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Sample records for absolute fracture risk

  1. Ten-year absolute risk of osteoporotic fractures according to BMD T score at menopause

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Vestergaard, Peter; Rud, Bo;

    2006-01-01

    by Kanis et al. Inclusion of HRT users in the cohorts used may have led to higher BMD values and lower absolute fracture risk in the Kanis model. These longitudinal data can be used directly in estimating absolute fracture risk in untreated north European women from BMD at menopause........ INTRODUCTION: International recommendations highlight the importance of absolute fracture risk in establishing intervention thresholds. The available estimates of long-term risk have been derived by combining relative risks from meta-analyses with U.S. normative BMD data and Swedish fracture incidence records...... neck T score and by 1.30 (95% CI, 1.06; 1.58) for each unit decrease in lumbar spine T score at baseline. Absolute fracture risk was higher than expected from the Kanis algorithm at all T score levels. The difference was greatest for participants in the higher range of T scores. At T = -1, the observed...

  2. External Validation of the Garvan Nomograms for Predicting Absolute Fracture Risk: The Tromsø Study

    Ahmed, Luai A; Nguyen, Nguyen D; Åshild Bjørnerem; Joakimsen, Ragnar M; Lone Jørgensen; Jan Størmer; Dana Bliuc; Center, Jacqueline R; Eisman, John A.; Nguyen, Tuan V; Nina Emaus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Absolute risk estimation is a preferred approach for assessing fracture risk and treatment decision making. This study aimed to evaluate and validate the predictive performance of the Garvan Fracture Risk Calculator in a Norwegian cohort. METHODS: The analysis included 1637 women and 1355 aged 60+ years from the Tromsø study. All incident fragility fractures between 2001 and 2009 were registered. The predicted probabilities of non-vertebral osteoporotic and hip fractures were dete...

  3. The gender- and age-specific 10-year and lifetime absolute fracture risk in Tromso, Norway

    Aim of this study is to estimate the gender- and age-specific 10-year and lifetime absolute risks of non-vertebral and osteoporotic (included hip, distal forearm and proximal humerus) fractures in a large cohort of men and women. This is a population-based 10 years follow-up study of 26,891 subjects aged 25 years and older in Tromso, Norway. All non-vertebral fractures were registered from 1995 throughout 2004 by computerized search in radiographic archives. Absolute risks were estimated by life-table method taking into account the competing risk of death. The absolute fracture risk at each year of age was estimated for the next 10 years (10-year risk) or up to the age of 90 years (lifetime risk). The estimated 10-year absolute risk of all non-vertebral fracture was higher in men than women before but not after the age of 45 years. The 10-year absolute risk for non-vertebral and osteoporotic fractures was over 10%, respectively, in men over 65 and 70 years and in women over 45 and 50 years of age. The 10-year absolute risks of hip fractures at the age of 65 and 80 years were 4.2 and 18.6% in men, and 9.0 and 24.0% in women, respectively. The risk estimates for distal forearm and proximal humerus fractures were under 5% in men and 13% in women. The estimated lifetime risks for all fracture locations were higher in women than men at all ages. At the age of 50 years, the risks were 38.1 and 24.8% in men and 67.4 and 55.0% in women for all non-vertebral and osteoporotic fractures, respectively. The estimated gender- and age-specific 10-year and lifetime absolute fracture risk were higher in Tromso than in other populations. The high lifetime fracture risk reflects the increased burden of fractures in this cohort

  4. External validation of the Garvan nomograms for predicting absolute fracture risk: the Tromso study.

    Luai A Ahmed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Absolute risk estimation is a preferred approach for assessing fracture risk and treatment decision making. This study aimed to evaluate and validate the predictive performance of the Garvan Fracture Risk Calculator in a Norwegian cohort. METHODS: The analysis included 1637 women and 1355 aged 60+ years from the Tromsø study. All incident fragility fractures between 2001 and 2009 were registered. The predicted probabilities of non-vertebral osteoporotic and hip fractures were determined using models with and without BMD. The discrimination and calibration of the models were assessed. Reclassification analysis was used to compare the models performance. RESULTS: The incidence of osteoporotic and hip fracture was 31.5 and 8.6 per 1000 population in women, respectively; in men the corresponding incidence was 12.2 and 5.1. The predicted 5-year and 10-year probability of fractures was consistently higher in the fracture group than the non-fracture group for all models. The 10-year predicted probabilities of hip fracture in those with fracture was 2.8 (women to 3.1 times (men higher than those without fracture. There was a close agreement between predicted and observed risk in both sexes and up to the fifth quintile. Among those in the highest quintile of risk, the models over-estimated the risk of fracture. Models with BMD performed better than models with body weight in correct classification of risk in individuals with and without fracture. The overall net decrease in reclassification of the model with weight compared to the model with BMD was 10.6% (p = 0.008 in women and 17.2% (p = 0.001 in men for osteoporotic fractures, and 13.3% (p = 0.07 in women and 17.5% (p = 0.09 in men for hip fracture. CONCLUSIONS: The Garvan Fracture Risk Calculator is valid and clinically useful in identifying individuals at high risk of fracture. The models with BMD performed better than those with body weight in fracture risk prediction.

  5. Individualizing fracture risk prediction

    van Geel, Tineke A. C. M.; van den Bergh, Joop P. W.; Dinant, Geert Jan; Geusens, Piet

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and clinical factors (CRF) have been identified as factors associated with an increased relative risk of fractures. From this observation and for clinical decision making, the concept of prediction of the individual absolute risk of fractures has emerged. It refers to the individual's risk for fractures over a certain time period, e.g. the next 5 and 10 years. Two individualized fracture risk calculation tools that are increasingly used and are available on the ...

  6. Assessment of fracture risk

    Kanis, John A. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.j.pontefract@sheffield.ac.uk; Johansson, Helena; Oden, Anders [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); McCloskey, Eugene V. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); Osteoporosis Centre, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Fractures are a common complication of osteoporosis. Although osteoporosis is defined by bone mineral density at the femoral neck, other sites and validated techniques can be used for fracture prediction. Several clinical risk factors contribute to fracture risk independently of BMD. These include age, prior fragility fracture, smoking, excess alcohol, family history of hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and the use of oral glucocorticoids. These risk factors in conjunction with BMD can be integrated to provide estimates of fracture probability using the FRAX tool. Fracture probability rather than BMD alone can be used to fashion strategies for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis.

  7. Assessment of fracture risk

    Fractures are a common complication of osteoporosis. Although osteoporosis is defined by bone mineral density at the femoral neck, other sites and validated techniques can be used for fracture prediction. Several clinical risk factors contribute to fracture risk independently of BMD. These include age, prior fragility fracture, smoking, excess alcohol, family history of hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and the use of oral glucocorticoids. These risk factors in conjunction with BMD can be integrated to provide estimates of fracture probability using the FRAX tool. Fracture probability rather than BMD alone can be used to fashion strategies for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis.

  8. Variance computations for functional of absolute risk estimates

    Pfeiffer, R. M.; E. Petracci

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple influence function based approach to compute the variances of estimates of absolute risk and functions of absolute risk. We apply this approach to criteria that assess the impact of changes in the risk factor distribution on absolute risk for an individual and at the population level. As an illustration we use an absolute risk prediction model for breast cancer that includes modifiable risk factors in addition to standard breast cancer risk factors. Influence function base...

  9. Relative and absolute risk in epidemiology and health physics

    The health risk from ionizing radiation commonly is expressed in two forms: (1) the relative risk, which is the percentage increase in natural disease rate and (2) the absolute or attributable risk which represents the difference between the natural rate and the rate associated with the agent in question. Relative risk estimates for ionizing radiation generally are higher than those expressed as the absolute risk. This raises the question of which risk estimator is the most appropriate under different conditions. The absolute risk has generally been used for radiation risk assessment, although mathematical combinations such as the arithmetic or geometric mean of both the absolute and relative risks, have also been used. Combinations of the two risk estimators are not valid because the absolute and relative risk are not independent variables. Both human epidemiologic studies and animal experimental data can be found to illustrate the functional relationship between the natural cancer risk and the risk associated with radiation. This implies that the radiation risk estimate derived from one population may not be appropriate for predictions in another population, unless it is adjusted for the difference in the natural disease incidence between the two populations

  10. Fracture risk assessed by Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) compared with fracture risk derived from population fracture rates

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Abrahamsen, Bo; Hermann, Anne Pernille;

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the Swedish version of Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX)) without bone mass density (BMD) in a Danish population to examine the possibility of applying this version to Danish women. METHODS: From the Danish National Register of social security numbers, we...... randomly selected 5000 women living in the region of Southern Denmark aged 40-90 years to receive a mailed questionnaire concerning risk factors for osteoporosis based on FRAX. The predicted 10-year probability of hip fractures was calculated for each woman returning a complete questionnaire using the...... Swedish version of FRAX. The observed 10-year hip fracture risk was also calculated for each woman using age-specific hip fracture rates from the National Hospital Discharge Register and National survival tables. RESULTS: A total of 4194 (84%) women responded to the questionnaire and 3636 (73%) gave...

  11. Vitamin D supplementation and fracture risk

    This letter is written in response to an editorial by Gray and Bolland stating incorrectly that vitamin D does not reduce fracture risk and that safety of vitamin D has not been demonstrated. We and others have demonstrated that vitamin D is effective in lowering risk of fractures when given in adeq...

  12. Absolute coronary risk analyser--a tool for managing coronary heart disease risk.

    Mitrabasu P; Shahapurkar J; Sreekumar T; Vyawahare M; Sarma C

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to develop a coronary risk analyser which can calculate authentically the absolute coronary risk of an individual for coronary risk management. METHODS AND RESULTS: After extensive literature survey was done to derive the most appropriate method to calculate the absolute coronary risk. Joint British recommendations derived from Framingham′s heart study were adopted for its supreme sensitivity and specificity. A windows based software is deve...

  13. Timing and risk factors for clinical fractures among postmenopausal women: a 5-year prospective study

    Rinkens Paula ELM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many risk factors for fractures have been documented, including low bone-mineral density (BMD and a history of fractures. However, little is known about the short-term absolute risk (AR of fractures and the timing of clinical fractures. Therefore, we assessed the risk and timing of incident clinical fractures, expressed as 5-year AR, in postmenopausal women. Methods In total, 10 general practice centres participated in this population-based prospective study. Five years after a baseline assessment, which included clinical risk factor evaluation and BMD measurement, 759 postmenopausal women aged between 50 and 80 years, were re-examined, including undergoing an evaluation of clinical fractures after menopause. Risk factors for incident fractures at baseline that were significant in univariate analyses were included in a multivariate Cox survival regression analysis. The significant determinants were used to construct algorithms. Results In the total group, 12.5% (95% confidence interval (CI 10.1–14.9 of the women experienced a new clinical fracture. A previous clinical fracture after menopause and a low BMD (T-score Conclusion In postmenopausal women, clinical fractures cluster in time. One in two women with a recent clinical fracture had a new clinical fracture within 5 years, regardless of BMD. The 5-year AR for a first clinical fracture was much lower and depended on BMD.

  14. Soluble CD14 and fracture risk

    Bethel, M; Bůžková, P; Fink, HA; Robbins, JA; Cauley, JA; Lee, J.; Barzilay, JI; Jalal, DI; Carbone, LD

    2016-01-01

    © 2015 International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation Summary: Soluble CD14 (sCD14) is an inflammatory marker associated with osteoclasts. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we found a positive association between plasma levels of sCD14 and risk of incident fracture among participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study. sCD14 may be useful in identifying those at risk for fracture. Introduction: Soluble CD14, a proinflammatory cytokine, is primarily derived fro...

  15. Communication of fracture risk and treatment benefit in terms of ‘bone health age’ using FRAX or Qfracture

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Rubin, Katrine Hass; Hansen, Carrinna;

    2013-01-01

    the same time increase agreement between risk algorithms. Results: The algorithms differed less in estimated bone health age than in percent risk. A 60 years old woman with a maternal history of hip fracture has a predicted major osteoporotic fracture risk equivalent to that of a 71 years (FRAX) or 68......Introduction: Communication of absolute and relative risks is challenging despite the development of tools to quickly derive absolute fracture risk estimates from risk factors with or without BMD. We speculated that back-transformation of risks to a risk age could make for a clearer message and at...... years-old woman (Qfracture). Treatment with 40% risk reduction is equivalent to a reduction in risk age by 10 years in both algorithms, reducing risk age to 62 (FRAX) or 60 years (Qfracture). Table 1 Assuming no treatment Assuming treatment with 40% risk reduction FRAX ‘Age’/ 10 years risk Qfracture...

  16. Multiple Sclerosis Increases Fracture Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Guixian Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The association between multiple sclerosis (MS and fracture risk has been reported, but results of previous studies remain controversial and ambiguous. To assess the association between MS and fracture risk, a meta-analysis was performed. Method. Based on comprehensive searches of the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, we identified outcome data from all articles estimating the association between MS and fracture risk. The pooled risk ratios (RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated. Results. A significant association between MS and fracture risk was found. This result remained statistically significant when the adjusted RRs were combined. Subgroup analysis stratified by the site of fracture suggested significant associations between MS and tibia fracture risk, femur fracture risk, hip fracture risk, pelvis fracture risk, vertebrae fracture risk, and humerus fracture risk. In the subgroup analysis by gender, female MS patients had increased fracture risk. When stratified by history of drug use, use of antidepressants, hypnotics/anxiolytics, anticonvulsants, and glucocorticoids increased the risk of fracture risk in MS patients. Conclusions. This meta-analysis demonstrated that MS was significantly associated with fracture risk.

  17. Binomial Distribution Sample Confidence Intervals Estimation 7. Absolute Risk Reduction and ARR-like Expressions

    Andrei ACHIMAŞ CADARIU

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of a controlled clinical trial suppose to interpret some key parameters as the controlled event rate, experimental event date, relative risk, absolute risk reduction, relative risk reduction, number needed to treat when the effect of the treatment are dichotomous variables. Defined as the difference in the event rate between treatment and control groups, the absolute risk reduction is the parameter that allowed computing the number needed to treat. The absolute risk reduction is compute when the experimental treatment reduces the risk for an undesirable outcome/event. In medical literature when the absolute risk reduction is report with its confidence intervals, the method used is the asymptotic one, even if it is well know that may be inadequate. The aim of this paper is to introduce and assess nine methods of computing confidence intervals for absolute risk reduction and absolute risk reduction – like function.Computer implementations of the methods use the PHP language. Methods comparison uses the experimental errors, the standard deviations, and the deviation relative to the imposed significance level for specified sample sizes. Six methods of computing confidence intervals for absolute risk reduction and absolute risk reduction-like functions were assessed using random binomial variables and random sample sizes.The experiments shows that the ADAC, and ADAC1 methods obtains the best overall performance of computing confidence intervals for absolute risk reduction.

  18. Contribution of Individual Risk Factor Changes to Reductions in Population Absolute Cardiovascular Risk

    Thomas Cochrane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few studies have investigated individual risk factor contributions to absolute cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. Even fewer have examined changes in individual risk factors as components of overall modifiable risk change following a CVD prevention intervention. Design. Longitudinal study of population CVD risk factor changes following a health screening and enhanced support programme. Methods. The contribution of individual risk factors to the estimated absolute CVD risk in a population of high risk patients identified from general practice records was evaluated. Further, the proportion of the modifiable risk attributable to each factor that was removed following one year of enhanced support was estimated. Results. Mean age of patients (533 males, 68 females was 63.7 (6.4 years. High cholesterol (57% was most prevalent, followed by smoking (53% and high blood pressure (26%. Smoking (57% made the greatest contribution to the modifiable population CVD risk, followed by raised blood pressure (26% and raised cholesterol (17%. After one year of enhanced support, the modifiable population risk attributed to smoking (56%, high blood pressure (68%, and high cholesterol (53% was removed. Conclusion. Approximately 59% of the modifiable risk attributable to the combination of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and current smoking was removed after intervention.

  19. High-Risk and Low-Risk Human Papillomavirus and the Absolute Risk of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia or Cancer

    Thomsen, Louise T; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Munk, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the absolute risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or cervical cancer (CIN 3 or worse) after detection of low-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and after a negative high-risk HPV test. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, consecutive liquid-based cer...

  20. Adequacy of relative and absolute risk models for lifetime risk estimate of radiation-induced cancer

    This report examines the applicability of the relative (multiplicative) and absolute (additive) models in predicting lifetime risk of radiation-induced cancer. A review of the epidemiologic literature, and a discussion of the mathematical models of carcinogenesis and their relationship to these models of lifetime risk, are included. Based on the available data, the relative risk model for the estimation of lifetime risk is preferred for non-sex-specific epithelial tumours. However, because of lack of knowledge concerning other determinants of radiation risk and of background incidence rates, considerable uncertainty in modelling lifetime risk still exists. Therefore, it is essential that follow-up of exposed cohorts be continued so that population-based estimates of lifetime risk are available

  1. Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

    ... exact reason for the increase in hip and spine fractures isn't clear, it's most likely due "to ... Osteoporosis International . "The increasing risk for hip and vertebral fracture in the 10 years after knee replacement may ...

  2. Management of High Blood Pressure in Those without Overt Cardiovascular Disease Utilising Absolute Risk Scores

    Mark R. Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing blood pressure has a continuum of adverse risk for cardiovascular events. Traditionally this single measure was used to determine who to treat and how vigorously. However, estimating absolute risk rather than measurement of a single risk factor such as blood pressure is a superior method to identify who is most at risk of having an adverse cardiovascular event such as stroke or myocardial infarction, and therefore who would most likely benefit from therapeutic intervention. Cardiovascular disease (CVD risk calculators must be used to estimate absolute risk in those without overt CVD as physician estimation is unreliable. Incorporation into usual practice and limitations of the strategy are discussed.

  3. Multiple Sclerosis Increases Fracture Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Guixian Dong; Ning Zhang; Zhanpo Wu; Yumin Liu; Litao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and fracture risk has been reported, but results of previous studies remain controversial and ambiguous. To assess the association between MS and fracture risk, a meta-analysis was performed. Method. Based on comprehensive searches of the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, we identified outcome data from all articles estimating the association between MS and fracture risk. The pooled risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs...

  4. Communicating risk using absolute risk reduction or prolongation of life formats

    Harmsen, Charlotte Gry; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Nexøe, Jørgen; Støvring, Henrik; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Edwards, Adrian; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2014-01-01

    -life patients. AIM: To compare the impact of using Prolongation Of Life (POL) and Absolute Risk Reduction (ARR) information formats to express effectiveness of cholesterol-lowering therapy on patients' redemptions of statin prescriptions, and on patients' confidence in their decision and satisfaction with the...... COMRADE questionnaire was used to measure patients' confidence in their decision and satisfaction with the risk communication. RESULTS: Of the 240 patients included for analyses, 112 were allocated to POL information and 128 to ARR. Patients redeeming a statin prescription totalled six (5.4%) when...... informed using POL, and 32 (25.0%) when using ARR. The level of confidence in decision and satisfaction with risk communication did not differ between the risk formats. CONCLUSION: Patients redeemed statin prescriptions less often when their GP communicated treatment effectiveness using POL compared with...

  5. Fracture risk and zoledronic acid therapy in men with osteoporosis

    Boonen, Steven; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Kaufman, Jean-Marc;

    2012-01-01

    Fractures in men are a major health issue, and data on the antifracture efficacy of therapies for osteoporosis in men are limited. We studied the effect of zoledronic acid on fracture risk among men with osteoporosis.......Fractures in men are a major health issue, and data on the antifracture efficacy of therapies for osteoporosis in men are limited. We studied the effect of zoledronic acid on fracture risk among men with osteoporosis....

  6. Pain-relief medication and risk of fractures.

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Medications to treat pain are in widespread use and any change in the risk of fracture may consequently have a significant impact at a population level. Strong analgesics of the opiate and opiate-like group are associated with an increased risk of fractures probably from an increased risk of falls resulting from the dizziness induced by these drugs. However, not all strong analgesics are associated with an increased risk of fractures. The differences are not readily explained from variations in pharmacokinetic properties. Weak analgesics mainly interact with the prostaglandin system; these drugs include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen. Acetaminophen is associated with an increased risk of fractures while acetylsalicylic acid is not. Some but not all NSAIDs are associated with an increased fracture risk, and the differences are not explained by variations in pharmacokinetic properties. More research is needed to determine if some analgesics are safer than others with respect to fracture risk. PMID:18691002

  7. Different effects of age, adiposity and physical activity on the risk of ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women.

    Armstrong, Miranda E G; Cairns, Benjamin J; Banks, Emily; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    While increasing age, decreasing body mass index (BMI), and physical inactivity are known to increase hip fracture risk, whether these factors have similar effects on other common fractures is not well established. We used prospectively-collected data from a large cohort to examine the role of these factors on the risk of incident ankle, wrist and hip fractures in postmenopausal women. 1,155,304 postmenopausal participants in the Million Women Study with a mean age of 56.0 (SD 4.8) years, provided information about lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive factors at recruitment in 1996-2001. All participants were linked to National Health Service cause-specific hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions. During follow-up for an average of 8.3 years per woman, 6807 women had an incident ankle fracture, 9733 an incident wrist fracture, and 5267 an incident hip fracture. Adjusted absolute and relative risks (RRs) for incident ankle, wrist, and hip fractures were calculated using Cox regression models. Age-specific rates for wrist and hip fractures increased sharply with age, whereas rates for ankle fracture did not. Cumulative absolute risks from ages 50 to 84 years per 100 women were 2.5 (95%CI 2.2-2.8) for ankle fracture, 5.0 (95%CI 4.4-5.5) for wrist fracture, and 6.2 (95%CI 5.5-7.0) for hip fracture. Compared with lean women (BMI<20 kg/m(2)), obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m(2)) had a three-fold increased risk of ankle fracture (RR=3.07; 95%CI 2.53-3.74), but a substantially reduced risk of wrist fracture and especially of hip fracture (RR=0.57; 0.51-0.64 and 0.23; 0.21-0.27, respectively). Physical activity was associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture but was not associated with ankle or wrist fracture risk. Ankle, wrist and hip fractures are extremely common in postmenopausal women, but the associations with age, adiposity, and physical activity differ substantially between the three fracture sites. PMID:22465850

  8. Risk of hip fracture after osteoporosis fractures. 451 women with fracture of lumbar spine, olecranon, knee or ankle

    Lauritzen, J B; Lund, B

    1993-01-01

    In a follow-up study during 1976-1984, the risk of a subsequent hip fracture was investigated in women aged 60-99 years, hospitalized for the following fractures: lumbar spine (n 70), olecranon (n 52), knee (n 129) and ankle (n 200). Follow-up ranged from 0 to 9 years. Observation time of the 4...... different fractures were 241, 180, 469, and 779, person-years, respectively. In women aged 60-79 years with one of the following fractures the relative risk of a subsequent hip fracture was increased by 4.8 (lumbar spine), 4.1 (olecranon), 3.5 (knee) and 1.5 (ankle). The relative risk of hip fracture showed...... a tendency to level off 3 years after the primary fracture....

  9. Schizophrenia, antipsychotics and risk of hip fracture

    Sørensen, Holger J; Jensen, Signe O W; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2013-01-01

    (matched to 1:3 to schizophrenia controls without hip fracture), antipsychotic polypharmacy predicted hip fracture. Analyses among antipsychotic monotherapy patients showed no differential effect of individual antipsychotics. A dose-response relationship of hip fracture and lifetime antipsychotics...

  10. Fracture risk is decreased in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Glintborg, Dorte; Nybo, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    Hyperandrogenism, obesity, and hyperinsulinemia may protect against osteoporosis, whereas amenorrhea, increased cortisol, and low growth hormone may be associated with higher fracture risk in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). OBJECTIVE: To investigate fracture risk in PCOS. MATERIAL/METHODS: PCOS...... be greater in women who have not yet reached peak bone mass. Reduced participation in sports activities was probably not the reason for the reduced risk of fractures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  11. Risk of solid cancer, cardiovascular disease, anaphylaxis, osteoporosis and fractures in patients with systemic mastocytosis

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Vestergaard, Hanne;

    2016-01-01

    In patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM), several aspects of morbidity remain poorly understood. We assessed the risk of solid cancers, cardiovascular disease, anaphylaxis, osteoporosis, and fractures in SM patients. Using Danish medical registries, we conducted a nationwide population.......2 (95% CI 0.9-1.6) and the 10-year AR was 5.9% (95% CI 3.9-8.4). SM patients are at increased risk of solid cancers - especially melanoma and NMSC-and cardiovascular disease. The risk of anaphylaxis and osteoporosis is clearly increased in SM, though absolute risk was low in this population-based study...

  12. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD.

  13. Vertebral Fracture Risk (VFR) Score for Fracture Prediction in Postmenopausal Women

    Lillholm, M.; Ghosh, A.; Pettersen, P. C.; Bruijne, M. de; Dam, E. B.; Karsdal, M. A.; Christiansen, C.; Genant, H.K.; Nielsen, Mads

    Early prognosis of osteoporosis risk is not only important to individual patients but is also a key factor when screening for osteoporosis drug trial populations. We present an osteoporosis fracture risk score based on vertebral heights. The score separated individuals who sustained fractures (by...

  14. Measuring, and identifying predictors of, women's perceptions of three types of breast cancer risk: population risk, absolute risk and comparative risk

    Apicella, C.; Peacock, S.J.; Andrews, L.; Tucker, K.; Daly, M B; Hopper, J L

    2009-01-01

    Although a key function of cancer genetics services is to provide risk information, to date there has been little consistency in the way in which breast cancer risk perception has been measured. The aims of the study were to measure estimates of (i) population risk, (ii) absolute risk and (iii) comparative risk of developing breast cancer for Ashkenazi Jewish women, and to determine predictors of breast cancer risk perception. Of 152 women, 107 (70%) completed all questions. The mean (s.d.) e...

  15. Fracture risk in hepatitis C virus infected persons

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Omland, Lars Haukali; Krarup, Henrik; Obel, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The association between Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection and fracture risk is not well characterized. We compared fracture risk between HCV-seropositive (HCV-exposed) patients and the general population and between patients with cleared and chronic HCV-infection. METHODS...

  16. Fracture risk in Danish men with prostate cancer

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Nielsen, Morten F; Eskildsen, Peter Claes; Andersen, Jens Thorup; Walter, Steen; Brixen, Kim

    2007-01-01

    To assess the risk of fracture attributable to prostate cancer, and the impact of exposure to prescribed gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists and antiandrogens on this risk in a nationwide, population-based case-control study.......To assess the risk of fracture attributable to prostate cancer, and the impact of exposure to prescribed gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists and antiandrogens on this risk in a nationwide, population-based case-control study....

  17. Subclinical Thyroid Dysfunction and Fracture Risk

    Blum, Manuel R; Bauer, Douglas C; Collet, Tinh-Hai;

    2015-01-01

    Japan. Levels of thyroid function were defined as euthyroidism (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], 0.45-4.49 mIU/L), subclinical hyperthyroidism (TSH <0.45 mIU/L), and subclinical hypothyroidism (TSH ≥4.50-19.99 mIU/L) with normal thyroxine concentrations. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES: The primary outcome...... was hip fracture. Any fractures, nonspine fractures, and clinical spine fractures were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Among 70,298 participants, 4092 (5.8%) had subclinical hypothyroidism and 2219 (3.2%) had subclinical hyperthyroidism. During 762,401 person-years of follow-up, hip fracture occurred in...... 2975 participants (4.6%; 12 studies), any fracture in 2528 participants (9.0%; 8 studies), nonspine fracture in 2018 participants (8.4%; 8 studies), and spine fracture in 296 participants (1.3%; 6 studies). In age- and sex-adjusted analyses, the hazard ratio (HR) for subclinical hyperthyroidism vs...

  18. Analysis on the risk factors of second fracture in osteoporosis-

    RUAN Wen-dong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To explore the clinical characteristics and risk factors of refracture in patients suffering from osteoporosis-related fractures as well as effective interventions. Methods: From January 2006 to January 2008, both out-patients and in-patients in our hospital who were over 50 years old and suffered from osteoporosis-related fractures were selected for this research. They were divided into fracture group and refracture group. The refracture rate was followed up for 2 years, during which 11 patients developed refracture, thus were included in the refracture group. Therefore, 273 patients, 225 first-fracture cases, aged (67.7± 8.5 years, and 48 refracture cases, aged (72.7±9.5 years, were included in this study. General data including age and sex, fracture types, femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD T-scores tested by dual-energy X-rays absorptiometry (DEXA, Charlson index, time-frame between two fractures as well as mobility skill assessment were collected and analyzed by single-factor and multivariate statistical methods. Results: Females accounted for 70.2% of the fracture group and 77.1% of the refracture group. The most common refracture type was vertebral fracture for the first time and femoral neck fracture for the second time during the followup. The second fracture happened 3.7 years after the first one on average. The refracture rate was 2.12% within one year, and 4.66% within two years. Risk factors for a second fracture in osteoporotic fracture patients included age (>75 years, HR=1.23, 95%CI 1.18-1.29; >85 years, HR=1.68, 95% CI 1.60-1.76, female sex (HR=1.36, 95%CI 1.32-1.40, prior vertebral fractures (HR=1.62, 95%CI 1.01-2.07, prior hip fractures (HR=1.27, 95%CI 0.89-2.42, BMD T-score<-3.5 (HR=1.38, 95%CI 1.17-1.72 and weakened motor skills (HR=1.27, 95%CI 1.09-1.40. Conclusions: The risks of second fracture among patients with initial brittle fracture are substantial. There is adequate time between the

  19. Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Astronaut Post Flight Bone Fracture

    Lewandowski, Beth; Myers, Jerry; Licata, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Space flight potentially reduces the loading that bone can resist before fracture. This reduction in bone integrity may result from a combination of factors, the most common reported as reduction in astronaut BMD. Although evaluating the condition of bones continues to be a critical aspect of understanding space flight fracture risk, defining the loading regime, whether on earth, in microgravity, or in reduced gravity on a planetary surface, remains a significant component of estimating the fracture risks to astronauts. This presentation summarizes the concepts, development, and application of NASA's Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM) to understanding pre-, post, and in mission astronaut bone fracture risk. The overview includes an assessment of contributing factors utilized in the BFxRM and illustrates how new information, such as biomechanics of space suit design or better understanding of post flight activities may influence astronaut fracture risk. Opportunities for the bone mineral research community to contribute to future model development are also discussed. Methods: To investigate the conditions in which spaceflight induced changes to bone plays a critical role in post-flight fracture probability, we implement a modified version of the NASA Bone Fracture Risk Model (BFxRM). Modifications included incorporation of variations in physiological characteristics, post-flight recovery rate, and variations in lateral fall conditions within the probabilistic simulation parameter space. The modeled fracture probability estimates for different loading scenarios at preflight and at 0 and 365 days post-flight time periods are compared. Results: For simple lateral side falls, mean post-flight fracture probability is elevated over mean preflight fracture probability due to spaceflight induced BMD loss and is not fully recovered at 365 days post-flight. In the case of more energetic falls, such as from elevated heights or with the addition of lateral movement

  20. Analysis on the risk factors of second fracture in osteoporosis-related fractures

    RUAN Wen-dong; WANG Pei; MA Xin-long; GE Rui-ping; ZHOU Xian-hu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical characteristics and risk factors of refracture in patients suffering from osteoporosis-related fractures as well as effective interventions.Methods: From January 2006 to January 2008, both out-patients and in-patients in our hospital who were over 50 years old and suffered from osteoporosis-related fractures were selected for this research. They were divided into fracture group and refracture group. The refracture rate was followed up for 2 years, during which 11 patients developed refracture, thus were included in the refracture group.Therefore, 273 patients, 225 first-fracture cases, aged (67.7±8.5) years, and 48 refracture cases, aged (72.7-9.5) years,were included in this study. General data including age and sex, fracture types, femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) T-scores tested by dual-energy X-rays absorptiometry (DEXA), Charlson index, time-frame between two fractures as well as mobility skill assessment were collected and analyzed by single-factor and multivariate statistical methods.Results: Females accounted for 70.2% of the fracture group and 77.1% of the refracture group. The most common refracture type was vertebral fracture for the first time and femoral neck fracture for the second time during the followup. The second fracture happened 3.7 years after the first one on average. The refracture rate was 2.12% within one year, and 4.66% within two years. Risk factors for a second fracture in osteoporotic fracture patients included age (>75years, HR=1.23, 95%CI 1.18-1.29; >85 years, HR=1.68, 95%CI 1.60-1.76), female sex (HR=1.36, 95%CI 1.32-1.40), prior vertebral fractures (HR=1.62, 95%CI 1.01-2.07), prior hip fractures (HR=1.27, 95%CI 0.89-2.42), BMD T-score<-3.5(HR=1.38, 95%CI 1.17-1.72) and weakened motor skills (HR=1.27,95%CI 1.09-1.40).Conclusions: The risks of second fracture among patients with initial brittle fracture are substantial. There is adequate time between the first and second fractures for

  1. High-Risk Stress Fractures: Diagnosis and Management.

    McInnis, Kelly C; Ramey, Lindsay N

    2016-03-01

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries in athletes. They occur during periods of increased training without adequate rest, disrupting normal bone reparative mechanisms. There are a host of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including biochemical and biomechanical, that put athletes at risk. In most stress fractures, the diagnosis is primarily clinical, with imaging indicated at times, and management focused on symptom-free relative rest with advancement of activity as tolerated. Overall, stress fractures in athletes have an excellent prognosis for return to sport, with little risk of complication. There is a subset of injuries that have a greater risk of fracture progression, delayed healing, and nonunion and are generally more challenging to treat with nonoperative care. Specific locations of high-risk stress fracture include the femoral neck (tension side), patella, anterior tibia, medial malleolus, talus, tarsal navicular, proximal fifth metatarsal, and great toe sesamoids. These sites share a characteristic region of high tensile load and low blood flow. High-risk stress fractures require a more aggressive approach to evaluation, with imaging often necessary, to confirm early and accurate diagnosis and initiate immediate treatment. Treatment consists of nonweight-bearing immobilization, often with a prolonged period away from sport, and a more methodic and careful reintroduction to athletic activity. These stress fractures may require surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion is essential to avoid delayed diagnosis and optimize outcomes in this subset of stress fractures. PMID:26972260

  2. Zolpidem Use and Risk of Fracture in Elderly Insomnia Patients

    Kang, Dong-Yoon; Park, Soyoung; Rhee, Chul-Woo; Kim, Ye-Jee; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Lee, Joongyub; Park, Byung-Joo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the risk of fractures related with zolpidem in elderly insomnia patients. Methods Health claims data on the entire South Korean elderly population from January 2005 to June 2006 were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. We applied a case-crossover design. Cases were defined as insomnia patients who had a fracture diagnosis. We set the hazard period of 1 day length prior to the fracture date and four control periods of the same leng...

  3. Recognizing and reporting vertebral fractures: reducing the risk of future osteoporotic fractures

    Given the increasing evidence that vertebral fractures are underdiagnosed and not acted on, Osteoporosis Canada and the Canadian Association of Radiologists initiated a project to develop and publish a set of recommendations to promote and facilitate the diagnosis and reporting of vertebral fractures. The identification of spinal fractures is not uniform. More than 65% of vertebral fractures cause no symptoms. It is also apparent that vertebral fractures are inadequately recognized when the opportunity for diagnosis arises fortuitously. It is to patients' benefit that radiologists report vertebral fractures evident on a chest or other radiograph, no matter how incidental to the immediate clinical indication for the examination. The present recommendations can help to close the gap in care in recognizing and treating vertebral fractures, to prevent future fractures and thus reduce the burden of osteoporosis-related morbidity and mortality, as well as fracture-related costs to the health care system. Several studies indicate that a gap exists in regard to the diagnosis of vertebral fractures and the clinical response following such diagnosis. All recommendations presented here are based on consensus. These recommendations were developed by a multidisciplinary working group under the auspices of the Scientific Advisory Council of Osteoporosis Canada and the Canadian Association of Radiologists. Prevalent vertebral fractures have important clinical implications in terms of future fracture risk. Recognizing and reporting fractures incidental to radiologic examinations done for other reasons has the potential to reduce health care costs by initiating further steps in osteoporosis diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Physicians should be aware of the importance of vertebral fracture diagnosis in assessing future osteoporotic fracture risk. Vertebral fractures incidental to radiologic examinations done for other reasons should be identified and reported. Vertebral fractures

  4. Change in fracture risk and fracture pattern after bariatric surgery: nested case-control study

    Rousseau, Catherine; Jean, Sonia; Gamache, Philippe; Lebel, Stéfane; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Biertho, Laurent; Michou, Laëtitia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether bariatric surgery increases the risk of fracture. Design Retrospective nested case-control study. Setting Patients who underwent bariatric surgery in the province of Quebec, Canada, between 2001 and 2014, selected using healthcare administrative databases. Participants 12 676 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, age and sex matched with 38 028 obese and 126 760 non-obese controls. Main outcome measures Incidence and sites of fracture in patients who had undergone bariatric surgery compared with obese and non-obese controls. Fracture risk was also compared before and after surgery (index date) within each group and by type of surgery from 2006 to 2014. Multivariate conditional Poisson regression models were adjusted for fracture history, number of comorbidities, sociomaterial deprivation, and area of residence. Results Before surgery, patients undergoing bariatric surgery (9169 (72.3%) women; mean age 42 (SD 11) years) were more likely to fracture (1326; 10.5%) than were obese (3065; 8.1%) or non-obese (8329; 6.6%) controls. A mean of 4.4 years after surgery, bariatric patients were more susceptible to fracture (514; 4.1%) than were obese (1013; 2.7%) and non-obese (3008; 2.4%) controls. Postoperative adjusted fracture risk was higher in the bariatric group than in the obese (relative risk 1.38, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.55) and non-obese (1.44, 1.29 to 1.59) groups. Before surgery, the risk of distal lower limb fracture was higher, upper limb fracture risk was lower, and risk of clinical spine, hip, femur, or pelvic fractures was similar in the bariatric and obese groups compared with the non-obese group. After surgery, risk of distal lower limb fracture decreased (relative risk 0.66, 0.56 to 0.78), whereas risk of upper limb (1.64, 1.40 to 1.93), clinical spine (1.78, 1.08 to 2.93), pelvic, hip, or femur (2.52, 1.78 to 3.59) fractures increased. The increase in risk of fracture reached significance only for

  5. Major osteoporotic fragility fractures: Risk factor updates and societal impact.

    Pisani, Paola; Renna, Maria Daniela; Conversano, Francesco; Casciaro, Ernesto; Di Paola, Marco; Quarta, Eugenio; Muratore, Maurizio; Casciaro, Sergio

    2016-03-18

    Osteoporosis is a silent disease without any evidence of disease until a fracture occurs. Approximately 200 million people in the world are affected by osteoporosis and 8.9 million fractures occur each year worldwide. Fractures of the hip are a major public health burden, by means of both social cost and health condition of the elderly because these fractures are one of the main causes of morbidity, impairment, decreased quality of life and mortality in women and men. The aim of this review is to analyze the most important factors related to the enormous impact of osteoporotic fractures on population. Among the most common risk factors, low body mass index; history of fragility fracture, environmental risk, early menopause, smoking, lack of vitamin D, endocrine disorders (for example insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), use of glucocorticoids, excessive alcohol intake, immobility and others represented the main clinical risk factors associated with augmented risk of fragility fracture. The increasing trend of osteoporosis is accompanied by an underutilization of the available preventive strategies and only a small number of patients at high fracture risk are recognized and successively referred for therapy. This report provides analytic evidences to assess the best practices in osteoporosis management and indications for the adoption of a correct healthcare strategy to significantly reduce the osteoporosis burden. Early diagnosis is the key to resize the impact of osteoporosis on healthcare system. In this context, attention must be focused on the identification of high fracture risk among osteoporotic patients. It is necessary to increase national awareness campaigns across countries in order to reduce the osteoporotic fractures incidence. PMID:27004165

  6. Risk factors for recurrent stress fractures in athletes.

    Korpelainen, R; Orava, S; Karpakka, J; Siira, P; Hulkko, A

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to identify factors predisposing athletes to multiple stress fractures, with the emphasis on biomechanical factors. Our hypothesis was that certain anatomic factors of the ankle are associated with risk of multiple stress fractures of the lower extremities in athletes. Thirty-one athletes (19 men and 12 women) with at least three separate stress fractures each, and a control group of 15 athletes without fractures completed a questionnaire focusing on putative risk factors for stress fractures, such as nutrition, training history, and hormonal history in women. Bone mineral density was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in the lumbar spine and proximal femur. Biomechanical features such as foot structure, pronation and supination of the ankle, dorsiflexion of the ankle, forefoot varus and valgus, leg-length inequality, range of hip rotation, simple and choice reaction times, and balance in standing were measured. There was an average of 3.7 (range, 3 to 6) fractures in each athlete, totaling 114 fractures. The fracture site was the tibia or fibula in 70% of the fractures in men and the foot and ankle in 50% of the fractures in women. Most of the patients were runners (61%); the mean weekly running mileage was 117 km. Biomechanical factors associated with multiple stress fractures were high longitudinal arch of the foot, leg-length inequality, and excessive forefoot varus. Nearly half of the female patients (40%) reported menstrual irregularities. Runners with high weekly training mileage were found to be at risk of recurrent stress fractures of the lower extremities. PMID:11394600

  7. Fracture Risk among Nursing Home Residents Initiating Antipsychotic Medications

    Rigler, Sally K.; Shireman, Theresa I.; Cook-Wiens, Galen J.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Whittle, Jeffrey C.; Mehr, David R.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives to determine whether antipsychotic medication initiation is associated with subsequent fracture in nursing home residents, whether fracture rates differ between first-generation versus second-generation antipsychotic use, and whether fracture rates differ among users of haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine. Design time-to-event analyses were conducted in a retrospective cohort using linked Medicaid, Medicare, Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification and Reporting data sets. Setting and Participants nursing home residents aged ≥ 65 years in CA, FL, MO, NJ and PA. Measurements fracture outcomes (any fracture; hip fracture) in first-versus second-generation antipsychotic users, and specifically among users of haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine. Comparisons incorporated propensity scores that included patient-level variables (demographics, comorbidity, diagnoses, weight, fall history, concomitant medications, cognitive performance, physical function, aggressivebehavior) and facility-level variables (nursing home size, ownership factors, staffing levels). Results Among 8,262 subjects (within 4,131 pairs), 4.3% suffered any fracture during observation with 1% having a hip fracture during an average follow up period of 93 ± 71 days; range 1 to 293 days). Antipsychotic initiation was associated with any fracture (hazard ratio (HR) 1.39, p=0.004) and with hip fracture (HR 1.76, p=0.024). The highest risk was found for hip fracture when antipsychotic use was adjusted for dose(HR=2.96; p=0.008). However, no differences in time-to-fracture were found in first-versus second-generation agents or across competing individual drugs. Conclusion Antipsychotic initiation is associated with fracture in nursing home residents, but risk does not differ across commonly used antipsychotics. PMID:23590366

  8. Exercise and risk factors of osteoporotic fractures in elderly women

    Korpelainen, R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to examine lifestyle risk factors for low bone mass, falls and fractures, and to determine the effect of 30-month exercise trial on bone mass, balance, muscle strength and gait in elderly women. Reliability of an inclinometric method for assessing postural sway was evaluated. Data on risk factors, falls and fractures were collected by questionnaires, and calcaneus and radius bone mass were measured from 1,222 women. Lifetime physical activity, low occ...

  9. The Effects of Age, Adiposity, and Physical Activity on the Risk of Seven Site-Specific Fractures in Postmenopausal Women.

    Lacombe, Jason; Cairns, Benjamin J; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie; Armstrong, Miranda Eg

    2016-08-01

    Risk factors for fracture of the neck of the femur are relatively well established, but those for fracture at other sites are little studied. In this large population study we explore the role of age, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity on the risk of fracture at seven sites in postmenopausal women. As part of the Million Women Study, 1,154,821 postmenopausal UK women with a mean age of 56.0 (SD 4.8) years provided health and lifestyle data at recruitment in 1996 to 2001. All participants were linked to National Health Service (NHS) hospital records for day-case or overnight admissions with a mean follow-up of 11 years per woman. Adjusted absolute and relative risks for seven site-specific incident fractures were calculated using Cox regression models. During follow-up, 4931 women had a fracture of the humerus; 2926 of the forearm; 15,883 of the wrist; 9887 of the neck of the femur; 1166 of the femur (not neck); 3199 a lower leg fracture; and 10,092 an ankle fracture. Age-specific incidence rates increased gradually with age for fractures of forearm, lower leg, ankle, and femur (not neck), and steeply with age for fractures of neck of femur, wrist, and humerus. When compared to women with desirable BMI (20.0 to 24.9 kg/m(2) ), higher BMI was associated with a reduced risk of fracture of the neck of femur, forearm, and wrist, but an increased risk of humerus, femur (not neck), lower leg, and ankle fractures (p Mineral Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR). PMID:26950269

  10. FRAX fracture risk in women with a recent fracture of the distal forearm

    Egsmose, Emilie Lund; Birkvig, Mette; Buhl, Thora;

    2015-01-01

    assessments were analysed by the Bland-Altman method. Agreement on the individual level was expressed as 95 % limits of agreement (LoA) and on the group level as the mean (or median) of intra-individual differences (the bias). The femoral neck T-score was -1.69 ± 0.87 (hip with lowest BMD value). The risk of...... a major fracture and a hip fracture based on the lowest femoral neck BMD value was 23.8 ± 21.4 % and 7.6 ± 8.3 %, respectively. For major fracture risk assessed without versus with the lowest BMD value, lower and upper LoA were -12.3 and 21.1 percentage points (pp) (bias 4.4 pp, p < 0.0001). The...... corresponding LoA for hip fracture risk were -11.6 and18.6 pp (bias 3.5 pp, p < 0.0001). LoA for major fracture risk assessed with the lowest versus the highest BMD value were 0.0 and 9.5 pp (bias 2.0, p < 0.0001), and correspondingly for hip fracture risk 0.0 and 9.5 pp (bias 1.0 pp, p < 0.0001). Intra...

  11. Strontium Ranelate Reduces the Risk of Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Osteopenia

    Seeman, E; Devogelaer, J; Lorenc, R; Spector, T; Brixen, K; Balogh, A; Stucki, G; Reginster, J

    2007-01-01

    Microabstract Many fractures occur in women with moderate fracture risk due to osteopenia. Strontium ranelate was studied in 1431 postmenopausal women with osteopenia. Vertebral fracture risk reduction of 41% to 59% was shown depending on the site and fracture status at baseline. This is the first...... report of anti-vertebral fracture efficacy in women with vertebral osteopenia...

  12. Leisure physical activity and the risk of fracture in men.

    Karl Michaëlsson

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Data from previous studies are inconsistent, and it is therefore uncertain whether, to what extent, and at what level leisure physical activity influences the risk of osteoporotic fractures in men. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cohort of 2,205 men, 49-51 y of age, was enrolled in a longitudinal, population-based study. Leisure physical activity and other lifestyle habits were established at baseline and at ages 60, 70, 77, and 82 y. During 35 y of follow-up, 482 men had at least one fracture. Cox's proportional hazards regression was used to determine hazard ratios (HRs of fracture associated with time-dependent physical activity habits and covariates. Men with a sedentary lifestyle (HR 2.56, 95% confidence interval 1.55-4.24 or men who walked or bicycled only for pleasure (HR 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.10-2.36 had an increased adjusted risk of hip fracture compared with men who participated in regular sports activities for at least 3 h/wk. At the end of follow-up, 8.4% of the men with a high physical activity, 13.3% of the men with a medium physical activity, and 20.5% of the men with a low physical activity had suffered a hip fracture. According to the estimation of population-attributable risk, one third of all hip fractures could be prevented by participation in regular sports activities. High activity also conferred a reduced overall fracture risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that regular sports activities can reduce the risk of fractures in older men.

  13. Impact and risk factors of post-stroke bone fracture.

    Huo, Kang; Hashim, Syed I; Yong, Kimberley L Y; Su, Hua; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-02-20

    Bone fracture occurs in stroke patients at different times during the recovery phase, prolonging recovery time and increasing medical costs. In this review, we discuss the potential risk factors for post-stroke bone fracture and preventive methods. Most post-stroke bone fractures occur in the lower extremities, indicating fragile bones are a risk factor. Motor changes, including posture, mobility, and balance post-stroke contribute to bone loss and thus increase risk of bone fracture. Bone mineral density is a useful indicator for bone resorption, useful to identify patients at risk of post-stroke bone fracture. Calcium supplementation was previously regarded as a useful treatment during physical rehabilitation. However, recent data suggests calcium supplementation has a negative impact on atherosclerotic conditions. Vitamin D intake may prevent osteoporosis and fractures in patients with stroke. Although drugs such as teriparatide show some benefits in preventing osteoporosis, additional clinical trials are needed to determine the most effective conditions for post-stroke applications. PMID:26929915

  14. Risk factors for hip fracture in elderly persons

    P. Olivi; Giannini, S; S. Sella; Lovato, R; M.C. Spenevello; S. Pancheri; C. Benini; C. Zambarda; O. Viapiana; Braga, V; A. Mattarei; Rossini, M.; Lavini, F.; G.M. Giulini; E. Fracassi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this observational study, promoted by the Health Authorities of the Regione Veneto (Italy), is to assess the prevalence of the most relevant environmental and individual risk factors in subjects with a recent hip fracture. Methods: Patients aged more than 60 years of both genders with a recent hip fracture not associated with malignancies, were administered questionnaires on dietary habits, sun exposure, and disability score. A complete family, pharmacological and pathol...

  15. Patients with eating disorders. A high-risk group for fractures

    Vestergaard, Peter; Emborg, Charlotte; Støving, René K;

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders). DESIGN: Clinical overview. FINDINGS: Bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased in patients with anorexia nervosa....... In patients with bulimia nervosa, bone mineral is only marginally decreased and fracture risk marginally increased. In patients with other eating disorders (eating disorders not otherwise specified), bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture risk is increased...... in patients with eating disorders. An eating disorder should be suspected in severely underweight young individuals (primarily girls) presenting with fractures, especially low-energy fractures....

  16. A general practice-based study examining the absolute risk of cardiovascular disease in treated hypertensive patients.

    Fahey, T P; Peters, T J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When managing hypertension, the assessment of the absolute risk of a cardiovascular' event is now advocated as the most accurate way in which the risks and benefits of anti-hypertensive therapy should be judged. Most studies that have examined control of hypertension have relied solely on the blood pressure level attained after treatment, with no measurement of the likely absolute risk in individual patients. AIM: To assess control of hypertension by quantifying the 10-year absolu...

  17. Risk of falling in patients with a recent fracture

    Willems Gittie

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with a history of a fracture have an increased risk for future fractures, even in short term. The aim of this study was to assess the number of patients with falls and to identify fall risk factors that predict the risk of falling in the first three months after a clinical fracture. Methods Prospective observational study with 3 months of follow-up in a large European academic and regional hospital. In 277 consenting women and men aged ≥ 50 years and with no dementia and not receiving treatment for osteoporosis who presented to hospital with a clinical fracture, fall risk factors were assessed according to the guidelines on fall prevention in the Netherlands. Follow-up information on falls and fractures was collected by monthly telephone interview. Incidence of falls and odds ratio's (OR, with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 512 consecutive patients with a fracture were regarded for analysis, 87 were not eligible for inclusion and 137 patients were excluded. No follow-up data were available for 11 patients. Therefore full analysis was possible in 277 patients. A new fall incident was reported by 42 patients (15%, of whom five had a fracture. Of the 42 fallers, 32 had one new fall and 10 had two or more. Multivariate analysis in the total group with sex, age, ADL difficulties, urine incontinence and polypharmacy showed that sex and ADL were significant fall risk factors. Women had an OR of 3.02 (95% CI 1.13–8.06 and patients with ADL-difficulties had an OR of 2.50 (95% CI 1.27–4.93. Multivariate analysis in the female group with age, ADL difficulties, polypharmacy and presence of orthostatic hypotension indicated that polypharmacy was the predominant risk factor (OR 2.51; 95% CI: 1.19 – 5.28. The incidence of falls was 35% in women with low ADL score and polypharmacy compared to 15% in women without these risk factors (OR 3.56: CI 1.47 – 8.67. Conclusion 15% of patients reported a new fall

  18. Fracture risk in perimenopausal women treated with beta-blockers

    Rejnmark, Lars; Vestergaard, Peter; Kassem, Moustapha;

    2004-01-01

    beta2-Adrenergic receptors have been identified on human osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells, raising the question of a sympathetic regulation of bone metabolism. We investigated effects of treatment with beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists (beta-blockers) on bone turnover, bone mineral density...... (BMD), and fracture risk. Within the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study (DOPS) a population based, comprehensive cohort study of 2016 perimenopausal women, associations between treatment with beta-blockers and bone turnover and BMD were assessed in a cross-sectional design at the start of study....... Moreover, in a nested case-control design, fracture risk during the subsequent 5 years was assessed in relation to treatment with beta-blockers at baseline. Multiple regression- and logistic regression-analyses were performed. Treatment with beta-blockers was associated with a threefold increased fracture...

  19. Altered disc pressure profile after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture is a risk factor for adjacent vertebral body fracture

    Tzermiadianos, Michael N.; Renner, Susan M.; Phillips, Frank M.; Hadjipavlou, Alexander G.; Zindrick, Michael R.; Havey, Robert M.; Voronov, Michael; Patwardhan, Avinash G.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of endplate deformity after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture in increasing the risk for adjacent vertebral fractures. Eight human lower thoracic or thoracolumbar specimens, each consisting of five vertebrae were used. To selectively fracture one of the endplates of the middle VB of each specimen a void was created under the target endplate and the specimen was flexed and compressed until failure. The fractured vertebra was subjected to spinal extension und...

  20. The fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX® score in subclinical hyperthyroidism

    Polovina Snežana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX® score is the 10-year estimated risk calculation tool for bone fracture that includes clinical data and hip bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to elucidate the ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and post-menopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Methods. The bone mineral density (by DXA, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH level, free thyroxine (fT4 level, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb titre, osteocalcin and beta-cross-laps were measured in 27 pre- and post-menopausal women with newly discovered subclinical hyperthyroidism [age 58.85 ± 7.83 years, body mass index (BMI 27.89 ± 3.46 kg/m2, menopause onset in 46.88 ± 10.21 years] and 51 matched euthyroid controls (age 59.69 ± 5.72 years, BMI 27.68 ± 4.66 kg/m2, menopause onset in 48.53 ± 4.58 years. The etiology of subclinical hyperthyroisims was autoimmune thyroid disease or toxic goiter. FRAX® score calculation was performed in both groups. Results. In the group with subclinical hyperthyroidism the main FRAX® score was significantly higher than in the controls (6.50 ± 1.58 vs 4.35 ± 1.56 respectively; p = 0.015. The FRAX® score for hip was also higher in the evaluated group than in the controls (1.33 ± 3.92 vs 0.50 ± 0.46 respectively; p = 0.022. There was no correlations between low TSH and fracture risk (p > 0.05. The ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and postmenopausal female subjects (p < 0.001 is presented by the area under the curve (AUC plotted via ROC analysis. The determined FRAX score cut-off value by this analysis was 6%, with estimated sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 75.9%, respectively. Conclusion. Pre- and postmenopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism have higher FRAX® scores and thus

  1. Fracture Risk Analysis in Postmenopausal Women with the Current Methods

    Salih Gultekin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to assess the risk of fracture in postmenopausal women using dual x-ray absorptiometry bone mineral density (DEXA-BMD as a reference method and FRAX as a new clinical risk assessment tool. Material and Method: 168 postmenopausal women (> 50 years evaluating with DEXA-BMD and FRAX methods were included in the study. Femoral BMD (F-BMD, femoral T-score (F-Ts, lumbar spine BMD (L-BMD and lumbar spine T-score (L-Ts values of the patients were calculated. Fracture risk assessments were carried out using T-score values and FRAX 10-year hip fracture (HF and major osteoporotic fracture (MOF risk ratios. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: According to the results of F-Ts and L-Ts, 44/168 (26.2% and 65/168 (38.7% of patients had osteoporosis as compatible with high fracture risk. In osteoporotic patients, mean values for F-Ts L-Ts, F-BMD and L-BMD were -2.8 ± 0.4, -3.2 ± 0.5, 0.530 ± 0.049 and 0.682 ± 0.066, respectively. There were found to be high MOF risk in 16/168 (9.5% and high HF risk in 51/168 (30.4% of patients according to FRAX. Positive correlations were determined between F-Ts and L-Ts (moderate; rho = 0.424, p <0.05 and between HF and MOF (strong; rho = 0.958, p <0001. There were strong negative correlations among HF and MOF with F-Ts (respectively, rho = -0.897 and rho = -0.844, p <0.001 and moderate negative correlations among HF and MOF with L-Ts (respectively, rho = -0.535 and rho = - 0.567, p <0.05. Discussion: In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, risk assessment by the FRAX besides the DXA-BMD measurements can be useful for not to be missed of patients with high risk of fracture.

  2. Risk factors for hip fracture in elderly persons

    P. Olivi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this observational study, promoted by the Health Authorities of the Regione Veneto (Italy, is to assess the prevalence of the most relevant environmental and individual risk factors in subjects with a recent hip fracture. Methods: Patients aged more than 60 years of both genders with a recent hip fracture not associated with malignancies, were administered questionnaires on dietary habits, sun exposure, and disability score. A complete family, pharmacological and pathology history was collected together with information on previous falls, details of the fracture index, and anthropometric data. In all subjects, blood was taken for the measurement of serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD. Results: The study included 704 patients (573 women and 131 men. Mean age was 81±8 years (range 60-102. Severe pre-fracture disability was a common feature (58% associated with multiple co-morbidities (84%, more frequently cardio- vascular and neurological diseases, and specific medications. In a large proportion (86% of the patients, environmental or individual risk factors for falling were found. Vitamin D insufficiency (serum 25OHD levels <75 nmol/l was quite common (70%, particularly in the regional Health Districts were strategies for preventing vitamin D deficiency were not implemented (91%. Only a small proportion (17% of the study population had been evaluated and treated for osteoporosis. Conclusions: In senile patients with a recent hip fracture, pre-existing disability, multiple co-morbidities, high risk of falling and inadequate intake of calcium and vitamin D is relatively common. Community and case-finding interventions aimed at selecting subjects at high risk of osteoporosis, preventing vitamin D and dietary calcium deficiency, and increasing awareness on the environmental risks of falling are highly warranted.

  3. Realized volatility and absolute return volatility: a comparison indicating market risk.

    Zheng, Zeyu; Qiao, Zhi; Takaishi, Tetsuya; Stanley, H Eugene; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    Measuring volatility in financial markets is a primary challenge in the theory and practice of risk management and is essential when developing investment strategies. Although the vast literature on the topic describes many different models, two nonparametric measurements have emerged and received wide use over the past decade: realized volatility and absolute return volatility. The former is strongly favored in the financial sector and the latter by econophysicists. We examine the memory and clustering features of these two methods and find that both enable strong predictions. We compare the two in detail and find that although realized volatility has a better short-term effect that allows predictions of near-future market behavior, absolute return volatility is easier to calculate and, as a risk indicator, has approximately the same sensitivity as realized volatility. Our detailed empirical analysis yields valuable guidelines for both researchers and market participants because it provides a significantly clearer comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods. PMID:25054439

  4. Realized volatility and absolute return volatility: a comparison indicating market risk.

    Zeyu Zheng

    Full Text Available Measuring volatility in financial markets is a primary challenge in the theory and practice of risk management and is essential when developing investment strategies. Although the vast literature on the topic describes many different models, two nonparametric measurements have emerged and received wide use over the past decade: realized volatility and absolute return volatility. The former is strongly favored in the financial sector and the latter by econophysicists. We examine the memory and clustering features of these two methods and find that both enable strong predictions. We compare the two in detail and find that although realized volatility has a better short-term effect that allows predictions of near-future market behavior, absolute return volatility is easier to calculate and, as a risk indicator, has approximately the same sensitivity as realized volatility. Our detailed empirical analysis yields valuable guidelines for both researchers and market participants because it provides a significantly clearer comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods.

  5. Self-perceived facture risk

    Rothmann, M J; Ammentorp, J; Bech, M;

    2015-01-01

    self-rated heath) and self-perceived fracture risk. Although women recognized the importance of some fracture risk factors, a number of significant risk factors appeared to be less well known. INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study is to investigate women's self-perceived fracture risk and potential...... factors associated with this and to compare self-perceived risk with absolute fracture risk estimated by FRAX® in women aged 65-80 years. METHODS: Data from 20,905 questionnaires from the ROSE study were analyzed. The questionnaire included 25 items on osteoporosis, risk factors for fractures, and self...... fracture risk significantly higher than their peers. No correlation between self-perceived risk and absolute risk was found. The ordered logistic regression model showed a significant association between high self-perceived fracture risk and previous fragility fracture, parental hip fracture, falls, self...

  6. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and risk of skeletal fractures: a population-based study

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Tang, Min; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Björkholm, Magnus; Blimark, Cecilie; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Wahlin, Anders; Turesson, Ingemar; Landgren, Ola

    2010-01-01

    Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) have an increased risk of fractures. On the basis of small numbers, patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) have been reported to have an increased fracture risk. Using population-based data from Sweden, we assessed the risks of fractures in 5326 MGUS patients diagnosed from 1958 to 2006, compared with 20 161 matched controls. MGUS patients had an increased risk of any fracture at 5 (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.74; 95% confidence i...

  7. Hyponatremia, a risk factor for osteoporosis and fractures in women

    Holm, J P; Amar, A O S; Hyldstrup, L;

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia has been linked to an increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures. We found an increased hazard ratio of major osteoporotic fractures adjusted for potential confounders, including osteoporosis and medication. A reduced BMD was not sufficiently explaining the association. Our data...... registries. RESULTS: Hyponatremia was associated with significant lower T-scores at total hip and a borderline significant lower T-score at femoral neck in the multivariate analysis. No association was found between hyponatremia and the lumbar spine T-score. Hyponatremia was associated with an increased...

  8. Altered disc pressure profile after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture is a risk factor for adjacent vertebral body fracture.

    Tzermiadianos, Michael N; Renner, Susan M; Phillips, Frank M; Hadjipavlou, Alexander G; Zindrick, Michael R; Havey, Robert M; Voronov, Michael; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of endplate deformity after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture in increasing the risk for adjacent vertebral fractures. Eight human lower thoracic or thoracolumbar specimens, each consisting of five vertebrae were used. To selectively fracture one of the endplates of the middle VB of each specimen a void was created under the target endplate and the specimen was flexed and compressed until failure. The fractured vertebra was subjected to spinal extension under 150 N preload that restored the anterior wall height and vertebral kyphosis, while the fractured endplate remained significantly depressed. The VB was filled with cement to stabilize the fracture, after complete evacuation of its trabecular content to ensure similar cement distribution under both the endplates. Specimens were tested in flexion-extension under 400 N preload while pressure in the discs and strain at the anterior wall of the adjacent vertebrae were recorded. Disc pressure in the intact specimens increased during flexion by 26 +/- 14%. After cementation, disc pressure increased during flexion by 15 +/- 11% in the discs with un-fractured endplates, while decreased by 19 +/- 26.7% in the discs with the fractured endplates. During flexion, the compressive strain at the anterior wall of the vertebra next to the fractured endplate increased by 94 +/- 23% compared to intact status (p 0.05). Subsequent flexion with compression to failure resulted in adjacent fracture close to the fractured endplate in six specimens and in a non-adjacent fracture in one specimen, while one specimen had no adjacent fractures. Depression of the fractured endplate alters the pressure profile of the damaged disc resulting in increased compressive loading of the anterior wall of adjacent vertebra that predisposes it to wedge fracture. This data suggests that correction of endplate deformity may play a role in reducing the risk of adjacent fractures. PMID:18795344

  9. The Framingham Risk Function Underestimated Absolute Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Czech Men

    Reissigová, Jindra; Zvárová, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2007), s. 43-49. ISSN 0026-1270 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : external validation * Framingham risk function * coronary heart disease Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.451, year: 2007

  10. The Influence of Absolute and Comparative Risk Perceptions on Cervical Cancer Screening and the Mediating Role of Cancer Worry.

    Zhao, Xinyan; Nan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the interrelationships between cancer risk perceptions (absolute and comparative risk perceptions), cancer worry, and cervical cancer screening. Using a nationally representative survey data set (N = 2,304) from the 2012 Health Information National Trends Survey Circle 1, we found that although neither absolute risk perceptions nor comparative risk perceptions exerted a direct impact on women's compliance with the cervical cancer screening recommendation (i.e., that women ages 21 to 65 obtain Pap smear every 3 years; U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 2012 ), both types of risk perceptions had an indirect effect on cervical cancer screening through the mediation of cancer worry. These results suggest a primal role of affect in health decision making. Implications of the findings for cancer risk communication are discussed. PMID:26312444

  11. EXTERNAL FIXATION OF INTERTROCHANTERIC FRACTURES AS AN OPTION IN HIGH RISK GERIATRIC PATIENTS

    Badoo; Naveed,; Syed Baasit Shafi; Mohammad,, K

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of external fixation of intertrochanteric fractures in high risk geriatric patients. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTINGS: Level - 1 trauma C entre. PATIENTS: Fifty high risk geriatric patients with intertrochanteric fractures. INTERVENTION: Close reduction and external fixation using AO external fixator. OUTCOME MEASURED: fracture union, time to union, pin tract in...

  12. A model for predicting individuals' absolute risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma: Moving toward tailored screening and prevention.

    Xie, Shao-Hua; Lagergren, Jesper

    2016-06-15

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is characterized by rapidly increasing incidence and poor prognosis, stressing the need for preventive and early detection strategies. We used data from a nationwide population-based case-control study, which included 189 incident cases of EAC and 820 age- and sex-matched control participants, from 1995 through 1997 in Sweden. We developed risk prediction models based on unconditional logistic regression. Candidate predictors included established and readily identifiable risk factors for EAC. The performance of model was assessed by the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) with cross-validation. The final model could explain 94% of all case patients with EAC (94% population attributable risk) and included terms for gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms or use of antireflux medication, body mass index (BMI), tobacco smoking, duration of living with a partner, previous diagnoses of esophagitis and diaphragmatic hernia and previous surgery for esophagitis, diaphragmatic hernia or severe reflux or gastric or duodenal ulcer. The AUC was 0.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81-0.87) and slightly lower after cross-validation. A simpler model, based only on reflux symptoms or use of antireflux medication, BMI and tobacco smoking could explain 91% of the case patients with EAC and had an AUC of 0.82 (95% CI 0.78-0.85). These EAC prediction models showed good discriminative accuracy, but need to be validated in other populations. These models have the potential for future use in identifying individuals with high absolute risk of EAC in the population, who may be considered for endoscopic screening and targeted prevention. PMID:26756848

  13. Risk of femoral shaft and subtrochanteric fractures among users of bisphosphonates and raloxifene

    Vestergaard, P; Schwartz, F; Rejnmark, L; Mosekilde, L

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested an association between bisphosphonate use and subtrochanteric fractures. This cohort study showed an increased risk of subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures both before and after the start of drugs against osteoporosis including bisphosphonates. This may suggest...

  14. Study of Hip Fracture Risk using Tree Structured Survival Analysis

    Lu Y

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In dieser Studie wird das Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei postmenopausalen Frauen untersucht, indem die Frauen in verschiedene Subgruppen hinsichtlich dieses Risikos klassifiziert werden. Frauen in einer gemeinsamen Subgruppe haben ein ähnliches Risiko, hingegen in verschiedenen Subgruppen ein unterschiedliches Hüftfraktur-Risiko. Die Subgruppen wurden mittels der Tree Structured Survival Analysis (TSSA aus den Daten von 7.665 Frauen der SOF (Study of Osteoporosis Fracture ermittelt. Bei allen Studienteilnehmerinnen wurde die Knochenmineraldichte (BMD von Unterarm, Oberschenkelhals, Hüfte und Wirbelsäule gemessen. Die Zeit von der BMD-Messung bis zur Hüftfraktur wurde als Endpunkt notiert. Eine Stichprobe von 75% der Teilnehmerinnen wurde verwendet, um die prognostischen Subgruppen zu bilden (Trainings-Datensatz, während die anderen 25% als Bestätigung der Ergebnisse diente (Validierungs-Datensatz. Aufgrund des Trainings-Datensatzes konnten mittels TSSA 4 Subgruppen identifiziert werden, deren Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei einem Follow-up von im Mittel 6,5 Jahren bei 19%, 9%, 4% und 1% lag. Die Einteilung in die Subgruppen erfolgte aufgrund der Bewertung der BMD des Ward'schen Dreiecks sowie des Oberschenkelhalses und nach dem Alter. Diese Ergebnisse konnten mittels des Validierungs-Datensatzes reproduziert werden, was die Sinnhaftigkeit der Klassifizierungregeln in einem klinischen Setting bestätigte. Mittels TSSA war eine sinnvolle, aussagekräftige und reproduzierbare Identifikation von prognostischen Subgruppen, die auf dem Alter und den BMD-Werten beruhen, möglich. In this paper we studied the risk of hip fracture for post-menopausal women by classifying women into different subgroups based on their risk of hip fracture. The subgroups were generated such that all the women in a particular subgroup had relatively similar risk while women belonging to two different subgroups had rather different risks of hip fracture. We used the Tree Structured

  15. Fracture Risk Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease, Prospective Testing Under Real World Environments (FRACTURE: a prospective study

    West Sarah L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with an increased risk of fracture. Decreased bone mass and disruption of microarchitecture occur early in the course of CKD and worsens with the progressive decline in renal function so that at the time of initiation of dialysis at least 50% of patients have had a fracture. Despite the excess fracture risk, and the associated increases in morbidity and mortality, little is known about the factors that are associated with an increase in fracture risk. Our study aims to identify prognostic factors for bone loss and fractures in patients with stages 3 to 5 CKD. Methods This prospective study aims to enroll two hundred and sixty men and women with stages 3 to 5 CKD. Subjects will be followed for 24 months and we will examine the ability of: 1 bone mineral density by dual x-ray absorptiometry at the spine, hip, and radius; 2 volumetric bone density by high resolution peripheral quantitated computed tomography at the radius and tibia; 3 serum markers of bone turnover; 4 bone formation rate by bone biopsy; and 5 muscle strength and balance to predict spine and non-spine fractures, identified by self-report and/or vertebral morphometry. All measurements will be obtained at baseline, at 12 and at 24 months with the exception of bone biopsy, which will be measured once at 12 months. Subjects will be contacted every 4 months to determine if there have been incident fractures or falls. Discussion This study is one of the first that aims to identify risk factors for fracture in early stage CKD patients. Ultimately, by identifying risk factors for fracture and targeting treatments in this group-before the initiation of renal replacement therapy - we will reduce the burden of disease due to fractures among patients with CKD.

  16. High absolute risks and predictors of venous and arterial thromboembolic events in patients with nephrotic syndrome: results from a large retrospective cohort study.

    Mahmoodi, B.K.; Kate, M.K. ten; Waanders, F.; Veeger, N.J.; Brouwer, J.L.; Vogt, L.; Navis, G.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No data are available on the absolute risk of either venous thromboembolism (VTE) or arterial thromboembolism (ATE) in patients with nephrotic syndrome. Reported risks are based on multiple case reports and small studies with mostly short-term follow-up. We assessed the absolute risk of

  17. Mapping the prescriptiome to fractures in men--a national analysis of prescription history and fracture risk

    Abrahamsen, B; Brixen, K

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY: A nationwide case-control study was performed in 62,865 men aged 50+ using fracture data from the national hospital discharge register to screen all redeemed prescriptions in the past 5 years for significant mapping to fracture risk, employing measures to control for false discovery rate....... INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis in men is frequently related to alcohol abuse, hypogonadism, hypercalciuria, or the use of glucocorticoids. Very limited information is available on the impact of other medications on fracture risk in men. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide population-based case-control study...... collecting fracture data from the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register and prescriptions from the National Prescriptions Database (1995-2000). We included men aged 50+ years, with hospital-treated fractures in the year 2000 (n = 15,716), and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 47,149). RESULTS: We...

  18. Mapping return levels of absolute NDVI variations for the assessment of drought risk in Ethiopia

    Tonini, F.; Hochmair, H. H.; Jona Lasinio, G.

    2012-12-01

    The analysis and forecasting of extreme climatic events has become increasingly relevant to planning effective financial and food-related interventions in third-world countries. Natural disasters and climate change, both large and small scale, have a great impact on non-industrialized populations who rely exclusively on activities such as crop production, fishing, and similar livelihood activities. It is important to identify the extent of the areas prone to severe drought conditions in order to study the possible consequences of the drought on annual crop production. In this paper, we aim to identify such areas within the South Tigray zone, Ethiopia, using a transformation of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) called Absolute Difference NDVI (ADVI). Negative NDVI shifts from the historical average can generally be linked to a reduction in the vigor of local vegetation. Drought is more likely to increase in areas where negative shifts occur more frequently and with high magnitude, making it possible to spot critical situations. We propose a new methodology for the assessment of drought risk in areas where crop production represents a primary source of livelihood for its inhabitants. We estimate ADVI return levels pixel per pixel by fitting extreme value models to independent monthly minima. The study is conducted using SPOT-Vegetation (VGT) ten-day composite (S10) images from April 1998 to March 2009. In all short-term and long-term predictions, we found that central and southern areas of the South Tigray zone are prone to a higher drought risk compared to other areas.; Temporal autocorrelation among monthly minima within the Alamata woreda. (a) ACF-Boxplot and (b) PACF-Boxplot. ; ADVI return level estimates. (a) 10-Month return levels. (b) 100-Month return levels. (c) 1000-Month return levels.

  19. Workflow Integrating Fracture Permeability Characterization and Multiphase Flow Modeling for CO2 Storage and Risk Assessments in Fractured Reservoirs

    Jin, G.; Pashin, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ensuring safe and permanent storage of sequestered CO2in naturally fractured geological media is vital for the success of geologic storage projects. Critical needs exist to develop advanced techniques to characterize and model fluid transport in naturally fractured reservoirs and seals. We have developed a scale-independent 3-D stochastic fracture permeability characterization workflow that employs multiple discrete fracture network (DFN) realizations. The workflow deploys a multidirectional flux-based upwind weighting scheme that is capable of modeling multiphase flow in highly heterogeneous fractured media. The techniques employed herein show great promise for increasing the accuracy of capacity determinations and the prediction of pressure footprints associated with injected CO2 plumes. The proposed workflow has been conducted in a simulation study of flow transport and risk assessment of CO2 injection into a deep fractured saline formation using geological parameters from Knox Group carbonate and Red Mountain shale rocks in central Alabama. A 3-D fracture permeability map was generated from multiple realizations of DFN models. A multiphase flow model composed of supercritical CO2 and saline water was applied to simulate CO2 plume evolution during and after injection. Injection simulation reveals significant permeability anisotropy that favors development of northeast-elongate CO2 plumes. The spreading front of the CO2 plume shows strong viscous fingering effects. Post-injection simulation indicates significant lateral spreading of CO2 near the top of the fractured formations because of the buoyancy of injectate in rock matrix and strata-bound vertical fractures. Risk assessment shows that although pressure drops faster in the fractured formations than in those lacking fractures, lateral movement of CO2 along natural fractures necessitates that the injectate be confined by widespread seals with high integrity.

  20. Relationship of Height to Site-Specific Fracture Risk in Postmenopausal Women.

    Armstrong, Miranda Eg; Kirichek, Oksana; Cairns, Benjamin J; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K

    2016-04-01

    Height has been associated with increased risk of fracture of the neck of femur. However, information on the association of height with fractures at other sites is limited and conflicting. A total of 796,081 postmenopausal women, who reported on health and lifestyle factors including a history of previous fractures and osteoporosis, were followed for 8 years for incident fracture at various sites by record linkage to National Health Service hospital admission data. Adjusted relative risks of fracture at different sites per 10-cm increase in height were estimated using Cox regression. Numbers with site-specific fractures were: humerus (3036 cases), radius and/or ulna (1775), wrist (9684), neck of femur (5734), femur (not neck) (713), patella (649), tibia and/or fibula (1811), ankle (5523), and clavicle/spine/rib (2174). The risk of fracture of the neck of femur increased with increasing height (relative risk [RR] = 1.48 per 10-cm increase, 99% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-1.57) and the proportional increase in risk was significantly greater than for all other fracture sites (pheterogeneity < 0.001). For the other sites, fracture risk also increased with height (RR = 1.15 per 10 cm, CI 1.12-1.18), but there was only very weak evidence of a possible difference in risk between the sites (pheterogeneity = 0.03). In conclusion, taller women are at increased risk of fracture, especially of the neck of femur. PMID:26572496

  1. Population-based studies on risk of fracture in patients with neurological disorders

    Pouwels, S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with neurological disorders may be at an increased risk of fracture via multiple causal pathways, including increases in the risk of falls, changes in bone mineral density and quality of bone microarchitecture. Risk of fracture may be increased by the disease itself, by comorbi

  2. A risk assessment tool for contaminated sites in low-permeability fractured media

    In Denmark, many contaminated sites are located in areas with low permeability or fractured geologies such as glacial moraine clays. Fractures increase the risk of fast transport of contaminants to underlying groundwater systems. It is therefore important to consider fracture transport when...

  3. Model linear absolute and relative risk estimates for cancer induced by ionizing radiation in Mexican cohort of occupationally exposed

    From the rate of natural mortality ms cancer (t) for every 100 thousand habitants, modeled by a fourth-degree polynomial function of the age data of the Mexican population (2008), and assuming: a) a relationship 1: 5 of cancer induced radiation respect to presented spontaneously, b) a size of initial cohort No = 100 k SOPs, c) a speed of HE = (2 ± 1) mSv / received by the SOPs from 18 to 65 years, d) a latency of 8 years for cancer induction after irradiation, e) a time tracking cohort to 75 years, f) and taking the coefficients absolute and relative risk BEIRs induction of cancer models II and VII (excluding leukemia); It determined: BEIR II for a total of 125 and 400 deaths from cancer for absolute and relative linear models respectively. For BEIR VII has a number of fatal cases of 345 and 927 deaths respectively for absolute and relative linear model cancer.

  4. Changing incidence and residual lifetime risk of common osteoporosis-related fractures

    Lauritzen, J B; Schwarz, Peter; Lund, B; McNair, P; Transbøl, I

    1993-01-01

    1735 fractures of the distal radius, 747 fractures of the proximal humerus, 878 cervical and 635 trochanteric hip fractures were included. In men 273 cervical and 232 trochanteric hip fractures were included. The fractures were registered during the period 1976 to 1984 and changes in age......-specific incidence were calculated (chi-squared test for linear trend; p-values less than 0.05 were considered significant). On the basis of life tables and population background data, the lifetime risk was estimated. The incidence of cervical hip fractures in women aged 60-89 years decreased significantly (p < 0.......05) during the observation period, while no significant decrease was found in the incidence of trochanteric fractures. No significant changes in incidence were observed in women with radial or humeral fractures, or in men with hip fractures. A women 60 years old with a life expectancy of 81 years had an...

  5. Shape-based Assessment of Vertebral Fracture Risk in Postmenopausal Women Using Discriminative Shape Alignment

    Crimi, Alessandro; Loog, Marco; de Bruijne, Marleen;

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Risk assessment of future osteoporotic vertebral fractures is currently based mainly on risk factors, such as bone mineral density, age, prior fragility fractures, and smoking. It can be argued that an osteoporotic vertebral fracture is not exclusively an abrupt event but...... the result of a decaying process. To evaluate fracture risk, a shape-based classifier, identifying possible small prefracture deformities, may be constructed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During a longitudinal case-control study, a large population of postmenopausal women, fracture free at baseline, were...... followed. The 22 women who sustained at least one lumbar fracture on follow-up represented the case group. The control group comprised 91 women who maintained skeletal integrity and matched the case group according to the standard osteoporosis risk factors. On radiographs, a radiologist and two technicians...

  6. A Biomechanical Approach to Assessing Hip Fracture Risk

    Ellman, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Bone loss in microgravity is well documented, but it is difficult to quantify how declines in bone mineral density (BMD) contribute to an astronaut's overall risk of fracture upon return. This study uses a biomechanical approach to assessing hip fracture risk, or Factor of Risk (Phi), which is defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expeditions 1-18 were included in this study (n=25), while crewmembers who flew twice (n=2) were treated as separate subjects. Bone strength was estimated based on an empirical relationship between areal BMD at the hip, as measured by DXA, and failure load, as determined by mechanical testing of cadaver femora. Fall load during a sideways fall was calculated from a previously developed biomechanical model, which takes into account body weight, height, gender, and soft tissue thickness overlying the lateral aspect of the hip that serves to attenuate the impact force. While no statistical analyses have been performed yet, preliminary results show that males in this population have a higher FOR than females, with a post- flight Phi of 0.87 and 0.36, respectively. FOR increases 5.1% from preflight to postflight, while only one subject crossed the fracture "threshold" of Phi = 1, for a total of 2 subjects with a postflight Phi > 1. These results suggest that men may be at greater risk for hip fracture due largely in part to their relatively thin soft tissue padding as compared to women, since soft tissue thickness has the highest correlation (R(exp 2)= .53) with FOR of all subject-specific parameters. Future work will investigate changes in FOR during recovery to see if baseline risk levels are restored upon return to 1-g activity. While dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most commonly used clinical measure of bone health, it fails to provide compartment-specific information that is useful in assessing changes to bone quality as a result of microgravity exposure. Peripheral

  7. Fracture risk in Danish men with prostate cancer: a nationwide register study

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Nielsen, Morten F; Eskildsen, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    fracture risk became apparent early after diagnosis and remained pronounced even in long-term survivors. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with an odds ratio of 1.7 (1.2-2.5; P < 0.01) and orchidectomy, at 1.7 (1.2-2.4; P < 0.01) added to the overall fracture risk. In all, 3.1% of hip fractures in Danish...... excess mortality in patients with advanced prostate cancer...

  8. Dementia and Hip Fractures: Development of a Pathogenic Framework for Understanding and Studying Risk

    Friedman, Susan M.; Menzies, Isaura B.; Bukata, Susan V.; Mendelson, Daniel A.; Stephen L Kates

    2010-01-01

    Dementia and hip fractures are 2 conditions that are seen primarily in older adults, and both are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. An individual with dementia is up to 3 times more likely than a cognitively intact older adult to sustain a hip fracture. This may occur via several mechanisms, including (1) risk factors that are common to both outcomes; (2) the presence of dementia increasing hip fracture incidence via intermediate risk factors, such as falls, osteoporosis, a...

  9. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  10. Risk of vertebral fracture after menopause: detection of high risk subjects by dual photon absorptiometry

    Dual photon absorptiometry of bone is used to detect in an exposed population those subjects who are high risk of fracture and also to follow up the evolution of these patients. 37 women who have suffered fractures have been compared to 41 women without fractures of similar age distribution. A highly significant correlation between body height and Bone Mineral Content (BMC) of the lumbar spine is found in the control group thus allowing the calculation of the expected BMC value for each patient. A crushing index is defined as the ratio of the observed BMC value to the expected one. Using this index, instead of the two more usual modes of BMC expression, leads to an improvement of the predictive estimation of fracture risk. The predictive value of such indices should still be improved. With this aim, further determinations of indices are desirable. The following requirements should be borne in mind: the physical data should be easily obtainable e.g. body height and weight and the meaning of the index based on these easily verifiable factors they should be easily understood

  11. Nutrient and food intakes in early life and risk of childhood fractures

    Händel, M. N.; Heitmann, B. L.; Abrahamsen, B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of detrimental dietary patterns early in life may contribute to reducing the high incidence of fracture among healthy children. However, information based on a systematic review of the effect of various dietary foods and nutrients on fracture risk is lacking......, potentially because of unethical aspects related to the enrollment of children randomly assigned to certain dietary exposures and later fracture rates. Overall, fracture risk seemed to be associated with milk avoidance, high energy intake, high cheese intake, high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, and no...

  12. The Risk of Fractures Among Patients With Cirrhosis or Chronic Pancreatitis

    Bang, Ulrich Christian; Benfield, Thomas; Bendtsen, Flemming; Hyldstrup, Lars; Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik

    2014-01-01

    cirrhosis and 11,972 patients (33.5% women) with CP. Each patient was compared with 10 age- and sex-matched controls. We also assessed the risk of fractures among patients with CP who received pancreatic enzyme substitution (PES) for fat malabsorption. RESULTS: During the study period, bone fractures......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Cirrhosis and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are accompanied by inflammation and malnutrition. Both conditions can have negative effects on bone metabolism and promote fractures. We evaluated the risk of fractures among patients with CP or cirrhosis and determined the effect of fat...

  13. Hip and fragility fracture prediction by 4-item clinical risk score and mobile heel BMD: a women cohort study

    Thulesius Hans

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One in four Swedish women suffers a hip fracture yielding high morbidity and mortality. We wanted to revalidate a 4-item clinical risk score and evaluate a portable heel bone mineral density (BMD technique regarding hip and fragility fracture risk among elderly women. Methods In a population-based prospective cohort study we used clinical risk factors from a baseline questionnaire and heel BMD to predict a two-year hip and fragility fracture outcome for women, in a fracture preventive program. Calcaneal heel BMD was measured by portable dual X-ray laser absorptiometry (DXL and compared to hip BMD, measured with stationary dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA technique. Results Seven women suffered hip fracture and 14 women fragility fracture/s (at hip, radius, humerus and pelvis among 285 women; 60% having heel BMD ≤ -2.5 SD. The 4-item FRAMO (Fracture and Mortality Index combined the clinical risk factors age ≥80 years, weight Conclusions In a follow-up study we identified high risk groups for hip and fragility fracture with our plain 4-item risk model. Increased fracture risk was also related to decreasing heel BMD in calcaneal bone, measured with a mobile DXL technique. A combination of high FRAMO Index, prior fragility fracture, and very low BMD restricted the high risk group to 11%, among whom most hip fractures occurred (71%. These practical screening methods could eventually reduce hip fracture incidence by concentrating preventive resources to high fracture risk women.

  14. Risk of fracture in celiac disease: Gender, dietary compliance, or both?

    María Inés Pinto Sánchez; Edgardo Smecuol; Adriana Crivelli; Juan Andrés de Paula; Juan C Gómez; Silvia Pedreira; Eduardo Mauri(n)o; Julio César Bai; Adriana Mohaidle; Andrea Baistrocchi; Dolores Matoso; Horacio Vázquez; Andrea González; Roberto Mazure; Evangelina Maffei; Guillermina Ferrari

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence of peripheral fractures in patients with celiac disease (CD) and the effect of treatment on fracture risk. METHODS: We compared the incidence and risk of peripheral fractures before and after diagnosis between a cohort of 265 patients who had been diagnosed with CD at least 5 years before study entry and a cohort of 530 age- and sex-matched controls who had been diagnosed with functional gastrointestinal disorders. Data were collected through in-person interviews with an investigator. The overall assessment window for patients was 9843 patient-years (2815 patient-years after diagnosis). RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the CD cohort showed significantly higher incidence rate and risk of first peripheral fracture before diagnosis [adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 1.78, 95% CI: 1.23-2.56, P < 0.002] and in men (HR: 2.67, 95% CI: 1.37-5.22, P < 0.004). Fracture risk was significantly associated with the classic CD presentation with gastrointestinal symptoms (P < 0.003). In the time period after diagnosis, the risk of fractures was comparable between the CD cohort and controls in both sexes (HR: 1.08, 95% CI: 0.55-2.10 for women; HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 0.57-4.26 for men). CONCLUSION: CD patients have higher prevalence of fractures in the peripheral skeleton before diagnosis. This is associated with male sex and classic clinical presentation. The fracture risk was reduced after the treatment.

  15. Risk of vertebral insufficiency fractures in relation to compressive strength predicted by quantitative computed tomography

    Vertebral insufficiency fractures may result from excessive loading of normal and routine loading of osteoporotic spines. Fractures occur when the mechanical load exceeds the vertebral compressive strength, i.e., the maximum load a vertebra can tolerate. Vertebral compressive strength is determined by trabecular bone density and the size of end-plate area. Both parameters can be measured non-invasively by quanti-tative computed tomography (QCT). In 75 patients compressive strength (i.e., trabecular bone density and endplate area) of the vertebra L3 was determined using QCT. In addition, conventional radiographs of the spines were analysed for the prevalence of insufficiency fractures in each case. By relating fracture prevalence to strength, 3 fracture risk groups were found: a high-risk group with strength values of L35 kN and a fracture risk near 0 percent. Biomechanical measurements and model calculations indicate that spinal loads of 3 to 4 kN at L3/4 will be common in everyday activities. These data and the results described above suggest that spines with strength values of L3<3 kN are at an extremely high risk of insufficiency fractures in daily life. Advantages of fracture risk assessment by strength determination over risk estimation based on clinically used trabecular bone density measurements are discussed. (author). 18 refs.; 4 figs

  16. Pronounced Risk of Fractures among Elderly Men Affected by Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Baslund, Bo; Obel, Niels

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is unknown whether patients affected by granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) are at increased risk of fractures, and whether the fracture risk in GPA varies with age and sex. The aim of the present study was to compare the fracture risk among patients with GPA with that among age......- and sex-matched population controls. METHODS: We established a monocentric cohort of patients treated for GPA at a Danish tertiary care center from 1995 to 2010 (n = 159) and a register-derived GPA cohort identified from the Danish National Hospital Register (n = 402). Each patient was matched with 7...... population controls. The occurrence of fractures among patients was compared with that among controls by calculation of incidence rate ratios (IRR). RESULTS: In the monocentric cohort, an increased fracture risk was observed among men aged ≥ 55 years at the time of first hospitalization for GPA (IRR 3.5, 95...

  17. Risk of septic knee following retrograde intramedullary nailing of open and closed femur fractures

    Halvorson Jason J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One potential complication of retrograde femoral nailing in the treatment of femur fractures is the risk of septic knee. This risk theoretically increases in open fractures as a contaminated fracture site has the potential to seed the instrumentation being passed in and out of the sterile intraarticular starting point. There are few studies examining this potential complication in a relatively commonly practiced technique. Methods All patients who received a retrograde femoral nail for femur fracture between September 1996 and November 2006 at a Level 1 trauma center were retrospectively reviewed. This yielded 143 closed fractures, 38 open fractures and 4 closed fractures with an ipsilateral traumatic knee arthrotomy. Patient follow-up records were reviewed for documentation of septic knee via operative notes, wound culture or knee aspirate data, or the administration of antibiotics for suspected septic knee. Results No evidence of septic knee was found in the 185 fractures examined in the dataset. Utilizing the Wilson confidence interval, the rate of septic knee based on our population was no greater than 2%, with that of the open fracture group alone being 9%. Conclusions Based on these results and review of the literature, the risk of septic knee in retrograde femoral nailing of both open and closed femoral shaft fractures appears low but potentially not insignificant. Funding There was no outside source of funding from either industry or other organization for this study.

  18. Predicting Absolute Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Using Age and Waist Circumference Values in an Aboriginal Australian Community

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To predict in an Australian Aboriginal community, the 10-year absolute risk of type 2 diabetes associated with waist circumference and age on baseline examination. Method A sample of 803 diabetes-free adults (82.3% of the age-eligible population) from baseline data of participants collected from 1992 to 1998 were followed-up for up to 20 years till 2012. The Cox-proportional hazard model was used to estimate the effects of waist circumference and other risk factors, including age, smoking and alcohol consumption status, of males and females on prediction of type 2 diabetes, identified through subsequent hospitalisation data during the follow-up period. The Weibull regression model was used to calculate the absolute risk estimates of type 2 diabetes with waist circumference and age as predictors. Results Of 803 participants, 110 were recorded as having developed type 2 diabetes, in subsequent hospitalizations over a follow-up of 12633.4 person-years. Waist circumference was strongly associated with subsequent diagnosis of type 2 diabetes with PAboriginal Australian community. It is simple and easily understood and will help identify individuals at risk of diabetes in relation to waist circumference values. Our findings on the relationship between waist circumference and diabetes on gender will be useful for clinical consultation, public health education and establishing WC cut-off points for Aboriginal Australians. PMID:25876058

  19. Absolute risk of suicide after first hospital contact in mental disorder

    Nordentoft, Merete; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of lifetime risk of suicide in mental disorders were based on selected samples with incomplete follow-up.......Estimates of lifetime risk of suicide in mental disorders were based on selected samples with incomplete follow-up....

  20. Is chronic hyponatremia a novel risk factor for hip fracture in the elderly?

    Carlos Ayus, Juan; Negri, Armando Luis; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Moritz, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures represent a serious health risk in the elderly, with significant associated morbidity and mortality. There is now an emerging literature that suggests that chronic hyponatremia increases the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for both falls and fractures in the elderly. Hyponatremia appears to contribute to falls and fractures by two mechanisms: (i) it produces mild cognitive impairment resulting in unsteady gait and falls and (ii) it directly contributes to osteoporosis and increased bon...

  1. Physical inactivity is an independent risk factor for hip fracture in the elderly.

    Coupland, C; Wood, D.; Cooper, C.

    1993-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that physical inactivity is an independent risk factor for hip fracture in the elderly. DESIGN--Population based, case-control study. SETTING--Metropolitan borough of Newcastle upon Tyne. PARTICIPANT--A total of 197 patients aged 50 years and over, resident in Newcastle, and admitted consecutively with a hip fracture, and 382 community controls, matched by age and sex, who had not suffered a hip fracture. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Validated methods...

  2. Beyond mobility assessment: Timed up and go test and its relationship to osteoporosis and fracture risk

    Shereen M. Mousa, MD; Doha Rasheedy, MD; Khalid E. El-Sorady, MSc; Ahmed K. Mortagy, MD

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fracture determinants are falls, bone fragility, imbalance, and decreased lower limb strength. The timed up and go (TUG) test assesses most of the fracture determinants. Aim: To assess the relationship between mobility status using TUG test, bone mineral density (BMD), and different fracture risks predicted by different tools. Methods: A case (TUG time > 20 seconds)–control (TUG ≤ 20 seconds) study comprised 66 patients and 72 controls. Participants were assessed for falls, ...

  3. Predict of fracture risk rate according to morphological measuring of proximal femoral part using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry

    The femoral fracture is the most serious problem of old ages having osteoporotic fractures. First of all, prevention to reduce the incidence of hip fracture and to identify the risk factor is essential subject. The purpose of this study is to investigate which geometric parameters of proximal femur are related to the hip fracture risk in old ages. Author analyzed the bone density and bone content of over 60 years old women who had suffered hip fracture (n = 60) and non fracture groups (n = 60). Author concluded that geometric measurements of proximal femoral part made on dual energy x-ray absorptiometry can predict hip fracture independently of bone mineral density

  4. The role of sarcopenia in the risk of osteoporotic hip fracture.

    Oliveira, A; Vaz, C

    2015-10-01

    Several common age-related mechanisms and factors influence muscle and bone, affecting functionality of both tissues. Sarcopenia is closely linked with osteoporosis, and their combined effect may exacerbate negative health outcomes. Fall-related fractures are some of the most serious consequences of these two systemic pathologies, with hip fracture being a major complication affecting osteoporotic and sarcopenic elderly. This work aims to review the literature on the current state of knowledge about the relations between sarcopenia and osteoporosis and to present the association between sarcopenia and osteoporosis and the risk of hip fracture. A literature search was performed in PubMed and Scopus databases for articles with the predefined terms "sarcopenia," "muscular atrophy," "femoral fractures," "hip fractures," "osteoporosis," and "bone density." There is a growing and significant interest being directed to sarcopenia and associated risk for osteoporotic hip fracture, but there still is a notorious heterogeneity in the methodology and cohort size of the available studies. Collectively, most of the studies herein analyzed indicate that sarcopenia could be a predictor of risk for hip fracture. The simultaneous evaluation of sarcopenia and osteoporosis may be of importance in identifying those patients in higher risk of suffering an osteoporotic hip fracture and who could benefit from preventive or therapeutic interventions, or both. PMID:25912213

  5. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction and fracture risk a meta-analysis

    M.R. Blum (Manuel); D.C. Bauer (Douglas C.); T.-H. Collet (Tinh-Hai); H.A. Fink (Howard A.); A.R. Cappola (Anne); F.L. Da Costa (F. Leal); C.D. Wirth (Christina); R.P. Peeters (Robin); B.O. Asvold (Bjorn O.); W.P.J. den Elzen (Wendy); R.N. Luben (Robert); M. Imaizumi (Misa); A.P. Bremner (Alexandra P.); A. Gogakos (Apostolos); R. Eastell (Richard); P.M. Kearney (Patricia M.); E.S. Strotmeyer (Elsa S.); E.R. Wallace (Erin R.); M. Hoff (Mari); G. Ceresini (Graziano); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); D.J. Stott (David. J.); R.G.J. Westendorp (Rudi); K.T. Khaw; A. Langhammer (Arnuf); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); J. Gussekloo (Jacobijn); G. Williams (Graham); J.P. Walsh (John); P. Jùni (Peter); D. Aujesky (Drahomir); N. Rodondi (Nicolas)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIMPORTANCE Associations between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and fractures are unclear and clinical trials are lacking. OBJECTIVE To assess the association of subclinical thyroid dysfunction with hip, nonspine, spine, or any fractures. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION The databases of

  6. Increased fracture rate in women with breast cancer: a review of the hidden risk

    Body Jean-Jacques

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women with breast cancer, particularly individuals diagnosed at a relatively early age, have an increased incidence of fractures. Fractures can have serious clinical consequences including the need for major surgery, increased morbidity and mortality, increased cost of disease management, and reduced quality of life for patients. The primary cause of the increased fracture risk appears to be an accelerated decrease in bone mineral density (BMD resulting from the loss of estrogenic signaling that occurs with most treatments for breast cancer, including aromatase inhibitors. However, factors other than BMD levels alone may influence treatment decisions to reduce fracture risk in this setting. Our purpose is to review current evidence for BMD loss and fracture risk during treatment for breast cancer and discuss pharmacologic means to reduce this risk. Results Fracture risk during treatment for breast cancer may be influenced by the rate of BMD loss and the consequent rapid alterations in bone microarchitecture, in addition to the established fracture risk factors in postmenopausal osteoporosis. The rapid decrease in BMD during adjuvant chemoendocrine therapy for breast cancer may necessitate more aggressive pharmacotherapy than is indicated for healthy postmenopausal women who develop osteoporosis. Over the last few years, clinical trials have established the effectiveness of bisphosphonates and other antiresorptive agents to preserve BMD during adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer. In addition, some bisphosphonates (eg, zoledronic acid may also delay disease recurrence in women with hormone-responsive tumors, thereby providing an adjuvant benefit in addition to preserving BMD and potentially preventing fractures. Conclusions It is likely that a combined fracture risk assessment (eg, as in the WHO FRAX algorithm will more accurately identify both women with postmenopausal osteoporosis and women with breast cancer who require

  7. Evaluation of easily measured risk factors in the prediction of osteoporotic fractures

    Brown Jacques P

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fracture represents the single most important clinical event in patients with osteoporosis, yet remains under-predicted. As few premonitory symptoms for fracture exist, it is of critical importance that physicians effectively and efficiently identify individuals at increased fracture risk. Methods Of 3426 postmenopausal women in CANDOO, 40, 158, 99, and 64 women developed a new hip, vertebral, wrist or rib fracture, respectively. Seven easily measured risk factors predictive of fracture in research trials were examined in clinical practice including: age (, 65–69, 70–74, 75–79, 80+ years, rising from a chair with arms (yes, no, weight (≥ 57kg, maternal history of hip facture (yes, no, prior fracture after age 50 (yes, no, hip T-score (>-1, -1 to >-2.5, ≤-2.5, and current smoking status (yes, no. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results The inability to rise from a chair without the use of arms (3.58; 95% CI: 1.17, 10.93 was the most significant risk factor for new hip fracture. Notable risk factors for predicting new vertebral fractures were: low body weight (1.57; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.37, current smoking (1.95; 95% CI: 1.20, 3.18 and age between 75–79 years (1.96; 95% CI: 1.10, 3.51. New wrist fractures were significantly identified by low body weight (1.71, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.90 and prior fracture after 50 years (1.96; 95% CI: 1.19, 3.22. Predictors of new rib fractures include a maternal history of a hip facture (2.89; 95% CI: 1.04, 8.08 and a prior fracture after 50 years (2.16; 95% CI: 1.20, 3.87. Conclusion This study has shown that there exists a variety of predictors of future fracture, besides BMD, that can be easily assessed by a physician. The significance of each variable depends on the site of incident fracture. Of greatest interest is that an inability to rise from a chair is perhaps the most readily identifiable significant risk factor for hip fracture and can be easily incorporated

  8. Season of birth and the risk of hip fracture in danish men and women aged 65+

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Heitmann, Berit L; Eiken, Pia Agnete

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D status in pregnant women has been linked to childhood bone mineral density in their offspring but it is unclear if effects extend to fracture risk in adulthood or even old age. As vitamin D levels in the population show pronounced seasonal variation in Denmark, we performed an...... epidemiological analysis of hip fracture rates as a function of season of birth, age, and sex. We retrieved information on all hip fractures in the 9-year period between 1997 and 2005 in all men and women aged 65-95, excluded hip fractures that occurred in current and recent prednisolone users, and subsequently...... was only statistically significant in the two oldest age groups (age 85-89 and 90-95). These findings suggest that vitamin D availability in the first and second trimester of intrauterine life could have a small but lasting impact on bone health and the risk of osteoporotic fractures. Further studies...

  9. Risk of fracture with thiazolidinediones: an individual patient data meta-analysis

    Marloes T Bazelier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs has been associated with increased fracture risks. Our aim was to estimate the risk of fracture with TZDs in three different healthcare registries, using exactly the same study design, and to perform an individual patient data meta-analysis of these three studies. Methods: Population-based cohort studies were performed utilizing the British General Practice Research Database (GPRD, the Dutch PHARMO Record Linkage System, and the Danish National Health Registers. In all three databases, the exposed cohort consisted of all patients (aged 18+ with at least one prescription of antidiabetic (AD medication. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs of fracture. The total period of follow-up for each patient was divided into periods of current exposure and past exposure, with patients moving between current and past use.Results: In all three registries, the risk of fracture was increased for women who were exposed to TZDs: HR 1.48 [1.37-1.60] in GPRD, HR 1.35 [1.15-1.58] in PHARMO and HR 1.22 [1.03-1.44] in Denmark. Combining the data in an individual patient data meta-analysis resulted, for women, in a 1.4-fold increased risk of any fracture for current TZD users versus other AD drug users (adj. HR 1.44 [1.35-1.53]. For men, there was no increased fracture risk (adj. HR 1.05 [0.96-1.14]. Risks were increased for fractures of the radius/ulna, humerus, tibia/fibula, ankle and foot, but not for hip/femur or vertebral fractures. Current TZD users with more than 25 TZD presciptions ever before had a 1.6-fold increased risk of fracture compared with other AD drug users (HR 1.59 [1.46-1.74].Conclusion: In this study, we consistently found a 1.2- to 1.5-fold increased risk of fractures for women using TZDs, but not for men, across three different healthcare registries. TZD users had an increased risk for fractures of the extremities, and risks further increased for prolonged users

  10. A risk assessment tool for contaminated sites in low-permeability fractured media

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Binning, Philip John; Jørgensen, Peter R.;

    2011-01-01

    A risk assessment tool for contaminated sites in low-permeability fractured media is developed, based on simple transient and steady-state analytical solutions. The discrete fracture (DF) tool, which explicitly accounts for the transport along fractures, covers different source geometries and......, chlorinated solvents, benzene and MTBE. The model is compared with field data and with results from a simpler approach based on an Equivalent Porous Media (EPM). Risk assessment conclusions of the DF and EPM approaches are very different due to the early breakthrough, long term tailing, and lower attenuation...

  11. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age (≥60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age (≥60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  12. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  13. Psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in old age: a prospective population-based study

    Piirtola Maarit

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that the use of any psychotropic and the concomitant use of two or more benzodiazepines are related to an increased risk of fractures in old age. However, also controversial results exist. The aim was to describe associations between the use of a psychotropic drug, or the concomitant use of two or more of these drugs and the risk of fractures in a population aged 65 years or over. Methods This study was a part of a prospective longitudinal population-based study carried out in the municipality of Lieto, South-Western Finland. The objective was to describe gender-specific associations between the use of one psychotropic drug [benzodiazepine (BZD, antipsychotic (AP or antidepressant (AD] or the concomitant use of two or more psychotropic drugs and the risk of fractures in a population 65 years or over. Subjects were participants in the first wave of the Lieto study in 1990-1991, and they were followed up until the end of 1996. Information about fractures confirmed with radiology reports in 1,177 subjects (482 men and 695 women during the follow-up was collected from medical records. Two follow-up periods (three and six years were used, and previously found risk factors of fractures were adjusted as confounding factors separately for men and women. The Poisson regression model was used in the analyses. Results The concomitant use of two or more BZDs and the concomitant use of two or more APs were related to an increased risk of fractures during both follow-up periods after adjusting for confounding factors in men. No similar associations were found in women. Conclusions The concomitant use of several BZDs and that of several APs are associated with an increase in the risk of fractures in older men. Our findings show only risk relations. We cannot draw the conclusion that these drug combinations are causes of fractures.

  14. Risk assessment tools to identify women with increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. Complexity or simplicity?

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Friis-Holmberg, Teresa; Hermann, Anne Pernille; Abrahamsen, Bo; Brixen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    existing valid and reliable risk assessment tools for prediction of osteoporotic fractures. Additionally, we aimed to determine if the performance each tool was sufficient for practical use and lastly to examine whether the complexity of the tools influenced their discriminative power. We searched Pub......A huge number of risk assessment tools have been developed. Far from all have been validated in external studies, more of them have absence of methodological and transparent evidence and few are integrated in national guidelines. Therefore, we performed a systematic review to provide an overview of...... methodological quality. None of the tools performed consistently better than others and simple tools (i.e. OST, ORAI and Garvan) often did as well or better than more complex tools (i.e. SCORE, FRAX, Qfracture). No studies determined the effectiveness of tools in selecting patients for therapy and thus improving...

  15. Is allopurinol use associated with an excess risk of osteoporotic fracture?

    Dennison, Elaine M; Rubin, Katrine Hass; Schwarz, Peter; Harvey, Nicholas C; Bone, Karen Walker; Cooper, Cyrus; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    gout diagnosis had been confirmed by at least one hospital contact. Prespecified subanalyses by filled dose of allopurinol (mg/day in first year of prescription) showed increased hip and major fracture risk in women in the highest allopurinol dose grouping only, while a less strong dose effect was...... evident for fracture rates in men. CONCLUSION: Gouty arthritis requiring allopurinol is associated with an excess risk of major or hip fracture, with an allopurinol dose effect evident in women such that women taking the highest doses of allopurinol-suggestive of more severe disease-were at increased risk...... elevated serum urate, obesity and high alcohol consumption. The mainstay of therapy is the urate-lowering agent, allopurinol. Here, we report the relationship between allopurinol prescription and fracture in a large registry population. METHODS: We established a Danish Register cohort of 86,039 adult cases...

  16. The association between compliance and persistence with bisphosphonate therapy and fracture risk: A review

    Middelhoven Hans

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub optimal levels of compliance and persistence with bisphosphonates are potentially compromising the reduction of post menopausal osteoporotic (PMO fracture risk. Methods A structured literature search (1990–2006 was performed to identify primary research studies evaluating the relationship between compliance and persistence with bisphosphonates and post menopausal osteoporotic (PMO fracture risk in clinical practice. Search criteria were: bisphosphonates; osteoporosis/osteopenia in postmenopausal women; all types of fractures; compliance and persistence. Results Only two retrospective studies using prescription databases have specifically evaluated bisphosphonates. A cohort study tracking 35,537 women reported that in those with a Medication Possession Ratio (MPR of ≥80% over 24 months the risk of fracture was lower than in those with an MPR of A nested case control study reported that 12 months persistence (refill gap Four other studies, not specific to bisphosphonates, reported that compliance ≥12 months decreased fracture risk by ~25%. Conclusion Sub optimal compliance and persistence with bisphosphonates is not providing the best possible protection against the risk of PMO fracture, however, more research is needed to delineate this relationship in clinical practice.

  17. Risk Assessment of Bone Fracture During Space Exploration Missions to the Moon and Mars

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Griffin, Devon

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of a traumatic bone fracture in space is a concern due to the observed decrease in astronaut bone mineral density (BMD) during spaceflight and because of the physical demands of the mission. The Bone Fracture Risk Module (BFxRM) was developed to quantify the probability of fracture at the femoral neck and lumbar spine during space exploration missions. The BFxRM is scenario-based, providing predictions for specific activities or events during a particular space mission. The key elements of the BFxRM are the mission parameters, the biomechanical loading models, the bone loss and fracture models and the incidence rate of the activity or event. Uncertainties in the model parameters arise due to variations within the population and unknowns associated with the effects of the space environment. Consequently, parameter distributions were used in Monte Carlo simulations to obtain an estimate of fracture probability under real mission scenarios. The model predicts an increase in the probability of fracture as the mission length increases and fracture is more likely in the higher gravitational field of Mars than on the moon. The resulting probability predictions and sensitivity analyses of the BFxRM can be used as an engineering tool for mission operation and resource planning in order to mitigate the risk of bone fracture in space.

  18. Pilot case-control investigation of risk factors for hip fractures in the urban Indian population

    Malhotra Nidhi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the reported high prevalence of osteoporosis in India, there have been no previous studies examining the risk factors for hip fracture in the Indian population. Methods We carried out a case control investigation comprising 100 case subjects (57 women and 43 men admitted with a first hip fracture into one of three hospitals across New Delhi. The 100 controls were age and sex matched subjects who were either healthy visitors not related to the case patients or hospital staff. Information from all subjects was obtained through a questionnaire based interview. Results There was a significant increase in the number of cases of hip fracture with increasing age. There were significantly more women (57% than men (43%. Univariate analysis identified protective effects for increased activity, exercise, calcium and vitamin supplements, almonds, fish, paneer (cottage cheese, curd (plain yogurt, and milk. However, tea and other caffeinated beverages were significant risk factors. In women, hormone/estrogen therapy appeared to have a marginal protective effect. For all cases, decreased agility, visual impairment, long term medications, chronic illnesses increased the risk of hip fracture. The multivariate analysis confirmed a protective effect of increased activity and also showed a decrease in hip fracture risk with increasing body mass index (odds ratio (OR 0.024, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.006-0.10 & OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97 respectively. Individuals who take calcium supplements have a decreased risk of hip fracture (OR 0.076; CI 0.017-0.340, as do individuals who eat fish (OR 0.094; CI 0.020-0.431, and those who eat paneer (OR 0.152; 0.031-0.741. Tea drinkers have a higher risk of hip fracture (OR 22.8; 95% CI 3.73-139.43. Difficulty in getting up from a chair also appears to be an important risk factor for hip fractures (OR 14.53; 95% CI 3.86-54.23. Conclusions In the urban Indian population, dietary calcium, vitamin D

  19. Fractures

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  20. Hip fracture risk and different gene polymorphisms in the turkish population

    Ercan Dinçel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to discuss the risk assessments for both patients with hip fractures due to fall-related, low energy traumas and non-fractured control patients by examining bone mineral density and genetic data, two features associated with femoral strength and hip fracture risk. METHODS: Twenty-one osteoporotic patients with proximal femur fractures and non-fractured, osteoporotic, age- and gender-matched controls were included in the study. Bone mineral density measurements were performed with a Lunar DXA. The COL1A1, ESR, VDR, IL-6, and OPG genes were amplified, and labeling of specific gene sequences was performed in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using the osteo/check PCR kit from the whole blood of all subjects. RESULTS: The bone mineral density (trochanteric and total bone mineral density values of the fracture group was significantly decreased relative to the control group. We were not able to conduct statistical tests for the polymorphisms of the COL1A1, ESR, and VDR genes because our results were expressed in terms of frequency. Although they were not significant, we did examine differences in the IL-6 and OPG genes polymorphisms between the two groups. We concluded that increasing the number of cases will allow us to evaluate racial differences in femoral hip fracture risk by genotypes.

  1. Anticholinergic Medication Use and Risk of Fracture in Elderly Adults with Depression.

    Chatterjee, Satabdi; Bali, Vishal; Carnahan, Ryan M; Chen, Hua; Johnson, Michael L; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2016-07-01

    Limited research exists regarding the effect of anticholinergics on falls and fractures in elderly nursing home residents in the United States. This study examined the risk of fractures associated with anticholinergic medication use in elderly nursing home residents with depression. A nested case-control design involving a cohort of elderly adults with depression from the 2007 to 2010 Minimum Data Set (MDS)-linked Medicare data was used to evaluate the risk of fractures. The study sample included Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older diagnosed with depression having at least one nursing home stay during 2007 to 2010 and no history of falls or fractures in 2007 (base period). Cases were individuals with incident fractures after the baseline period. For each case, four age- and sex-matched controls were selected using incidence density sampling. Anticholinergic exposure was defined using the Anticholinergic Drug Scale (ADS). Prescription of Level 2 or 3 anticholinergic medications within 30 days before the event date was the primary exposure. The primary outcome was an inpatient or outpatient claim for a fracture between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010. A conditional logistic regression model stratified on matched case-control sets was used to evaluate association between anticholinergic use and fractures, controlling for other risk factors of the outcome. The study sample consisted of 40,452 individuals with fractures and 161,808 matched controls. After adjusting for other risk factors, high-level anticholinergic use was associated with 14% greater fracture risk than nonuse (odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11-1.17). The high risk of fractures remained consistent across levels of anticholinergic potency (Level 2, OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.11-1.19; Level 3, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07-1.15). The study findings remained consistent in multiple sensitivity analyses. Overall, use of high-level anticholinergic medications was associated with

  2. Risk Factors and Clinical Evaluation of Superficial Femoral Artery Stent Fracture: Prote'ge'GPS Stent

    To evaluate the occurrence of superficial femoral artery stent fractures, the risk factors of stent fracture, and the relationship between fractures and clinical findings. Of the 38 patients who underwent treatment with Prote'ge'GPS stenting due to arterial occlusions on the superficial femoral artery, 17 also underwent a clinical analysis. Forty-three stents were inserted in the 17 superficial femoral arteries, ranging between 15 and 50 cm in length, with a mean treated length of 26.4 cm (15-50 cm). A fracture was evaluated by taking a PA and lateral simple radiography, as well as a follow-up evaluation accompanied with a CT angiography, DSA, and a color Doppler sonography. The examination involved the assessment of the difference between bone fractures due to length, placement, and frequency. Fractures occurred in 13 of 43 stents (30.2%). A total of 10 (71.4%) occurred in the upper third, compared to 4 (28.6%) in the lower third of the superficial femoral artery. In addition, 10 stents (71.4%) had a single strut fracture, whereas 4 (28.6%) had multiple strut fractures. A stent fracture occurred more frequently when the stents and lesions were longer (p=0.021, 0.012) and the stents were inserted near the joint. However, there was no significant relationship between stent numbers and the fractures (p=0.126). When the stents were inserted along the popliteal artery, a stent fracture occurred more frequently in the lower third of the artery. The stent fractures did not significantly influence the patency rate of the stented artery (p=0.44) Prote'ge'GPS stents in the superficial femoral artery revealed a considerable number of fractures and the fracture frequency showed a significant relationship with the length of stents and lesions. The closer stent insertion was to the joints, the more frequently fractures occurred. There were no evident significant relationships between the presence of stent fractures and the patency of the stented arteries

  3. Impact of Maternal Diet on Offspring Bone Fracture Risk During Childhood

    Petersen, Sesilje Elise Bondo

    , there were some indications of an increased risk for fractures when the mother consumed a Western diet and had high consumption of artificially sweetened soft drinks. Further, our results indicated that mid-pregnancy use of dietary supplements with high doses of vitamin D increased the risk for offspring...

  4. Habitual physical inertia and other factors in relation to risk of fracture of the proximal femur.

    Boyce, W J; Vessey, M P

    1988-09-01

    Physical inactivity is associated with low bone mass in adults, and might therefore be a risk factor for proximal femoral fracture in old age. This hypothesis was tested in a case-control study of 139 selected patients with confirmed proximal femoral fracture and 139 age- and sex-matched community controls, using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Patients had been significantly less physically active in middle age than had controls, a difference that was greater in the younger subjects. It is suggested that the progressive decrease during the present century in the amount of physical activity associated with everyday life has resulted in increased numbers of elderly people being at risk of femoral fracture and may be the cause of the rises in age-specific incidence rates now being observed. If this explanation is correct, a planned increase in leisure-time physical activity in middle age and beyond may be the most effective method of preventing these fractures. PMID:3232586

  5. Patient-related risk factors for fracture-healing complications in the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database

    HERNANDEZ, ROHINI K.; Do, Thy P.; Critchlow, Cathy W; Dent, Ricardo E.; Jick, Susan S

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose A variety of risk factors have been hypothesized to contribute to the development of fracture-healing complications; however, population-based estimates of the strength of these risk factors are limited. In this case-control study, we evaluated patient-related risk factors for fracture-healing complications. Methods Using the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database, we identified patients with a fracture-healing complication (delayed union, nonunion, or maluni...

  6. Fracture Risk Prediction Using Phalangeal Bone Mineral Density or FRAX(®)?

    Friis-Holmberg, Teresa; Rubin, Katrine Hass; Brixen, Kim;

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective study, we investigated the ability of Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX), phalangeal bone mineral density (BMD), and age alone to predict fractures using data from a Danish cohort study, Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008, including men (n = 5206) and women (n = 7552......) aged 40-90 yr. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and by phalangeal BMD measurement. Information on incident and prevalent fractures, rheumatoid arthritis, and secondary osteoporosis was retrieved from the Danish National Patient Registry. Survival analyses were used to examine...

  7. Interpreting Risk: Variations and Explanations of Resident Perceptions of Hydraulic Fracturing Impacts

    Uzunian, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a novel technological development that has pushed the extraction of energy resources forward. As technology improves and world oil and gas markets shift, more shale formations are being uncovered, and new drilling activities are seen as economically viable. I examine the ways in which residents perceive environmental and health risks of hydraulic fracturing in the Eagle Ford Shale region of Texas, and how these perceptions differ depending on social position and where ...

  8. The excess risk of major osteoporotic fractures in hypothyroidism is driven by cumulative hyperthyroid as opposed to hypothyroid time

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Laulund, Anne Sofie;

    2015-01-01

    The long-term relationship between hypothyroidism and fracture risk is challenging to dissect because of the modifying influence of subsequent thyroxine replacement with the potential for excessive replacement doses. We studied changes in serum thyrotropin concentration (TSH) over time and...... identified as a predictor of fracture risk in postmenopausal women whereas hypothyroid time predicted increased fracture risk in men below age 75 years. In conclusion, among patients who present with an elevated TSH, the long-term risk of hip and other osteoporotic fractures is strongly related to the...

  9. Is use of fall risk-increasing drugs in an elderly population associated with an increased risk of hip fracture, after adjustment for multimorbidity level

    Thorell, Kristine; Ranstad, Karin; Midlöv, Patrik; Borgquist, Lars; Halling, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Risk factors for hip fracture are well studied because of the negative impact on patients and the community, with mortality in the first year being almost 30% in the elderly. Age, gender and fall risk-increasing drugs, identified by the National Board of Health and Welfare in Sweden......, are well known risk factors for hip fracture, but how multimorbidity level affects the risk of hip fracture during use of fall risk-increasing drugs is to our knowledge not as well studied. This study explored the relationship between use of fall risk-increasing drugs in combination with...... multimorbidity level and risk of hip fracture in an elderly population. METHODS: Data were from Östergötland County, Sweden, and comprised the total population in the county aged 75 years and older during 2006. The odds ratio (OR) for hip fracture during use of fall risk-increasing drugs was calculated by...

  10. Vertebral Strength and Estimated Fracture Risk Across the BMI Spectrum in Women.

    Bachmann, Katherine N; Bruno, Alexander G; Bredella, Miriam A; Schorr, Melanie; Lawson, Elizabeth A; Gill, Corey M; Singhal, Vibha; Meenaghan, Erinne; Gerweck, Anu V; Eddy, Kamryn T; Ebrahimi, Seda; Koman, Stuart L; Greenblatt, James M; Keane, Robert J; Weigel, Thomas; Dechant, Esther; Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne; Bouxsein, Mary L; Miller, Karen K

    2016-02-01

    Somewhat paradoxically, fracture risk, which depends on applied loads and bone strength, is elevated in both anorexia nervosa and obesity at certain skeletal sites. Factor-of-risk (Φ), the ratio of applied load to bone strength, is a biomechanically based method to estimate fracture risk; theoretically, higher Φ reflects increased fracture risk. We estimated vertebral strength (linear combination of integral volumetric bone mineral density [Int.vBMD] and cross-sectional area from quantitative computed tomography [QCT]), vertebral compressive loads, and Φ at L4 in 176 women (65 anorexia nervosa, 45 lean controls, and 66 obese). Using biomechanical models, applied loads were estimated for: 1) standing; 2) arms flexed 90°, holding 5 kg in each hand (holding); 3) 45° trunk flexion, 5 kg in each hand (lifting); 4) 20° trunk right lateral bend, 10 kg in right hand (bending). We also investigated associations of Int.vBMD and vertebral strength with lean mass (from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry [DXA]) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT, from QCT). Women with anorexia nervosa had lower, whereas obese women had similar, Int.vBMD and estimated vertebral strength compared with controls. Vertebral loads were highest in obesity and lowest in anorexia nervosa for standing, holding, and lifting (p p p p p ≤ 0.0001) in all groups combined and negatively with VAT (R = -[0.36 to 0.38], p < 0.003) within the obese group. Therefore, women with anorexia nervosa had higher estimated vertebral fracture risk (Φ) for holding and bending because of inferior vertebral strength. Despite similar vertebral strength as controls, obese women had higher vertebral fracture risk for standing, holding, and lifting because of higher applied loads from higher body weight. Examining the load-to-strength ratio helps explain increased fracture risk in both low-weight and obese women. PMID:26332401

  11. Is Turkish FRAX® Model Sufficient? The Analysis of Osteoporotic Fracture Risk in Turkish Population by Using Frax

    Ahmet Aslan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Turkish FRAX model in the prediction of osteoporotic fracture risk and to determine the factors that may affect the results in this model. Material and Methods: Data of 104 patients with hip fracture who had underwent bone densitometry scan between 2009-2012, in Kastamonu and Afyon cities in Turkey, were assessed in this study. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Group-1; patients with osteoporotic hip fractures (n=36, Group-2; patients with other osteoporotic bone fractures (n=33, Group-3; patients with no osteoporotic fracture history (n=35. The recent osteoporotic fractures in patients were ruled out and by noting the former fractures and previously determined risk factors, fracture risks were calculated by Frax method. The groups were compared on the basis of fracture risks, t-scores and demographical characteristics. Results: A statistically significant difference was found between the patients with major osteoporotic fracture (MOF in Group-1 and Group-2 and patients with no MOF history in Group-3 (p0.05. With respect to average age in patients, a significant difference was found between Group-1 and 3(p0.05. Also, no statistically meaningful difference with regard to other risk factors was found between the groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: Results of this study: previous MOFs, advanced age and a remarkable decrease in t-scores are the main risk factors in osteoporotic fractures. Turkish FRAX® model may be useful in the prediction of fracture risk in patients with increased risk factors in Turkish population. However, this study may not be adequate to rule out the concerns that Turkish Frax model must be revised to fulfill the expectations in determining osteoporotic fracture risk. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2014;20: 21-5

  12. Fracture Risk and Areal Bone Mineral Density in Adolescent Females with Anorexia Nervosa

    Faje, Alexander T.; Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Miller, Karen K.; Katzman, Debra K.; Ebrahimi, Seda; Lee, Hang; Mendes, Nara; Snelgrove, Deirdre; Meenaghan, Erinne; Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Objective To (i) compare fracture prevalence in adolescent females with anorexia nervosa (AN) vs. normal-weight controls and (ii) examine whether reductions in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) predict fracture risk in females with AN. Methods 418 females (310 with active AN and 108 normal-weight controls) 12–22 years old were studied cross-sectionally. Lifetime fracture history was recorded by a physician during participant interviews. Body composition and aBMD measurements of the whole body, whole body less head, lumbar spine, and hip were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) was calculated for the lumbar spine. Results Participants with AN and normal-weight controls did not differ for chronological age, sexual maturity, or height. The lifetime prevalence of prior fracture was 59.8% higher in those with AN compared to controls (31.0 % versus 19.4 %, p = 0.02), and the fracture incidence rate peaked in our cohort after the diagnosis of AN. Lower aBMD and lumbar BMAD were not associated with a higher prevalence of fracture in the AN or control group on univariate or multivariate analyses. Compared to controls, fracture prevalence was significantly higher in the subgroup of girls with AN who had normal aBMD or only modest reductions of aBMD (Z-scores > −1 or −1.5). Discussion This is the first study to show that the risk of fracture during childhood and adolescence is significantly higher in patients with AN than in normal-weight controls. Fracture prevalence is increased in this cohort of subjects with AN even without significant reductions in aBMD. PMID:24430890

  13. EXTERNAL FIXATION OF INTERTROCHANTERIC FRACTURES AS AN OPTION IN HIGH RISK GERIATRIC PATIENTS

    Badoo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of external fixation of intertrochanteric fractures in high risk geriatric patients. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTINGS: Level - 1 trauma C entre. PATIENTS: Fifty high risk geriatric patients with intertrochanteric fractures. INTERVENTION: Close reduction and external fixation using AO external fixator. OUTCOME MEASURED: fracture union, time to union, pin tract infect ion rate, shortening, varus collapse and range of motion at knee. RESULTS: Fifty patients with average age of 68.5 years all high anaesthetic/surgical risk were managed by closed reduction and external fixation. Forty were operated under regional and ten u nder local anaesthesia. Eight patients died before fracture union and four were lost in follow up after removal of fixator. Remaining thirty eight were in regular follow up for at least six months. Pin tract inflammation was the most common complication wh ile shortening and varus collapse occurred in ten cases. CONCLUSION: external fixation of intertrochanteric fractures is useful in high risk geriatric patients.

  14. Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal

    Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

    2008-07-01

    A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints

  15. Combined Measures of Dynamic Bone Quality and Postural Balance-A Fracture Risk Assessment Approach in Osteoporosis.

    Bhattacharya, Amit; Watts, Nelson B; Dwivedi, Alok; Shukla, Rakesh; Mani, Ashutosh; Diab, Dima

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated functional measures of neuromuscular integrity and bone's resistance to fracture as a combined tool in discriminating osteoporosis patients with and without fractures. Functional aspects of neuromuscular integrity were quantified with a noninvasive measure of static and dynamic functional postural stability (FPS), and fracture resistance was obtained with bone shock absorption in patients with osteoporosis aged 65-85 and compared our measures with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX [World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases, Sheffield, UK]) in women with osteoporosis, some with and some without vertebral fractures. Patients with vertebral fracture showed larger static FPS (postural sway excursion) in the mediolateral and anterior-posterior directions, suggesting poorer balance. Most of the variables of dynamic FPS showed significant differences between fracture and no-fracture groups (e.g., the fracture group took significantly longer during turning, implying poorer dynamic balance control). Also, compared with healthy control subjects, all 4 dynamic FPS responses for osteoporosis patients with and without fracture were significantly poorer, suggesting potential risk for falls. In summary, patients with osteoporosis who have vertebral fractures (compared with patients with similarly low bone mineral density and other nonfracture risk fractures) have not only lower bone shock absorption damping (ζ) but also increased postural imbalance. PMID:25936482

  16. Patient effective dose and radiogenic risks from fluoroscopically assisted surgical reconstruction of femoral fractures

    The objectives were to assess patient effective radiation dose from fluoroscopically guided surgical reconstruction of femoral fractures and provide normalized data for the estimation of patient effective dose and risks associated with such procedures performed in any laboratory. The fluoroscopic control required during surgical reconstruction of femoral fractures was classified into two types identified by beam orientation, i.e., posterior-anterior (PA) and lateral cross-table (LC) exposures. The duration and the dose area product (DAP) of each exposure were monitored in 24 patients with femoral fractures. Patient dose per DAP unit and per minute of fluoroscopy were measured at 14 radiosensitive organs/tissues using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry. The typical effective dose to patients with femoral fracture treated surgically in our institution was 11.6-21.7 μSv. This effective dose is estimated to cause an excess of 1.4 fatal cancers per million patients treated, and an excess of 0.4 hereditary disorders per million of births. Induction of deterministic skin injuries to treated patients is highly improbable at the dose levels found in this study. Patient effective dose and associated risks from a typical fluoroscopically guided surgical fixation of femoral fracture are low. However, they may be significantly elevated if treated patients are young individuals and/or the fluoroscopic exposure is prolonged. The present data may be used to determine effective dose to patients undergoing surgical reconstruction of femoral fracture in any institution. (authors)

  17. Relationship between bone mineral density changes and fracture risk reduction in patients treated with strontium ranelate

    Bruyere, Olivier; Roux, Christian; Detilleux, Johann; Slosman, Daniel O; Spector, Tim D; Fardellone, Patrice; Brixen, Kim; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Diaz-Curiel, Manuel; Albanese, Carlina; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Pors-Nielsen, Stig; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to analyze the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) changes and fracture incidence during 3-yr treatment with strontium ranelate. PATIENTS: Women from the strontium ranelate arm of the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention study and the TReatment Of...... Peripheral OSteoporosis study were evaluated. OUTCOME MEASURES: The outcome measures included BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total proximal femur assessed at baseline and after a follow-up of 1 and 3 yr; semiquantitative visual assessment of vertebral fractures; and nonvertebral fractures based...... on written documentation. RESULTS: After 3 yr of strontium ranelate treatment, each percentage point increase in femoral neck and total proximal femur BMD was associated with a 3% (95% adjusted confidence interval, 1-5%) and 2% (1-4%) reduction in risk of a new vertebral fracture, respectively. The 3...

  18. Does Alendronate reduce the risk of fracture in men? A meta-analysis incorporating prior knowledge of anti-fracture efficacy in women

    Papaioannou Alexandra

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alendronate has been found to reduce the risk of fractures in postmenopausal women as demonstrated in multiple randomized controlled trials enrolling thousands of women. Yet there is a paucity of such randomized controlled trials in osteoporotic men. Our objective was to systematically review the anti-fracture efficacy of alendronate in men with low bone mass or with a history of prevalent fracture(s and incorporate prior knowledge of alendronate efficacy in women in the analysis. Methods We examined randomized controlled trials in men comparing the anti-fracture efficacy of alendronate to placebo or calcium or vitamin D, or any combination of these. Studies of men with secondary causes of osteoporosis other than hypogonadism were excluded. We searched the following electronic databases (without language restrictions for potentially relevant citations: Medline, Medline in Process (1966-May 24/2004, and Embase (1996–2004. We also contacted the manufacturer of the drug in search of other relevant trials. Two reviewers independently identified two trials (including 375 men, which met all inclusion criteria. Data were abstracted by one reviewer and checked by another. Results of the male trials were pooled using Bayesian random effects models, incorporating prior information of anti-fracture efficacy from meta-analyses of women. Results The odds ratios of incident fractures in men (with 95% credibility intervals with alendronate (10 mg daily were: vertebral fractures, 0.44 (0.23, 0.83 and non-vertebral fractures, 0.60 (0.29, 1.44. Conclusion In conclusion, alendronate decreases the risk of vertebral fractures in men at risk. There is currently insufficient evidence of a statistically significant reduction of non-vertebral fractures, but the paucity of trials in men limit the statistical power to detect such an effect.

  19. Prediction of absolute risk reduction of cardiovascular events with perindopril for individual patients with stable coronary artery disease - results from EUROPA

    van der Leeuw, Joep; Oemrawsingh, Rohit M.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Brugts, Jasper J.; Deckers, Jaap W.; Bertrand, Michel; Fox, Kim; Ferrari, Roberto; Remme, Willem J.; Simoons, Maarten L.; Boersma, Eric; Visseren, Frank L J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibition reduces the risk of cardiovascular events at a group level. Presumably, the absolute effect of treatment varies between individuals. We sought to develop multivariable prediction scores to estimate individual treatment effect of perindopril in pat

  20. Differing risk profiles for individual fracture sites: evidence from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW).

    FitzGerald, Gordon; Boonen, Steven; Compston, Juliet E; Pfeilschifter, Johannes; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Hosmer, David W; Hooven, Frederick H; Gehlbach, Stephen H

    2012-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine fracture risk profiles at specific bone sites, and to understand why model discrimination using clinical risk factors is generally better in hip fracture models than in models that combine hip with other bones. Using 3-year data from the GLOW study (54,229 women with more than 4400 total fractures), we present Cox regression model results for 10 individual fracture sites, for both any and first-time fracture, among women aged ≥55 years. Advanced age is the strongest risk factor in hip (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.3 per 10-year increase), pelvis (HR = 1.8), upper leg (HR = 1.8), and clavicle (HR = 1.7) models. Age has a weaker association with wrist (HR = 1.1), rib (HR = 1.2), lower leg (not statistically significant), and ankle (HR = 0.81) fractures. Greater weight is associated with reduced risk for hip, pelvis, spine, and wrist, but higher risk for first lower leg and ankle fractures. Prior fracture of the same bone, although significant in nine of 10 models, is most strongly associated with spine (HR = 6.6) and rib (HR = 4.8) fractures. Past falls are important in all but spine models. Model c indices are ≥0.71 for hip, pelvis, upper leg, spine, clavicle, and rib, but ≤0.66 for upper arm/shoulder, lower leg, wrist, and ankle fractures. The c index for combining hip, spine, upper arm, and wrist (major fracture) is 0.67. First-time fracture models have c indices ranging from 0.59 for wrist to 0.78 for hip and pelvis. The c index for first-time major fracture is 0.63. In conclusion, substantial differences in risk profiles exist among the 10 bones considered. PMID:22550021

  1. Potential Explanatory Factors for Higher Incident Hip Fracture Risk in Older Diabetic Adults

    Elsa S. Strotmeyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is associated with higher fracture risk. Diabetes-related conditions may account for this risk. Cardiovascular Health Study participants (N=5641; 42.0% men; 15.5% black; 72.8±5.6 years were followed 10.9 ± 4.6 years. Diabetes was defined as hypoglycemic medication use or fasting glucose (FG ≥126 mg/dL. Peripheral artery disease (PAD was defined as ankle-arm index <0.9. Incident hip fractures were from medical records. Crude hip fracture rates (/1000 person-years were higher for diabetic vs. non-diabetic participants with BMI <25 (13.6, 95% CI: 8.9–20.2 versus 11.4, 95% CI: 10.1–12.9 and BMI ≥25 to <30 (8.3, 95% CI: 5.7–11.9 versus 6.6, 95% CI: 5.6–7.7, but similar for BMI ≥30. Adjusting for BMI, sex, race, and age, diabetes was related to fractures (HR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.01–1.78. PAD (HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 0.92–1.57 and longer walk time (HR = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.04–1.10 modified the fracture risk in diabetes (HR = 1.17 (95% CI: 0.87–1.57. Diabetes was associated with higher hip fracture risk after adjusting for BMI though this association was modified by diabetes-related conditions.

  2. [The role of anorexia nervosa in secondary osteoporosis development with the risk for low energy fractures].

    Horst-Sikorska, Wanda; Ignaszak-Szczepaniak, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) has in recent years become considerably more common. The disease primarily affects girls and young women, also boys and young men. AN is a risk factor for secondary osteoporosis. AN-related metabolic disturbances lead to diminished bone quality and increased risk of fractures. The consequences of low energy fractures are the main causes of death in women with AN. Hormonal disturbances (e.g. hypoestrogenism, increased levels of ghrelin and Y peptide, changes in leptin and endocannabinoid levels), as well as the mechanisms involved in bone resorption (RANK/RANKL/OPG system), are considered to be of great importance for anorectic bone quality. The risk for osteoporotic, non-vertebral fractures in AN patients is significantly higher than in healthy women. Improvement of bone mineral density is possible after substantial body mass increase. Weight loss, in conjunction with a well-balanced, controlled diet, is the key to correct peak bone mass levels, and diminishes the risk for osteoporosis with its consequence of low energy bone fractures. PMID:22161979

  3. The role of anorexia nervosa in secondary osteoporosis development with the risk for low energy fractures.

    Horst-Sikorska, Wanda; Ignaszak-Szczepaniak, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) has in recent years become considerably more common. The disease primarily affects girls and young women, and also boys and young men. AN is a risk factor for secondary osteoporosis. AN-related metabolic disturbances lead to diminished bone quality and increased risk of fractures. The consequences of low energy fractures are the main causes of death in women with AN. Hormonal disturbances (e.g. hypoestrogenism, increased levels of ghrelin and Y peptide, changes in leptin and endocannabinoid levels), as well as the mechanisms involved in bone resorption (RANK/RANKL/OPG), are considered to be of great importance for anorectic bone quality. The risk of osteoporotic, non-vertebral fractures in AN patients is significantly higher than in healthy women. An improvement of bone mineral density is possible after substantial body mass increase. Weight loss, in conjunction with a well-balanced, controlled diet, is the key to correct peak bone mass levels, and diminishes the risk of osteoporosis with its consequence of low energy bone fractures. (Pol J Endocrinol 2011; 62 (1): 45-47). PMID:21365578

  4. Hydraulic fracturing – Integrating public participation with an independent review of the risks and benefits

    This paper describes a fully independent public participation and review process on the environmental, economic, health, community and social risks and benefits of hydraulic fracturing for the development of unconventional gas and oil resources. We describe the approach taken to maximise public engagement in the process and how that participation informed the work of an independent panel charged with examining the scientific evidence and related legal issues. The major findings from the review are presented, including a risk matrix which summarises the frequency, severity and mitigation measures for 16 potential hazards associated with hydraulic fracturing, as they may pertain to the province of Nova Scotia in Canada. We discuss the complexity of managing public perceptions of novel risks such as hydraulic fracturing and conclude with brief observations on the contribution of the review to public policy. -- Highlights: •We describe a review and public participation process on hydraulic fracturing •We discuss the difficulty of reconciling social and scientific assessments of risk •Processes of societal learning should be further developed •Changes in natural resource governance and democratic process are needed •Where trust is very low governments may still be incapable of action

  5. Estrogen receptor alpha polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and hip fracture

    Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne;

    2007-01-01

    Background- We hypothesized that the estrogen receptor (ESR1) IVS1-397T/C polymorphism affects high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer of reproductive organs, and hip fracture. Methods and Results- We studied cr...

  6. Innovative probabilistic risk assessment applications: barrier impairments and fracture toughness. Panel Discussion

    Full text of publication follows: New probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) applications promise to improve the overall safety and efficiency of nuclear plant operations. This discussion will explore the use of PRA in evaluating barrier integrity with respect to the consequences of natural phenomena such as tornadoes, floods, and harsh environments. Additionally, the session will explore proposals to improve fracture toughness techniques using PRA. (authors)

  7. Socioeconomic characteristics and lifestyle elements vs. 10-year fracture risk in people aged 65+ from small towns in the north-east of Poland. The SenFood Project

    Małgorzata Anna Słowińska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study evaluated the correlation between selected socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics and 10-year risk of fracture in persons aged 65+, living in small towns in the north-east of Poland. Material  and methods. 267 individuals (76 males and 191 females aged 76.9 ±2.5 years, living in small towns in the north-east of Poland in independent households, took part in the study. The basic information on the socioeconomic situation and lifestyle of the subjects was gathered during a face-to-face interview. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA was used to determine bone mineral density (BMD in the distal part of the forearm. The absolute 10-year risk of bone fracture was calculated in accordance with the algorithm developed by WHO and IOF. Results. The average value of 10-year fracture risk was significantlyhigher in females than in males (31.4% vs. 14.5%, respectively, as was the probability of fracturing a thigh bone (13.7% vs. 6.1%, respectively, as was the probability of any fracture (23.9% vs. 10.1%, respectively, but BMD was lower (290.6 mg/cm2 vs. 405.2 mg/cm2, respectively. A higher 10-year risk of fracture was observed in people who used dietary supplements (T3 RB-10: OR = 3.23; 95% CI: 1.61-6.47 and a lower risk was observed in people who had a spouse/partner (T3 RB-10: OR = 0.14; 95% CI: 0.07-0.28, lived with someone (T3 RB-10: OR = 0.20; 95% CI: 0.08-0.48 and with a high physical activity (T2 RB-10: OR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.47-0.99. Conclusions. The 10-year risk of fracture was significantly gender-related. Lower bone mineral density and more than twice higher 10-year fracture risk, probability of fracturing a thigh bone and any fracture was observed in women than in men. The 10-year risk of fracture was higher in single persons, living alone, with a low physical activity and using dietary supplements.

  8. Predictors of Fracture Risk and Bone Mineral Density in Men with Prostate Cancer on Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Katherine Neubecker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Decrease of bone mineral density (BMD and fracture risk is increased in men with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. We looked at possible predictors of decreased BMD and increased fracture risk in men with prostate cancer; most of whom were on ADT. In a retrospective study, we analyzed serum, BMD, and clinical risk factors used in the Fracture Risk Assessment (FRAX tool and others in 78 men with prostate cancer with reported height loss. The subjects were divided in two groups: 22 men with and 56 without vertebral fractures. 17 of the 22 men with vertebral fractures on spine X-rays did not know they had a vertebral fracture. Of those 17 men, 9 had not previously qualified for treatment based on preradiograph FRAX score calculated with BMD, and 6 based on FRAX calculated without BMD. Performing spine films increased the predictive ability of FRAX for vertebral fracture. Vertebral fracture was better predicted by FRAX for other osteoporotic fractures than FRAX for hip fractures. The inclusion of BMD in FRAX calculations did not affect the predictive ability of FRAX. The PSA level showed a positive correlation with lumbar spine BMD and accounted for about 9% of spine BMD.

  9. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients

  10. Potential Explanatory Factors for Higher Incident Hip Fracture Risk in Older Diabetic Adults

    Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Aruna Kamineni; Cauley, Jane A.; Robbins, John A.; Fried, Linda F.; Siscovick, David S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Newman, Anne B

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with higher fracture risk. Diabetes-related conditions may account for this risk. Cardiovascular Health Study participants (N = 5641; 42.0% men; 15.5% black; 72.8±5.6 years) were followed 10.9 ± 4.6 years. Diabetes was defined as hypoglycemic medication use or fasting glucose (FG) ≥126 mg/dL. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) was defined as ankle-arm index

  11. Risk Factors for Fracture in Diabetes: The Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study

    Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Ma, Jinhui; Thabane, Lehana

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Individuals with diabetes have been found to be at increased risk of nontraumatic fracture. However, within the diabetic population, how to distinguish who is at the highest risk and warranting therapy has remained elusive. Design. Cross-sectional analysis of a national population-based cohort study. Patients. Men and women over the age of 50 with diabetes from across Canada. Measurements. Logistic regression analysis to identify diabetes specific factors associated with a history ...

  12. Factors associated with an increased risk of vertebral fracture in monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance

    Monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of fractures. This study describes prospectively the bone status of MGUS patients and determines the factors associated with vertebral fracture. We included prospectively 201 patients with MGUS, incidentally discovered, and with no known history of osteoporosis: mean age 66.6±12.5 years, 48.3% women, 51.7% immunoglobulin G (IgG), 33.3% IgM and 10.4% IgA. Light chain was kappa in 64.2% patients. All patients had spinal radiographs and bone mineral density measurement in addition to gammopathy assessment. At least one prevalent non-traumatic vertebral fracture was discovered in 18.4% patients and equally distributed between men and women. Fractured patients were older, had a lower bone density and had also more frequently a lambda light chain isotype. Compared with patients with κ light chain, the odds ratio of being fractured for patients with λ light chain was 4.32 (95% confidence interval 1.80–11.16; P=0.002). These results suggest a high prevalence of non-traumatic vertebral fractures in MGUS associated with lambda light chain isotype and not only explained by low bone density

  13. Inferior alveolar nerve injuries associated with mandibular fractures at risk: a two-center retrospective study.

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury in mandibular fractures. This study is based on two databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures in two departments-Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin, Italy. Demographic, anatomic, and etiology variables were considered for each patient and statistically assessed in relation to the neurosensory IAN impairment. Statistically significant associations were found between IAN injury and fracture displacement (p = 0.03), isolated mandibular fractures (p = 0.01), and angle fractures (p = 0.004). A statistically significant association was also found between IAN injury and assaults (p = 0.03). Displaced isolated mandibular angle fractures could be considered at risk for increased incidence of IAN injury. Assaults seem to be the most important etiological factor that is responsible for IAN lesions. PMID:25383147

  14. Common Polymorphism in the LRP5 Gene May Increase the Risk of Bone Fracture and Osteoporosis

    Guang-Yue Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5 was identified to be linked to the variation in bone mineral density and types of bone diseases. The present study was aimed at examining the association of LRP5 rs3736228 C>T gene with bone fracture and osteoporosis by meta-analysis. A systematic electronic search of literature was conducted to identify all published studies in English or Chinese on the association of the LRP5 gene with bone fracture and osteoporosis risks. All analyses were calculated using the Version 12.0 STATA software. Odds ratios (ORs and their corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI were calculated. An updated meta-analysis was currently performed, including seven independent case-control studies. Results identified that carriers of rs3736228 C>T variant in the LRP5 gene were associated with an increased risk of developing osteoporosis and fractures under 4 genetic models but not under the dominant model (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.97~1.46, and P=0.103. Ethnicity-subgroup analysis implied that LRP5 rs3736228 C>T mutation was more likely to develop osteoporosis and fractures among Asians and Caucasians in majority of subgroups. These results suggest that there is a modest effect of the LRP5 rs3736228 C>T on the increased susceptibility of bone fracture and osteoporosis.

  15. Finite Element Analysis of Foot and Ankle Impact Injury: Risk Evaluation of Calcaneus and Talus Fracture

    Duo Wai-Chi Wong; Wenxin Niu; Yan Wang; Ming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Foot and ankle impact injury is common in geriatric trauma and often leads to fracture of rearfoot, including calcaneus and talus. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of foot impact on the risk of calcaneus and talus fracture via finite element analysis. Methods A three-dimensional finite element model of foot and ankle was constructed based on magnetic resonance images of a female aged 28. The foot sustained a 7-kg passive impact through a foot plate. The sim...

  16. Prevalence of Fracture Risk Factors in Postmenopausal Women Enrolled in the POSSIBLE US Treatment Cohort

    Nicole Yurgin; Sally Wade; Sacha Satram-Hoang; David Macarios; Marc Hochberg

    2013-01-01

    Subject- and physician-reported data from 4,429 postmenopausal women receiving osteoporosis treatment in the Prospective Observational Scientific Study Investigating Bone Loss Experience (POSSIBLE US) were used to assess the prevalence of risk factors (RFs) and on-study fracture. RFs assessed at study entry were age >70 years; fracture since age 50; minimum T-score (hip/spine) ≤−2.5 at diagnosis; body mass index 70 years were the most common RFs in the osteoporosis group, and age >70 years an...

  17. Atypical fractures, a biased perspective.

    Aspenberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    When stress fractures started to show up in the femurs of elderly ladies, it was soon evident that bisphosphonate use lay behind, and the absolute risk increase due to bisphosphonate use was reasonably well estimated already in 2008. Thereafter followed a period of confusion: the term atypical fracture was introduced, with a definition so vague that the true stress fractures tended to disappear in a cloud of ambiguity. This cast doubt on the association with bisphosphonates. The association was then re-established by large epidemiological studies based on radiographic adjudication. Atypical fractures are largely caused by bisphosphonates. With a correct indication, bisphosphonates prevent many more fractures than they cause, at least during the first years of use. With an incorrect indication they are likely to cause more harm than good. PMID:26768286

  18. Time, absolute.

    Mughal, Muhammad Aurang Zeb

    2009-01-01

    The concept of absolute time is a hypothetical model from the laws of classical physics postulated by Isaac Newton in the Principia in 1687. Although the Newtonian model of absolute time has since been opposed and rejected in light of more recent scholarship, it still provides a way to study science with reference to time and understand the phenomena of time within the scientific tradition. According to this model, it is assumed that time runs at the same rate for all the observers in the uni...

  19. A risk assessment tool for contaminated sites in low-permeability fractured media

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Binning, Philip John; Jørgensen, P.R.; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2010-01-01

    A risk assessment tool for contaminated sites in low-permeability fractured media is developed, based on simple transient and steady-state analytical solutions. The tool, which explicitly takes into account the transport along fractures, covers different source geometries and can be applied to a...... wide range of compounds (conservative, sorbing, degradable). The superiority of this risk assessment tool compared to an Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) model is clearly demonstrated on experimental data. The use of the model for risk assessment is illustrated for diffuse pesticide sources in a Danish...... catchment. The model simulates well the presence of pesticides in drinking water wells and predicts the contamination duration, however, the early breakthrough and long term tailing cannot be validated due to lack of long term monitoring data....

  20. Dental trauma. Combination injuries 1. The risk of pulp necrosis in permanent teeth with concussion injuries and concomitant crown fractures

    Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Ahrensburg, Søren Steno; Kreiborg, Sven; Andreasen, Jens Ove

    2012-01-01

    The reported risk of pulp necrosis (PN) is low in teeth with concussion injuries. A concomitant crown fracture may affect the risk of PN. Aim:  To analyze the influence of a crown fracture (with and without pulp exposure) on the risk of PN in teeth with concussion injury. Material:  The study...... included 469 permanent incisors with concussion from 358 patients (226 male, 132 female). Among these, 292 had a concomitant crown fracture (70 with and 222 without pulp exposure). All teeth were examined and treated according to standardized protocol. Statistical analysis:  The risk of PN was analyzed by...... increased to 55.0% (95% CI: 34.3–75.8). Conclusion:  No response to EPT at the initial examination or a concomitant crown fracture significantly increased the risk of PN in teeth with concussion injury and mature root development. If both risk factors were present there was a synergetic effect....

  1. A study on risk assessment approach of water inflow into a shaft in fractured rock mass

    Since water inflow into a tunnel significantly impacts construction costs and schedules, it is important to estimate the impact on these factors quantitatively based on prior information about hydrogeological properties. A simplified formula is proposed in order to estimate water inflow volume into tunnel. This formula enables us to calculate water inflow risk more quickly than DFN model. Monte Carlo simulation and sensitivity analysis about water inflow risk are performed by using this formula. Then relationships between water inflow risk and amount of information about fracture properties are obtained based on the sensitivity analysis. (author)

  2. Finite Element Analysis of Foot and Ankle Impact Injury: Risk Evaluation of Calcaneus and Talus Fracture.

    Duo Wai-Chi Wong

    Full Text Available Foot and ankle impact injury is common in geriatric trauma and often leads to fracture of rearfoot, including calcaneus and talus. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of foot impact on the risk of calcaneus and talus fracture via finite element analysis.A three-dimensional finite element model of foot and ankle was constructed based on magnetic resonance images of a female aged 28. The foot sustained a 7-kg passive impact through a foot plate. The simulated impact velocities were from 2.0 to 7.0 m/s with 1.0 m/s interval.At 5.0 m/s impact velocity, the maximum von Mises stress of the trabecular calcaneus and talus were 3.21MPa and 2.41MPa respectively, while that of the Tresca stress were 3.46MPa and 2.55MPa. About 94% and 84% of the trabecular calcaneus and talus exceeded the shear yielding stress, while 21.7% and 18.3% yielded the compressive stress. The peak stresses were distributed around the talocalcaneal articulation and the calcaneal tuberosity inferiorly, which corresponded to the common fracture sites.The prediction in this study showed that axial compressive impact at 5.0 m/s could produce considerable yielding of trabecular bone in both calcaneus and talus, dominantly by shear and compounded with compression that predispose the rearfoot in the risk of fracture. This study suggested the injury pattern and fracture mode of high energy trauma that provides insights in injury prevention and fracture management.

  3. Long-term Fracture Risk in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    Jafri, Mohammed R.; Nordstrom, Charles W.; Murray, Joseph A.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Melton, Lee J.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, but there are conflicting data regarding fracture risk. We determined the fracture incidence relative to matched controls in a population-based cohort with celiac disease before and after diagnosis. Olmsted County residents with celiac disease (n = 83) diagnosed between 1950 and 2002 were compared with 166 gender and age matched controls. Fracture histories were ascertained from each subject’s medical records. Celiac disease is linked ...

  4. Risk factors for fracture in elderly men: a population-based prospective study

    Frost, M; Abrahamsen, B; Masud, Tahir; Brixen, K

    2012-01-01

    Risk factors for fractures were assessed in a random sample of 4,696 elderly men followed for 5.4 years. Results highlighted the importance of assessment of falls and dizziness as well as novel risk factors including frequent urination and erectile dysfunction. INTRODUCTION: Knowledge about risk.......05-2.33), falls (2-4/year: 2.10; 1.35-3.27, >4/year: 2.46; 1.12-5.41, both compared to no falls), dizziness (2.36; 1.51-3.71), erectile dysfunction (1.41; 1.06-1.87) and frequent urination (2.06; 1.26-3.39). Similarly, falls (2.36; 1.45-3.86), dizziness (2.83; 1.52-5.25), erectile dysfunction (2.01; 1.......30-3.09) and pulmonary illness (1.90; 1.03-3.53) were associated with increased risk of osteoporotic fractures in adjusted models. CONCLUSION: These results underline the importance of assessment of dizziness, falls and those with a family history of hip fracture. Frequent urination and erectile dysfunction...

  5. Comparison of additive (absolute) risk projection models and multiplicative (relative) risk projection models in estimating radiation-induced lifetime cancer risk

    Lifetime cancer risk estimates depend on risk projection models. While the increasing lengths of follow-up observation periods of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki bring about changes in cancer risk estimates, the validity of the two risk projection models, the additive risk projection model (AR) and multiplicative risk projection model (MR), comes into question. This paper compares the lifetime risk or loss of life-expectancy between the two projection models on the basis of BEIR-III report or recently published RERF report. With Japanese cancer statistics the estimates of MR were greater than those of AR, but a reversal of these results was seen when the cancer hazard function for India was used. When we investigated the validity of the two projection models using epidemiological human data and animal data, the results suggested that MR was superior to AR with respect to temporal change, but there was little evidence to support its validity. (author)

  6. Risk of injury to vascular-nerve bundle after calcaneal fracture: comparison among three techniques

    Pedro José Labronici

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether the number of screws or pins placed in the calcaneus might increase the risk of injury when three different techniques for treating calcaneal fractures. METHOD: 126 radiographs of patients who suffered displaced calcaneal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. Three surgical techniques were analyzed on an interobserver basis: 31 radiographs of patients treated using plates that were not specific for the calcaneus, 48 using specific plates and 47 using an external fixator. The risk of injury to the anatomical structures in relation to each Kirschner wire or screw was determined using a graded system in accordance with the Licht classification. The total risk of injury to the anatomical structures through placement of more than one wire/screw was quantified using the additive law of probabilities for the product, for independent events. RESULTS: All of the models presented high explanatory power for the risk evaluated, since the coefficient of determination values (R2 were greater than 98.6 for all the models. Therefore, the set of variables studied explained more than 98.6% of the variations in the risks of injury to arteries, veins or nerves and can be classified as excellent models for prevention of injuries. CONCLUSION: The risk of injury to arteries, veins or nerves is not defined by the total number of pins/screws. The region and the number of pins/screws in each region define and determine the best distribution of the risk.

  7. Risk of injury to vascular-nerve bundle after calcaneal fracture: comparison among three techniques

    Labronici, Pedro José; Reder, Vitor Rodrigues; de Araujo Marins Filho, Guilherme Ferreira; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Fernandes, Hélio Jorge Alvachian; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether the number of screws or pins placed in the calcaneus might increase the risk of injury when three different techniques for treating calcaneal fractures. Method 126 radiographs of patients who suffered displaced calcaneal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. Three surgical techniques were analyzed on an interobserver basis: 31 radiographs of patients treated using plates that were not specific for the calcaneus, 48 using specific plates and 47 using an external fixator. The risk of injury to the anatomical structures in relation to each Kirschner wire or screw was determined using a graded system in accordance with the Licht classification. The total risk of injury to the anatomical structures through placement of more than one wire/screw was quantified using the additive law of probabilities for the product, for independent events. Results All of the models presented high explanatory power for the risk evaluated, since the coefficient of determination values (R2) were greater than 98.6 for all the models. Therefore, the set of variables studied explained more than 98.6% of the variations in the risks of injury to arteries, veins or nerves and can be classified as excellent models for prevention of injuries. Conclusion The risk of injury to arteries, veins or nerves is not defined by the total number of pins/screws. The region and the number of pins/screws in each region define and determine the best distribution of the risk. PMID:27069891

  8. Corresponding waist circumference and body mass index values based on 10-year absolute type 2 diabetes risk in an Australian Aboriginal community

    Adegbija, Odewumi; Hoy, Wendy E; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is a lack of waist circumference (WC) thresholds to identify Aboriginal individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes. We generated gender-specific WC values with equivalent 10-year absolute risk of type 2 diabetes as body mass index (BMI) points in an Australian Aboriginal community to contribute to guidelines needed for establishing WC cut-off points for Aboriginals. Research design and methods A cohort of 803 adult participants free from type 2 diabetes in an Aboriginal community was followed up for up to 20 years. We derived WC values with absolute risks equivalent for the development of type 2 diabetes as BMI values (20–35 kg/m2) using the Weibull accelerated failure-time model. Results After a mean follow-up of 15.7 years, 110 participants developed type 2 diabetes. Absolute risk of type 2 diabetes increased as WC increased, ranging from 3.52% (WC=77.5 cm) to 14.14% (WC=119.9 cm) in males, and 5.04% (WC=79.5 cm) to 24.25% (WC=113.7 cm) in females. In males, WC values with same absolute risks of type 2 diabetes as BMI values were 77.5 cm for BMI=20 kg/m2, 91.5 cm for BMI=25 kg/m2 (overweight threshold), 105.7 cm for BMI=30 kg/m2 (obesity threshold) and 119.9 cm for BMI=35 kg/m2. In females, WC values were 79.5 cm for BMI=20 kg/m2, 90.9 cm for BMI=25 kg/m2, 102.3 cm for BMI=30 kg/m2 and 113.7 cm for BMI=35 kg/m2. Interaction between WC and gender was not statistically significant (p=0.53). Conclusions The absolute risk of type 2 diabetes increased with higher WC measured at baseline screening. Males were not significantly different from females in the association between WC and type 2 diabetes. Our findings are useful contributions for future establishment of WC cut-off points for identifying high-risk individuals in Aboriginal people. PMID:26405557

  9. Crohn's disease and risk of fracture: does thyroid disease play a role?

    Nakechand Pooran; Pankaj Singh; Simmy Bank

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of thyroid disease as a risk for fractures in Crohn's patients.METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1998 to 2000. The study group consisted of 210 patients with Crohn's disease. A group of 206 patients without inflammatory bowel disease served as controls. Primary outcome was thyroid disorder. Secondary outcomes included use of steroids, immunosuppressive medications, surgery and incidence of fracture.RESULTS: The prevalence of hyperthyroidism was similar in both groups. However, the prevalence of hypothyroidism was lower in Crohn's patients (3.8 % vs 8.2 %, P=0.05).Within the Crohn's group, the use of immunosuppressive agents (0 % vs11 %), steroid usage (12.5 % vs37 %), small bowel surgery (12.5 % vs 28 %) and large bowel surgery (12.5 % vs27 %) were lower in the hypothyroid subset as compared to the euthyroid subset. Seven (3.4 %) Crohn'spatients suffered fracture, all of whom were euthyroid.CONCLUSION: Thyroid disorder was not found to be associated with Crohn's disease and was not found to increase the risk for fractures. Therefore, screening for thyroid disease is not a necessary component in the management of Crohn's disease.

  10. Study of sex differences in the association between hip fracture risk and body parameters by DXA-based biomechanical modeling.

    Nasiri, Masoud; Luo, Yunhua

    2016-09-01

    There is controversy about whether or not body parameters affect hip fracture in men and women in the same way. In addition, although bone mineral density (BMD) is currently the most important single discriminator of hip fracture, it is unclear if BMD alone is equally effective for men and women. The objective of this study was to quantify and compare the associations of hip fracture risk with BMD and body parameters in men and women using our recently developed two-level biomechanical model that combines a whole-body dynamics model with a proximal-femur finite element model. Sideways fall induced impact force of 130 Chinese clinical cases, including 50 males and 80 females, were determined by subject-specific dynamics modeling. Then, a DXA-based finite element model was used to simulate the femur bone under the fall-induced loading conditions and calculate the hip fracture risk. Body weight, body height, body mass index, trochanteric soft tissue thickness, and hip bone mineral density were determined for each subject and their associations with impact force and hip fracture risk were quantified. Results showed that the association between impact force and hip fracture risk was not strong enough in both men (r=-0.31,p0.05), but it can be considered as a protective factor among women (r=-0.28,p<0.05). In contrast to men, trochanteric soft tissue thickness can be considered as a protective factor against hip fracture in women (r=-0.50,p<0.001). This study suggested that the biomechanical risk/protective factors for hip fracture are sex-specific. Therefore, the effect of body parameters should be considered differently for men and women in hip fracture risk assessment tools. These findings support further exploration of sex-specific preventive and protective measurements to reduce the incidence of hip fractures. PMID:27292653

  11. Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and risk of fractures: an updated meta analysis from the National Osteoporosis Foundation

    Introduction: Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation has been widely recommended to prevent osteoporosis and subsequent fractures; however, considerable controversy exists regarding the association of such supplementation and fracture risk. The aim was to conduct a meta-analysis of randomized contr...

  12. Absolute beginners

    Costa, Carlos Casimiro da; Costa, Jacinta Casimiro da

    2012-01-01

    Tomorrow, I m recovering my Thursday child as an absolute beginner , Transporting you to the essential touch of surface skin and space, Only for you, i do not regret, looking for education in a materia set. My love is your love , my materiality is you making things, The legacy of our ethnography, craftsmen s old and disappear, make me strong hard feelings, Recovering experiences and knowledge sprinkled in powder of stone, wood and metal ( ) reflecting in your dirty face the ...

  13. Estrogen receptor alpha polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and hip fracture

    Kjaergaard, AD; Ellervik, C; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Axelsson, CK; Grønholdt, ML; Grande, P; Jensen, Gorm B; Nordestgaard, BG; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Ellervik, Christina; Axelsson, Christen Kirk; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Grande, Peer; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2007-01-01

    thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism), cancer of reproductive organs (breasts, ovaries, uterus, and prostate), and hip fracture. We also studied patients with ischemic heart disease (n=2495), ischemic cerebrovascular disease (n=856), and breast cancer (n=1256) versus general population......Background- We hypothesized that the estrogen receptor (ESR1) IVS1-397T/C polymorphism affects high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer of reproductive organs, and hip fracture. Methods and Results- We studied...... controls. The CC, CT, and TT genotypes had general population frequencies of 21%, 50%, and 29%, respectively. Cross-sectionally, genotype did not influence high-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to hormone replacement therapy. In the cohort study, there were no differences in risks of CVD, cancer of...

  14. Absolute risk representation in cardiovascular disease prevention: comprehension and preferences of health care consumers and general practitioners involved in a focus group study

    Ryan Rebecca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communicating risk is part of primary prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke, collectively referred to as cardiovascular disease (CVD. In Australia, health organisations have promoted an absolute risk approach, thereby raising the question of suitable standardised formats for risk communication. Methods Sixteen formats of risk representation were prepared including statements, icons, graphical formats, alone or in combination, and with variable use of colours. All presented the same risk, i.e., the absolute risk for a 55 year old woman, 16% risk of CVD in five years. Preferences for a five or ten-year timeframe were explored. Australian GPs and consumers were recruited for participation in focus groups, with the data analysed thematically and preferred formats tallied. Results Three focus groups with health consumers and three with GPs were held, involving 19 consumers and 18 GPs. Consumers and GPs had similar views on which formats were more easily comprehended and which conveyed 16% risk as a high risk. A simple summation of preferences resulted in three graphical formats (thermometers, vertical bar chart and one statement format as the top choices. The use of colour to distinguish risk (red, yellow, green and comparative information (age, sex, smoking status were important ingredients. Consumers found formats which combined information helpful, such as colour, effect of changing behaviour on risk, or comparison with a healthy older person. GPs preferred formats that helped them relate the information about risk of CVD to their patients, and could be used to motivate patients to change behaviour. Several formats were reported as confusing, such as a percentage risk with no contextual information, line graphs, and icons, particularly those with larger numbers. Whilst consumers and GPs shared preferences, the use of one format for all situations was not recommended. Overall, people across groups felt that risk

  15. Cost-effectiveness of quantitative ultrasound as a technique for screening of osteoporotic fracture risk

    Aidelsburger, P.; Hessel, F.; Wasem, J

    2004-01-01

    Aim: On behalf of the German Agency for Health Technology Assessment (DAHTA@DIMDI) a rapid economic HTA was conducted. Aim of the HTA was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) for screening of osteoporotic fracture risk. Study population was formed by postmenopausal women. QUS was compared to the dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as the most frequently used method of measurement. Methods: According to the recommendations for rapid economic HTA a comprehensive liter...

  16. Fusion of clinical and stochastic finite element data for hip fracture risk prediction.

    Jiang, Peng; Missoum, Samy; Chen, Zhao

    2015-11-26

    Hip fracture affects more than 250,000 people in the US and 1.6 million worldwide per year. With an aging population, the development of reliable fracture risk models is therefore of prime importance. Due to the complexity of the hip fracture phenomenon, the use of clinical data only, as it is done traditionally, might not be sufficient to ensure an accurate and robust hip fracture prediction model. In order to increase the predictive ability of the risk model, the authors propose to supplement the clinical data with computational data from finite element models. The fusion of the two types of data is performed using deterministic and stochastic computational data. In the latter case, uncertainties in loading and material properties of the femur are accounted for and propagated through the finite element model. The predictive capability of a support vector machine (SVM) risk model constructed by combining clinical and finite element data was assessed using a Women׳s Health Initiative (WHI) dataset. The dataset includes common factors such as age and BMD as well as geometric factors obtained from DXA imaging. The fusion of computational and clinical data systematically leads to an increase in predictive ability of the SVM risk model as measured by the AUC metric. It is concluded that the largest gains in AUC are obtained by the stochastic approach. This gain decreases as the dimensionality of the problem increases: a 5.3% AUC improvement was achieved for a 9 dimensional problem involving geometric factors and weight while a 1.3% increase was obtained for a 20 dimensional case including geometric and conventional factors. PMID:26482733

  17. Case Report: Turner’s Syndrome with Juvenil Osteoporosis and Spontaneous Fracture Risk

    Ayşegül Türkyılmaz; Diclehan Oral; Nafi Sakar; Turgay Budak

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a case report is presented with Turner’s Syndrome with isochromosome carrier, Juvenile Osteoporosis and spontaneous fracture risk. As regards the case, who was referred to Genetic laboratory of Medical Biology Department, Medical Faculty, Dicle University, with pre-diagnosis of growth and development retardation and primary amenore, on average 10 preparats were prepared after performing peripheric blood culture method for chromosomal analysis. The preparats were stained with Gi...

  18. Risk of Major Osteoporotic Fracture After Cardiovascular Disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Tsai, Pang-Yao; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Pei-Chun; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the risk of major osteoporotic fracture in Taiwan. Methods Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database for the period 2000–2007, we classified 43 874 patients aged 50 years or older with newly diagnosed CVD (coronary artery disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral atherosclerosis) as the CVD group and 43 874 subjects without CVD (frequency-matched by sex, age, and date selected) a...

  19. Logistic regression in estimates of femoral neck fracture by fall

    Jaroslava Wendlová

    2010-01-01

    Jaroslava WendlováDerer’s University Hospital and Policlinic, Osteological Unit, Bratislava, SlovakiaAbstract: The latest methods in estimating the probability (absolute risk) of osteoporotic fractures include several logistic regression models, based on qualitative risk factors plus bone mineral density (BMD), and the probability estimate of fracture in the future. The Slovak logistic regression model, in contrast to other models, is created from quantitative variables o...

  20. Length of preoperative hospital stay: a risk factor for reducing surgical infection in femoral fracture cases

    Pereira, Hoberdan Oliveira; Rezende, Edna Maria; Couto, Bráulio Roberto Gonçalves Marinho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze infections of the surgical site among patients undergoing clean-wound surgery for correction of femoral fractures. Methods This was a historical cohort study developed in a large-sized hospital in Belo Horizonte. Data covering the period from July 2007 to July 2009 were gathered from the records in electronic medical files, relating to the characteristics of the patients, surgical procedures and surgical infections. The risk factors for infection were identified by means of statistical tests on bilateral hypotheses, taking the significance level to be 5%. Continuous variables were evaluated using Student's t test. Categorical variables were evaluated using the chi-square test, or Fisher's exact test, when necessary. For each factor under analysis, a point estimate and the 95% confidence interval for the relative risk were obtained. In the final stage of the study, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Results 432 patients who underwent clean-wound surgery for correcting femoral fractures were included in this study. The rate of incidence of surgical site infections was 4.9% and the risk factors identified were the presence of stroke (odds ratio, OR = 5.0) and length of preoperative hospital stay greater than four days (OR = 3.3). Conclusion To prevent surgical site infections in operations for treating femoral fractures, measures involving assessment of patients’ clinical conditions by a multiprofessional team, reduction of the length of preoperative hospital stay and prevention of complications resulting from infections will be necessary.

  1. Increase in Fracture Risk Following Unintentional Weight Loss in Postmenopausal Women: The Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women.

    Compston, Juliet E; Wyman, Allison; FitzGerald, Gordon; Adachi, Jonathan D; Chapurlat, Roland D; Cooper, Cyrus; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Gehlbach, Stephen H; Greenspan, Susan L; Hooven, Frederick H; LaCroix, Andrea Z; March, Lyn; Netelenbos, J Coen; Nieves, Jeri W; Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Rossini, Maurizio; Roux, Christian; Saag, Kenneth G; Siris, Ethel S; Silverman, Stuart; Watts, Nelson B; Anderson, Frederick A

    2016-07-01

    Increased fracture risk has been associated with weight loss in postmenopausal women, but the time course over which this occurs has not been established. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of unintentional weight loss of ≥10 lb (4.5 kg) in postmenopausal women on fracture risk at multiple sites up to 5 years after weight loss. Using data from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW), we analyzed the relationships between self-reported unintentional weight loss of ≥10 lb at baseline, year 2, or year 3 and incident clinical fracture in the years after weight loss. Complete data were available in 40,179 women (mean age ± SD 68 ± 8.3 years). Five-year cumulative fracture rate was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and adjusted hazard ratios for weight loss as a time-varying covariate were calculated from Cox multiple regression models. Unintentional weight loss at baseline was associated with a significantly increased risk of fracture of the clavicle, wrist, spine, rib, hip, and pelvis for up to 5 years after weight loss. Adjusted hazard ratios showed a significant association between unintentional weight loss and fracture of the hip, spine, and clavicle within 1 year of weight loss, and these associations were still present at 5 years. These findings demonstrate increased fracture risk at several sites after unintentional weight loss in postmenopausal women. This increase is found as early as 1 year after weight loss, emphasizing the need for prompt fracture risk assessment and appropriate management to reduce fracture risk in this population. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26861139

  2. Increase in Fracture Risk Following Unintentional Weight Loss in Postmenopausal Women: The Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women†

    Compston, Juliet E.; Wyman, A; FitzGerald, Gordon; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Chapurlat, Roland D.; Cooper, Cyrus; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Gehlbach, Stephen H; Greenspan, Susan L.; Hooven, Frederick H.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; March, Lyn; Coen Netelenbos, J.; Nieves, Jeri W.; Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Rossini, Maurizio; Roux, Christian; Saag, Kenneth G.; Siris, Ethel S.; Silverman, Stuart; Watts, Nelson B.; Anderson, Frederick A.

    2016-01-01

    Increased fracture risk has been associated with weight loss in postmenopausal women but the time course over which this occurs has not been established. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of unintentional weight loss of ≥10 lb (4.5 kg) in postmenopausal women on fracture risk at multiple sites up to 5 years following weight loss. Using data from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW) we analyzed the relationships between self-reported unintentional weight loss of ≥10 lb at baseline, year 2, or year 3 and incident clinical fracture in the years following weight loss. Complete data were available in 40,179 women (mean age ± SD 68 ± 8.3 years). Five-year cumulative fracture rate was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and adjusted hazard ratios for weight loss as a time-varying covariate were calculated from Cox multiple regression models. Unintentional weight loss at baseline was associated with a significantly increased risk of fracture of the clavicle, wrist, spine, rib, hip, and pelvis for up to 5 years following weight loss. Adjusted hazard ratios showed a significant association between unintentional weight loss and fracture of the hip, spine, and clavicle within 1 year of weight loss, and these associations were still present at 5 years. These findings demonstrate increased fracture risk at several sites after unintentional weight loss in postmenopausal women. This increase is seen as early as 1 year following weight loss, emphasizing the need for prompt fracture risk assessment and appropriate management to reduce fracture risk in this population. PMID:26861139

  3. Growth and Age-Related Abnormalities in Cortical Structure and Fracture Risk.

    Seeman, Ego

    2015-12-01

    Vertebral fractures and trabecular bone loss have dominated thinking and research into the pathogenesis and the structural basis of bone fragility during the last 70 years. However, 80% of all fractures are non-vertebral and occur at regions assembled using large amounts of cortical bone; only 20% of fractures are vertebral. Moreover, ~80% of the skeleton is cortical and ~70% of all bone loss is cortical even though trabecular bone is lost more rapidly than cortical bone. Bone is lost because remodelling becomes unbalanced after midlife. Most cortical bone loss occurs by intracortical, not endocortical remodelling. Each remodelling event removes more bone than deposited enlarging existing canals which eventually coalesce eroding and thinning the cortex from 'within.' Thus, there is a need to study the decay of cortical as well as trabecular bone, and to develop drugs that restore the strength of both types of bone. It is now possible to accurately quantify cortical porosity and trabecular decay in vivo. The challenges still to be met are to determine whether measurement of porosity identifies persons at risk for fracture, whether this approach is compliments information obtained using bone densitometry, and whether changes in cortical porosity and other microstructural traits have the sensitivity to serve as surrogates of treatment success or failure. PMID:26394727

  4. Absolute Summ

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  5. Risk of hip fractures associated with benzodiazepines: Applying common protocol to a multi-database nested case-control study. The protect project

    Requena, Gema; Logie, John; González-González, Rocío; Gardarsdottir, Helga; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.; Merino, Elisa Martin; Boudiaf, Nada; Huerta, Consuelo; Bate, Andrew; Alvarez, Yolanda; García-Rodríguez, Luis A.; Reynolds, Robert; Schlienger, Raymond G.; De Groot, Mark C.H.; Klungel, Olaf H.; De Abajo, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between benzodiazepines (BZD) and hip fractures has been estimated in several observational studies although diverse methodologies and definitions have hampered comparability. Objectives: To evaluate the discrepancies in the risk estimates of hip/femur fractures associate

  6. Alveolar process fractures in the permanent dentition. Part 2. The risk of healing complications in teeth involved in an alveolar process fracture

    Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas; Andreasen, Jens Ove

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the risk of pulp canal obliteration (PCO), pulp necrosis (PN), repair-related resorption (RRR), infection-related resorption (IRR), ankylosis-related resorption (ARR), marginal bone loss (MBL), and tooth loss (TL) for teeth involved in an alveolar process fracture and to identify...... possible risk factors. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A total of 91 patients with 223 traumatized teeth. STATISTICS: The risks of PCO, PN, RRR, IRR, ARR, MBL, and TL were analyzed separately for teeth with immature and mature root development using Kaplan-Meier and Aalen-Johansen methods. Possible risk factors for...

  7. Fracture Risk Is Decreased in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Register-Based and Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Glintborg, Dorte; Nybo, Mads; Andersen, Marianne; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Hyperandrogenism, obesity, and hyperinsulinemia may protect against osteoporosis, whereas amenorrhea, increased cortisol, and low growth hormone may be associated with higher fracture risk in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The objective of this study was to investigate fracture risk in PCOS. In the PCOS Denmark study, women with PCOS and/or hirsutism were identified in the Danish National Patient Register (1995-2012). Each patient was assigned three age-matched controls on the index date of PCOS diagnosis. Individuals with a previous endocrine diagnosis were excluded. Within PCOS Denmark, we embedded a well-characterized subcohort of patients, PCOS OUH, diagnosed with PCOS at Odense University Hospital (n = 1217). We identified incident fractures by International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes and used conditional Cox regression analyses to compare fracture risk. In the PCOS Denmark study, there were 19,199 women with PCOS and 57,483 controls were included, mean age 30.6 years (range, 12-60 years). Fracture rates were decreased in PCOS Denmark (10.3/1000 patient years) versus controls (13.6/1000 patient years). The adjusted ORs were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.80) for all fractures, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.92) for major osteoporotic fractures, and 0.57 (95% CI, 0.47 to 0.70) for fractures of head and face. The risk reduction was more pronounced below the age of 30 years at diagnosis. Women with PCOS had significant more hospital contacts due to strains and sprains. In the PCOS OUH subcohort, the risk reduction of fractures did not differ between PCOS women with elevated versus normal testosterone levels and the risk reduction was nominally smaller in overweight versus normal weight PCOS women. Women with PCOS had reduced risk of fractures, in particular of the appendicular skeleton. The risk reduction was greater in women with younger age at diagnosis suggesting that the skeletal effects of PCOS may be greater in women who have not yet

  8. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people

    Shimada Hiroyuki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. Methods The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotomous questions to screen for fall risks during movements and behaviours such as walking, transferring, and wandering. The history of falls and fall-related fractures during the previous year was reported by participants or determined from an interview with the participant's family and care staff. Results All SRRST items showed significant differences between the participants with and without falls and fall-related fractures. In multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, diseases, and behavioural variables, the SRRST score was independently associated with history of falls and fractures. Odds ratios for those in the high-risk SRRST group (≥ 5 points compared with the no risk SRRST group (0 point were 6.15 (p Conclusion These results suggest that subjective ratings by care staff can be utilized to determine the risks of falls and fall-related fractures in the frail elderly, however, these preliminary results require confirmation in further prospective research.

  9. Long-term fracture risk in patients with celiac disease: a population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota.

    Jafri, Mohammed R; Nordstrom, Charles W; Murray, Joseph A; Van Dyke, Carol T; Dierkhising, Ross A; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Melton, Lee J

    2008-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, but there are conflicting data regarding fracture risk. We determined the fracture incidence relative to matched controls in a population-based cohort with celiac disease before and after diagnosis. Olmsted County residents with celiac disease (n = 83) diagnosed between 1950 and 2002 were compared with 166 gender and age matched controls. Fracture histories were ascertained from each subject's medical records. Celiac disease is linked to an increased fracture risk before and after diagnosis. Before the index date, cases had a fracture rate twice that of controls (CI: 1.0-3.9, P = 0.045) and 2.5-fold greater after the index date (CI: 1.1-5.6, P = 0.026). Appendicular and axial fractures were 2.5 (CI: 0.9-6.5) and 3.2 times more likely (CI: 1.0-10.5) after the index date. These observations support a rationale for earlier detection of celiac disease, and active management of bone disease before bone effects have occurred, to reduce the persistent risk of fractures. PMID:17934823

  10. Hip fracture risk and cadmium in erythrocytes: a nested case-control study with prospectively collected samples.

    Sommar, Johan Nilsson; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Lundh, Thomas; Svensson, Olle; Hallmans, Göran; Bergdahl, Ingvar A

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have investigated the relation between bone mass density and cadmium exposure, but only few studies have been performed on fractures and biomarkers of cadmium. This study analyzed the association between hip fracture risk and cadmium in erythrocytes (Ery-Cd). Prospective samples from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study's biobank were used for 109 individuals who later in life had sustained a low-trauma hip fracture, matched with two controls of the same age and gender. The mean concentration of Ery-Cd (±SD) in case samples was 1.3 ± 1.4 versus 0.9 ± 1.0 μg/L in controls. The odds ratio (OR) was 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-2.42] for suffering a hip fracture for each microgram per liter increase in Ery-Cd. However, when taking smoking into consideration (never, former, or current), neither Ery-Cd nor smoking showed a statistically significant increase in fracture risk. Using multiple conditional logistic regression with BMI, height, and smoking, the estimated OR for a 1-μg/L increase in Ery-Cd was 1.52 (95% CI 0.77-2.97). Subgroup analysis showed an increased fracture risk among women (OR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.18-3.20, for a 1 μg/L increase), which also remained in the multiple analysis (OR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.29-8.56). This study shows that fracture risk is associated with Ery-Cd. It is, however, not possible to draw firm conclusions on whether cadmium is the causal factor or whether other smoking-related factors cause this association. Subgroup analysis shows that cadmium is a risk factor for hip fracture among women. PMID:24101229

  11. Fracture risk in patients with type 2 diabetes under different antidiabetic treatment regimens: a retrospective database analysis in primary care

    Pscherer, S; Kostev, K; Dippel, FW; Rathmann, W

    2016-01-01

    Aim Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of fractures. There are a few studies on the effects of diabetes treatment on fracture risk. The aim was to investigate the fracture risk related to various types of insulin therapy in primary care practices. Methods Data from 105,960 type 2 diabetes patients from 1,072 general and internal medicine practices in Germany were retrospectively analyzed (Disease Analyzer database; 01/2000–12/2013). Fracture risk of the following therapies was compared using multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, diabetes care, comorbidity, and glycemic control (HbAlc): 1) incident insulin therapy versus oral antidiabetic drugs, 2) basal-supported oral therapy versus supplementary insulin therapy versus conventional insulin therapy, and 3) insulin glargine versus insulin detemir versus NPH insulin. Results There was a lower odds of having incident fractures in the oral antidiabetic drug group compared to incident insulin users, although not significant (odds ratio [OR]; 95% confidence interval: 0.87; 0.72–1.06). There were increased odds for conventional insulin therapy (OR: 1.59; 95% CI [confidence interval] 0.89–2.84) and supplementary insulin therapy (OR: 1.20; 0.63–2.27) compared to basal-supported oral therapy, which was not significant as well. Overall, there was no significant difference in fracture risk for basal insulins (glargine, detemir, NPH insulin). After a treatment duration ≥2 years, insulin glargine showed a lower odds of having ≥1 fracture compared to NPH users (OR: 0.78; 0.65–0.95) (detemir vs NPH insulin: OR: 1.03; 0.79–1.36). Conclusion Long-standing therapy with insulin glargine was associated with a lower odds of having any fractures compared to NPH insulin. Further studies are required to investigate whether the lower chance is due to a reduced frequency of hypoglycemia. PMID:26929655

  12. Effects of long-term strontium ranelate treatment on the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures in postmenopausal osteoporosis

    Reginster, Jean-Yves; Felsenberg, Dieter; Boonen, Steven; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Rizzoli, Rene; Brandi, Maria-Luisa; Spector, Tim D; Brixen, Kim; Goemaere, Stefan; Cormier, Catherine; Balogh, Adam; Delmas, Pierre D; Meunier, Pierre J

    2008-01-01

    of the study. Fracture data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survival method. RESULTS: Of the 5,091 patients, 2,714 (53%) completed the study up to 5 years. The risk of nonvertebral fracture was reduced by 15% in the strontium ranelate group compared with the placebo group (relative risk 0.85 [95......% confidence interval 0.73-0.99]). The risk of hip fracture was decreased by 43% (relative risk 0.57 [95% confidence interval 0.33-0.97]), and the risk of vertebral fracture was decreased by 24% (relative risk 0.76 [95% CI 0.65-0.88]) in the strontium ranelate group. After 5 years, the safety profile of......OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to assess the effect of strontium ranelate on nonvertebral and vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis in a 5-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS: A total of 5,091 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis were randomized to...

  13. A Meta-Analysis of Trabecular Bone Score in Fracture Risk Prediction and Its Relationship to FRAX.

    McCloskey, Eugene V; Odén, Anders; Harvey, Nicholas C; Leslie, William D; Hans, Didier; Johansson, Helena; Barkmann, Reinhard; Boutroy, Stephanie; Brown, Jacques; Chapurlat, Roland; Elders, Petra Jm; Fujita, Yuki; Glüer, Claus-C; Goltzman, David; Iki, Masayuki; Karlsson, Magnus; Kindmark, Andreas; Kotowicz, Mark; Kurumatani, Norio; Kwok, Timothy; Lamy, Oliver; Leung, Jason; Lippuner, Kurt; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mellström, Dan; Merlijn, Thomas; Oei, Ling; Ohlsson, Claes; Pasco, Julie A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rosengren, Björn; Sornay-Rendu, Elisabeth; Szulc, Pawel; Tamaki, Junko; Kanis, John A

    2016-05-01

    Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a gray-level textural index of bone microarchitecture derived from lumbar spine dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images. TBS is a bone mineral density (BMD)-independent predictor of fracture risk. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine whether TBS predicted fracture risk independently of FRAX probability and to examine their combined performance by adjusting the FRAX probability for TBS. We utilized individual-level data from 17,809 men and women in 14 prospective population-based cohorts. Baseline evaluation included TBS and the FRAX risk variables, and outcomes during follow-up (mean 6.7 years) comprised major osteoporotic fractures. The association between TBS, FRAX probabilities, and the risk of fracture was examined using an extension of the Poisson regression model in each cohort and for each sex and expressed as the gradient of risk (GR; hazard ratio per 1 SD change in risk variable in direction of increased risk). FRAX probabilities were adjusted for TBS using an adjustment factor derived from an independent cohort (the Manitoba Bone Density Cohort). Overall, the GR of TBS for major osteoporotic fracture was 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-1.53) when adjusted for age and time since baseline and was similar in men and women (p > 0.10). When additionally adjusted for FRAX 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fracture, TBS remained a significant, independent predictor for fracture (GR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.24-1.41). The adjustment of FRAX probability for TBS resulted in a small increase in the GR (1.76, 95% CI 1.65-1.87 versus 1.70, 95% CI 1.60-1.81). A smaller change in GR for hip fracture was observed (FRAX hip fracture probability GR 2.25 vs. 2.22). TBS is a significant predictor of fracture risk independently of FRAX. The findings support the use of TBS as a potential adjustment for FRAX probability, though the impact of the adjustment remains to be determined in the context of clinical

  14. Risk-benefit analyses of SG tube maintenance based on probabilistic fracture mechanics

    As an application of probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM), a risk-benefit analysis was performed for the purpose of optimizing maintenance activities of steam generator (SG) tubes used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The probabilities of the SG tube leakage and rupture are defined as risks in this study. A model was made modifying pc-PRAISE (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events) to evaluate the risks during 60 year operations due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the tubes under various maintenance strategies for SG tubes. In the risk analysis, parameters such as inspection accuracy, inspection interval, sampling inspection and crack propagation law were selected for sensitivity analysis. Based on the risk analysis, a risk-benefit analysis was conducted when implementing two maintenance strategies taking both costs and revenues for 60 year operations into account. In the risk-benefit analysis, the expected cost of leakage or rupture was calculated by multiplying 'probability of leakage or rupture' by 'expected loss of leakage or rupture accident'. To justify whether it is worthwhile implementing the maintenance strategies or not, the net present value (NPV) was calculated as an index, which is one of the most fundamental financial indices for decision-making based on the discounted cash flow (DCF) method. The results demonstrated that in the risk analysis, the risks are influenced significantly by the crack propagation law, accuracy of inspection and sampling inspection. In the risk-benefit analysis, it was suggested that investment to improve inspection accuracy would reduce the total costs of 60 year operations significantly and increase the NPV. Although the analysis was mainly conducted for SG tubes made of Inconel 600 mill anneal (MA) material, the analysis was also carried out for Inconel 690 thermal treatment (TT) material, making assumptions on its crack initiation and crack propagation law. In addition, the effect of introducing

  15. Risk Factors and Clinical Evaluation of Superficial Femoral Artery Stent Fracture: Prote'ge'GPS Stent

    Lee, Da Un; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jung, Hye Doo; Huh, Tae Wook; Yim, Nam Yeol; Oh, Hyun jun; Choi, Soo Jin Na [Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University, Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Nam Kyu [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Chonnam National University, Medical School, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    To evaluate the occurrence of superficial femoral artery stent fractures, the risk factors of stent fracture, and the relationship between fractures and clinical findings. Of the 38 patients who underwent treatment with Prote'ge'GPS stenting due to arterial occlusions on the superficial femoral artery, 17 also underwent a clinical analysis. Forty-three stents were inserted in the 17 superficial femoral arteries, ranging between 15 and 50 cm in length, with a mean treated length of 26.4 cm (15-50 cm). A fracture was evaluated by taking a PA and lateral simple radiography, as well as a follow-up evaluation accompanied with a CT angiography, DSA, and a color Doppler sonography. The examination involved the assessment of the difference between bone fractures due to length, placement, and frequency. Fractures occurred in 13 of 43 stents (30.2%). A total of 10 (71.4%) occurred in the upper third, compared to 4 (28.6%) in the lower third of the superficial femoral artery. In addition, 10 stents (71.4%) had a single strut fracture, whereas 4 (28.6%) had multiple strut fractures. A stent fracture occurred more frequently when the stents and lesions were longer (p=0.021, 0.012) and the stents were inserted near the joint. However, there was no significant relationship between stent numbers and the fractures (p=0.126). When the stents were inserted along the popliteal artery, a stent fracture occurred more frequently in the lower third of the artery. The stent fractures did not significantly influence the patency rate of the stented artery (p=0.44) Prote'ge'GPS stents in the superficial femoral artery revealed a considerable number of fractures and the fracture frequency showed a significant relationship with the length of stents and lesions. The closer stent insertion was to the joints, the more frequently fractures occurred. There were no evident significant relationships between the presence of stent fractures and the patency of the stented arteries

  16. An approach towards a parameterised model for risk assessment of hydraulic fracturing operations

    Gläser, Dennis; Class, Holger; Kissinger, Alexander; Beck, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The main ambition of the recently started research project FracRisk (funded within the EU Horizon 2020 programme) is the development of a comprehensive knowledge base and the formulation of scientific recommendations, which can contribute to efforts aimed at minimising the environmental footprint of shale gas production while addressing scientific and public concerns. Forward numerical modelling linked to a detailed risk and uncertainty assessment is applied for estimating the mechanical, hydromechanical, and geochemical consequences resulting from hydraulic fracturing. To capture a broad range of environmental risks, six exemplary scenarios focussing on different physical processes on different spatial and temporal scales are investigated. An approach regarding sources, pathways and targets is used for the quantification of the environmental impacts. A fundamental understanding of the potential risks is achieved by allowing for mutual feedback between the scenarios, identifying key parameters and processes. The coupling of the scenarios to a Polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) paves the way to an abstracted and parameterised model for risk assessment to be used both by regulators and contractors. This contribution at an early stage of the project will elaborate on the general workflow of implementing focussed scenarios into a PCE-based Monte-Carlo approach to parameter sensitivities, that will eventually be embedded into a FEP-based (features, events, processes) evaluation of risk and counteractive measures.

  17. β3-adrenergic receptor gene, body mass index, bone mineral density and fracture risk in elderly men and women: the Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study (DOES)

    Center Jacqueline R; Eisman John A; Morrison Nigel A; Nguyen Nguyen D; Wang Claire Y; Nguyen Tuan V

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that the Arg allele of β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) gene is associated with body mass index (BMI), which is an important predictor of bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk. However, whether the ADRB3 gene polymorphism is associated with fracture risk has not been investigated. The aim of study was to examine the inter-relationships between ADRB3 gene polymorphisms, BMI, BMD and fracture risk in elderly Caucasians. Methods Genotypes of...

  18. Robotic-Assisted Device in Posterior Spinal Fusion for a High Risk Thoraculombar Fracture in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Suliman, Ali; Wollstein, Ronit; Bernfeld, Benjamin; Bruskin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Fractures in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are often difficult to treat and surgical treatment may be fraught with complications. We describe the use of a robotic-assisted device in the surgical treatment of an unstable L1 fracture in an elderly patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and AS. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged after 3 days. The use of a robotic-assisted device in spine surgery is particularly indicated in difficult high risk cases.

  19. Treating postmenopausal osteoporosis in women at increased risk of fracture – critical appraisal of bazedoxifene: a review

    Peter Vestergaard

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Peter Vestergaard, Susanna vid Streym ThomsenDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism C, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkAbstract: Several categories of drugs to treat osteoporosis exist in the form of bisphosphonates, strontium, parathyroid hormone, and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM. Advantages and disadvantages exist for each category as some patients may, for example, not tolerate bisphosphonates for gastrointestinal side effects, and especially in women in whom osteoporosis is frequent, several options for treatment are needed. The objectives of this review were to critically appraise the effects of bazedoxifene on risk of fractures especially in women at high risk of fractures. A systematic literature search was conducted for studies, especially randomized controlled trials with fractures as end-points. Bazedoxifene is a new member of the SERM group. The literature search identified one randomized controlled trial with fractures as end-point. This was a 3-year randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial in which 7492 postmenopausal women aged 55 to 85 years were randomly allocated to 1 bazedoxifene (20 [n = 1886] or 40 [n = 1872] mg/day; 2 raloxifene (60 mg/day, n = 1849; or 3 placebo (n = 1885. The risk of vertebral fractures decreased with both 20 (HR 0.58, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.89 and 40 (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.96 mg of bazedoxifene per day compared to placebo. There was no reduction in non-vertebral fractures. A subgroup of women with a priori high risk of fractures was identified post hoc. In this subgroup there was a reduction in the risk of non-vertebral fractures with the 20 mg dose of bazedoxifene compared to placebo (HR 0.50, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.90. In the 40 mg bazedoxifene group no significant reduction in non-vertebral fractures was seen in this subgroup (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.20. In general post-hoc defined subgroup analyses should be interpreted with caution. However, the results indicate that

  20. TRPV4 deficiency causes sexual dimorphism in bone metabolism and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    van der Eerden, B C J; Oei, L; Roschger, P; Fratzl-Zelman, N; Hoenderop, J G J; van Schoor, N M; Pettersson-Kymmer, U; Schreuders-Koedam, M; Uitterlinden, A G; Hofman, A; Suzuki, M; Klaushofer, K; Ohlsson, C; Lips, P J A; Rivadeneira, F; Bindels, R J M; van Leeuwen, J P T M

    2013-12-01

    We explored the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) in murine bone metabolism and association of TRPV4 gene variants with fractures in humans. Urinary and histomorphometrical analyses demonstrated reduced osteoclast activity and numbers in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, which was confirmed in bone marrow-derived osteoclast cultures. Osteoblasts and bone formation as shown by serum procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide and histomorphometry, including osteoid surface, osteoblast and osteocyte numbers were not affected in vivo. Nevertheless, osteoblast differentiation was enhanced in Trpv4(-/-) bone marrow cultures. Cortical and trabecular bone mass was 20% increased in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, compared to sex-matched wild type (Trpv4(+/+)) mice. However, at the same time intracortical porosity was increased and bone matrix mineralization was reduced. Together, these lead to a maximum load, stiffness and work to failure of the femoral bone, which were not different compared to Trpv4(+/+) mice, while the bone material was less resistant to stress and less elastic. The differential impacts on these determinants of bone strength were likely responsible for the lack of any changes in whole bone strength in the Trpv4(-/-) mice. None of these skeletal parameters were affected in female Trpv4(-/-) mice. The T-allele of rs1861809 SNP in the TRPV4 locus was associated with a 30% increased risk (95% CI: 1.1-1.6; p=0.013) for non-vertebral fracture risk in men, but not in women, in the Rotterdam Study. Meta-analyses with the population-based LASA study confirmed the association with non-vertebral fractures in men. This was lost when the non-population-based studies Mr. OS and UFO were included. In conclusion, TRPV4 is a male-specific regulator of bone metabolism, a determinant of bone strength, and a potential risk predictor for fractures through regulation of bone matrix mineralization and intra-cortical porosity. This identifies TRPV4 as a unique sexually

  1. Combined Microwave Ablation and Cementoplasty in Patients with Painful Bone Metastases at High Risk of Fracture

    Pusceddu, Claudio, E-mail: clapusceddu@gmail.com [Regional Referral Center for Oncologic Diseases, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Oncological Radiology, Ocological Hospital “A. Businco” (Italy); Sotgia, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.sotgia@gmail.com; Fele, Rosa Maria, E-mail: rosellafele@tiscali.it [Regional Referral Center for Oncological Diseases, Department of Oncological Radiology, Oncological Hospital “A. Businco” (Italy); Ballicu, Nicola, E-mail: nicolaballicu77@gmail.com [Regional Referral Center for Oncologic Diseases, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Oncological Radiology, Ocological Hospital “A. Businco” (Italy); Melis, Luca, E-mail: doclucamelis@tiscali.it [Regional Referral Center for Oncological Diseases, Department of Oncological Radiology, Oncological Hospital “A. Businco” (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of computed tomography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) and cementoplasty in patients with painful bone metastases at high risk of fracture.Materials and MethodsThirty-five patients with 37 metastatic bone lesions underwent computed tomography-guided MWA combined with cementoplasty (polymethylmethacrylate injection). Vertebrae, femur, and acetabulum were the intervention sites and the primary end point was pain relief. Pain severity was estimated by visual analog scale (VAS) before treatment; 1 week post-treatment; and 1, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. Functional outcome was assessed by improved patient walking ability. Radiological evaluation was performed at baseline and 3 and 12 months post-procedure.ResultsIn all patients, pain reduction occurred from the first week after treatment. The mean reduction in the VAS score was 84, 90, 90 % at week 1, month 1, and month 6, respectively. Improved walking ability occurred in 100 and 98 % of cases at the 1- and 6-month functional outcome evaluations, respectively. At the 1-year evaluation, 25 patients were alive, and 10 patients (28 %) had died because of widespread disease. The mean reduction in the VAS score and improvement in surviving patients’ walking ability were 90 and 100 %, respectively. No patients showed evidence of local tumor recurrence or progression and pathological fracture in the treated sites.ConclusionOur results suggest that MWA combined with osteoplasty is safe and effective when treating painful bone metastases at high risk of fracture. The number of surviving patients at the 1-year evaluation confirms the need for an effective and long-lasting treatment.

  2. Characterizing trabecular bone structure for assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Tsai, Halley; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    While the proximal femur is preferred for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in fracture risk estimation, the introduction of volumetric quantitative computed tomography has revealed stronger associations between BMD and spinal fracture status. In this study, we propose to capture properties of trabecular bone structure in spinal vertebrae with advanced second-order statistical features for purposes of fracture risk assessment. For this purpose, axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were acquired from 28 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. A semi-automated method was used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the central vertebral slice with a circular region of interest (ROI) to exclude cortical bone; pixels within were converted to values indicative of BMD. Six second-order statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and the mean BMD within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a generalized radial basis functions (GRBF) neural network to predict the failure load of the specimens; true failure load was measured through biomechanical testing. Prediction performance was evaluated with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric. The best prediction performance was observed with GLCM feature `correlation' (RMSE = 1.02 ± 0.18), which significantly outperformed all other GLCM features (p < 0.01). GLCM feature correlation also significantly outperformed MDCTmeasured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 ± 0.17) (p< 10-4). These results suggest that biomechanical strength prediction in spinal vertebrae can be significantly improved through characterization of trabecular bone structure with GLCM-derived texture features.

  3. A risk-economic approach to nuclear power generation. Beyond the myth of absolute safety and unthinkable events

    This paper deals with a risk-economic approach to nuclear power generation, a very timely yet rather neglected area in the economics profession. The economic and psychological consequences of Japan's recent catastrophe have been so grave and wide-spread, thus calling for careful reexamination of the economics of risk and uncertainty. It is Daniel Bernoulli, a mathematical genius of the 18th century, who first introduced the expected utility theory into decision making under risk. Although a great deal of applications has been done in many areas since then, it appears that the most recent nuclear meltdown of Japan is casting serious doubt upon the general validity of existing risk theories. It is high time for us to establish a new comprehensive approach by taking account of psychological, sociological, cultural, and historical factors. (author)

  4. Prevalence of risk factors for fractures and use of DXA scanning in Danish women. A regional population-based study

    Rubin, Kathrine Hass; Abrahamsen, B; Hermann, A P;

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relationship between risk factors and use of DXA scans. Our study showed a relatively high use of DXA in low-risk women and the relatively low coverage in women with multiple risk factors. Moreover, distance to DXA clinics, age, and socio-economic factors are associated with the...... use of DXA. INTRODUCTION: To determine the relationship between risk factors for fracture and use of DXA scans in Danish women in relation to distance to DXA clinics and socio-economic factors. METHODS: From the Danish National Civil Register we randomly selected 5,000 women aged 40-90 years living in...... the region of Southern Denmark to receive a mailed questionnaire concerning risk factors for fractures. RESULTS: The respondents rate was 84% and 77% of the invited population were available for analysis. A total of 10.3% of the women without risk factors and only 36% of the women with three or more...

  5. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people

    Shimada Hiroyuki; Suzukawa Megumi; Ishizaki Tatsuro; Kobayashi Kumiko; Kim Hunkyung; Suzuki Takao

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST) to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. Methods The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotom...

  6. Fracture risk assessment: improved evaluation of vertebral integrity among metastatic cancer patients to aid in surgical decision-making

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Camp, Jon J.; Holmes, David R.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Lu, Lichun; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2012-03-01

    Failure of the spine's structural integrity from metastatic disease can lead to both pain and neurologic deficit. Fractures that require treatment occur in over 30% of bony metastases. Our objective is to use computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with analytic techniques that have been previously developed to predict fracture risk in cancer patients with metastatic disease to the spine. Current clinical practice for cancer patients with spine metastasis often requires an empirical decision regarding spinal reconstructive surgery. Early image-based software systems used for CT analysis are time consuming and poorly suited for clinical application. The Biomedical Image Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic, Rochester has developed an image analysis computer program that calculates from CT scans, the residual load-bearing capacity in a vertebra with metastatic cancer. The Spine Cancer Assessment (SCA) program is built on a platform designed for clinical practice, with a workflow format that allows for rapid selection of patient CT exams, followed by guided image analysis tasks, resulting in a fracture risk report. The analysis features allow the surgeon to quickly isolate a single vertebra and obtain an immediate pre-surgical multiple parallel section composite beam fracture risk analysis based on algorithms developed at Mayo Clinic. The analysis software is undergoing clinical validation studies. We expect this approach will facilitate patient management and utilization of reliable guidelines for selecting among various treatment option based on fracture risk.

  7. Decision to take osteoporosis medication in patients who have had a fracture and are 'high' risk for future fracture: A qualitative study

    Hawker Gillian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' values and preferences are fundamental tenets of evidence-based practice, yet current osteoporosis (OP clinical guidelines pay little attention to these issues in therapeutic decision making. This may be in part due to the fact that few studies have examined the factors that influence the initial decision to take OP medication. The purpose of our study was to examine patients' experiences with the decision to take OP medication after they sustained a fracture. Methods A phenomenological qualitative study was conducted with outpatients identified in a university teaching hospital fracture clinic OP program. Individuals aged 65+ who had sustained a fragility fracture within 5 years, were 'high risk' for future fracture, and were prescribed OP medication were eligible. Analysis of interview data was guided by Giorgi's methodology. Results 21 patients (6 males, 15 females aged 65-88 years participated. All participants had low bone mass; 9 had OP. Fourteen patients were taking a bisphosphonate while 7 patients were taking no OP medications. For 12 participants, the decision to take OP medication occurred at the time of prescription and involved minimal contemplation (10/12 were on medication. These patients made their decision because they liked/trusted their health care provider. However, 4/10 participants in this group indicated their OP medication-taking status might change. For the remaining 9 patients, the decision was more difficult (4/9 were on medication. These patients were unconvinced by their health care provider, engaged in risk-benefit analyses using other information sources, and were concerned about side effects; 7/9 patients indicated that their OP medication-taking status might change at a later date. Conclusions Almost half of our older patients who had sustained a fracture found the decision to take OP medication a difficult one. In general, the decision was not considered permanent. Health care

  8. WNT16 influences bone mineral density, cortical bone thickness, bone strength, and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    Hou-Feng Zheng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify genetic variants associated with cortical bone thickness (CBT and bone mineral density (BMD by performing two separate genome-wide association study (GWAS meta-analyses for CBT in 3 cohorts comprising 5,878 European subjects and for BMD in 5 cohorts comprising 5,672 individuals. We then assessed selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for osteoporotic fracture in 2,023 cases and 3,740 controls. Association with CBT and forearm BMD was tested for ∼2.5 million SNPs in each cohort separately, and results were meta-analyzed using fixed effect meta-analysis. We identified a missense SNP (Thr>Ile; rs2707466 located in the WNT16 gene (7q31, associated with CBT (effect size of -0.11 standard deviations [SD] per C allele, P = 6.2 × 10(-9. This SNP, as well as another nonsynonymous SNP rs2908004 (Gly>Arg, also had genome-wide significant association with forearm BMD (-0.14 SD per C allele, P = 2.3 × 10(-12, and -0.16 SD per G allele, P = 1.2 × 10(-15, respectively. Four genome-wide significant SNPs arising from BMD meta-analysis were tested for association with forearm fracture. SNP rs7776725 in FAM3C, a gene adjacent to WNT16, was associated with a genome-wide significant increased risk of forearm fracture (OR = 1.33, P = 7.3 × 10(-9, with genome-wide suggestive signals from the two missense variants in WNT16 (rs2908004: OR = 1.22, P = 4.9 × 10(-6 and rs2707466: OR = 1.22, P = 7.2 × 10(-6. We next generated a homozygous mouse with targeted disruption of Wnt16. Female Wnt16(-/- mice had 27% (P<0.001 thinner cortical bones at the femur midshaft, and bone strength measures were reduced between 43%-61% (6.5 × 10(-13risk of fracture.

  9. Data Mining Activity for Bone Discipline: Calculating a Factor of Risk for Hip Fracture in Long-Duration Astronauts

    Ellman, R.; Sibonga, J. D.; Bouxsein, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    The factor-of-risk (Phi), defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength, is a biomechanical approach to hip fracture risk assessment that may be used to identify subjects who are at increased risk for fracture. The purpose of this project was to calculate the factor of risk in long duration astronauts after return from a mission on the International Space Station (ISS), which is typically 6 months in duration. The load applied to the hip was calculated for a sideways fall from standing height based on the individual height and weight of the astronauts. The soft tissue thickness overlying the greater trochanter was measured from the DXA whole body scans and used to estimate attenuation of the impact force provided by soft tissues overlying the hip. Femoral strength was estimated from femoral areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measurements by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which were performed between 5-32 days of landing. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expedition 1 to 18 were included in this study, where repeat flyers were treated as separate subjects. Male astronauts (n=20) had a significantly higher factor of risk for hip fracture Phi than females (n=5), with preflight values of 0.83+/-0.11 and 0.36+/-0.07, respectively, but there was no significant difference between preflight and postflight Phi (Figure 1). Femoral aBMD measurements were not found to be significantly different between men and women. Three men and no women exceeded the theoretical fracture threshold of Phi=1 immediately postflight, indicating that they would likely suffer a hip fracture if they were to experience a sideways fall with impact to the greater trochanter. These data suggest that male astronauts may be at greater risk for hip fracture than women following spaceflight, primarily due to relatively less soft tissue thickness and subsequently greater impact force.

  10. Risk factors for falls with severe fracture in elderly people living in a middle-income country: a case control study

    Bloch Katia V

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fracture after falling has been identified as an important problem in public health. Most studies of risk factors for fractures due to falls have been carried out in developed countries, although the size of the elderly population is increasing fast in middle income countries. The objective of this paper is to identify risk factors for fall related to severe fractures in those aged 60 or more in a middle-income country. Methods A case-control study was carried out in Rio de Janeiro-Brazil based general hospitals between 2002–2003. Two hundred-fifty hospitalised cases of fracture were matched with 250 community controls by sex, age group and living area. Data were collected for socio-demographic variables, health status and drugs used before the fall. A conditional logistic regression model was fitted to identify variables associated with the risk of fall related severe fracture. Results Low body mass index, cognitive impairment, stroke and lack of urine control were associated with increased risk of severe fall related fractures. Benzodiazepines and muscle relaxants were also related to an increased risk of severe fractures while moderate use of alcohol was associated with reduced risk. Conclusion Although the association between benzodiazepines and fractures due to fall has been consistently demonstrated for old people, this has not been the case for muscle relaxant drugs. The decision to prescribe muscle relaxants for elderly people should take into account the risk of severe fracture associated with these drugs.

  11. Biomechanical optimization of subject-specific implant positioning for femoral head resurfacing to reduce fracture risk.

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Appleyard, Richard; Theodore, Willy; Zheng, Keke; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    Peri-prosthetic femoral neck fracture after femoral head resurfacing can be either patient-related or surgical technique-related. The study aimed to develop a patient-specific finite element modelling technique that can reliably predict an optimal implant position and give minimal strain in the peri-prosthetic bone tissue, thereby reducing the risk of peri-prosthetic femoral neck fracture. The subject-specific finite element modelling was integrated with optimization techniques including design of experiments to best possibly position the implant for achieving minimal strain for femoral head resurfacing. Sample space was defined by varying the floating point to find the extremes at which the cylindrical reaming operation actually cuts into the femoral neck causing a notch during hip resurfacing surgery. The study showed that the location of the maximum strain, for all non-notching positions, was on the superior femoral neck, in the peri-prosthetic bone tissue. It demonstrated that varus positioning resulted in a higher strain, while valgus positioning reduced the strain, and further that neutral version had a lower strain. PMID:27098752

  12. Relationship of Weight, Height, and Body Mass Index with Fracture Risk at Different Sites in Postmenopausal Women: The Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW)

    Compston, Juliet E.; Flahive, Julie; David W.Hosmer; Watts, Nelson B; Siris, Ethel S.; Silverman, Stuart; Saag, Kenneth G; Roux, Christian; Rossini, Maurizio; Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Nieves, Jeri W.; Netelenbos, J Coen; March, Lyn; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Hooven, Frederick H.

    2014-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for fracture in postmenopausal women. Height and obesity have also been associated with increased fracture risk at some sites. We investigated the relationships of weight, BMI, and height with incident clinical fracture in a practice-based cohort of postmenopausal women participating in the Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW). Data were collected at baseline and 1, 2, and 3 years. For hip, spine, wrist, pelvis, ...

  13. Integrin beta3 Leu33Pro polymorphism and risk of hip fracture: 25 years follow-up of 9233 adults from the general population

    Tofteng, Charlotte L; Bach-Mortensen, Pernille; Bojesen, Stig E;

    2007-01-01

    integrin beta3 Leu33Pro polymorphism have a two-fold risk of hip fracture, mainly confined to postmenopausal women. Integrin beta3 Leu33Pro homozygosity could prove a useful marker for risk of future hip fracture and may contribute to pharmacogenetic variation in effects of integrin alphavbeta3 antagonists....

  14. Risk of hip, subtrochanteric, and femoral shaft fractures among mid and long term users of alendronate

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Eiken, Pia; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the skeletal safety and efficacy of long term (≥10 years) alendronate use in patients with osteoporosis. DESIGN: Open register based cohort study containing two nested case control studies. SETTING: Nationwide study of population of Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 61 990 men and...... fracture cases by sex, year of birth, and year of initiation of alendronate treatment. Conditional logistic regression models were fitted to calculate odds ratios with and without adjustment for comorbidity and comedications. Sensitivity analyses investigated subsequent treatment with other drugs for...... ratio (MPR, a proxy for compliance) >80%) compared with poor adherence (MPR <50%; odds ratio 0.88, 0.77 to 0.99; P=0.05). Multivariable adjustment attenuated this association (adjusted odds ratio 0.88, 0.77 to 1.01; P=0.08). The risk was no higher in long term users (≥10 dose years; 0.70, 0.44 to 1...

  15. Fall and Fracture Risk in Sarcopenia and Dynapenia With and Without Obesity: the Role of Lifestyle Interventions.

    Scott, David; Daly, Robin M; Sanders, Kerrie M; Ebeling, Peter R

    2015-08-01

    Due to their differing etiologies and consequences, it has been proposed that the term "sarcopenia" should revert to its original definition of age-related muscle mass declines, with a separate term, "dynapenia", describing muscle strength and function declines. There is increasing interest in the interactions of sarcopenia and dynapenia with obesity. Despite an apparent protective effect of obesity on fracture, increased adiposity may compromise bone health, and the presence of sarcopenia and/or dynapenia ("sarcopenic obesity" and "dynapenic obesity") may exacerbate the risk of falls and fracture in obese older adults. Weight loss interventions are likely to be beneficial for older adults with sarcopenic and dynapenic obesity but may result in further reductions in muscle and bone health. The addition of exercise including progressive resistance training and nutritional strategies, including protein and vitamin D supplementation, may optimise body composition and muscle function outcomes thereby reducing falls and fracture risk in this population. PMID:26040576

  16. The Water Risks of Hydraulic Fracturing (Fracking): Key Issues from the New California Assessment

    Gleick, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    A key component of the Water-Energy Nexus is the effort over the past decade or so to quantify the volumes and form of water required for the energy fuel cycle from extraction to generation to waste disposal. The vast majority of the effort in this area has focused on the water needs of electricity generation, but other fuel-cycle components also entail significant water demands and threats to water quality. Recent work for the State of California (managed by the California Council on Science and Technology - CCST) has produced a new state-of-the-art assessment of a range of potential water risks associated with hydraulic fracturing and related oil and gas extraction, including volumetric water demands, methods of disposal of produced water, and aquifer contamination. For example, this assessment produced new information on the disposal of produced water in surface percolation pits and the potential for contamination of local groundwater (see Figure). Understanding these risks raises questions about current production and future plans to expand production, as well as tools used by state and federal agencies to manage these risks. This talk will summarize the science behind the CCST assessment and related policy recommendations for both water and energy managers.

  17. Pelvic Insufficiency Fracture After Pelvic Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Analysis of Risk Factors

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Medical records and imaging studies, including bone scintigraphy, CT, and MRI of 557 patients with cervical cancer who received whole-pelvic RT between January 1998 and August 2005 were reviewed. Results: Eighty-three patients were diagnosed as having PIF after pelvic RT. The 5-year cumulative incidence of PIF was 19.7%. The most commonly involved site was the sacroiliac joint. Pelvic pain developed in 48 patients (57.8%) at diagnosis. Eleven patients (13.3%) needed admission or narcotics because of severe pain, and others had good relief of symptoms with conservative management. In univariate analysis, age ≥55 years (p < 0.001), anteroposterior/posteroanterior parallel opposing technique (p = 0.001), curative treatment (p < 0.001), and radiation dose ≥50.4 Gy (p = 0.005) were the predisposing factors for development of PIF. Concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.78) was not significant. Multivariate analysis showed that age ≥55 years (p < 0.001), body weight <55 kg (p = 0.02), curative treatment (p = 0.03), and radiation dose ≥50.4 Gy (p = 0.04) were significant predisposing factors for development of PIF. Conclusion: The development of PIF is not rare after pelvic RT. The use of multibeam arrangements to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture, especially in elderly women with low body weight

  18. Effects of Statins on Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk: A PRISMA-compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Wang, Zongze; Li, Ying; Zhou, Fengxin; Piao, Zhe; Hao, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Although observational studies have identified the protective effect of statins on bone health, the effects remain controversial in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We conducted a meta-analysis of RCTs to evaluate the effects of statins on bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk among adults.We searched electronic databases of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and conducted a bibliography review to identify articles published until May, 2015.Studies included in this meta-analysis should be randomized controlled trials conducted in adults, using statins in the intervention group. Information on changes in BMD or odds ratio, relative risk or hazard ratio (HR) for fracture risk with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) was provided.Two investigators independently reviewed the title or abstract, further reviewed the full-texts and extracted information on study characteristics and study outcomes. Net change estimates of BMD and pooled HR of fracture risk comparing the intervention group with the control group were estimated across trials using random-effects models.Of the relevant 334 citations, 7 trials (including 27,900 randomized participants in total) meeting the eligibility criteria were included. Of the 7 trials, 5 were conducted to assess the association of statins use with BMD change and 2 with fracture risk. Compared with the control group, statins use was associated with significant increase in BMD of 0.03 g/cm (95% CI: 0.006, 0.053; I = 99.2%; P consistent and robust.The effect of statins use on bone health among subpopulation could not be identified due to limited number of trials.These findings provide evidence that statins could be used to increase BMD other than decreasing fracture risk in participant with dyslipidemia. In addition, further trials with the primary outcome of bone health-related measurements in subpopulation are warranted to ensure the effect of statins use. PMID

  19. Use of Acid-Suppressive Drugs and Risk of Fracture: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies

    Eom, Chun-Sick; Park, Sang Min; Myung, Seung-Kwon; Yun, Jae Moon; Ahn, Jeong-Soo

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Previous studies have reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between the use of acid-suppressive drugs such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and fracture risk. We investigated this association using meta-analysis.

  20. Risk factors for insufficient perioperative oral nutrition after hip fracture surgery within a multi-modal rehabilitation programme

    Foss, Nicolai B; Jensen, Pia S; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    To examine oral nutritional intake in the perioperative phase in elderly hip fracture patients treated according to a well-defined multi-modal rehabilitation program, including unselected oral nutritional supplementation, and to identify independent risk factors for insufficient nutritional intake....

  1. Use of proton pump inhibitors and risk of hip/femur fracture: a population-based case-control study

    S. Pouwels (Sander); A. Lalmohamed (Arief); P. Souverein (Patrick); C. Cooper (Charles); B.J. Veldt (Bart); H.G.M. Leufkens (Hubert); A. de Boer (Anthonius); T.P. van Staa (Tjeerd); F. de Vries (Frank)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSummary: Previous studies evaluated the association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and subsequent fracture risk, but they showed ambiguous results. Therefore, the objective was to evaluate this association in a different study population. Our findings show that there is probably

  2. Excess risk of hip fractures attributable to the use of antidepressants in five European countries and the USA

    Prieto-Alhambra, D.; Petri, H.; Goldenberg, J. S B; Khong, T. P.; Klungel, O. H.; Robinson, N. J.; De Vries, F.

    2014-01-01

    The association between antidepressant use and hip fracture remains unclear. We conducted a systematic review to estimate Population Attributable Risks (PAR) for France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, and the USA. We report a heterogeneous prevalence of antidepressant use and related PARs, both lowest f

  3. Rib stress fractures among rowers: definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors and effectiveness of injury prevention strategies.

    McDonnell, Lisa K; Hume, Patria A; Nolte, Volker

    2011-11-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) can have serious effects on rowing training and performance and accordingly represent an important topic for sports medicine practitioners. Therefore, the aim of this review is to outline the definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors, injury management and injury prevention strategies for RSF in rowers. To this end, nine relevant books, 140 journal articles, the proceedings of five conferences and two unpublished presentations were reviewed after searches of electronic databases using the keywords 'rowing', 'rib', 'stress fracture', 'injury', 'mechanics' and 'kinetics'. The review showed that RSF is an incomplete fracture occurring from an imbalance between the rate of bone resorption and the rate of bone formation. RSF occurs in 8.1-16.4% of elite rowers, 2% of university rowers and 1% of junior elite rowers. Approximately 86% of rowing RSF cases with known locations occur in ribs four to eight, mostly along the anterolateral/lateral rib cage. Elite rowers are more likely to experience RSF than nonelite rowers. Injury occurrence is equal among sweep rowers and scullers, but the regional location of the injury differs. The mechanism of injury is multifactorial with numerous intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors contributing. Posterior-directed resultant forces arising from the forward directed force vector through the arms to the oar handle in combination with the force vector induced by the scapula retractors during mid-drive, or repetitive stress from the external obliques and rectus abdominis in the 'finish' position, may be responsible for RSF. Joint hypomobility, vertebral malalignment or low bone mineral density may be associated with RSF. Case studies have shown increased risk associated with amenorrhoea, low bone density or poor technique, in combination with increases in training volume. Training volume alone may have less effect on injury than other factors. Large differences in seat and handle

  4. Dental trauma. Combination injuries 2. The risk of pulp necrosis in permanent teeth with subluxation injuries and concomitant crown fractures

    Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Gerds, Thomas Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    .0001), enamel–dentin–pulp fracture (log-rank test: P hazard ratio: 21 (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.5–172.5), P = 0.005]. Teeth with mature root development: the risk of PN was increased in teeth with an enamel–dentin fracture [hazard...... ratio: 12.2 (95% CI: 5.0–29.8), P hazard ratio: 5.1 (95% CI: 1.2–21.4) P = 0.04] and in teeth with no response to EPT at the initial examination [hazard ratio: 8 (95% CI: 3.3–19.5), P

  5. Is Zolpidem Associated with Increased Risk of Fractures in the Elderly with Sleep Disorders? A Nationwide Case Cross-Over Study in Taiwan.

    Yih-Jing Tang

    Full Text Available We conducted a study using a case-crossover design to clarify the risk of acute effects of zolpidem and benzodiazepine on all-sites of fractures in the elderly.Case-crossover design.Elderly enrollees (n = 6010 in Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database with zolpidem or benzodiazepine use were analyzed for the risk of developing fractures.After adjusting for medications such as antipsychotics, antidepressants, and diuretics, or comorbidities such as hypertension, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and depression, neither zolpidem nor benzodiazepine was found to be associated with increased risk in all-sites fractures. Subjects without depression were found to have an increased risk of fractures. Diazepam is the only benzodiazepine with increased risk of fractures after adjusting for medications and comorbidities. Hip and spine were particular sites for increased fracture risk, but following adjustment for comorbidities, the associations were found to be insignificant.Neither zolpidem nor benzodiazepine was associated with increased risk of all-site fractures in this case cross-over study after adjusting for medications or comorbidities in elderly individuals with insomnia. Clinicians should balance the benefits and risks for prescribing zolpidem or benzodiazepine in the elderly accordingly.

  6. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  7. Estimation of return-to-sports-time for athletes with stress fracture – an approach combining risk level of fracture site with severity based on imaging

    Dobrindt Oliver

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to compare the return-to-sports-time (RTST following stress fractures on the basis of site and severity of injury. This retrospective study was set up at a single institution. Diagnosis was confirmed by an interdisciplinary adjudication panel and images were rated in a blinded-read setting. Methods 52 athletes (female, n = 30; male, n = 22; mean age, 22.8 years with stress fracture (SFX who had undergone at least one examination, either MRI or bone scintigraphy, were included. Magnetic resonance images (MRI and/or bone scintigraphy (BS of SFX were classified as either low- or high-grade SFX, according to existing grading systems. For MRI, high-grade SFX was defined as visibility of a fracture line or bone marrow edema in T1-, T2-weighted and short tau inversion recovery (STIR sequences, with low-grade SFX showing no fracture line and bone marrow edema only in STIR and/or T2-weighted sequences. In BS images, a mild and poorly defined focal tracer uptake represented a low-grade lesion, whereas an intense and sharply marginated uptake marked a high-grade SFX. In addition, all injuries were categorized by location as high- or low-risk stress fractures. RTST was obtained from the clinical records. All patients were treated according to a non-weight-bearing treatment plan and comprehensive follow-up data was complete until full recovery. Two-sided Wilcoxon’s rank sum test was used for group comparisons. Results High-risk SFX had a mean RTST of 132 days (d [IQR 64d – 132d] compared to 119d [IQR 50d – 110d] for low-risk sites (p = 0.19. RTST was significantly longer (p = 0.01 in high-grade lesions [mean, 143d; IQR 66d – 134d] than in low-grade [mean, 95d; IQR 42d – 94d]. Analysis of high-risk SFX showed no difference in RTST (p = 0.45 between high- and low-grade [mean, 131d; IQR 72d – 123d vs. mean, 135d; IQR 63d – 132d]. In contrast, the difference was significant for low-risk SFX

  8. Fracture risk and correlating factors of a pediatric population with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a nationwide matched study.

    Guo, Nai-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Ming-Tung; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Lin, Chii-Jeng

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of fracture and the difference between sexes from a nationwide database of fracture risk among children aged 4-17 years with or without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, ICD-9-CD codes 314). The Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID 2000) was used to analyze fracture characteristics of children from the National Health Insurance that covered 96.1% of the Taiwanese population (N=21.4 million). A total of 7200 ADHD children aged between 4 and 17 years whose diagnosis had been confirmed in at least three outpatient clinics between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2009 were included, and a cohort of 36 000 children without ADHD matched for age, sex, and urbanization was recruited for analysis. The incidence rate of fractures in ADHD children was 21.0 (95% confidence interval=19.4-22.7) per 1000 person-years, significantly (P<0.001) higher than 15.0 (95% confidence interval=14.4-15.6) in non-ADHDs. After adjusting by age, sex, urbanization level, and geographic region, the statistically significant (P<0.001) hazard ratios (HR) of fracture for ADHD children compared with non-ADHD children included 1.62 in girls and 1.38 in boys, 1.53 in the skull, neck, and trunk (ICD-9-CM 800-809), 1.28 in the upper extremity (ICD-9-CM 810-819), and 1.84 in the lower extremity (ICD-9-CM 820-829). The HR also (P<0.001) increased significantly in all age groups, including 1.35 in 4-6, 1.37 in 7-9, and 1.54 in 10-17 years. ADHD should be listed among risk factors of children's fractures in each sex, all age groups, and all body areas that the parents, teachers, caregivers of ADHD children, and pediatric orthopedists should be aware of. Besides, ADHD girls were more affected than ADHD boys, especially after 10 years of age, whereas the adjusted HR was the highest in the lower extremities. Nationwide analysis matched for age and sex showed that ADHD should be considered the risk factor of children's fracture, especially

  9. The risk of second hip fracture is decreased with compliant and persistent use of bisphosphonates

    Hansen, Louise; Vestergaard, Peter; Petersen, Karin Dam

    medical assumption that 50% of additional hip fractures may be prevented with compliant and persistent use of alendronate in five years following the initial fracture. RESULTS: In the no treatment arm, the average cost was EUR 16,233 and 0.32 hip fractures per woman, and in the alendronate treatment arm...... the average cost was EUR 13,395 and 0.17 hip fractures per woman. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) resulted in a cost saving of EUR 18,623 per prevented hip fracture. In the alendronate treatment arm, the average cost and effect was EUR 5,631 and 0.16 hip fractures per man. The no...

  10. Cluster analysis of bone microarchitecture from high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography demonstrates two separate phenotypes associated with high fracture risk in men and women.

    Edwards, M H; Robinson, D E; Ward, K A; Javaid, M K; Walker-Bone, K; Cooper, C; Dennison, E M

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare problem which is conventionally assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). New technologies such as high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) also predict fracture risk. HRpQCT measures a number of bone characteristics that may inform specific patterns of bone deficits. We used cluster analysis to define different bone phenotypes and their relationships to fracture prevalence and areal bone mineral density (BMD). 177 men and 159 women, in whom fracture history was determined by self-report and vertebral fracture assessment, underwent HRpQCT of the distal radius and femoral neck DXA. Five clusters were derived with two clusters associated with elevated fracture risk. "Cluster 1" contained 26 women (50.0% fractured) and 30 men (50.0% fractured) with a lower mean cortical thickness and cortical volumetric BMD, and in men only, a mean total and trabecular area more than the sex-specific cohort mean. "Cluster 2" contained 20 women (50.0% fractured) and 14 men (35.7% fractured) with a lower mean trabecular density and trabecular number than the sex-specific cohort mean. Logistic regression showed fracture rates in these clusters to be significantly higher than the lowest fracture risk cluster [5] (pfemoral neck areal BMD was significantly lower than cluster 5 in women in cluster 1 and 2 (p<0.001 for both), and in men, in cluster 2 (p<0.001) but not 1 (p=0.220). In conclusion, this study demonstrates two distinct high risk clusters in both men and women which may differ in etiology and response to treatment. As cluster 1 in men does not have low areal BMD, these men may not be identified as high risk by conventional DXA alone. PMID:27130873

  11. Scaling Analysis of Natural Fracture Systems in Support of Fluid Flow Modeling and Seismic Risk Assessment

    La Pointe, P. R.

    2001-12-01

    Many significant problems in rock engineering require consideration of fluid flow through natural fractures in rock or the mechanical response of a fractured rock mass. Accurate prediction of flow volumes, rates and mass transport through natural fracture systems, and their mechanical response, is critical for design and licensing of nuclear waste repositories, optimization of recovery from many petroleum reservoirs, and also in solution mining, groundwater resource development and protection, and hardrock civil engineering projects. Many of these projects require a large-scale, 3D numerical model for flow, transport or mechanical simulation or visualization. A fundamental problem in constructing these models is that fracture data from wells, boreholes, geophysical profiles or surface outcrops represents a small portion of the rock volume under consideration. Not only does the data represent a very small proportion of the reservoir or rock mass, it also represents fracturing in very restricted size scales. Thus scaling analysis is critical to accurately constructing a fracture model from the data. This paper describes, through two case examples, how scaling analysis techniques have been used to develop models of natural fracturing to support the design and licensing of a high level nuclear waste repository in Finland, and for optimization of a tertiary recovery project in an aging oil field in the US. A new technique for scaling fracture sizes is presented. Together, these two examples illustrate the importance of the scaling analyses, pitfalls in carrying out the analyses, and new methods to improve the 3D characterization of naturally fractured rock masses.

  12. A prospective cohort study on the absolute risks of venous thromboembolism and predictive value of screening asymptomatic relatives of patients with hereditary deficiencies of protein S, protein C or antithrombin.

    Mahmoodi, B.K.; Brouwer, J.L.P.; Kate, M.K. Ten; Lijfering, W.M.; Veeger, N.J.; Mulder, A.B.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.; Meer, J. van der

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Absolute risks of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in protein S-, protein C-, or antithrombin-deficient subjects are mainly based on retrospective data. Screening asymptomatic relatives of these patients is disputed, though studies addressing this issue have yet to be conducted. METHODS: We

  13. MRI and bone scintigraphy in operated high risk femoral neck fractures

    Fifteen patients who had been operated on for high risk femoral neck fractures with titanium screws were examined with 1.0 Tesla MRI and scintimetry at 1 and 6 weeks after operation. Radiological and clinical follow-up was performed up to two years after surgery. Three patients underwent a third 1.5 Tesla MRI examination. Six patients had normal radiographic findings. Early redisplacement (R) was found in 5/15 patients and non-union (NU) in 2/15 patients. Two patients developed late segmental collapse (LSC). Scintigraphy correlated well with normal radiographic findings, but seemed less reliable in detecting R, NU and LSC. MRI seemed reliable but revealed pathological changes in 2/6 patients with an uneventful recovery. Three of 5 patients with R had moderate to severe pathological findings on MRI. In 2 cases with NU moderate or severe pathologic changes were seen, and 2 patients with LSC had clear pathological MRI findings. We conclude that MRI seem to be the method of choice to detect osteonecrotic areas early, even with T, weighted images only, if performed more than 6 weeks after the operation. (orig.)

  14. Low Magnitude Mechanical Signals Reduce Risk-Factors for Fracture during 90-Day Bed Rest

    Muir, J. W.; Xia, Y.; Holquin, N.; Judex, S.; Qin, Y.; Evans, H.; Lang, T.; Rubin, C.

    2007-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight leads to multiple deleterious changes to the musculoskeletal system, where loss of bone density, an order of magnitude more severe than that which follows the menopause, combined with increased instability, conspire to elevate the risk of bone fracture due to falls on return to gravitational fields. Here, a ground-based analog for spaceflight is used to evaluate the efficacy of a low-magnitude mechanical intervention, VIBE (Vibrational Inhibition of Bone Erosion), as a potential countermeasure to preserve musculoskeletal integrity in the face of disuse. Twenty-six subjects consented to ninety days of six-degree head-down tilt bed-rest. 18 completed the 90d protocol, 8 of which received daily 10-minute exposure to 30 Hz, 0.3g VIBE, applied in the supine position using a vest elastically coupled to the vibrating platform. The shoulder harness induced a load of 60% of the subjects body weight. At baseline and 90d, Qualitative Ultrasound Scans (QUS) of the calcaneus and CT-scans of the hip and spine were performed to measure changes in bone density. Postural control (PC) was assessed through center of pressure (COP) recordings while subjects stood on a force platform for 4 minutes of quiet stance with eyes closed, and again with eyes opened. As compared to control bedrest subjects,

  15. Male Astronauts Have Greater Bone Loss and Risk of Hip Fracture Following Long Duration Spaceflights than Females

    Ellman, Rachel; Sibonga, Jean; Bouxsein, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews bone loss in males and compares it to female bone loss during long duration spaceflight. The study indicates that males suffer greater bone loss than females and have a greater risk of hip fracture. Two possible reason for the greater male bone loss are that the pre-menopausal females have the estrogen protection and the greater strength of men max out the exercise equipment that provide a limited resistance to 135 kg.

  16. Protective effects of dietary carotenoids on risk of hip fracture in men: the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    Dai, Zhaoli; Wang, Renwei; Ang, Li-Wei; Low, Yen-Ling; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic data suggest that carotenoids in vegetables and fruits may benefit bone health due to their antioxidant properties. The relationship between dietary total and specific carotenoids, as well as vegetables and fruits, and risk of hip fracture was examined among Chinese in Singapore. We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 men and women who were of ages 45–74 years between 1993 and 1998. At recruitment, subjects were inte...

  17. Inferior alveolar nerve injuries associated with mandibular fractures at risk: a two-center retrospective study

    P. Boffano; F. Roccia; C. Galessio; K. Karagozoglu; T. Forouzanfar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury in mandibular fractures. This study is based on two databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures in two departments—Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, V

  18. No effect of vitamin K1 intake on bone mineral density and fracture risk in perimenopausal women

    Rejnmark, L; Vestergaard, P; Charles, P; Hermann, A P; Brot, C; Eiken, P; Mosekilde, L

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vitamin K functions as a co-factor in the post-translational carboxylation of several bone proteins, including osteocalcin. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between vitamin K(1) intake and bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk in a perimenopausal...... vitamin K(1) intake between cases and controls. CONCLUSION: In a group of perimenopausal and early postmenopausal women, vitamin K(1) intake was not associated with effects on BMD or fracture risk.......INTRODUCTION: Vitamin K functions as a co-factor in the post-translational carboxylation of several bone proteins, including osteocalcin. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between vitamin K(1) intake and bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk in a perimenopausal...... Danish population. DESIGN: The study was performed within the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study (DOPS), including a population-based cohort of 2,016 perimenopausal women. During the study approximately 50% of the women received hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Associations between vitamin K(1...

  19. Pace bowlers in cricket with history of lumbar stress fracture have increased risk of lower limb muscle strains, particularly calf strains

    John Orchard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available John Orchard1, Patrick Farhart2, Alex Kountouris3, Trefor James3, Marc Portus31School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia; 2Punjab Kings XI team, Indian Premier League, India; 3Cricket Australia, Melbourne, AustraliaObjective: To assess whether a history of lumbar stress fracture in pace bowlers in cricket is a risk factor for lower limb muscle strains.Methods: This was a prospective cohort risk factor study, conducted using injury data from contracted first class pace bowlers in Australia during seasons 1998–1999 to 2008–2009 inclusive. There were 205 pace bowlers, 33 of whom suffered a lumbar stress fracture when playing first class cricket. Risk ratios ([RR] with 95% confidence intervals[CI] were calculated to compare the seasonal incidence of various injuries between bowlers with a prior history of lumbar stress fracture and those with no history of lumbar stress fracture.Results: Risk of calf strain was strongly associated with prior lumbar stress fracture injury history (RR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.4–7.1. Risks of both hamstring strain (RR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.03–2.1 and quadriceps strain (RR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1–3.5 were somewhat associated with history of lumbar stress fracture. Risk of groin strain was not associated with history of lumbar stress fracture (RR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4–1.1. Other injuries showed little association with prior lumbar stress fracture, although knee cartilage injuries were more likely in the non-stress fracture group.Conclusion: Bony hypertrophy associated with lumbar stress fracture healing may lead to subsequent lumbar nerve root impingement, making lower limb muscle strains more likely to occur. Confounders may be responsible for some of the findings. In particular, bowling speed is likely to be independently correlated with risk of lumbar stress fracture and risk of muscle strain. However, as the relationship between lumbar stress fracture history and calf strain was very strong, and that there is a

  20. Eosinophil count - absolute

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  1. Tobacco smoking and risk of hip fracture in men and women

    Høidrup, S; Prescott, E; Sørensen, T I;

    2000-01-01

    estimated by means of multiplicative Poisson regression models. RESULTS: During follow-up, 722 hip fractures were identified in women, and 447 in men. After adjustment for potential confounders, including body mass index, female current smokers had an RR of hip fracture of 1.36 (95% CI: 1.12-1.65) and male...... smokers 1.59 (95% CI: 1.04-2.43) relative to never smokers. In both sexes, the RR of hip fracture gradually increased by current and accumulated tobacco consumption. The RR were consistently higher in men than in women, but the test for interaction between sex and tobacco smoking was insignificant. After...

  2. Reducing exploration and appraisal risk in low permeability reservoirs using microseismic fracture mapping - part 2

    Cipolla, C.; Mack, M; Maxwell, S. [Schlumberger (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of conventional oil reservoirs and the increasing energy demand, there is a need for exploitation of low permeability and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. However, exploration and appraisal of those reservoirs require pilot programs to determine their economic viability. The aim of this paper is to present the use of hydraulic fracture monitoring (HFM) to determine the effectiveness of stimulation programs and completion approaches in a more efficient manner. Several case histories of the application of microseismic hydraulic fracture mapping are presented herein, notably for shale gas and tight gas sand applications, and ways to identify fracture complexity and obtain real time results are presented. It was shown that microseismic measurements combined with geological and 3D seismic data can provide important insights into stress regime and natural fracturing. This paper highlighted the benefits of the application of HFM for exploration and appraisal, which could be of significant help in evaluating low permeability reservoirs outside North America.

  3. Novel Computed Tomography-based Metric Reliably Estimates bone Strength, Offering Potentially Meaningful Enhancement in Clinical Fracture Risk Prediction

    S Imran A. Shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis with resultant fractures is a major global health problem with huge socio-economic implications for patients, families and healthcare services. Areal (2D bone mineral density (BMD assessment is commonly used for predicting such fracture risk, but is unreliable, estimating only about 50% of bone strength. By contrast, computed tomography (CT based techniques could provide improved metrics for estimating bone strength such as bone volume fraction (BVF; a 3D volumetric measure of mineralised bone, enabling cheap, safe and reliable strategies for clinical application, and to help divert resources to patients identified as most likely to benefit, meeting an unmet need. Here we describe a novel method for measuring BVF at clinical-CT like low-resolution (550µm voxel size. Femoral heads (n=8 were micro-CT scanned ex-vivo. Micro-CT data were downgraded in resolution from 30µm to 550µm voxel size and BVF calculated at high and low resolution. Experimental mechanical testing was applied to measure ex vivo bone strength of samples. BVF measures collected at high-resolution showed high correlation (correlation coefficient r2=0.95 with low-resolution data. Low-resolution BVF metrics showed high correlation (r2=0.96 with calculated sample strength. These results demonstrate that measuring BVF at low resolution is feasible, which also predicts bone strength. Measures of BVF should be useful for clinically estimating bone strength and fracture risk. The method needs to be validated using clinical CT scans.

  4. Effects of parathyroid hormone alone or in combination with antiresorptive therapy on bone mineral density and fracture risk--a meta-analysis

    Vestergaard, P; Jørgensen, Niklas R; Mosekilde, L;

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH) alone or in combination with antiresorptive therapy on changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk were studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomised placebo controlled trials were retrieved from the PubMed, Web of Science or Embase databases......, nausea and discomfort at the injection sites. Only limited data are currently available on fracture risk reduction with PTH plus antiresorptive therapies. CONCLUSION: Although the number of studies on non-vertebral fractures is limited, our pooled analysis revealed that PTH alone or in combination with...... antiresorptive drugs would appear to be able to reduce the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures and to increase spine and perhaps hip BMD. However, these analyses were based on cross-sectional data--i.e. based on indirect comparisons--and further studies with a direct comparison of study duration are...

  5. Evaluation of osteoporotic fractures in the group of woman over 50 years of age – Comparison of tools FRAX® BMD versus FRAX® BMI

    Cezary Strugała

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the project is to identify the risk of osteoporotic fractures in women aged over 50, the evaluation of FRAX® BMD and FRAX® BMI in women with and without osteoporotic fractures and the proposal of therapeutic starting points for treatment of osteoporosis. Material and Methods: A group of 1014 women aged 50-89, living in the Kujawsko-Pomorskie province, was investigated. The analysis was based on the WHO definition of osteoporosis. Calculations of 10-year absolute risk of major osteoporotic fractures (AR-10 MOF Fx and femoral neck fractures (AR-10 FN Fx were done using Polish 3.3 version of FRAX® tool. The analysis of fracture risk employed the logistic regression method. Results: A statistically significant relationship was found between the risk of osteoporotic fractures and age, femoral neck BMD, a history of previous osteoporotic fractures, estimated calcaneal BMD and vertebral column BMD. The differences between 10-year absolute risk of major osteoporotic fractures BMD and BMI was small, which means that FRAX® BMI might be a useful tool for GPs and occupational medicine specialists. Conclusions: A high usefulness of the FRAX® BMI tool for evaluating the risk of major osteoporotic fractures provide a new possibility of identifying women at risk of such events. The mean value of 10-year absolute risk of major osteoporotic fractures for FRAX® BMD and BMI was identified as 10% and 12%, respectively and these values were proposed as therapeutic starting points for treatment of osteoporosis in women living in the Kujawsko-Pomorskie province. Med Pr 2013;64(3:327–333

  6. Methodology to predict long-term cancer survival from short-term data using Tobacco Cancer Risk and Absolute Cancer Cure models

    Three parametric statistical models have been fully validated for cancer of the larynx for the prediction of long-term 15, 20 and 25 year cancer-specific survival fractions when short-term follow-up data was available for just 1-2 years after the end of treatment of the last patient. In all groups of cases the treatment period was only 5 years. Three disease stage groups were studied, T1N0, T2N0 and T3N0. The models are the Standard Lognormal (SLN) first proposed by Boag (1949 J. R. Stat. Soc. Series B 11 15-53) but only ever fully validated for cancer of the cervix, Mould and Boag (1975 Br. J. Cancer 32 529-50), and two new models which have been termed Tobacco Cancer Risk (TCR) and Absolute Cancer Cure (ACC). In each, the frequency distribution of survival times of defined groups of cancer deaths is lognormally distributed: larynx only (SLN), larynx and lung (TCR) and all cancers (ACC). All models each have three unknown parameters but it was possible to estimate a value for the lognormal parameter S a priori. By reduction to two unknown parameters the model stability has been improved. The material used to validate the methodology consisted of case histories of 965 patients, all treated during the period 1944-1968 by Dr Manuel Lederman of the Royal Marsden Hospital, London, with follow-up to 1988. This provided a follow-up range of 20- 44 years and enabled predicted long-term survival fractions to be compared with the actual survival fractions, calculated by the Kaplan and Meier (1958 J. Am. Stat. Assoc. 53 457-82) method. The TCR and ACC models are better than the SLN model and for a maximum short-term follow-up of 6 years, the 20 and 25 year survival fractions could be predicted. Therefore the numbers of follow-up years saved are respectively 14 years and 19 years. Clinical trial results using the TCR and ACC models can thus be analysed much earlier than currently possible. Absolute cure from cancer was also studied, using not only the prediction models which

  7. Is there an increased risk of hip fracture in multiple sclerosis? Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    Bhattacharya RK

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rajib K Bhattacharya, Niralee Vaishnav, Richard M Dubinsky Departments of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Genetics and Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA Background: Impaired ambulation, frequent falls, and prolonged immobilization combined with the high rate of vitamin D deficiency in people with multiple sclerosis (MS could lead to an increased risk of hip fracture. Methods: A retrospective cohort analysis of 20 years of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (AHRQ.gov, a 20% stratified yearly sample of USA hospital admissions from the year 1988–2007, was performed. Based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision (ICD9 codes, admissions with a primary diagnosis of acute hip fracture (ICD9 code 226.xx and a secondary diagnosis of MS (ICD9 code 340 was identified. Indirect adjustment was used to compare the prevalence of MS in this population with that of the USA. Significance was set a priori at P<0.0001 due to the large number of records and multiple comparisons. Results: A total of 1,066,404 hip fracture admissions were identified and 0.25% had MS. Those with MS were younger, had lower mortality rates (0.25% for people with MS versus 2.97% for those without MS, P<0.0001 and lower rates of discharge to nursing home or rehabilitation (69.25% for people with MS versus 72.17% for those without MS, P<0.0001. When compared with the population prevalence, the predicted prevalence of MS among patients with hip fracture was 2.844 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.837–2.852 greater than expected when adjusted for age, 2.505 (95% CI 2.499–2.512 when adjusted for sex and age, and 2.175 (95% CI 2.168–2.182 when adjusted for race (white, black. Race was specified for only 65% of the sample. Conclusion: In this nationwide sample of 20 years of hospital admissions in the USA, the prevalence of MS in the population with hip fracture was greater than twice that predicted, and MS patients suffered an acute

  8. Digital x-ray radiogrammetry identifies women at risk of osteoporotic fracture: results from a prospective study

    Bach-Mortensen, Pernille; Hyldstrup, Lars; Appleyard, Merete; Hindsø, Klaus; Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    suffered a fracture. Odds ratios (ORs) per 1 standard deviation decline in DXR-BMD were statistically significant for fracture in the groups of wrist fractures, proximal humerus fractures, vertebral fractures, and other fractures as well as in the total fracture group. In the hip fracture group, the P...... value almost reached significance (0.052). The highest ORs (2.4) were found in the group with proximal humerus fractures and in the vertebral fracture group (2.0). In the wrist fracture and hip fracture groups, ORs were 1.7 and 1.4, respectively. The group with other fractures had an OR of 1.7, and the......Using digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) on hand radiographs from a large population-based study, 1,370 postmenopausal women were evaluated in a prospective fashion; fracture occurrence was compared with DXR measurements of historic radiographs. Further, the aim of the study was to evaluate factors...

  9. Risk of Pre-and Post-Operative Delirium and the Delirium Elderly At Risk (DEAR) Tool in Hip Fracture Patients

    Freter, Susan; Dunbar, Michael; Koller, Katalin; MacKnight, Chris; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Delirium is common after hip fracture. Previous work has shown that a simple delirium risk factor tool, the Delirium Elderly At Risk instrument (DEAR), has a high inter-rater reliability in this population. Little research has looked at the ability of risk factor screening tools to identify patients at high risk of pre-operative delirium. This study investigates the ability of the DEAR to identify patients at high risk of pre-operative delirium, as well as reporting its performance in a post-operative validation sample. Associations between delirium risk factors and pre-operative delirium are explored. Methods This prospective cohort study took place on an orthopedic in-patient service at a University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Patients aged 65 and older who were admitted for surgical repair of hip fracture (N = 283) were assessed pre-operatively for 5 delirium risk factors (cognitive impairment, sensory impairment, functional dependence, substance use, age) using the DEAR. Patients were assessed for delirium using the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Confusion Assessment Method pre-operatively and on post-operative days 1, 3 and 5. Characteristics of patients who developed delirium were compared with the characteristics of those who did not. Results Delirium was present in 58% (95% CI = 52–63%) of patients pre-operatively and 42% (95% CI = 36–48%) post-operatively. Individually, sensory impairment (χ2 = 21.7, p = .0001), functional dependence (χ2 = 24.1, p = .0001), cognitive impairment (χ2 = 55.5, p = .0001) and substance use (χ2 = 7.5, p = .007) were significantly associated with pre-operative delirium, as was wait-time for surgery (t = 3.1, p = .003) and length of stay (t = 2.8, p =.03). In multivariate modeling, the strongest association with pre-operative delirium was cognitive impairment. Conclusions The DEAR, a simple, delirium risk factor screening tool, can be used to identify hip fracture patients at risk of

  10. Trends in absolute and relative educational inequalities in four modifiable ischaemic heart disease risk factors: repeated cross-sectional surveys from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 1984–2008

    Ernstsen Linda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been an overall decrease in incident ischaemic heart disease (IHD, but the reduction in IHD risk factors has been greater among those with higher social position. Increased social inequalities in IHD mortality in Scandinavian countries is often referred to as the Scandinavian “public health puzzle”. The objective of this study was to examine trends in absolute and relative educational inequalities in four modifiable ischaemic heart disease risk factors (smoking, diabetes, hypertension and high total cholesterol over the last three decades among Norwegian middle-aged women and men. Methods Population-based, cross-sectional data from The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT: HUNT 1 (1984–1986, HUNT 2 (1995–1997 and HUNT 3 (2006–2008, women and men 40–59 years old. Educational inequalities were assessed using the Slope Index of Inequality (SII and The Relative Index of Inequality (RII. Results Smoking prevalence increased for all education groups among women and decreased in men. Relative and absolute educational inequalities in smoking widened in both genders, with significantly higher absolute inequalities among women than men in the two last surveys. Diabetes prevalence increased in all groups. Relative inequalities in diabetes were stable, while absolute inequalities increased both among women (p = 0.05 and among men (p = 0.01. Hypertension prevalence decreased in all groups. Relative inequalities in hypertension widened over time in both genders. However, absolute inequalities in hypertension decreased among women (p = 0.05 and were stable among men (p = 0.33. For high total cholesterol relative and absolute inequalities remained stable in both genders. Conclusion Widening absolute educational inequalities in smoking and diabetes over the last three decades gives rise to concern. The mechanisms behind these results are less clear, and future studies are needed to assess if educational