films at various laser wavelengths by the laser induced deflection (LID) technique. An independent absolute calibration, using electrical heaters, is applied to obtain absolute absorption data without the actual knowledge of the photo-thermal material properties. Verification of the absolute calibration is obtained by measuring different silicon samples at 633 nm where all laser light, apart from the measured reflection/scattering, is absorbed. Various experimental results for bulk materials and thin films are presented including measurements of fused silica and CaF2 at 193 nm, nonlinear crystals (LBO) for frequency conversion and AR coated fused silica for high power material processing at 1030 nm and Yb-doped silica raw materials for high power fiber lasers at 1550 nm. In particular for LBO the need of an independent calibration is demonstrated since thermal lens generation is dominated by stress-induced refractive index change which is in contrast to most of the common optical materials. The measured results are proven by numerical simulations and their influence on the measurement strategy and the obtained accuracy are shown.

  20. Absolute frequency measurements and hyperfine structures of the molecular iodine transitions at 578 nm

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Inaba, Hajime; Okubo, Sho; Tanabe, Takehiko; Yasuda, Masami; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2016-01-01

    We report absolute frequency measurements of 81 hyperfine components of the rovibrational transitions of molecular iodine at 578 nm using the second harmonic generation of an 1156-nm external-cavity diode laser and a fiber-based optical frequency comb. The relative uncertainties of the measured absolute frequencies are typically $1.4\\times10^{-11}$. Accurate hyperfine constants of four rovibrational transitions are obtained by fitting the measured hyperfine splittings to a four-term effective Hamiltonian including the electric quadrupole, spin-rotation, tensor spin-spin, and scalar spin-spin interactions. The observed transitions can be good frequency references at 578 nm, and are especially useful for research using atomic ytterbium since the transitions are close to the $^{1}S_{0}-^{3}P_{0}$ clock transition of ytterbium.

  1. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  2. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  3. Absolute measurement of neutron source emission rate with manganese bath method

    The manganese bath method is one of the most widespread and exact method to measure neutron source emission rate (neutron source intensity) absolutely at present. Pouring some 56Mn solution with known activity into the bath, the system efficiency can be obtained from γ counts of 56Mn, which is measured by two NaI(Tl) detectors. From saturated counts of a 241Am-Be(α, n) neutron source in the bath, the source emission rate can be obtained. An standard 241Am-Be(α, n) source which is the transfer source of the CCRI(Ⅲ)-K9. AmBe international key comparison organized by the Comite Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants, was measured absolutely with the neutron source emission rate standard equipment (manganese bath method). The result is coincident with the average value of the comparison within the uncertainties, therefore the reliability of the standard equipment is verified. (authors)

  4. High-precision gravity measurements using absolute and relative gravimeters at Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy

    Ciro Del Negro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate detection of time gravity changes attributable to the dynamics of volcanoes requires high-precision gravity measurements. With the aim of improving the quality of data from the Mount Etna gravity network, we used both absolute and relative gravimeters in a hybrid method. In this report, some of the techniques for gravity surveys are reviewed, and the results related to each method are compared. We show how the total uncertainty estimated for the gravity measurements performed with this combined use of absolute and relative gravimeters is roughly comparable to that calculated when the measurements are acquired using only relative gravimeters (the traditional method. However, the data highlight how the hybrid approach improves the measurement capabilities for surveying the Mount Etna volcanic area. This approach enhances the accuracy of the data, and then of the four-dimensional surveying, which minimizes ambiguities inherent in the gravity measurements. As a case study, we refer to two gravity datasets acquired in 2005 and 2010 from the western part of the Etna volcano, which included five absolute and 13 relative stations of the Etna gravity network.

  5. Radioactivity measurement of radioactive contaminated soil by using a fiber-optic radiation sensor

    Joo, Hanyoung; Kim, Rinah; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    A fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) was developed to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. The FORS was fabricated using an inorganic scintillator (Lu,Y)2SiO5:Ce (LYSO:Ce), a mixture of epoxy resin and hardener, aluminum foil, and a plastic optical fiber. Before its real application, the FORS was tested to determine if it performed adequately. The test result showed that the measurements by the FORS adequately followed the theoretically estimated values. Then, the FORS was applied to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. For comparison, a commercial radiation detector was also applied to measure the same soil samples. The measurement data were analyzed by using a statistical parameter, the critical level to determine if net radioactivity statistically different from background was present in the soil sample. The analysis showed that the soil sample had radioactivity distinguishable from background.

  6. Laser induced deflection technique for absolute thin film absorption measurement: optimized concepts and experimental results

    Using experimental results and numerical simulations, two measuring concepts of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique are introduced and optimized for absolute thin film absorption measurements from deep ultraviolet to IR wavelengths. For transparent optical coatings, a particular probe beam deflection direction allows the absorption measurement with virtually no influence of the substrate absorption, yielding improved accuracy compared to the common techniques of separating bulk and coating absorption. For high-reflection coatings, where substrate absorption contributions are negligible, a different probe beam deflection is chosen to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. Various experimental results for the two different measurement concepts are presented.

  7. Absolute Frequency Measurements of the D1 and D2 Transitions in Aatomic Li

    Sheets, Donal; Almaguer, Jose; Baron, Jacob; Elgee, Peter; Rowan, Michael; Stalnaker, Jason

    2014-05-01

    We present preliminary results from our measurements of the D1 and D2 transitions in Li. The data were obtained from a collimated atomic beam excited by light from an extended cavity diode laser. The frequency of the diode laser was stabilized to an optical frequency comb, providing absolute frequency measurement and control of the excitation laser frequency. These measurements will provide a stringent test of atomic structure calculations and yield information about the nuclear structure. We also discuss plans to extend the technique to other high-lying states in lithium. Funded by the NIST Precision Measurements Grant and NSF Award #1305591.

  8. Absolute reaction rate measurement with D-D neutron source in polyethylene spherical shell

    The absolute reaction rate distribution measurements in a polyethylene spherical shell with 38.6 cm outside diameter and 10 cm thickness were performed with D-D neutron source. By combining fission method and activation method, rich-uranium fission chamber, depleted-uranium fission chamber, 237Np fission chamber and 115In activation foils were placed at several positions on the equatorial line of the inner face of the shell, and the absolute reaction rates were obtained. The uncertainty of fission rates is 2.5%-4.3%, while the uncertainty of activation rates is about 6.3%. The reaction rates were calculated by MCNP and ENDF/B-VII. 0. The calculated results are lower than the measured results and 238U is typical. (authors)

  9. Hyperspectral interferometry for single-shot absolute measurement of two-dimensional optical path distributions

    We propose a method that we call hyperspectral interferometry (HSI) to resolve the 2π phase unwrapping problem in the analysis of interferograms recorded with a narrow-band light source. By using a broadband light source and a hyperspectral imaging system, a set of interferograms at different wave numbers are recorded simultaneously on a high resolution image sensor. These are then assembled to form a three-dimensional intensity distribution. By Fourier transformation along the wave number axis, an absolute optical path difference is obtained for each pixel independently of the other pixels in the field of view. As a result, interferograms with spatially distinct regions are analysed as easily as continuous ones. The approach is illustrated with a HSI system to measure 3D profiles of optically smooth or rough surfaces. Compared to existing profilometers able to measure absolute path differences, the single-shot nature of the approach provides greater immunity from environmental disturbance

  10. Absolutely continuous invariant measure of a map from grazing-impact oscillators

    In this paper we investigate a one-dimensional map with unbounded derivative. The map is the limit of the Nordmark map which is the normal form of a discrete time representation of impact oscillators near grazing, i.e. when the dissipation of the systems is large, the Nordmark map can be viewed as a perturbation of the one-dimensional map. We prove that the map has an ergodic absolutely continuous invariant probability measure in a region of parameter space by constructing an induced Markov map. - Highlights: • We investigate a one-dimensional map with unbounded derivative. • The map is the limit of the Nordmark map which is the normal form of the impact oscillators near grazing states. • We prove that the map has an ergodic absolutely continuous invariant probability measure by constructing an induced Markov map

  11. FFTF (FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY) REACTOR CHARACTERIZATION PROGRAM ABSOLUTE FISSION RATE MEASUREMENTS

    FULLER JL; GILLIAM DM; GRUNDL JA; RAWLINS JA; DAUGHTRY JW

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  12. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) Reactor Characterization Program: Absolute Fission-rate Measurements

    Fuller, J.L.; Gilliam, D.M.; Grundl, J.A.; Rawlins, J.A.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  13. Absolute Frequency Measurement of Rubidium 5S-7S Two-Photon Transitions

    Morzynski, Piotr; Ablewski, Piotr; Gartman, Rafal; Gawlik, Wojciech; Maslowski, Piotr; Nagorny, Bartlomiej; Ozimek, Filip; Radzewicz, Czeslaw; Witkowski, Marcin; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2013-01-01

    We report the absolute frequency measurements of rubidium 5S-7S two-photon transitions with a cw laser digitally locked to an atomic transition and referenced to an optical frequency comb. The narrow, two-photon transition, 5S-7S (760 nm) insensitive to first order in a magnetic field, is a promising candidate for frequency reference. The performed tests yield the transition frequency with accuracy better than reported previously.

  14. Use of relative and absolute effect measures in reporting health inequalities: structured review

    Nicholas B. King; Harper, Sam; Young, Meredith E

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the frequency of reporting of absolute and relative effect measures in health inequalities research. Design Structured review of selected general medical and public health journals. Data sources 344 articles published during 2009 in American Journal of Epidemiology, American Journal of Public Health, BMJ, Epidemiology, International Journal of Epidemiology, JAMA, Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, The Lancet, The New England Journal of Medicine, and Social Scie...

  15. Absolute nuclear energy measurements using the γ-γ coincidence method

    I n this report a summary is first given of the principle of the γ-γ calibration method, stress being laid on the corrections required. After a description of the equipment used, the choice of the experimental conditions required for various isotopes is discussed (22Na, 46Sc, 60Co, 88Y) and the agreement between these results and those obtained by other absolute measurement methods is considered. (authors)

  16. Absolute Polarization Measurements at RHIC in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference Region

    Eyser, K. O.; Alekseev, I.; Bravar, A; Bunce, G.; Dhawan, S.; Gill, R; Haeberli, W.; Huang, H.; Jinnouchi, O.; Makdisi, Y.; Nakagawa, I.; Nass, A.; Okada, H.; Stephenson, E.; Svirida, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory provides polarized proton beams for the investigation of the nucleon spin structure. For polarimetry, carbon-proton and proton-proton scattering is used in the Coulomb nuclear interference region at small momentum transfer ($-t$). Fast polarization measurements of each beam are carried out with carbon fiber targets at several times during an accelerator store. A polarized hydrogen gas jet target is needed for absolute norma...

  17. Absolute measurement of the ultrafast nonlinear electronic and rovibrational response in H$_2$ and D$_2$

    Wahlstrand, J K; Cheng, Y -H; Palastro, J P; Milchberg, H M

    2015-01-01

    The electronic, rotational, and vibrational components of the ultrafast optical nonlinearity in H$_2$ and D$_2$ are measured directly and absolutely at intensities up to the ionization threshold of $\\sim$10$^{14}$ W/cm$^2$. As the most basic nonlinear interactions of the simplest molecules exposed to high fields, these results constitute a benchmark for high field laser-matter theory and simulation.

  18. Geometry of expanding absolutely continuous invariant measures and the liftability problem

    We consider a quite broad class of maps on compact manifolds of arbitrary dimension possibly admitting critical points, discontinuities and singularities. Under some mild nondegeneracy assumptions we show that f admits an induced Gibbs-Markov map with integrable inducing times if and only if it has an ergodic invariant probability measure which is absolutely continuous with respect to the Riemannian volume and has all Lyapunov exponents positive. (author)

  19. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases

    Ave, M; Daumiller, K; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Luis, P Facal San; Gonzales, D; Hojvat, C; Hörandel, J R; Hrabovský, M; Iarlori, M; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuehn, F; Monasor, M; Nožka, L; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Ridky, J; Rizi, V; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Salamida, F; Schovánek, P; Šmida, R; Spinka, H; Ulrich, A; Verzi, V; Williams, C

    2011-01-01

    We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

  20. A luminescent molecular thermometer for long-term absolute temperature measurements at the nanoscale

    Brites, Carlos; Lima, Patricia; Silva, Nuno Joâo O.; Millán, Ángel; Amaral, Vitor S.; Palacio, Fernando; Carlos, Luis D.

    2010-01-01

    A unique Eu3+/Tb3+ luminescent self-referencing nanothermometer allowing absolute measurements in the 10–350 K temperature range and sub-micrometer spatial resolution is reported (see Figure). It has up to 4.9%·K−1 temperature sensitivity and high photostability for long-term use. The combination of molecular thermometry, superparamagnetism and luminescence in a nanometric host matrix provides multifunctionality opening the way for new exciting applications.

  1. Identification of radionuclide in radioactivity measurement with imaging plate

    In this paper, we describe the application of Imaging Plate (IP) to in-situ detection and distribution measurement of extremely low level radioactivity, such as slightly contaminated floor surface, lab-wear and lab-shoes in a controlled area or the natural radioactivity on the surfaces of various materials, and identification methods of the nuclide species. (J.P.N.)

  2. Frequency comparison and absolute frequency measurement of I{sub 2}-stabilized lasers at 532 nm

    Nevsky, A.Yu. [Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany)]|[Inst. of Laser Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Holzwarth, R.; Reichert, J.; Udem, T.; Haensch, T.W.; Zanthier, J. von; Walther, H. [Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Schnatz, H.; Riehle, F. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Pokasov, P.V.; Skvortsov, M.N.; Bagayev, S.N. [Inst. of Laser Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    We present a frequency comparison and an absolute frequency measurement of two independent I{sub 2}-stabilized frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers at 532 nm, one set up at the Institute of Laser Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, the other at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany. The absolute frequency of the I{sub 2}-stabilized lasers was determined using a CH{sub 4}-stabilized He-Ne laser as a reference. This laser had been calibrated prior to the measurement by an atomic cesium fountain clock. The frequency chain linking phase-coherently the two frequencies made use of the frequency comb of a Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser where the comb mode separation was controlled by a local cesium atomic clock. A new value for the R(56)32-0:a{sub 10} component, recommended by the Comite International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) for the realization of the metre, was obtained with reduced uncertainty. Absolute frequencies of the R(56)32-0 and P(54)32-0 iodine absorption lines together with the hyperfine line separations were measured.

  3. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10-7 or better, resulting in a resolution of ±25 μm for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented

  4. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry.

    Le Floch, Sébastien; Salvadé, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10(-7) or better, resulting in a resolution of +/-25 microm for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented. PMID:18516123

  5. A flowrate measurement method by counting of radioactive particles suspended in a liquid

    By external counting of fine #betta# emitting radioactive particles suspended in a liquid, the flowrate in a system of pipes can be measured. The study comprises three phases: 1. - The hydraulic validity of the method is demonstrated in laminar as well as in turbulent flow under certain conditions of particles size and density and of liquid viscosity. 2. - Radioactive labelling of microspheres of serumalbumin or ion exchange resins with indium 113m delivered by a generator Tin 113 → Indium 113m. 3. - Counting with a scintillation detector: a method of threshold overstepping is experimented with a mechanical or electronic simulator; the statistical study of particle superposition under the detector enables a correction for the resulting counting losses to be proposed. The method provides absolute measurements, but is particularly suitable to measure relative flowrates in a hydraulic network. It can be continuous and does not perturb the flow and the network. The accuracy of the method is analysed in details

  6. LHCb: A novel method for an absolute luminosity measurement at LHCb using beam-gas imaging

    Barschel, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to measure the absolute luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using beam-gas interactions has been successfully used in the LHCb experiment. A gas injection device (SMOG) has been installed in the LHCb experiment to increase the pressure around the interaction point during dedicated fills. The Beam Gas Imaging method (BGI) has now the potential to surpass the accuracy of the commonly used van der Meer scan method (VDM). This poster presents the principles of the Beam Gas Imaging method used to measure the beam overlap integral. Furthermore the gas injection increased the accuracy measurement of the so-called ghost charges and also intensities per bunch.

  7. Results of radioactivity measurements on foodstuffs in Romania

    There are presented the results of gamma-spectrometric measurements performed between 1986-1995 on: milk and dairy products; meat and meat products; fish; wheat flour; fresh fruits and vegetables. The foodstuffs are sampled from some representative areas like: Bucharest, Bechet (affected by Kozloduj NPP, Bulgaria), Cernavoda, middle of Transylvania, Neamt. The radioactivity measurements are performed by high-resolution γ-ray spectrometry. There are identified and analysed mainly 134Cs, 137Cs, 40K and, sometimes, other radionuclides. There are pointed out: the constancy of natural radionuclides amounts; the drastic increasing in radioactive concentration in May 1986; the seasonal variation of radioactivity in some food items; the time - exponential diminution of radioactivity in 1991-1995; and the maximum permitted levels of radioactive contamination of foodstuffs following a nuclear accident. (author)

  8. Modelling and measurement of the absolute level of power radiated by antenna integrated THz UTC photodiodes.

    Natrella, Michele; Liu, Chin-Pang; Graham, Chris; van Dijk, Frederic; Liu, Huiyun; Renaud, Cyril C; Seeds, Alwyn J

    2016-05-30

    We determine the output impedance of uni-travelling carrier (UTC) photodiodes at frequencies up to 400 GHz by performing, for the first time, 3D full-wave modelling of detailed UTC photodiode structures. In addition, we demonstrate the importance of the UTC impedance evaluation, by using it in the prediction of the absolute power radiated by an antenna integrated UTC, over a broad frequency range and confirming the predictions by experimental measurements up to 185 GHz. This is done by means of 3D full-wave modelling and is only possible since the source (UTC) to antenna impedance match is properly taken into account. We also show that, when the UTC-to-antenna coupling efficiency is modelled using the classical junction-capacitance/series-resistance concept, calculated and measured levels of absolute radiated power are in substantial disagreement, and the maximum radiated power is overestimated by a factor of almost 7 dB. The ability to calculate the absolute emitted power correctly enables the radiated power to be maximised through optimisation of the UTC-to-antenna impedance match. PMID:27410104

  9. A Method for Measurement of Absolute Angular Position and Application in a Novel Electromagnetic Encoder System

    Zijian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the encoders, especially the sine-cosine magnetic ones, a new method to measure absolute angular position is proposed in the paper. In the method, the code disc of the encoder has only two circle tracks and each one was divided into N and (N-1 equal code cells. The cell angles, changing from 0° to 360° between any two neighboring code cells, are defined to represent any position on the code disc. The position value of the same point can be represented by different cell angle values of different tracks and the absolute angular position of the point can be obtained by the difference value between the cell angle value of the outer track and the inner one. To validate the correctness of the method theoretically, the derivation process of the method was provided. An electromagnetic encoder system was designed and the experimental platform was established to test the method. The experimental results indicate that the electromagnetic encoder can measure the absolute angular position. Besides, it shows that the method is easy to be realized in algorithm and can reduce computational complexity and decrease dimension of the encoder.

  10. Scanning Laser Polarimetry for Measurement of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Absolute, Advanced and Early Glaucoma

    Jen-Chia Tsai

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To detect differences in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL measurements inabsolute, advanced and early glaucoma with scanning laser polarimetry (TheNerve Fiber Analyzer GDx, and to assess the usefulness and limitations ofthis technique for longitudinal follow-up of glaucoma patients.Methods: This is a prospective, cross-sectional study. Twenty-one eyes of 21 patientswith absolute glaucoma, twenty-six eyes of 26 patients with advanced glaucomaand twenty-four eyes of 24 patients with early glaucoma were imagedusing scanning laser polarimetry. The twelve standard GDx measurementparameters were compared using ANOVA (analysis of variance and theTukey test.Results: No significant differences were demonstrated for any of the twelve GDxmeasurement parameters between absolute and advanced glaucoma cases.There were significant differences for some GDx parameters, including theGDx number (p < 0.0001 superior ratio (p < 0.0001, inferior ratio (p <0.0001, superior/nasal ratio (p < 0.0001, maximum modulation (p <0.0001, ellipse modulation (p < 0.0001 and inferior average (p = 0.001between early and advanced glaucoma, and, between early and absoluteglaucoma. Significant differences were demonstrated for the superior average(p = 0.01 parameter between early and absolute glaucoma, but notbetween early and advanced glaucoma.Conclusions: For follow-up of glaucoma progression, RNFL measurements using scanninglaser polarimetry are more useful in the early stage than in the advancedstage.

  11. Absolute X-ray emission cross section measurements of Fe K transitions

    Hell, Natalie; Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Boyce, Kevin R.; Grinberg, Victoria; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, Frederick Scott; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the absolute X-ray emission cross sections of K-shell transitions in highly charged L- and K-shell Fe ions using the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap and the NASA GSFC EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS). The cross sections are determined by using the ECS to simultaneously record the spectrum of the bound-bound K-shell transitions and the emission from radiative recombination from trapped Fe ions. The measured spectrum is then brought to an absolute scale by normalizing the measured flux in the radiative recombination features to their theoretical cross sections, which are well known. Once the spectrum is brought to an absolute scale, the cross sections of the K-shell transitions are determined. These measurements are made possible by the ECS, which consists of a 32 channel array, with 14 channels optimized for detecting high energy photons (hν > 10 keV) and 18 channels optimized for detecting low energy photons (hν collection area, relatively high energy resolution, and a large bandpass; all properties necessary for this measurement technique to be successful. These data will be used to benchmark cross sections in the atomic reference data bases underlying the plasma modeling codes used to analyze astrophysical spectra, especially those measured by the Soft X-ray Spectrometer calorimeter instrument recently launched on the Hitomi X-ray Observatory.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and supported by NASA grants to LLNL and NASA/GSFC and by ESA under contract No. 4000114313/15/NL/CB.

  12. Absolute silicon molar mass measurements, the Avogadro constant and the redefinition of the kilogram

    Vocke, R. D., Jr.; Rabb, S. A.; Turk, G. C.

    2014-10-01

    The results of an absolute silicon molar mass determination of two independent sets of samples from the highly 28Si-enriched crystal (AVO28) produced by the International Avogadro Coordination are presented and compared with results published by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany), the National Research Council (NRC, Canada) and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ, Japan). This study developed and describes significant changes to the published protocols for producing absolute silicon isotope ratios. The measurements were made at very high resolution on a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer using tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to dissolve and dilute all samples. The various changes in the measurement protocol and the use of TMAH resulted in significant improvements to the silicon isotope ratio precision over previously reported measurements and in particular, the robustness of the 29Si/30Si ratio of the AVO28 material. These new results suggest that a limited isotopic variability is present in the AVO28 material. The presence of this variability is at present singular and therefore its significance is not well understood. Fortunately, its magnitude is small enough so as to have an insignificant effect on the overall uncertainty of an Avogadro constant derived from the average molar mass of all four AVO28 silicon samples measured in this study. The NIST results confirm the AVO28 molar mass values reported by PTB and NMIJ and confirm that the virtual element-isotope dilution mass spectrometry approach to calibrated absolute isotope ratio measurements developed by PTB is capable of very high precision as well as accuracy. The Avogadro constant NA and derived Planck constant h based on these measurements, together with their associated standard uncertainties, are 6.02214076(19) × 1023 mol-1 and 6.62607017(21) × 10-34 Js, respectively.

  13. Absolute measurement of {beta} activities and application to the determination of neutronic densities; Mesure absolue d'activites {beta} et application a la determination des densites neutronique

    Cohen, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1951-01-15

    M. Berthelot, to my entrance to the ''Commissariat a l 'Energie Atomique'', proposed me to study the absolute measurement of neutron densities. Very quickly the problem of the absolute activity of {beta} sources became the central object of this work. In a first part, we will develop the methods of absolute determination for {beta} activities. The use of a 4{pi} counter permits to get the absolute activity of all beta radioactive source, susceptible to be put as thin leaf and of period superior than some minutes. The method is independent of the spectra of the measured radioelement. we will describe in the second part some applications which use neutron densities measurement, neutron sources intensities and ratio of cross sections of capture of thermal neutrons. (M.B.) [French] M. Berthelot, a mon entree au ''Commissariat a l 'Energie Atomique'', m'a propose d'etudier la mesure absolue des densites neutroniques. Tres rapidement le probleme de l'activite absolue des sources beta est devenu l'objet central de ce travail. Dans une premiere partie, on abordera les methodes de determination absolue des activites beta. L'utilisation d'un compteur 4{pi} permet d 'obtenir l'activite absolue de toute source radioactive beta, susceptible d'etre mise sous forme de feuille mince et de periode superieure a quelques minutes. La methode est independante du spectre du radioelement mesure. On decrira dans la seconde partie quelques applications a des mesures de densites neutroniques, d'intensites de sources de neutrons et de rapport de sections efficaces de capture de neutrons thermiques. (M.B.)

  14. Characterization of Fricke-gel layers for absolute dose measurements in radiotherapy

    Gambarini, G. [Dept. of Physics, ' Universita degli Studi' of Milan, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); INFN Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Section Milan, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Carrara, M. [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Rrushi, B.; Guilizzoni, R. [Dept. of Physics, ' Universita degli Studi' of Milan, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Borroni, M.; Tomatis, S. [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Pirola, L. [Dept. of Physics, ' Universita degli Studi' of Milan, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Battistoni, G. [INFN Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Section Milan, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Fricke-gel layer dosimeters (FGLDs) have shown promising features for attaining absolute measurements of the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in radiotherapy. Good precision of results (within 3%) is achieved by means of calibration of each single dosimeter before measurement. The calibration is performed irradiating the dosimeter at a uniform and precisely known dose, in order to get a calibration matrix that must be used, with pixel-to-pixel manipulation, to obtain the dose image. A study of the trend in time of dosimeter response after one or more exposures was carried out and calibration protocols were suitably established and verified. (authors)

  15. A Model for Converting Solid State Fermentation Growth Profiles Between Absolute and Relative Measurement Bases

    Viccini, Graciele; Mitchell, David A; Krieger, Nadia

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for converting between the two measurement bases commonly used in the construction of growth profiles in solid-state fermentation, namely absolute mass ratio m(dry biomass)/m(initial dry matter) and relative mass ratio m(dry biomass)/m(dry matter). These are not equivalent, due to the loss of dry matter as CO2 during the fermentation. The model is equally applicable to any biomass component used in indirect measurements of growth, such as protein. Use of the ...

  16. Absolute Pulse Energy Measurements of Soft X-Rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Tiedtke, K.; Sorokin, Andrey; Soufli, R.; Fernández-Perea, M.; Juha, L.; Heimann, P.(Universität Siegen, Siegen, Germany); Nagler, B.; Lee, H. J.; Mack, S; Cammarata, M.; O. Krupin; Messerschmidt, M.; Jastrow, U.; Holmes, M.; Rowen, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by usin...

  17. Wave cutoff method to measure absolute electron density in cold plasma

    A method for precise measurements of absolute electron density in plasma using wave cutoff is described. This method of measurement uses a network analyzer with radiating and detecting antenna A microwave signal of 10 kHZ-3 GHz frequency is introduced into the plasma from a radiating port of the network analyzer and propagates in the plasma. The transmitted wave is monitored at a distance from a radiating antenna using an antenna connected to the receiving port of the network analyzer. The transmitted wave decays rapidly at a cutoff plasma frequency, which is a direct measure of the absolute electron density. This cutoff method is free of many difficulties often encountered with a Langmuir probe, such as thin film deposition and plasma potential fluctuation. The cutoff probe can also measure the spatial distribution of the electron density. The measurement technique is analyzed theoretically and experimentally, demonstrated in density measurements of an inductively coupled radio-frequency plasma, and is compared with the double probe and a plasma oscillation methods

  18. Radioactive contamination of edible mushrooms. Current measured values (State: 2013)

    The report includes the current measured values (2013) of the radioactive contamination of edible mushrooms in Southern Germany (Cs137 and K-40) and discusses the relation radio-cesium intake and radiation exposure now and and the future.

  19. Radioactivity Measurement of Short Life Nuclide 89Rb

    2008-01-01

    <正>The radioactivity of short life nuclide 89Rb produced by fast radiochemical separation was measured by the digital coincidence counting (DCC) system. In this experiment, there were a large quantity of impurities

  20. Deduction of interfering nuclides in radioactive measurement of 87Kr

    The radioactivity of short-lived nuclide 87Kr is interfered by 85mKr and 125Xe when it is measured by internal gas proportional counting. It is difficult to separate interfering nuclides from the gas sample. In this work, a series of data were measured according to the characteristic that different nuclides have different half-life, the radioactivity of 87Kr is obtained by calculating coefficients of linear equations by the least square method. (authors)

  1. Absolute Position of Targets Measured Through a Chamber Window Using Lidar Metrology Systems

    Kubalak, David; Hadjimichael, Theodore; Ohl, Raymond; Slotwinski, Anthony; Telfer, Randal; Hayden, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Lidar is a useful tool for taking metrology measurements without the need for physical contact with the parts under test. Lidar instruments are aimed at a target using azimuth and elevation stages, then focus a beam of coherent, frequency modulated laser energy onto the target, such as the surface of a mechanical structure. Energy from the reflected beam is mixed with an optical reference signal that travels in a fiber path internal to the instrument, and the range to the target is calculated based on the difference in the frequency of the returned and reference signals. In cases when the parts are in extreme environments, additional steps need to be taken to separate the operator and lidar from that environment. A model has been developed that accurately reduces the lidar data to an absolute position and accounts for the three media in the testbed air, fused silica, and vacuum but the approach can be adapted for any environment or material. The accuracy of laser metrology measurements depends upon knowing the parameters of the media through which the measurement beam travels. Under normal conditions, this means knowledge of the temperature, pressure, and humidity of the air in the measurement volume. In the past, chamber windows have been used to separate the measuring device from the extreme environment within the chamber and still permit optical measurement, but, so far, only relative changes have been diagnosed. The ability to make accurate measurements through a window presents a challenge as there are a number of factors to consider. In the case of the lidar, the window will increase the time-of-flight of the laser beam causing a ranging error, and refract the direction of the beam causing angular positioning errors. In addition, differences in pressure, temperature, and humidity on each side of the window will cause slight atmospheric index changes and induce deformation and a refractive index gradient within the window. Also, since the window is a

  2. A new Ultra Precision Interferometer for absolute length measurements down to cryogenic temperatures

    A new Ultra Precision Interferometer (UPI) was built at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. As its precursor, the precision interferometer, it was designed for highly precise absolute length measurements of prismatic bodies, e.g. gauge blocks, under well-defined temperature conditions and pressure, making use of phase stepping imaging interferometry. The UPI enables a number of enhanced features, e.g. it is designed for a much better lateral resolution and better temperature stability. In addition to the original concept, the UPI is equipped with an external measurement pathway (EMP) in which a prismatic body can be placed alternatively. The temperature of the EMP can be controlled in a much wider range compared to the temperature of the interferometer's main chamber. An appropriate cryostat system, a precision temperature measurement system and improved imaging interferometry were established to permit absolute length measurements down to cryogenic temperature, demonstrated for the first time ever. Results of such measurements are important for studying thermal expansion of materials from room temperature towards less than 10 K. (paper)

  3. Radioactivity measuring system of labelled biopolymers

    System for determining the radioactivity of labelled biopolymers, comprising a bank of containers filled with aqueous solutions of biological samples containing biopolymers. This system features an electric drive to move the bank of containers step by step; a device for the acid precipitation of the biopolymers which sends determined amounts of co-precipitant and diatom suspension in an acid solution to the containers containing a biological sample; a system for taking precipitated samples from the containers; a system for filtering the precipitated biopolymers carrying out successive filterings; placing the deposit into suspension; dissolving the biopolymers and sending the labelled mixture labelled by the scintillation labeller to the detection chamber

  4. Camera-based speckle noise reduction for 3-D absolute shape measurements.

    Zhang, Hao; Kuschmierz, Robert; Czarske, Jürgen; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-05-30

    Simultaneous position and velocity measurements enable absolute 3-D shape measurements of fast rotating objects for instance for monitoring the cutting process in a lathe. Laser Doppler distance sensors enable simultaneous position and velocity measurements with a single sensor head by evaluating the scattered light signals. The superposition of several speckles with equal Doppler frequency but random phase on the photo detector results in an increased velocity and shape uncertainty, however. In this paper, we present a novel image evaluation method that overcomes the uncertainty limitations due to the speckle effect. For this purpose, the scattered light is detected with a camera instead of single photo detectors. Thus, the Doppler frequency from each speckle can be evaluated separately and the velocity uncertainty decreases with the square root of the number of camera lines. A reduction of the velocity uncertainty by the order of one magnitude is verified by the numerical simulations and experimental results, respectively. As a result, the measurement uncertainty of the absolute shape is not limited by the speckle effect anymore. PMID:27410133

  5. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Dance Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n ,γ ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n ,f ) resonance at En ,R=7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the cross section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section at the En ,R=2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4 % of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30 % lower than the evaluated data at En≈1 keV and are approximately 2 σ away from the previous measurement at En≈20 keV.

  6. Absolute efficiency measurements with the {sup 10}B based Jalousie detector

    Modzel, G., E-mail: modzel@physi.uni-heidelberg [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Henske, M. [CDT CASCADE Detector Technologies GmbH, Hans-Bunte-Str. 8–10, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Houben, A. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Landoltweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Klein, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); CDT CASCADE Detector Technologies GmbH, Hans-Bunte-Str. 8–10, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Köhli, M.; Lennert, P. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Meven, M. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), 85747 Garching (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS), Outstation at MLZ, 85747 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, C.J. [CDT CASCADE Detector Technologies GmbH, Hans-Bunte-Str. 8–10, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Detector Laboratory, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schmidt, U. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schweika, W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS), 52425 Jülich (Germany); European Spallation Source ESS AB, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-04-11

    The {sup 10}B based Jalousie detector is a replacement for {sup 3}He counter tubes, which are nowadays less affordable for large area detectors due to the {sup 3}He crisis. In this paper we investigate and verify the performance of the new {sup 10}B based detector concept and its adoption for the POWTEX diffractometer, which is designed for the detection of thermal neutrons with predicted detection efficiencies of 75–50% for neutron energies of 10–100 meV, respectively. The predicted detection efficiency has been verified by absolute measurements using neutrons with a wavelength of 1.17 Å (59 meV)

  7. Absolute beam flux measurement at NDCX-I using gold-melting calorimetry technique

    We report on an alternative way to measure the absolute beam flux at the NDCX-I, LBNL linear accelerator. Up to date, the beam flux is determined from the analysis of the beam-induced optical emission from a ceramic scintilator (Al-Si). The new approach is based on calorimetric technique, where energy flux is deduced from the melting dynamics of a gold foil. We estimate an average 260 kW/cm2 beam flux over 5 (micro)s, which is consistent with values provided by the other methods. Described technique can be applied to various ion species and energies.

  8. Absolute measurement of $sup 235$U fission cross-section for 2200 m/sec neutrons

    Borcea, C.; Borza, A.; Buta, A.

    1973-12-31

    The results of an absolute fission cross-section measurement of /sup 235/ U are presented; the thermal neutrons were selected by the time-of-flight method. The principle of the method and the experimental apparatus are described. The method had the advantage of avoiding the use of an intermediate cross section in the neutron flux determination by choice of a B target thick enough to absorb all thermal neutrons. Target preparation, efficiency determination, corrections, etc., are reported. The value determined was 581.7 plus or minus 7.8 barns. (6 figures, 4 tables) (RWR)

  9. Measurement of the absolute values of cross-sections in neutron photoproduction (1962)

    The absolute values of photoneutrons production cross-sections for the case of intermediate and heavy nuclei (lanthanium, cerium, tantalum, gold, lead and bismuth) are determined with an error of 15 per cent. The results obtained agree with theories in which the giant resonance is explained by the collective motion of the protons against the neutrons. The effect of the nuclear deformation on the shape of the giant resonance is seen in the case of Ta181, it will be possible to determine the quadrupole momenta of deformed nuclei with a good accuracy when we shall increase the statistics of measurements. (author)

  10. Absolute Measurement of Hadronic Branching Fractions of the D_s^+ Meson

    Alexander, J; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L

    2008-01-01

    The branching fractions of D_s meson decays serve to normalize many measurements of processes involving charm quarks. Using 298 /pb of e+ e- collisions recorded at a center of mass energy of 4.17 GeV, we determine absolute branching fractions for eight D_s decays with a double tag technique. In particular we determine the branching fraction B(D_s -> K- K+ pi+) = (5.50 +- 0.23 +- 0.16)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic respectively. We also provide partial branching fractions for kinematic subsets of the K- K+ pi+ decay mode.

  11. A Method for Measurement of Absolute Angular Position and Application in a Novel Electromagnetic Encoder System

    Zijian Zhang; Yangyang Dong; Fenglei Ni; Minghe Jin; Hong Liu

    2015-01-01

    For the encoders, especially the sine-cosine magnetic ones, a new method to measure absolute angular position is proposed in the paper. In the method, the code disc of the encoder has only two circle tracks and each one was divided into N and (N-1) equal code cells. The cell angles, changing from 0° to 360° between any two neighboring code cells, are defined to represent any position on the code disc. The position value of the same point can be represented by different cell angle values of di...

  12. Improved Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of the Ds+ Meson

    Onyisi, P U E; Cinabro, D; Smith, M J; Zhou, P; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Edwards, K W; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Das, S; Ehrlich, R; Gibbons, L; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Sun, W M; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Lowrey, N; Mehrabyan, S; Selen, M; Wiss, J; Libby, J; Kornicer, M; Mitchell, R E; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Hietala, J; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Powell, A; Thomas, C; Wilkinson, G; Asner, D M; Tatishvili, G; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Napolitano, J; Ecklund, K M; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Pearson, L J; Thorndike, E H; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M

    2013-01-01

    The branching fractions of Ds meson decays serve to normalize many measurements of processes involving charm quarks. Using 586 pb^-1 of e+ e- collisions recorded at a center of mass energy of 4.17 GeV, we determine absolute branching fractions for 13 Ds decays in 16 reconstructed final states with a double tag technique. In particular we make a precise measurement of the branching fraction B(Ds -> K- K+ pi+) = (5.55 +- 0.14 +- 0.13)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic respectively. We find a significantly reduced value of B(Ds -> pi+ pi0 eta') compared to the world average, and our results bring the inclusively and exclusively measured values of B(Ds -> eta' X)$ into agreement. We also search for CP-violating asymmetries in Ds decays and measure the cross-section of e+ e- -> Ds* Ds at Ecm = 4.17 GeV.

  13. Common mistakes associated with absolute full energy peak efficiency measurements using high pure germanium detectors

    The present work focuses on the uncertainties associated with absolute full energy peak efficiency (AFEPE) when measurements of calibration point sources conducted at various distances from two high pure germanium detectors (HPGe) from Ortec and Eurisys. A set consists of 11 point sources from Amersham were used. The measurements were performed at different source to detector distances. All the spectra were unfolded and analyzed using Emc plus MCA card from Silena. Full energy peak efficiency for each energy was then calculated using the well-know formula. The first approach was to fit the experimental data using least square fitting. Following that, a comparison between the experimental and calculated results was performed. The scattering data due to measurements of the multi-energetic sources specially when measurements carried out at very close distances from the detector were plotted and discussed.(author)

  14. Utilization of coincidence criteria in absolute length measurements by optical interferometry in vacuum and air

    Traceability of length measurements to the international system of units (SI) can be realized by using optical interferometry making use of well-known frequencies of monochromatic light sources mentioned in the Mise en Pratique for the realization of the metre. At some national metrology institutes, such as Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany, the absolute length of prismatic bodies (e.g. gauge blocks) is realized by so-called gauge-block interference comparators. At PTB, a number of such imaging phase-stepping interference comparators exist, including specialized vacuum interference comparators, each equipped with three highly stabilized laser light sources. The length of a material measure is expressed as a multiple of each wavelength. The large number of integer interference orders can be extracted by the method of exact fractions in which the coincidence of the lengths resulting from the different wavelengths is utilized as a criterion. The unambiguous extraction of the integer interference orders is an essential prerequisite for correct length measurements. This paper critically discusses coincidence criteria and their validity for three modes of absolute length measurements: 1) measurements under vacuum in which the wavelengths can be identified with the vacuum wavelengths, 2) measurements under air in which the air refractive index is obtained from environmental parameters using an empirical equation, and 3) measurements under air in which the air refractive index is obtained interferometrically by utilizing a vacuum cell placed along the measurement pathway. For case 3), which corresponds to PTB’s Kösters-Comparator for long gauge blocks, the unambiguous determination of integer interference orders related to the air refractive index could be improved by about a factor of ten when an ‘overall dispersion value,’ suggested in this paper, is used as coincidence criterion. (paper)

  15. Measurements of radioactive dust in high altitude air

    The radioactivities of airborne dust in samples were measured. The samples had been collected at high altitude by the Japan Air Self-Defense Force from April 2009 to March 2010. The data were obtained for the gross beta activity, gamma nuclide determination and radiochemical analysis. It was shown that there was no appreciable difference between the activity levels of this time and in the year before. Seasonal variations were not very pronounced. It is found that the radioactivity has been stable at a low level at high altitude. Radioactive gas (gaseous radioiodine) was not detected. (author)

  16. Measurements of radioactive dusts in high altitude air

    The radioactively of airborne dust in samples collected by aircraft of the Japan Air Self-Defense Force at high altitude during the period between April 2001 to March 2002 were measured. The data of the gross beta activity, gamma nuclide determination and radiochemical analysis show that there is no appreciable difference from the activity levels of the year before. Seasonal variations are becoming less pronounced and this shows that the low level radioactivity at high altitude is stable. Radioactive gas (gaseous radioiodine) was not detected. (author)

  17. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA (invited)

    A neutron spectrometer, called a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS), has been built and implemented at the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] for absolute measurements of the neutron spectrum in the range of 6-30 MeV, from which fuel areal density (ρR), ion temperature (Ti), and yield (Yn) can be determined. The results from the first MRS measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum are presented. In addition, measuring ρR at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will be essential for assessing implosion performance during all stages of development from surrogate implosions to cryogenic fizzles to ignited implosions. To accomplish this, we are also developing an MRS for the NIF. As much of the research and development and instrument optimization of the MRS at OMEGA are directly applicable to the MRS at the NIF, a description of the design and characterization of the MRS on the NIF is discussed as well.

  18. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) at OMEGA

    A new type of neutron spectrometer, called a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), has been built and implemented at the OMEGA laser facility (T. R. Boehly. D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)) for absolute measurements of the neutron spectrum in the range 6 to 30 MeV, from which fuel areal density (ρR), ion temperature (Ti) and yield (Yn) can be determined. The results from the first MRS measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum are presented. In addition, measuring ρR at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) (G.H. Miller, E.I. Moses and C.R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)) will be essential for assessing implosion performance during all stages of development from surrogate implosions to cryogenic fizzles and ignited implosions. To accomplish this, we are also developing an MRS for the NIF. As much of the R and D and instrument optimization of the MRS at OMEGA is directly applicable to the MRS at the NIF, a description of the MRS design on the NIF is discussed as well

  19. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) at OMEGA

    Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Rygg, J R; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Hatchett, S; Haan, S; Cerjan, C; Landen, O; Moran, M; Song, P; Wilson, D C; Leeper, R J

    2008-05-12

    A new type of neutron spectrometer, called a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), has been built and implemented at the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly. D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] for absolute measurements of the neutron spectrum in the range 6 to 30 MeV, from which fuel areal density ({rho}R), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and yield (Y{sub n}) can be determined. The results from the first MRS measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum are presented. In addition, measuring {rho}R at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G.H. Miller, E.I. Moses and C.R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will be essential for assessing implosion performance during all stages of development from surrogate implosions to cryogenic fizzles and ignited implosions. To accomplish this, we are also developing an MRS for the NIF. As much of the R&D and instrument optimization of the MRS at OMEGA is directly applicable to the MRS at the NIF, a description of the MRS design on the NIF is discussed as well.

  20. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA (invited).

    Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Rygg, J R; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Hatchett, S; Haan, S; Cerjan, C; Landen, O; Moran, M; Song, P; Wilson, D C; Leeper, R J

    2008-10-01

    A neutron spectrometer, called a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS), has been built and implemented at the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] for absolute measurements of the neutron spectrum in the range of 6-30 MeV, from which fuel areal density (rhoR), ion temperature (T(i)), and yield (Y(n)) can be determined. The results from the first MRS measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum are presented. In addition, measuring rhoR at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will be essential for assessing implosion performance during all stages of development from surrogate implosions to cryogenic fizzles to ignited implosions. To accomplish this, we are also developing an MRS for the NIF. As much of the research and development and instrument optimization of the MRS at OMEGA are directly applicable to the MRS at the NIF, a description of the design and characterization of the MRS on the NIF is discussed as well. PMID:19044488

  1. Absolute fission rate measurement of 238U induced by 14 MeV neutrons penetrated composite material

    In order to prove the model calculation method and parameter, the 238U absolute fission rate in the case of 14 MeV neutrons penetrating through the special composite material was measured by minitype slab uranium fission chambers. The measuring spots are distributed in the surface of iron ball hull along the different position of equator. The calculated results are compared with the experiment results. The total error of measured 238U absolute fission rate is 6.1%. (author)

  2. Measurement of environmental radioactivity by imaging plate

    A photostimulable phosphor screen imaging technique has been developed to detect radioactive contamination on surface of Mugwort leaves due to JCO criticality accident. The imaging plate (IP) is well known to have many striking performances of two-dimensional radiation detection. IP has been extensively applied to surface contamination distribution studies since IP, is an integrated detection. Plant samples were collected in the surrounding areas of the uranium conversion facility of JCO Company Limited, Tokai, Ibaraki, Japan. The highest photo-stimulated luminescence density of IP of the nuclides was found in samples collected near the ventilation exhaust. The radionuclides detected in leaves by γ-ray spectroscopy were 131I, 133I, 140Ba, - 140La, and 137Cs and β-ray spectroscopy was 89Sr. In order to assess contamination, comparison has been made with leaves affected due to Chernobyl nuclear accident. (author)

  3. Measurement of total body radioactivity in man

    Techniques for the determination of whole-body radioactivity in man using uncollimated NaI(Tl) detectors have been studied. Geometrical effects and photon attenuation effects due to the different shapes of humans as well as due to varying in-vivo radioactivity distributions have been evaluated particularly for scanning-bed geometries and the chair geometry. Theoretically it is shown that the attenuation effects are generally dominating, for full-energy-peak pulse-range methods. For the application in radiation protection a cheap and simple chair-geometry unit has been constructed and used at various places distantly from the home-laboratory, for studies of body activity of Cs-137 in northern Sweden. High body activities were found particularly in reindeer-breeding Lapps. The elimination rate of Cs-137 in man was studied in the stationary whole-body counter in Lund as well as with the field-system. For the study of the performances at low and high photon energies clinical applications of methods for gastro-intestinal absorption of vitamin B12 (Co-57; 122 keV) and total body potassium determination (K-40; 1.46 MeV, K-42; 1.52 MeV) have been evaluated. Theoretical and experimental results as well as experiences of applications in radiation protection and medicine show that the scanning-bed geometry effectively evens out redistributional effects. For optimum results, however, scatter-energy pulse-ranges rather than full-energy-peak ranges should be used. (Auth.)

  4. Natural radioactivity measurements at the proposed nuclear power plant site

    Natural radioactivity measurement in the Philippines aims to establish baseline radioactivity levels in the environment of items essential to man. In this article, results of the environmental surveillance conducted in Bagac, Bataan from 1973 to 1974 are presented. Analyses were made on air parti-culates, sea and fresh water, grass, and soil samples for gross beta-gamma activities. Results obtained showed activity levels below the maximum permissible concentration recommended by the International Committee on Radiation Protection (ICRP)

  5. Superharp — A wire scanner with absolute position readout for beam energy measurement at CEBAF

    Yan, C.; Adderley, P.; Barker, D.; Beaufait, J.; Capek, K.; Carlini, R.; Dahlberg, J.; Feldl, E.; Jordan, K.; Kross, B.; Oren, W.; Wojcik, R.; VanDyke, J.

    1995-02-01

    The CEBAF superharp is an upgraded beam wire scanner which provides absolute beam position readout using a shaft encoder. Superharps allow for high precision measurements of the beam's profile and position ( Δx ˜ 10 μm). The Hall C endstation at CEBAF will use three pairs of superharps to perform beam energy measurements with 10 -3 accuracy. The three pairs are installed at the beginning, the mid-point and the end of the Hall C arc beamline. Using superharps in conjunction with a dual sensor system: the direct current pick-up and the bremsstrahlung detectors, beam profile measurements can be obtained over a wide beam current range of 1 ˜ 200 μA.

  6. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE POLARIZATION OF HIGH ENERGY PROTON BEAMS AT RHIC

    MAKDISI,Y.; BRAVAR, A. BUNCE, G. GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires knowledge of the beam polarization to better than 5%. Such a goal is made the more difficult by the lack of knowledge of the analyzing power of high energy nuclear physics processes. To overcome this, a polarized hydrogen jet target was constructed and installed at one intersection region in RHIC where it intersects both beams and utilizes the precise knowledge of the jet atomic hydrogen beam polarization to measure the analyzing power in proton-proton elastic scattering in the Nuclear Coulomb Interference (CNI) region at the prescribed RHIC proton beam energy. The reverse reaction is used to assess the absolute beam polarization. Simultaneous measurements taken with fast high statistics polarimeters that measure the p-Carbon elastic scattering process also in the CNI region use the jet results to calibrate the latter.

  7. Absolute measurement of the relativistic magnetic dipole transition energy in heliumlike argon.

    Amaro, Pedro; Schlesser, Sophie; Guerra, Mauro; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Isac, Jean-Michel; Travers, Pascal; Santos, José Paulo; Szabo, Csilla I; Gumberidze, Alexandre; Indelicato, Paul

    2012-07-27

    The 1s2s (3)S(1)→1s(2) (1)S(0) relativistic magnetic dipole transition in heliumlike argon, emitted by the plasma of an electron-cyclotron resonance ion source, has been measured using a double-flat crystal x-ray spectrometer. Such a spectrometer, used for the first time on a highly charged ion transition, provides absolute (reference-free) measurements in the x-ray domain. We find a transition energy of 3104.1605(77) eV (2.5 ppm accuracy). This value is the most accurate, reference-free measurement done for such a transition and is in good agreement with recent QED predictions. PMID:23006085

  8. Sonographic Measurement of Absolute and Relative Renal Length in Healthy Isfahani Adults

    A Hekmatnia

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no information on renal size and its relation to age, sex and height in the area of Isfahan. The aim of this study was to define sonographically measured absolute renal lengths and their relations to height in normal Isfahani adults. Methods: 400 healthy Isfahani subjects aged 20 to 69 years with normal blood pressure, no history of renal disease in them or their first degree relatives and with normal sonographic appearance were chosen in 2002-2003. The study was cross-sectional. With real-time sonography, absolute renal length was measured. Results: Four hundred healthy adults (230 men and 170 women aged 20 to 69 years (39.6 ± 13.6 year were evaluated. The length of left kidney was longer than the right one (111 ± 9.8 mm vs. 109 ± 8.4 mm in right kidney; P < 0.01. Renal length was significantly greater in males compared to females (P < 0.01. Renal length decreased with age and the rate of decrease was accelerated at the age of 60 years and older. There was a significant correlation between kidney length and the subject's height (P < 0.01. Conclusion: The result of this study shows the normal values for renal length in Iranian males and females, which may be helpful in assessing the size of patients’ kidneys in different clinical settings. Keywords: Kidney size, Renal length, Ultrasonography, Normal values.

  9. Relative vs. absolute physiological measures as predictors of mountain bike cross-country race performance.

    Gregory, John; Johns, David P; Walls, Justin T

    2007-02-01

    The aims of this study were to document the effect terrain has on the physiological responses and work demands (power output) of riding a typical mountain bike cross-country course under race conditions. We were particularly interested in determining whether physiological measures relative to mass were better predictors of race performance than absolute measures. Eleven A-grade male cross-country mountain bike riders (VO2max 67.1 +/- 3.6 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) performed 2 tests: a laboratory-based maximum progressive exercise test, and a 15.5-km (six 2.58-km laps) mountain bike cross-country time trial. There were significant differences among the speed, cadence, and power output measured in each of 8 different terrain types found in the cross-country time trial course. The highest average speed was measured during the 10-15% downhill section (22.7 +/- 2.6 km x h(-1)), whereas the cadence was highest in the posttechnical flat sections (74.3 +/- 5.6 rpm) and lowest on the 15-20% downhill sections (6.4 +/- 12.1 rpm). The highest mean heart rate (HR) was obtained during the steepest (15-20% incline) section of the course (179 +/- 8 b x min(-1)), when the power output was greatest (419.8 +/- 39.7 W). However, HR remained elevated relative to power output in the downhill sections of the course. Physiological measures relative to total rider mass correlated more strongly to average course speed than did absolute measures (peak power relative to mass r = 0.93, p < 0.01, vs. peak power r = 0.64, p < 0.05; relative VO2max r = 0.80, p < 0.05, vs. VO2max r = 0.66, p < 0.05; power at anaerobic threshold relative to mass r = 0.78, p < 0.05, vs. power at anaerobic threshold r = 0.5, p < 0.05). This suggests that mountain bike cross-country training programs should focus upon improving relative physiological values rather than focusing upon maximizing absolute values to improve performance. PMID:17313256

  10. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  11. Radiation Protection Research: Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    Hurtgen, C

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advice the nuclear and non-nuclear industry in matters concerning radioactive contamination and/or low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain the quality assurance system according to the EN45001 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 1999 are reported. Particular emphasis is SCK-CEN's contribution to the EULEP-EURADOS Action Group on 'Derivation of parameter values for application in the new model of the human respiratory tract for occupational exposure'.

  12. Absolute absorption cross-section measurements of ozone in the wavelength region 238-335 nm and the temperature dependence

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    The absolute absorption cross-section of ozone has been experimentally determined at the temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K at several discrete wavelengths in the 238-335-nm region. The present results for ozone at 295 K are found to be in agreement with those of Hearn (1961). Absolute cross-section measurements of ozone at 195 K have confirmed previous (Freeman et al., 1984) relative cross-section measurements throughout the 240-335-nm region.

  13. Measured radioactivity data acquisition and evaluation system (REA)

    In Germany, authorities in the Federal States are obliged to monitor the environment for radioactivity. Various institutions run radioactivity measurements for this purpose. The measured results are made available to the competent authorities in a variety of ways. Computer systems are now used for central collection and evaluation of these data. LfU has developed a concept to support by DP technologies also the procedures between the measurement site and the central authority. This facilitates data acquisition and speeds up data transmission. The REA concept will streamline procedures and improve data quality. (orig.)

  14. Measurements of radioactive dusts in high altitude air

    The radioactivities of the airborne dusts were measured in samples collected by aircrafts of the Japan Air Self-Defense Force in high altitude during the period between April 2000 and March 2001. From June 2000 the newly designed filters composed of electret filter and fibrous activated carbon filter were used to collect air suspended dust and radioactive gas at the same time. The data of the gross beta activities, gamma nuclide determination and radiochemical analysis show that there is no appreciable difference from the activity levels of the year before and seasonal variations are becoming not so clear, that shows the radioactivities in high altitude is stable in a low level. Radioactive gas (gaseous radioiodine) was not detected. (author)

  15. Application of the 4 pigammaMethod to the Absolute Standardization of Radioactive Sources of Positron Emitters

    We discuss the application of the method known as 4 pigammacountingto the standardization of positron emitters. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the detection efficiency of positrons emitted by the nuclides 22Na and 18F. Two experimental setups are used, both based on a NaI(Tl) well detector. The results of the standardizations are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. It is shown that the 4 pigammamethod can be successfully used for the absolute standardization of sources of positron emitters. (Author) 23 refs

  16. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm band in atmospheric gases

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Curry, E.; Di Carlo, P.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Li, S.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; Rouille D'Orfeuil, B.; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2013-02-01

    A measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm nitrogen band, relevant to ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) detectors, is reported. Two independent calibrations of the fluorescence emission induced by a 120 GeV proton beam were employed: Cherenkov light from the beam particle and calibrated light from a nitrogen laser. The fluorescence yield in air at a pressure of 1013 hPa and temperature of 293 K was found to be Y337=5.61±0.06stat±0.22syst photons/MeV. When compared to the fluorescence yield currently used by UHECR experiments, this measurement improves the uncertainty by a factor of three, and has a significant impact on the determination of the energy scale of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  17. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Magoon, J; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M; Ulreich, J; Ashabranner, R C; Bionta, R M; Carpenter, A C; Felker, B; Khater, H Y; LePape, S; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Rygg, J R; Yeoman, M F; Zacharias, R; Leeper, R J; Fletcher, K; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J; Paguio, R

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF. PMID:23635195

  18. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  19. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2013-04-15

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  20. Measurement of absolute reaction rates in Be,Pb and Fe spherical systems

    LiuRong; ChenYuan; 等

    1998-01-01

    The absolute reaction rates in Be,Pb and Fe have been measured by using the activation foil technique with different reaction energy thresholds.Thicknesses of Be,Pb and Fe spheres were 5.3,19.1 and 31.9cm.respectively,Eight kinds of activation folis were used for Fe,and four kinds each for Be and Pb,The total experimental er5ror was about 5-7%.The measured results were compared to the values calculated with the 1-D ANISN code and the ENDF/B-VI library data.The average ratio of the experimental to the calculational is less than 7% for Be and Pb,about 5-30% for Fe.

  1. Absolute alpha activity measurements of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils in Sri Lanka

    Mahawatte, P.; Hewamanna, R. (Colombo Univ. (Sri Lanka). Radioisotope Centre)

    1991-01-01

    Deposits of monazite bearing soils occur along the Southwest, West and East Coasts of Sri Lanka. High levels of gamma activity in some plant species growing in the West Coast have been reported. The high levels were due to the presence of the daughter nuclides of {sup 232}Th, most of which are alpha emitters. Absolute alpha activity measurements of ash samples of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils were carried out using the alpha sensitive polymeric nuclear track detector CR-39. The values ranged from 60-1900 mBq/g and were in good agreement with the values obtained from conventional scintillation counting method. The activity concentration of {sup 228}Th in the ash samples was also calculated by measuring the activity concentration of emanated thoron trapped inside a glass bottle with the use of a CR-39 track detector. (author).

  2. Absolute alpha activity measurements of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils in Sri Lanka

    Deposits of monazite bearing soils occur along the Southwest, West and East Coasts of Sri Lanka. High levels of gamma activity in some plant species growing in the West Coast have been reported. The high levels were due to the presence of the daughter nuclides of 232Th, most of which are alpha emitters. Absolute alpha activity measurements of ash samples of some plants growing in monazite bearing soils were carried out using the alpha sensitive polymeric nuclear track detector CR-39. The values ranged from 60-1900 mBq/g and were in good agreement with the values obtained from conventional scintillation counting method. The activity concentration of 228Th in the ash samples was also calculated by measuring the activity concentration of emanated thoron trapped inside a glass bottle with the use of a CR-39 track detector. (author)

  3. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm band in atmospheric gases

    Ave, M; Curry, E; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Luis, P Facal San; Gonzales, D; Hojvat, C; Hörandel, J; Hrabovsky, M; Iarlori, M; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuehn, F; Li, S; Monasor, M; Nozka, L; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Ridky, J; Rizi, V; D'Orfeuil, B Rouille; Salamida, F; Schovanek, P; Smida, R; Spinka, H; Ulrich, A; Verzi, V; Williams, C

    2012-01-01

    A measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm nitrogen band, relevant to ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) detectors, is reported. Two independent calibrations of the fluorescence emission induced by a 120 GeV proton beam were employed: Cherenkov light from the beam particle and calibrated light from a nitrogen laser. The fluorescence yield in air at a pressure of 1013 hPa and temperature of 293 K was found to be $Y_{337} = 5.61\\pm 0.06_{stat} \\pm 0.21_{syst}$ photons/MeV. When compared to the fluorescence yield currently used by UHECR experiments, this measurement improves the uncertainty by a factor of three, and has a significant impact on the determination of the energy scale of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  4. Evaluation of the systematic shifts and absolute frequency measurement of a single Ca+ ion frequency standard

    Huang, Yao; Liu, Peiliang; Bian, Wu; Guan, Hua; Gao, Kelin

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the 40Ca+ optical frequency standard uncertainty evaluation and the absolute frequency measurement of the clock transition, as a summary and supplement for the published papers of Yao Huang et al. (Phys Rev A 84:053841, 1) and Huang et al. (Phys Rev A 85:030503, 2). The calculation of systematic frequency shifts, expected for a single trapped Ca+ ion optical frequency standard with a "clock" transition at 729 nm is described. There are several possible causes of systematic frequency shifts that need to be considered. In general, the frequency was measured with an uncertainty of 10-15 level, and the overall systematic shift uncertainty was reduced to below a part in 10-15. Several frequency shifts were calculated for the Ca+ ion optical frequency standard, including the trap design, optical and electromagnetic fields geometry and laboratory conditions, including the temperature condition and the altitude of the Ca+ ion. And we measured the absolute frequency of the 729-nm clock transition at the 10-15 level. An fs comb is referenced to a hydrogen maser, which is calibrated to the SI-second through the Global Positioning System (GPS). Using the GPS satellites as a link, we can calculate the frequency difference of the two hydrogen masers with a long distance, one in WIPM (Wuhan) and the other in National Institute of Metrology (NIM, Beijing). The frequency difference of the hydrogen maser in NIM (Beijing) and the SI-second calculated by BIPM is published on the BIPM web site every 1 month, with a time interval of every 5 days. By analyzing the experimental data obtained within 32 days of a total averaging time of >2 × 106 s, the absolute frequency of the 40Ca+ 4 s 2 S 1/2-3 d 2D5/2 clock transition is measured as 411 042 129 776 393.0 (1.6) Hz with a fractional uncertainty of 3.9 × 10-15.

  5. A new method for the absolute radiance calibration for UV-vis measurements of scattered sunlight

    Wagner, T.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Penning de Vries, M.; Remmers, J.; Rozanov, A.; Shaiganfar, R.

    2015-10-01

    Absolute radiometric calibrations are important for measurements of the atmospheric spectral radiance. Such measurements can be used to determine actinic fluxes, the properties of aerosols and clouds, and the shortwave energy budget. Conventional calibration methods in the laboratory are based on calibrated light sources and reflectors and are expensive, time consuming and subject to relatively large uncertainties. Also, the calibrated instruments might change during transport from the laboratory to the measurement sites. Here we present a new calibration method for UV-vis instruments that measure the spectrally resolved sky radiance, for example zenith sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments or multi-axis (MAX)-DOAS instruments. Our method is based on the comparison of the solar zenith angle dependence of the measured zenith sky radiance with radiative transfer simulations. For the application of our method, clear-sky measurements during periods with almost constant aerosol optical depth are needed. The radiative transfer simulations have to take polarisation into account. We show that the calibration results are almost independent from the knowledge of the aerosol optical properties and surface albedo, which causes a rather small uncertainty of about < 7 %. For wavelengths below about 330 nm it is essential that the ozone column density during the measurements be constant and known.

  6. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  7. A pulse-recording system for radioactivity measurements

    The NIST Radioactivity Group is developing a computer-based pulse-recording system to use for radioactivity measurements. The system consists of a dual ADC module and a plug-in board for an industry-standard-architecture personal computer. The host computer (or another computer) can be programmed to simulate many different logic systems (coincidence, anticoincidence, selective sampling, correlation counting, etc.), so that the pulse data from a given measurement can be analyzed using a wide range of timing parameters and types of logic

  8. Measurement methodology of natural radioactivity in the thermal establishments

    The thermal baths have been identified as an activity susceptible to expose to ionizing radiations the workers through the natural sources of radon and radon 220. The new regulation obliges these facilities to realize radioactivity measurements. The principal ways of exposure are radon and its daughters inhalation,, exposure to gamma radiation, ingestion of radioelements in thermal waters. I.R.S.N. proposes two methods of measurements of the natural radioactivity in application to the regulation relative to the protection of persons and workers. Some principles to reduce exposure to radon are reminded. (N.C.)

  9. Study on measurement of trace radioactivity, (2)

    The method was worked out so as to measure 59Fe, 60Co, 65Zn, 95Zr, and 144Ce successively from the same sample by ion-exchange separation. This method was also applicable to the measurement of 90Sr and 137Cs. It was confirmed that 131I in milk could be measured satisfactorily by the method of US Atomic Energy Commission, when raw milk before processing was preserved in good condition. 3H in natural water can be measured with a gas magnifying counter without isotope concentration when water is transformed into hydrogen gas. It was found that an external heater type reactor is desirable to transform 3H in water into methane gas so far as the repair is concerned. The present reactor needs some improvement, however, to get better yield as the best synthesizing yield for methane gas obtained so far was only 48.8%. (Kobatake, H.)

  10. Anticoincidence and differential measuring arrangement for radioactive substances

    For discontinuous measurement of radioactive substances in air, water, food, soil samples, and for potash determination, anticoincidence and differential measuring arrangements with large-area counters are used. By a number of measures, the background is effectively reduced. With anticoincidence measuring arrangements, low alpha and beta activities may also be detected. With differential measurements, substances are measured whose activities are not extremely low. Further applications are simultaneous alpha and alpha/beta measurements and the specific measurement of the man-made alpha component in air. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of absolute minority species concentration and temperature in a flame by the photothermal deflection spectroscopy technique.

    Li, Yunjing; Gupta, Rajendra

    2003-04-20

    It is experimentally demonstrated that absolute concentrations of minority species in flames can be measured by the photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PTDS) technique. In addition, the PTDS signal simultaneously yields the flame temperature the measurement point. Absolute concentration profiles of OH have been measured in a flat-flame burner with methane as fuel. The PTDS measurements agree well with those obtained independently by the absorption technique. The flame temperature measurements by PTDS are also in good agreement with those obtained by the Boltzmann distribution among the rotational levels of OH. PMID:12716166

  12. Conversion of far ultraviolet to visible radiation: absolute measurements of the conversion efficiency of tetraphenyl butadiene

    Vest, Robert E.; Coplan, Michael A.; Clark, Charles W.

    Far ultraviolet (FUV) scintillation of noble gases is used in dark matter and neutrino research and in neutron detection. Upon collisional excitation, noble gas atoms recombine into excimer molecules that decay by FUV emission. Direct detection of FUV is difficult. Another approach is to convert it to visible light using a wavelength-shifting medium. One such medium, tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) can be vapor-deposited on substrates. Thus the quality of thin TPB films can be tightly controlled. We have measured the absolute efficiency of FUV-to-visible conversion by 1 μm-thick TPB films vs. FUV wavelengths between 130 and 300 nm, with 1 nm resolution. The energy efficiency of FUV to visible conversion varies between 1% and 5%. We make comparisons with other recent results. Work performed at the NIST SURF III Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility,.

  13. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-04-25

    The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  14. Absolute Polarization Measurements at RHIC in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference Region

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory provides polarized proton beams for the investigation of the nucleon spin structure. For polarimetry, carbon-proton and proton-proton scattering is used in the Coulomb nuclear interference region at small momentum transfer (-t). Fast polarization measurements of each beam are carried out with carbon fiber targets at several times during an accelerator store. A polarized hydrogen gas jet target is needed for absolute normalization over multiple stores, while the target polarization is constantly monitored in a Breit-Rabi polarimeter. In 2005, the jet polarimeter has been used with both RHIC beams. We present results from the jet polarimeter including a detailed analysis of background contributions to asymmetries and to the beam polarization

  15. Coincidence system for the absolute measurement of radionuclides activity using a liquid scintillator

    A system for the standartization of radioisotopes activity using liquid scintillator detector was developed. The system was set up at Nuclear Metrology Laboratory - L.M.N. (Nuclear Physics Division - IEA). The system performance was checked by absolute activity measurements for two radioisotopes, 60Co and 241Am. The activities were determined by the 4π(α, β-γ) coincidence method. An accuracy of the order of 99,8% was obtained. The results for 60Co were compared with those obtained by 4πβ-γ coincidence method using a proportional counter at L.M.N., while the results for 241Am were compared with those obtained through the linear extrapolation method using the same liquid scintillator. Compared to other systems, the advantages of this one are the simplicity and the short time spent in the sample preparation, and the negligible self-absorption. (Author)

  16. Absolute luminosity and proton-proton total cross section measurement for the ATLAS experiment at LHC

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva will soon deliver collisions with an energy never reached in a particle accelerator. An energy in the center of mass of 10 and ultimately 14 TeV will allow to go beyond the borders of the physics known so far. ATLAS, the largest detector ever built, will hunt the Higgs boson and search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Any physical process is described by a cross section that measures its probability to occur. The events resulting from a given process are registered by ATLAS. To determine their according cross section, one has to know the luminosity. For the ATLAS experiment, a relative measurement of the luminosity can be done using the response of several sub-detectors. However to calibrate these detectors, an absolute measurement has to be performed. The ALFA detector has been designed to measure the elastic scattering spectrum that will allow to determine the absolute luminosity and the proton-proton total cross section. This provides an accurate calibration tool at a percent level. These detectors, located 240 m away from the interaction point, are called roman pots, a mechanical system that allows to approach a scintillating fiber tracker a few millimeters to the beam center. The simulation of the measurement requires to use a charged particles transport program. This program has to be carefully chosen because the determination of the protons lost during their travel from the interaction point to the detector has a major impact on the acceptance computation. The systematical uncertainties affecting the luminosity and the total cross section measurements are also determined using the full simulation chain. The ALFA detector operates in a complex environment and consequently its design requires a great care. A large tests campaign has been performed on the front end electronics. The results and the corresponding data analysis have shown that all requirement where fulfilled. A test beam has been

  17. Absolute measurements of the fast neutron capture cross section of 115In

    The 115In(n,#betta#)/sup 116m1/In cross section has been absolutely determined at neutron energies of 23, 265 and 964 keV. These energies are the median neutron energies of the three photo-neutron sources. Sb-Be, Na-CD2 and Na-Be, utilized in this work. The measurements are independent of other cross section data except for corrections amounting to less than 10%. Independent determinations of the reaction rate, detector efficiency, neutron source strength, scalar flux and target masses were performed. Reaction rates were determined by beta counting of the /sup 116ml/In decay activity using a 4π gas flow proportional counter. Detector efficiency was measured using 4π#betta#-#betta# coincidence counting techniques and the foil absorber method of efficiency extrapolation for correction of complex decay scheme effects. Photoneutron source emission rates were determined by intercomparison with the NBS-II calibrated 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron source in the University of Michigan Manganese Bath. The normalized scalar flux was calculated from the neutron emission angular distribution results of the Monte Carlo computer program used to model neutron and gamma transport in the source. Target mass determinations were made with a microbalance. Correction factors were applied for competing reaction activities, neutron scattering from experiment components, room-return induced activities, spectral effects in the manganese bath and the neutron energy spectra of the photoneutron sources. Experimental cross section results were normalized to the source median energy using energy spectra d cross section shape data. The absolute cross sections obtained for the 115In(n,#betta#)/sup 116ml/In reaction were 588 +- 12, 196 +- 4 and 200 +- 3 millibarns at 23, 265 and 964 keV, respectively

  18. Croatian-Hungarian cooperation on the Danube river radioactivity measurements

    Danube river radioactivity measurements on the border profile Mohac-Batina have been performed since the beginning of 1978 with varying frequency of sampling. Thus, in the period before nuclear power plant Paks started to work joint croatian-hungarian sampling at the border profile was taking place four times a year; the obtained results of measured radioactivity levels were used to assess radioactivity background data. From the start of nuclear power plant Paks running until Chernobyl reactor accident (April 1986) sampling was performed six times a year. After the Chernobyl accident, samples have been taken every month. Since decreased Chernobyl reactor accident influence was estimated until present samples have been taken six times a year. On the Danube river border profile the concentration activity of gamma radionuclides has been determined in water samples (filtered water and suspended matter), and in fish, sediment and Danube river algae samples. (authors)

  19. Geometry Optimization Of Marinelli Sample In Environmental Radioactivity Measurement

    The problem of geometry optimization in environmental radioactivity determination has been studied by many scientists in the world. However, up to now, there have been not any published articles which studied optimum sample geometry in any given volumes. In this work, the simulation program MCNP was used to build the detection efficiency analytical formulas which can be used to calculate optimized geometries of Marinelli beaker in environmental radioactivity measurement. The geometry optimization was carried out with the sample volumes from 10 ml to 450 ml and the gamma-ray energy from 60 keV to 2 MeV. These optimized geometries give the highest detection efficiencies corresponding to given volumes. The goal of our study is to improve the limitation in low-level radioactivity measurement of environmental samples. (author)

  20. Measurements of radioactive dust in high altitude air

    The radioactivity in samples of airborne dust was measured. The samples had been collected at high altitude by the Japan Air Self-Defense Force. The data were obtained for the gross beta activity, gamma nuclide determination and radiochemical analysis. It was shown that there was no appreciable difference between the activity levels obtained in this time and in the year before. Seasonal variations were not very pronounced. It was found that the radioactivity at high altitude had been stable at a low level. Radioactive gases (gaseous radioiodine and xenon gas) were not detected. This report does not include the result on radionuclide measurements that Technical Research and Development Institute executed for examining the nuclear emergency situation at Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear power plants after Tohoku Region Pacific Ocean Earthquake on March 11, 2011. (author)

  1. Improvement of a new portable monitor for measuring radioactivity levels

    Using a silicon photodiode as a sensor, the author has developed a new portable monitor for clinical use to measure irradiation from an inner organ through the body surface after the administration of radiopharmaceutical agent. The monitor can record the time course of radioactivity and can be assessed in the outpatient clinic. The total weight of this monitor is 660 g: the detector 70 g, the recorder 295 g, and the battery 295 g. In the present study, the monitor was utilized to measure and record the radioactivity in the bladder content of a patient who had been given Tc-99m methylene-diphosphonate for bone scintigraphy. The detector probe was placed on the abdomen over the bladder and fixed with adhesive tape. The recorder and battery were carried in a small backpack. The correlation between the radioactivity level in the urinary excretion and the count rate estimated by the monitor on the wall of urinary bladder was investigated. The average time to the first urinary excretion was made approximately 2 hr after the administration of radiopharmaceutical agent. The radioactivity count from the bladder reached the maximum level after approximately 2-3 hr, and subsequently decreased. The radioactivity in urine when excreted at 1 hr after administration was at 85% of that when excreted at 2 hr. In conclusion, the absorbed dosage in the bladder could be significantly reduced when the patients urinate at 1 hr after the administration of radiopharmaceutical agent. The newly developed portable monitor was adaptable to determine the radioactivity of inner organs directly from the outside of the body surface, and is effective in clinical management for excretion of clinical radioactive agents. (author)

  2. Measuring radioactive carbon with a liquid scintillator

    Petkov, T.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented on the measurement of the soft beta emitter carbon-14 in a liquid scintillator by means of a single-channel scintillation spectrometer provided with a lucite light-guide. The scintillation solution had the composition: PPO-10 grams, POPOP-0.25 grams, naphthalene-100 grams, and dioxane-1 liter. The background count rate and counting efficiency were determined at a discrimination threshold of 2 V and an amplification of 54. Carbon-14 activities of 10 to 20 picocuries could be measured at 90% counting efficiency under the proper conditions. (SJR)

  3. A study on the absolute measurement of β-ray absorbed dose in the skin depth

    The absolute measurement of β ray absorbed dose in the skin depth located at the certain distance from the radiation source (90Sr + 90Y, 204TI, 147Pm) recommended by the International Standardization Organization is performed by using an extrapolation chamber in the range of several mGy/h. Since one of critical points in measuring of absorbed dose is to make the environment in chamber similar to tissue, a new approach to the measurement of absorbed dose is proposed. The attenuation difference is minimized by deciding a window thickness such as the attenuation effect in chamber window becomes similar to that in the skin depth. A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, whose structure and density is very similar to tissue, is used for back material. The back scattering effect of both media is measured using the proposed method to calibrate the difference in back scattering effect between back material and tissue. For the measurement of back scattering effect of each material, an ionization chamber, whose structure is very similar to the extrapolation chamber and back material is replaceable, is made. Based on the results, β ray absorbed dose in the skin depth of 70 μm was measured as follows : 0.759 μGy/s (±3.78% ) for 90Sr + 90Y, 0.173 μGy/s (±4.17%) for 204TI and 0.088 μGy/s (±7.70%) for 147Pm. In order to evaluate the reliability of the proposed method, the absorbed dose measured in this study is compared to that measured in PTB (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt) for the same β ray source. Although the proposed method gives slightly higher value, the difference is within 1%. In conclusion, the proposed method seems to make the measuring environment closer to tissue, even though the calibration factor yielded by the proposed method has a little effect on evaluation of absorbed dose

  4. Measuring the absorbed radioactivity during a flight

    This paper presents the new system SIEVERT developed by the General Direction of the Civil Aviation (DGAC) to measure the radiations doses absorbed from cosmic radiation. The system is available on the Internet site: www.sievert-system.org. (A.L.B.)

  5. Krypton-85 and other airborne radioactivity measurements throughout Ireland

    In compliance with articles 35 and 36 of the EURATOM Treaty, the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) undertakes a comprehensive programme of radioactivity monitoring in the Irish terrestrial environment. Radioactivity is present in the terrestrial environment due to natural processes, the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, accidents such as the Chernobyl accident and the routine discharge of radionuclides from nuclear installations. The RPII monitors airborne radioactivity concentrations at ten stations throughout Ireland, of which, nine are equipped with low volume particulate samplers and one, in Dublin, with a high volume particulate sampler. The low volume particulate samples are assessed for total beta activity and high volume samples for gamma emitting radionuclides such as caesium-137 and beryllium-7. In addition, air sampled at the RPII laboratory in Dublin, is monitored for krypton-85, a radioactive noble gas, released into the environment primarily as a result of the reprocessing of nuclear fuel at installations such as Sellafield in the UK and La Hague in France. Since the inception of the krypton measurements in 1993 a trend of increasing atmospheric concentrations has been observed. The results of the krypton-85 monitoring, as well as the airborne radioactivity concentration measurements, will be presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  6. Absolute measurement of the isotopic ratio of a water sample with very low deuterium content

    The presence of H3+ ions which are indistinguishable from HD+ ions presents the principal difficulty encountered in the measurement of isotopic ratios of water samples with very low deuterium contents using a mass spectrometer. Thus, when the sample contains no deuterium, the mass spectrometer does not indicate zero. By producing, in situ, from the sample to be measured, water vapor with an isotopic ratio very close to zero using a small distilling column, this difficulty is overcome. This column, its operating parameters, as well as the way in which the measurements are made are described. An arrangement is employed in which the isotopic ratios can be measured with a sensitivity better than 0.01 x 10-6. The method is applied to the determination of the isotopic ratios of three low deuterium content water samples. The results obtained permit one to assign to the sample with the lowest deuterium content an absolute value equal to 1.71 ± 0.03 ppm. This water sample is a primary standard from which is determined the isotopic ratio of a natural water sample which serves as the laboratory standard. (author)

  7. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics.

    Landoas, Olivier; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Rossé, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C; Duffy, Tim; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range. PMID:21806179

  8. Absolute production rate measurements of nitric oxide by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    Pipa, A V; Bindemann, T; Foest, R; Kindel, E; Roepcke, J; Weltmann, K-D [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung and Technologie e.V. (INP), Felix-Hausdorff Strasse 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)], E-mail: foest@inp-greifswald.de

    2008-10-07

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has been applied to measure the absolute production rate of NO molecules in the gas phase of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) operating at rf (13.56 MHz) in argon with small (up to 1%) admixtures of air. The resulting NO production rates were found to be in the range (0.1-80) x 10{sup -3} sccm or (0.05-35) x 10{sup 18} molecules s{sup -1} depending on the experimental conditions. Maximum rates were obtained at 0.2% air. For TDLAS measurements the APPJ was arranged inside an astigmatic multi-pass cell of Herriott type with 100 m absorption length. The insertion into a closed volume differs slightly from the normal, open operation with the jet propagating freely into air. Therefore, the measuring results are compared with optical emission of the open jet to verify equivalent experimental conditions. The dependence of the optical emission of NO (237 nm) on power and gas mixture has been measured. The similar shape of the dependence of absorption and emission signals gives evidence that the comparability of experimental conditions is sufficiently satisfied. It is concluded that the NO production rate of the APPJ in ambient air can be characterized using TDLAS and provides reliable results in spite of differing experimental conditions due to the set-up.

  9. Radioactivity measurements of the HMI after the Chernobyl reactor accident

    The report explains the methods applied and the data measured by the HMI campaign. The material is presented so as to be of interest also to readers who in general are not concerned with aspects of radiation protection. The data measured refer to the local dose rate and to radioactivity in the environment (air, rain, surface waters, soil, food, mother's milk. Also, results of measurements of samples from Eastern Europe are given. (orig./HP)

  10. The impact of water temperature on the measurement of absolute dose

    Islam, Naveed Mehdi

    To standardize reference dosimetry in radiation therapy, Task Group 51 (TG 51) of American Association of Physicist's in Medicine (AAPM) recommends that dose calibration measurements be made in a water tank at a depth of 10 cm and at a reference geometry. Methodologies are provided for calculating various correction factors to be applied in calculating the absolute dose. However the protocol does not specify the water temperature to be used. In practice, the temperature of water during dosimetry may vary considerably between independent sessions and different centers. In this work the effect of water temperature on absolute dosimetry has been investigated. Density of water varies with temperature, which in turn may impact the beam attenuation and scatter properties. Furthermore, due to thermal expansion or contraction air volume inside the chamber may change. All of these effects can result in a change in the measurement. Dosimetric measurements were made using a Farmer type ion chamber on a Varian Linear Accelerator for 6 MV and 23 MV photon energies for temperatures ranging from 10 to 40 °C. A thermal insulation was designed for the water tank in order to maintain relatively stable temperature over the duration of the experiment. Dose measured at higher temperatures were found to be consistently higher by a very small magnitude. Although the differences in dose were less than the uncertainty in each measurement, a linear regression of the data suggests that the trend is statistically significant with p-values of 0.002 and 0.013 for 6 and 23 MV beams respectively. For a 10 degree difference in water phantom temperatures, which is a realistic deviation across clinics, the final calculated reference dose can differ by 0.24% or more. To address this effect, first a reference temperature (e.g.22 °C) can be set as the standard; subsequently a correction factor can be implemented for deviations from this reference. Such a correction factor is expected to be of similar