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Sample records for absolute gamma ray

  1. Re-estimation of absolute gamma ray intensities of 56Mn using k0- standardization

    M. AHMAD; W. AHMAD; M. U. RAJPUT; A. QAYYUM

    2005-01-01

    The thermal neutron capture gamma ray facility at Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) is being used for the re-estimation of various properties like capture cross-sections, resonance integral, absolute gamma intensities, etc.of different isotopes. The data for gamma ray transitions from the capture of thermal neutrons by 55Mn are not in good agreement specifically below 2 MeV. So there is a need to re-estimate its intensities with better accuracy. Analytical grade MnCl2 powder and high purity Mn metal pieces were used in this study. Standard 152Eu and 60Co radioactive sources as well as thermal neutron capture γ-rays in chlorine were chosen for efficiency calibration. The k0standardization technique was applied for these measurements to eliminate systematic errors in efficiencies. Chlorine also acted as a comparator in k0- factor calculations. The results have been tabulated for the main gamma rays from 56Mn in the low as well as in the medium energy regions. The absolute intensities are in good agreement with most of the reported values.

  2. Systematics of Absolute Gamma Ray Transition Probabilities in Deformed Odd-A Nuclei

    Malmskog, S.G.

    1965-11-15

    All known experimentally determined absolute gamma ray transition probabilities between different intrinsic states of deformed odd-A nuclei in the rare earth, region (153 < A < 181) and in the actinide region (A {>=} 227) are compared with transition probabilities (Weisskopf and Nilsson estimate). Systematic deviations from the theoretical values are found. Possible explanations for these deviations are given. This discussion includes Coriolis coupling, {delta}K ={+-}2 band-mixing effects and pairing interaction.

  3. Systematics of Absolute Gamma Ray Transition Probabilities in Deformed Odd-A Nuclei

    All known experimentally determined absolute gamma ray transition probabilities between different intrinsic states of deformed odd-A nuclei in the rare earth, region (153 < A < 181) and in the actinide region (A ≥ 227) are compared with transition probabilities (Weisskopf and Nilsson estimate). Systematic deviations from the theoretical values are found. Possible explanations for these deviations are given. This discussion includes Coriolis coupling, ΔK =±2 band-mixing effects and pairing interaction

  4. The half-lives of 151Tb and 151Gd and the absolute gamma ray intensities of 151Gd

    The gamma rays accompanying the electron capture/positron decay of 151Tb and the electron capture decay of its 151Gd daughter have been studied. The half life of 151Tb has been found to be 17.609+-.014 hours. The half life of 151Gd has been found to be 123.9+-1.0 days and the absolute intensities of the 151Gd gamma rays have been determined. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of absolute gamma ray emission probability of 1001 keV from the decay of 234mPa

    In the direct γ-ray spectrometric measurements of 238U content, 1001 keV γ-ray of 234mPa is commonly used in recent years. 234mPa is the second daughter of 238U and rapidly reaches secular equilibrium with the parent nucleus. This clean peak is well resolved by high purity Ge detectors and gives more accurate indication of uranium content without requiring any self attenuation correction. Several measurements of the absolute emission probability of the 1001 keV γ-ray of 234mPa have resulted in doubts concerning the old recommended value 0.59±0.01 % obtained by a radiochemical method. Therefore, this old value is now absolute and a newly value of 0.835±0.004 % is recommended. In this study the γ-ray spectrometric measurements were carried out using the powdered U3O8 and the certified uranium samples. A new experimental value o 0.861±0.015 % for the absolute γ-ray emission probability for the 1001 keV gamma-ray of the 234mPa has been obtained. The present measured values agrees good with the most experimental results appeared in the literature and is close to the newly recommended values of 0.835±0.004 % and 0.837±0.012 % for the 1001 keV γ-ray of 234mPa

  6. Beta decay of the fission product 125Sb and a new complete evaluation of absolute gamma ray transition intensities

    Rajput, M. U.; Ali, N.; Hussain, S.; Mujahid, S. A.; MacMahon, D.

    2012-04-01

    The radionuclide 125Sb is a long-lived fission product, which decays to 125Te by negative beta emission with a half-life of 1008 day. The beta decay is followed by the emission of several gamma radiations, ranging from low to medium energy, that can suitably be used for high-resolution detector calibrations, decay heat calculations and in many other applications. In this work, the beta decay of 125Sb has been studied in detail. The complete published experimental data of relative gamma ray intensities in the beta decay of the radionuclide 125Sb has been compiled. The consistency analysis was performed and discrepancies found at several gamma ray energies. Evaluation of the discrepant data was carried out using Normalized Residual and RAJEVAL methods. The decay scheme balance was carried out using beta branching ratios, internal conversion coefficients, populating and depopulating gamma transitions to 125Te levels. The work has resulted in the consistent conversion factor equal to 29.59(13) %, and determined a new evaluated set of the absolute gamma ray emission probabilities. The work has also shown 22.99% of the delayed intensity fraction as outgoing from the 58 d isomeric 144 keV energy level and 77.01% of the prompt intensity fraction reaching to the ground state from the other excited states. The results are discussed and compared with previous evaluations. The present work includes additional experimental data sets which were not included in the previous evaluations. A new set of recommended relative and absolute gamma ray emission probabilities is presented.

  7. Absolute activity measurement and gamma-ray emission probability for decay of I-126

    The accurate knowledge of the gamma-ray emission probability per decay of radionuclides is important in several applications. In the case of 126 I, its importance lies mainly in fast neutron dosimetry as well as in the production of 125 I where 126 I appears as an impurity. In the present work the gamma-ray emission probabilities per decay for the 388 and 666-KeV transitions of 126 I have been measured. This radionuclide was obtained by means of the 127 I(n, 2n)126 I reaction in a fast neutron flux at the IPEN 2 MW research reactor. The methodology for the primary standardization of 126 I is described. For this purpose, two different coincidence systems were used due to the complex decay scheme of this radionuclide. The βbranch measurement was carried out in a 4 π(PC)β-γ coincidence system consisting of a proportional counter, coupled to a pair of 3'x3' Na I (Tl) crystal. The electron capture branch was measured in a X-γ coincidence system using two NaI(Tl) crystals. The gamma-ray measurements were performed in a HPGe system, previously calibrated by means of standard sources supplied by the International Atomic Energy Agency. All the uncertainties evolved were treated rigorously, by means of covariance analysis. (author)

  8. Determination of fission cross-section and absolute fission yields using track-cum gamma-ray spectrometric technique

    The fission cross-section of 233Pa(2nth, f) using fission track technique has been determined for the first time using thermal neutron flux of the reactor APSARA. This is important from the point of view of advance heavy water reactor (AHWR), which is to be described. On the other hand, the yields of fission products in the fast neutron induced fission of minor actinides are important from the point accelerator driven sub critical system (ADSS). In view of that, absolute yields of fission products in the fast neutron induced fission of 238U, 237Np, 238,240Pu, 243Am and 244Cm have been determined using the fission track-cum gamma-ray spectrometric technique. The total number of fission occurring in the target was estimated by track technique, whereas the activities of the fission products have been determined using gamma-ray spectrometric technique. Detailed procedure and its importance are to be discussed. (author)

  9. Absolute activity measurement and gamma-ray emission probability for decay of I-126

    Fonseca, K A

    1997-01-01

    The accurate knowledge of the gamma-ray emission probability per decay of radionuclides is important in several applications. In the case of sup 1 sup 2 sup 6 I, its importance lies mainly in fast neutron dosimetry as well as in the production of sup 1 sup 2 sup 5 I where sup 1 sup 2 sup 6 I appears as an impurity. In the present work the gamma-ray emission probabilities per decay for the 388 and 666-KeV transitions of sup 1 sup 2 sup 6 I have been measured. This radionuclide was obtained by means of the sup 1 sup 2 sup 7 I(n, 2n) sup 1 sup 2 sup 6 I reaction in a fast neutron flux at the IPEN 2 MW research reactor. The methodology for the primary standardization of sup 1 sup 2 sup 6 I is described. For this purpose, two different coincidence systems were used due to the complex decay scheme of this radionuclide. The beta branch measurement was carried out in a 4 pi(PC)beta-gamma coincidence system consisting of a proportional counter, coupled to a pair of 3'x3' Na I (Tl) crystal. The electron capture branch ...

  10. Comparison of high energy gamma rays from absolute value of b greater than 30 deg with the galactic neutral hydrogen distribution

    Ozel, M. E.; Ogelman, H.; Tumer, T.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    High-energy gamma-ray (energy above 35 MeV) data from the SAS 2 satellite have been used to compare the intensity distribution of gamma rays with that of neutral hydrogen (H I) density along the line of sight, at high galactic latitudes (absolute values greater than 30 deg). A model has been constructed for the case where the observed gamma-ray intensity has been assumed to be the sum of a galactic component proportional to the H I distribution plus an isotropic extragalactic emission. A chi-squared test of the model parameters indicates that about 30% of the total high-latitude emission may originate within the Galaxy.

  11. Comparative and Absolute Measurements of 11 Inorganic Constituents of 38 Human Tooth Samples with Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    The mean concentrations of the following elements have been simultaneously determined in normal human dentine, enamel and dental calculus with gamma-ray spectrometry; Na, P, Cl, Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, W and Au. In a typical run one sample each of dentine, enamel and dental calculus were irradiated together with standards of the elements to be determined in a thermal neutron flux of 2 x 1012 n/cm/sec for 20 hours. The chemical elements were separated into nine groups with ion exchange technique before the subsequent gamma spectrometric measurements. One man can manage the chemical separations and take the necessary gamma spectra from a run in one day. In a few samples of dentine, enamel and dental calculus which had been irradiated in a thermal neutron flux of 7 x 1013 n/cm/sec for one week the additional long lived trace elements were qualitatively determined Cr, Fe, Co, Rb, Ag, Sb, Cs and Ba

  12. Gamma-ray methods

    Bulk analysis techniques using gamma radiation are described. The methods include gamma-ray induced reactions, selective gamma-ray scattering and methods which rely on natural radioactivity. The gamma-ray resonance scattering technique can be used for the determination of copper and nickel in bulk samples and drill cores. The application of gamma-gamma methods to iron ore analysis is outlined

  13. Gamma-ray astronomy

    Pohl, Martin

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recents results in gamma-ray astronomy, most of which were derived with data from ground-based gamma-ray detectors. Many of the contributions presented at this conference involve multiwavelength studies which combine ground-based gamma-ray measurements with optical data or space-based X-ray and gamma-ray measurements. Besides measurements of the diffuse emission from the Galaxy, observations of blazars, gamma-ray bursts, and supernova remnants this paper also covers theo...

  14. Technique of absolute efficiency determination for gamma radiation semiconductor detectors

    Simple technique is suggested to determine the absolute efficiency (E) of semiconductor detectors (SCD) which employes low-intensity neutron sources wide spread in scientific laboratories. The technique is based on using radioactive nuclide gamma radiation in decay chains of heavy element fission fragments, uranium-235, for example. Cumulative yields of a number of nulcides following heavy element fission are measured to a high accuracy (1-5%), which permits to . the value E is determined for a wide energy range (from X- ray to some MeV); using a nuclide with a well known decay scheme and measured to a high accuracy cumulative yield 140La, for example, one can calibrate in absolute values comparatively easily obtained plots of the SCD relative efficiency. The technique allows to determine the E value for extended plane (and volumetric) sources of an arbitrary form. Some nuclides, convenient for the determination of E, and their nuclear characteristics are tabulated

  15. Gamma-ray Astronomy

    Hinton, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

  16. Gamma-ray sources

    Results are presented from an analysis of the celestial gamma-ray fine-scale structure based on over half of the data which may ultimately be available from the COS-B satellite. A catalogue consisting of 25 gamma-ray sources measured at energies above 100 MeV is presented. (Auth.)

  17. Gamma ray optics

    Jentschel, M.; Guenther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F38042 Grenoble (France); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-09

    Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape {gamma} ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E{sup 2}, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E{sup 2} extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

  18. Gamma ray camera

    An improved Anger-type gamma ray camera utilizes a proximity-type image intensifier tube. It has a greater capability for distinguishing between incident and scattered radiation, and greater spatial resolution capabilities

  19. Gamma-ray astronomy

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Cosmic gamma rays, the physical processes responsible for their production and the astrophysical sites from which they were seen are reported. The bulk of the observed gamma ray emission is in the photon energy range from about 0.1 MeV to 1 GeV, where observations are carried out above the atmosphere. There are also, however, gamma ray observations at higher energies obtained by detecting the Cerenkov light produced by the high energy photons in the atmosphere. Gamma ray emission was observed from sources as close as the Sun and the Moon and as distant as the quasar 3C273, as well as from various other galactic and extragalactic sites. The radiation processes also range from the well understood, e.g. energetic particle interactions with matter, to the still incompletely researched, such as radiation transfer in optically thick electron positron plasmas in intense neutron star magnetic fields.

  20. SVOM gamma ray monitor

    2010-01-01

    The space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor(SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection,localization and broad-band study of gamma-ray bursts(GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena.The gamma ray monitor(GRM) onboard is designed to observe GRBs up to 5 MeV.With this instrument,one of the key GRB parameters,Epeak,can be easily measured in the hard X-ray band.It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  1. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  2. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  3. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Gehrels, Neil; 10.1126/science.1216793

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, last typically 10s of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  4. Chemist's gamma-ray table

    An edited listing of gamma-ray information has been prepared. Prominent gamma rays originating from nuclides with half lives long enough to be seen in radiochemical experiments are included. Information is ordered by nuclide in one section and by energy in a second section. This shorter listing facilitates identification of nuclides responsible for gamma rays observed in experiments

  5. Gamma ray beam transmutation

    We have proposed a new approach to nuclear transmutation by a gamma ray beam of Compton scattered laser photon. We obtained 20 MeV gamma ray in this way to obtain transmutation rates with the giant resonance of 197Au and 129Iodine. The rate of the transmutation agreed with the theoretical calculation. Experiments on energy spectrum of positron, electron and neutron from targets were performed for the energy balance and design of the system scheme. The reaction rate was about 1.5∼4% for appropriate photon energies and neutron production rate was up to 4% in the measurements. We had stored laser photon more than 5000 times in a small cavity which implied for a significant improvement of system efficiency. Using these technologies, we have designed an actual transmutation system for 129Iodine which has a 16 million year's activity. In my presentation, I will address the properties of this scheme, experiments results and transmutation system for iodine transmutation

  6. Gamma ray camera

    An Anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the Anger camera. The image intensifier tube has a negatively charged flat scintillator screen, a flat photocathode layer, and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen, all of which have the same dimension to maintain unit image magnification; all components are contained within a grounded metallic tube, with a metallic, inwardly curved input window between the scintillator screen and a collimator. The display screen can be viewed by an array of photomultipliers or solid state detectors. There are two photocathodes and two phosphor screens to give a two stage intensification, the two stages being optically coupled by a light guide. (author)

  7. Cosmic gamma rays from quasars

    The diffuse gamma radiation consists of the galactic and extragalactic components. The latter component is of special interest on account of its cosmological significance. Following the method recently proposed to estimate the gamma ray flux from galaxy clusters, and the detection of gamma rays from the quasars 3C273, the data base of the SAS II satellite was used to estimate the contribution from quasars to the extragalactic gamma ray flux. It is shown that quasars as a whole are significant gamma ray contributors, the average gamma ray flux per quasar in the energy range 35 MeV to 100 Mev being (1.3 + or - 0.9) x .00001 cm(-2)s(-1)sr(-1)

  8. Cosmic gamma rays from quasars

    Lau, M. M.; Young, E. C. M.

    1985-01-01

    The diffuse gamma radiation consists of the galactic and extragalactic components. The latter component is of special interest on account of its cosmological significance. Following the method recently proposed to estimate the gamma ray flux from galaxy clusters, and the detection of gamma rays from the quasars 3C273, the data base of the SAS II satellite was used to estimate the contribution from quasars to the extragalactic gamma ray flux. It is shown that quasars as a whole are significant gamma ray contributors, the average gamma ray flux per quasar in the energy range 35 MeV to 100 Mev being (1.3 + or - 0.9) x .00001 cm(-2)s(-1)sr(-1).

  9. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components. ...

  10. Absolute calibration of space-resolving soft X-ray spectrograph for plasma diagnostics

    Yoshikawa, M; Kawamori, E; Watanabe, Y; Watabe, C; Yamaguchi, N; Tamano, T

    2001-01-01

    A grazing incidence flat-field soft X-ray (20-350 A) spectrograph was constructed and applied for impurity diagnostics in the GAMMA 10 fusion plasma. The spectrograph consisted of a limited height entrance slit, an aberration-corrected concave grating, a microchannel-plate intensified detector and an instant camera/a high speed solid state camera. An absolute calibration experiment for the SX spectrograph was performed at the Photon Factory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization with monitoring the incident synchrotron beam intensity by using an absolutely calibrated XUV silicon photodiode. From the results of absolute calibration of the spectrograph, the radiation loss from the plasma was obtained.

  11. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Reedy, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical composition of a planet can be inferred from the gamma rays escaping from its surface and can be used to study its origin and evolution. The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The major sources of these gamma-ray lines are the decay of natural radionuclides, reactions induced by energetic galactic-cosmic-ray particles, capture of low energy neutrons, and solar-proton-induced radioactivities. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 30 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted from a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 288 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes have been used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with results from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed.

  12. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    The chemical composition of a planet can be inferred from the gamma rays escaping from its surface and can be used to study its origin and evolution. The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The major sources of these gamma-ray lines are the decay of natural radionuclides, reactions induced by energetic galactic-cosmic-ray particles, capture of low energy neutrons, and solar-proton-induced radioactivities. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 30 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted from a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 288 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes have been used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with results from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed

  13. Gamma-ray Pulsar Revolution

    Caraveo, Patrizia A.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. At first, in the 70s, there were only two identified sources, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space both in the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led t...

  14. Absolute activity measurement and gamma-ray emission probability for decay of I-126; Medida absoluta da atividade e determinacao da taxa de emissao gama por decaimento do {sup 126} I

    Fonseca, Katia Aparecida

    1997-07-01

    The accurate knowledge of the gamma-ray emission probability per decay of radionuclides is important in several applications. In the case of {sup 126} I, its importance lies mainly in fast neutron dosimetry as well as in the production of {sup 125} I where {sup 126} I appears as an impurity. In the present work the gamma-ray emission probabilities per decay for the 388 and 666-KeV transitions of {sup 126} I have been measured. This radionuclide was obtained by means of the {sup 127} I(n, 2n){sup 126} I reaction in a fast neutron flux at the IPEN 2 MW research reactor. The methodology for the primary standardization of {sup 126} I is described. For this purpose, two different coincidence systems were used due to the complex decay scheme of this radionuclide. The {beta}branch measurement was carried out in a 4 {pi}(PC){beta}-{gamma} coincidence system consisting of a proportional counter, coupled to a pair of 3'x3' Na I (Tl) crystal. The electron capture branch was measured in a X-{gamma} coincidence system using two NaI(Tl) crystals. The gamma-ray measurements were performed in a HPGe system, previously calibrated by means of standard sources supplied by the International Atomic Energy Agency. All the uncertainties evolved were treated rigorously, by means of covariance analysis. (author)

  15. Gamma rays at airplane altitudes

    An examination of the gamma ray flux above 1 TeV in the atmosphere is needed to better understand the anomalous showers from point sources. Suggestions are made for future experiments on board airplanes

  16. Cosmic-Rays and Gamma Ray Bursts

    Meli, A.

    2013-07-01

    Cosmic-rays are subatomic particles of energies ranging between a few eV to hundreds of TeV. These particles register a power-law spectrum, and it seems that most of them originate from astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The shock acceleration in superalfvenic astrophysical plasmas, is believed to be the main mechanism responsible for the production of the non-thermal cosmic-rays. Especially, the importance of the very high energy cosmic-ray acceleration, with its consequent gamma-ray radiation and neutrino production in the shocks of the relativistic jets of Gamma Ray Bursts, is a favourable theme of study. I will discuss the cosmic-ray shock acceleration mechanism particularly focusing on simulation studies of cosmic-ray acceleration occurring in the relativistic shocks of GRB jets.

  17. Magnetic angle for gamma rays

    In December 2002 astronomers at the University of California in Berkeley got a lucky break. A bright gamma-ray burst appeared in the sky within 18 degrees of the Sun, which was close enough to be picked up by the RHESSI solar satellite. Analysing data from the satellite, Wayne Coburn and Steven Boggs made the stunning discovery that the gamma rays from the burst - named GRB021206 - were linearly polarized. And not just by any amount, but by 80% - the maximum polarization theoretically possible. The discovery represents a major breakthrough in gamma-ray astronomy (Nature 423 415).Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic events in the universe, typically corresponding to the conversion of 1% of the mass of the Sun into energy. Every day an average of about one of these brief flashes of gamma rays - which come from any direction in the sky and last a few tens of seconds - are detected. Observations of the optical afterglow of the bursts reveal that they originate in galaxies that are several billions of light-years away. But what causes the bursts, and how the gamma rays are actually produced, have, until recently, remained a mystery. It has been suggested that gamma-ray bursts result from supernovae - the explosions of massive stars that have used up all their fuel - and that the bursts might be the 'birth cries' of black holes. Some of this evidence is circumstantial. It is known, for example, that the host galaxies of the bursts are regions where massive stars are copiously forming. However, observations of the afterglow of GRB980425 in 1998 revealed a spectral signature that would be expected for a supernova. This provided the first compelling, but inconclusive, direct evidence for the link between gamma-ray bursts and supernovae. In March this year, however, this link was dramatically confirmed. The HETE-2 satellite detected a spectacular gamma-ray burst that was among the closest and brightest ever observed. GRB030329 was just two billion light-years away, which

  18. Gamma rays in thunderstorms

    Not only lightning occur in thunderstorms but also luminous flashes that are emitted upwards over the clouds. These flashes have been studied for 20 years. Satellites have detected gamma flashes with an energy of 30 MeV. It was thought that these flashes resulted from collisions between cosmic particles and cloud molecules but recent results from the Italian Agile satellite question this explanation. Gamma flashes with an energy of 100 MeV have been detected which is too high an energy to be explained by collisions with cosmic particles. Another result show the existence of very strong acceleration of electrons in areas where some type of flashes are likely to happen. (A.C.)

  19. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  20. Absolute differential yield of parametric x-ray radiation

    The results of measurements of absolute differential yield of parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) in thin single crystal are presented for the first time. It has been established that the experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations according with kinematical theory. The influence of density effect on PXR properties is discussed. (author). 19 refs., 7 figs

  1. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    Mannheim, K

    2000-01-01

    The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. Thes...

  2. Hypernuclear gamma rays

    The observation of hypernuclear γ rays pprovides a method of determining the spin dependence of the Λ-nucleon interaction with a sensitivity not approachable by other means in the forseeable future. The transitions of primary interest are those between states that differ only in the orientation of the spin of the Λ particle with respect to the angular momentum of the nuclear core. The effective Λ-nucleon interaction can be specified by a small number of γ-ray measurements. A program of experiments directed at this goal is in progress at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This paper reviews the status of the subject with emphasis on the recent experiment to measure ground state doublet splittings using germanium γ-ray detectors

  3. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  4. Gamma ray slush hydrogen monitor

    Singh, Jag J.; Shen, Chih-Peng; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1992-01-01

    Mass attenuation for 109Cd radiation have been measured in mixtures of phases and in single phases of five chemical compounds. As anticipated, the mass attenuation coefficients are independent of the phases of the test chemicals. It is recommended that a slush hydrogen monitoring system based on low energy gamma ray attenuation be developed for utilization aboard the NASP.

  5. The GRAD gamma ray spectrometer

    Rester, A.C.; Piercey, R.B.; Eichhorn, G.; Coldwell, R.L.; McKisson, J.M.; Ely, D.W.; Mann, H.M.; Jenkins, D.A.

    1986-02-01

    A gamma-ray spectrometer for an upcoming space shuttle mission is described. Consisting of a 150 cm/sup 3/ n-type germanium detector set inside active shielding of bismuth germanate and plastic scintillator, the instrument will be used in studies of the Orbiter background and the galactic center.

  6. The GRAD gamma ray spectrometer

    A gamma-ray spectrometer for an upcoming space shuttle mission is described. Consisting of a 150 cm3 n-type germanium detector set inside active shielding of bismuth germanate and plastic scintillator, the instrument will be used in studies of the Orbiter background and the galactic center

  7. Periodicities in gamma ray bursts

    Gamma ray burst models based on magnetic neutron stars face a problem of account for the scarcity of observed periods. Both this scarcity and the typical period found when any is detected are explained if the neutron stars are accreting in binary systems

  8. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  9. GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY-LOUD BLAZARS

    ZHANG XIONG; ZHAO GANG; XIE GUANG-ZHONG; ZHENG GUANG-SHENG; ZHANG LI

    2001-01-01

    We present a strong correlation of the gamma-ray (above 100 MeV) mean spectral indices aγ and X-ray (1 keV)mean spectral indices cX for 34 gamma-ray-loud blazars (16 BL Lac objects and 18 flat spectrum radio quasars). Astrong correlation is also found between the gamma-ray flux densities F-γ and X-ray flux densities Fx in the low state for 47 blazars (17 BL Lac and 30 flat spectrum radio quasars). Possible correlation on the gamma-ray emission mechanism is discussed. We suggest that the main gamma-ray radiation mechanism is probably the synchrotron process. The gamma-ray emission may be somewhat different from that of BL Lac objects and flat spectrum radio quasars.

  10. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    Thompson, D J

    2013-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as clusters of galaxies. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance violation derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure in the direction of the center of our Galaxy, and strong constraints on some Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) models for dark matter.

  11. Gravitational microlensing of gamma-ray blazars

    F. Torres, Diego; E. Romero, Gustavo; F. Eiroa, Ernesto;

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the effects of gravitational microlensing on compact and distant $\\gamma$-ray blazars. These objects have $\\gamma$-ray emitting regions which are small enough as to be affected by microlensing effects produced by stars lying in intermediate galaxies. We analyze the...... galactic latitude whose gamma-ray statistical properties are very similar to detected $\\gamma$-ray blazars) are indeed the result of gravitational lensing magnification of background undetected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs)....

  12. X-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    Frontera, Filippo

    2004-01-01

    The discovery by the BeppoSAX satellite of X-ray afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst which occurred on 28 February 1997 produced a revolution in our knowledge of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon. Along with the discovery of X-ray afterglows, the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts were discovered and the distance issue was settled, at least for long $\\gamma$-ray bursts. The 30 year mystery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon is now on the way to solution. Here I rewiew the observationa...

  13. Cascaded Gamma Rays as a Probe of Cosmic Rays

    Murase, Kohta

    2014-06-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE) and ultra-high-energy (UHE) gamma rays from extragalactic sources experience electromagnetic cascades during their propagation in intergalactic space. Recent gamma-ray data on TeV blazars and the diffuse gamma-ray background may have hints of the cascade emission, which are especially interesting if it comes from UHE cosmic rays. I show that cosmic-ray-induced cascades can be discriminated from gamma-ray-induced cascades with detailed gamma-ray spectra. I also discuss roles of structured magnetic fields, which suppress inverse-Compton pair halos/echoes but lead to guaranteed signals - synchrotron pair halos/echoes.

  14. Compton suppression gamma ray spectrometry

    In the past decade there have been many studies to use Compton suppression methods in routine neutron activation analysis as well as in the traditional role of low level gamma ray counting of environmental samples. On a separate path there have been many new PC based software packages that have been developed to enhance photopeak fitting. Although the newer PC based algorithms have had significant improvements, they still suffer from being effectively used in weak gamma ray lines in natural samples or in neutron activated samples that have very high Compton backgrounds. We have completed a series of experiments to show the usefulness of Compton suppression. As well we have shown the pitfalls when using Compton suppression methods for high counting deadtimes as in the case of neutron activated samples. We have also investigated if counting statistics are the same both suppressed and normal modes. Results are presented in four separate experiments. (author)

  15. Airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its role as collector and disseminator of information on nuclear techniques has long had an interest in gamma ray spectrometer methods and has published a number of Technical Reports on various aspects of the subject. At an Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna in November 1986 to review appropriate activities the IAEA could take following the Chernobyl accident, it was recommended that preparation begin on a new Technical Report on airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying, taking into account the use of the technique for environmental monitoring as well as for nuclear emergency response requirements. Shortly thereafter the IAEA became the lead organization in the Radioelement Geochemical Mapping section of the International Geological Correlation Programme/United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Project on International Geochemical Mapping. These two factors led to the preparation of the present Technical Report. 18 figs, 4 tabs

  16. Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

  17. Sterilization of pharmaceuticals by gamma ray

    This paper shows the possibility of sterilization of certain pharmaceuticals and materials involved by gamma radiation from cobalt-60 and cesium-137 sources, and illustrates the importance of gamma ray sterilization compared with other sterilization methods. The paper also reviews some pharmaceuticals and materials involved, which proved the possibility of gamma ray sterilization. (author)

  18. Radial distribution of the diffuse gamma-ray emissivity in the galactic disk

    Yang, Rui-Zhi; Aharonian, Felix; Evoli, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi-LAT data accumulated over 7 years of {\\gamma}-ray observations, together with the high resolution gas (CO & HI) and the dust opacity maps, are used to study the emissivity of {\\gamma}-rays induced by interactions of cosmic rays (CRs) with the interstellar medium. Based on the dust opacity templates, the {\\gamma}-ray emissivity was measured for 36 segments of the Galactic plane. Furthermore, the {\\gamma}-ray emissivity was evaluated in six Galactocentric rings. Both the absolute emis...

  19. Comparison of total experimental and theoretical absolute γ-ray detection efficiencies of a cylindrical NaI(Tl) crystal

    A new fit function has been developed to calculate theoretically the absolute gamma ray detection efficiencies (ηTh) of a cylindrical NaI(Tl) crystal, for calculating the absolute efficiency at any interesting gamma energy in the energy range between 10 and 1300 keV and distance between 0 and 8 cm. The total absolute gamma ray detection efficiencies have been calculated for five detectors, four are 2x2 and one is 3x 3 inches NaI(Tl) crystal at different distances. The absolute efficiency of the different detectors was calculated at the specific energy of the standard sources for each measuring distances. In this calculation, experimental (ηExp) and theoretical (ηTh) have been calculated. The uncertainties of efficiency calibration have been calculated also for quality control. Measurements were performed with calibrated point source. Gamma-ray energies under consideration were 0.356, 0.662, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. The differences between (ηExp) and (ηTh) at these energies are 1.30E-06, 7.99E-05, 2.29E-04 and 2.42E-04 respectively. The results obtained on the basis of (ηExp) and (ηTh) seem to be in very good agreement

  20. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research.

  1. Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP)

    The gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP: GAmma-ray burst Polarimeter), which had been almost handcrafted by scientists, has succeeded in working normally in interplanetary space, and in detecting the polarization of the gamma-ray from a mysterious astronomical object 'gamma-ray burst'. It is the first result of the detectors in the world exclusively aiming at detecting gamma-ray polarization. We mainly describe the hardware of our GAP equipment and show the method of preparing equipment to work in the cosmic space with a tight budget. The mechanical structure, the electronic circuits, the software on the equipment, the data analysis on the earth, and the scientific results gained by the observation just over one year, are presented after explaining the principle of gamma-ray polarization detection. Our design to protect equipment against mechanical shock and cosmic radiation may provide useful information for future preparation of compact satellite. (J.P.N.)

  2. Recommended standards for gamma ray intensities

    Bé, Marie-Martine, E-mail: mmbe@cea.fr [LNHB, CEA LIST Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Chechev, Valery P. [KRI, V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-11

    Gamma ray data are used in more and more areas of application, and so over the years the demand for recommended gamma ray energies and intensities has increased. This paper proposes a list of gamma rays whose intensity is sufficiently well-known and they can be used for the calibration of gamma ray spectrometers and other applications; it is based on studies carried out by an international group of evaluators: the Decay Data Evaluation Project. One goal of this paper is to gather this set of data together in order to facilitate and generalize their use. In the first part, a brief description of the methodology followed throughout the evaluations is given, different methods of gamma ray intensity evaluation are presented, some typical examples of evaluations are shown; in the second part, the list of chosen nuclides is given along with their applications, and finally a list of recommended gamma ray intensities is presented.

  3. Mining Gamma-Ray Burst Data

    Hakkila, Jon; Roiger, Richard J.; Haglin, David J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts provide what is probably one of the messiest of all astrophysical data sets. Burst class properties are indistinct, as overlapping characteristics of individual bursts are convolved with effects of instrumental and sampling biases. Despite these complexities, data mining techniques have allowed new insights to be made about gamma-ray burst data. We demonstrate how data mining techniques have simultaneously allowed us to learn about gamma-ray burst detectors and data collectio...

  4. Prompt and Delayed Gamma-Rays from Fission

    The following data about gamma-rays from fission are reported and discussed; Total prompt gamma-ray spectrum, and average number and energy of gamma-rays; X-rays in prompt fission, and excitation of X-rays in matter; gamma-ray spectra as a function of the mass ratio in fission, gamma-lines in those spectra, and Doppler effect-, anisotropy in gamma-emission relative to the direction of fragments; average gamma-energy and gamma-spectra as a function of mass of the fission products; delayed gamma-rays; delayed gamma-rays as a function of fission product mass. (author)

  5. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  6. Gravitational Waves versus X and Gamma Ray Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst

    Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2012-01-01

    The recent progress in the understanding the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst, GRB 090227B, allows to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X and Gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst.

  7. Gamma-ray emission from thunderstorm discharges

    Fine features of gamma-ray radiation registered during a thunderstorm at Tien-Shan Mountain Cosmic Ray Station are presented. Long duration (100-600 ms) gamma-ray bursts are found. They are for the first time identified with atmospheric discharges (lighting). Gamma-ray emission lasts all the time of the discharge and is extremely non-uniform consisting of numerous flashes. Its peak intensity in the flashes exceeds the gamma-ray background up to two orders of magnitude. Exclusively strong altitude dependence of gamma radiation is found. The observation of gamma radiation at the height 4-8 km could serve as a new important method of atmospheric discharge processes investigation. - Highlights: → Gamma-radiation bursts always accompany the electric discharges in atmosphere. → The gamma burst fill up the time of an atmospheric discharge completely. → The higher is the discharge electric field change - the higher is gamma intensity. → The temporal distribution of gamma intensity during the burst is non-uniform. → The altitude dependence of the burst gamma intensity is dramatic.

  8. Gamma-ray emission from thunderstorm discharges

    Gurevich, A.V., E-mail: alex@lpi.r [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chubenko, A.P. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Karashtin, A.N. [Radiophysical Research Institute, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Mitko, G.G.; Naumov, A.S.; Ptitsyn, M.O.; Ryabov, V.A.; Shepetov, A.L. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shlyugaev, Yu.V. [Radiophysical Research Institute, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Vildanova, L.I. [Tien-Shan Mountain Cosmic Ray Station, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Zybin, K.P. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-11

    Fine features of gamma-ray radiation registered during a thunderstorm at Tien-Shan Mountain Cosmic Ray Station are presented. Long duration (100-600 ms) gamma-ray bursts are found. They are for the first time identified with atmospheric discharges (lighting). Gamma-ray emission lasts all the time of the discharge and is extremely non-uniform consisting of numerous flashes. Its peak intensity in the flashes exceeds the gamma-ray background up to two orders of magnitude. Exclusively strong altitude dependence of gamma radiation is found. The observation of gamma radiation at the height 4-8 km could serve as a new important method of atmospheric discharge processes investigation. - Highlights: Gamma-radiation bursts always accompany the electric discharges in atmosphere. The gamma burst fill up the time of an atmospheric discharge completely. The higher is the discharge electric field change - the higher is gamma intensity. The temporal distribution of gamma intensity during the burst is non-uniform. The altitude dependence of the burst gamma intensity is dramatic.

  9. Modulated gamma ray beam absorptiometer

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the study and operating of a heavy elements content measuring instrument. This apparatus (French patent n0 2184533, December 16, 1974) uses the absorption of a modulated gamma ray beam to measure the concentration of 5 to 500 g per litre uranium of plutonium solutions with an over 1% accuracy. The activity of the fission products present in the solution may rise to 60 Ci/l. An automatic device suppresses all daily checkings and adjustements. The tension obtained is proportional to the content of the heavy element being measured. The influence of the nitric acid content is twenty times as weak as in the case of a conventional densimeter. This apparatus is particularly adapted to fuel reprocessing plants

  10. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    Kern, J. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  11. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  12. A 16N gamma-ray facility

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Stanley, Michelle R.; Foster, Charles C.; Komisarcik, Kevin; East, Gary W.; Vanderwerp, John D.; Friesel, Dennis L.

    1997-02-01

    A practical 16N gamma-ray source is created in a medium-energy cyclotron environment. A 16N source emits 6129 and 7115 keV gamma rays. The viability of this several μCi source for detector calibration and studying detector physics is established.

  13. A 16N gamma-ray facility

    A practical 16N gamma-ray source is created in a medium-energy cyclotron environment. A 16N source emits 6129 and 7115 keV gamma rays. The viability of this several μCi source for detector calibration and studying detector physics is established. (orig.)

  14. Intercomparison of gamma ray analysis software packages

    The IAEA undertook an intercomparison exercise to review available software for gamma ray spectra analysis. This document describes the methods used in the intercomparison exercise, characterizes the software packages reviewed and presents the results obtained. Only direct results are given without any recommendation for a particular software or method for gamma ray spectra analysis

  15. Gamma-ray pulsars: a gold mine

    Grenier, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    The most energetic neutron stars, powered by their rotation, are capable of producing pulsed radiation from the radio up to gamma rays with nearly TeV energies. These pulsars are part of the universe of energetic and powerful particle accelerators, using their uniquely fast rotation and formidable magnetic fields to accelerate particles to ultra-relativistic speed. The extreme properties of these stars provide an excellent testing ground, beyond Earth experience, for nuclear, gravitational, and quantum-electrodynamical physics. A wealth of gamma-ray pulsars has recently been discovered with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The energetic gamma rays enable us to probe the magnetospheres of neutron stars and particle acceleration in this exotic environment. We review the latest developments in this field, beginning with a brief overview of the properties and mysteries of rotation-powered pulsars, and then discussing gamma-ray observations and magnetospheric models in more detail.

  16. Unveiling the Secrets of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Gomboc, A

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are unpredictable and brief flashes of gamma rays that occur about once a day in random locations in the sky. Since gamma rays do not penetrate the Earth's atmosphere, they are detected by satellites, which automatically trigger ground-based telescopes for follow-up observations at longer wavelengths. In this introduction to Gamma Ray Bursts we review how building a multi-wavelength picture of these events has revealed that they are the most energetic explosions since the Big Bang and are connected with stellar deaths in other galaxies. However, in spite of exceptional observational and theoretical progress in the last 15 years, recent observations raise many questions which challenge our understanding of these elusive phenomena. Gamma Ray Bursts therefore remain one of the hottest topics in modern astrophysics.

  17. Gamma-ray detected radio galaxies

    Beckmann, Volker; Soldi, Simona; De Jong, Sandra; Kretschmer, Karsten; Savchenko, Volodymyr

    2016-07-01

    So far 15 radio galaxies have been detected in the gamma-ray domain by CGRO/EGRET and Fermi/LAT, with a few detections also in the VHE range. We search for distinguishing parameters and estimate the total number of gamma-ray emitting radio galaxies that are potentially detectable by Fermi/LAT. We use Fermi/LAT data in comparison with X-ray and hard X-ray data in order to constrain basic parameters such as the total power of the inverse Compton branch and the position of its peak. We search for possible correlations between the radio, UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray domain and derive the number counts distribution. We then compare their properties with those of the radio galaxies in the 3CRR and SMS4 catalogues. The data show no correlation between the peak of the inverse Compton emission and its luminosity. For the gamma-ray detected radio galaxies the luminosities in the various bands are correlated, except for the UV band, but there is no indication of a correlation of peak frequency or luminosity with the spectral slopes in the X-ray or gamma-ray band. The comparison with other bright radio galaxies shows that the gamma-ray detected objects are among those that have the largest X-ray but rather moderate radio fluxes. Their UV and X-ray luminosities are similar, but gamma-ray detected radio galaxies are predominantly of type FR-I, while the 3CRR sample contains mainly FR-II objects. The number counts of the so far gamma-ray detected radio galaxies shows a very shallow slope, indicating that potentially a fraction of radio galaxies has been missed so far or has not been identified as such, although the predicted number of 22 ± 7 is consistent with the observed 15 objects.

  18. Gamma-ray Astronomy and GLAST

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray (30 MeV to 100 GeV) sky has been relatively poorly studied. Most of our current knowledge comes from observations made by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), which revealed that the GeV gamma-ray sky is rich and vibrant. Studies of astrophysical objects at GeV energies are interesting for several reasons: The high energy gamma-rays are often produced by a different physical process than the better studied X-ray and optical emission, thus providing a unique information for understanding these sources. Production of such high-energy photons requires that charged particles are accelerated to equally high energies, or much greater. Thus gamma-ray astronomy is the study of extreme environments, with natural and fundamental connections to cosmic-ray and neutrino astrophysics. The launch of GLAST in 2008 will herald a watershed in our understanding of the high energy gamma-ray sky, providing dramatic improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution and energy range. GLAST will open a new avenue to study our Universe as well as to answer scientific questions EGRET observations have raised. In this talk, I will describe the GLAST instruments and capabilities and highlight some of the science we expect to address.

  19. Study of X-rays and nuclear gamma -rays in muonic thallium

    Backe, H; Jahnke, U; Kankeleit, E; Pearce, R M; Petitjean, C; Schellenberg, L; Schneuwly, H; Schröder, W U; Walter, H K; Zehnder, A

    1972-01-01

    Energies and intensities of muonic X-rays, nuclear gamma -rays and mu -capture gamma -rays were measured in natural muonic thallium with Ge (Li) detectors. The absolute intensities of higher mu X-rays were reproduced by a cascade calculation starting with a statistical population at n=20 including K-, L- and M-conversion. The electron screening effect was deduced from energies of higher mu X-rays. Eight prompt nuclear gamma -rays were found. This excitation explains the anomalous intensity ratios of the 2p-1s and 3d-2p fine structure components. From the nuclear gamma -rays of the first excited states were deduced: the magnetic h.f. splittings, muonic isomer shifts E2/M1 mixing ratios and the half-life in the presence of the muon in /sup 205/Tl. Evidence for a magnetic nuclear polarization was found. An isotope shift of Delta E=10.35+or-0.25 keV was measured for the 1s/sub 1/2/ state which is compared with data from optical spectroscopy. From an analysis of the time distribution of delayed gamma -rays from mu...

  20. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  1. Gamma-Ray Bursts: The End Game

    Lamb, Don

    1997-11-01

    The nature of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in astrophysics for more than a quarter century. A major reason for this is that no definite counterparts to the bursts could be found at other wavelengths, despite intense efforts spanning more than two decades. Consequently, the study of gamma-ray bursts has been isolated from the rest of astronomy. Scientists studying them have had only the laws of physics and the bursts themselves to guide them in attempting to solve the burst mystery. All of this changed dramatically with the discovery earlier this year of fading X-ray and optical sources in the arcminute-sized positional error boxes of several gamma-ray bursts. For the first time, temporal, as well as spatial, coincidence could be used to associate these X-ray and optical sources with the gamma-ray bursts. As a result, the odds are great that the fading X-ray and optical sources are counterparts of the bursts, and that the study of gamma-ray bursts has finally been connected with the rest of astronomy. In this talk, we describe the dramatic new information about the nature of gamma-ray bursts that the X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the fading sources have provided, and emphasize the implications that this information has for the distance scale to the bursts.

  2. An optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectrometry

    De la Torre, F.; Rios M, C.; Ruvalcaba A, M. G.; Mireles G, F.; Saucedo A, S.; Davila R, I.; Pinedo, J. L., E-mail: fta777@hotmail.co [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Centro Regional de Estudis Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work aims to obtain an optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectroscopy by means of Genie 2000 (Canberra). Twenty different analysis sequences were customized using different peak area percentages and different algorithms for: 1) peak finding, and 2) peak area determination, and with or without the use of a library -based on evaluated nuclear data- of common gamma-ray emitters in environmental samples. The use of an optimum analysis sequence with certified nuclear information avoids the problems originated by the significant variations in out-of-date nuclear parameters of commercial software libraries. Interference-free gamma ray energies with absolute emission probabilities greater than 3.75% were included in the customized library. The gamma-ray spectroscopy system (based on a Ge Re-3522 Canberra detector) was calibrated both in energy and shape by means of the IAEA-2002 reference spectra for software intercomparison. To test the performance of the analysis sequences, the IAEA-2002 reference spectrum was used. The z-score and the reduced {chi}{sup 2} criteria were used to determine the optimum analysis sequence. The results show an appreciable variation in the peak area determinations and their corresponding uncertainties. Particularly, the combination of second derivative peak locate with simple peak area integration algorithms provides the greater accuracy. Lower accuracy comes from the combination of library directed peak locate algorithm and Genie's Gamma-M peak area determination. (Author)

  3. An optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectrometry

    This work aims to obtain an optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectroscopy by means of Genie 2000 (Canberra). Twenty different analysis sequences were customized using different peak area percentages and different algorithms for: 1) peak finding, and 2) peak area determination, and with or without the use of a library -based on evaluated nuclear data- of common gamma-ray emitters in environmental samples. The use of an optimum analysis sequence with certified nuclear information avoids the problems originated by the significant variations in out-of-date nuclear parameters of commercial software libraries. Interference-free gamma ray energies with absolute emission probabilities greater than 3.75% were included in the customized library. The gamma-ray spectroscopy system (based on a Ge Re-3522 Canberra detector) was calibrated both in energy and shape by means of the IAEA-2002 reference spectra for software intercomparison. To test the performance of the analysis sequences, the IAEA-2002 reference spectrum was used. The z-score and the reduced χ2 criteria were used to determine the optimum analysis sequence. The results show an appreciable variation in the peak area determinations and their corresponding uncertainties. Particularly, the combination of second derivative peak locate with simple peak area integration algorithms provides the greater accuracy. Lower accuracy comes from the combination of library directed peak locate algorithm and Genie's Gamma-M peak area determination. (Author)

  4. Software tool for xenon gamma-ray spectrometer control

    Chernysheva, I. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Shustov, A. E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Pyae Nyein, Sone; Petrenko, D.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2016-02-01

    Software tool "Acquisition and processing of gamma-ray spectra" for xenon gamma-ray spectrometers control was developed. It supports the multi-windows interface. Software tool has the possibilities for acquisition of gamma-ray spectra from xenon gamma-ray detector via USB or RS-485 interfaces, directly or via TCP-IP protocol, energy calibration of gamma-ray spectra, saving gamma-ray spectra on a disk.

  5. High Energy Radiation from $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    Dermer, C D; Dermer, Charles D.; Chiang, James

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) engines are probed most intimately during the prompt gamma-ray luminous phase when the expanding blast wave is closest to the explosion center. Using GRBs 990123 and 940217 as guides, we briefly review observations of high-energy emission from GRBs and summarize some problems in GRB physics. \\gamma\\gamma transparency arguments imply relativistic beaming. The parameters that go into the external shock model are stated, and we show numerical simulation results of gamma-ray light curves from relativistic blast waves with different amounts of baryon loading. A distinct component due to the synchrotron self-Compton process produces significant emission at GeV and TeV energies. Predictions for spectral and temporal evolution at these energies are presented for a blast wave expanding into uniform surroundings. Observations of the slow decay of GeV-TeV radiation provide evidence for ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration in GRBs.

  6. The Polarization Dependence of Gamma-Gamma Absorption - Implications for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Blazars

    Boettcher, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the dependence of the opacity for high-energy gamma-rays to gamma-gamma absorption by low-energy photons, on the polarization of the gamma-ray and target photons. This process has so far only been considered using the polarization-averaged gamma-gamma absorption cross section. It is demonstrated that in the case of polarized gamma-ray emission, subject to source-intrinsic gamma-gamma absorption by polarized target photons, this may lead to a slight over-estimation of the gamma-gamma opacity by up to ~ 10 % in the case of a perfectly ordered magnetic field. Thus, for realistic astrophysical scenarios with partially ordered magnetic fields, the use of the polarization-averaged gamma-gamma cross section is justified for practical purposes, such as estimates of minimum Doppler factors inferred for gamma-ray bursts and blazars, based on gamma-gamma transparency arguments, and this paper quantifies the small error incurred by the unpolarized-radiation approximation. Furthermore, i...

  7. Gamma-Ray Burst Physics with GLAST

    Omodei, N.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-10-06

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV, the upper end of which is one of the last poorly observed region of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The ancestor of the GLAST/LAT was the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector, which flew onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The amount of information and the step forward that the high energy astrophysics made thanks to its 9 years of observations are impressive. Nevertheless, EGRET uncovered the tip of the iceberg, raising many questions, and it is in the light of EGRET's results that the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) vastly more capable than instruments own previously, as well as a secondary instrument, the GLAST Bursts Monitor, or GBM, to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science is one of the most exciting challenges for the GLAST mission, exploring the high energy emission of one of the most intense phenomena in the sky, shading light on various problems: from the acceleration of particles to the emission processes, to more exotic physics like Quantum Gravity effect. In this paper we report the work done so far in the simulation development as well as the study of the LAT sensitivity to GRB.

  8. Gamma-ray emission from globular clusters

    Tam, P H Thomas; Hui, C Y

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, the fruitful data provided by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects like millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Gamma-ray emission between 100 MeV to 10 GeV has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our Galaxy, most notably 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gamma-ray globular clusters, empirical relations between the gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as stellar encounter rate, metallicity, as well as optical and infrared photon energy density in the cluster, have been derived. The gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few GeV. Together with the detection of pulsed gamma-rays from a millisecond pulsar in a globular cluster, such spectral signature gives support that gamma-rays from globular clusters are collective curvature emission from...

  9. Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-06-14

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  10. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  11. Librarian driven analysis of gamma ray spectra

    For a set of a priori given radionuclides extracted from a general nuclide data library, the authors use median estimates of the gamma-peak areas and estimates of their errors to produce a list of possible radionuclides matching gamma ray line(s). The identification of a given radionuclide is obtained by searching for a match with the energy information of a database. This procedure is performed in an interactive graphic mode by markers that superimpose, on the spectral data, the energy information and yields provided by a general gamma ray data library. This library of experimental data includes approximately 17,000 gamma ray energy lines related to 756 known gamma emitter radionuclides listed by the ICRP. (author)

  12. Gamma rays from extragalactic astrophysical sources

    Bosch-Ramon, V

    2011-01-01

    Presently there are several classes of detected gamma-ray extragalatic sources. They are mostly associated to active galactic nuclei (AGN) and (at soft gamma rays) to gamma-ray bursts (GRB), but not only. Active galactic nuclei consist of accreting supermassive black holes hosted by a galaxy that present in some cases powerful relativistic jet activity. These sources, which have been studied in gamma rays for several decades, are probably the most energetic astrophysical objects, and their appearance depends much on whether their jets point to us. Gamma-ray bursts, thought to be associated to collapsing or merging stellar-mass objects at cosmological distances, are also accreting highly relativistic jet sources that shine strongly at high energies. These are very short-duration events, but they are also the most luminous. Recently, star formation galaxies have turned out to be also gamma-ray emitters. On the other hand, clusters of galaxies have not been detected beyond X-rays yet. These are the largest known...

  13. Gamma Ray Astronomy with Magnetized Zevatrons

    Armengaud, E; Miniati, F; Armengaud, Eric; Sigl, Guenter; Miniati, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    Nearby sources of cosmic rays up to a ZeV(=10^21 eV) could be observed with a multi-messenger approach including secondary gamma-rays and neutrinos. If cosmic rays above ~10^18 eV are produced in magnetized environments such as galaxy clusters, the flux of secondary gamma-rays below ~1 TeV can be enhanced up to several orders of magnitudes compared to unmagnetized sources. A particular source of enhancement are synchrotron and cascade photons from e^+e^- pairs produced by protons from sources with relatively steep injection spectra proportional to E^-2.6. Such sources should be visible at the same time in ultra-high energy cosmic ray experiments and gamma-ray telescopes.

  14. INTEGRAL & RXTE View of Gamma-ray Binaries

    Jian LI; Torres, Diego F.; Zhang, Shu; WANG, JIANMIN

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray binaries are X-ray binaries with gamma-ray emissions. Their multi-wavelength emissions range from radio, optical, X-ray and to very high energy (TeV). X-ray emissions are crucial to understand the nature of gamma-ray binaries. INTEGRAL and RXTE have covered and monitored most of the gamma-ray binaries in hard and soft X-rays. Here we report the results of several gamma-ray binaries and possible gamma-ray binaries from INTEGRAL and RXTE.

  15. Gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation methodology

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a well established nuclear technique, suited to investigate the microstructural or elemental composition and can be applied to studies of a large variety of samples. The work with large samples involves, beside the development of large irradiation devices with well know neutron field characteristics, the knowledge of perturbing phenomena and adequate evaluation of correction factors like: neutron self shielding, extended source correction, gamma ray auto absorption. The objective of the works presented in this paper is to validate an appropriate methodology for gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation for large inhomogeneous samples. For this purpose a benchmark experiment has been defined - a simple gamma ray transmission experiment, easy to be reproduced. The gamma ray attenuation in pottery samples has been measured and computed using MCNP5 code. The results show a good agreement between the computed and measured values, proving that the proposed methodology is able to evaluate the correction factors. (authors)

  16. Gamma rays from clusters of galaxies

    Blasi, P; Brunetti, G; Blasi, Pasquale; Gabici, Stefano; Brunetti, Gianfranco

    2007-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies and the large scale filaments that connect neighboring clusters are expected to be sites of acceleration of charged particles and sources of non-thermal radiation from radio frequencies to gamma rays. Gamma rays are particularly interesting targets of investigation, since they may provide precious information on the nature and efficiency of the processes of acceleration and magnetic confinement of hadrons within clusters of galaxies. Here we review the status of viable scenarios that lead to the production of gamma rays from large scale structures and are compatible with the multifrequency observations that are already available. We also discuss the possibility of detection of gamma rays with space-borne telescopes such as GLAST and ground based Cherenkov telescopes, and the physical information that may be gathered from such observations.

  17. Gamma-Ray Astrophysics NSSTC Fermi GBM

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is not a pointed or imaging instrument. To determine fluxes for known sources, we measure the change in the count rate...

  18. Precision measurements of gamma-ray intensities

    To determine relative intensities of gamma rays in the region of 280 to 2750 keV, Ge(Li) detectors were calibrated with standard sources and cascade gamma-ray sources. Decay rates of the standard sources were determined by means of the 4πβ-γ or 4πX-γ coincidence method. Experimental conditions were improved and spectra were carefully analyzed. Relative gamma-ray intensities of 56Co, 88Y, sup(110m)Ag, 133Ba, 134Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 192Ir and 207Bi were determined within the accuracy of about 0.5% for strong gamma rays. Intensities per decays were obtained from the relative intensities for most of the nuclides. (author)

  19. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  20. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-12-01

    I'll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ˜ 0.4% - 3%.

  1. Gamma Ray Astronomy with Magnetized Zevatrons

    Armengaud, Eric; Sigl, Guenter; Miniati, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    Nearby sources of cosmic rays up to a ZeV(=10^21 eV) could be observed with a multi-messenger approach including secondary gamma-rays and neutrinos. If cosmic rays above ~10^18 eV are produced in magnetized environments such as galaxy clusters, the flux of secondary gamma-rays below ~1 TeV can be enhanced up to several orders of magnitudes compared to unmagnetized sources. A particular source of enhancement are synchrotron and cascade photons from e^+e^- pairs produced by protons from sources...

  2. Absolute measurements of the alpha-gamma emitters activities by a sum-coincidence method

    The absolute activity of U-235 contained in a UO2 sample, using a sum-coincidence circuit which selected only the alpha particles which were simultaneous with the well known 184 Kev gamma radiation from Th-231. The alpha particles were detected by ZnS(Ag) scintillator specially designed to show its maximun efficiency for U-235 alpha particles, whereas the gamma radiation was detected by NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The values obtained for the half-life of U-235 was compared with data from various observers using different experimental techniques. (Author)

  3. Cosmic gamma-ray studies at Srinagar

    Cosmic gamma ray studies being carried out at the Nuclear Research Laboratory at Srinagar and Gulmarg are described and some of the results of observation and possible conclusions are mentioned. These studies use ground base techniques which can detect short-time scale gamma ray bursts from supernovae and primordial black hole (PBH) and also high energy gamma rays from various point sources. A large area photomultiplier system is employed to detect pulses of visible fluorescence radiation which is caused by a gamma ray burst of supernovae of PBH origin. However, any signal out a large number of signals recorded at Gulmarg could not be identified as coinciding with any such event observed elsewhere. It shows that the size of the burst source cannot exceed 30 km., which is in agreement with neutron-star source models. An array using plastic scintillator detectors at the corner of a 10 metre square has been set up at Gulmarg to detect air-shower due to high energy gamma rays. Cerenkov light pulses recorded at Gulmarg have been projected on the sidereal map. A significant excess observed in the right ascension range 20 +- 3 h suggests the possible presence of a quasic-periodic source of gamma rays of energy greater than 1014 eV in the general direction of Cygnus X-3. Future programme of studies is mentioned. (K.M.)

  4. Gamma-ray pulsar studies with COMPTEL

    Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Diehl, R.; Lichti, G.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A. W.; Connors, A.; Ryan, J.; Bennett, K.; Busetta, M.; Carraminana, A.; Buccheri, R.; Grenier, I. A.

    1994-06-01

    Since the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) the number of detected gamma-ray pulsars increased from two to six. COMPTEL, on-board CGRO and sensitive to gamma-rays with energies between approximately 0.7 and 30 MeV, detected three of these unambiguously. The classical Crab and Vela pulsars have been observed on several occasions and detailed pulse patterns and spectral parameters have been derived. The new CGRO gamma-ray pulsar PSR B1509-58 has been detected by COMPTEL at a significance level above 4 sigma, consistently in a timing and spatial analysis. A likely detection of Geminga has been obtained at an approximately 3 sigma level. This indication is found in a phase interval in which COS B data showed the presence of a new variable component, Interpeak 2, exhibiting a very soft spectrum above 50 MeV. The diversities in light-curve sphapes and spectral distributions, the apparent time variabilities, and the significant differences in the fractions of the spin-down power radiated at gamma-ray energies in this small sample of gamma-ray pulsars pose important constraints to pulsar modeling.

  5. Heliospheric Origin of $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts

    Li Ti Pei

    1997-01-01

    Systematic variations of average observational characteristics and correlation properties between different parameters of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with time from 1991 April to 1994 September are revealed. It is hard to explain the observed long-term variability by variations of experimental conditions. The variability of GRB properties with the time scale of months to years, together with the similarity between GRBs, solar hard X-ray flares and terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, may indicate an origin of GRBs, at least partly, within the heliosphere. Large-voltage and high-temperature pinch plasma columns produced by disruptive electrical discharges in the outer heliosphere can generate hard X-ray and gamma-ray flashes with energy spectra and spectral evolution characters consistent with that observed in GRBs.

  6. Absolute hydrogen depth profiling using the resonant $^{1}$H($^{15}$N,$\\alpha\\gamma$)$^{12}$C nuclear reaction

    Reinhardt, Tobias P; Bemmerer, Daniel; Stöckel, Klaus; Wagner, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Resonant nuclear reactions are a powerful tool for the determination of the amount and profile of hydrogen in thin layers of material. Usually, this tool requires the use of a standard of well-known composition. The present work, by contrast, deals with standard-less hydrogen depth profiling. This approach requires precise nuclear data, e.g. on the widely used $^{1}$H($^{15}$N,$\\alpha\\gamma$)$^{12}$C reaction, resonant at 6.4\\,MeV $^{15}$N beam energy. Here, the strongly anisotropic angular distribution of the emitted $\\gamma$-rays from this resonance has been re-measured, resolving a previous discrepancy. Coefficients of (0.38$\\pm$0.04) and (0.80$\\pm$0.04) have been deduced for the second and fourth order Legendre polynomials, respectively. In addition, the resonance strength has been re-evaluated to (25.0$\\pm$1.5)\\,eV, 10\\% higher than previously reported. A simple working formula for the hydrogen concentration is given for cases with known $\\gamma$-ray detection efficiency. Finally, the absolute approach i...

  7. Found: A Galaxy's Missing Gamma Rays

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Recent reanalysis of data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has resulted in the first detection of high-energy gamma rays emitted from a nearby galaxy. This discovery reveals more about how supernovae interact with their environments.Colliding Supernova RemnantAfter a stellar explosion, the supernovas ejecta expand, eventually encountering the ambient interstellar medium. According to models, this generates a strong shock, and a fraction of the kinetic energy of the ejecta is transferred into cosmic rays high-energy radiation composed primarily of protons and atomic nuclei. Much is still unknown about this process, however. One open question is: what fraction of the supernovas explosion power goes into accelerating these cosmic rays?In theory, one way to answer this is by looking for gamma rays. In a starburst galaxy, the collision of the supernova-accelerated cosmic rays with the dense interstellar medium is predicted to produce high-energy gamma rays. That radiation should then escape the galaxy and be visible to us.Pass 8 to the RescueObservational tests of this model, however, have beenstumped by Arp 220. This nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy is the product of a galaxy merger ~700 million years ago that fueled a frenzy of starbirth. Due to its dusty interior and extreme levels of star formation, Arp 220 has long been predicted to emit the gamma rays produced by supernova-accelerated cosmic rays. But though weve looked, gamma-ray emission has never been detected from this galaxy until now.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Fang-Kun Peng (Nanjing University) reprocessed 7.5 years of Fermi observations using the new Pass 8 analysis software. The resulting increase in resolution revealed the first detection of GeV emission from Arp 220!Acceleration EfficiencyGamma-ray luminosity vs. total infrared luminosity for LAT-detected star-forming galaxies and Seyferts. Arp 220s luminosities are consistent with the scaling relation. [Peng et al. 2016

  8. Gamma rays from the interstellar medium

    This thesis describes new gamma-ray views on cosmic rays and the interstellar medium. The author describes the COS-B data base and the pre-launch and in-flight calibration data used for all analyses. Diffuse galactic gamma radiation (> 50 MeV) may be either a result of cosmic-ray-matter interactions, or of the cosmic-ray electrons with the interstellar radiation field (mainly at optical and infrared wavelengths), through the inverse-Compton process. A detailed comparison between the gamma-ray observations of the large complex of interstellar clouds in Orion and Monoceros and the CO and HI surveys of this region is given. It gives insight into the cloud penetration of cosmic rays and in the relation between CO detections and molecular hydrogen column densities. Next, the radial distribution of gamma rays in the Galaxy is studied, as well as the galactic centre (more precisely, the central 400 pc), which contains a large concentration of CO molecules. The H2/CO abundance and the cosmic-ray density in the galactic centre are discussed and compared to the findings for the galactic disk. In various analyses in this thesis a likelihood-ratio method is applied for parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. A general description of this method is added as an appendix. (Auth.)

  9. Gamma-ray binaries and related systems

    Dubus, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    After initial claims and a long hiatus, it is now established that several binary stars emit high (0.1-100 GeV) and very high energy (>100 GeV) gamma rays. A new class has emerged called 'gamma-ray binaries', since most of their radiated power is emitted beyond 1 MeV. Accreting X-ray binaries, novae and a colliding wind binary (eta Car) have also been detected - 'related systems' that confirm the ubiquity of particle acceleration in astrophysical sources. Do these systems have anything in common ? What drives their high-energy emission ? How do the processes involved compare to those in other sources of gamma rays: pulsars, active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants ? I review the wealth of observational and theoretical work that have followed these detections, with an emphasis on gamma-ray binaries. I present the current evidence that gamma-ray binaries are driven by rotation-powered pulsars. Binaries are laboratories giving access to different vantage points or physical conditions on a regular timescale as ...

  10. GRI: the gamma-ray imager mission

    Knödlseder, J

    2006-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are the major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. With the INTEGRAL observatory, ESA has provided a unique tool to the astronomical community revealing hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes. While INTEGRAL provides the global overview over the soft gamma-ray sky, there is a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources. In soft X-rays a...

  11. Transuranic isotopic analysis using gamma rays

    Clark, D; Decman, D

    1998-10-15

    Transuranic waste typically emits gamma rays that are characteristic of the isotopic composition of the materials. If the area of the gamma ray photopeaks in a High Purity Ge (HPGe) spectrum can be accurately determined and if the gamma ray/x-ray branching ratios and half-lives for the radionuclides in the sample are known the relative concentration of each isotope in the waste can be determined using tomographic techniques. Methods used to accurately determine these photopeaks usually requires a computer code that does multi-peak analysis and unfolding of a given part of the gamma-ray spectrum. Computer techniques allow an accurate determination of the photopeaks and hence the isotopic composition of the waste material. These computer techniques can be automated for different spectra within a wide range of possible isotopic compositions. To improve photopeak statistics all of the spectra taken in a tomographic survey of the sample are summed and are used in the isotopic analysis. The method, accuracy, and limitations of this type of isotopic analysis system will be discussed. The gamma ray acquisition system is currently being upgraded with multiple HPGe detectors to improve the counting statistics obtainable in a given amount of time. The results of the DOE performance evaluations and the progress of the multiple detector upgrade will be discussed.

  12. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  13. Absolute calibration of soft X-ray plates by using a self-calibrated X-ray bolometer

    The sensitivity of soft X-ray plates, Kodak 101-05 and ILFORD Q-PLATE at 1.1 keV was measured by using a self-calibrated X-ray bolometer as a standard detector for absolute measurements of soft X-rays. Cross-calibration was also made by using an X-ray sensitive diamond detector. Good agreement in the absolute sensitivity was obtained between the bolometer and the diamond detector. (author)

  14. Gamma Ray Bursts in the HAWC Era

    Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Fox, Derek; Gao, He; Senno, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.

  15. Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

  16. Evaluation of gamma-ray intensities

    Relative intensities and intensities per decay of gamma rays were evaluated for 16 nuclides, 22Na, 24Na, 46Sc, 54Mn, 60Co, 85Sr, 88Y, 95Nb, sup(108m)Ag, 134Cs, 133Ba, 139Ce, sup(180m)Hf, 198Au, 203Hg and 207Bi. For most of these nuclides disintegration rates can be determined by means of β-γ or X-γ coincidence method. Since decay schemes of these nuclides are established, intensities per decay of strong gamma rays were accurately evaluated by using weak beta-ray branching ratios, relative gamma-ray intensities and internal conversion coefficients. Half-lives of the nuclides were also evaluated. Use of the nuclides, therefore, are recommended for precision intensity calibration of the detectors. (author)

  17. Gamma ray astronomy and the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    Diffusive shock acceleration operating at expanding supernova remnant shells is by far the most popular model for the origin of galactic cosmic rays. Despite the general consensus received by the model, an unambiguous and conclusive proof of the supernova remnant hypothesis is still missing. In this context, the recent developments in gamma ray astronomy provide us with precious insights into the problem of the origin of galactic cosmic rays, since production of gamma rays is expected both during the acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova remnant shocks and during their subsequent propagation in the interstellar medium. In particular, the recent detection of a number of supernova remnants at TeV energies nicely fits with the model, but it still does not constitute a conclusive proof of it, mainly due to the difficulty of disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the observed gamma ray emission. The main goal of my research is to search for an unambiguous and conclusive observational test for proving (or disproving) the idea that supernova remnants are the sources of galactic cosmic rays with energies up to (at least) the cosmic ray knee. Our present comprehension of the mechanisms of particle acceleration at shocks and of the propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields encourages beliefs that such a conclusive test might come from future observations of supernova remnants and of the Galaxy in the almost unexplored domain of multi-TeV gamma rays. (author)

  18. Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics-and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI

    Wunderer, C. B.; Ballmoos, P. V.; Barriere, N.;

    2009-01-01

    , albeit at much more modest sensitivities. There will be clearly a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources in the 100-keV to MeV regime. Recent technological advances in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Lane diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques......Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are...... accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. While Fermi will take the...

  19. A Search for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Pulsars, and the Application of Kalman Filters to Gamma-Ray Reconstruction

    Jones, B B

    2002-01-01

    Part I describes the analysis of periodic and transient signals in EGRET data. A method to search for the transient flux from gamma-ray bursts independent of triggers from other gamma-ray instruments is developed. Several known gamma-ray bursts were independently detected, and there is evidence for a previously unknown gamma-ray burst candidate. Statistical methods using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference are developed and implemented to extract periodic signals from gamma-ray sources ...

  20. Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    Maryland Univ. College Park

    2001-01-01

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory, located at an altitude of 8,600 feet in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico, is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire sky for sources of TeV gamma rays. It is uniquely capable of searching for transient sources of VHE gamma rays. The core of the detector is a 60m x 80m x 8m pond instrumented with 723 PMTs deployed in two layers. This part of the detector is complete and has operated continuously since Jan. 2000. Initial studies including searches for gamma-ray sources are ongoing, and preliminary results are available. The final stage of construction is under way. We are deploying 170 auxiliary "outrigger" water Cherenkov detectors in an area of 40,000 square-meters surrounding the pond, which will significantly enhance our ability to reject background and more accurately reconstruct the gamma-ray direction and energy. In addition, we are lowering the energy threshold of the detector by using custom processing to en...

  1. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ < z < $6, using deep survey galaxy observations from Spitzer, Hubble and GALEX and have consequently predicted spectral absorption features for extragalactic gamma-ray sources. This procedure can also be reversed. Determining the cutoff energies of gamma-ray sources with known redshifts using the recently launched Fermi gamma-ray space telescope may enable a more precise determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  2. Gamma-Ray Astronomy from the Ground

    Horns, D

    2016-01-01

    The observation of cosmic gamma-rays from the ground is based upon the detection of gamma-ray initiated air showers. At energies between approximately $10^{11}$ eV and $10^{13}$ eV, the imaging air Cherenkov technique is a particularly successful approach to observe gamma-ray sources with energy fluxes as low as $\\approx 10^{-13}$ erg\\,cm$^{-2}\\,$s$^{-1}$. The observations of gamma-rays in this energy band probe particle acceleration in astrophysical plasma conditions and are sensitive to high energy phenomena beyond the standard model of particle physics (e.g., self-annihilating or decaying dark matter, violation of Lorentz invariance, mixing of photons with light pseudo-scalars). The current standing of the field and its major instruments are summarised briefly by presenting selected highlights. A new generation of ground based gamma-ray instruments is currently under development. The perspectives and opportunities of these future facilities will be discussed.

  3. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Tam, Pak-Hin T.; Hui, Chung Y.; Kong, Albert K. H.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs). Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC) emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  4. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from beta-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of their prime energy sources. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massi...

  5. Gamma ray source studies using muon tracking

    A large area (128 m2) streamer tube detector, located within the KASCADE-Grande experiment has been built. We discuss the possibility of observing gamma-ray sources by means of photo-pion produced single isolated muon tracks above the background of cosmic-ray muons using a muon tracking detector (MTD). Properties of the photo-production process in the atmosphere and of the MTD which support the identification of gammas are discussed. The sensitivity of the technique of observing the Crab energy spectrum in the tens of GeV range is discussed. Gamma spectra accumulated from Crab and a Mrk 421 flux correlation with X-ray (RXTE/PCA) are presented.

  6. Solution To The Gamma Ray Burst Mystery?

    Dar, Arnon

    1996-01-01

    Photoexcitation and ionization of partially ionized heavy atoms in highly relativistic flows by interstellar photons, followed by their reemission in radiative recombination and decay, boost star-light into beamed $\\gamma$ rays along the flow direction. Repeated excitation/decay of highly relativistic baryonic ejecta from merger or accretion induced collapse of neutron stars in dense stellar regions (DSRs), like galactic cores, globular clusters and super star-clusters, can convert enough kinetic energy in such events in distant galaxies into cosmological gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The model predicts remarkably well all the main observed temporal and spectral properties of GRBs. Its success strongly suggests that GRBs are $\\gamma$ ray tomography pictures of DSRs in galaxies at cosmological distances with unprecedented resolution: A time resolution of $dt\\sim 1~ms$ in a GRB can resolve stars at a Hubble distance which are separated by only $D\\sim 10^{10}cm$. This is equivalent to the resolving power of an optica...

  7. Gamma-ray bursters at cosmological distances

    Paczynski, B.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that some, perhaps most, gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances, like quasars, with a redshift of about 1 or 2. This proposition requires a release of supernova-like energy of about 10 to the 51st ergs within less than 1 s, making gamma-ray bursters the brightest objects known in the universe, many orders of magnitude brighter than any quasars. This power must drive a highly relativistic outflow of electron-positron plasma and radiation from the source. It is proposed that three gamma-ray bursts, all with identical spectra, detected from B1900 + 14 by Mazets, Golenetskii, and Gur'yan and reported in 1979, were all due to a single event multiply imaged by a gravitational lens. The time intervals between the successive bursts, 10 hr to 3 days, were due to differences in the light travel time for different images.

  8. Solar hard X-rays and gamma-rays

    甘为群; 常进; 李友平; 林春梅

    2002-01-01

    We briefly introduce our recent work on the spectral evolution of energetic protons, the beam property of accelerated electrons, the gamma-ray flare classification, the temporal features of the annihilation line, the hard X-ray delayed events, the hydrodynamic process, and the continuum emission in solar flares.

  9. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  10. Gamma ray spectrometer for Lunar Scout 2

    Moss, C. E.; Burt, W. W.; Edwards, B. C.; Martin, R. A.; Nakano, George H.; Reedy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    We review the current status of the Los Alamos program to develop a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer for the Lunar Scout-II mission, which is the second of two Space Exploration Initiative robotic precursor missions to study the Moon. This instrument will measure gamma rays in the energy range of approximately 0.1 - 10 MeV to determine the composition of the lunar surface. The instrument is a high-purity germanium crystal surrounded by an CsI anticoincidence shield and cooled by a split Stirling cycle cryocooler. It will provide the abundance of many elements over the entire lunar surface.

  11. A Shotgun Model for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    Heinz, S

    1999-01-01

    We propose that gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are produced by a shower of heavy blobs running into circumstellar material at highly relativistic speeds. The gamma ray emission is produced in the shocks these bullets drive into the surrounding medium. The short term variability seen in GRBs is set by the slowing-down time of the bullets while the overall duration of the burst is set by the lifetime of the central engine. A requirement of this model is that the ambient medium be dense, consistent with a strong stellar wind. In contrast to other external shock scenarios, the efficiency of the shock can be close to unity.

  12. Gamma-ray surveys in uranium exploration

    This report is intended to provide newcomers to uranium exploration with an up-to-date statement of the principal factors to be considered in planning and using gamma-ray surveys. Since the report incorporates the results of recent research, and since its preparation was influenced by the cumulative experience of its contributors, it should also be useful to those who already have some knowledge of radioactivity surveys and methods. The intention is that the information and explanations given in the report will make it possible for gamma-ray surveys to be used in the most efficient way for a given exploration task

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Jets and Energetics

    Frail, D A

    2003-01-01

    The relativistic outflows from gamma-ray bursts are now thought to be narrowly collimated into jets. After correcting for this jet geometry there is a remarkable constancy of both the energy radiated by the burst and the kinetic energy carried by the outflow. Gamma-ray bursts are still the most luminous explosions in the Universe, but they release energies that are comparable to supernovae. The diversity of cosmic explosions appears to be governed by the fraction of energy that is coupled to ultra-relativistic ejecta.

  14. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    The Whipple Observatory High Resolution Camera will be used in a vigorous program of observations to search for new sources of very-high-energy gamma rays. In addition, a search for antimatter using the moon-earth system as an ion spectrometer will be begun. The first phase of GRANITE, the new 37-element 11-m camera, will be concluded with first light scheduled for September, 1991. The two cameras will operate in support of the Gamma Ray Observatory mission in the winter of 1991/2

  15. Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2001-01-01

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  16. Nuclear forensics using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Norman, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the past several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low- resolution gamma ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  17. Gamma rays induced variation in Plantago ovata

    Plantago ovata Fork., a medicinal herb, requires improvement in seed yield to meet would demand for its seed husk. Mutation breeding has been attempted on account of narrow genetic base of the crop. The mutagen, gamma rays from 60Co sources was tried for its effect on various phenotypic traits, including those related to seed yield. Studies indicate that P. ovata is radio-resistant. Gamma rays also induce alteration in mean and variance of yield related characters which can be exploited to select superior genotypes in this conservative crop

  18. Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts

    M. Della Valle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se revisa el estatus observacional de la conexi on Supernova (SN/Estallido de Rayos-Gamma (GRB. Recientes (y no tan recientes observaciones de GRBs largos sugieren que una fracci on signi cativa de ellos (pero no todos est an asociados con supernovas brillantes del tipo Ib/c. Estimaciones actuales de las tasas de producci on de GRBs y SNs dan una raz on para GRB/SNe-Ibc en el rango 0:4%

  19. Very high energy gamma-ray telescope at Gulmarg

    An indigenously built gamma-ray telescope has been operating at Gulmarg for the last four years. Based on the atmospheric Cerenkov technique, it can detect cosmic photons of energy above 1012 eV. The system employs six equatorially mounted parabolic mirrors each of 0.9 m aperture and viewed by a fast Cphotomultiplier tube at its focus. The stepper motor-based drive system of the telescope provides a pointing/tracking accuracy of 0.5deg in an effective field of view of 4deg diameter. The telescope is provided with an IBM PC/XT personal computer-based data acquisition system (storage capacity ∼0.5 Mbytes) as well as a home-built timing standard capable of giving absolute time information accurate within ±300 μs. In addition to steady and transient gamma-ray emissions from cosmic sources of different genres, the experiment enables one to meaningfully carry out periodicity searches from pulsar-like objects at time scales down to a few milliseconds. Already new and interesting insights have been obtained on the gamma-ray emission characteristics of several sources including Cygnus X-3, Geminga and AM-Herculis. (author). 12 refs., 10 figs

  20. Recent improvements in plutonium gamma-ray analysis using MGA

    MGA is a gamma-ray spectrum analysis program for determining relative plutonium isotopic abundances. It can determine plutonium isotopic abundances better than 1% using a high-resolution, low-energy, planar germanium detector and measurement times ten minutes or less. We have modified MGA to allow determination of absolute plutonium isotopic abundances in solutions. With calibration of a detector using a known solution concentration in a well-defined sample geometry, plutonium solution concentrations can be determined. MGA can include analysis of a second spectrum of the high-energy spectrum to include determination of fission product abundances relative to total plutonium. For the high-energy gamma-ray measurements we have devised a new hardware configuration, so that both the low- and high-energy gamma-ray detectors are mounted in a single cryostat thereby reducing weight and volume of the detector systems. We describe the detector configuration, and the performance of the MGA program for determining plutonium concentrations in solutions and fission product abundances

  1. About gamma-ray intensity measurement in manganese

    Full text: Thermal neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy setup at Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) is being used for the various properties like re-estimation of capture cross-sections, absolute intensity measurements, etc in different isotopes. The facility comprises a collimated thermal neutron beam having a flux of ∼2·l06 n/cm2/s at the target position about two meters away from the reactor wall. The measurement system consists of well-shielded anti-Compton/pair spectrometer assembly containing high-resolution HPGe detector surrounded by two large Nal crystals. The spectrometer was calibrated using standard radioactive sources up to 1.5 MeV. In the higher energy region (up to 10 MeV), the energy calibration was performed with prompt gamma rays from thermal neutron capture in chlorine. Spec pure powder and 5N pure Mn metal pieces were used for this study. Chlorine was used a comparator for calculation of Ko factor. The results have been tabulate for all interference free gamma-rays from manganese

  2. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  3. GammaModeler 3-D gamma-ray imaging technology

    The 3-D GammaModelertrademark system was used to survey a portion of the facility and provide 3-D visual and radiation representation of contaminated equipment located within the facility. The 3-D GammaModelertrademark system software was used to deconvolve extended sources into a series of point sources, locate the positions of these sources in space and calculate the 30 cm. dose rates for each of these sources. Localization of the sources in three dimensions provides information on source locations interior to the visual objects and provides a better estimate of the source intensities. The three dimensional representation of the objects can be made transparent in order to visualize sources located within the objects. Positional knowledge of all the sources can be used to calculate a map of the radiation in the canyon. The use of 3-D visual and gamma ray information supports improved planning decision-making, and aids in communications with regulators and stakeholders

  4. Absolute calibration of the soft X-ray streak camera static characteristic

    The soft X-ray streak camera is very important detection tool for studying soft X-ray time characteristics. We have calibrated its absolute energy response in terms of X rays provided by synchrotron Radiation Source on the BSRF. The combined uncertainty of quantum efficiency of the streak camera in 100-1000 eV photon energy region is 23%

  5. Skyshine spectra of gamma rays

    A study of the spectra of gamma photons back-scattered in vertical direction by infinite air above ground (skyshine) is presented. The source for these measurements is a 650 Ci Cobalt-60 point-source and the skyshine spectra are reported for distances from 150 m to 325 m from the source, measured with a 5 cm x 5 cm NaI(Tl) detector collimated with collimators of 12 mm and 20 mm diameter and 5 cm length. These continuous spectra are unfolded with Gold's iterative technique. The photon-spectra so obtained have a distinct line at 72 keV due to multiply-scattered photons. This is an energy where photoelectric and Compton cross-sections for multiply-scattered photons balance each other. The intensity of the line(I) decreases exponentially with distance (d) from the source obeying a relation of the type I = Isub(o)esup(-μd) where μ is called as ''Multiply-Scatter Coefficient'', a constant of the medium which is air in these measurements. This relationship is explained in terms of a halo around the source comprising of multiply-scattered gamma photons, Isub(0) being the intensity of these scattered photons at the location of cobalt-source. A fraction called as ''Back-scattered Fraction'', the ratio of Isub(0) to the number of original photons from the cobalt-source entering the infinite air, is also calculated. It is shown that with a properly calibrated detector system, this fraction can be used to determine the strength of a large gamma source, viz. a nuclear explosion in air, and for mineral prospecting. These conclusions are general and can be applied to any other infinite medium. Some forward-scatter (transmission) spectra of cobalt-60 source through 10 cm of Pb and 2.5 cm of Al are also reported. (auth.)

  6. Natural background gamma-ray spectrum. List of gamma-rays ordered in energy from natural radionuclides

    Ichimiya, Tsutomu [Japan Radioisotope Association, Tokyo (Japan); Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke

    1998-03-01

    A quick index to {gamma}-rays and X-rays from natural radionuclides is presented. In the list, {gamma}-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. The list also contains {gamma}-rays from radioactive nuclides produced in a germanium detector and its surrounding materials by interaction with cosmic neutrons, as well as direct {gamma}-rays from interaction with the neutrons. Artificial radioactive nuclides emitting {gamma}-rays with same or near energy value as that of the natural {gamma}-rays and X-rays are also listed. In appendix, {gamma}-ray spectra from a rock, uranium ore, thorium, monazite and uraninite and also background spectra obtained with germanium detectors placed in iron or lead shield have been given. The list is designed for use in {gamma}-ray spectroscopy under the conditions of highly natural background, such as in-situ environmental radiation monitoring or low-level activity measurements, with a germanium detector. (author)

  7. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) Observed with the Fermi-Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor: The First Hundred TGFs

    Fishman, G J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) is now detecting 2.1 TGFs per week. At this rate, nearly a hundred TGFs will have been detected by the time of this Meeting. This rate has increased by a factor of 8 since new flight software was uploaded to the spacecraft in November 2009 in order to increase the sensitivity of GBM to TGFs. The high time resolution (2 microseconds) allows temporal features to be resolved so that some insight may be gained on the origin and transport of the gamma-ray photons through the atmosphere. The absolute time of the TGFs, known to several microseconds, also allows accurate correlations of TGFs with lightning networks and other lightning-related phenomena. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 40 MeV. New results on the some temporal aspects of TGFs will be presented.

  8. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) Observed with the Fermi-Gamma-ray Burst Monitor: Temporal and Spectral Properties

    Fishman, G. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, W.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Bhat, P. N.

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) was detecting 2.1 TGFs per week. This rate has increased by a factor of 8 since new flight software was uploaded to the spacecraft in November 2009 in order to increase the sensitivity of GBM to TGFs. Further upgrades to Fermi-GBM to allow observations of weaker TGFs are in progress. The high time resolution (2 s) allows temporal features to be resolved so that some insight may be gained on the origin and transport of the gamma-ray photons through the atmosphere. The absolute time of the TGFs, known to several microseconds, also allows accurate correlations of TGFs with lightning networks and other lightning-related phenomena. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 40 MeV. New results on the some temporal aspects of TGFs will be presented along with spectral characteristics and properties of several electron-positron TGF events that have been identified.

  9. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    A mercuric iodide (HgI2) gamma ray imaging array and camera system previously described have been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on these data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criteria for the new camera will be presented. (orig.)

  10. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    Patt, B. E.; Beyerle, A. G.; Dolin, R. C.; Ortale, C.

    1989-11-01

    A mercuric iodide (HgI2) gamma ray imaging array and camera system previously described have been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on these data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criteria for the new camera will be presented.

  11. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    Patt, B.E.; Beyerle, A.G.; Dolin, R.C.; Ortale, C.

    1987-01-01

    A mercuric iodide gamma-ray imaging array and camera system previously described has been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on this data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criterion for the new camera will be presented. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    Patt, B.E.; Beyerle, A.G.; Dolin, R.C.; Ortale, C. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA). Santa Barbara Operations)

    1989-11-01

    A mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) gamma ray imaging array and camera system previously described have been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on these data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criteria for the new camera will be presented. (orig.).

  13. Gamma-Ray Telescope and Uncertainty Principle

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle is one of the important basic principles of quantum mechanics. In most of the books on quantum mechanics, this uncertainty principle is generally illustrated with the help of a gamma ray microscope, wherein neither the image formation criterion nor the lens properties are taken into account. Thus a better…

  14. Gamma ray induced female mutation in castor

    Three female mutants in castor (Ricinus communis L.) were obtained from 100 to 125 kR gamma-rays treated M2 population. The racemes of these mutants bore only pistillate flowers. This character is monogenic, recessive and these mutants can be used for large scale hybrid seed production

  15. Primary shutter and gamma ray trap

    This paper reports on the main radiation shutter and gamma ray trap, which will be used at LNLS front-ends that has been designed. The components external to the UHV chamber have been assembled and are undergoing tests. Vacuum requirements for the chamber have been estimated

  16. The new gamma-ray observatory: CTA

    Carr, John

    2016-07-01

    CTA is the next generation gamma-ray observatory and will have a factor 10 better sensitivity compared to existing facilities, as well as many other superior parameters. Aspects of array layout, performance and sites are presented. The broad range of forefront science which will be studied is described.

  17. The single backscattering of gamma rays

    The paper presents the results of the single backscattering investigations of gamma rays in various materials. A simplified mathematical model is given for determining the probability that a photon scattered back by a single Compton scattering is incident on the detector. The probability is calculated as a function of the primary photon energy and the atomic number Z of the scatterer. (Auth.)

  18. Neutrino Balls and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Holdom, B

    1994-01-01

    We propose a mechanism by which the neutrino emission from a supernova-type explosion can be converted into a gamma-ray burst of total energy $\\sim 10^{50}$ ergs. This occurs naturally if the explosion is situated inside a ball of trapped neutrinos, which in turn may lie at a galactic core. There are possible unique signatures of this scenario.

  19. Tracking and imaging gamma-ray experiment (TIGRE) for 300-keV to 100-MeV gamma-ray astronomy

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Bhattacharya, Dipen; Blair, Scott C.; Case, Gary; Dixon, David D.; Liu, Chia-Ling; O'Neill, Terrence J.; White, R. Stephen; Zych, Allen D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tracking and Imaging Gamma-Ray Experiment (TIGRE) uses multilayers of silicon strip detectors both as a gamma-ray converter and to track Compton recoil electrons and positron-electron pairs. The silicon strip detectors also measure the energy losses of these particles. For Compton events, the direction and energy of the Compton scattered gamma ray are measured with arrays of small CsI(TI)-photodiode detectors so that an unique direction and energy can be found for each incident gamma ray. The incident photon direction for pair events is found from the initial pair particle directions. TIGRE is the first Compton telescope with a direct imaging capability. With a large (pi) -steradian field-of-view, it is sensitive to gamma rays from 0.3 to 100 MeV with a typical energy resolution of 3% (FWHM) and a 1-(sigma) angular resolution of 40 arc-minutes at 2 MeV. A small balloon prototype instrument is being constructed that has a high absolute detection efficiency of 8% over the full energy range and a sensitivity of 10 milliCrabs for an exposure of 500,000 s. TIGRE's innovative design also uses the polarization dependence of the Klein-Nishina formula for gamma-ray source polarization measurements. The telescope will be described in detail and new results from measurements at 0.5 MeV and Monte Carlo calculations from 1 to 100 MeV will be presented.

  20. Gamma-Gamma Absorption in the Broad Line Region Radiation Fields of Gamma-Ray Blazars

    Boettcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The expected level of gamma-gamma absorption in the Broad Line Region (BLR) radiation field of gamma-ray loud Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs)is evaluated as a function of the location of the gamma-ray emission region. This is done self-consistently with parameters inferred from the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED) in a single-zone leptonic EC-BLR model scenario. We take into account all geometrical effects both in the calculation of the gamma-gamma opacity and the normalization of the BLR radiation energy density. As specific examples, we study the FSRQs 3C279 and PKS 1510-089, keeping the BLR radiation energy density at the location of the emission region fixed at the values inferred from the SED. We confirm previous findings that the optical depth due to $\\gamma\\gamma$ absorption in the BLR radiation field exceeds unity for both 3C279 and PKS 1510-089 for locations of the gamma-ray emission region inside the inner boundary of the BLR. It decreases monotonically, with distance from the cen...

  1. Gamma ray bursts of black hole universe

    Zhang, T. X.

    2015-07-01

    Slightly modifying the standard big bang theory, Zhang recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which has only a single postulate but is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain existing observations of the universe. In the previous studies, we have explained the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, cosmic microwave background radiation, quasar, and acceleration of black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This study investigates gamma ray bursts of black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the energy and spectrum measurements of gamma ray bursts according to the black hole universe model. The results indicate that gamma ray bursts can be understood as emissions of dynamic star-like black holes. A black hole, when it accretes its star or merges with another black hole, becomes dynamic. A dynamic black hole has a broken event horizon and thus cannot hold the inside hot (or high-frequency) blackbody radiation, which flows or leaks out and produces a GRB. A star when it collapses into its core black hole produces a long GRB and releases the gravitational potential energy of the star as gamma rays. A black hole that merges with another black hole produces a short GRB and releases a part of their blackbody radiation as gamma rays. The amount of energy obtained from the emissions of dynamic star-like black holes are consistent with the measurements of energy from GRBs. The GRB energy spectra derived from this new emission mechanism are also consistent with the measurements.

  2. Determination of nitrogen in pork meat using in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation technique

    The concentration of nitrogen in pork meat is determined by in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation analysis using the reactor neutron beam and a high purity germanium gamma-ray spectrometer. The photopeak area of the 10827 keV high energy prompt gamma-ray, originated from 14N(n,γ) reaction on the pork medium, is analyzed to determine the concentration of nitrogen. Urea solutions with various concentration of nitrogen are used to calibrate the absolute efficiency of the gamma-ray spectrometer. In 9000 s irradiation and counting period, the minimum detectable concentration is 1.7 g of N/100 g of meat using the in-vivo technique. The result is also compared to data obtained by another analytical method. This nondestructive, in-vivo technique, with nominal radiation dose, is a reliable and promising method to determine the nitrogen concentration in living body. (author) 25 refs.; 2 figs

  3. Angular Distributions of U238 Fission Fragments Produced by Mono-Energetic Gamma Rays

    The angular distribution of U238 fission fragments has been measured using mica plates as detectors. The fission process was induced by mono-energetic gamma rays of the following discrete energies: 6.07, 6.75, 6.80, 7.38, 7.64, 7.73 and 9.00 MeV. The sources of mono-energetic gamma-rays were (n, γ ) reactions on seven different target elements in the SAPHIR reactor of the E.T.H. in Zurich. The gamma-ray line absolute intensities were of the order of 106 photons/cm2s. The neutron and gamma-ray backgrounds were estimated with a bismuth target. (author)

  4. Method of incident low-energy gamma-ray direction reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space telescope

    Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Zverev, V. G.; Galper, A. M.; Arkhangelskaya, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Dalkarov, O. D.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space-based telescope has as its main goals to measure cosmic γ-ray fluxes and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component produced, theoretically, in dark-matter-particles decay or annihilation processes, to search for discrete γ-ray sources and study them in detail, to examine the energy spectra of diffuse γ-rays — both galactic and extragalactic — and to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and γ-rays from the active Sun. Scientific goals of GAMMA-400 telescope require fine angular resolution. The telescope is of a pair-production type. In the converter-tracker, the incident gamma-ray photon converts into electron-positron pair in the tungsten layer and then the tracks are detected by silicon- strip position-sensitive detectors. Multiple scattering processes become a significant obstacle in the incident-gamma direction reconstruction for energies below several gigaelectronvolts. The method of utilising this process to improve the resolution is proposed in the presented work.

  5. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  6. The future of gamma-ray astronomy

    Knödlseder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has experienced impressive progress over the last decade. Thanks to the advent of a new generation of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS) and thanks to the launch of the Fermi-LAT satellite, several thousand gamma-ray sources are known today, revealing an unexpected ubiquity of particle acceleration processes in the Universe. Major scientific challenges are still ahead, such as the identification of the nature of Dark Matter, the discovery and understanding of the sources of cosmic rays, or the comprehension of the particle acceleration processes that are at work in the various objects. This paper presents some of the instruments and mission concepts that will address these challenges over the next decades.

  7. Gamma-ray emission from normal galaxies ?

    Full text: Usual suspects for extragalactic high energy gamma-ray emission are cosmic monsters: supermassive black holes and their surrounding, embedded in Active Galactic Nuclei. Normal galaxies begin to arise from the shadows at high energies, as can be seen with the discovery of high energy gamma-ray emission from the Andromeda galaxy (M 31) by the Fermi collaboration. This emission is expected to originate from cosmic ray (CR) interactions with the interstellar medium in these galaxies. For the first time, measurements of the CR energy density are possible outside our Galaxy. We present a study on the search for high energy emission around normal galaxies in the neighbourhood of our Milky Way. (author)

  8. Interstellar medium structure and content and gamma ray astronomy

    A general description of gamma-ray astronomy is presented with special emphasis on the study of diffuse gamma-ray emission. This is followed by a collection of reflections and observations on the structure and the gas and dust content of the local interstellar medium. Results of gamma-ray observations on the local interstellar medium are given. The last part is devoted to the whole of the galactic gamma-ray emission and its interpretation

  9. High Energy $\\gamma$ Rays from Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray Protons in $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    Böttcher, M

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that ultrahigh energy ($\\gtrsim 10^{19}$ eV) cosmic rays (UHECR) are accelerated by the blast waves associated with GRBs. We calculate the observed synchrotron radiation spectrum from protons and energetic leptons formed in the cascades initiated by photopion production, taking into account $\\gamma\\gamma$ attenuation at the source. Normalizing to the emission characteristics of GRB~970508, we predict $\\sim 10$ MeV - 100 GeV fluxes at a level which may have been observed with EGRET from bright GRBs, and could be detected with the proposed GLAST experiment or with ground-based air Cherenkov telescopes having thresholds $\\lesssim $ several hundred GeV. Besides testing the UHECR origin hypothesis, the short wavelength emission and afterglows can be used to probe the level of the diffuse intergalactic infrared radiation fields or constrain redshifts of GRB sources.

  10. Balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion

    Takahashi, Satoru; Group, for the Emulsion Gamma-ray Telescope

    2010-01-01

    By detecting the beginning of electron pairs with nuclear emulsion, precise gamma-ray direction and gamma-ray polarization can be detected. With recent advancement in emulsion scanning system, emulsion analyzing capability is becoming powerful. Now we are developing the balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion. Overview and status of our telescope is described.

  11. Principles and techniques of gamma ray tracers

    Radioactive tracer techniques provide a very sensitive means of studying physical and chemical processes in a whole variety of different media. Some of the techniques and principles of radioactive tracers and their application to practical engineering systems are discussed. Information which has been found useful in the design of high temperature liquid sodium facilities employing radio-tracers, is presented. The report deals solely with the use of gamma-emitting species as the tracer. These find particular application for in-situ studies on engineering systems where the highly penetrating properties of gamma rays are needed for detection through strongly absorbent media such as stainless steel pepe walls. (author)

  12. Shielding evaluation by laser compton scattering gamma-ray

    Laser Compton scattering gamma-ray beam was used for evaluation of gamma ray shield. The gamma source of a NewSUBARU Synchrotron Radiation Facility can generate the quasi-monochromatic gamma ray beam of 0.5-1.7 MeV by combining a carbon dioxide laser and a 0.5-1.0 GeV electron beam. This gamma-ray source has small divergence of 1/γ radian due to the relativistic effect, where γ is relativistic factor of electron. Small diameter test beam of gamma-ray of about 1 mm in diameter is possible to use at the 10 m from the gamma-ray source by combining the small divergence gamma-ray beam with small hole lead collimator. Test sample size used was 2 cm in diameter. Measured shield factor was compared with calculated value using known shield materials such as lead. (author)

  13. Gamma-ray pulsars: A gold mine

    Grenier, Isabelle A.; Harding, Alice K.

    2015-08-01

    The most energetic neutron stars, powered by their rotation, are capable of producing pulsed radiation from the radio up to γ rays with nearly TeV energies. These pulsars are part of the universe of energetic and powerful particle accelerators, using their uniquely fast rotation and formidable magnetic fields to accelerate particles to ultra-relativistic speed. The extreme properties of these stars provide an excellent testing ground, beyond Earth experience, for nuclear, gravitational, and quantum-electrodynamical physics. A wealth of γ-ray pulsars has recently been discovered with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The energetic γ rays enable us to probe the magnetospheres of neutron stars and particle acceleration in this exotic environment. We review the latest developments in this field, beginning with a brief overview of the properties and mysteries of rotation-powered pulsars, and then discussing γ-ray observations and magnetospheric models in more detail. xml:lang="fr"

  14. Critical Test Of Gamma Ray Burst Theories

    Dado, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Long and precise follow-up measurements of the X-ray afterglow (AG) of very intense gamma ray bursts (GRBs) provide a critical test of GRB afterglow theories. Here we show that the power-law decline with time of X-ray AG of GRB 130427A, the longest measured X-ray AG of an intense GRB with the Swift, Chandra and XMM Newton satellites, and of all other well measured late-time X-ray afterglow of intense GRBs, is that predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs from their measured spectral index, while it disagrees with that predicted by the widely accepted fireball (FB) models of GRBs.

  15. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Hoover, Andrew S; van der Horst, Alexander J; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McBreen, Sheila; Paciesas, W S; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wallace, Mark S; Wilson, Robert B; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations on-board to allow re-orientiong the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of twelve sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from ~8 keV to ~40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The on-board trigger threshold is ~0.7 photons/cm2/s (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates on-board triggers for ~250 GRBs per year.

  16. X-ray and gamma ray transmission densitometry

    Gamma and x-ray attenuation densitometers are systems in which measurements of the attenuation of one or several radiation beams are used to infer the density of the attenuating material. This report contains discussions of theoretical and practical aspects of densitometer design, operation, and data interpretation

  17. The Haleakala Gamma Ray Observatory

    A 10 m2 multi-mirror telescope for observing Cherenkov light signals from atmospheric cascades is now operating at Mount Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii. It differs from other atmospheric Cherenkov detectors in accepting pulses that originate from single photoelectrons, employing two sets of 18 optically independent phototubes in a logic system with nanosecond time resolution to reject ambient light from the night sky. With an angular aperture of 1.3x10-4 sr, cosmic ray showers are observed at a rate of ≅ 0.5 hz at the zenith, with nearly complete rejection of ambient light. This rate for hadronic showers implies an effective threshold near 100 GeV for electromagnetic showers. Two regions of the sky, one centered on the source and the other separated by from it by 3.60 are simultaneously monitored. Examples of observations of episodic and periodic (pulsar) sources are given. (orig.)

  18. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    Parker, W

    2009-09-18

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the {gamma}-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor

  19. Solar gamma-ray lines and interplanetary solar protons

    Yoshimori, M.

    1985-12-01

    Solar gamma-ray lines and protons were simultaneously observed for six flares on 1 April, 4 April, 27 April, 13 May 1981, 1 February, and 6 June, 1982 by Hinotori and Himawari satellites. The time histories of gamma-ray lines and protons are analyzed. The relationship between the gamma-ray line fluences and peak proton fluxes for these flares does not reveal an apparent correlation between them. The present result implies that the protons producing gamma-ray lines in the flare region and protons observed near the earth do not always belong to the same population, and favor the downward streaming model for the gamma-ray line production.

  20. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  1. Attenuation of the gamma rays in tissues

    The mass and lineal attenuation coefficient and of hepatic tissue, muscular, osseous and of brain before gamma rays of 10-3 to 105 MeV were calculated. For the case of the osseous tissue the calculation was made for the cartilage, the cortical tissue and the bone marrow. During the calculations the elementary composition of the tissues of human origin was used. The calculations include by separate the Photoelectric effect, the Compton scattering and the Pair production, as well as the total. For to establish a comparison with the attenuation capacities, the coefficients of the water, the aluminum and the lead also were calculated. The study was complemented measuring the attenuation coefficient of hepatic tissue of bovine before gamma rays of 0.662 MeV of a source of 137 Cs. The measurement was made through of an experiment of photons transmission through samples frozen of hepatic tissue and with a Geiger-Mueller detector. (Author)

  2. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  3. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  4. Environmental Effects of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Gamma rays bursts, coming from very massive stars, are the most powerful explosions in our Universe. Some authors have linked them to some of the climatic changes and consequent biological mass extinctions of the Phanerozoic eon. However, the consequences of their direct impact on primitive Earth, is today a hot topic of debate. On the other hand, it is usually assumed that they were more common in earlier stages of our galaxy. So it is important to evaluate its potential effects on terrestrial paleoenvironments. We outline some simple models to estimate their influence mainly on the primordial atmospheric chemistry of Earth and on the climate in general. To do that, we consider different scenarios where the atmospheric composition diverges substantially from the atmosphere today, and compute the evolution of principal chemical species under the intense radiational stress of a gamma ray burst. Furthermore, the possible impact on the isotopic composition, geochemistry and the biosphere are mentioned in general way

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission

    Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission, bursts of gamma-rays lasting from shorter than one second to thousands of seconds, remains not fully understood after more than 40 years of observations. The uncertainties lie in several open questions in the GRB physics, including jet composition, energy dissipation mechanism, particle acceleration mechanism, and radiation mechanism. Recent broad-band observations of prompt emission with Fermi sharpen the debates in these areas, which stimulated intense theoretical investigations invoking very different ideas. I will review these debates, and argue that the current data suggest the following picture: A quasi-thermal spectral component originating from the photosphere of the relativistic ejecta has been detected in some GRBs. Even though in some cases (e.g. GRB 090902B) this component dominates the spectrum, in most GRBs, this component either forms a sub-dominant "shoulder" spectral component in the low energy spectral regime of the more dominant "Band" co...

  6. Gamma-ray Constraints on Effective Interactions

    Cheung, Kingman; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Using an effective interaction approach to describe the interactions between the dark matter particle and the light degrees of freedom of the standard model, we calculate the gamma-ray flux due to the annihilation of the dark matter into quarks, followed by fragmentation into neutral pions which subsequently decay into photons. By comparison to the mid-latitude data released from the Fermi-LAT experiment, we obtain useful constraints on the size of the effective interactions and they are found to be comparable to those deduced from collider, gamma-ray line and anti-matter search experiments. However, the two operators induced by scalar and vector exchange among fermionic dark matter and light quarks that contribute to spin-independent cross sections are constrained more stringently by the recent XENON100 data.

  7. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    Herrmann, H. W., E-mail: herrmann@lanl.gov; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, R. M. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shmayda, W. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  8. GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, NEW COSMOLOGICAL BEACONS

    V. Avila-Reese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs are the brightest electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, associated to the death of massive stars. As such, GRBs are potential tracers of the evolution of the cosmic massive star formation, metallicity, and Initial Mass Function. GRBs also proved to be appealing cosmological distance indicators. This opens a unique opportunity to constrain the cosmic expansion history up to redshifts 5-6. A brief review on both subjects is presented here.

  9. Requirements on gamma ray spectrum analysis programs

    Many programs intended for the evaluation of gamma ray spectra have been written. Most of them cover the basic needs but there are several options a user might want to have which are not incorporated. This paper attempts to list all general and some special requirements on such programs. Recommendations on details of the physical and technical methods to match the requirements and the citation of any existing program are avoided. (author)

  10. Solution To The Gamma Ray Burst Mystery?

    Shaviv, Nir J.; Dar, Arnon

    1996-01-01

    Photoexcitation and ionization of partially ionized heavy atoms in highly relativistic flows by interstellar photons, followed by their reemission in radiative recombination and decay, boost star-light into beamed $\\gamma$ rays along the flow direction. Repeated excitation/decay of highly relativistic baryonic ejecta from merger or accretion induced collapse of neutron stars in dense stellar regions (DSRs), like galactic cores, globular clusters and super star-clusters, can convert enough kin...

  11. Cosmological parametrization of $\\gamma$ ray burst models

    Linder, E V

    1996-01-01

    Using three parametrizations of the gamma ray burst count data comparison is made to cosmological source models. While simple models can fit and faint end slope constraints, the addition of a logarithmic count range variable describing the curvature of the counts shows that models with no evolution or evolution power law in redshift with index less than 10 fail to satisfy simultaneously all three descriptors of the burst data. The cosmological source density that would be required for a fit is illustrated.

  12. Gamma-ray bursts - a critical review

    We present a short general introduction into the field of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) research, summarizing the past and the present status. We give an general view of the GRBs observations to date, both in the prompt emission phase as well as in the afterglow phase, and a brief primer into the theory, mainly in the frame-work of the fireball model. (authors)

  13. Gamma Ray Bursts and their Optical Counterparts

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) have been discovered 38 years ago and still remain one of the most intriguing puzzles of astrophysics. In this paper we remind briefly the history of GRB studies and review the current experimental evidence with the emphasis on GRB optical counterparts. At the end we introduce '' π of the Sky '' project designed to catch prompt optical emission from GRB sources. (author)

  14. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    The Whipple Observatory's atmospheric Cerenkov camera has detected TeV radiation from four galactic sources: the Crab Nebula, Cygnus X-3, Hercules X-1, and 4U0115+63. Recent simulations encourage the view that unwanted cosmic-ray background showers may be suppressed by a large factor. Emphasis in the coming year will be on determining optimum selection criteria for enhancing gamma-ray signals and in developing a prototype camera with finer angular resolution as a first step towards implementation of the HERCULES concept

  15. EXIST's Gamma-Ray Burst Sensitivity

    Band, D. L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Fishman, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Garson III, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Skinner, G.

    2007-01-01

    We use semi-analytic techniques to evaluate the burst sensitivity of designs for the EXIST hard X-ray survey mission. Applying these techniques to the mission design proposed for the Beyond Einstein program, we find that with its very large field-of-view and faint gamma-ray burst detection threshold, EXIST will detect and localize approximately two bursts per day, a large fraction of which may be at high redshift. We estimate that EXIST's maximum sensitivity will be ~4 times greater than that...

  16. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the γ-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor streams

  17. Gamma Rays frim the Galactic Centre

    Erlykin, A D

    2007-01-01

    Recent results from the HESS gamma ray telescope have shown the presence of both a diffuse, extended, flux of gamma rays above ~0.4 TeV and discrete sources in and near the Galactic Centre. Here, we put forward a possible explanation in terms of the diffusion of cosmic ray protons from a succession of supernova remnants (SNR) in the SgrA* region of the Galaxy plus a contribution from SNR in the rest of the Galactic Centre Region, to be called the Galactic Centre Ridge (GCR). Protons are favoured over electrons because the mG magnetic fields in the Region will attenuate energetic electrons severely. Prominent features are the need for 'anomalous diffusion' of the protons in the whole region and the adoption of low efficiency for SNR acceleration in the high density regions. The latter is related by us to the well-known low 'cosmic ray gradient' in the Galaxy. A corroborating feature is the close correlation of inferred cosmic ray intensity with the smoothed intensity of 5 GHZ radio radiation. We attribute this...

  18. Swift: A Gamma Ray Bursts Explorer

    Gehrels, Neil

    2003-01-01

    Swift is a NASA gamma-ray burst MIDEX mission that is in development for launch in December 2003. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. It will also.perform a survey of the hard X-ray sky to a sensitivity level of -1 mCrab. A wide-field camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 5 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled 'swift' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many of the bursts. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approximately 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The hardware is currently in final stages of fabrication and initial stages of integration and test. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift.

  19. Gamma-ray astronomy with underground detectors

    Halzen, Francis

    1995-01-01

    Underground detectors measure the directions of up-coming muons of neutrino origin. They can also observe down-going muons made by gamma rays in the Earth's atmosphere. Although gamma ray showers are muon-poor, they produce a sufficient number of muons to detect the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes. With a threshold higher by one hundred and a probability of muon production of about 1\\% for the shallower AMANDA and Lake Baikal detectors, these instruments can, for a typical GRO source, match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector since their effective area is larger by a factor 10^4. The muons must have enough energy for accurate reconstruction of their direction. Very energetic muons on the other hand are rare because they are only produced by higher energy gamma rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy in the 100~GeV energy region which nicely matches th...

  20. Gamma Ray Bursts Cook Book I: Formulation

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2008-01-01

    Since the suggestion of relativistic shocks as the origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in early 90's, the mathematical formulation of this process has stayed at phenomenological level. One of the reasons for the slow development of theoretical works in this domain has been the simple power-law behaviour of the afterglows hours or days after the prompt gamma-ray emission. Nowadays with the launch of the Swift satellite, gamma-ray bursts can be observed in multi-wavelength from a few tens of seconds after trigger onward. These observations have leaded to the discovery of features unexplainable by the simple formulation of the shocks and emission processes used up to now. But "devil is in details" and some of these features may be explained with a more detailed formulation of phenomena and without adhoc addition of new processes. Such a formulation is the goal of this work. We present a consistent formulation of the collision between two spherical relativistic shells. The model can be applied to both internal and ...

  1. Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Diaz Rodriguez, Mariangelly; Smith, M.; Tešic, G.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are known to be bright, irregular flashes of gamma rays that typically last just a few seconds, believed to be caused by stellar collapse or the merger of a pair of compact objects. Through previous work, it has been found that GRBs are distributed roughly uniformly over the entire sky, rather than being confined to the relatively narrow band of the Milky Way. Using the Python programming language, we generated a model of GRBs over cosmological distances, based on current empirical GRB distributions. The grbsim python module uses the acceptance-rejection Monte Carlo method to simulate the luminosity and redshift of a large population of GRBs, including cosmological effects such as dark energy and dark matter terms that modify the large-scale structure of space-time. The results of running grbsim are demonstrated to match the distribution of GRBs observed by the Burst Alert Telescope on NASA’s Swift satellite. The grbsim module will subsequently be used to simulate gamma ray and neutrino events for the Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network.

  2. Study of p-wave gamma-ray strength functions

    Gamma-ray strength functions are important for description of the gamma emission channel in nuclear reactions. The impact of different models- Weisskopf's single particle model, Brink's standard Lorentzian and Kopecky's generalized Lorentzian for gamma ray strength functions on the calculation of neutron capture related experimental quantities such as total radiation widths Γγ cross sections and gamma-ray spectra has been studied

  3. Absolutely calibrated soft-x-ray streak camera for laser-fusion applications

    The intensity output of a soft-x-ray streak camera was calibrated (SXRSC) in order to make absolute flux measurements of x rays emitted from laser-produced plasmas. The SXRSC developed at LLNL is used to time-resolve x-ray pulses to better than 20 ps. The SXRSC uses a Au photocathode on a thin carbon substrate which is sensitive to x rays from 100 eV to greater than 10 keV. Calibrations are done in the dynamic mode using a small laser-produced x-ray source. The SXRSC is calibrated by comparing its integrated signal to the output of calibrated x-ray diodes monitoring the source strength. The measured SXRSC response is linear over greater than two orders of magnitude. Using these calibrations, absolute intensities can be measured to an accuracy of +-30%

  4. Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  5. Catalog of gamma-rays unplaced in radioactive decay schemes

    A catalog is made for gamma-rays emitted in decay of radioactive nuclides but not placed in their decay schemes. It consists of two tables. In Table 1, the number of these unplaced gamma-ray components by a nuclide is given together with the fraction of total intensity of these gamma-rays to that of all observed gamma-rays. In Table 2, the unplaced gamma-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. Each line of this table contains the gamma-ray energy, intensity, nuclide identification, and energies and intensities of the most prominent gamma-rays from the decay of the radionuclides. This catalog is a compilation from Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) maintained by National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory, of at February 1990. (author)

  6. Gamma Ray Tomographic Scan Method for Large Scale Industrial Plants

    The gamma ray tomography systems have been used to investigate a chemical process for last decade. There have been many cases of gamma ray tomography for laboratory scale work but not many cases for industrial scale work. Non-tomographic equipment with gamma-ray sources is often used in process diagnosis. Gamma radiography, gamma column scanning and the radioisotope tracer technique are examples of gamma ray application in industries. In spite of many outdoor non-gamma ray tomographic equipment, the most of gamma ray tomographic systems still remained as indoor equipment. But, as the gamma tomography has developed, the demand on gamma tomography for real scale plants also increased. To develop the industrial scale system, we introduced the gamma-ray tomographic system with fixed detectors and rotating source. The general system configuration is similar to 4th generation geometry. But the main effort has been made to actualize the instant installation of the system for real scale industrial plant. This work would be a first attempt to apply the 4th generation industrial gamma tomographic scanning by experimental method. The individual 0.5-inch NaI detector was used for gamma ray detection by configuring circular shape around industrial plant. This tomographic scan method can reduce mechanical complexity and require a much smaller space than a conventional CT. Those properties make it easy to get measurement data for a real scale plant

  7. The solar gamma ray and neutron capabilities of COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    Ryan, James M.; Lockwood, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging Compton telescope COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has unusual spectroscopic capabilities for measuring solar gamma-ray and neutron emission. The launch of the GRO is scheduled for June 1990 near the peak of the sunspot cycle. With a 30 to 40 percent probability for the Sun being in the COMPTEL field-of-view during the sunlit part of an orbit, a large number of flares will be observed above the 800 keV gamma-ray threshold of the telescope. The telescope energy range extends to 30 MeV with high time resolution burst spectra available from 0.1 to 10 MeV. Strong Compton tail suppression of instrumental gamma-ray interactions will facilitate improved spectral analysis of solar flare emissions. In addition, the high signal to noise ratio for neutron detection and measurement will provide new neutron spectroscopic capabilities. Specifically, a flare similar to that of 3 June 1982 will provide spectroscopic data on greater than 1500 individual neutrons, enough to construct an unambiguous spectrum in the energy range of 20 to 200 MeV. Details of the instrument and its response to solar gamma-rays and neutrons will be presented.

  8. Discovery of a Young Gamma-ray Pulsar Associated with an Extended TeV Gamma-ray Source

    Dormody, Michael; Collaboration, for the Fermi-LAT

    2009-01-01

    Since its launch in June 2008, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), onboard the \\emph{Fermi} Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has greatly added to our understanding of gamma-ray pulsars. Its fine point spread function and large effective area, combined with the time-differencing method, make it the first gamma-ray instrument capable of discovering a new population of gamma-ray pulsars. We will present the recent discovery of the youngest (~4600 yr) radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar discovered in a blind freq...

  9. Tomodensitometry with X- and gamma-rays

    For materials testing computerized tomography (CT) offers the great advantage to produce nondestructively maps of the local X-ray absorption inside an object. For radiation sources in the energy range between 0.2 and 1.5 MeV the absorption is proportional to the density. Therefore with CT the density distribution can be determined. For simple cases the absolute value of the density can be measured. Within the reported paper applications on concrete, powder metallurgical parts and ceramics are given. The last two groups of materials are compared for the green and sintered state. (orig./RHM)

  10. Use of proportional gas scintillator in absolute measurements of alpha-gamma emitter activities

    The absolute activity of U-235 contained in a U3 O8 sample was measured utilizing a sum-coincidence circuit which selects only the alpha particles which are simultaneous with the 143 KeV and 186 KeV gamma radiations from the Th-231 (product nucleus). The alpha particles were detected by means of a new type of a gas scintillating chamber, in which the light emitted by excitation of the gas atoms, due to the passage of a charged incoming particle, has its intensity increased by the action of an applied electric field. The gamma radiations were detected by means of a NaI(Tl) 1'' x 11/2'' scintillation detector. The value obtained for the half-life of U-235 was compared with the data available from various observers which used different experimental techniques. It is shown tht the results, are in excellent agreement with the best international data available on the subject and that, therefore, the sum-coincidence technique constitutes an important method for such measurements. (Author)

  11. Application of the alanine detector to gamma-ray, X-ray and fast neutron dosimetry

    A dosimeter based on alanine has been developed at the INP in Krakow and at Risoe National Laboratory. Due to its near tissue-equivalence and stability of signal, measured using ESR spectrometry at room temperature, this free-radical amino-acid dosimetric system is particularly suitable for measuring X-ray, gamma-ray and fast neutron doses in the range 10-105 Gy. The relative effectiveness (with respect to 60Co γ-rays) of the alanine dosimeter to 250 kVp X-rays and to cyclotron-produced fast neutrons (mean neutron energy 5.6 MeV) is measured to be 0.76± 0.06 and 0.60±0.05, respectively. The suitability of the alanine dosimeter for intercomparison gamma-ray dosimetry is also shown. The estimated absolute difference between 60Co dosimetry at Risoe National Laboratory and at the Centre of Oncology in Krakow is about 5%, somewhat more than the experimental uncertainty. These results are based on ESR measurements performed in Krakow on about 25% of the exposed detectors. 28 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  12. ISGRI: the integral soft gamma-ray imager

    Lebrun, F.; Leray, J.P.; Lavocat, P.; Cretolle, J.; Blondel, C.; Bonnin, C.; Bouere, A.; Cara, C.; Daly, F.; Dzitko, H.; Horeau, B.; Laurent, P.; Limousin, O.; Mauguen, V.; Meignier, F.; Poindron, E.; Sauvageon, A.; Tourrette, T. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee -DAPNIA/DSM, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Arques, M.; Mathy, F. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique - LETI, 38 (France); Chateil, T.; Moulinie, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee -DAPNIA/DSM/SIS, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Desages, F.; Rouger, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee -DAPNIA/DSM/SEDI, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-11-01

    For the first time in the history of high energy astronomy, a large CdTe gamma-ray camera is operating in space. ISGRI is the low-energy camera of the IBIS telescope on board the INTEGRAL satellite. This paper details its design and its in-flight behavior and performances. Having a sensitive area of 2621 cm{sup 2} with a spatial resolution of 4.6 mm, a low threshold around 12 keV and an energy resolution of {approx} 8% at 60 keV, ISGRI shows absolutely no signs of degradation after 9 months in orbit. All aspects of its in-flight behavior and scientific performance are fully nominal, and in particular the observed background level confirms the expected sensitivity of 1 milli-Crab for a 10{sup 6} s observation. (authors)

  13. Effect of Dust Extinction on Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    Lŭ, Gu-Jing; Shao, Lang; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming

    2011-10-01

    In order to study the effect of dust extinction on the afterglow of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we carry out numerical calculations with high precision based on the rigorous Mie theory and the latest optical properties of interstellar dust grains, and analyze the different extinction curves produced by dust grains with different physical parameters. Our results indicate that the absolute extinction quantity is substantially determined by the medium density and metallicity. However, the shape of the extinction curve is mainly determined by the size distribution of the dust grains. If the dust grains aggregate to form larger ones, they will cause a flatter or grayer extinction curve with lower extinction quantity. On the contrary, if the dust grains are disassociated to smaller ones due to some uncertain processes, they will cause a steeper extinction curve with larger amount of extinction. These results might provide an important insight into understanding the origin of the optically dark GRBs.

  14. Effect of Dust Extinction on Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    Lv, Gu-Jing; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the effect of dust extinction on the afterglow of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we carry out numerical calculations with high precision based on rigorous Mie theory and latest optical properties of interstellar dust grains, and analyze the different extinction curves produced by dust grains with different physical parameters. Our results indicate that the absolute extinction quantity is substantially determined by the medium density and metallicity. However, the shape of the extinction curve is mainly determined by the size distribution of the dust grains. If the dust grains aggregate to form larger ones, they will cause a flatter or grayer extinction curve with lower extinction quantity. On the contrary, if the dust grains are disassociated to smaller ones due to some uncertain processes, they will cause a steeper extinction curve with larger amount of extinction. These results might provide an important insight into understanding the origin of the optically dark GRBs.

  15. Is Calvera a Gamma-ray Pulsar?

    Halpern, J P

    2011-01-01

    Originally selected as a neutron star (NS) candidate in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, 1RXS J141256.0+792204 ("Calvera") was discovered to be a 59 ms X-ray pulsar in a pair of XMM-Newton observations (Zane et al. 2011). Surprisingly, their claimed detection of this pulsar in Fermi gamma-ray data requires no period derivative, severely restricting its dipole magnetic field strength, spin-down luminosity, and distance to small values. This implies that the cooling age of Calvera is much younger than its characteristic spin-down age. If so, it could be a mildly recycled pulsar, or the first "orphaned" central compact object (CCO). Here we show that the published Fermi ephemeris fails to align the pulse phases of the two X-ray observations with each other, which indicates that the Fermi detection is almost certainly spurious. Analysis of additional Fermi data also does not confirm the gamma-ray detection. This leaves the spin-down rate of Calvera less constrained, and its place among the families of NSs uncertain. It ...

  16. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission

    Gehrels, N; Burrows, D N; Chincarini, G L; Cominsky, L R; Giommi, P; Hurley, K C; Marshall, F E; Mason, K O; Mészáros, P; Nousek, J A; Roming, P W A; Wells, A A; White, N E; Team, Swift Science

    2004-01-01

    The Swift mission, scheduled for launch in early 2004, is a multiwavelength observatory for gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy. It is the first-of-its-kind autonomous rapid-slewing satellite for transient astronomy and pioneers the way for future rapid-reaction and multiwavelength missions. It will be far more powerful than any previous GRB mission, observing more than 100 bursts per year and performing detailed X-ray and UV/optical afterglow observations spanning timescales from 1 minute to several days after the burst. The objectives are to determine the origin of GRBs; classify GRBs and search for new types; study the interaction of the ultra-relativistic outflows of GRBs with their surrounding medium; and use GRBs to study the early universe out to z>10. The mission is being developed by a NASA-led international collaboration. It will carry three instruments: a new-generation wide-field gamma-ray (15-150 keV) detector; a narrow-field X-ray telescope; and a narrow-field UV/optical telescope. Redshift determin...

  17. The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Mission

    Gehrels, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Swift is an international mission managed by NASA as part of its MIDEX program. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy that will launch in 2004. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. A wide field gamma-ray camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 2-5 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray, and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 75 sec by an autonomously controlled 'swift' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/x-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many of the bursts. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approx. 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The instruments have now completed their fabrication phase and are integrated on the observatory for final testing. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift. The talk will describe the mission and its status and give a summary of our plans for GRB operations.

  18. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  19. High-energy gamma-ray afterglows from low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts

    He, Hao-Ning; WANG, XIANG-YU; Yu, Yun-Wei; Meszaros, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) such as 980425, 031203 and 060218, with luminosities much lower than those of other classic bursts, lead to the definition of a new class of GRBs -- low-luminosity GRBs. The nature of the outflow responsible for them is not clear yet. Two scenarios have been suggested: one is the conventional relativistic outflow with initial Lorentz factor of order of $\\Gamma_0\\ga 10$ and the other is a trans-relativistic outflow with $\\Gamma_0\\simeq 1-2$. Here we ...

  20. Absolute γ-ray line intensities in mass chains A=142-144, 146 and 147

    Unknown absolute γ-ray line intensities of the members (cesium, barium, lanthanum, cerium) in mass chains 142, 143, 144, 146 and 147 were determined relative to the absolute γ-ray line intensities of the well known descendants 142La, 143Ce, 144La, 146Pr and 147Pr using the mass separators HELIOS and OSTIS. The method relies on a clean chemical separation of the first chain members of interest (cesium and barium) from their daughters that takes place in the ion source of the separators. (orig.)

  1. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  2. Collimatorless imaging of gamma rays with help of gamma-ray tracking

    In many gamma-ray detector systems that are built for imaging purposes Compton scattered photons are suppressed as much as possible. However, the information from photons that scattered inside a detector system can be used to reconstruct the tracks of the photons with help of gamma-ray tracking. Estimates of the incident directions of the photons can be made and an image can be created. Examples of potential applications for this technique are the use as a gamma-camera in medical imaging (e.g. SPECT) or as a detector for PET. Due to the omission of collimators, much higher detection efficiencies can be achieved, reducing the doses required for an image. A gamma-ray tracking method, called backtracking, has been developed for nuclear spectroscopy. The method tracks gamma-rays originating from a point source in the center of a spherical detector system consisting of position-sensitive germanium detectors. This method can also be used as a tracking technique for imaging of an unknown source distribution. With help of Monte Carlo simulations the method has been investigated for simple test cases with one or two planar detectors and one or two point sources. The results show that the sources can be located accurately in three dimensions

  3. Collimatorless imaging of gamma rays with help of gamma-ray tracking

    Marel, J V D

    2001-01-01

    In many gamma-ray detector systems that are built for imaging purposes Compton scattered photons are suppressed as much as possible. However, the information from photons that scattered inside a detector system can be used to reconstruct the tracks of the photons with help of gamma-ray tracking. Estimates of the incident directions of the photons can be made and an image can be created. Examples of potential applications for this technique are the use as a gamma-camera in medical imaging (e.g. SPECT) or as a detector for PET. Due to the omission of collimators, much higher detection efficiencies can be achieved, reducing the doses required for an image. A gamma-ray tracking method, called backtracking, has been developed for nuclear spectroscopy. The method tracks gamma-rays originating from a point source in the center of a spherical detector system consisting of position-sensitive germanium detectors. This method can also be used as a tracking technique for imaging of an unknown source distribution. With he...

  4. List of strong gamma-rays emitted from radionuclides

    This is a compilation of intense gamma-rays, with energy value greater than 1 keV, emitted from decay of radioactive nuclides. These gamma-rays are three strongest of gamma-rays originating from each radionuclide. These gamma-rays are listed in the order of increasing energy. The table contains the energy and the intensity of the gamma-rays, the parent nuclide, the decay mode and the half-life of the parent nuclide and the total number of gamma-rays originating from the nuclide, and is also accompanied with energies and intensities of other two of the three gamma-rays in the same row. The list can be used as a quick guide to identify radionuclides in gamma-ray spectrometry. An annex contains the list of radionuclides having no measured gamma-ray intensities, together with energy values of the gamma-rays. The numerical values given in the list are taken from the values adopted in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory, as of February 1991. The list has also been prepared on a floppy diskette. (author)

  5. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results. 2. Localized sources

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR1818-04 and PSR1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma-ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Since the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma-ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma-ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. Using distance estimates it is found that PSR1818-04 has a gamma-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, while the luminosities of PSR1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. This survey of SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations has also yielded upper limits to gamma-ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars.

  6. Gamma rays as probes of the Universe

    Horns, Dieter; Jacholkowska, Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of γ rays over very large distances provides new insights on the intergalactic medium and on fundamental physics. On their path to the Earth, γ rays can annihilate with diffuse infrared or optical photons of the intergalactic medium, producing e+e- pairs. The density of these photons is poorly determined by direct measurements due to significant galactic foregrounds. Studying the absorption of γ rays from extragalactic sources at different distances allows the density of low-energy diffuse photons to be measured. Gamma-ray propagation may also be affected by new phenomena predicted by extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. Lorentz Invariance is violated in some models of Quantum Gravity, leading to an energy-dependent speed of light in vacuum. From differential time-of-flight measurements of the most distant γ-ray bursts and of flaring active galactic nuclei, lower bounds have been set on the energy scale of Quantum Gravity. Another effect that may alter γ-ray propagation is predicted by some models of String Theory, namely the mixing of the γ ray with a light fundamental boson called an "axion-like particle", which does not interact with low-energy photons. Such a mixing would make the Universe more transparent to γ rays than what would otherwise be, in a sense it decreases the amount of modification to the spectrum that comes from the extragalactic background light. The present status of the search for all these phenomena in γ-ray astronomy is reviewed. xml:lang="fr"

  7. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Our scientific goal is to discover and study by means of gamma-ray astronomy those regions of the universe where particles are accelerated to extreme energies. The atmospheric Cherenkov technique provides a unique and potentially sensitive window in the region of 1011 to approximately 1014 eV for this purpose. The Whipple Observatory Collaboration is currently engaged in the development of a Cherenkov camera which has the ultimate capability of distinguishing gamma-ray showers from the numerous cosmic-ray background showers by imaging the Cherenkov light from each shower. We have recently demonstrated the potential of the imaging technique with our 18 sigma detection of TeV photons from the Crab Nebula using a camera of 10 elements, pixel spacing 0.25 degrees. This detection represents a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity compared to a non-imaging detector. The next step in the development of the detector is to obtain a second large reflector, similar to the present 10 meter instrument, for stereoscopic viewing of showers. This project, named GRANITE, is now approved by DOE. With GRANITE it should be possible to probe more deeply in space by a factor of 7, and to fully investigate the possibility of new physics which has been suggested by reports of anomalous radiation from Hercules X-1. 18 refs

  8. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  9. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    The second reflector (project GRANITE) is on schedule. At present (January 1992) it and the 10 m reflector are obtaining stereoscopic views of gamma-ray air showers from the Crab Nebula which verify the expected performance of the twin reflector telescopes. With the additional improvements of the upgrade (a pending DOE proposal) the twin reflectors should reach a limiting intensity of 1% that of the Crab. The astonishing early results from the EGRET detector aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory indicate that distant quasars (powered by supermassive black holes) are active at GeV energies. The Whipple instruments are poised to see if such behavior continues above 100 GeV, as well as perform sensitive observations of previously reported GeV (Geminga) and TeV (Hercules X-1, etc.) sources. In addition to observing sources and identifying their location in the sky to one arcminute, experiments are planned to search for WIMPS in the mass range 0.1 to 1 TeV, and to determine the abundance of anti-protons in the cosmic rays. The successful performance of the stereoscopic reflectors demonstrates the feasibility of the concept of arrays of Cherenkov receivers. Design studies for a much larger array (CASITA) are just beginning.

  10. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Cosmology

    Norris, Jay P.

    2003-01-01

    The unrivalled, extreme luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) make them the favored beacons for sampling the high redshift Universe. To employ GRBs to study the cosmic terrain -- e.g., star and galaxy formation history -- GRB luminosities must be calibrated, and the luminosity function versus redshift must be measured or inferred. Several nascent relationships between gamma-ray temporal or spectral indicators and luminosity or total energy have been reported. These measures promise to further our understanding of GRBs once the connections between the luminosity indicators and GRB jets and emission mechanisms are better elucidated. The current distribution of 33 redshifts determined from host galaxies and afterglows peaks near z $\\sim$ 1, whereas for the full BATSE sample of long bursts, the lag-luminosity relation predicts a broad peak z $\\sim$ 1--4 with a tail to z $\\sim$ 20, in rough agreement with theoretical models based on star formation considerations. For some GRB subclasses and apparently related phenomena -- short bursts, long-lag bursts, and X-ray flashes -- the present information on their redshift distributions is sparse or entirely lacking, and progress is expected in Swift era when prompt alerts become numerous.

  11. The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope characteristics. Angular resolution and electrons/protons separation

    Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Boyarchuk, K A; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2014-01-01

    The measurements of gamma-ray fluxes and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV, which will be implemented by the specially designed GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope, concern with the following broad range of science topics. Searching for signatures of dark matter, surveying the celestial sphere in order to study gamma-ray point and extended sources, measuring the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, studying gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measuring spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons and nuclei up to the knee. To clarify these scientific problems with the new experimental data the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics comparing with previous and present experiments. For gamma-ray energies more than 100 GeV GAMMA-400 provides the energy resolution of ~1% and angular resolution better than 0.02 deg. The methods developed to reconstru...

  12. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  13. The Birthplaces of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Young, P A; Young, Patrick A.

    2007-01-01

    We use population synthesis to construct distributions of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for different proposed progenitor models. We use a description of star formation that takes into account the evolution of metallicity with redshift and galaxy mass, the evolution of galaxy mass with redshift, and the star formation rate with galaxy mass and redshift. We compare predicted distributions with redshift and metallicity to observations of GRB host galaxies and find that the the simple models cannot produce the observed distributions, but that current theoretical models can reproduce the observations within some constraints on the fraction of fallback black holes that produce GRBs.

  14. Are Gamma-ray Bursts Universal?

    Eichler, David; Levinson, Amir

    2006-01-01

    It is noted that the Liang-Zhang correlation can be accounted for with the viewing angle interpretation proposed earlier. The Ghirlanda correlation, recently generalized by Nava et al (2006) to a wind profile, can be accounted for by the viewing angle interpretation accordingly generalized to a wind profile. Most of the scatter in the spectra and time-integrated brightness in $\\gamma$-ray bursts (GRB) can thus be accounted for by variation in two parameters, 1) the viewing angle and 2) the je...

  15. Gamma ray detector optimization for mobile detectors

    The Energy Research and Development Administration supports a program enabling a rapid response to situations requiring a mobile, detection-at-a-distance capability for locating lost or stolen nuclear materials. For this application, man-portable, vehicular-borne, and airborne detection systems are used. For gamma ray detection, NaI detectors are usually used. Because weight is a serious constraint, many systems employ unshielded detectors. Results of optimization studies to determine a suitable thickness for 12.7 cm diameter NaI detectors that are commonly used in these applications are presented

  16. Gamma Ray Shielding from Saudi White Sand

    Al-horayess OKLA; Al-Dayel OMAR; Hefne JAMEEL; Al-Ajyan TURKI; Bagazi ALI

    2010-01-01

    This study is a comparison of gamma ray linear attenuation coefficient of two typs of shielding materials made of Saudi white and red sand. Each shield was consisted of one part of cement two parts of sand in addi-tion to water. Different thicknesses were tested. The concentrations of all elements in each shield material were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The results obtained from the ICP-MS were used in MCNP4B (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Computer ...

  17. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.;

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  18. The short gamma-ray burst revolution

    Swift, a dedicated gamma-ray burst (GRB) satellite with ultrarapid slewing capability, and a suite of ground-based (ESO) telescopes have recently achieved a major breakthrough: detecting the first afterglows of short-duration GRBs. The faintness of these afterglows and the diversity of old and young host galaxies lend support to the emerging 'standard model', in which they are created during the merging of two compact objects. However, the afterglow light-curve properties and possible high-redshift origin of some short bursts suggests that more than one progenitor type may be involved. (orig.)

  19. Gamma Ray Signatures from Ordinary Cosmic Strings

    MacGibbon, Jane H.; Brandenberger, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    We calculate the flux of ultra high energy photons from individual ordinary (i.e. non-superconducting) cosmic strings and compare the results with the sensitivity of current and proposed TeV and EeV telescopes. Our calculations give only upper limits for the gamma ray flux, since the source of the photons, jets from particle production at cusps, may be weakened by back reaction effects. For the usual cosmic distribution of strings, the predicted bursts from strings with the value of mass per ...

  20. Classification of Fermi Gamma-RAY Bursts

    Horvath, I; Hakkila, J; Bagoly, Z; Preece, R D

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi GBM Catalog has been recently published. Previous classification analyses of the BATSE, RHESSI, BeppoSAX, and Swift databases found three types of gamma-ray bursts. Now we analyzed the GBM catalog to classify the GRBs. PCA and Multiclustering analysis revealed three groups. Validation of these groups, in terms of the observed variables, shows that one of the groups coincides with the short GRBs. The other two groups split the long class into a bright and dim part, as defined by the peak flux. Additional analysis is needed to determine whether this splitting is only a mathematical byproduct of the analysis or has some real physical meaning.

  1. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence of...

  2. A separation of electrons and protons in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope

    Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following scientific goals: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. The main components of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the part of lepton component in the total flux is ~10E-3 for high energies. In present paper, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated. The individual contribution to the proton rejection is studied for each detector system of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray tel...

  3. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  4. Improved Gamma-Ray Flux Monitoring at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source (HIGS)

    Reynolds, Robert

    2002-10-01

    An improved gamma-ray beam flux monitor has been built for use at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratories. It is important to know precisely the gamma-ray flux of this beam. It is also important to limit beam attenuation to a minimum while making an accurate flux measurement. The improvements from a more accurate gamma-ray intensity monitor will allow for more precise cross-section measurements and will be valuable to many of the experiments conducted at HIGS. The detector consists of a thin scintillator optically coupled to two photomultiplier tubes, a thin foil, and then another thin scintillator attached to two photomultiplier tubes. The front scintillator is used to veto counts from charged particles emitted upstream in the beam-line. The preliminary tests of the monitor show very promising results and after slight adjustments and calibrations, the detector will be ready to acquire accurate beam intensity measurements while contributing very little to beam attenuation.

  5. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  6. Pulse Summing in the gamma-Ray Spectra

    Gromov, K Ya; Samatov, Zh K; Chumin, V G

    2004-01-01

    It was shown that the peaks formed at the summing of the cascade gamma-rays pulses can be used for the determination of gamma-ray source activity and gamma-ray registration efficency. Possible sources of the determined quantities errors have been investigated. Such a method can be useful at the nuclear reaction cross section measurements, at background analysis in looking for rare decays and so on.

  7. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation explores the relationship between Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and lightning. Using data from the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), and the gamma ray observations from Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), the study reviews any causal relationship between TGFs and lightning. The conclusion of the study is that the TGF and lightning are simultaneous with out a causal relationship.

  8. Long Duration Gamma-Ray Emission From Thunderclouds

    Kelley, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray glows are long duration emission coming from thunderclouds. They are one example of high-energy atmospheric physics, a relatively new field studying high-energy phenomena from thunderstorms and lightning. Glows arise from sustained relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREA). Gamma-ray instruments on the ground, balloons and airplanes have detected glows. The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) is an array of gamma-ray detectors, built at the University o...

  9. Gamma ray bursts, neutron star quakes, and the Casimir effect

    Carlson, C; Pérez-Mercader, J; Carlson, C; Goldman, T; Perez-Mercader, J

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the dynamic Casimir effect is a mechanism that converts the energy of neutron starquakes into \\gamma--rays. This mechanism efficiently produces photons from electromagnetic Casimir energy released by the rapid motion of a dielectric medium into a vacuum. Estimates based on the cutoff energy of the gamma ray bursts and the volume involved in a starquake indicate that the total gamma ray energy emission is consonant with observational requirements.

  10. Gamma Rays from Top-Mediated Dark Matter Annihilations

    Jackson, C.B.(Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019, USA); Servant, Géraldine; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Tim M.P. Tait; Taoso, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Lines in the energy spectrum of gamma rays are a fascinating experimental signal, which are often considered "smoking gun" evidence of dark matter annihilation. The current generation of gamma ray observatories are currently closing in on parameter space of great interest in the context of dark matter which is a thermal relic. We consider theories in which the dark matter's primary connection to the Standard Model is via the top quark, realizing strong gamma ray lines consistent with a therma...