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Sample records for absolute fission yields

  1. Determination of fission cross-section and absolute fission yields using track-cum gamma-ray spectrometric technique

    The fission cross-section of 233Pa(2nth, f) using fission track technique has been determined for the first time using thermal neutron flux of the reactor APSARA. This is important from the point of view of advance heavy water reactor (AHWR), which is to be described. On the other hand, the yields of fission products in the fast neutron induced fission of minor actinides are important from the point accelerator driven sub critical system (ADSS). In view of that, absolute yields of fission products in the fast neutron induced fission of 238U, 237Np, 238,240Pu, 243Am and 244Cm have been determined using the fission track-cum gamma-ray spectrometric technique. The total number of fission occurring in the target was estimated by track technique, whereas the activities of the fission products have been determined using gamma-ray spectrometric technique. Detailed procedure and its importance are to be discussed. (author)

  2. Fission Mass Yield Studies

    Mass yields from fission induced by a span of neutron energies up to 18 MeV have been measured for Th232, U235 and U238 target nuclei. Particular attention has been given to the dependence of symmetric fission yields on energy. To study the effect of angular momentum, fission yields from the U236 compound nucleus formed by alpha-particle irradiations of Th232 were also studied over the same span of excitation energies. A standard set of Pd109, Ag111, Pd112 and Ag113 symmetric fission yields was generally measured for all irradiations. In addition, yields of Eu156, Cs136 and 2.3-d Cd115 were measured for some selected combinations of projectile, energy and target nucleus. Assays for Zr97 and sometimes also Ba139 served as fission monitors. Altogether 150 fission yields were measured for these combinations of target nucleus, projectile and incident energy. About one-third of these were checked by replicated irradiations. At highest energies for the U236 compound nucleus the symmetric fission yield from alpha-particle-induced fission is about 13% higher than for neutron-induced fission. Dips in symmetric fission yield were observed at the energy onset of third-chance fission for each target and projectile. Some indication of a small central peak in the mass distribution was observed in the yields from U236 compound nucleus fission, but not from the Th233 compound nucleus fission. Detailed mathematical methods have been developed to separate the effects of fissions preceding and following neutron emission. These methods were used to remove the effects of second- and third-chance fissions from the measured symmetric fission yields. These calculated yields for first-chance fission show no dips with energy. The calculations also show that perhaps half the difference between symmetric yields for alpha- particle-induced fission of Th232 and neutron-induced fission of U235 is attributable to angular momentum effects. Both calculated first-chance yields and measured yields

  3. Fission product yields

    Data are summed up necessary for determining the yields of individual fission products from different fissionable nuclides. Fractional independent yields, cumulative and isobaric yields are presented here for the thermal fission of 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu and for fast fission (approximately 1 MeV) of 235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu; these values are included into the 5th version of the YIELDS library, supplementing the BIBFP library. A comparison is made of experimental data and possible improvements of calculational methods are suggested. (author)

  4. Absolute calibration technique for spontaneous fission sources

    An absolute calibration technique for a spontaneously fissioning nuclide (which involves no arbitrary parameters) allows unique determination of the detector efficiency for that nuclide, hence of the fission source strength

  5. Status of fission yield measurements

    Fission yield measurement and yield compilation activities in the major laboratories of the world are reviewed. In addition to a general review of the effort of each laboratory, a brief summary of yield measurement activities by fissioning nuclide is presented. A new fast reactor fission yield measurement program being conducted in the US is described

  6. Measurements of periods, relative abundances and absolute yields of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission of {sup 237}Np

    Piksaikine, V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The experimental method for measurements of the delayed neutron yields and period is presented. The preliminary results of the total yield, relative abundances and periods are shown comparing with the previously reported values. (J.P.N.)

  7. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  8. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  9. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural material of the fission chamber, etc

  10. Fission product yields from 22 MeV neutron-induced fission of 235U

    The chain yields of 28 product nuclides were determined for the fission of 235U induced by 22 MeV neutrons for the first time. Absolute fission rate was monitored with a double-fission chamber. Fission product activities were measured by HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. Time of flight technique was used to measure the neutron spectrum in order to estimate fission events induced by break-up neutrons and scattering neutrons. A mass distribution curve was obtained and the dependence of fission yield on neutron energy is discussed

  11. Fission product yields from 19.1 MeV neutron induced fission of 238U

    36 chain yields were determined for the fission of 238U induced by 19.1 MeV neutrons for the first time. Absolute fission rate was monitored with a double-fission chamber. Fission product activities were measured by HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. Threshold detector method was used to measure the neutron spectrum in order to estimate the fission events induced by break-up neutrons and scattering neutrons. A mass distribution curve was obtained and the dependence of fission yield on neutron energy was discussed

  12. Status of fission yield data

    In this paper we summarize the current status of the recent US evaluation for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yields sets, and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized the recommended data will become part of Version VI of the US ENDF/B. Other major evaluations in progress that are included in a recently formed IAEA Coordinated Research Program are also summarized. In a second part we review two empirical models in use to estimate independent yields. Comparison of model estimates with measured data is presented, including a comparison with some recent data obtained from Lohengrin (Cf-249 T). 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Status of fission yield evaluations

    Very few yield compilations are also evaluations, and very few contain an extensive global library of measured data and extensive models for unmeasured data. The earlier U.K. evaluations and US evaluations were comparable up to the retirements of the primary evaluators. Only the effort in the US has been continued and expanded. The previous U.K. evaluations have been published. In this paper we summarize the current status of the US evaluation, philosophy, and various integral yield tests for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and/or for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yield sets and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized, the recommended data will become part of the next version of the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VI). The complete set of data, including the basic input of measured yields, will be issued as a sequel to the General Electric evaluation reports (better known by the authors' names: Rider - or earlier - Meek and Rider). 16 references

  14. Fission yields in the thermal neutron fission of plutonium-239

    Fission yields for 27 mass numbers were determined in the thermal neutron fission of 239Pu using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry and radiochemical method. The results obtained using gamma ray spectrometry and from the investigations on the fission yield of 99Mo using radiochemical method were reported earlier. These data along with fission yields for 19 mass numbers determined using radiochemical method formed a part of Ph.D. thesis. The data given here are a compilation of all the results and are presented considering the neutron temperature correction to 239Pu fission cross-section which is used for calculating the total number of fissions in these studies. A comparison is made of the resulting fission yield values with the latest experimentally determined values and those given in two recent compilations. (author)

  15. Fission Yields in the Iodine Region

    Independent yields of all iodine isotopes from l118 to I134 except I122 (short-lived), I127(stable) and I129(long-lived) resulting from irradiating natural uranium with 590-MeV and 19-GeV protons have been measured. In addition, cross-sections (mostly cumulative) of many xenon and tellurium isotopes have been obtained. In the experiments extensive use has been made of an electromagnetic isotope separator, constructed at CERN for nuclear reaction studies, by which the iodine (or tellurium) isotopes were separated from samples chemically isolated from the irradiated targets. In the study of xenon isotopes the uranium target was heated in a small oven connected to the separator via a cold trap to stop unwanted activities. After the separation, the activity of the samples was measured by counting methods. In certain cases (I118, I119, I120,I121, Xe118, Xe119, Xe120, Xe121) spectroscopic investigations were performed to provide information for the conversion of the counting data to absolute counting-rates needed for the determination of the fission yields. The experiments show a significant shift in the isotopic cross-section distribution when the 19-GeV results are compared with those obtained at the lower irradiation energy. The yields far out ai the neutron-deficient wing increase considerably whereas the other part of the distribution is depressed. A comparison with spallation data indicates that the neutron-deficient part of the distribution might result from the spallation of uranium. Spallation gives negligible yields in the iodine regional 590 MeV, but at 19 GeV these cross-sections a re expected to be much larger. The competition with spallation decreases the probability for fission, and consequently the yields of the fission products will decrease. (author)

  16. Present status of fission yield data

    Fission yield data of minor actinides are needed for transmutation of nuclear waste by an ADS system. The yield data, however, are not enough for the application. The present status of the yield data is presented in this report. (author)

  17. Systematics of Fission-Product Yields

    Empirical equations representing systematics of fission-product yields have been derived from experimental data. The systematics give some insight into nuclear-structure effects on yields, and the equations allow estimation of yields from fission of any nuclide with atomic number ZF = 90 thru 98, mass number AF = 230 thru 252, and precursor excitation energy (projectile kinetic plus binding energies) PE = 0 thru ∼200 MeV--the ranges of these quantities for the fissioning nuclei investigated. Calculations can be made with the computer program CYFP. Estimates of uncertainties in the yield estimates are given by equations, also in CYFP, and range from ∼ 15% for the highest yield values to several orders of magnitude for very small yield values. A summation method is used to calculate weighted average parameter values for fast-neutron (∼ fission spectrum) induced fission reactions

  18. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Fluorescence Yield

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P. Facal; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the absolute yield of fluorescence emission in atmospheric gases. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with a variety of beam particles and gases. Absolute calibration of the fluorescence yield to 5% level was achieved by comparison with two known light sources--the Cherenkov light emitted by the beam particles, and a calibrated nitrogen laser. The uncertainty of the energy scale of current Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays experiments will be significantly improved by the AIRFLY measurement.

  19. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement

  20. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Shields, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Arnold, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Blakeley, R. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hecht, A.A.; Heffern, L.E. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mader, D. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); O' Donnell, J.M.; Sierk, A.; White, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using {sup 229}Th and {sup 252}Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  1. Fine structure in the fission fragment yields

    Discussed are the most interesting experiments on the fine structure of fission product yields of U, Pu, Th, Cf, Es, Cm, Fr, Np isotopes. Modern comprehension of the fine structure nature in connection with other problems of fission dynamics is considered. It is noted, that the fine structure results from pairing correlations in a nucleus. The conclusion is drawn, that the available set of experimental data is not sufficient to elucidate the fine structure nature

  2. Fission Yields of Some Isotopes in the Fission of Th232 by Reactor Neutrons

    The fission yields of the longer-lived isotopes produced in the fission of Th232 are not very well known; existing data show rather large discrepancies and/or uncertainties. Since we feel that at least some of these discrepancies arise from difficulties in measuring the absolute activities of the fission products, we measured the fission yield of 10 selected isotopes whose decay schemes are well understood. The thorium foils were irradiated in a position at the edge of the core of the SAPHIR swimming pool reactor. Following irradiation, the thorium was dissolved after addition of appropriate carriers. The fission products of interest were determined by conventional radiochemical methods that had to be modified slightly to ensure good decontamination from the abundantly formed Pa233 . The chemical yields were determined by gravimetric methods. Counting was done preferentially on a γ-spectrometer that had been calibrated at 11 different energies by standards either obtained from the IAEA or prepared by 4πβ-counting. In the case of Sr90, Ru106 and Ce144 a β-proportional counter was used that had been calibrated for these isotopes. In addition to the sought elements, Mo99 was isolated from each foil to serve as an internal monitor for the number of fissions taking place. The experiment thus gave the ratio of the yield of the sought element to the yield of Mo99. This ratio ''R'' was obtained for Sr90, Ru103, Ru106, Ag111, Pd112, I131, Cs137, Ba140, Ba141, Ce141 and Ce144, Results indicate the existence of a third peak in the yield mass curve in the region of symmetric fission. Yields of fission products relative to the Mo99 yields are given, and the absolute yields calculated by assuming y Mo99 = 2.78%. This number was derived from the work of Iyer et al., and was obtained by normalizing the area under the yield mass curve to 200%. (author)

  3. Model Calculation of Fission Product Yields Data using GEF Code

    Fission yields data are classified with spontaneous fission data and neutron induced fission data. The fission product yields data at several energy points for the limited actinides are included in nuclear data libraries such as ENDF/B, JEFF and JENDL because production of those is based mainly on experimental results and it is very difficult to conduct experiments for all actinides and continuous energies. Therefore, in order to obtain fission yields data without experimental data, a theoretical fission model should be introduced to produce the yields data. GEneral Fission model (GEF) is developed to predict the properties for fissioning systems that have not been measured and that are not accessible to experiment. In this study, the fission yields data generated from GEF code are compared with the measured data and the recently available nuclear data libraries. The GEF code is very powerful tool to generate fission yields without measurements. Also, it can produce the distribution of fission product yields for continuous neutron energy while measured data are given only at several energies. The fission yields data of 235U have been tentatively generated with GEF code in this work. Comparing GEF results with measurements and recently released evaluated fission yields data, it is confirmed that GEF code can successfully predict the fission yields data. With its sophisticated model, GEF code is playing a significant role in nuclear industry

  4. Revision of the JENDL FP Fission Yield Data

    Katakura Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some fission yields data of JENDL FP Fission Yields Data File 2011 (JENDL/FPY-2011 revealed inadequacies when applied to delayed neutron related subjects. The sensitivity analyses of decay heat summation calculations also showed some problems. From these results the fission yields of JENDL/FPY-2011 have been revised. The present report describes the revision of the yield data by emphasizing the sensitivity analyses.

  5. Revision of the JENDL FP Fission Yield Data

    Katakura, Jun-ichi; Minato, Futoshi; Ohgama, Kazuya

    2016-03-01

    Some fission yields data of JENDL FP Fission Yields Data File 2011 (JENDL/FPY-2011) revealed inadequacies when applied to delayed neutron related subjects. The sensitivity analyses of decay heat summation calculations also showed some problems. From these results the fission yields of JENDL/FPY-2011 have been revised. The present report describes the revision of the yield data by emphasizing the sensitivity analyses.

  6. Absolute Quantum Yield Measurement of Powder Samples

    Moreno, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of fluorescence quantum yield has become an important tool in the search for new solutions in the development, evaluation, quality control and research of illumination, AV equipment, organic EL material, films, filters and fluorescent probes for bio-industry.

  7. Energy Dependence of Plutonium Fission-Product Yields

    A method is developed for interpolating between and/or extrapolating from two pre-neutron-emission first-chance mass-asymmetric fission-product yield curves. Measured 240Pu spontaneous fission and thermal-neutron-induced fission of 239Pu fission-product yields (FPY) are extrapolated to give predictions for the energy dependence of the n + 239Pu FPY for incident neutron energies from 0 to 16 MeV. After the inclusion of corrections associated with mass-symmetric fission, prompt-neutron emission, and multi-chance fission, model calculated FPY are compared to data and the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation. The ability of the model to reproduce the energy dependence of the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation suggests that plutonium fission mass distributions are not locked in near the fission barrier region, but are instead determined by the temperature and nuclear potential-energy surface at larger deformation.

  8. Energy Dependence of Plutonium Fission-Product Yields

    Lestone, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    A method is developed for interpolating between and/or extrapolating from two pre-neutron-emission first-chance mass-asymmetric fission-product yield curves. Measured 240Pu spontaneous fission and thermal-neutron-induced fission of 239Pu fission-product yields (FPY) are extrapolated to give predictions for the energy dependence of the n + 239Pu FPY for incident neutron energies from 0 to 16 MeV. After the inclusion of corrections associated with mass-symmetric fission, prompt-neutron emission, and multi-chance fission, model calculated FPY are compared to data and the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation. The ability of the model to reproduce the energy dependence of the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation suggests that plutonium fission mass distributions are not locked in near the fission barrier region, but are instead determined by the temperature and nuclear potential-energy surface at larger deformation.

  9. Fission yield covariance generation and uncertainty propagation through fission pulse decay heat calculation

    Highlights: • Fission yield data and uncertainty comparison between major nuclear data libraries. • Fission yield covariance generation through Bayesian technique. • Study of the effect of fission yield correlations on decay heat calculations. • Covariance information contribute to reduce fission pulse decay heat uncertainty. - Abstract: Fission product yields are fundamental parameters in burnup/activation calculations and the impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past. Evaluations of these uncertainties were released, still without covariance data. Therefore, the nuclear community expressed the need of full fission yield covariance matrices to be able to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. State-of-the-art fission yield data and methodologies for fission yield covariance generation were researched in this work. Covariance matrices were generated and compared to the original data stored in the library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235U. Calculations were carried out using different libraries and codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the libraries. The uncertainty quantification was performed first with Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the uncertainty of decay heat. Eventually, a sensitivity analysis of fission product yields to fission pulse decay heat was performed in order to provide a full set of the most sensitive nuclides for such a calculation

  10. Fission product yield distribution in the 12, 14, and 16 MeV bremsstrahlung-induced fission of 232Th

    The absolute cumulative yields of various fission products in the 12, 14, and 16 MeV bremsstrahlung-induced fission of 232Th were determined using a recoil catcher and an off-line γ -ray spectrometric technique using the ELBE electron linac of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf in Dresden, Germany. The mass chain yields were obtained from the absolute cumulative yields by correcting the charge distribution. The peak-to-valley ratio, average light mass (left angle AL right angle) and heavy mass (left angle AH right angle) values, and average number of neutrons (left angle n right angle exp) in the bremsstrahlung-induced fission of 232Th at different excitation energies were obtained from the mass chain yield data. The present study and existing literature data for the 232Th(γ, f) reaction are compared with similar data for the 238U(γ, f) reaction at various excitation energies, and surprisingly different behavior was found in the two fissioning systems. (orig.)

  11. Revisiting the even-odd staggering in fission fragment yields

    Caamano, M.; Rejmund, F.; Schmidt, K. -H.

    2009-01-01

    The even-odd staggering observed in the experimental fission-fragment nuclear-charge yields is investigated over a wide systematics of fission fragments measured at Lohengrin in direct kinematics and at GSI in inverse kinematics. The general increase of the even-odd staggering in the fission-fragment charge yields towards asymmetric charge splits is explained by the absorption of the unpaired nucleons by the heavy fragment. As a consequence, the well established trend of evenodd staggering in...

  12. The fission fragment yields at the photofission of actinide nuclei

    The fission fragment yields of isotopes 101Mo, 135I, 135mCs were measured at the photo-fission of actinide nuclei 232Th, 238U, 237Np. These fission fragments have some peculiarities in nuclear structure or in practical using. The measurements were performed on the microtron bremsstrahlung at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, at the electron energy 22 MeV. The activation method with an HPGe detector was used in these measurements of the yields

  13. Compilation and evaluation of fission yield nuclear data

    The task of this meeting was to review the progress made since the previous meeting on fission yield evaluation and to define the tasks for an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme in detail. Improvements have been noted in measured data, model calculations and the situation of fission yield evaluation. Tabs

  14. On the absolute value of the air-fluorescence yield

    Rosado Vélez, Jaime; Blanco Ramos, Francisco; Arqueros Martínez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The absolute value of the air-fluorescence yield is a key parameter for the energy reconstruction of extensive air showers registered by fluorescence telescopes. In previous publications, we reported a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the air-fluorescence generation that allowed the theoretical evaluation of this parameter. This simulation has been upgraded in the present work. As a result, we determined an updated absolute value of the fluorescence yield of 7.9 +/- 2.0 ph/MeV for the band ...

  15. Study of Relationship Between Neutron Energy and Fission Yields of 95Zr, 140Ba and 147Nd From 235U

    2001-01-01

    This work measures fission yields of 235U induced by neutrons with energy of thermal, 3.0, 5.0, 5.5, 8.0 and 14.8 MeV. The main purpose is to study the relationship between neutron energy and fission fields of 95Zr,140Ba and 147Nd from 235U by measuring the radioactivity of foil with direct gamma spectrometry. The fission yields induced by fast neutrons are get by fast-thermal-ratio method which based on yields from thermal neutrons, yields by thermal neutron are come from absolute measurement. Since fast-thermal-ratio method eliminates uncertainties of gamma intensity, gamma

  16. Determination of fission gas yields from isotope ratios

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a method of calculating the actual fission yield of Kr and Xe in nuclear fuel including the effect of neutron capture reactions and decay. The bases for this calculation are the cumulative yields (ref. 1) of Kr and Xe isotopes (or pairs of isotopes) which are unaffected by...... neutron capture reactions, and measured Kr and Xe isotope ratios. Also the burnup contribution from the different fissile heavy isotopes must be known in order to get accurate fission gas yields....

  17. FFTF (FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY) REACTOR CHARACTERIZATION PROGRAM ABSOLUTE FISSION RATE MEASUREMENTS

    FULLER JL; GILLIAM DM; GRUNDL JA; RAWLINS JA; DAUGHTRY JW

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  18. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) Reactor Characterization Program: Absolute Fission-rate Measurements

    Fuller, J.L.; Gilliam, D.M.; Grundl, J.A.; Rawlins, J.A.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  19. Some 235U reference fission product yield data evaluation

    To satisfy the requirement of application for reference fission product yield data, the data have been and will be continuously evaluated. Present work, in which the reference data for 20 product nuclides from 235U fission were evaluated, is a part of the whole work

  20. Absolute differential yield of parametric x-ray radiation

    The results of measurements of absolute differential yield of parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) in thin single crystal are presented for the first time. It has been established that the experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations according with kinematical theory. The influence of density effect on PXR properties is discussed. (author). 19 refs., 7 figs

  1. Relative fission product yield determination in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Koehl, Michael A.

    Fission product yield data sets are one of the most important and fundamental compilations of basic information in the nuclear industry. This data has a wide range of applications which include nuclear fuel burnup and nonproliferation safeguards. Relative fission yields constitute a major fraction of the reported yield data and reduce the number of required absolute measurements. Radiochemical separations of fission products reduce interferences, facilitate the measurement of low level radionuclides, and are instrumental in the analysis of low-yielding symmetrical fission products. It is especially useful in the measurement of the valley nuclides and those on the extreme wings of the mass yield curve, including lanthanides, where absolute yields have high errors. This overall project was conducted in three stages: characterization of the neutron flux in irradiation positions within the U.S. Geological Survey TRIGA Mark I Reactor (GSTR), determining the mass attenuation coefficients of precipitates used in radiochemical separations, and measuring the relative fission products in the GSTR. Using the Westcott convention, the Westcott flux, modified spectral index, neutron temperature, and gold-based cadmium ratios were determined for various sampling positions in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor. The differential neutron energy spectrum measurement was obtained using the computer iterative code SAND-II-SNL. The mass attenuation coefficients for molecular precipitates were determined through experiment and compared to results using the EGS5 Monte Carlo computer code. Difficulties associated with sufficient production of fission product isotopes in research reactors limits the ability to complete a direct, experimental assessment of mass attenuation coefficients for these isotopes. Experimental attenuation coefficients of radioisotopes produced through neutron activation agree well with the EGS5 calculated results. This suggests mass attenuation coefficients of molecular

  2. Compilation of fission product yields Vallecitos Nuclear Center

    This document is the ninth in a series of compilations of fission yield data made at Vallecitos Nuclear Center in which fission yield measurements reported in the open literature and calculated charge distributions have been utilized to produce a recommended set of yields for the known fission products. The original data with reference sources, as well as the recommended yields are presented in tabular form for the fissionable nuclides U-235, Pu-239, Pu-241, and U-233 at thermal neutron energies; for U-235, U-238, Pu-239, and Th-232 at fission spectrum energies; and U-235 and U-238 at 14 MeV. In addition, U-233, U-236, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Np-237 at fission spectrum energies; U-233, Pu-239, Th-232 at 14 MeV and Cf-252 spontaneous fission are similarly treated. For 1979 U234F, U237F, Pu249H, U234He, U236He, Pu238F, Am241F, Am243F, Np238F, and Cm242F yields were evaluated. In 1980, Th227T, Th229T, Pa231F, Am241T, Am241H, Am242Mt, Cm245T, Cf249T, Cf251T, and Es254T are also evaluated

  3. Evaluation and compilation of fission product yields 1993

    This document is the latest in a series of compilations of fission yield data. Fission yield measurements reported in the open literature and calculated charge distributions have been used to produce a recommended set of yields for the fission products. The original data with reference sources, and the recommended yields axe presented in tabular form. These include many nuclides which fission by neutrons at several energies. These energies include thermal energies (T), fission spectrum energies (F), 14 meV High Energy (H or HE), and spontaneous fission (S), in six sets of ten each. Set A includes U235T, U235F, U235HE, U238F, U238HE, Pu239T, Pu239F, Pu241T, U233T, Th232F. Set B includes U233F, U233HE, U236F, Pu239H, Pu240F, Pu241F, Pu242F, Th232H, Np237F, Cf252S. Set C includes U234F, U237F, Pu240H, U234HE, U236HE, Pu238F, Am241F, Am243F, Np238F, Cm242F. Set D includes Th227T, Th229T, Pa231F, Am241T, Am241H, Am242MT, Cm245T, Cf249T, Cf251T, Es254T. Set E includes Cf250S, Cm244S, Cm248S, Es253S, Fm254S, Fm255T, Fm256S, Np237H, U232T, U238S. Set F includes Cm243T, Cm246S, Cm243F, Cm244F, Cm246F, Cm248F, Pu242H, Np237T, Pu240T, and Pu242T to complete fission product yield evaluations for 60 fissioning systems in all. This report also serves as the primary documentation for the second evaluation of yields in ENDF/B-VI released in 1993

  4. Evaluation and compilation of fission product yields 1993

    England, T.R.; Rider, B.F.

    1995-12-31

    This document is the latest in a series of compilations of fission yield data. Fission yield measurements reported in the open literature and calculated charge distributions have been used to produce a recommended set of yields for the fission products. The original data with reference sources, and the recommended yields axe presented in tabular form. These include many nuclides which fission by neutrons at several energies. These energies include thermal energies (T), fission spectrum energies (F), 14 meV High Energy (H or HE), and spontaneous fission (S), in six sets of ten each. Set A includes U235T, U235F, U235HE, U238F, U238HE, Pu239T, Pu239F, Pu241T, U233T, Th232F. Set B includes U233F, U233HE, U236F, Pu239H, Pu240F, Pu241F, Pu242F, Th232H, Np237F, Cf252S. Set C includes U234F, U237F, Pu240H, U234HE, U236HE, Pu238F, Am241F, Am243F, Np238F, Cm242F. Set D includes Th227T, Th229T, Pa231F, Am241T, Am241H, Am242MT, Cm245T, Cf249T, Cf251T, Es254T. Set E includes Cf250S, Cm244S, Cm248S, Es253S, Fm254S, Fm255T, Fm256S, Np237H, U232T, U238S. Set F includes Cm243T, Cm246S, Cm243F, Cm244F, Cm246F, Cm248F, Pu242H, Np237T, Pu240T, and Pu242T to complete fission product yield evaluations for 60 fissioning systems in all. This report also serves as the primary documentation for the second evaluation of yields in ENDF/B-VI released in 1993.

  5. Covariance Matrix Evaluations for Independent Mass Fission Yields

    Terranova, N., E-mail: nicholas.terranova@unibo.it [Industrial Engineering Department (DIN), University of Bologna (Italy); Serot, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Sumini, M. [Industrial Engineering Department (DIN), University of Bologna (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Recent needs for more accurate fission product yields include covariance information to allow improved uncertainty estimations of the parameters used by design codes. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility to generate more reliable and complete uncertainty information on independent mass fission yields. Mass yields covariances are estimated through a convolution between the multi-Gaussian empirical model based on Brosa's fission modes, which describe the pre-neutron mass yields, and the average prompt neutron multiplicity curve. The covariance generation task has been approached using the Bayesian generalized least squared method through the CONRAD code. Preliminary results on mass yields variance-covariance matrix will be presented and discussed from physical grounds in the case of {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f) reactions.

  6. Measurement of Absolute Cross-Sections of Fission Induced by 156-MeV Protons, Using Mica as a Fission Fragment Detector

    The fission of elements of medium Z induced by 156-MeV protons is difficult to demonstrate, owing to the particularly small cross-section of the reaction. The detection of fission fragments by means of sheets of mica seemed to be a technique well suited to this type of experiment. In the sheets of synthetic mica that we used it was only the fission fragments that left microscopically identifiable traces. Moreover, these samples contain very few impurities likely to undergo fission, so practically no parasitic traces are observed. The targets consisted of metals of not less than 99.999% purity. We determined the absolute cross-sections.of fission induced by 156-MeV protons in the case of lanthanum (5 μb) and praseodymium (6 μb), and estimated those of cadmium, indium, tin and antimony (≤ 0.1 μb). The sheets of mica were placed on each side of the metal sheet. The kinetics of the reaction explain why more traces were found on the mica sheets placed on the from face. As thick targets were used to take account of self-absorption, we determined (in the case of uranium and gold) the ratio of yields between a thin target and a thick target, and then extrapolated our results to the other elements. We made checks by comparing the absolute cross-sections for fission (induced by 156-MeV protons) in uranium, bismuth, gold and tantalum, as obtained by this method, with those obtained by counters at this energy. The observed agreement was very good. (author)

  7. Fission Yields and Other Diagnostics for Nuclear Performance

    I summarize advances in our understanding of basic nuclear physics cross sections and decay properties that are needed to characterize the magnitude and energy-dependence of a neutron flux, and to determine the amount of fission burnup in plutonium fuel. The number of fissions that have occurred in a neutron environment can be deduced from measurements of the fission products created, providing that the fission product yields are known accurately. I describe how our understanding of plutonium fission product yields has improved in recent years through a meta-analysis of various measured data, and through identification of fission product yield incident-energy dependencies over the 0.2-2 MeV fast energy region. This led to the resolution of a previous discrepancy between the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories in their plutonium yield assessments in the fast energy region, although more experimental work is still needed to resolve discrepancies at 14 MeV. Work is also described that has improved our understanding of (n,2n) cross sections that are used as diagnostics of the high-energy neutron spectrum – both on plutonium and americium, and on the radiochemical detectors yttrium, iridium, and thulium. Finally, some observations are made on the importance of continuing to develop our Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF) database using physics insights from differential cross section and integral laboratory experiments and from nuclear theory advances

  8. Development of JENDL Decay and Fission Yield Data Libraries

    Katakura, J.

    2014-04-01

    Decay and fission yield data of fission products have been developed for decay heat calculations to constitute one of the special purpose files of JENDL (Japanese Nuclear Data Library). The decay data in the previous JENDL decay data file have been updated based on the data extracted from ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) and those by Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (TAGS) measurements reported recently. Fission yield data have also been updated in order to maintain consistency between the decay and yield data files. Decay heat calculations were performed using the updated decay and yield data, and the results were compared with measured decay heat data to demonstrate their applicability. The uncertainties of the calculated results were obtained by sensitivity analyses. The resulting JENDL calculations and their uncertainty were compared with those from the ENDF and JEFF evaluated files.

  9. Microscopic description of Cf-252 cold fission yields

    Mirea, M.; Delion, D. S.; Sandulescu, A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the cold fission of 252Cf within the two center shell model to compute the potential energy surface. The fission yields are estimated by using the semiclassical penetration approach. It turns out that the inner cold valley of the total potential energy is strongly connected with Z=50 magic number. The agreement with experimental values is very much improved only by considering mass and charge asymmetry degrees of freedom. Thus, indeed cold fission of 252Cf is a Sn-like radioact...

  10. Fission yields of molybdenum in the Oklo natural reactor

    The isotopic compositions of molybdenum in six uranium-rich samples from the Oklo Zone 9 natural reactor were accurately measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The samples were subjected to an ion exchange separation process that removed the isobaric elements zirconium and ruthenium, with high efficiency and a low blank. Molybdenum possesses seven isotopes of which 92,94,96Mo are unaffected by the fission process, enabling the raw data to be corrected for isotope fractionation by normalising to 92Mo/96Mo, and to use 94Mo to correct for the primordial component in each of the fission-produced isotopes. This enables the relative fission yields of Mo to be calculated from the isotopic composition measurements, to give cumulative fission yields of 1:0.941:0.936:1.025 for 95,97,98,100Mo, respectively. These data demonstrate that the most important nuclear process involved in reactor Zone 9 was the thermal neutron fission of 235U. The consistency of the relative cumulative fission yields of all six samples from different locations in the reactor, implies that Mo is a mobile element in the uraninite comprising Zone 9, and that a significant fraction of molybdenum was mobilized within the reactor zone and probably escaped from Zone 9, a conclusion in agreement with earlier published work. (author)

  11. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal

  12. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Gooden, M.E., E-mail: megooden@tunl.duke.edu [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Kelley, J.H. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Tornow, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Arnold, C.W.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Moody, W.A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Becker, J.A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  13. A Covariance Generation Methodology for Fission Product Yields

    Terranova N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent safety and economical concerns for modern nuclear reactor applications have fed an outstanding interest in basic nuclear data evaluation improvement and completion. It has been immediately clear that the accuracy of our predictive simulation models was strongly affected by our knowledge on input data. Therefore strong efforts have been made to improve nuclear data and to generate complete and reliable uncertainty information able to yield proper uncertainty propagation on integral reactor parameters. Since in modern nuclear data banks (such as JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/BVII.1 no correlations for fission yields are given, in the present work we propose a covariance generation methodology for fission product yields. The main goal is to reproduce the existing European library and to add covariance information to allow proper uncertainty propagation in depletion and decay heat calculations. To do so, we adopted the Generalized Least Square Method (GLSM implemented in CONRAD (COde for Nuclear Reaction Analysis and Data assimilation, developed at CEA-Cadarache. Theoretical values employed in the Bayesian parameter adjustment are delivered thanks to a convolution of different models, representing several quantities in fission yield calculations: the Brosa fission modes for pre-neutron mass distribution, a simplified Gaussian model for prompt neutron emission probability, theWahl systematics for charge distribution and the Madland-England model for the isomeric ratio. Some results will be presented for the thermal fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

  14. A Covariance Generation Methodology for Fission Product Yields

    Terranova, N.; Serot, O.; Archier, P.; Vallet, V.; De Saint Jean, C.; Sumini, M.

    2016-03-01

    Recent safety and economical concerns for modern nuclear reactor applications have fed an outstanding interest in basic nuclear data evaluation improvement and completion. It has been immediately clear that the accuracy of our predictive simulation models was strongly affected by our knowledge on input data. Therefore strong efforts have been made to improve nuclear data and to generate complete and reliable uncertainty information able to yield proper uncertainty propagation on integral reactor parameters. Since in modern nuclear data banks (such as JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/BVII.1) no correlations for fission yields are given, in the present work we propose a covariance generation methodology for fission product yields. The main goal is to reproduce the existing European library and to add covariance information to allow proper uncertainty propagation in depletion and decay heat calculations. To do so, we adopted the Generalized Least Square Method (GLSM) implemented in CONRAD (COde for Nuclear Reaction Analysis and Data assimilation), developed at CEA-Cadarache. Theoretical values employed in the Bayesian parameter adjustment are delivered thanks to a convolution of different models, representing several quantities in fission yield calculations: the Brosa fission modes for pre-neutron mass distribution, a simplified Gaussian model for prompt neutron emission probability, theWahl systematics for charge distribution and the Madland-England model for the isomeric ratio. Some results will be presented for the thermal fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

  15. Construction of covariance matrix for absolute fission yield data measurement

    The purpose is to provide a tool for experimenters and evaluators to conveniently construct the covariance based on the information of the experiment. The method used is so called as parameter analysis one. The basic method and formula are given in the first section, a practical program is introduced in the second section, and finally, some examples are given in the third section

  16. Reducing uncertainties for short lived cumulative fission product yields

    Uncertainties associated with short lived (halflives less than 1 day) fission product yields listed in databases such as the National Nuclear Data Center's ENDF/B-VII are large enough for certain isotopes to provide an opportunity for new precision measurements to offer significant uncertainty reductions. A series of experiments has begun where small samples of 235U are irradiated with a pulsed, fission neutron spectrum at the Nevada National Security Site and placed between two broad-energy germanium detectors. The amount of various isotopes present immediately following the irradiation can be determined given the total counts and the calibrated properties of the detector system. The uncertainty on the fission yields for multiple isotopes has been reduced by nearly an order of magnitude. (author)

  17. Comparison of Fission Product Yields and Their Impact

    S. Harrison

    2006-02-01

    This memorandum describes the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Space Nuclear Power Program (SNPP) interest in determining the expected fission product yields from a Prometheus-type reactor and assessing the impact of these species on materials found in the fuel element and balance of plant. Theoretical yield calculations using ORIGEN-S and RACER computer models are included in graphical and tabular form in Attachment, with focus on the desired fast neutron spectrum data. The known fission product interaction concerns are the corrosive attack of iron- and nickel-based alloys by volatile fission products, such as cesium, tellurium, and iodine, and the radiological transmutation of krypton-85 in the coolant to rubidium-85, a potentially corrosive agent to the coolant system metal piping.

  18. Investigation of the fission yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of 233U

    As a stars, a survey of the different methods of investigations of the fission product yields and the experimental data status have been studied, showing advantages and shortcomings for the different approaches. An overview of the existing models for the fission product distributions has been as well intended. The main part of this thesis was the measurement of the independent yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of233U, never investigated before this work. The experiment has been carried out using the mass separator OSIRIS (Isotope Separator On-Line). Its integrated ion-source and its specific properties required an analysis of the delay-parameter and ionisation efficiency for each chemical species. On the other hand, this technique allows measurement of independent yields and cumulative yields for elements from Cu to Ba, covering most of the fission yield distribution. Thus, we measured about 180 independent yields from Zn (Z=30) to Sr (Z=38) in the mass range A=74-99 and from Pd (Z=46) to Ba (Z=56) in the mass range A=113-147, including many isomeric states. An additional experiment using direct γ-spectroscopy of aggregates of fission products was used to determine more than 50 cumulative yields of element with half-life from 15 min to a several days. All experimental data have been compared to estimates from a semi-empirical model, to calculated values and to evaluated values from the European library JEF 2.2. Furthermore, a study of both thermal and fast neutron-induced fission of 233U measured at Studsvik, the comparison of the OSIRIS and LOHENGRIN facilities and the trends in new data for the Reactors Physics have been discussed. (author)

  19. ENDF/B-6 fission-product yield sublibraries

    The contents and the documentation of the ENDF/B-6 fission-product yield sublibraries which were released in 1991 and updated in 1993, are summarized. Copies of the data libraries are available on magnetic tape of PC diskettes from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, costfree upon request. (author). 1 tab

  20. Isotopic yield in alpha accompanied ternary fission of 252Cf

    The cold ternary fission of 252Cf with 4He as light charged particle (LCP) is studied with fragments in the equatorial and collinear configuration, taking the interacting barrier as the sum of the Coulomb and proximity potential. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold valley plot and by calculating the yield for charge-minimized fragments. In both equatorial and collinear configurations, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combination 116Pd + 4He + 132Sn, which possess doubly magic nuclei 132Sn(N = 82, Z = 50). The presence of doubly or near doubly magic nuclei (132Sn, 130Sn etc.) and higher Q value plays an important role in the alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of 252Cf. The comparison of the relative yield for equatorial configuration with that of collinear configuration, points to the fact that equatorial configuration is the preferred configuration for the LCP (4He) accompanied ternary fission in 252Cf isotope. The yields obtained for the alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of 252Cf in equatorial and collinear configuration are compared with the experimental data. The emission probability of long range alpha (LRA) particle from 252Cf isotope is predicted using our formalism and is found to be in agreement with experimental value. (author)

  1. Absolute fission rate measurement of 238U induced by 14 MeV neutrons penetrated composite material

    In order to prove the model calculation method and parameter, the 238U absolute fission rate in the case of 14 MeV neutrons penetrating through the special composite material was measured by minitype slab uranium fission chambers. The measuring spots are distributed in the surface of iron ball hull along the different position of equator. The calculated results are compared with the experiment results. The total error of measured 238U absolute fission rate is 6.1%. (author)

  2. Fission fragment formation and fission yields in the model of octupole neutron-proton oscillations

    Yavshits S.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The fission fragment formation is considered as a result of neck instability in the process of octupole oscillations of neutrons and protons near the scission point. To describe such a phenomenon the potential surface of fissionning nucleus with neck radius about 1 fm was calculated with shell correction approach. The new version of smooth liquid drop part of deformation energy is proposed. The liquid drop part is formulated in a double folding model with n-n, p-p, and n-p Yukawa interaction potential. Fission fragment mass and charge distributions correspond approximately to isoscalar and isovector modes of vibrations and are defined by wave functions of oscillations. The preliminary calculation results have shown a rather good description of main integral fission yield observables.

  3. The SOFIA experiment: Measurement of 236U fission fragment yields in inverse kinematics

    Grente L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The SOFIA (Studies On FIssion with Aladin experiment aims at measuring fission-fragments isotopic yields with high accuracy using inverse kinematics at relativistic energies. This experimental technique allows to fully identify the fission fragments in nuclear charge and mass number, thus providing very accurate isotopic yields for low energy fission of a large variety of fissioning systems. This report focuses on the latest results obtained with this set-up concerning electromagnetic-induced fission of 236U.

  4. Measurement of mass and isotopic fission yields for heavy fission products with the LOHENGRIN mass spectrometer

    In spite of the huge amount of fission yield data available in different libraries, more accurate values are still needed for nuclear energy applications and to improve our understanding of the fission process. Thus measurements of fission yields were performed at the mass spectrometer Lohengrin at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. The mass separator Lohengrin is situated at the research reactor of the institute and permits the placement of an actinide layer in a high thermal neutron flux. It separates fragments according to their atomic mass, kinetic energy and ionic charge state by the action of magnetic and electric fields. Coupled to a high resolution ionization chamber the experiment was used to investigate the mass and isotopic yields of the light mass region. Almost all fission yields of isotopes from Th to Cf have been measured at Lohengrin with this method. To complete and improve the nuclear data libraries, these measurements have been extended in this work to the heavy mass region for the reactions 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f) and 241Pu(nth,f). For these higher masses an isotopic separation is no longer possible. So, a new method was undertaken with the reaction 239Pu(nth,f) to determine the isotopic yields by spectrometry. These experiments have allowed to reduce considerably the uncertainties. Moreover the ionic charge state and kinetic energy distributions were specifically studied and have shown, among others, nanosecond isomers for some masses. (author)

  5. Radiochemical measurement of 10-15 MeV proton induced fission yields for U-238

    The production of realistic nuclear forensics debris requires an accurate knowledge of cross sections and fission yields for large number of systems. Proton induced fission of U-238 was examined for incident energies in the range of 10-15 MeV. Fission yields were first measured directly from the irradiated materials. The valley and wing fission products were then isolated in various chemical fractions in order to increase the counting statistics leading to improvements in the fission yields. In addition to the total fission cross section and the fission mass yields for U-238, proton based reaction cross sections on U-238 and U-235 were also measured. (author)

  6. Microscopic description of Cf-252 cold fission yields

    Mirea, M; Sandulescu, A

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the cold fission of 252Cf within the two center shell model to compute the potential energy surface. The fission yields are estimated by using the semiclassical penetration approach. It turns out that the inner cold valley of the total potential energy is strongly connected with Z=50 magic number. The agreement with experimental values is very much improved only by considering mass and charge asymmetry degrees of freedom. Thus, indeed cold fission of 252Cf is a Sn-like radioactivity, related the other two "magic radioactivities", namely alpha-decay and heavy-cluster decay, called also Pb-like radioactivity. This calculation provides the necessary theoretical confidence to estimate the penetration cross section in producing superheavy nuclei, by using the inverse fusion process.

  7. SOFIA, a Next-Generation Facility for Fission Yields Measurements and Fission Study. First Results and Perspectives

    Audouin, L.; Pellereau, E.; Taieb, J.; Boutoux, G.; Béliera, G.; Chatillon, A.; Ebran, A.; Gorbinet, T.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Jurado, B.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Caamano, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Paradela, C.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J.-L.; Vargas, J.; Casarejos, E.; Heinz, A.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Nociforo, C.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rossi, D.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    Fission fragments play an important role in nuclear reactors evolution and safety. However, fragments yields are poorly known : data are essentially limited to mass yields from thermal neutron-induced fissions on a very few nuclei. SOFIA (Study On FIssion with Aladin) is an innovative experimental program on nuclear fission carried out at the GSI facility, which aims at providing isotopic yields on a broad range of fissioning systems. Relativistic secondary beams of actinides and pre-actinides are selected by the Fragment Separator (FRS) and their fission is triggered by electromagnetic interaction. The resulting excitation energy is comparable to the result of an interaction with a low-energy neutron, thus leading to useful data for reactor simulations. For the first time ever, both fission fragments are completely identified in charge and mass in a new recoil spectrometer, allowing for precise yields measurements. The yield of prompt neutrons can then be deduced, and the fission mechanism can be ascribed, providing new constraints for fission models. During the first experiment, all the technical challenges were matched : we have thus set new experimental standards in the measurements of relativistic heavy ions (time of flight, position, energy loss).This communication presents a first series of results obtained on the fission of 238U; many other fissioning systems have also been measured and are being analyzed presently. A second SOFIA experiment is planned in September 2014, and will be focused on the measurement of the fission of 236U, the analog of 235U+n.

  8. Fission Product Yields from Fission Spectrum n+239Pu for ENDF/B-VII.1

    We describe a new cumulated fission product yield (FPY) evaluation for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium that updates the ENDF/B-VI evaluation by England and Rider, for the forthcoming ENDF/B-VII.1 database release. We focus on FPs that are needed for high accuracy burnup assessments; that is, for inferring the number of fissions in a neutron environment. Los Alamos conducted an experiment in the 1970s in the Bigten fast critical assembly to determine fission product yields as part of the Interlaboratory Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration, and this has defined the Laboratory's fission standard to this day. Our evaluation includes use of the LANL-ILRR measurements (not previously available to evaluators) as well as other Laboratory FPY measurements published in the literature, especially the high-accuracy mass spectrometry data from Maeck and others. Because the measurement database for some of the FPs is small - especially for 99Mo - we use a meta-analysis that incorporates insights from other accurately-measured benchmark FP data, using R-value ratio measurements. The meta-analysis supports the FP measurements from the LANL-ILRR experiment. Differences between our new evaluations and ENDF/B-VI are small for some FPs (less than 1-2%-relative for 95Zr, 140Ba, 144Ce), but are larger for 99Mo (4%-relative) and 147Nd (5%-relative, at 1.5 MeV) respectively. We present evidence for an incident neutron energy dependence to the 147Nd fission product yield that accounts for observed differences in the FPY at a few-hundred keV average energy in fast reactors versus measurements made at higher average neutron energies in Los Alamos' fast critical assemblies. Accounting for such FPY neutron energy dependencies is important if one wants to reach a goal of determining the number of fissions to accuracies of 1-2%. An evaluation of the energy-dependence of fission product yields is given for all A values based on systematical trends in the measured data, with a focus on the

  9. Some Yields in the Thermal- and Epi-Cadmium-Neutron Fission of Pu239

    The yields of several nuclides in the thermal- and epi-cadmium-neutron fission of Pu239 have been measured and are reported. In epi-cadmium-neutron fission a decrease, relative to thermal fission, in the yields of Ag111 and Ag113, i.e. an increased peak-to-valley ratio, was found. The yield of As77 and As78, which represent, highly unsymmetrical fission, were found to be greater in epi-cadmium-neutron fission than in thermal fission. This result is' shown to be inconsistent with the simple two mode of fission hypothesis. (author)

  10. Absolute Energy Calibration of Solid-State Detectors for Fission Fragments and Heavy Ions

    Detailed measurements of the pulse-height response of silicon solid-state detectors to energetic heavy ions and fission fragments have been made. These studies have now led to a reliable method of absolute energy calibration of solid-state detectors for fission fragments, as well as to a better understanding of the somewhat peculiar response characteristics of the detectors to fission fragments and heavy ions. The use of silicon solid-state detectors in fragment kinetic energy measurements in recent years has been widespread; at the same time, questions have been raised about the detailed interpretation of such measurements because of the increasing evidence for anomalous behaviour in charge production, charge collection and charge multiplication in the case of densely ionizing particles. The present report discusses systematics and possible origins of these effects. Application of the absolute energy calibration method, which takes into account the mass and energy dependence of the response, is based simply on a Cf252 or U235 fragment pulse- height spectrum. Our studies were carried out with mono-energetic Br71, Br81 and I127 ions of energies from 30 to 120 MeV, and with fission fragments from spontaneous fission of Cf252 and neutron-induced fission of U235 and Pu239. It is shown that for a given fragment mass, over a wide energy range, the fragment energy versus pulse-height relationship is of the form E = ax + b, where E is the fragment energy and x is the measured pulse height. A dependence of pulse height on fragment mass has also been established, which leads to an energy versus pulse-height relationship, for the range of fission-fragment masses and energies, of the form E = (a + a'm)x + b + b'M, where M is the fragment mass. The effect of detector window and of detector type, resistivity and electric field have been studied. Guides to the selection of detectors and to their use with fission fragments are given. The effect of the more exact calibration

  11. NEANDC specialists meeting on yields and decay data of fission product nuclides

    Chrien, R.E.; Burrows, T.W. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 29 papers presented. Workshop reports on decay heat, fission yields, beta- and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and delayed neutrons are included. An appendix contains a survey of the most recent compilations and evaluations containing fission product yield, fission product decay data, and delayed neutron yield information. (WHK)

  12. NEANDC specialists meeting on yields and decay data of fission product nuclides

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 29 papers presented. Workshop reports on decay heat, fission yields, beta- and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and delayed neutrons are included. An appendix contains a survey of the most recent compilations and evaluations containing fission product yield, fission product decay data, and delayed neutron yield information

  13. Nuclear model calculation on neutron induced fission fragment mass yields of 238U

    The fission fragment mass yield is one of the most important characteristics of the fission process in both applications and basic nuclear physics. In nuclear energy applications, the configuration of fission products must be known because they are accumulated during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In theoretical physics, the ability to describe and predict fission yields is required for an effective nuclear fission model. Since the nuclear fission process is described by a great number of parameters, and the existing theoretical models fail to describe the fission process completely, the fission yields are amongst the most important consequences to benchmark the validity of fission models. In the present study, two different approaches to predict the neutron-induced fission fragment mass distribution of 238U has been applied. The first approach is temperature dependent Brosa model, and the other based on GEF model. The model-based predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental data

  14. Evaluation of independent and cumulative fission product yields with gamma spectrometry

    Fission product yields are critical data for a variety of nuclear science and engineering applications; however, independent yields have not been extensively measured to date. We have previously documented a methodology to measure the cumulative and independent fission product yields using gamma spectrometry and nuclide buildup and decay modeling, and numerical optimization. We have produced fission products by bombarding 235U with 14.1 MeV neutrons and made measurements of fission product yields. In this paper, we summarize our approach, describe initial experiments, and present preliminary results where we have determined nine fission product yields for long-lived nuclides. (author)

  15. A review of libraries of fission product yields

    Several libraries of fission product yields are in use internationally. This paper summarizes and compares Chinese, French, UK and US libraries. These, being in the same format, can be quite readily compared. The different methods and philosophies of evaluation are reviewed, especially as they affect the recommended uncertainties. Detailed comparisons of the libraries are presented, and some of the larger differences studied in depth. The effects of any discrepancies on decay heat calculations are discussed. It is also noted that differences in uncertainties in yield data lead to some differences in uncertainties in summation calculations. There is great advantage in maintaining at least two independent yield libraries, and it is hoped that the libraries described will be continually improved and updated. Suggestions for improvements in evaluation methods, and for collaboration at various pre-evaluation stages are made

  16. UKFY2: The UK fission product yield library version 2, 1991

    The UKFY2 Fission Product Yields Library contains 7 files with fission yield information in different formats and references, as received at the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in February 1991. File 2 contains the complete set of adjusted independent and cumulative yields in ENDF-6 format as adopted for the JEF-2 fission product yield file. It contains yields for 21 different fissioning nuclides. Many more chain yield and fractional yield sets are given in tabular form in other files of this library. The data are available costfree on magnetic tape from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  17. Fission Product Yields from Fission Spectrum n+ 239Pu for ENDF/B-VII.1

    Chadwick, M. B.; Kawano, T.; Barr, D. W.; Mac Innes, M. R.; Kahler, A. C.; Graves, T.; Selby, H.; Burns, C. J.; Inkret, W. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Lestone, J. P.; Sierk, A. J.; Talou, P.

    2010-12-01

    We describe a new cumulated fission product yield (FPY) evaluation for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium that updates the ENDF/B-VI evaluation by England and Rider, for the forthcoming ENDF/B-VII.1 database release. We focus on FPs that are needed for high accuracy burnup assessments; that is, for inferring the number of fissions in a neutron environment. Los Alamos conducted an experiment in the 1970s in the Bigten fast critical assembly to determine fission product yields as part of the Interlaboratory Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration, and this has defined the Laboratory's fission standard to this day. Our evaluation includes use of the LANL-ILRR measurements (not previously available to evaluators) as well as other Laboratory FPY measurements published in the literature, especially the high-accuracy mass spectrometry data from Maeck and others. Because the measurement database for some of the FPs is small — especially for 99Mo — we use a meta-analysis that incorporates insights from other accurately-measured benchmark FP data, using R-value ratio measurements. The meta-analysis supports the FP measurements from the LANL-ILRR experiment. Differences between our new evaluations and ENDF/B-VI are small for some FPs (less than 1-2%-relative for 95Zr, 140Ba, 144Ce), but are larger for 99Mo (4%-relative) and 147Nd (5%-relative, at 1.5 MeV) respectively. We present evidence for an incident neutron energy dependence to the 147Nd fission product yield that accounts for observed differences in the FPY at a few-hundred keV average energy in fast reactors versus measurements made at higher average neutron energies in Los Alamos' fast critical assemblies. Accounting for such FPY neutron energy dependencies is important if one wants to reach a goal of determining the number of fissions to accuracies of 1-2%. An evaluation of the energy-dependence of fission product yields is given for all A values based on systematical trends in the measured data, with a focus on

  18. Fission yield calculation using toy model based on Monte Carlo simulation

    Jubaidah, E-mail: jubaidah@student.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology. Jl. Ganesa No. 10 Bandung – West Java, Indonesia 40132 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science – State University of Medan. Jl. Willem Iskandar Pasar V Medan Estate – North Sumatera, Indonesia 20221 (Indonesia); Kurniadi, Rizal, E-mail: rijalk@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology. Jl. Ganesa No. 10 Bandung – West Java, Indonesia 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Toy model is a new approximation in predicting fission yield distribution. Toy model assumes nucleus as an elastic toy consist of marbles. The number of marbles represents the number of nucleons, A. This toy nucleus is able to imitate the real nucleus properties. In this research, the toy nucleons are only influenced by central force. A heavy toy nucleus induced by a toy nucleon will be split into two fragments. These two fission fragments are called fission yield. In this research, energy entanglement is neglected. Fission process in toy model is illustrated by two Gaussian curves intersecting each other. There are five Gaussian parameters used in this research. They are scission point of the two curves (R{sub c}), mean of left curve (μ{sub L}) and mean of right curve (μ{sub R}), deviation of left curve (σ{sub L}) and deviation of right curve (σ{sub R}). The fission yields distribution is analyses based on Monte Carlo simulation. The result shows that variation in σ or µ can significanly move the average frequency of asymmetry fission yields. This also varies the range of fission yields distribution probability. In addition, variation in iteration coefficient only change the frequency of fission yields. Monte Carlo simulation for fission yield calculation using toy model successfully indicates the same tendency with experiment results, where average of light fission yield is in the range of 90fission yield is in about 135

  19. Fission yield calculation using toy model based on Monte Carlo simulation

    Toy model is a new approximation in predicting fission yield distribution. Toy model assumes nucleus as an elastic toy consist of marbles. The number of marbles represents the number of nucleons, A. This toy nucleus is able to imitate the real nucleus properties. In this research, the toy nucleons are only influenced by central force. A heavy toy nucleus induced by a toy nucleon will be split into two fragments. These two fission fragments are called fission yield. In this research, energy entanglement is neglected. Fission process in toy model is illustrated by two Gaussian curves intersecting each other. There are five Gaussian parameters used in this research. They are scission point of the two curves (Rc), mean of left curve (μL) and mean of right curve (μR), deviation of left curve (σL) and deviation of right curve (σR). The fission yields distribution is analyses based on Monte Carlo simulation. The result shows that variation in σ or µ can significanly move the average frequency of asymmetry fission yields. This also varies the range of fission yields distribution probability. In addition, variation in iteration coefficient only change the frequency of fission yields. Monte Carlo simulation for fission yield calculation using toy model successfully indicates the same tendency with experiment results, where average of light fission yield is in the range of 90fission yield is in about 135

  20. Absolute measurement of $sup 235$U fission cross-section for 2200 m/sec neutrons

    Borcea, C.; Borza, A.; Buta, A.

    1973-12-31

    The results of an absolute fission cross-section measurement of /sup 235/ U are presented; the thermal neutrons were selected by the time-of-flight method. The principle of the method and the experimental apparatus are described. The method had the advantage of avoiding the use of an intermediate cross section in the neutron flux determination by choice of a B target thick enough to absorb all thermal neutrons. Target preparation, efficiency determination, corrections, etc., are reported. The value determined was 581.7 plus or minus 7.8 barns. (6 figures, 4 tables) (RWR)

  1. Final report on ARPA fission yield project work at Battelle-Northwest, April 1970--April 1973

    The overall objective has been to measure the independent and cumulative fission yields of selected halogen and rare gas nuclides for application to characterization of underground nuclear detonations. The studies have included fission yield measurements for thermal, fission spectrum, and 15 MeV neutron-induced fission events. Target materials included 235U, 238U and 239Pu. The research effort was divided into two basic parts. In one part, the nuclides of interest were separated radiochemically and determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. This approach provides information on the independent and cumulative yields of nuclides with half-lives of a few seconds or greater. The second part of our effort involved the use of on-line mass separation techniques. This approach yields information on independent fission yields of nuclides with half-lives ranging down to fractions of a second and provides data on all significant isotopes of a given fission product element in one set of measurements. The main effort in the radiochemistry program was centered on measurements of the cumulative fission yield of 89Kr. Cumulative fission yields of 89Kr were measured for thermal-neutron fission of 239Pu and for fission-spectrum and 15-MeV neutron fission of 235U, 238U and 239Pu. In addition, cumulative fission yields of the other rare gas radionuclides, /sup 85m/Kr, 87Kr, 88Kr, 137Xe, 138Xe, were measured for the same fission type events. Fractional independent yields of 89Rb and 138Cs were also measured for a limited number of fission systems. On-line mass spectrometer facilities were established at a Van de Graaff accelerator and at a nuclear reactor. Measurements were made of relative independent fission yields of rubidium isotopes of masses 89 through 97 and of cesium isotopes of masses 139 through 145.(U.S.)

  2. The absolute total delayed neutron yields, relative abundances and half-lives of delayed neutron groups in 6- and 8-group model format from neutron induced fission of 232Th, 233U, 236U, 239Pu, and 241Am in the energy range from 0.35 MeV (or threshold energy) to 5 MeV

    The latest evaluation of delayed neutron constants was made for main fuel nuclides (235U, 238U, 239Pu) within an working group under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA) Working Party on International Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC), Subgroup 6 (SG6) in 1999 [1]. As a result of this work the total delayed yields for the above nuclides were essentially corrected as compared with Tuttle’s recommended data set [2]. For the total delayed yields from 238U correction is +5.6%, for thermal induced fission of 239Pu - +3.4% and for fast neutron induced fission of 239Pu - +3.2%. This is a direct indication that there is a need for a continuing effort on delayed neutron data improving. From now, this will be mainly directed at satisfying new requirements emerging from the current trends in reactor technology, such as: the use of high burn-up fuel, the burning of plutonium stocks, the general growing interest in fuel recycling strategies, and new concept of actinide burners

  3. Evaluation of fission product yields from fission spectrum n+239Pu using a meta analysis of benchmark data

    Chadwick, Mark B.

    2009-10-01

    Los Alamos conducted a dual fission-chamber experiment in the 1970s in the Bigten critical assembly to determine fission product data in a fast (fission neutron spectrum) environment, and this defined the Laboratory's fission basis today. We describe how the data from this experiment are consistent with other benchmark fission product yield measurements for 95,97Zr, 140Ba, 143,144Ce, 137Cs from the NIST-led ILRR fission chamber experiments, and from Maeck's mass-spectrometry data. We perform a new evaluation of the fission product yields that is planned for ENDF/B-VII.1. Because the measurement database for some of the FPs is small—especially for 147Nd and 99Mo—we use a meta-analysis that incorporates insights from other accurately-measured benchmark FP data. The %-relative changes compared to ENDF/B-VI are small for some FPs (less than 1% for 95Zr, 140Ba, 144Ce), but are larger for 99Mo (3%) and 147Nd (5%). We suggest an incident neutron energy dependence to the 147Nd fission product yield that accounts for observed differences in the FPY at a few-hundred keV average energy in fast reactors versus measurements made at higher average energies.

  4. EDB-II validated, key fission product yields for fast reactor application

    Relative fission yields were measured for three different locations in the row 4 ''Test Region'' of the EBR-II reactor. Correlation of the relative fission yields to the measured average energy (anti E) and the measured 137Cs 238U/235U spectral indices have been made. The measured relative fission yields for selected fission products from 235U, 238U, 239Pu and 237Np have been compared with those values reported by the Interlaboratory Reaction Rate (ILRR) program, EBR-II fast reactor yields from destructive analysis and summation, and the March 1977 version of ENDF/B-V

  5. Absolute Fluorescence Spectrum and Yield Measurements for a wide range of experimental conditions

    Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Gorodetzky, P.; Moretto, C; Blaksley, C.; Dagoret-Campagne, D.; Gonnin, A.; Miyamoto, H.; Monard, H.; Wicek, F.

    2013-01-01

    For the JEM-EUSO Collaboration The fluorescence yield is a key ingredient in cosmic ray energy determination. It is sensitive to pressure, temperature and humidity. Up to now the fluorescence yield of the brightest line at 337 nm has been measured in an absolute way in one set of conditions, whereas fluorescence yields at the other wavelengths have been relatively measured for different conditions. Thus, absolute calibration for all the lines is unclear. We will do all measurements at once...

  6. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fission yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice

  7. Evolution of isotopic fission-fragment yields with excitation energy

    Two fission experiments have been performed at GANIL using 238U beams at different energies and light targets. Different fissioning systems were produced with excitation energies from 10 to 230 MeV and their decay by fission was investigated with GANIL spectrometers. Preliminary fission-fragment isotopic distributions have been obtained. The evolution with impinging energy of their properties, the neutron excess and the width of the neutron-number distributions, gives important insights into the dynamics of fusion-fission mechanism. (authors)

  8. Evolution of isotopic fission-fragment yields with excitation energy

    Bazin D.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Two fission experiments have been performed at GANIL using 238U beams at different energies and light targets. Different fissioning systems were produced with excitation energies from 10 to 230 MeV and their decay by fission was investigated with GANIL spectrometers. Preliminary fission-fragment isotopic distributions have been obtained. The evolution with impinging energy of their properties, the neutron excess and the width of the neutron-number distributions, gives important insights into the dynamics of fusion-fission mechanism.

  9. Measurement of fission products yields in the quasi-mono-energetic neutron-induced fission of 232Th

    Naik, H.; Mukherji, Sadhana; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Jagadeesan, K. C.; Thakare, S. V.; Sharma, S. C.

    2016-08-01

    The cumulative yields of various fission products in the 232Th(n, f) reaction at average neutron energies of 5.42, 7.75, 9.35 and 12.53 MeV have been determined by using an off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The neutron beam was produced from the 7Li(p, n) reaction by using the proton energies of 7.8, 12, 16 and 20 MeV. The mass chain yields were obtained from the cumulative fission yields by using the charge distribution correction of medium energy fission. The fine structure in the mass yield distribution was interpreted from the point of nuclear structure effect. On the other hand, the higher yield around mass number 133-134 and 143-144 as well as their complementary products were explained based on the standard I and standard II asymmetric mode of fission. From the mass yield data, the average value of light mass (), heavy mass (), the average number of neutrons () and the peak-to-valley (P / V) ratios at different neutron energies of present work and literature data were obtained in the 232Th(n, f) reaction. The different parameters of the mass yield distribution in the 232Th(n, f) reaction were compared with the similar data in the 232Th(γ, f) reaction at comparable excitation energy and a surprising difference was observed.

  10. Role of energy cost in the yield of cold ternary fission of 252Cf

    P V Kunhikrishnan; K P Santhosh

    2013-01-01

    The energy costs in the cold ternary fission of 252Cf for various light charged particle emission are calculated by includingWong's correction for Coulomb potential. Energy cost is found to be higher in cold fission than in normal fission. It is found that energy cost always increases with decrease in experimental yield in all the light charged particle emissions. The higher ground state deformation of the fragments, the odd–even effect and the enhanced yield in the octupole region observed in cold fission are found to be consistent with the concept of energy cost.

  11. Assessment of fission product yields data needs in nuclear reactor applications

    Studies on the build-up of fission products in fast reactors have been performed, with particular emphasis on the effects related to the physics of the nuclear fission process. Fission product yields, which are required for burn-up calculations, depend on the proton and neutron number of the target nucleus as well as on the incident neutron energy. Evaluated nuclear data on fission product yields are available for all relevant target nuclides in reactor applications. However, the description of their energy dependence in evaluated data is still rather rudimentary, which is due to the lack of experimental fast fission data and reliable physical models. Additionally, physics studies of evaluated JEFF-3.1.1 fission yields data have shown potential improvements, especially for various fast fission data sets of this evaluation. In recent years, important progress in the understanding of the fission process has been made, and advanced model codes are currently being developed. This paper deals with the semi-empirical approach to the description of the fission process, which is used in the GEF code being developed by K.-H. Schmidt and B. Jurado on behalf of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, and with results from the corresponding author's diploma thesis. An extended version of the GEF code, supporting the calculation of spectrum weighted fission product yields, has been developed. It has been applied to the calculation of fission product yields in the fission rate spectra of a MOX fuelled sodium-cooled fast reactor. Important results are compared to JEFF-3.1.1 data and discussed in this paper. (authors)

  12. Measurement of fission yields far from the center of isotopic distributions in the thermal neutron fission of 235U

    The main purpose of this work was to measure independent yields, in the thermal neutron fission of 235U, of fission products which lie far from the centers of the isotopic and isobaric yield distributions. These measurements were used to test the predictions of semi-empirical systematics of fission yields and theoretical fission models. Delay times were measured as a function of temperature in the range 1200-2000degC. The very low delay times achieved in the present work permitted expanding the measurable region to the isotopes 147,148Cs and 99Rb which are of special interest in the present work. The delay times of Sr and Ba isotopes achieved were more than two orders of magnitude lower than values reported in the literature and thus short-lived isotopes of these elements could be separated for the first time by mass spectrometry. The half-lives of 147Ba, 148Ba, 149La and 149Ce were measured for the first time. The isotopic distributions of fission yields were measured for the elements Rb, Sr, Cs and Ba in the thermal neutron fission of 235U, those of 99Rb, 147Cs and 148Cs having been measured for the first time. A comparison of the experimental yields with the predictions of the currently accepted semi-empirical systematics of fission yields, which is the odd-even effect systematics, shows that the systematics succeeds in accounting for the strong odd-even proton effect and the weaker odd-even neutron effect and also in predicting the shape of the distributions in the central region. It is shown that prompt neutron emission broadens the distribution only slightly in the wing of heavy isotopes and more significantly in the wing of light isotopes. But the effect of prompt neutron emission cannot explain the large discrepancies existing between the predictions of fission models and the experimentally measured fission yield in the wings of the isotopic distributions. (B.G.)

  13. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    Leeper R.J.; Bleuel D. L.; Frenje J.A.; Eckart M.J.; Hartouni E.; Kilkenny J.D.; Casey D.T.; Chandler G.A.; Cooper G.W.; Glebov V.Yu.; Hagmann C.; Johnson M. Gatu; Knauer J.P.; Knittel K.M.; Linden-Levy L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF.

  14. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    Leeper R.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF.

  15. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF. (authors)

  16. Independent isotopic yields in 25 MeV and 50 MeV proton-induced fission of natU

    Penttilä, H.; Gorelov, D.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Parkkonen, J.; Peräjärvi, K.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Saastamoinen, A.; Simutkin, V.; Sonoda, T.; Weber, C.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-04-01

    Independent isotopic yields for elements from Zn to La in the 25 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were determined with the JYFLTRAP facility. In addition, isotopic yields for Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Pd and Xe in the 50 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were measured. The deduced isotopic yield distributions are compared with a Rubchenya model, the GEF model with universal parameters and the semi-empirical Wahl model. Of these, the Rubchenya model gives the best overall agreement with the obtained data. Combining the isotopic yield data with mass yield data to obtain the absolute independent yields was attempted. The result depends on the mass yield distribution.

  17. Advanced model for the prediction of the neutron-rich fission product yields

    Rubchenya V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The consistent models for the description of the independent fission product formation cross sections in the spontaneous fission and in the neutron and proton induced fission at the energies up to 100 MeV is developed. This model is a combination of new version of the two-component exciton model and a time-dependent statistical model for fusion-fission process with inclusion of dynamical effects for accurate calculations of nucleon composition and excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus at the scission point. For each member of the compound nucleus ensemble at the scission point, the primary fission fragment characteristics: kinetic and excitation energies and their yields are calculated using the scission-point fission model with inclusion of the nuclear shell and pairing effects, and multimodal approach. The charge distribution of the primary fragment isobaric chains was considered as a result of the frozen quantal fluctuations of the isovector nuclear matter density at the scission point with the finite neck radius. Model parameters were obtained from the comparison of the predicted independent product fission yields with the experimental results and with the neutron-rich fission product data measured with a Penning trap at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä (JYFLTRAP.

  18. Revisiting the even-odd staggering in fission-fragment yields

    The even-odd staggering observed in the experimental fission-fragment nuclear-charge yields is investigated over a wide systematics of fission fragments measured at Lohengrin in direct kinematics and at GSI in inverse kinematics. The general increase of the even-odd staggering in the fission-fragment charge yields towards asymmetric charge splits is explained by the absorption of the unpaired nucleons by the heavy fragment. As a consequence, the well established trend of even-odd staggering in the fission fragment charge yields to decrease with the fissility is attributed in part to the asymmetry evolution of the charge distribution. This interpretation is strongly supported by the data measured at GSI, which cover the complete charge distribution and include precise yields at symmetry. They reveal that the even-odd effect around symmetry remains constant over a large range of fissility. (authors)

  19. The LANL C-NR counting room and fission product yields

    This PowerPoint presentation focused on the following areas: LANL C-NR counting room; Fission product yields; Los Alamos Neutron wheel experiments; Recent experiments ad NCERC; and Post-detonation nuclear forensics

  20. The LANL C-NR counting room and fission product yields

    Jackman, Kevin Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-21

    This PowerPoint presentation focused on the following areas: LANL C-NR counting room; Fission product yields; Los Alamos Neutron wheel experiments; Recent experiments ad NCERC; and Post-detonation nuclear forensics

  1. IAEA CRP on Fission Yield Data and activity of WG in Japanese Nuclear Data Committee

    The outline of the coordinate research program on fission yield data organized by International Atomic Energy Agency and the working group on the subject newly organized in Japanese Nuclear Data Committee are presented. (author)

  2. Neutron and fragment yields in proton-induced fission of 238U at intermediate energies

    The primary fission fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions, and neutron multiplicities as function of fragment mass have been measured in the proton-induced fission of 238U at energies Ep=20, 35, 50 and 60 MeV using time-of-flight technique. Pre-scission and post-scission neutron multiplicities have been extracted from double differential distributions. The fragment mass dependence of the post-scission neutron multiplicities reveals the gross nuclear shell structure effect even at the higher proton energies we measured. The yields of neutron-rich fission products in the fission of 238U by 25 MeV protons were measured using an ion guide-based isotope separator technique. The results indicate enhancement for superasymmetric mass division at intermediate excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus. The experimental results have been analysed in the framework of a time-dependent statistical model with inclusion of nuclear friction effects in the fission process

  3. Fission product yields measurement of 232Th induced by 14.8 MeV neutron

    The relative cumulative yields of 62 fission products were determined using γ-spectrum method for 232Th induced by 14.8 MeV neutron. Using chain yields summation 200% normalization method, 47 chain yields were given, and the data precision is better than 10%. (authors)

  4. The dependence of cumulative 238U(n,f) fission yield on incident-neutron energy

    ZHENG Na; ZHONG Chunlai; MA Liyong; CHEN Zhongjing; LI Xiangqing; LIU Tingjin; CHEN Jinxiang; FAN Tieshuan

    2009-01-01

    This work is aim at studying the dependence of fission yields on incident neutron energy,so as to produce evaluated yield sets of the energy dependence.Experimental data at different neutron energies for gas fission products 85m,87,88Kr and 138Xe resulting from the 238U(n,f) reaction are processed using codes AVERAGE for weighed average and ZOTT for simultaneous evaluation.Energy dependence of the cumulative fission product yields on the incident neutron is presented.The evaluated curve of product yield is compared with the results calculated by the TALYS-0.64 code.The present evaluation is consistent with other main libraries in error permission.The fit curve of 87,88Kr can be recommended to predict the unmeasured fission yields.Comparisons of the evaluated energy dependence curves with theoretical calculated results show that the predictions using purely theoretical model for the fission process are not sufficiently accurate and reliable for the calculations of the cumulative fission yields for the 238U(n,f).

  5. Theoretical and experimental studies of the neutron rich fission product yields at intermediate energies

    Äystö J.; Penttilä H.; Gorelov D.; Rubchenya V.A.

    2012-01-01

    A new method to measure the fission product independent yields employing the ion guide technique and a Penning trap as a precision mass filter, which allows an unambiguous identification of the nuclides is presented. The method was used to determine the independent yields in the proton-induced fission of 232Th and 238U at 25 MeV. The data were analyzed with the consistent model for description of the fission product formation cross section at the projectile energies up to 100 MeV. Pre-compoun...

  6. Influence of asymmetry and fissility on even-odd effect in fission-fragment yields

    Rejmund F.; Caamaño M.; Schmidt K.-H

    2010-01-01

    Based on a wide systematics of fragment distributions measured in thermal-neutron induced fission, the even-odd staggering in the fission-fragment element yields is investigated. The asymmetry evolution of the element yield distribution with the fissility of the fissioning nucleus is shown to be for an important part responsible for the decrease of the even-odd staggering with the fissility. The even-odd staggering close to symmetry is shown to be a small contribution to the global even-odd e...

  7. Determination of isobar composition and yields of 239Pu fission-products by thermal neutrons

    On the research nuclear reactor WWR-SM of INP Uz AS by means of mass-spectrometer the heavy fission-products of 239Pu nuclei induced by thermal neutrons are measured in ranges of mass Ai = 125 -157, kinetic energies Ek = 45 - 87 MeV and effective ionic charges z* = 18 - 30. 102 isobar nuclei in composition of the measured fission-products, also the partial yields of the each element giving the contribution to formation of a total yield of heavy fission-product with mass Ai are defined. (authors)

  8. Determination of short-lived fission product yields with gamma spectrometry

    The majority of fission yield measurements to date have examined cumulative yields of long-lived nuclides. We present a method for determining independent as well as cumulative fission yields using gamma spectrometry and a Bayesian inverse analysis. This paper outlines the impetus for new fission product yield measurements, the methodology developed to measure these and other nuclear parameters, and initial experimental results for long-lived nuclides and sensitivity analyses. In initial scoping measurements, the cumulative yield of 140Ba was estimated as 4.9966±0.3309 %, and the independent yield of 140La was estimated to be 0.0045±0.0022 %. These estimated values are commensurate with existing literature values. (author)

  9. Investigation of inconsistent ENDF/B-VII.1 independent and cumulative fission product yields with proposed revisions

    Pigni, Marco T [ORNL; Francis, Matthew W [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    A recent implementation of ENDF/B-VII. independent fission product yields and nuclear decay data identified inconsistencies in the data caused by the use of updated nuclear scheme in the decay sub-library that is not reflected in legacy fission product yield data. Recent changes in the decay data sub-library, particularly the delayed neutron branching fractions, result in calculated fission product concentrations that are incompatible with the cumulative fission yields in the library, and also with experimental measurements. A comprehensive set of independent fission product yields was generated for thermal and fission spectrum neutron induced fission for 235,238U and 239,241Pu in order to provide a preliminary assessment of the updated fission product yield data consistency. These updated independent fission product yields were utilized in the ORIGEN code to evaluate the calculated fission product inventories with experimentally measured inventories, with particular attention given to the noble gases. An important outcome of this work is the development of fission product yield covariance data necessary for fission product uncertainty quantification. The evaluation methodology combines a sequential Bayesian method to guarantee consistency between independent and cumulative yields along with the physical constraints on the independent yields. This work was motivated to improve the performance of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library in the case of stable and long-lived cumulative yields due to the inconsistency of ENDF/B-VII.1 fission p;roduct yield and decay data sub-libraries. The revised fission product yields and the new covariance data are proposed as a revision to the fission yield data currently in ENDF/B-VII.1.

  10. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  11. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  12. A novel method for the absolute fluorescence yield measurement by AIRFLY

    Ave, M

    2008-01-01

    One of the goals of the AIRFLY (AIR FLuorescence Yield) experiment is to measure the absolute fluorescence yield induced by electrons in air to better than 10% precision. We introduce a new technique for measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm line that has the advantage of reducing the systematic uncertainty due to the detector calibration. The principle is to compare the measured fluorescence yield to a well known process - the Cerenkov emission. Preliminary measurements taken in the BFT (Beam Test Facility) in Frascati, Italy with 350 MeV electrons are presented. Beam tests in the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator at the Argonne National Laboratory, USA with 14 MeV electrons have also shown that this technique can be applied at lower energies.

  13. Primary fragment mass-yield distributions for asymmetric fission path of heavy nuclei

    The primary fragment mass-yield distribution for the asymmetric fission path in heavy nuclei, 233Pa, 239Np, 245Am and 249Bk at the excitation energy of ∼20 MeV are experimentally constructed based on the intensities of total kinetic energies for individual mass splits. The results revealed an interesting phenomenon: in all the studied fissioning systems, the inner wings of the mass-yield distributions in the asymmetric fission path appear along the same mass-wall of A = 130 fragment mass. The asymmetric mass-yield distribution indicates the strong effect of structural shells in fragments on the final mass division process of the asymmetric fission path. (author)

  14. Compilation of data related to fission products. I - Chain total yields

    As the theoretical study of the formation and evolution of fission products in a pile fuel requires the knowledge of a large number of data (fission product characteristics, parameters related to fission mechanism), and in the frame of such a type a study which aimed at taking, non only fuel irradiation conditions and fuel composition, but also the evolution of these features in time into account, the authors have been leaded to perform a large compilation of data required by the calculation, and also to make a choice among the available data. This volume gathers data related to the total yields of fission product chains. The first part contains chain total yields from different documents. These data deal with various energies and concern the following products: 233U, 235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu. The second part proposes curves which, for 235U and 239Pu, give the total yields as a function of incident neutron energy

  15. The Criticality Calculation Of Fission Yield Of U-235 Solution And Its Radiation Dose

    The calculation assesment of fission yield of U-235 solution in the extraction and evaporation units has been performed for the prediction of that when the criticality accident occurs in the production of fuel element for the research reactor. The Grover Tuck and fission distribution probability methods are used in this case. The calculation result using the fission distribution probability methods show the fission of 2,7 x 1018 for the uranium concentration of 200 grams/litre and that of 2,5 x 1018 fissions for U of 40 grams/litre in the extraction unit. The calculation results from the evaporation unit revealed the fission of 3,1 x 1018 for 400 grams/litre uranium and 1,77 x 1018 fissions for 80 grams/litre uranium. Using the Grover Tuck calculation method give results that 8,267 x 1017 fissions and 2,878 x 1017 fissions respectively. Radiation dose of 200 gram/litre solution is about 1450,29 Rad for neutron and 4785,96 Rad for gamma ray

  16. Estimation of 239Pu independent and cumulative fission product yields from the chain yield data using a Bayesian technique

    The independent and cumulative fission product yields (FPYs) are obtained by using the Bayesian technique based on the evaluated mass chain yield, where required constraints such as the normalization can be straightforwardly included. We apply this technique to the 239Pu FPY data at neutron incident energies of 0.5, 2.0, and 14 MeV, where the most updated mass chain yield ENDF/B-VII.1 data are available. The obtained yield data are compared with the evaluated values by England and Rider in ENDF/B-VI, and differences from their values are investigated. We show that the modern decay data used, such as branching ratios to ground and metastable states, cause differences in the evaluated individual and cumulative fission yields. (author)

  17. The Effects of Nuclear Excitation of Prompt Fragments on the Independent Yields and Neutron Yields in Fission

    It has been found possible to account for the fine structure in the neutron yield versus mass distribution. The prediction is based on the assumption of a prompt independent curve obtained from the equal-charge-displacement (ECD) postulate and a linear dependence of fission-fragment excitation energy with mass. The method adopted for calculating neutron yields has been used to investigate the effect of neutron emission on independent yields. Independent yields after neutron emission have been calculated using ECD and a ''transition-state'' method to describe the prompt charge distribution. The calculated independent yields have been compared with some recent data. (author)

  18. Fission fragment formation and fission yields in the model of octupole neutron-proton oscillations

    Yavshits S.

    2010-01-01

    The fission fragment formation is considered as a result of neck instability in the process of octupole oscillations of neutrons and protons near the scission point. To describe such a phenomenon the potential surface of fissionning nucleus with neck radius about 1 fm was calculated with shell correction approach. The new version of smooth liquid drop part of deformation energy is proposed. The liquid drop part is formulated in a double folding model with n-n, p-p, and n-p Yukawa interac...

  19. Investigation of Inconsistent ENDF/B-VII.1 Independent and Cumulative Fission Product Yields with Proposed Revisions

    A recent implementation of ENDF/B-VII.1 independent fission product yields and nuclear decay data identified inconsistencies in the data caused by the use of updated nuclear schemes in the decay sub-library that are not reflected in legacy fission product yield data. Recent changes in the decay data sub-library, particularly the delayed neutron branching fractions, result in calculated fission product concentrations that do not agree with the cumulative fission yields in the library as well as with experimental measurements. To address these issues, a comprehensive set of independent fission product yields was generated for thermal and fission spectrum neutron-induced fission for 235,238U and 239,241Pu in order to provide a preliminary assessment of the updated fission product yield data consistency. These updated independent fission product yields were utilized in the ORIGEN code to compare the calculated fission product inventories with experimentally measured inventories, with particular attention given to the noble gases. Another important outcome of this work is the development of fission product yield covariance data necessary for fission product uncertainty quantification. The evaluation methodology combines a sequential Bayesian method to guarantee consistency between independent and cumulative yields along with the physical constraints on the independent yields. This work was motivated to improve the performance of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library for stable and long-lived fission products. The revised fission product yields and the new covariance data are proposed as a revision to the fission yield data currently in ENDF/B-VII.1

  20. Comparison of Yields of neutron rich nuclei in Proton and Photon induced $^{238}$U fission

    Khan, F A; Basu, D N; Farooq, M; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of fission of actinides specially $^{238}$U, by proton and bremsstrahlung photon is performed. Relative mass distribution of $^{238}$U fission fragments have been explored theoretically for both proton and photon induced fission. The integrated yield along with charge distribution of the products are calculated to find out the neutron richness in comparison to the nuclei produced by r-process in nucleosynthesis. Some r-process nuclei in intermediate mass range for symmetric fission mode are found to be produced almost two order of magnitude more for proton induced fission than photofission, although rest of the neutron rich nuclei in the asymmetric mode are produced in comparable proportion for both the processes.

  1. Isotopic yield distribution of neutron-rich fragment nuclei produced in thermal neutron induced fission

    Nuclear fission allows us to produce and study the properties of the nuclei with a higher neutron to proton ratio. Spectroscopic studies of such neutron-rich fragment nuclei provide direct information on the nuclear excited states. Such studies help to explore the new regions of nuclear deformations, and to extend the theoretical model(s) to regions which have hitherto been inaccessible. A lot of work has already been done on these set of nuclei by means of spontaneous fission of 252Cf and 248Cm sources, heavy-ion induced fusion-fission reactions, and also using deep-inelastic reactions. More recently, spectroscopic studies were performed using thermal neutron induced fission of 235U using CIRUS reactor facility. Here we report the yield distribution of the isotopes, produced in thermal neutron induced fission of 235U, using prompt γ-γ coincidence measurement technique

  2. Measurement of the hydrogen yield in the radiolysis of water by dissolved fission products

    Hydrogen from the radiolysis of water by dissolved fission products is stripped from the solution and collected by bubbling CO2 through the solution. Quantitative measurements of the G value for hydrogen show that the yield is essentially the same as would be obtained by external gamma radiolysis of nonradioactive solutions of the same chemical composition. The hydrogen yield can be enhanced by addition of a hydrogen-atom donor, such as formic acid, to the solution. The yield of hydrogen from fission-waste solutions is discussed with respect to the question of whether it represents a significant energy source

  3. The production and transmission of covariance in the evaluation processing of fission yield data

    The production and transmission of correlation in the evaluation processing of fission yield data, including average with weight, ratio and sum consistence adjusting, are researched. The variation of the averaged and adjusted yields and/or rations with the correlation coefficient of the input data are investigated. The results obtained are reasonable in physics

  4. Yield-Energy Evaluation of 85Kr of 239Pu+n Fission

    2008-01-01

    <正>The yields of 85Kr, the important production of the 239Pu fission, were re-evaluated over the incident neutron energy 1-15 MeV, based upon all the experimental data. The yields as function of energ

  5. SOFIA: An innovative setup to measure complete isotopic yield of fission fragments

    We performed an experiment dedicated to the accurate isotopic yield measurement of fission fragments over the whole range. SOFIA exploits the inverse kinematics technique: using heavy ion beams at relativistic energies, fission is induced by Coulomb excitation in a high-Z target. The fragments are emitted forward and both of them are identified in charge and mass. The setup will be presented, as well as preliminary spectra. (authors)

  6. SOFIA: An innovative setup to measure complete isotopic yield of fission fragments

    Pellereau E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed an experiment dedicated to the accurate isotopic yield measurement of fission fragments over the whole range. SOFIA exploits the inverse kinematics technique: using heavy ion beams at relativistic energies, fission is induced by Coulomb excitation in a high-Z target. The fragments are emitted forward and both of them are identified in charge and mass. The setup will be presented, as well as preliminary spectra.

  7. JENDL FP decay data file 2011 and fission yields data file 2011

    The decay and fission yield data of fission products were compiled as JENDL FP Decay Data File 2011 (JENDL/FPD-2011) and JENDL FP Fission Yields Data File 2011 (JENDL/FPY-2011). After the release of JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000 (JENDL/FPD-2000) in 2000, new measured data have been accumulated and new TAGS (Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy) data have been published. This new release is to reflect such new measured and available data. The file contains the decay data of 1284 FP nuclides (of which 142 nuclides are stable). In the compilation of the decay data, data of some nuclides were newly added and those of some nuclides were deleted. In order to keep the consistency between the number of nuclides contained of the decay data file and fission yields file, the JENDL/FPY-2011 file was also compiled. The decay heat calculation for various kinds of fissioning nuclides were performed to confirm the validity of the JENDL/FPD-2011 and JENDL/FPY-2011 files. The calculated results were compared with the measured data and showed good agreement. The uncertainty analyses of the decay heat calculation were carried out by the method of sensitivity analysis. It was shown that the uncertainty was about 10 % at 0.1 s after a burst fission. (author)

  8. Discrimination between roles of fissioning nucleus and asymmetry degree of freedom on the even-odd structure in fission-fragment yields

    Caamano, M.; Rejmund, F.; Schmidt, K. -H.

    2009-01-01

    Based on a wide systematics of fission-fragment distributions measured in low-energy fission, the even-odd staggering in the fission-fragment element yields is investigated. The well-established evolution of the global even-odd effect with the fissioning system is found to be only a partial aspect of the even-odd structure. Indeed, it is shown that the global even-odd effect is varying systematically with the mean asymmetry of the fission-fragment distribution, and that the general increase o...

  9. Determination of fission product yields in the 14 MeV photon (Bremsstrahlung) induced fission of 232Th

    The cumulative yields of various fission products in the 232Th(γ,f) with end-point Bremsstrahlung energy of 14 MeV having have been determined using off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The end-point Bremsstrahlung energy of 14 MeV was generated by impinging the electron beam on a solid graphite beam dump of the 20 electron LINAC (ELBE) at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden, Germany. From the cumulative fission yields, the mass chain yields were obtained by using charge distribution correction of medium energy. The fine structure in the mass yield distribution was interpreted from the point of nuclear structure effect such as shell closure proximity and even-odd effect. The mass yield distribution in 232Th(γ,f) is triple humped unlike 238U(γ,f), where it is double humped. This different behaviour in between 232Th* and 238U* was explained from the point of different potential energy surfaces between two systems. (author)

  10. Fission Product Yields for 14 MeV Neutrons on 235U, 238U and 239Pu

    Mac Innes, M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Kawano, T.

    2011-12-01

    We report cumulative fission product yields (FPY) measured at Los Alamos for 14 MeV neutrons on 235U, 238U and 239Pu. The results are from historical measurements made in the 1950s-1970s, not previously available in the peer reviewed literature, although an early version of the data was reported in the Ford and Norris review. The results are compared with other measurements and with the ENDF/B-VI England and Rider evaluation. Compared to the Laurec (CEA) data and to ENDF/B-VI evaluation, good agreement is seen for 235U and 238U, but our FPYs are generally higher for 239Pu. The reason for the higher plutonium FPYs compared to earlier Los Alamos assessments reported by Ford and Norris is that we update the measured values to use modern nuclear data, and in particular the 14 MeV 239Pu fission cross section is now known to be 15-20% lower than the value assumed in the 1950s, and therefore our assessed number of fissions in the plutonium sample is correspondingly lower. Our results are in excellent agreement with absolute FPY measurements by Nethaway (1971), although Nethaway later renormalized his data down by 9% having hypothesized that he had a normalization error. The new ENDF/B-VII.1 14 MeV FPY evaluation is in good agreement with our data.

  11. Fission Product Yields for 14 MeV Neutrons on 235U, 238U and 239Pu

    We report cumulative fission product yields (FPY) measured at Los Alamos for 14 MeV neutrons on 235U, 238U and 239Pu. The results are from historical measurements made in the 1950s–1970s, not previously available in the peer reviewed literature, although an early version of the data was reported in the Ford and Norris review. The results are compared with other measurements and with the ENDF/B-VI England and Rider evaluation. Compared to the Laurec (CEA) data and to ENDF/B-VI evaluation, good agreement is seen for 235U and 238U, but our FPYs are generally higher for 239Pu. The reason for the higher plutonium FPYs compared to earlier Los Alamos assessments reported by Ford and Norris is that we update the measured values to use modern nuclear data, and in particular the 14 MeV 239Pu fission cross section is now known to be 15–20% lower than the value assumed in the 1950s, and therefore our assessed number of fissions in the plutonium sample is correspondingly lower. Our results are in excellent agreement with absolute FPY measurements by Nethaway (1971), although Nethaway later renormalized his data down by 9% having hypothesized that he had a normalization error. The new ENDF/B-VII.1 14 MeV FPY evaluation is in good agreement with our data.

  12. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases

    Ave, M; Daumiller, K; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Luis, P Facal San; Gonzales, D; Hojvat, C; Hörandel, J R; Hrabovský, M; Iarlori, M; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuehn, F; Monasor, M; Nožka, L; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Ridky, J; Rizi, V; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Salamida, F; Schovánek, P; Šmida, R; Spinka, H; Ulrich, A; Verzi, V; Williams, C

    2011-01-01

    We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

  13. Optimal version of a detector for relative measuring of fission neutron yield

    A fission neutron detector ( anti ν-detector), registration efficiency E of which does not depend on neutron energy is discussed. The detector represents a cylindrical moderator (polyethylene) along the axis of which a channel for the fission detector is located. Coaxially with the central channel 3He or BF3 cylindrical counters are located in several raws. The account of neutron energy effect on E is carried out by simultaneous measurement of anti ν and THETA, where anti ν - fission neutron yield, THETA-neutron ''temperature'', connected with the mean energy by the relation anti E=3/2 THETA. The method of simultaneous measurements of anti ν and THETA suggests the pulse coincidence registration from the BF3 or 3H counters with pulses from the fission detector. Ratio of the coincidence numbers is used for determining THETA and the sum for anti ν. As an example presented are the results of measuring the 244Cm fission neutron yield with respect to anti νsub(o) in the case of 252Cf spontaneous fission by means of the detector, containing four raws of counters. The data obtained satisfactorily agree with the data published earlier

  14. Study of asymmetric fission yield behavior from neutron-deficient Hg isotope

    Perkasa, Y. S. [Department of Physics, Sunan Gunung Djati State Islamic University Bandung, Jl. A.H Nasution No. 105 Cibiru, Bandung (Indonesia); Waris, A., E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id; Kurniadi, R., E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id; Su' ud, Z., E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa No. 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    A study of asymmetric fission yield behavior from a neutron-deficient Hg isotope has been conducted. The fission yield calculation of the neutron-deficient Hg isotope using Brownian Metropolis shape had showed unusual result at decreasing energy. In this paper, this interesting feature will be validated by using nine degree of scission shapes parameterization from Brosa model that had been implemented in TALYS nuclear reaction code. This validation is intended to show agreement between both model and the experiment result. The expected result from these models considered to be different due to dynamical properties that implemented in both models.

  15. Effects of Fission Yield Data in the Calculation of Antineutrino Spectra for 235U (n ,fission) at Thermal and Fast Neutron Energies

    Sonzogni, A. A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Dimitriou, P.

    2016-04-01

    Fission yields form an integral part of the prediction of antineutrino spectra generated by nuclear reactors, but little attention has been paid to the quality and reliability of the data used in current calculations. Following a critical review of the thermal and fast ENDF/B-VII.1 235U 235 fission yields, deficiencies are identified and improved yields are obtained, based on corrections of erroneous yields, consistency between decay and fission yield data, and updated isomeric ratios. These corrected yields are used to calculate antineutrino spectra using the summation method. An anomalous value for the thermal fission yield of 86Ge generates an excess of antineutrinos at 5-7 MeV, a feature which is no longer present when the corrected yields are used. Thermal spectra calculated with two distinct fission yield libraries (corrected ENDF/B and JEFF) differ by up to 6% in the 0-7 MeV energy window, allowing for a basic estimate of the uncertainty involved in the fission yield component of summation calculations. Finally, the fast neutron antineutrino spectrum is calculated, which at the moment can only be obtained with the summation method and may be relevant for short baseline reactor experiments using highly enriched uranium fuel.

  16. Effects of Fission Yield Data in the Calculation of Antineutrino Spectra for ^{235}U(n,fission) at Thermal and Fast Neutron Energies.

    Sonzogni, A A; McCutchan, E A; Johnson, T D; Dimitriou, P

    2016-04-01

    Fission yields form an integral part of the prediction of antineutrino spectra generated by nuclear reactors, but little attention has been paid to the quality and reliability of the data used in current calculations. Following a critical review of the thermal and fast ENDF/B-VII.1 ^{235}U fission yields, deficiencies are identified and improved yields are obtained, based on corrections of erroneous yields, consistency between decay and fission yield data, and updated isomeric ratios. These corrected yields are used to calculate antineutrino spectra using the summation method. An anomalous value for the thermal fission yield of ^{86}Ge generates an excess of antineutrinos at 5-7 MeV, a feature which is no longer present when the corrected yields are used. Thermal spectra calculated with two distinct fission yield libraries (corrected ENDF/B and JEFF) differ by up to 6% in the 0-7 MeV energy window, allowing for a basic estimate of the uncertainty involved in the fission yield component of summation calculations. Finally, the fast neutron antineutrino spectrum is calculated, which at the moment can only be obtained with the summation method and may be relevant for short baseline reactor experiments using highly enriched uranium fuel. PMID:27081973

  17. A Covariance Generation Methodology for Fission Product Yields

    Terranova N.; Serot O.; Archier P.; Vallet V.; De Saint Jean C.; Sumini M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent safety and economical concerns for modern nuclear reactor applications have fed an outstanding interest in basic nuclear data evaluation improvement and completion. It has been immediately clear that the accuracy of our predictive simulation models was strongly affected by our knowledge on input data. Therefore strong efforts have been made to improve nuclear data and to generate complete and reliable uncertainty information able to yield proper uncertainty propagation on integral reac...

  18. Model-based generation of neutron induced fission yields up to 20 MeV by the GEF code

    Model-based fission product yields from the fission of various important target nuclides have been calculated for incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV, divided into a 77 energy group structure. The calculations have been performed with two versions of the GEF code, which have been externally coupled to TALYS-1.4. In this application, the TALYS-1.4 code calculates any pre-fission nucleon or gamma emission from the compound nucleus as well as the probabilities of excitation states at the time it undergoes fission. The obtained quantities, fully characterizing the fissioning nucleus, are then passed to GEF, which generates the corresponding primary fission product yields in a Monte Carlo calculation. Cumulative fission product yields have been calculated using these primary fission product yields together with evaluated radioactive decay data as input. The interim and final results from the modelling, i.e. cross-sections, independent and cumulative fission yields, have been compared to experimental data. Important results from this, as well as sensitivities and reliabilities of the models, are discussed in this paper. The objective of this work was to generate energy dependent fission product yields data to serve as a basis for further investigations on potential improvements of evaluated data for nuclear reactor applications, which are beyond the scope of this publication. (author)

  19. Influence of asymmetry and fissility on even-odd effect in fission-fragment yields

    Rejmund F.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on a wide systematics of fragment distributions measured in thermal-neutron induced fission, the even-odd staggering in the fission-fragment element yields is investigated. The asymmetry evolution of the element yield distribution with the fissility of the fissioning nucleus is shown to be for an important part responsible for the decrease of the even-odd staggering with the fissility. The even-odd staggering close to symmetry is shown to be a small contribution to the global even-odd effect, and seems to vary little with the fissility of the nucleus. These experimental observations show that the established interpretation in which the intrinsic excitation energy at scission is accountable for the even-odd staggering amplitude has to be reconsidered.

  20. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm band in atmospheric gases

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Curry, E.; Di Carlo, P.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Li, S.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; Rouille D'Orfeuil, B.; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2013-02-01

    A measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm nitrogen band, relevant to ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) detectors, is reported. Two independent calibrations of the fluorescence emission induced by a 120 GeV proton beam were employed: Cherenkov light from the beam particle and calibrated light from a nitrogen laser. The fluorescence yield in air at a pressure of 1013 hPa and temperature of 293 K was found to be Y337=5.61±0.06stat±0.22syst photons/MeV. When compared to the fluorescence yield currently used by UHECR experiments, this measurement improves the uncertainty by a factor of three, and has a significant impact on the determination of the energy scale of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  1. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm band in atmospheric gases

    Ave, M; Curry, E; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Luis, P Facal San; Gonzales, D; Hojvat, C; Hörandel, J; Hrabovsky, M; Iarlori, M; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuehn, F; Li, S; Monasor, M; Nozka, L; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Ridky, J; Rizi, V; D'Orfeuil, B Rouille; Salamida, F; Schovanek, P; Smida, R; Spinka, H; Ulrich, A; Verzi, V; Williams, C

    2012-01-01

    A measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm nitrogen band, relevant to ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) detectors, is reported. Two independent calibrations of the fluorescence emission induced by a 120 GeV proton beam were employed: Cherenkov light from the beam particle and calibrated light from a nitrogen laser. The fluorescence yield in air at a pressure of 1013 hPa and temperature of 293 K was found to be $Y_{337} = 5.61\\pm 0.06_{stat} \\pm 0.21_{syst}$ photons/MeV. When compared to the fluorescence yield currently used by UHECR experiments, this measurement improves the uncertainty by a factor of three, and has a significant impact on the determination of the energy scale of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  2. Theoretical and experimental studies of the neutron rich fission product yields at intermediate energies

    Äystö J.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new method to measure the fission product independent yields employing the ion guide technique and a Penning trap as a precision mass filter, which allows an unambiguous identification of the nuclides is presented. The method was used to determine the independent yields in the proton-induced fission of 232Th and 238U at 25 MeV. The data were analyzed with the consistent model for description of the fission product formation cross section at the projectile energies up to 100 MeV. Pre-compound nucleon emission is described with the two-component exciton model using Monte Carlo method. Decay of excited compound nuclei is treated within time-dependent statistical model with inclusion of the nuclear friction effect. The charge distribution of the primary fragment isobaric chain was considered as a result of frozen quantal fluctuations of the isovector nuclear density. The theoretical predictions of the independent fission product cross sections are used for normalization of the measured fission product isotopic distributions.

  3. Absolute determination of the neutron source yield using melamine as a neutron detector

    Ciechanowski, M.; Bolewski, A., Jr.; Kreft, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to absolute determination of the neutron source yield is presented. It bases on the application of melamine (C3H6N6) to neutron detection combined with Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport. Melamine has the ability to detect neutrons via 14N(n, p)14C reaction and subsequent determination of 14C content. A cross section for this reaction is relatively high for thermal neutrons (1.827 b) and much lower for fast neutrons. A concentration of 14C nuclei created in the irradiated sample of melamine can be reliably measured with the aid of the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The mass of melamine sufficient for this analysis is only 10 mg. Neutron detection is supported by Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport carried out with the use of MCNP-4C code. These simulations are aimed at computing the probability of 14C creation in the melamine sample per the source neutron. The result of AMS measurements together with results of MCNP calculations enable us to determine the number of neutrons emitted from the source during the irradiation of melamine. The proposed method was applied for determining the neutron emission from a commercial 252Cf neutron source which was independently calibrated. The measured neutron emission agreed with the certified one within uncertainty limits. The relative expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the absolute neutron source yield determination was estimated at 2.6%. Apart from calibration of radionuclide neutron sources the proposed procedure could facilitate absolute yield measurements for more complex sources. Potential applications of this methodology as it is further developed include diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion and plasma-focus experiments, calibration of neutron measurement systems at tokamaks and accelerator-based neutron sources as well as characterization of neutron fields generated in large particle detectors during collisions of hadron beams.

  4. Isotopic yield in cold binary fission of even-even 244-258Cf isotopes

    Santhosh, K. P.; Cyriac, Annu; Krishnan, Sreejith

    2016-05-01

    The cold binary fission of even-even 244-258Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold valley plot (plot of driving potential vs. mass number of fragments) and by calculating the yield for charge minimized fragments. It is found that for 244,246,248Cf isotopes highest yield is for the fragments with isotope of Pb (Z = 82) as one fragment, whereas for 250Cf and 252Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with isotope of Hg (Z = 80) as one fragment. In the case of 254,256,258Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with Sn (Z = 50) as one fragment. Thus, the fragment combinations with maximum yield reveal the role of doubly magic and near doubly magic nuclei in binary fission. It is found that asymmetric splitting is favored for Cf isotopes with mass number A ≤ 250 and symmetric splitting is favored for Cf isotopes with A > 252. In the case of Cf isotope with A = 252, there is an equal probability for asymmetric and symmetric splitting. The individual yields obtained for the cold fission of 252Cf isotope are compared with the experimental data taken from the γ- γ- γ coincidences technique using Gammasphere.

  5. Compilation of Data on Radionuclide Data for Specific Activity, Specific Heat and Fission Product Yields

    Gibbs, A.; Thomason, R.S.

    2000-09-05

    This compilation was undertaken to update the data used in calculation of curie and heat loadings of waste containers in the Solid Waste Management Facility. The data has broad general use and has been cross-checked extensively in order to be of use in the Materials Accountability arena. The fission product cross-sections have been included because they are of use in the Environmental Remediation and Waste Management areas where radionuclides which are not readily detectable need to be calculated from the relative fission yields and material dispersion data.

  6. Compilation of Data on Radionuclide Data for Specific Activity, Specific Heat and Fission Product Yields

    This compilation was undertaken to update the data used in calculation of curie and heat loadings of waste containers in the Solid Waste Management Facility. The data has broad general use and has been cross-checked extensively in order to be of use in the Materials Accountability arena. The fission product cross-sections have been included because they are of use in the Environmental Remediation and Waste Management areas where radionuclides which are not readily detectable need to be calculated from the relative fission yields and material dispersion data

  7. Effect of fission yield libraries on the irradiated fuel composition in Monte Carlo depletion calculations

    Improving the prediction of radiation parameters and reliability of fuel behaviour under different irradiation modes is particularly relevant for new fuel compositions, including recycled nuclear fuel. For fast reactors there is a strong dependence of nuclide accumulations on the nuclear data libraries. The effect of fission yield libraries on irradiated fuel is studied in MONTEBURNS-MCNP5-ORIGEN2 calculations of sodium fast reactors. Fission yield libraries are generated for sodium fast reactors with MOX fuel, using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF3.1, original library FY-Koldobsky, and GEFY 3.3 as sources. The transport libraries are generated from ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1. Analysis of irradiated MOX fuel using different fission yield libraries demonstrates the considerable spread in concentrations of fission products. The discrepancies in concentrations of inert gases being ∼25%, up to 5 times for stable and long-life nuclides, and up to 10 orders of magnitude for short-lived nuclides. (authors)

  8. Evidence for the predominant influence of the asymmetry degree of freedom on the evenodd structure in fission-fragment yields

    Caamaño, Manuel; Rejmund, Fanny; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Based on a comprehensive set of fission-fragment distributions measured in low-energy fission, the even-odd staggering in the fission-fragment element yields is investigated. The well-established evolution of the global even-odd effect with the fissioning system is found to be only a partial aspect of the even-odd structure. Indeed, it is shown that the global even-odd effect varies systematically with the mean asymmetry of the fission-fragment distribution, and that the general i...

  9. Regression analysis for a bottom-up approach to analyzing semi-prompt fission gamma yields

    Highlights: ► Fitting the semi-prompt non-resolved photon spectrum after fission. ► Energy–time dependence can be factorized. ► Physical model, statistical model, sampling procedure. ► The best fit is: lognormal for energy and F for time. - Abstract: We present an empirical model that describes the yield of gamma rays emitted by fission in the time interval from 20 to 958 ns following a fission event. The analysis is based on experimental data from neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu. The model is devised by first using regression analysis to identify likely patterns in the data and to choose plausible fitting functions. We provide statistical and physical arguments in support of time and energy independence. The intensity of the emitted gamma rays can be described as a bivariate distribution that is the product of independent variates for energy and time. We test several plausible distribution families for the energy and time variates and use maximum likelihood and minimum χ2 to estimate distribution parameters. Because of the uncertainty in the experimental data, multiple combinations of variate pairs give rise to a surface that plausibly well fits the observations well. The best-fit variate turns out to be lognormal in energy and F in time. The findings illustrated in this paper can be used to simulate gamma ray de-excitation from fission in Monte Carlo codes.

  10. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics.

    Landoas, Olivier; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Rossé, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C; Duffy, Tim; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range. PMID:21806179

  11. Measurement of Am-242 fission yields at the Lohengrin spectrometer; improvement and Benchmarking of the semi-empirical code GEF

    The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. While the yields are known for the major actinides (U-235, Pu-239) in the thermal neutron-induced fission, only few measurements were performed on Am-242. Moreover, the two main data libraries do not agree among each other on the light peak. Am-241 and Am-242 are nuclei of interest for the MOX-fuel reactors and for the reduction of nuclear waste radiotoxicity using transmutation reactions. Thus, a campaign of precise measurement of the fission mass yields from the reaction Am-241(2n,f) was performed at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer (ILL, France) for both the light and the heavy peak. Forty-one masses were measured. Moreover, the measurement of the isotopic fission yields on the heavy peak by gamma-ray spectrometry led to the extraction of 20 independent isotopic yields. Our measurement was also meant to determine whether there is a difference in fission yields between the Am-242 isomeric state and its ground state as it exists in fission cross sections. The experimental method used to answer this question is based on the measurement a set of fission mass yields as a function of the ratio of Am-242gs to Am-242m fission rate. Results show that the mass yields are independent of the fission rate ratio. A future experimental campaign is proposed to observe a possible influence on the isomeric yields. The theoretical models are nowadays unable to predict the fission yields with enough accuracy and therefore we have to rely on experimental data and phenomenological models. The accuracy of the predictions of the semi empirical GEF fission model predictions makes it a useful tool for evaluation. This thesis also presents the physical content and part of the development of this model. Validation of the kinetic energy distributions, isomeric yields and fission yields predictions was performed. The extension of the GEF

  12. Measurement of Delayed Neutron Yields from Thermal Neutron Induced Fission of $^{237}$Np

    Gundorin, N A; Pikelner, L B; Revrova, N V; Salamatin, I M; Smirnov, V I; Zhdanova, K V; Zhuchko, V E

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports about the measurement of delayed neutron yields from a thermal neutron induced fission of $^{237}$Np. The method based on periodic irradiation of the sample in pulsed neutron beam with the subsequent registration of neutrons in intervals between pulses is used in the experiment. The method is realized on the "Isomer-M" installation, located on the channel of the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. A description of the installation and a technique of the experiment are presented, a thorough analysis of background processes is performed, results of measurements are shown in this paper. The value of delayed neutron yields from thermal neutron induced fission of $^{237}$Np obtained in the present investigation is $\

  13. Relative Yields of 149-153Pr in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf

    Eldridge, Jonathan; Wang, Enhong; Hwang, J. K.; Hamilton, Joe; Ramayya, A. V.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Zhu, S. J.; Liu, S. H.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.

    2013-10-01

    The relative yields of the fission partners of 149-153Pr, resulting from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf, were studied. This study was done by means of γ - γ - γ , and γ - γ - γ - γ coincidence data taken in 2000 by the multi-HPGe, Compton-suppressed, gamma detector array, Gammasphere, at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The coincidence data were analyzed by double- and triple-gating on transitions in 149-153Pr and obtaining the intensities of the 93-101Y transitions. For 150 , 151 , 152 , 153Pr the 3n channel was found to be the strongest. The 149Pr, however, was found to peak at the 4n channel. These results were used to verify the assignments of the level schemes of 151 , 152 , 153Pr. The data are found to be in agreement with Wahl's independent yield tables.

  14. Fractional independent yields of 141La and 142La from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 233U

    The fractional independent yields of 141La and 142La from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 233U were found to be 0.026 +- 0.006 and 0.068 +- 0.010, respectively. These yields are consistent with charge distributions for which σ = 0.56 +- 0.02 and 0.52 +- 0.02, respectively. These results are in good agreement with similar yields measured for fission of 235U, but not with those from fission of 249Cf. (author)

  15. Fission-product yields for thermal-neutron fission of 243Cm determined from measurements with a high-resolution low-energy germanium gamma-ray detector

    Cumulative fission-product yields have been determined for 13 gamma rays emitted during the decay of 12 fission products created by thermal-neutron fission of 243Cm. A high-resolution low-energy germanium detector was used to measure the pulse-height spectra of gamma rays emitted from a 77-nanogram sample of 243Cm after the sample had been irradiated by thermal neutrons. Analysis of the data resulted in the identification and matching of gamma-ray energies and half-lives to individual radioisotopes. From these results, 12 cumulative fission product yields were deduced for radionuclides with half-lives between 4.2 min and 84.2 min. 7 references

  16. Microscopic predictions of fission yields based on the time dependent GCM formalism

    Regnier D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization in nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. One of the most promising theoretical frameworks is the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM applied under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA. Previous studies reported promising results by numerically solving the TDGCM+GOA equation with a finite difference technique. However, the computational cost of this method makes it difficult to properly control numerical errors. In addition, it prevents one from performing calculations with more than two collective variables. To overcome these limitations, we developed the new code FELIX-1.0 that solves the TDGCM+GOA equation based on the Galerkin finite element method. In this article, we briefly illustrate the capabilities of the solver FELIX-1.0, in particular its validation for n+239Pu low energy induced fission. This work is the result of a collaboration between CEA,DAM,DIF and LLNL on nuclear fission theory.

  17. Microscopic predictions of fission yields based on the time dependent GCM formalism

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization in nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. One of the most promising theoretical frameworks is the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) applied under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). Previous studies reported promising results by numerically solving the TDGCM+GOA equation with a finite difference technique. However, the computational cost of this method makes it difficult to properly control numerical errors. In addition, it prevents one from performing calculations with more than two collective variables. To overcome these limitations, we developed the new code FELIX-1.0 that solves the TDGCM+GOA equation based on the Galerkin finite element method. In this article, we briefly illustrate the capabilities of the solver FELIX-1.0, in particular its validation for n+239Pu low energy induced fission. This work is the result of a collaboration between CEA,DAM,DIF and LLNL on nuclear fission theory.

  18. Design of a High Intensity Neutron Source for Neutron-Induced Fission Yield Studies

    The upgraded IGISOL facility with JYFLTRAP, at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, has been supplied with a new cyclotron which will provide protons of the order of 100 μA with up to 30 MeV energy, or deuterons with half the energy and intensity. This makes it an ideal place for measurements of neutron-induced fission products from various actinides, in view of proposed future nuclear fuel cycles. The groups at Uppsala University and University of Jyväskylä are working on the design of a neutron converter that will be used as neutron source in fission yield studies. The design is based on simulations with Monte Carlo codes and a benchmark measurement that was recently performed at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. In order to obtain a competitive count rate the fission targets will be placed very close to the neutron converter. The goal is to have a flexible design that will enable the use of neutron fields with different energy distributions. In the present paper, some considerations for the design of the neutron converter will be discussed, together with different scenarios for which fission targets and neutron energies to focus on. (author)

  19. Testing JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 Decay and Fission Yield Nuclear Data Libraries with Fission Pulse Neutron Emission and Decay Heat Experiments

    Cabellos, O.; de Fusco, V.; Diez de la Obra, C. J.; Martinez, J. S.; Gonzalez, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work is to test the present status of Evaluated Nuclear Decay and Fission Yield Data Libraries to predict decay heat and delayed neutron emission rate, average neutron energy and neutron delayed spectra after a neutron fission pulse. Calculations are performed with JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1, and these are compared with experimental values. An uncertainty propagation assessment of the current nuclear data uncertainties is performed.

  20. Isotopic yield in cold binary fission of even-even $^{244-258}$Cf isotopes

    Santhosh, K P; Krishnan, Sreejith

    2016-01-01

    The cold binary fission of even-even 244-258Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold valley plot (plot of driving potential vs. mass number of fragments) and by calculating the yield for charge minimized fragments. It is found that highest yield for 244,246,248Cf isotopes are for the fragments with isotope of Pb (Z=82) as one fragment, whereas for 250Cf and 252Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with isotope of Hg (Z=80) as one fragment. In the case of 254,256,258Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with Sn (Z=50) as one fragment. Thus, the fragment combinations with maximum yield reveal the role of doubly magic and near doubly magic nuclei in binary fission. It is found that asymmetric splitting is favoured for Cf isotopes with mass number A 252. In the case of Cf isotope with A=252, there is an equal probability for asymmetric and symmetric splitti...

  1. Absolute dating of the youngest sediments of the Swiss Molasse basin by apatite fission track analysis

    A set of ash layer samples within the uppermost Upper Freshwater Molasse (OSM) sediments (N and E of Frauenfeld, Switzerland) was dated by apatite fission track (FT) means. The ages indicate an early Tortonian (perhaps latest Serravallian) eruption and sedimentation age of 11.5 ± 0.3 Ma. The age is in agreement with time constraints by Mammalian relicts which point to MN7-8. Due to the position of the ash layers close to the erosional gap and overlying Quaternary cover, the age represents a maximum age for the cessation of OSM sedimentation in the Swiss Molasse Basin. However, the end of Molasse sedimentation in this region had not stopped before the cover of OSM sediments by volcanic ash layers at the Hoewenegg volcano (southern Germany), an event further constrained by an apatite FT age of 9.8 (-0.7/+0.8) Ma from a hornblende-bearing ash layer at Hoewenegg. An isolated bentonitic ash layer occurring 25 km to the WSW of the main set of dated ashes (near Humlikon) has an age component identical to the OSM ash layers near Frauenfeld. The age suggests a source for this material within the Hegau, but is too young to be related to the volcanic activity at the Kaiserstuhl. The apatites from the ash layer samples show two distinct compositional populations, one very close to a Cl end member and one with apatites of equal proportions of Cl and OH end member. These populations are interpreted to have possibly originated from at least two distinct igneous sources for the ashes, separated by their eruption site or eruption time or both. The distinct compositional data on the volcanic apatites may provide a basis to clarify their origin in future work. (author)

  2. Relative yields of U-235 fission products measured in a high level radioactive sludge at Savannah River Site

    This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at Savannah River Site. The 42 fision products make up 98% of the waste sludge. We used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for the analysis. The relative yields for most of the fission products are in complete agreement with the known relative yields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. Disagreements can be reconciled based on the chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses. This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 (98%) of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at the Savannah River Site. We analyzed the sludge with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The relative yields for most of the fission products agree completely with the known relative vields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric: branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. The chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses explain the differences in the measured and calculated results

  3. Cumulative fission yields of short-lived isotopes under natural-abundance-boron-carbide-moderated neutron spectrum

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce; Wittman, Richard S.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2015-04-09

    The availability of gamma spectroscopy data on samples containing mixed fission products at short times after irradiation is limited. Due to this limitation, data interpretation methods for gamma spectra of mixed fission product samples, where the individual fission products have not been chemically isolated from interferences, are not well-developed. The limitation is particularly pronounced for fast pooled neutron spectra because of the lack of available fast reactors in the United States. Samples containing the actinide isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu individually were subjected to a 2$ pulse in the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. To achieve a fission-energy neutron spectrum, the spectrum was tailored using a natural abundance boron carbide capsule to absorb neutrons in the thermal and epithermal region of the spectrum. Our tailored neutron spectrum is unique to the WSU reactor facility, consisting of a soft fission spectrum that contains some measurable flux in the resonance region. This results in a neutron spectrum at greater than 0.1 keV with an average energy of 70 keV, similar to fast reactor spectra and approaching that of 235U fission. Unique fission product gamma spectra were collected from 4 minutes to 1 week after fission using single-crystal high purity germanium detectors. Cumulative fission product yields measured in the current work generally agree with published fast pooled fission product yield values from ENDF/B-VII, though a bias was noted for 239Pu. The present work contributes to the compilation of energy-resolved fission product yield nuclear data for nuclear forensic purposes.

  4. Beta decay of the fission product 125Sb and a new complete evaluation of absolute gamma ray transition intensities

    Rajput, M. U.; Ali, N.; Hussain, S.; Mujahid, S. A.; MacMahon, D.

    2012-04-01

    The radionuclide 125Sb is a long-lived fission product, which decays to 125Te by negative beta emission with a half-life of 1008 day. The beta decay is followed by the emission of several gamma radiations, ranging from low to medium energy, that can suitably be used for high-resolution detector calibrations, decay heat calculations and in many other applications. In this work, the beta decay of 125Sb has been studied in detail. The complete published experimental data of relative gamma ray intensities in the beta decay of the radionuclide 125Sb has been compiled. The consistency analysis was performed and discrepancies found at several gamma ray energies. Evaluation of the discrepant data was carried out using Normalized Residual and RAJEVAL methods. The decay scheme balance was carried out using beta branching ratios, internal conversion coefficients, populating and depopulating gamma transitions to 125Te levels. The work has resulted in the consistent conversion factor equal to 29.59(13) %, and determined a new evaluated set of the absolute gamma ray emission probabilities. The work has also shown 22.99% of the delayed intensity fraction as outgoing from the 58 d isomeric 144 keV energy level and 77.01% of the prompt intensity fraction reaching to the ground state from the other excited states. The results are discussed and compared with previous evaluations. The present work includes additional experimental data sets which were not included in the previous evaluations. A new set of recommended relative and absolute gamma ray emission probabilities is presented.

  5. JENDL-3.2/FPY. The JENDL-3.2 fission-product yield data library. Contents and documentation

    This data library contains neutron-induced fission-product yield data for ten fissile nuclides, some of them at 3 incident neutron energies, including independent yields and cumulative yields. The data library, which is in ENDF-6 format, is available, costfree, on magnetic tape or on diskette(s). (author)

  6. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Taieb, Julien; Chatillon, Audrey; Bélier, Gilbert; Boutoux, Guillaume; Ebran, Adeline; Gorbinet, Thomas; Grente, Lucie; Laurent, Benoit; Pellereau, Eric; Alvarez-Pol, Héctor; Audouin, Laurent; Aumann, Thomas; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Casarejos, Enrique; Cortina Gil, Dolores; Caamaño, Manuel; Farget, Fanny; Fernández Domínguez, Beatriz; Heinz, Andreas; Jurado, Beatriz; Kelić-Heil, Aleksandra; Kurz, Nikolaus; Nociforo, Chiara; Paradela, Carlos; Pietri, Stéphane; Ramos, Diego; Rodríguez-Sànchez, Jose-Luis; Rodríguez-Tajes, Carme; Rossi, Dominic; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Simon, Haik; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Vargas, Jossitt; Voss, Bernd; Weick, Helmut

    2015-12-01

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism.

  7. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Taieb, Julien; Chatillon, Audrey; Belier, Gilbert; Boutoux, Guillaume; Ebran, Adeline; Gorbinet, Thomas; Grente, Lucie; Laurent, Benoit; Pellereau, Eric [CEA DAM Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Arpajon (France); Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Cortina Gil, Dolores; Caamano, Manuel; Fernandez Dominguez, Beatriz; Paradela, Carlos; Ramos, Diego; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Jose-Luis; Vargas, Jossitt [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Audouin, Laurent; Tassan-Got, Laurent [CNRS/IN2P3, IPNO, Orsay (France); Aumann, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Casarejos, Enrique [Universidad de Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Farget, Fanny; Rodriguez-Tajes, Carme [CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Heinz, Andreas [Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jurado, Beatriz [CNRS/IN2P3, CENBG, Gradignan (France); Kelic-Heil, Aleksandra; Kurz, Nikolaus; Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Rossi, Dominic; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Simon, Haik; Voss, Bernd; Weick, Helmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism. (orig.)

  8. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism. (orig.)

  9. A new evaluation of fission product yields and the production of a new library (UKFY2) of independent and cumulative yields. Pt. 2

    A new evaluation has been prepared of the independent and cumulative yields of the products of fission induced by thermal, fast, and 14 MeV neutrons in nuclides important for reactor design and operation and for fuel and waste management. Three spontaneously fissioning nuclides were also considered. The evaluation used a database that is considered to be complete up to early 1989. Careful study was made of experimental uncertainties and discrepancies, emphasising the need for further measurements. Gaps in the data were filled by interpolation and extrapolation, using fits to empirical models. The yields were adjusted to fit physical constraints of the fissioning process. The present report contains Tables of cumulative and chain yields, and of fractional independent yields. Each set of Tables gives all the relevant measurements in the database, with uncertainties. Recommended weighted averages are included with standard deviations, discrepant sets of measurements are clearly indicated and references to all the entries in the database are listed. (author)

  10. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, UR, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2012-10-15

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  11. Measuring the absolute deuterium–tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  12. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF. PMID:23126915

  13. Application of a Bayesian/generalised least-squares method to generate correlations between independent neutron fission yield data

    Fission product yields are fundamental parameters for several nuclear engineering calculations and in particular for burn-up/activation problems. The impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past and evaluations were released, although still incomplete. Recently, the nuclear community expressed the need for full fission yield covariance matrices to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. In this work, we studied and applied a Bayesian/generalised least-squares method for covariance generation, and compared the generated uncertainties to the original data stored in the JEFF-3.1.2 library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235U. Calculations were carried out using different codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the library. The uncertainty quantification was performed with the Monte Carlo sampling technique. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the statistics of decay heat. (authors)

  14. Direct physical measurements of independent fission yields at a 1-MW research reactor

    Over the past 20 yr, the number of nuclear reactors on university campuses in the United States has decreased from >70 to <40. Contrary to this trend, the University of Texas at Austin recently completed construction of a new reactor facility at a cost of $5.8 million. The TRIGA Mark II reactor in this facility will be licensed for 1.1-MW steady-state operation and $3.00 power-pulse transients. The new reactor facility was established to enhance the instructional and research opportunities in nuclear science and engineering for both undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Texas. In addition to neutron activation analysis, programs are being planned and equipment is being designed for neutron depth profiling, prompt gamma activation analysis, neutron radiography, and cold neutron research. Because of continued interest in fission-yield system developed by the author when he was at the University of Illinois. The operation of this unique system for the direct physical measurement of independent yields in thermal-neutron fission is reviewed in this paper

  15. Analysis of effects of updated decay and fission yield data on ORIGEN 2 results

    Work has been performed to improve the accuracy of ORIGEN2 results by updating both the decay library and the fission yield data in the cross-section library. This effort was performed under the auspices of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to ensure that ORIGEN2 uses the most up-to-date data. The impact of the new data was then quantitatively evaluated by solving a set of standard light water reactor (LWR) problems solved with ORIGEN2. The ORIGEN code, developed at ORNL in the late 1960's, is a point depletion code used to determine the composition and characteristics of spent fuel. The results from calculations performed with the code often form the basis for the study and design of reprocessing plants, spent-fuel shipping casks, waste treatment systems, and disposal facilities. The decay data were updated using data from ENDF/B-VI; fission yield data were updated using data from ENDF/B-V. The impact of these new data was then evaluated

  16. Accurate measurements of fission-fragment yields in 234,235,236,238U(γ,f) with the SOFIA set-up

    Chatillon, A.; Taïeb, J.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Boutoux, G.; Gorbinet, T.; Grente, L.; Bélier, G.; Laurent, B.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Caamaño, M.; Audouin, L.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Farget, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Heinz, A.; Jurado, B.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Lindberg, S.; Löher, B.; Nociforo, C.; Paradela, C.; Pietri, S.; Ramos, D.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J.-L.; Rodrìguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Tassan-Got, L.; Törnqvist, H.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.; Yan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    SOFIA (Studies On Fission with Aladin) is a new experimental set-up dedicated to accurate measurement of fission-fragments isotopic yields. It is located at GSI, the only place to use inverse kinematics at relativistic energies in order to study the (γ,f) electromagnetic-induced fission. The SOFIA set-up is a large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer, which allows to fully identify both fission fragments in coincidence on the whole fission-fragment range. This paper will report on fission yields obtained in 234,235,236,238U(γ,f) reactions.

  17. Accurate measurements of fission-fragment yields in $^{234,235,236,238}$U(γ,f) with the SOFIA set-up

    Chatillon A.; Taïeb J.; MARTIN J. - F.; Pellereau E.; Boutoux G.; Gorbinet T.; Grente L.; Bélier G.; Laurent B.; Alvarez-Pol H.; Ayyad Y.; Benlliure J.; Caamaño M.; Audouin L.; Casarejos E.

    2015-01-01

    SOFIA (Studies On Fission with Aladin) is a new experimental set-up dedicated to accurate measurement of fission-fragments isotopic yields. It is located at GSI, the only place to use inverse kinematics at relativistic energies in order to study the (γ,f) electromagnetic-induced fission. The SOFIA set-up is a large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer, which allows to fully identify both fission fragments in coincidence on the whole fission-fragment range. This paper will report on fission yields...

  18. Accurate measurements of fission-fragment yields in 234,235,236,238U(γ,f with the SOFIA set-up

    Chatillon A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SOFIA (Studies On Fission with Aladin is a new experimental set-up dedicated to accurate measurement of fission-fragments isotopic yields. It is located at GSI, the only place to use inverse kinematics at relativistic energies in order to study the (γ,f electromagnetic-induced fission. The SOFIA set-up is a large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer, which allows to fully identify both fission fragments in coincidence on the whole fission-fragment range. This paper will report on fission yields obtained in 234,235,236,238U(γ,f reactions.

  19. Exploratory study of fission product yields of neutron-induced fission of 235U , 238U , and 239Pu at 8.9 MeV

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B. F.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G. Y.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.

    2015-06-01

    Using dual-fission chambers each loaded with a thick (200 -400 -mg /c m2) actinide target of 235 ,238U or 239Pu and two thin (˜10 -100 -μ g /c m2) reference foils of the same actinide, the cumulative yields of fission products ranging from 92Sr to 147Nd have been measured at En= 8.9 MeV . The 2H(d ,n ) 3He reaction provided the quasimonoenergetic neutron beam. The experimental setup and methods used to determine the fission product yield (FPY) are described, and results for typically eight high-yield fission products are presented. Our FPYs for 235U(n ,f ) , 238U(n ,f ) , and 239Pu(n ,f ) at 8.9 MeV are compared with the existing data below 8 MeV from Glendenin et al. [Phys. Rev. C 24, 2600 (1981), 10.1103/PhysRevC.24.2600], Nagy et al. [Phys. Rev. C 17, 163 (1978), 10.1103/PhysRevC.17.163], Gindler et al. [Phys. Rev. C 27, 2058 (1983), 10.1103/PhysRevC.27.2058], and those of Mac Innes et al. [Nucl. Data Sheets 112, 3135 (2011), 10.1016/j.nds.2011.11.009] and Laurec et al. [Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2965 (2010), 10.1016/j.nds.2010.11.004] at 14.5 and 14.7 MeV, respectively. This comparison indicates a negative slope for the energy dependence of most fission product yields obtained from 235U and 239Pu , whereas for 238U the slope issue remains unsettled.

  20. Investigation of the fission yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of {sup 233}U; Mesure de la distribution en masse et en charge des produits de la fission rapide de l'{sup 233}U

    Galy, J

    1999-09-01

    As a stars, a survey of the different methods of investigations of the fission product yields and the experimental data status have been studied, showing advantages and shortcomings for the different approaches. An overview of the existing models for the fission product distributions has been as well intended. The main part of this thesis was the measurement of the independent yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of{sup 233}U, never investigated before this work. The experiment has been carried out using the mass separator OSIRIS (Isotope Separator On-Line). Its integrated ion-source and its specific properties required an analysis of the delay-parameter and ionisation efficiency for each chemical species. On the other hand, this technique allows measurement of independent yields and cumulative yields for elements from Cu to Ba, covering most of the fission yield distribution. Thus, we measured about 180 independent yields from Zn (Z=30) to Sr (Z=38) in the mass range A=74-99 and from Pd (Z=46) to Ba (Z=56) in the mass range A=113-147, including many isomeric states. An additional experiment using direct {gamma}-spectroscopy of aggregates of fission products was used to determine more than 50 cumulative yields of element with half-life from 15 min to a several days. All experimental data have been compared to estimates from a semi-empirical model, to calculated values and to evaluated values from the European library JEF 2.2. Furthermore, a study of both thermal and fast neutron-induced fission of {sup 233}U measured at Studsvik, the comparison of the OSIRIS and LOHENGRIN facilities and the trends in new data for the Reactors Physics have been discussed. (author)

  1. Decay Heat Analyses after Thermal-Neutron Fission of 235U and 239Pu by SCALE-6.1.3 with Recently Available Fission Product Yield Data

    The heat reaches about 1.5% after one hour and falls to 0.4% after a day. After a week it will be about 0.2%. The reactor, however, still requires further cooling for several years to keep the fuel rods safe. In general, the decay heat in the reactors can be calculated using a summation calculation method, which is simply the sum of the activities of the fission products produced during the fission process and after the reactor shutdown weighted by the mean decay energies. Consequently, the method is strongly dependent on the available nuclear structure data. Nowadays, the method has been implemented in various burnup and depletion programs such as ORIGEN and CINDER. In this study, the decay heat measurements after thermal-neutron fission of 235U and 239Pu have been evaluated by the ORIGEN-S with the decay data and fission product yield libraries included in the SCALE-6.1.3 software package. The new libraries were applied to the decay heat calculations, and the results were compared with those by the ORIGEN reference calculation. The decay heat measurements for very short cooling times after thermal-neutron fission of 235U and 239Pu have been evaluated by the ORIGEN-S summation calculation. The reference calculation results by the latest ORIGEN data libraries of the SCALE-6.1.3 have been validated with the measurements by ORNL and Studsvik. In addition, the generation of the new ORIGEN yield libraries has been completed based on the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.1, JENDL/FPY-2011, and JENDL-4.0. The new libraries have been successfully applied to the decay heat calculations and comparative analyses have been devoted to verifying the importance of the fission product yield data when estimating the decay heat values for each isotope in a very short time. The decay data library occupies an important position in the ORIGEN summation calculation along with the fission product yield library

  2. Measurement of fission yields from the 241Am(2nth,f reaction at the Lohengrin Spectrometer

    Amouroux Ch.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. While the yields are known for the major actinides (235U, 239Pu in the thermal neutron-induced fission, only few measurements have been performed on 242Am. This paper presents the results of a measurement at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer (ILL, France on the reaction 241Am(2nth,f: a total of 41 mass yields in the light and the heavy peaks have been measured and compared with the fission process simulation code GEF. Modus operandi and first results of a second experiment performed in May 2013 on the same reaction but with the goal of extracting the isotopic yields are presented as well: 8 mass yields were re-measured and 18 isotopic yields have been investigated and are being analyzed. Results concerning the kinetic energy and its comparison with the GEF Code are also presented in this paper.

  3. Contribution to the design, fulfillment, and data analysis of fission fragment yields of the SOFIA experiment at GSI

    The isotopic fission yields of U 238 following the SOFIA experiment, conducted at the GSI facility (Darmstadt), are presented here. This experiment takes advantage of the inverse kinematics technique at relativistic energies. Benefits are several: fission fragments are highly focused (high geometrical efficiency) and are also completely stripped, which greatly simplifies their nuclear charge measurement. The first detector of the SOFIA setup is an active target in which fission occurs via electromagnetic excitation, followed by an ionization chamber to measure the nuclear charge and the horizontal angle of both fission fragments. The masses are deduced by the bending radius measurement of the fragments, deflected by a strong magnet (ALADIN), thanks to two position detectors (MWPC), and also by a highly resolved time-of-flight measurement (40 ps FWHM) so that heavy neighboring isotopes can be separated. The data analysis shows that the main goals are achieved since the isotopic separation is reached over the whole range of the fission fragments. A strong even-odd effect is seen in the charge spectrum, which also exhibits a mean heavy charge close to Z = 54. Surprisingly, the neutron even-odd effect of the light region is seen to be very close to the one in thermal neutron induced fission. The peak-to-valley ratio of the mass spectrum confirms that the mean excitation energy at fission is close to the expected one (14 MeV). The GEF code is used for comparison and always gives results very close to ours. (author)

  4. Determination of 235U isotope abundance by difference method of fission yield

    Background: Determination of the uranium isotope abundance ratio of fuel pins is a significant stage for the quality control in safe operations of reactor. Purpose: The aim is to establish a method to examine the 235U abundance of fuel rod with fast neutron as an excitation source. Methods: Taking the fission-yield ratios of Y-bar88Rb/Y-bar104Tc and Y-bar92Sr/Y-bar104Tc as the subjects of research, the relation curves between the average yield ratios and the 235U isotopic abundance as well as the expressions Y-bar1/Y-bar2=f(H0), in which the average yield ratio (Y-bari/Y-barj ) is a function of the 235U isotopic abundance (H0), were obtained and presented based on the previous studies. Results: In order to testify the accuracy of the method, the simulation sample of 72.2% is measured by working curve, and RSD is less than 2%. Within the limit of error, the results of sample analysis are in correspondence with those of passive gamma ray method. Conclusion: All of these results indicate that the method is feasible to determine the 235U abundance of fuel rod. (authors)

  5. A Proposed Method for Measurement of Absolute Air Fluorescence Yield based on High Resolution Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Gika, V; Maltezos, S

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a method for absolute measurement of air fluorescence yield based on high resolution optical emission spectroscopy. The absolute measurement of the air fluorescence yield is feasible using the Cherenkov light, emitted by an electron beam simultaneously with the fluorescence light, as a "standard candle". The separation of these two radiations can be accomplished exploiting the "dark" spectral regions of the emission band systems of the molecular spectrum of nitrogen. In these "dark" regions the net Cherenkov light can be recorded experimentally and be compared with the calculated one. The instrumentation for obtaining the nitrogen molecular spectra in high resolution and the noninvasive method for monitoring the rotational temperature of the emission process are also described. For the experimental evaluation of the molecular spectra analysis we used DC normal glow discharges in air performed in an appropriate spectral lamp considered as an air-fluorescence light emulator. The propose...

  6. Compilation and evaluation of fission yield nuclear data. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1991-1996

    Fission product yields are required at several stages of the nuclear fuel cycle and are therefore included in all large international data files for reactor calculations and related applications. Such files are maintained and disseminated by the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA as a member of an international data centres network. Users of these data are from the fields of reactor design and operation, waste management and nuclear materials safeguards, all of which are essential parts of the IAEA programme. In the 1980s, the number of measured fission yields increased so drastically that the manpower available for evaluating them to meet specific user needs was insufficient. To cope with this task, it was concluded in several meetings on fission product nuclear data, some of them convened by the IAEA, that international co-operation was required, and an IAEA co-ordinated research project (CRP) was recommended. This recommendation was endorsed by the International Nuclear Data Committee, an advisory body for the nuclear data programme of the IAEA. As a consequence, the CRP on the Compilation and Evaluation of Fission Yield Nuclear Data was initiated in 1991, after its scope, objectives and tasks had been defined by a preparatory meeting. The different tasks, such as special evaluations and development of improved methods, were distributed among participants. The results of the research work were discussed and approved by all participants in research co-ordination meetings. For a successful development of theoretical and empirical models, experiments had to be recommended and their results to be awaited, which made necessary an extension of the CRP by two years. This TECDOC is the result of a joint effort of all participants in this CRP. The individual sections represent CRP tasks and were prepared by the participants responsible for doing the research, some of which comprise significant new scientific developments. The appendices to this book contain voluminous

  7. Advanced model for the prediction of the neutron-rich fission product yields

    Rubchenya V.A.; Gorelov D.; Jokinen A.; Penttilä H.; Äystö J.

    2013-01-01

    The consistent models for the description of the independent fission product formation cross sections in the spontaneous fission and in the neutron and proton induced fission at the energies up to 100 MeV is developed. This model is a combination of new version of the two-component exciton model and a time-dependent statistical model for fusion-fission process with inclusion of dynamical effects for accurate calculations of nucleon composition and excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus a...

  8. Mass Yields and Average Total Kinetic Energy Release in Fission for 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    Duke, Dana

    2015-10-01

    Mass yield distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) in neutron induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu targets were measured with a gridded ionization chamber. Despite decades of fission research, our understanding of how fragment mass yields and TKE depend on incident neutron energy is limited, especially at higher energies (above 5-10 MeV). Improved accuracy in these quantities is important for nuclear technology as it enhances our simulation capabilities and increases the confidence in diagnostic tools. The data can also guide and validate theoretical fission models where the correlation between the fragment mass and TKE is of particular value for constraining models. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) provides a neutron beam with energies from thermal to hundreds of MeV, well-suited for filling in the gaps in existing data and exploring fission behavior in the fast neutron region. The results of the studies on target nuclei 235U, 238U, and 239Pu will be presented with a focus on exploring data trends as a function of neutron energy from thermal through 30 MeV. Results indicate clear evidence of structure due to multi-chance fission in the TKE . LA-UR-15-24761.

  9. Yield of Prompt Gamma Radiation in Slow-Neutron Induced Fission of 235U a a Function of the Total Fragment Kinetic Energy

    Fission gamma radiation yields as functions of the total fragment kinetic energy were obtained for 235U thermal-neutron induced fission. The fragments were detected with silicon surface-barrier detectors and the gamma radiation with a Nal(Tl) scintillator. In some of the measurements mass selection was used so that the gamma radiation could also be measured as a function of fragment mass. Time discrimination between the fission gammas and the prompt neutrons released in the fission process was employed to reduce the background. The gamma radiation emitted during different time intervals after the fission event was studied with the help of a collimator, the position of which was changed along the path of the fission fragments. Fission-neutron and gamma-ray data of previous experiments were used for comparisons of the yields, and estimates were made of the variation of the prompt gamma-ray energy with the total fragment kinetic energy

  10. Fission fragment mass yield deduced from density distribution in the pre-scission configuration

    Warda, M.; Zdeb, A.

    2015-01-01

    Static self-consistent methods usually allow to determine the most probable fission fragments mass asymmetry. We have applied random neck rupture mechanism to the nuclei in the configuration at the end of fission paths. Fission fragment mass distributions have been deduced from the pre-scission nuclear density distribution obtained from the self-consistent calculations. Potential energy surfaces as well as nuclear shapes have been calculated in the fully microscopic theory, namely the constra...

  11. On the absolute calibration of a DT fusion neutron yield diagnostic

    Ruiz C.L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility (NIF have underscored the need for accurate total yield measurements of DT neutrons because yield measurements provide a measure of the predicted performance of the experiments. Future gas-puff DT experiments at Sandia National Laboratory's Z facility will also require similar measurements. For ICF DT experiments, the standard technique for measuring the neutron (14.1 MeV yield, counts the activity (counts/minute induced in irradiated copper samples. This activity occurs by the 63Cu(n,2n62Cu reaction where 62Cu decays by positrons (β+ with a half-life of 9.67 minutes. The calibrations discussed here employ the associated-particle method (APM, where the α (4He particles from the T(d,n4He reaction are measured to infer neutron fluxes on a copper sample. The flux induces 62Cu activity, measured in a coincidence counting system. The method leads to a relationship between a DT neutron yield and copper activity known as the F-factor. The goal in future experiments is to apply this calibration to measure the yield at NIF with a combined uncertainty approaching 5%.

  12. Contribution to the measurement of absolute activity of electron capture decaying nuclides. Determination of the fluorescence yield of some elements

    The object of this work is the study of techniques of measurement of the absolute activity of electron capture nuclides. Two methods have been specially studied. Determination of the number of X rays emitted from the K shell due to the reorganization of atomic electrons following electron capture. This measurement was made with a high pressure (5 kg/cm2) 4π proportional counter. The absorption in the source and the backing were also studied. To determine the absolute activity it is necessary to know the fluorescence yield and the different capture probabilities PL and PK. When the electron capture is followed by γ emission (within the resolution time of the coincidence circuit) the activity was determined through the X-γ coincidence method. In such a case it is not necessary to know the fluorescence yield and the capture probabilities. Various corrections - dead time, chance coincidences - were also studied. This method minimizes the decay scheme corrections. By applying these two methods to the following nuclides: Cr51, Mn54 and Zn65, the corresponding fluorescence yields have been determined: vanadium ωK = 0.191 ±0.002, chromium ωK = 0.262 ± 0.002 and copper ωK = 0.390 ± 0.004. (author)

  13. Detection of sputtered and evaporated carbon aggregates: relative and absolute electron ionization fragmentation yields

    The present study is a first attempt to determine electron impact ionization efficiencies for C2 and C3. A novel method has been applied to obtain the partial cross-section values for the reactions C2+e→C+,C2+e→C2+ and C3+e→C+,C3+e→C2+ and C3+e→C3+. The neutral target consisting of C, C2 and C3 is produced by thermal evaporation from a heated graphite sample and the neutral precursors in the subsequent ionization process can be distinguished by their different flight-time distributions acquired in the evaporation process. The partial ionization cross-section ratios obtained in this experiment have been calibrated with calculated absolute total ionization cross section curves of C2 and C3 using the Deutsch-Maerk (DM) formalism

  14. Miniature high-throughput chemosensing of yield, ee, and absolute configuration from crude reaction mixtures.

    Bentley, Keith W; Zhang, Peng; Wolf, Christian

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput experimentation (HTE) has emerged as a widely used technology that accelerates discovery and optimization processes with parallel small-scale reaction setups. A high-throughput screening (HTS) method capable of comprehensive analysis of crude asymmetric reaction mixtures (eliminating product derivatization or isolation) would provide transformative impact by matching the pace of HTE. We report how spontaneous in situ construction of stereodynamic metal probes from readily available, inexpensive starting materials can be applied to chiroptical chemosensing of the total amount, enantiomeric excess (ee), and absolute configuration of a wide variety of amines, diamines, amino alcohols, amino acids, carboxylic acids, α-hydroxy acids, and diols. This advance and HTS potential are highlighted with the analysis of 1 mg of crude reaction mixtures of a catalytic asymmetric reaction. This operationally simple assay uses a robust mix-and-measure protocol, is amenable to microscale platforms and automation, and provides critical time efficiency and sustainability advantages over traditional serial methods. PMID:26933684

  15. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm band in atmospheric gases

    Ave, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Curry, E.; Di Carlo, P.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J.; Hrabovský, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Li, S.; Monasor, M.; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Řídký, Jan; Rizi, V.; Rouille D’Orfeuil, B.; Salamida, F.; Schovánek, Petr; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 42, Feb (2013), 90-102. ISSN 0927-6505 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nitrogen fluorescence yield * air fluorescence detection * ultra-high energy cosmic rays Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.450, year: 2013

  16. Energy dependence of 238U fission yields investigated in inverse kinematics

    Veselsky M.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The production cross sections of neutron-rich fission residues produced in reactions induced by a 238U beam impinging onto Pb and Be targets were investigated at the Fragment Separator (FRS at GSI using the inverse kinematic technique. These data allowed us to discuss the optimum energies in fission for producing the most neutron-rich residues.

  17. A new evaluation of fission product yields and the production of a new library (UKFY2) of independent and cumulative yields. Pt. 3

    A new evaluation has been prepared of the independent and cumulative yields of the products of fission induced by thermal, fast, and 14 MeV neutrons in nuclides important for reactor design and operation and for fuel and waste management. Three spontaneously fissioning nuclides were also considered. The evaluation used a database that is considered to be complete up to early 1989. Careful study was made of experimental uncertainties and discrepancies, emphasising the need for further measurements. Gaps in the data were filled by interpolation and extrapolation, using fits to empirical models. The yields were adjusted to fit physical constraints of the fissioning process. The present report contains lists of chain and independent yields for which the experimental data may be regarded as inadequate. An entry is made if (i) there are no measurements, (ii) there is only one measurement, or (iii) there are several measurements but they are discrepant in the sense that the probability of the calculated value of χ2 arising by chance is less than 10%. So that the source of each measurement may be identified, the database reference list is included as an Appendix. (author)

  18. Fission products yield in the neutron-induced fission of 232Th using neutrons source from 7Li( p, n)7Be reaction at incident proton energy of 20 MeV

    This paper presents the measurement of fission product yields from the neutron induced fission of 232Th. These measurements were carried out using the neutron source from 7Li (p,n) reaction at TIFR-BARC Pelletron facility. The yields were obtained using activation and off-line gamma ray spectroscopic technique. The fission yields values are reported for twelve fission products. Activated targets were counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. The results obtained from the present work were compared with the similar data of mono-energetic neutrons of comparable energy from literature and are found to be in good agreement

  19. Systematic determination of the JET absolute neutron yield using the MPR spectrometer

    This thesis describes the first high-statistics systematic analysis of JET neutron yield and rate measurements obtained by using data acquired with the Magnetic Proton Recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer. The neutron yield and rate were determined by using the count-rate from the MPR neutron spectrometer together with neutron profile information from other neutron diagnostic systems. This has previously been done manually for a few pulses. To be able to do this in a more systematic way a part of the neutron spectrum evaluation code was extracted and put into a separate custom-made program and modifications were done to extract sets of MPR data automatically. The codes have been used for analysis of a large set of pulses from the deuterium-tritium campaign at JET in 1997. Several results were obtained, the most significant of which was the clear improvement seen when neutron profile corrections were applied. Neutron yield-rates derived from MPR count-rate are shown to be in excellent agreement with other JET neutron diagnostic data

  20. Systematic determination of the JET absolute neutron yield using the MPR spectrometer

    Kronborg-Pettersson, N

    2003-04-01

    This thesis describes the first high-statistics systematic analysis of JET neutron yield and rate measurements obtained by using data acquired with the Magnetic Proton Recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer. The neutron yield and rate were determined by using the count-rate from the MPR neutron spectrometer together with neutron profile information from other neutron diagnostic systems. This has previously been done manually for a few pulses. To be able to do this in a more systematic way a part of the neutron spectrum evaluation code was extracted and put into a separate custom-made program and modifications were done to extract sets of MPR data automatically. The codes have been used for analysis of a large set of pulses from the deuterium-tritium campaign at JET in 1997. Several results were obtained, the most significant of which was the clear improvement seen when neutron profile corrections were applied. Neutron yield-rates derived from MPR count-rate are shown to be in excellent agreement with other JET neutron diagnostic data.

  1. Measurement of mass and isotopic fission yields for heavy fission products with the LOHENGRIN mass spectrometer; Mesures de rendements isobariques et isotopiques des produits de fission lourds sur le spectrometre de masse LOHENGRIN

    Bail, A.

    2009-05-15

    In spite of the huge amount of fission yield data available in different libraries, more accurate values are still needed for nuclear energy applications and to improve our understanding of the fission process. Thus measurements of fission yields were performed at the mass spectrometer Lohengrin at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. The mass separator Lohengrin is situated at the research reactor of the institute and permits the placement of an actinide layer in a high thermal neutron flux. It separates fragments according to their atomic mass, kinetic energy and ionic charge state by the action of magnetic and electric fields. Coupled to a high resolution ionization chamber the experiment was used to investigate the mass and isotopic yields of the light mass region. Almost all fission yields of isotopes from Th to Cf have been measured at Lohengrin with this method. To complete and improve the nuclear data libraries, these measurements have been extended in this work to the heavy mass region for the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f), {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) and {sup 241}Pu(n{sub th},f). For these higher masses an isotopic separation is no longer possible. So, a new method was undertaken with the reaction {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) to determine the isotopic yields by spectrometry. These experiments have allowed to reduce considerably the uncertainties. Moreover the ionic charge state and kinetic energy distributions were specifically studied and have shown, among others, nanosecond isomers for some masses. (author)

  2. Identification of fission-like events in the 16O + 181Ta system: Mass and isotopic yield distribution

    In this paper, nuclear reaction cross sections for 24 fission-like fragments (30≤Z≤60) have been measured for the 6.5 MeV/A 16O + 181Ta system. The recoil-catcher activation technique was employed followed by off-line γ spectroscopy. The isotopic yield distributions for yttrium and indium isotopes have been obtained from the experimental data. The variance of the presently measured isotopic yield distributions have been found to be in agreement with the literature values. However, the variance of the mass distribution of fission residues has found to be narrower as compared to other relatively heavier systems. A self-consistent approach to determining the isobaric charge dispersion parameters has been adopted. The measured fission cross sections at 97 and 100 MeV are satisfactorily described by a statistical model code. An attempt has been made to explain the production cross sections of intermediate mass residues in the fission of heavy residues populated via complete and/or incomplete fusion processes.

  3. Impact of the fission yield nuclear data uncertainties in the pin-cell burn-up OECD/NEA UAM Benchmark

    The prediction of fission products and the impact of their uncertainties to different safety-related spent fuel applications (burn-up credit, decay heat generation, radiological safety, waste management, burn-up prediction) are required for the evaluation of spent fuel system designs and safety analysis options. One of the nuclear data needs to this prediction is the independent fission yields. The mostly used general-purpose evaluated nuclear data libraries provide these data including their uncertainties as standard deviation, with no-correlation between fission yields. However, new developments in the theory and measurements of fission product yields are expected to result in new evaluated files in the next coming years. These files will include considerably more accurate yields including neutron energy dependence combined with new covariance information allowing realistic uncertainty estimates. In this paper, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on criticality and depletion calculations. A LWR pin-cell burn-up benchmark, proposed in the general framework of the OECD/UAM Benchmark is analyzed to address the impact of independent fission yield uncertainties. Calculations were performed with the SCALE6 system and the ENDF/B-VII.1 fission yield data library, adding covariance data obtained from including covariance info of mass yields. Results are compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by ENDF/B-VII.1. The uncertainty quantification is performed with a Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. (author)

  4. Measurements of fission product yield in the neutron-induced fission of 238U with average energies of 9.35 MeV and 12.52 MeV

    The yields of various fission products in the neutron-induced fission of 238U with the flux-weighted averaged neutron energies of 9.35 MeV and 12.52 MeV were determined by using an off-line gamma ray spectroscopic technique. The neutrons were generated using the 7Li(p, n) reaction at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre-Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Pelletron facility, Mumbai. The gamma- ray activities of the fission products were counted in a highly-shielded HPGe detector over a period of several weeks to identify the decaying fission products. At both the neutron energies, the fission-yield values are reported for twelve fission product. The results obtained from the present work have been compared with the similar data for mono-energetic neutrons of comparable energy from the literature and are found to be in good agreement. The peak-to-valley (P/V) ratios were calculated from the fission-yield data and were found to decreases for neutron energy from 9.35 to 12.52 MeV, which indicates the role of excitation energy. The effect of the nuclear structure on the fission product-yield is discussed.

  5. Mass and Cumulative Yields in Near-Symmetric Fission of U235 with Thermal Neutrons. Part I. The 121-Mass Chain

    Determination of fission yield of mass 121 and of cumulative yields of members of that decay chain have been made as part of a study of symmetric and near-symmetric fission of uranium-235 with thermal neutrons. Fast chemical separation methods have been developed that permit isolation of selected fission product elements in 3-30 s. The methods have been applied to identification and characterization of new, short-lived radionuclides in addition to their use in studies of distribution of nuclear charge in fission. The cumulative fission yield of Sn121 (27.5h) was measured to be (1.1±0.1) 10-2% as compared to the single literature value of 1.5 x 10-2%. Taking the cumulative yield of Sn121m (∼25 yr) as 0,08 x 10-2%, and making the reasonable assumption that the independent fission yield of Sb121 is negligible, we obtain a fission mass yield of (1.2±0.1) 10-2% for mass chain 121 in thermal-neutron fission of uranium-235. Identification of Cd121 was made. Its half-life and cumulative fission yield were determined to be 12.8+0.4-0.3 s and (6.4±0.5) 10-3% respectively. If the nuclear charge distribution curve is Gaussian and if a width parameter o of 0.62 as given by Wahl et al. is taken, the cumulative fission yield of Cd121 leads to a value of 48.35 for the most probable nuclear charge (Zp) for mass chain 121. This value of Zp, combined with published values for other mais chains more removed from symmetric fission, indicates in a preliminary way that the Zp function proceeds towards the point of symmetric fission by a gentle rather than an abrupt approach. Fast chemical separation techniques have been developed based on sublimation of metal chelates, precipitation and metal reduction reactions. Isolation of indium in about 30 s was accomplished by precipitation and sublimation of its acetylacetonate. With this procedure the cumulative fission yield of In121 (3.1 min) was determined to be 3.2 x 10-3%. Cadmium as an ammine complex was separated in 3 s from hydroxide

  6. Isoscaling and fission modes in the yields of the Kr and Xe isotopes from photofission of actinides

    Drnoyan, J.; Zhemenik, V. I.; Mishinsky, G. V.

    2016-05-01

    Yields of Kr and Xe isotopes in photofission of 232Th, 238U, 237Np, 244Pu, 243Am, and 248Cm were tested for isoscaling dependence. Isoscaling for Kr is revealed. For Xe, isoscaling is found to be affected by the STI and STII fission modes governed by the N = 82 and N = 88 neutron shells. The work was performed at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR).

  7. Fission fragment mass yield deduced from density distribution in the pre-scission configuration

    Warda, M

    2015-01-01

    Static self-consistent methods usually allow to determine the most probable fission fragments mass asymmetry. We have applied random neck rupture mechanism to the nuclei in the configuration at the end of fission paths. Fission fragment mass distributions have been deduced from the pre-scission nuclear density distribution obtained from the self-consistent calculations. Potential energy surfaces as well as nuclear shapes have been calculated in the fully microscopic theory, namely the constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogolubov model with the effective Gogny D1S density-dependent interaction. The method has been applied for analysis of fission of Fm-256,258, Cf-252 and Hg-180 and compared with the experimental data.

  8. Fission fragment mass yield deduced from density distribution in the pre-scission configuration

    Warda, M.; Zdeb, A.

    2015-11-01

    Static self-consistent methods usually allow one to determine the most probable fission fragments mass asymmetry. We have applied random neck rupture mechanism to the nuclei in the configuration at the end of fission paths. Fission fragment mass distributions have been deduced from the pre-scission nuclear density distribution obtained from the self-consistent calculations. Potential energy surfaces as well as nuclear shapes have been calculated in the fully microscopic theory, namely the constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model with the effective Gogny D1S density-dependent interaction. The method has been applied for analysis of fission of {}{256,258}Fm, 252Cf and 180Hg and compared with the experimental data.

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Mass and nuclear charge yields for sup 237 Np(2n sub th ,f) at different fission fragment kinetic energies

    Martinez, G.; Barreau, G.; Sicre, A.; Doan, T.P.; Audouard, P.; Leroux, B. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, 33 - Gradignan (France)); Arafa, W.; Brissot, R.; Bocquet, J.P. (Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France). Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires); Faust, H. (Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Koczon, P.; Mutterer, M. (Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernphysik); Goennenwein, F. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.); Asghar, M. (Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Algiers (Algeria). Inst. de Physique); Quade, U.; Rudolph, K. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Engelhardt, D. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.)); Piasecki, E. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland))

    1990-09-03

    The recoil mass separator LOHENGRIN of the Laue-Langevin Institute Grenoble has been used to measure for the first time, the yields of light fission fragments from the fissioning system: {sub 93}{sup 239}Np; this odd-Z nucleus is formed after double thermal neutron capture in a {sub 93}{sup 237}Np target. The mass distributions were measured for different kinetic energies between 92 and 115.5 MeV, but the nuclear charge distributions were determined only up to 112 MeV. These distributions are compared to the distributions obtained for the even-even system {sub 94}{sup 240}Pu. At high kinetic energy, the mass distribution shows a prominent peak around mass number A{sub L}=106. These cold fragmentations are discussed in terms of a calculation based on a scission point model extrapolated to the cold fission case. As expected for an odd-Z fissioning nucleus, the nuclear charge distributions do not reveal any odd-even effect. The global neutron odd-even effect is found to be (8.1{plus minus}1.5)%. A simple model has been used to show that most of the neutron odd-even effect results from prompt neutron evaporation from the fragments. (orig.).

  12. Benchmarking Nuclear Fission Theory

    G. F. Bertsch(INT, Seattle, USA); Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Talou, P.

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. The purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of the neutron capture and fission yields of {sup 233}U

    Berthoumieux, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.A.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.A.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapic, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    We have measured the neutron capture and fission cross section of {sup 233}U at the neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV with high accuracy by using a high performance 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) as a detection device. The method, based on the shape analysis of the TAC energy response, allowing to disentangle between {gamma}'s originating from fission and capture will be presented as well as the first very preliminary results. (authors)

  14. Simultaneous measurement of the neutron capture and fission yields of 233U

    We have measured the neutron capture and fission cross section of 233U at the neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV with high accuracy by using a high performance 4π BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) as a detection device. The method, based on the shape analysis of the TAC energy response, allowing to disentangle between γ's originating from fission and capture will be presented as well as the first very preliminary results. (authors)

  15. Measurements of the yields of the light fission products from the reaction 233U(nsub(th),f) by a ionization chamber

    The aim of this thesis was to develop a new measuring apparature and measuring method which allows to study together with the mass separator 'Lohengrin' at the high flux reactor in Grenoble in realizable measurement times detailedly the unknown mass, nuclear charge, and energy distributions of the fission products resulting from the fission of 233U with thermal neutrons. First the yields and the energy distributions of the masses, thereafter the yields and the energy distributions of the isobaric nuclear charges of the light fission products in the mass range 79<=Asub(L)<=106 are measured. The measuring method for the determination of the mass yields consists of a energy measurement of the fission products separated in the mass separator by a ionization chamber. The isobaric nuclear charges and their yields are determined by the nuclear-charge-specific energy-loss method from the residual-energy spectra behind an absorber. (orig./HSI)

  16. Use of proportional counter in X-Ray spectrometry between 5 and 100 keV. Application to the detection of fission products and to the determination of absolute X-Ray disintegration rates

    The measurement of electromagnetic radiations is difficult in the energy range 20-100 keV. We made suitable for this purpose a regular proportional counter, modifying both the nature and pressure of the gaseous mixture filling the detector volume. We selected the CPEN-SAIP counter, which is able to withstand such modifications. In the energy range considered, the counter is to be standardized with radioactive sources. Such standards were selected according to their disintegration schemes. We thus defined the conditions of use (resolution, yield) of the CPN counter, filled with an argon-methane mixture under a pressure of about 3 bars, in the energy range 5-100 keV. With such an equipment, we were able to measure the absolute disintegration rate for the X-rays of 133 Ba and 75 Se, then to perform the study of a mixed fission products sample. In the same way, we used xenon-based gaseous mixtures, in order to improve the detector yield; in the later case, we carefully examined the limitations introduced by the presence of many parasite rays emitted by the gas. We thus displayed in addition to the leakage peak, the fluorescence ray of the gas, whose origin is difficult to explain. (author)

  17. High Triplet Yield from Singlet Fission in a Thin Film of 1,3-Diphenylisobenzofuran

    Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 46 (2010), s. 16302-16303. ISSN 0002-7863 Grant ostatní: Department of Energy(US) XAT-5-33636-01; Department of Energy(US) DE-FG36-08GO18017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : singlet fission * thin solid films * heterocycles Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.019, year: 2010

  18. Determination of 114Pd cumulative yield and investigation of the fine-structure at light peak in mass distribution of 252Cf spontaneous fission

    A rapid radiochemical procedure for Pd separation was developed. It was the first time to use radiochemical techniques to determine 114Pd cumulative yield (2.50 ± 0.14)% in 252Cf spontaneous fission. The cumulative yields of (3.50 ± 0.13)% and (3.70 ± 0.11)% for 112Pd and 113gAg were also obtained. These are in agreement with Skovorodkin's results. The cumulative yields determined show that there is a fine-structure at light peak of mass number A = 113 in the mass distribution of 252Cf spontaneous fission

  19. Measurement of absolute light yield and determination of a lower limit for the light attenuation length for YAP:Ce crystal

    The aim of this work was to study the peak position of the photoabsorption peak as a function of the interaction distance from the photomultiplier window in order to get some information about the light attenuation length, internal reflectivity and absolute light yield for a 2 x 2 x 30 mm3 YAP:Ce scintillator

  20. Microstructural origins of yield strength changes in AISI 316 during fission or fusion irradiation

    The changes in yield strength of AISI 316 irradiated in breeder reactors have been successfully modeled in terms of concurrent changes in microstructural components. Two new insights involving the strength contributions of voids and Frank loops have been incorporated into the hardening models. Both the radiation-induced microstructure and the yield strength exhibit transients which are then followed by saturation at a level dependent on the irradiation temperature. Extrapolation to anticipated fusion behavior based on microstructural comparisons leads to the conclusion that the primary influence of transmutational differences is only to alter the transient behavior and not the saturation level of yield strength

  1. Reliability of Monte Carlo simulations in modeling neutron yields from a shielded fission source

    McArthur, Matthew S.; Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2016-08-01

    Using the combination of a neutron-sensitive 6Li glass scintillator detector with a neutron-insensitive 7Li glass scintillator detector, we are able to make an accurate measurement of the capture rate of fission neutrons on 6Li. We used this detector with a 252Cf neutron source to measure the effects of both non-borated polyethylene and 5% borated polyethylene shielding on detection rates over a range of shielding thicknesses. Both of these measurements were compared with MCNP calculations to determine how well the calculations reproduced the measurements. When the source is highly shielded, the number of interactions experienced by each neutron prior to arriving at the detector is large, so it is important to compare Monte Carlo modeling with actual experimental measurements. MCNP reproduces the data fairly well, but it does generally underestimate detector efficiency both with and without polyethylene shielding. For non-borated polyethylene it underestimates the measured value by an average of 8%. This increases to an average of 11% for borated polyethylene.

  2. Fission product data library

    A library is described of data for 584 isotopes of fission products, including decay constants, branching ratios (both burn-up and decay), the type of emitted radiation, relative and absolute yields, capture cross sections for thermal neutrons, and resonance integrals. When a detailed decay scheme is not known, the mean energies of beta particles and neutrino and gamma radiations are given. In the ZVJE SKODA system the library is named BIBFP and is stored on film No 49 of the NE 803 B computer. It is used in calculating the inventory of fission products in fuel elements (and also determining absorption cross sections for burn-up calculations, gamma ray sources, heat generation) and in solving radioactivity transport problems in the primary circuit. It may also be used in the spectrometric method for burn-up determination of fuel elements. The library comprises the latest literary data available. It serves as the basis for library BIBGRFP storing group constants of fission products with independent yields of isotopes from fission. This, in turn, forms the basis for the BIBDN library collecting data on the precursors of delayed neutron emitters. (author)

  3. Measurement of Fragment Mass Yields in Neutron-Induced Fission of 232TH and 238U at 33, 45 and 60 Mev

    Simutkin, V. D.; Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Österlund, M.; Andersson, P.; Bevilacqua, R.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Khlopin, V. G.; Onegin, M. S.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Meulders, J. P.; Prieels, R.

    2011-10-01

    Over the past years, a significant effort has been devoted to measurements of neutron-induced fission cross-sections at intermediate energies but there is a lack of experimental data on fission yields. Here we describe recent measurements of pre-neutron emission fragment mass distributions from intermediate energy neutron-induced fission of 232Th and 238U. The measurements have been done at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE and neutron peak energies at 32.8, 45.3 and 59.9 MeV. A multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The measurement results are compared with available experimental data. Some TALYS code modifications done to describe the experimental results are discussed.

  4. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors.

    Waugh, C J; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule. PMID:26026524

  5. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule

  6. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    Waugh, C. J., E-mail: cjwaugh@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  7. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule

  8. Review of fission product yields and delayed neutron data for the actinides NP-237, PU-242, AM-242M, AM-243, CM-243 and CM-245

    A review of fission product yields and delayed neutron data for Np-237, Pu-242, Am-242m, Am-243, Cm-243 and Cm-245 has been undertaken. Gaps in understanding and inconsistencies in existing data were identified and priority areas for further experimental, theoretical and evaluation investigation detailed

  9. Variation of Fission-Fragment Kinetic Energy Distribution, Mass Distribution, and Yield of Long-Range Alpha Particles in the Resonance-Neutron-Induced Fission of U235 and Pu239

    These measurements were undertaken to obtain additional information on the fission process, and to investigate the application of this information to the assignment of J-values to resonance levels, as the usual methods of determining J-values are of limited applicability in the case of fissile isotopes. An earlier study of U235 showed that the fission-fragment kinetic energy and the alpha yield varied significantly from level to level, and fell into two groups suggestive of the two possible J-values. The present paper reports on measurements on Pu239. A study of 19 levels shows 15 levels with high average kinetic energy and 4 levels with low average kinetic energy, the former being assigned J -1 and the latter J = 0 on the basis of the expected ratio of population of the two spin states and also for maximum compatibility with other determinations. Some variation of relative alpha-particle yield was found. It is concluded that (1) there are definite variations of kinetic energy of the fragments from level to level; (2) the variation in the case of U235 is correlated with the relative yield of symmetric fission; (3) there is some indication in the case of Pu239 that the variation of fragment energy is correlated with the J-values; and (4) the relative yield of alpha particles varies in an expected fashion. (author)

  10. The even-odd effect in fission-fragment Z yields – a new kind of nuclear clock

    Jurado Beatriz; Schmidt Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    A model for the even-odd effect in fission based on statistical mechanics is presented. It reveals that the variation of the even-odd effect with the mass of the fissioning nucleus and the increase towards asymmetric splits is due to the important statistical weight of configurations where the light fission fragment populates the ground state of an even-even nucleus. This implies that excitation energy and unpaired nucleons are predominantly transferred to the heavy fragment. Our results indi...

  11. Experimental Neutron-Induced Fission Fragment Mass Yields of 232Th and 238U at Energies from 10 to 33 MeV

    Simutkin, V. D.; Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Österlund, M.; R. Bevilacqua; Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Yavshits, S. G.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Onegin, M S; Meulders, J.P.; Prieels, R.

    2013-01-01

    Development of nuclear energy applications requires data for neutron-induced reactions for actinides in a wide neutron energy range. Here we describe measurements of pre-neutron emission fission fragment mass yields of 232Th and 238U at incident neutron energies from 10 to 33 MeV. The measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE; a multi-section twin Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used to detect fission fragments. For...

  12. Mass yields in the reaction 235U(nsub(th),f) as a function of the kinetic energy and ion charge of the fission products

    In this paper measurements of mass- and ioncharge distributions of the lower mass 235U(nsub(th),f)-fission products, performed with the 'Lohengrin' recoil spectrometer of the Institut Lane-Langevin at Grenoble, are reported. The uranium targets used led to an energy loss of the fission fragments of only 1 to 2 MeV, so their energy was well defined. The mass abundance have been measured for the following fragment energies: E = 83.6, 88.5, 93.4, 98.3, 103.1, 108.0, 112.0 MeV. The energy integrated mass distributions were compared with recent data collections of fission yields. For nearly all masses the abundancies agree well within the limits of error. So these maesurements can be used as an independent source of data. (orig./RW)

  13. Energies and Yields of Prompt Gamma Rays from Fragments in Slow-Neutron Induced Fission of 235U

    Measurements were made on the gamma radiation emitted from fission fragments in slow-neutron induced fission of 235U. The fragments were detected with solid state detectors of the surface barrier type and the gamma radiation with a Nal(Tl) scintillator. Mass selection was used so that the gamma radiation could be measured as a function of fragment mass. Time discrimination between the fission gammas and the prompt neutrons released in the fission process was employed to reduce the background. The gamma radiation emitted during different time intervals after the fission event was studied with the help of a collimator, the position of which was changed along the path of the fission fragments. In this way it was possible to select various collimator settings and let gamma radiation of different half-lives be enhanced. Gamma-ray energy spectra from these time components were then recorded as function of mass. The spectrum shape differed greatly depending on the half-life of the radiation and the fragment from which it was emitted. The results of the present measurements were discussed in the light of existing fission models, and comparisons were made with prompt gamma-ray and neutron data from other fission experiments

  14. Development of ionization technique for measurement of fast neutron induced fission products yields of {sup 237}Np

    Goverdovski, A.A.; Khryachkov, V.A.; Ketlerov, V.V.; Mitrofanov, V.F.; Ostapenko, Yu.B.; Semenova, N.N.; Fomichev, A.N.; Rodina, L.F. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    Twin gridded ionization chamber and corresponding software was designed for measurements of masses, kinetic energies and nuclear charges of fission fragments from fast neutron induced fission of {sup 237}Np. The ionization detector design, electronics, data acquisition and processing system and the test results are presented in this paper. (J.P.N.)

  15. Direct detection of neutral metal atoms in electron-stimulated desorption: Al from CH3O/Al(111) - velocity distribution and absolute yield

    Electron-stimulated desorption of neutral aluminum from the system CH3O/Al(111) has been directly monitored via quasiresonant photoionization with 193 nm excimer laser light and confirmed by two-step resonant ionization, utilizing the Al 3d 2D manifold. Velocity distribution measurements for the neutral Al peak at ∼ 800 m/s for 1 keV incident electron energy. An absolute yield of 3.2 x 10-6 Al atoms/electron was determined by comparison with sputtering measurements in the same apparatus. This is the first observation of electron-stimulated metal desorption from adsorbate-covered metallic surfaces

  16. The even-odd effect in fission-fragment Z yields – a new kind of nuclear clock

    Jurado Beatriz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A model for the even-odd effect in fission based on statistical mechanics is presented. It reveals that the variation of the even-odd effect with the mass of the fissioning nucleus and the increase towards asymmetric splits is due to the important statistical weight of configurations where the light fission fragment populates the ground state of an even-even nucleus. This implies that excitation energy and unpaired nucleons are predominantly transferred to the heavy fragment. Our results indicate that the time for transfer of excitation energy and nucleons is shorter than the saddle-to-scission time.

  17. The even-odd effect in fission-fragment Z yields - A new kind of nuclear clock

    A model for the even-odd effect in fission based on statistical mechanics is presented. It reveals that the variation of the even-odd effect with the mass of the fissioning nucleus and the increase towards asymmetric splits is due to the important statistical weight of configurations where the light fission fragment populates the ground state of an even-even nucleus. This implies that excitation energy and unpaired nucleons are predominantly transferred to the heavy fragment. Our results indicate that the time for transfer of excitation energy and nucleons is shorter than the saddle-to-scission time. (authors)

  18. Monte Carlo analysis of direct measurements of the fission neutron yield per absorption by 233U and 235U of monochromatic neutrons

    Monte Carlo analysis of the measurements of Smith et al. of the number of fission neutrons produced per neutron absorbed, eta, for 2200 m/sec neutrons absorbed by 233U and 235U yields: eta2200233 = 2.2993 +- 0.0082 and eta2200235 = 2.0777 +- 0.0064. The standard deviations include Monte Carlo, cross section, and experimental uncertainties. The Monte Carlo analysis was confirmed by calculating measured quantities used by the experimentalists in determining eta2200

  19. Rare-gas yields in 238U and 232Th fission by 14MeV neutrons, measured by an emanating method

    A direct method, using emanation of rare gases by uranyle stearate and thorium stearate, has been applied to the measurement of cumulative fractional yields of certain isotopes of krypton and xenon, in the fissions of 238U and 232Th by 14MeV-neutrons. The independent yields of the same isotopes were measured previously by means of isotopic on-line separation. From these results, the widths of the mass and charge distributions, the relative chain yields, the fractional cumulative yields of certain bromine and iodine isotopes, the values of Zsub(p) the most probable charge, in the isobaric chains 87-93 and 137-142, and the elemental yields of krypton and xenon were calculated

  20. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  1. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of nitrogen in air. Consequences on the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    The study of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (E > 1020 eV) requires to determine the energy with much more precision than what is currently achieved. The shower of particles created in the atmosphere can be detected either by sampling particle on the ground, or by detecting the fluorescence induced by the excitation of nitrogen by shower electrons. At present, the measurement of the fluorescence is the simplest and the most reliable method, since it does not call upon hadronic physics laws at extreme energies, a field still inaccessible to accelerators. The precise knowledge of the conversion factor between deposited energy and the number of fluorescence photons produced (the yield) is thus essential. Up to now, it has been determined with an accuracy of 15 % only. This main goal of this work is to measure this yield to better than 5 per cent. To do this, 1 MeV electrons from a radioactive source excite nitrogen of the air. The accuracy has been reached thanks to the implementation of a new method for the absolute calibration of the photomultipliers detecting the photons, to better than 2 per cent. The fluorescence yield, measured and normalized to 0.85 MeV, 760 mmHg and 15 Celsius degrees, is (4.23 ± 0.20) photons per meter, or (20.46 ± 0.98) photons per deposited MeV. In addition, and for the first time, the absolute fluorescence spectrum of nitrogen excited by a source has been measured with an optical grating spectrometer. (author)

  2. Technique of absolute efficiency determination for gamma radiation semiconductor detectors

    Simple technique is suggested to determine the absolute efficiency (E) of semiconductor detectors (SCD) which employes low-intensity neutron sources wide spread in scientific laboratories. The technique is based on using radioactive nuclide gamma radiation in decay chains of heavy element fission fragments, uranium-235, for example. Cumulative yields of a number of nulcides following heavy element fission are measured to a high accuracy (1-5%), which permits to . the value E is determined for a wide energy range (from X- ray to some MeV); using a nuclide with a well known decay scheme and measured to a high accuracy cumulative yield 140La, for example, one can calibrate in absolute values comparatively easily obtained plots of the SCD relative efficiency. The technique allows to determine the E value for extended plane (and volumetric) sources of an arbitrary form. Some nuclides, convenient for the determination of E, and their nuclear characteristics are tabulated

  3. Experimental Neutron-Induced Fission Fragment Mass Yields of 232Th and 238U at Energies from 10 to 33 MeV

    Simutkin, V D; Blomgren, J; Österlund, M; Bevilacqua, R; Ryzhov, I V; Tutin, G A; Yavshits, S G; Vaishnene, L A; Onegin, M S; Meulders, J P; Prieels, R

    2013-01-01

    Development of nuclear energy applications requires data for neutron-induced reactions for actinides in a wide neutron energy range. Here we describe measurements of pre-neutron emission fission fragment mass yields of 232Th and 238U at incident neutron energies from 10 to 33 MeV. The measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE; a multi-section twin Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used to detect fission fragments. For the peak neutron energies at 33, 45 and 60 MeV, the details of the data analysis and the experimental results have been published before and in this work we present data analysis in the low-energy tail of the neutron energy spectra. The preliminary measurement results are compared with available experimental data and theoretical predictions.

  4. Absolute quantum yield measurements for the formation of oxygen atoms after UV laser excitation of SO2 at 222.4 nm

    Mohammed Abu-Bajeh; Melanie Cameron; Kyung-Hoon Jung; Christoph Kappel; Almuth Läuter; Kyoung-Seok Lee; Hari P Upadhyaya; Rajesh K Vatsa; Hans-Robert Volpp

    2002-12-01

    The dynamics of formation of oxygen atoms after UV photoexcitation of SO2 in the gas-phase was studied by pulsed laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence `pump-and-probe' technique in a flow reactor. SO2 at room-temperature was excited at the KrCl excimer laser wavelength (222.4 nm) and O(3P) photofragments were detected under collision-free conditions by vacuum ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence. The use of narrow-band probe laser radiation, generated via resonant third-order sum-difference frequency conversion of dye laser radiation in Krypton, allowed the measurement of the nascent O(3P=2,1,0) fine-structure state distribution: =2/=1/=0 = (0.88 ± 0.02)/(0.10 ± 0.01)/(0.02 ± 0.01). Employing NO2 photolysis as a reference, a value of O(3P) = 0.13 ± 0.05 for the absolute O(3P) atom quantum yield was determined. The measured O(3P) quantum yield is compared with the results of earlier fluorescence quantum yield measurements. A suitable mechanism is suggested in which the dissociation proceeds via internal conversion from high rotational states of the initially excited SO2(∼ 1 B2) (1, 2, 2) vibronic level to nearby continuum states of the electronic ground state.

  5. The Energies, Angular Distribution and Yields of the Prompt Neutrons from Individual Fragments in the Thermal-Neutron Fission of U233 and U235

    An apparatus for simultaneously recording the velocities of both fission fragments and the velocity of a neutron at any one of four angles to the fragment direction has been used to investigate the neutron-emission properties of individual fragments. Early results for U233 exhibit the saw-tooth variation of v, the neutron yield per fragment, observed in the spontaneous fission of Cf252 The yields in the vicinity of mass 130 are consistent with no neutrons being emitted from these fragments. Unlike the neutron yields, the average neutron kinetic energy is symmetric about the symmetric mass point, being high near this point and low at the most probable mass division. The paradox between very small yields and high apparent nuclear temperatures has been qualitatively explained on the basis of a model that takes account of shell structure in the level densities and assumes that at the time of scission the fragments are cold but in some cases highly deformed, in others nearly spherical. The model is supported by the fact that in fissions with more than the average total excitation energy, the fragments near mass 130 and 80 receive much less than half the increase in energy and the other fragment of the pair much more. The experiment is now being conducted with U235 under considerably improved conditions. The background per channel under the neutron spectrum has been reduced by nearly a factor of three, so that 0.39 of all recorded events in the 10° detector are useful neutron events with a corresponding increase in statistical accuracy. Better time resolution in the fragment system (1.5 ns, full width at half maximum) has allowed the. flight paths to be shortened to 125 and 100 cm (formerly 145-145 cm) with a concomitant higher countings rate. (author)

  6. Methodology and experimental setup for measuring short-lives fission product yields in actinides induced fission by charged particles; Metodologia e montagem experimental para a medicao de rendimentos de produtos de fissao de meia vida curta na fissao de actinideos por particulas carregadas

    Bellido, A.V.

    1995-07-01

    The theoretical principles and the laboratory set-up for the fission products yields measurements are described. The procedures for the experimental determinations are explain in detail. (author). 43 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Potentialities and practical limitations of absolute neutron dosimetry using thin films of uranium and thorium applied to the fission track dating

    Bigazzi, G; Hadler-Neto, J C; Iunes, P J; Paulo, S R; Oddone, M; Osorio, A M A; Zúñiga, A G

    1999-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry using natural uranium and thorium thin films makes possible that mineral dating by the fission-track method can be accomplished, even when poor thermalized neutron facilities are employed. In this case, the contributions of the fissions of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th induced by thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons to the population of tracks produced during irradiation are quantified through the combined use of natural uranium and thorium films. If the Th/U ratio of the sample is known, only one irradiation (where the sample and the films of uranium and thorium are present) is necessary to perform the dating. However, if that ratio is unknown, it can be determined through another irradiation where the mineral to be dated and both films are placed inside a cadmium box. Problems related with film manufacturing and calibration are discussed. Special attention is given to the utilization of thin films having very low uranium content. The problems faced sugg...

  8. Measurements of yields of fission products in the reaction of {sup 238}U with high-energy p, d and n beams

    Nolen, J.A.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B. [and others

    1995-08-01

    An experiment was performed at the Michigan State University cyclotron to determine the yields of neutron-rich fission products in the reaction of {sup 238}U with 100-MeV neutrons, 200-MeV deuterons and 200-MeV protons. Several 1-mm-thick {sup 238}U foils were irradiated for 100-second intervals sequentially for each configuration and the ten spectra were added for higher statistics. The three successive spectra, each for a 40 s period, were accumulated for each sample. Ten foils were irradiated. Successive spectra allowed us to determine approximate half-lives of the gamma peaks. Several arrangements, which were similar to the setup we plan to use in our radioactive beam proposal, were used for the production of fission products. For the high-energy neutron irradiation, U foils were placed after a 5-inch-long, 1-inch-diameter Be cylinder which stopped the 200-MeV deuteron beam generating 100-MeV neutrons. Arrangements for deuteron irradiation included direct irradiation of U foils, placing U foils after different lengths of (0.5 inch, 1.0 inch and 1.5 inch) 2-inch diameter U cylinder. Since the deuteron range in uranium is 17 mm, some of the irradiations were due to the secondary neutrons from the deuteron-induced fission of U. Similar arrangements were also used for the 200-MeV proton irradiation of the {sup 238}U foils. In all cases, several neutron-rich fission products were identified and their yields determined. In particular, we were able to observe Sn in all the runs and determine its yield. The data show that with our proposed radioactive device we will be able to produce more than 10{sup 12} {sup 132}Sn atoms per second in the target. Assuming an overall efficiency of 1 %, we will be able to deliver one particle nanoampere of {sup 132}Sn beam at a target location. Detailed analysis of the {gamma}-ray spectra is in progress.

  9. Absolute rate constant and O(3P yield for the O(1D+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    S. A. Carl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The absolute rate constant for the reaction that is the major source of stratospheric NOx, O(1D+N2O → products, has been determined in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P. Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularly, O(3P yields, than do other methods. We found the rate constant, kR1, to be essentially independent of temperature between 400 K and 227 K, having a value of (1.37±0.11×10−10 cm3 s−1, and for temperatures greater than 450 K a marked decrease in rate constant was observed, with a rate constant of only (0.94±0.11×10−10 cm3 s−1 at 719 K. The rate constants determined over the 227 K–400 K range show very low scatter and are significantly greater, by 20% at room temperature and 15% at 227 K, than the current recommended values. The fraction of O(3P produced in this reaction was determined to be 0.002±0.002 at 250 K rising steadily to 0.010±0.004 at 600 K, thus the channel producing O(3P can be entirely neglected in atmospheric kinetic modeling calculations. A further result of this study is an expression of the relative quantum yields as a function of temperature for the chemiluminescence reactions (kCL1C2H + O(1D → CH(A + CO and (kCL2C2H + O(3P → CH(A + CO, both followed by CH(A → CH(X + hν, as kCL1(T/kCL2(T=(32.8T−3050/(6.29T+398.

  10. Experimental Neutron-induced Fission Fragment Mass Yields of 232Th and 238U at Energies from 10 to 33 Me

    Simutkin, V. D.; Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Österlund, M.; Bevilacqua, R.; Andersson, P.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Yavshits, S. G.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Onegin, M. S.; Meulders, J. P.; Prieels, R.

    2014-05-01

    Development of nuclear energy applications requires data for neutron-induced reactions for actinides in a wide neutron energy range. Here we describe measurements of pre-neutron emission fission fragment mass yields of 232Th and 238U at incident neutron energies from 10 to 33 MeV. The measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE; a multi-section twin Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used to detect fission fragments. For the peak neutron energies at 33, 45 and 60 MeV, the details of the data analysis and the experimental results were published in Ref. [I.V. Ryzhov, S.G. Yavshits, G.A. Tutin et al., Phys. Rev. C 83, 054603 (2011)]. In this work we present data analysis in the low-energy tail of the neutron energy spectra. The preliminary measurement results are compared with available experimental data and theoretical predictions.

  11. Experimental studies of fission properties utilized in reactor design

    Experimental studies of fission properties utilized in reactor design. A programme of experimental studies of fission parameters useful in reactor design is described including the following: (a) The periods and yields of delayed-neutron groups emitted following the neutron-induced fission of Pu241 are measured. Evidence for systematic isotopic dependence of delayed-neutron yields is presented. An experimental investigation of the relation between the time behaviour of delayed-neutron emission and the energy of the incident neutron inducing fission is described. (b) The cross-section for the inducing, of fission in Am243, Pu242 and Pu241 with neutrons in the energy range 0.030 to 1.8 MeV is measured. Emphasis is placed upon the detailed dependence of the fission cross-section on the incident-neutron energy. The absolute values of the cross-sections are given to a precision of ∼25%. (c) Detailed results of a measurement of the Pu241 fission-neutron spectrum are given, including the spectral shape and average fission-neutron energy. Techniques and methods of measuring prompt-fission-neutron spectra are described. (d) The dependence of #-v# (the average number of neutrons emitted per fission) of U235 on the incident neutron energy is measured from 100 keV to 1.6 MeV. #-v# of U238 and other fissile isotopes is compared to #-v# of U235 (thermal). The relative precision of the measurements is #>approx#1.2%. (author)

  12. Reaction rate, fission product yield, and Rossi-α measurements using a HEU metal, copper reflected critical assembly

    A critical experiment was performed on the Comet assembly to provide nuclear data in a non-thermal neutron spectrum and to re-establish experimental measurement capabilities relevant to the United States Department of Energy's general purpose nuclear criticality experiments capability and to the Technical Nuclear Forensic program. Activation and fission foils were placed at specific locations in the Zeus all-oralloy core, copper reflected critical experiment to infer spectral indices data and obtain reaction rates data. After the irradiation, passive gamma-ray measurements were performed on all the foils and several of them were packaged and shipped to Los Alamos National Laboratory for further radiochemical analysis. The results from the non-destructive and radiochemical analyses are presented in this paper. Finally, Rossi-α measurements were performed on a slightly modified configuration from the configuration used for the activation measurements. The Rossi-α results are presented and compared to past measurements performed using other critical assemblies. (author)

  13. Relative quantifying technique to measure mass of fission plate in a fission chamber

    Under the same neutron radiation conditions, fission counts are proportional to the number of fission nuclei. Based on this concept, a relative quantifying method has been developed to measure the mass of fission plate in fission chamber on a 14 MeV accelerator neutron source at the Neutron Physics Laboratory, INPC, CAEP. The experimental assembly was introduced and mass of the fission material in several fission chambers was measured. The results by this method agree well (within 1%) with the α-quantifying method. Therefore, it is absolutely feasible to quantify the fission plate mass in fission chambers. The measurement uncertainty is 2%-4%. (authors)

  14. To fission or not to fission

    Pomorski, Krzysztof; Ivanyuk, Fedir A

    2016-01-01

    The fission-fragments mass-yield of 236U is obtained by an approximate solution of the eigenvalue problem of the collective Hamiltonian that describes the dynamics of the fission process whose degrees of freedom are: the fission (elongation), the neck and the mass-asymmetry mode. The macroscopic-microscopic method is used to evaluate the potential energy surface. The macroscopic energy part is calculated using the liquid drop model and the microscopic corrections are obtained using the Woods-Saxon single-particle levels. The four dimensional modified Cassini ovals shape parametrization is used to describe the shape of the fissioning nucleus. The mass tensor is taken within the cranking-type approximation. The final fragment mass distribution is obtained by weighting the adiabatic density distribution in the collective space with the neck-dependent fission probability. The neck degree of freedom is found to play a significant role in determining that final fragment mass distribution.

  15. ENDF/B-6 FPY. The ENDF/B-6 fission-product yield sublibraries. Released by the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center in 1991, including revisions up to May 1995. Summary documentation

    The contents and the documentation of the ENDF/B-6 fission-product yield sublibraries which were released in 1991 and updated in 1993 and 1995, are summarized. Copies of the data libraries are available on magnetic tape or PC diskettes from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, costfree upon request. (author)

  16. Absolute rate constant and O(3P) yield for the O(1D)+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    Carl, S. A.; Peeters, J.; Vranckx, S.

    2008-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction that is the major source of stratospheric NOx, O(1D)+N2O → products, has been determined in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P). Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D) that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularl...

  17. Application of digital signal-processing technique to delayed-neutron yield measurements on thermal-neutron induced fission of 237Np

    The measurement procedure based on the continuous thermal-neutron beam modulation with a mechanical chopper was developed for delayed-neutron yield measurement of the thermal-neutron induced fission of 237Np. The idea of the procedure is similar to that which is widely used in modern communications for the nonauthorized data access prevention. The data is modulated with predefined pattern before transmission to the public network and only the recipient that has the modulation pattern is able to demodulate it upon reception. For the thermal-neutron induced reaction applications, the thermal-neutron beam modulation pattern was used to demodulate the measured delayed-neutron intensity signals on the detector output resulting in nonzero output only for the detector signals correlated with the beam modulation pattern. A comparison of the method with the conventional measurement procedure was provided, and it was demonstrated that the cross-correlation procedure has special features making it superior over the conventional one when the measured value difference from the background is extremely small. Due to strong sensitivity of measurement procedure on the modulation pattern of the neutron beam, one can implement the modulation pattern of specific shape to separate the effect of the thermal part of the beam from the higher energy one in the most confident way in a particular experiment

  18. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  19. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions.

    Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Waugh, C J; Séguin, F H; Sio, H; Sinenian, N; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Hohenberger, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Yeamans, C B; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Bionta, R M; Talison, B; Casey, D T; Landen, O L; Moran, M J; Zacharias, R A; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ∼1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF. PMID:25362390

  20. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ∼1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF

  1. Energy Dependence of Fission Product Yields from 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Incident Neutron Energies Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    Gooden, M. E.; Arnold, C. W.; Becker, J. A.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fallin, B.; Fowler, M. M.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Krishichayan; Macri, R.; Rusev, G.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Fission Product Yields (FPY) have historically been one of the most observable features of the fission process. They are known to have strong variations that are dependent on the fissioning species, the excitation energy, and the angular momentum of the compound system. However, consistent and systematic studies of the variation of these FPY with energy have proved challenging. This is caused primarily by the nature of the experiments that have traditionally relied on radiochemical procedures to isolate specific fission products. Although radiochemical procedures exist that can isolate all products, each element presents specific challenges and introduces varying degrees of systematic errors that can make inter-comparison of FPY uncertain. Although of high importance in fields such as nuclear forensics and Stockpile Stewardship, accurate information about the energy dependence of neutron induced FPY are sparse, due primarily to the lack of suitable monoenergetic neutron sources. There is a clear need for improved data, and to address this issue, a collaboration was formed between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure the energy dependence of FPY for 235U, 238U and 239Pu. The measurements have been performed at TUNL, using a 10 MV Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to produce monoenergetic neutrons at energies between 0.6 MeV to 14.8 MeV through a variety of reactions. The measurements have utilized a dual-fission chamber, with thin (10-100 μg/cm2) reference foils of similar material to a thick (100-400 mg) activation target held in the center between the chambers. This method allows for the accurate determination of the number of fissions that occurred in the thick target without requiring knowledge of the fission cross section or neutron fluence on target. Following activation, the thick target was removed from the dual-fission chamber and gamma

  2. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the tenth issue of a report series on Fission Product Data, which informs us about all the activities in this field, which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products, lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption, etc.). There is also a section with recent references relative to fission product nuclear data

  3. Time, absolute.

    Mughal, Muhammad Aurang Zeb

    2009-01-01

    The concept of absolute time is a hypothetical model from the laws of classical physics postulated by Isaac Newton in the Principia in 1687. Although the Newtonian model of absolute time has since been opposed and rejected in light of more recent scholarship, it still provides a way to study science with reference to time and understand the phenomena of time within the scientific tradition. According to this model, it is assumed that time runs at the same rate for all the observers in the uni...

  4. A method to calculate fission-fragment yields Y(Z,N) versus proton and neutron number in the Brownian shape-motion model. Application to calculations of U and Pu charge yields

    Möller, Peter; Ichikawa, Takatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method to calculate the two-dimensional (2D) fission-fragment yield Y(Z,N) versus both proton and neutron number, with inclusion of odd-even staggering effects in both variables. The approach is to use the Brownian shape-motion on a macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface which, for a particular compound system is calculated versus four shape variables: elongation (quadrupole moment Q2), neck d , left nascent fragment spheroidal deformation ɛ_{f1}, right nascent fragment deformation ɛ_{f2} and two asymmetry variables, namely proton and neutron numbers in each of the two fragments. The extension of previous models 1) introduces a method to calculate this generalized potential-energy function and 2) allows the correlated transfer of nucleon pairs in one step, in addition to sequential transfer. In the previous version the potential energy was calculated as a function of Z and N of the compound system and its shape, including the asymmetry of the shape. We outline here how to generalize the model from the "compound-system" model to a model where the emerging fragment proton and neutron numbers also enter, over and above the compound system composition.

  5. A method to calculate fission-fragment yields Y(Z,N) versus proton and neutron number in the Brownian shape-motion model. Application to calculations of U and Pu charge yields

    Moeller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ichikawa, Takatoshi [Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    We propose a method to calculate the two-dimensional (2D) fission-fragment yield Y(Z,N) versus both proton and neutron number, with inclusion of odd-even staggering effects in both variables. The approach is to use the Brownian shape-motion on a macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface which, for a particular compound system is calculated versus four shape variables: elongation (quadrupole moment Q{sub 2}), neck d, left nascent fragment spheroidal deformation ε{sub f1}, right nascent fragment deformation ε{sub f2} and two asymmetry variables, namely proton and neutron numbers in each of the two fragments. The extension of previous models 1) introduces a method to calculate this generalized potential-energy function and 2) allows the correlated transfer of nucleon pairs in one step, in addition to sequential transfer. In the previous version the potential energy was calculated as a function of Z and N of the compound system and its shape, including the asymmetry of the shape. We outline here how to generalize the model from the ''compound-system'' model to a model where the emerging fragment proton and neutron numbers also enter, over and above the compound system composition. (orig.)

  6. A method to calculate fission-fragment yields Y(Z,N) versus proton and neutron number in the Brownian shape-motion model. Application to calculations of U and Pu charge yields

    We propose a method to calculate the two-dimensional (2D) fission-fragment yield Y(Z,N) versus both proton and neutron number, with inclusion of odd-even staggering effects in both variables. The approach is to use the Brownian shape-motion on a macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface which, for a particular compound system is calculated versus four shape variables: elongation (quadrupole moment Q2), neck d, left nascent fragment spheroidal deformation εf1, right nascent fragment deformation εf2 and two asymmetry variables, namely proton and neutron numbers in each of the two fragments. The extension of previous models 1) introduces a method to calculate this generalized potential-energy function and 2) allows the correlated transfer of nucleon pairs in one step, in addition to sequential transfer. In the previous version the potential energy was calculated as a function of Z and N of the compound system and its shape, including the asymmetry of the shape. We outline here how to generalize the model from the ''compound-system'' model to a model where the emerging fragment proton and neutron numbers also enter, over and above the compound system composition. (orig.)

  7. A Method to Calculate Fission-Fragment Yields $Y(Z,N)$ versus Proton and Neutron Number in the Brownian Shape-Motion Model. Application to calculations of U and Pu charge yields

    Moller, P

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to calculate the two-dimensional (2D) fission-fragment yield $Y(Z,N)$ versus both proton and neutron number, with inclusion of odd-even staggering effects in both variables. The approach is to use Brownian shape-motion on a macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface which, for a particular compound system is calculated versus four shape variables: elongation (quadrupole moment $Q_2$), neck $d$, left nascent fragment spheroidal deformation $\\epsilon_{\\rm f1}$, right nascent fragment deformation $\\epsilon_{\\rm f2}$ and two asymmetry variables, namely proton and neutron numbers in each of the two fragments. The extension of previous models 1) introduces a method to calculate this generalized potential-energy function and 2) allows the correlated transfer of nucleon pairs in one step, in addition to sequential transfer. In the previous version the potential energy was calculated as a function of $Z$ and $N$ of the compound system and its shape, including the asymmetry of the shape. We ou...

  8. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Delayed fission

    Delayed fission is a nuclear process that couples beta decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes beta decay or electron capture and thus populates excited states in the daughter nucleus. This review covers experimental methods for detecting and measuring delayed fission. Experimental results (ECDF activities and beta-DF activities) and theory are presented. The future prospects for study of delayed fission are discussed. 50 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Absolute beginners

    Costa, Carlos Casimiro da; Costa, Jacinta Casimiro da

    2012-01-01

    Tomorrow, I m recovering my Thursday child as an absolute beginner , Transporting you to the essential touch of surface skin and space, Only for you, i do not regret, looking for education in a materia set. My love is your love , my materiality is you making things, The legacy of our ethnography, craftsmen s old and disappear, make me strong hard feelings, Recovering experiences and knowledge sprinkled in powder of stone, wood and metal ( ) reflecting in your dirty face the ...

  13. Assessment of experimental d-PIGE γ-ray production cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O and comparison with absolute thick target yields

    Csedreki, L.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Measured differential cross sections for deuteron induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 12C(d,pγ)13C, (Eγ = 3089 keV), 14N(d,pγ)15N (Eγ = 8310 keV) and 16O(d,pγ)17O (Eγ = 871 keV) available in the literature were assessed. In order to cross check the assessed γ-ray production cross section data, thick target γ-yields calculated from the differential cross sections were compared with available measured thick target yields. Recommended differential cross section data for each reaction were deduced for particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) applications.

  14. Ternary Fission

    The fission process in which heavy nuclei fragment into three large charged panicles, in place of the usual two, has been studied in the case of thermal-neutron-induced fission of U235 and the spontaneous fission of Cf252. Solid-state detectors, a fast triple coincidence system and a three-coincident-parameter analyser were used to measure the three fission fragment energies parallel with the detection of each ternary fission event. Experimental evidence is presented supporting the existence of ternary fission by specifically excluding recoil phenomena and accidental events as contributing to the observed three-fold coincidence events. Mass-energy-angular correlations of ternary fission have been determined and are summarized as follows: The total kinetic energy release in ternary fission appears to be slightly higher (by approximately 10 MeV) than that for binary fission. In the case of the spontaneous ternary fission of Cf252, the frequency of occurrence is observed to be greater than 2.2 x 10-6 ternary fission events per binary fission event. Tripartition of Cf252 results preferentially in division into two medium mass particle (one of which has a mass number near 56) and one larger mass. In the case of thermal-neutron-induced fission of U235, the frequency of occurrence is observed to be greater than 1.2 x 10-6 ternary fission events per binary fission event. Ternary fission of U236: results in the formation of one light fragment (near mass 36) and two large fragments or, as in the case of Cf252, two medium fragments and one large one. These results indicate that axially asymmetric distortion modes are possible in the pre-scission configurations of the fissioning nucleus. A description is given of experiments designed to radiochemically detect the light fragment resulting from ternary fission. (author)

  15. Absolute Summ

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  16. Nuclear fission

    The nuclear fission process is pedagogically reviewed from a macroscopic-microscopic point of view. The Droplet model is considered. The fission dynamics is discussed utilizing path integrals and semiclassical methods. (L.C.)

  17. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons. Pt. 3. Evaluation of the effect of the induced α and β activity on the chromosomal aberration yield

    Aim: Further experiments were performed to explain a difference in chromosomal aberration yield found between samples cultivated immediately after fission neutron irradiation and samples which were cultivated with 96 h delay after irradiation. Material and Method: Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated in mixed fission neutron/gamma field (1800 s) and biological effect assessed in the mean of analysis of unstable chromosome aberrations with a time delay in culturing cells of 12, 24, 48 and 96 h. Additional measurements were performed on irradiated and blank blood samples with the aim to detect any increase in α and β activity after fission neutron irradiation. No difference was found. Results were compared to theoretically calculated values of the α and β activity released from natural radioactive isotopes. Result and Conclusion: As a conclusion it is shown that in our experimental conditions the secondary effects resulting from nuclear transformations of natural or induced radioactive isotopes, recoil reactions and accompanying α, β, and γ radiation are not the reason for the increase observed in chromosomal aberration yield in blood samples cultured with a time delay of at least 24 hours. (orig.)

  18. 1.4MeV-5MeV中子诱发238U裂变产额测量%Fission Product Yield Measurement of 238 U Induced by 1.4-5 MeV Neutrons

    李映映; 肖军; 王攀; 李子越; 汪超; 罗小兵

    2016-01-01

    238 U fission yield measurement has a significant meaning in nuclear data measurement .This thesis a-dopts1.4 MeV-5 MeV mono -energetic neutrons generated by 2.5 MeV proton electrostatic accelerator to stimulate 238U fission, and then measures the yield of fission product nuclide 135I、133I、105Ru and 91Sr through measuring fission product radioactivity .Neutron flux during irradiation process is determined by activation meth-od .Subsequently , this thesis analyzes multiple components influencing experiment measurement , including cor-rection on neutron′s multiple scattering and self -shielding effect in target head and sample on the basis of MC-NPX program as well as correction on sample′s self-absorption of γ-ray.Typical deviation of yield data is concluded as 3.5%.Finally, this thesis compares measurement consequences with existing fission yield data .%238 U裂变产额测量工作在核数据测量中有着重要意义,本工作利用2.5MeV质子静电加速器产生的1.4MeV-5MeV单能中子诱发238 U裂变,通过对裂变产物放射性的测量对裂变产物核素135 I、133 I、105 Ru和91 Sr的产额进行了测定。照射过程中中子通量用活化法确定。分析了影响实验测量的多个因素,包括用MCNPX程序对中子在靶头及样品中的多次散射和自屏蔽效应进行了修正,对γ射线在样品中的自吸收进行修正等。得到产额数据典型误差为3.5%,最后把测量结果与已有的裂变产额数据进行比对。

  19. Prompt Neutrons from Fission

    A survey is given of the present state of knowledge of the spectrum, angular distribution and number of prompt fission neutrons, as functions of incident neutron energy and individual fragment mass, for low-energy fission. The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons has been found to be of the same form (nearly Maxwellian) for many different types of fission. It has been shown that this type of spectrum is to be expected on the basis of evaporation from moving fragments, and theoretical predictions of the spectrum agree very accurately with experimental data. Some data are now available on the variation of the neutron spectrum with fragment mass and angle of emission. Only recently has it become possible to take accurate data on the angular distribution of the neutrons. It appears that the neutrons have the angular distribution to be expected if emitted almost isotropically from the moving fragments, with a possibility that some small fraction are not emitted in this way, but directly from the fissioning nuclide. Much work has been done on the variation of fission neutron number v with incident neutron energy for neutron-induced fission. The neutron number increases roughly linearly with energy, with a slope of about 0.15 n/MeV. There is now evidence that this slope changes somewhat with energy. This change must be associated with other changes in the-fission process. The most interesting recent discovery concerning fission neutrons is the strong dependence of neutron number on individual fragment mass. The data are being rapidly improved by means of the newer techniques of determining fragment mass yields from velocity and pulse-height data, and of determining neutron yields from cumulative mass yields. There is evidence of similar dependence of neutron yield on fragment mass in a number of cases. It has been suggested that this property is directly connected with the deformability of the fragments, and in particular with the near-spherical shapes of magic

  20. Observation of cold fission in 242Pu spontaneous fission

    Coincidence γ-ray data from the spontaneous fission of 242Pu were collected at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory high purity Ge (HPGe) array, GAMMASPHERE. Data from several cold-fission (0 neutron emission) isotopic pairs were observed and are presented. An interesting trend in the fractional population of cold-fission events was observed and is discussed. Relative yields of Zr-Xe, Sr-Ba, and Mo-Te pairs were measured. The Zr-Xe system has the most complete data set. Some speculations on the trend in the number of neutrons emitted as a function of the mass of the Xe isotope populated are presented. Comparisons between the yields from the spontaneous fission of 242Pu and the yields from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 241Pu are also presented. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Nuclear fission

    V.M. STRUTINSKY's semi-classical method is the most precise to determine the energy of the different states along the fission way. The double-humped fission barrier explains fission isomerism. V.M. STRUTINSKY's barrier explains the ''intermediate structure'' observed in the cross section under the threshold; it provides also the observed effect of ''vibrational resonances'' with an interpretation. Taking an asymmetry parameter in consideration, a triple-humped fission barrier seems to be essential now for the light actinides. There is still a microscopic fission barrier to be explained

  2. Maximizing Singlet Fission in Organic Dimers: Theoretical Investigation of Triplet Yield in the Regime of Localized Excitation and Fast Coherent Electron Transfer

    Greyson, E. C.; Vura-Weis, J.; Michl, Josef; Ratner, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 45 (2010), s. 14168-14177. ISSN 1520-6106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : photophysics * singlet fission * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.603, year: 2010

  3. Hidden systematics of fission channels

    Schmidt Karl-Heinz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is a common procedure to describe the fission-fragment mass distributions of fissioning systems in the actinide region by a sum of at least 5 Gaussian curves, one for the symmetric component and a few additional ones, together with their complementary parts, for the asymmetric components. These components have been attributed to the influence of fragment shells, e.g. in the statistical scission-point model of Wilkins, Steinberg and Chasman. They have also been associated with valleys in the potential-energy landscape between the outer saddle and the scission configuration in the multi-channel fission model of Brosa. When the relative yields, the widths and the mean mass-asymmetry values of these components are fitted to experimental data, the mass distributions can be very well reproduced. Moreover, these fission channels are characterised by specific values of charge polarisation, total kinetic energy and prompt-neutron yields. The present contribution investigates the systematic variation of the characteristic fission-channel properties as a function of the composition and the excitation energy of the fissioning system. The mean position of the asymmetric fission channels in the heavy fragment is almost constant in atomic number. The deformation of the nascent fragments at scission, which is the main source of excitation energy of the separated fission fragments ending up in prompt-neutron emission, is found to be a unique function of Z for the light and the heavy fragment of the asymmetric fission channels. A variation of the initial excitation energy of the fissioning system above the fission saddle is only seen in the neutron yield of the heavy fragment. The charge polarisation in the two most important asymmetric fission channels is found to be constant and to appreciably exceed the macroscopic value. The variation of the relative yields and of the positions of the fission channels as a function of the composition and excitation energy

  4. Calculations of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis

    Panov, I. V.; Kolbe, E.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Kratz, K.-L.; Thielemann, F. -K.

    2004-01-01

    Fission plays an important role in the r-process which is responsible not only for the yields of transuranium isotopes, but may have a strong influence on the formation of the majority of heavy nuclei due to fission recycling. We present calculations of beta-delayed and neutron-induced fission rates, taking into account different fission barriers predictions and mass formulae. It is shown that an increase of fission barriers results naturally in a reduction of fission rates, but that neverthe...

  5. Spontaneous fission

    Recent experimental results for spontaneous fission half-lives and fission fragment mass and kinetic-energy distributions and other properties of the fragments are reviewed and compared with recent theoretical models. The experimental data lend support to the existence of the predicted deformed shells near Z = 108 and N = 162. Prospects for extending detailed studies of spontaneous fission properties to elements beyond hahnium (element 105) are considered. (orig.)

  6. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  7. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored

  8. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wootan, David W.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  9. Spontaneous Fission

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  10. Investigation of fission layers for precise fission cross-section measurements with a gridded ionization chamber

    An ionization chamber with a Frisch grid is used to determine both the energy (E) of the charged particles emitted from the source positioned coplanar with the cathode, and the cosine of the emission angle (/sigma phi/) with respect to the normal of the cathode. In the plane determined by the variables cos/sigma phi/ and E, it is possible to identify an area that is unaffected by backscattering and self-absorption. Events belonging to this area show an isotropic angular distribution for alpha particles and also for fragments of fission induced by thermal neutrons, which, extrapolated to 90 deg, yields the absolute number of events. The capabilities of this technique are demonstrated by the investigation of four evaporated 235 UF4 layers and one suspension-sprayed 235U3O8 layer. For the UF4 layers, the alpha-particle source strengths were determined, and agreement was found within 0.3% with values independently measured by low-geometry alpha counting. The same method was also applied to fission events induced by thermal neutrons. The determination of the total number of fission events is determined to an accuracy of better than 0.5%. The longstanding doubts on the magnitudes of fragment absorption and scattering are, in principle, circumvented by the present method, and therefore no assumptions on fragment ranges and scattering cross sections are needed. It is emphasized that the present method, within reasonable limits, is insensitive to source shape and homogeneity in its thickness

  11. Investigation of fission layers for precise fission cross section measurements with a gridded ionization chamber

    An ionization chamber with Frisch-grid is used to determine both the energy (E) of the charged particles emitted from the source positioned coplanar with the cathode, and the cosine of the emission angle (theta) with respect to the normal of the cathode. In the plane determined by the variables cos theta and E it is possible to identify an area which is unaffected by backscattering and selfabsorption. Events belonging to this area show an isotropic angular distribution for alpha particles and also for fission fragments induced by thermal neutrons, which, extrapolated to 90 deg., yields the absolute number of events. The capabilities of this technique are demonstrated by the investigation of four evaporated 235UF4 layers and one suspension sprayed 235U3O8 layer. For the UF4 layers the alpha particle source strengths were determined, and agreement was found within 0.3% with values independently measured by low geometry alpha counting. The same method was applied also to fission events induced by thermal neutrons. An accuracy for the determination of the total number of fission events of better than 0.5% is reached. The longstanding doubts on the magnitudes of fragment absorption and scattering are in principle circumvented by the present method and therefore no assumptions on fragment ranges and scattering cross-sections are needed. It is also emphasized that the present method, within reasonable limits, is intensive to source shape and thickness homogeneity. (author)

  12. The Fission of Thorium with Alpha Particles

    Newton, Amos S.

    1948-04-15

    The fission distribution of fission of thorium with alpha particle of average energy 37.5 Mev has been measured by the chemical method. The distribution found shows that the characteristic dip in the fission yield mass spectrum has been raised to within a factor of two of the peaks compared to a factor of 600 in slow neutron fission of U{sup 235}. The raise in the deip has caused a corresponding lowering in fission yield of these elements at the peaks. The cross section for fission of thorium with 37.5 Mev alphas was found to be about 0.6 barn, and the threshold for fission was found to be 23 to 24 Mev.

  13. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the 12th issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the IAEA. The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The type of activities included are: measurements, compilations and evaluations of fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The first part of the report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The second part contains recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted, and selected papers from conferences

  14. Mass and Charge Distribution in Low-Energy Fission

    The mass and charge distributions for thermal-neutron fission of U235 are discussed in considerable detail and compared with the corresponding distributions in other low-energy fission processes. Points discussed in connection with the mass distributions for binary fission include the positions of the peaks, valley and fine structure in a mass yield curve with respect to filled nuclear shells and the changes in the positions that occur with changing fissioning nucleus and excitation energy. The mass distribution from ternary fission is discussed also. For both binary and ternary fission comments are made concerning the mass distributions of primary fragments (before neutron evaporation) and of fission products (after neutron evaporation). Charge distribution is discussed in terms of charge dispersion among fission products with the same mass number and the variation with mass number of Zp, the ''most probable charge'' (non-integral) for a given mass number. Although direct information about charge distribution is limited to fission products, estimates are presented of charge distribution for primary fission fragments. Knowledge and estimates of mass and charge distribution for a fission process allow estimation of primary yields of all fission products or fragments. Although many estimated primary yields are quite uncertain mainly because of lack of knowledge of charge distribution, especially for fission products formed in low yield; some estimates of primary yields are presented to illustrate the need for and possible practicality of further experimentation. Fission processes other than thermal-neutron fission of U235 that are discussed include thermal-neutron fission of U233 and Pu239, spontaneous fission of Pu240 and Cf252, 14-MeV neutron fission of U235 and U238, 11-MeV proton fission of Ra226 and 22-MeV deuteron fission of Bi209. (author)

  15. Fission at high angular momenta

    By studies on the system 40Ar+165Ho by means of selected measuring methods which made a differential selection of certain angular momentum ranges and by this a discrimination between ''fast fission'' and compound-nucleus fission possible the validity of fundamental predictions of the model of the ''fast fission'' hitherto experimentally no yet confirmed was studied: 1) At the turning point of the trajectory for ''fast fission'' calculated by Gregoire the corresponding shape of which must be responsible for the angular distribution the centers of the two fragments must be separated by about 11 fm. 2) The widths of the mass distributions after ''fast fission'' and compound-nucleus fission must be different by a factor 2. The measurements of the angular dependence showed that both prediction cannot be simultaneously brought into accordance with the experimental results. The results of coincidence measurements between fission fragments and alpha particles confirmed the assumption mentioned under topic 2. The analysis of the angular dependence then yielded for the shape of the nuclear complex leading to ''fast fission'' a more compact shape than that indicated by Gregoire, namely with a distance of the fragments of about 7 fm. (orig.)

  16. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  17. Ternary fission

    M Balasubramaniam; K R Vijayaraghavan; C Karthikraj

    2015-09-01

    We present the ternary fission of 252Cf and 236U within a three-cluster model as well as in a level density approach. The competition between collinear and equatorial geometry is studied by calculating the ternary fragmentation potential as a function of the angle between the lines joining the stationary middle fragment and the two end fragments. The obtained results for the 16O accompanying ternary fission indicate that collinear configuration is preferred to equatorial configuration. Further, for all the possible third fragments, the potential energy surface (PES) is calculated corresponding to an arrangement in which the heaviest and the lightest fragments are considered at the end in a collinear configuration. The PES reveals several possible ternary modes including true ternary modes where the three fragments are of similar size. The complete mass distributions of Si and Ca which accompanied ternary fission of 236U is studied within a level density picture. The obtained results favour several possible ternary combinations.

  18. Research of the Mass Spectra of the Fission Products and Yields of (n, gamma) and (n, 2n) Reactions in a Model Subcritical Uranium Blanket of the Electronuclear System "Energy Plus Transmutation" on Proton Beam of the Dubna Synchrophasotron at 1.5 Ge

    Chultem, D; Krivopustov, M I; Gerbish, S; Tumendemberel, B; Pavlyuk, A B; Zaveryukha, O S

    2002-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the research of the spatial distributions of the yields of (n, f), (n, gamma) and (n, 2n) reactions in a two-section model of the uranium blanket electronuclear installation constructed at the Laboratory of High Energies, JINR (Dubna) for experiments according to the program "Research of physical aspects of the electronuclear method of energy production and of radioactive waste transmutation in atomic power-engineering on beams of the synchrophasotron and nuclotron" - project "Energy plus Transmutation". The mass spectrum of the fission products and yields of above reactions in uranium activation detectors placed on the radii of the so-called detector plates is determined. The experimental results testify that the fission of nuclei in the uranium blanket is made by fast neutrons. This conclusion coincides with the result obtained with track integrators of uranium fission.

  19. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the eleventh issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS

  20. Prompt Fission Neutron Emission in Resonance Fission of 239Pu

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Varapai, Natallia; Zeinalov, Shakir; Oberstedt, Stephan; Serot, Olivier

    2005-05-01

    The prompt neutron emission probability from neutron-induced fission in the resonance region is being investigated at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the IRMM. A double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is used as a fission-fragment detector. For the data acquisition of both the fission-fragment signals as well as the neutron detector signals the fast digitization technique has been applied. For the neutron detection, large-volume liquid scintillation detectors from the DEMON collaboration are used. A specialized data analysis program taking advantage of the digital filtering technique has been developed to treat the acquired data. Neutron multiplicity investigations for actinides, especially in resonance neutron-induced fission, are rather scarce. They are, however, important for reactor control and safety issues as well as for understanding the basic physics of the fission process. Fission yield measurements on both 235U and 239Pu without prompt neutron emission coincidence have shown that fluctuation of the fission-fragment mass distribution exists from resonance to resonance, larger in the case of 235U. To possibly explain these observations, the question now is whether the prompt neutron multiplicity shows similar fluctuations with resonance energy.

  1. Fission Spectrum

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  2. Singlet Fission

    Smith, M. B.; Michl, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 11 (2010), s. 6891-6936. ISSN 0009-2665 Grant ostatní: Department of Energy(US) DE-FG36-08GO18017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : solar energy conversion * photovoltaics * singlet fission Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 33.033, year: 2010

  3. Ideological Fission

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    materialisation of an ideological fission which attempts to excise certain ideological constructions, yet paradoxically casting them in a form that is recognizable and familiar. The monstrous metonomy which is used shows us glimpses of a horrid being, intended to vilify the attack on New York City. However, it is...

  4. Calculations of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis

    Panov, I V; Pfeiffer, B; Rauscher, T; Kratz, K L; Thielemann, F K

    2005-01-01

    Fission plays an important role in the r-process which is responsible not only for the yields of transuranium isotopes, but may have a strong influence on the formation of the majority of heavy nuclei due to fission recycling. We present calculations of beta-delayed and neutron-induced fission rates, taking into account different fission barriers predictions and mass formulae. It is shown that an increase of fission barriers results naturally in a reduction of fission rates, but that nevertheless fission leads to the termination of the r-process. Furthermore, it is discussed that the probability of triple fission could be high for $A>260$ and have an effect on the formation of the abundances of heavy nuclei. Fission after beta-delayed neutron emission is discussed as well as different aspects of the influence of fission upon r-process calculations.

  5. An absolute measurement of #-v# of Cf252

    An absolute measurement of v of Cf252. An absolute determination of the average number of neutrons, #-v#, emitted in the spontaneous fission of Cf252 has been made by counting the fission neutrons in a large liquid scintillator. The detection efficiency of this counter was measured as a function of neutron energy. Well-collimated neutrons were scattered into the scintillator by an anthracene crystal, which detected the corresponding recoil protons. Pulse-shape discrimination was employed to eliminate γ-ray background. The detection efficiency for Cf252 fission neutrons was found to be 0.703 ± 0.007, giving a value of 3.78 ± 0.04 for the average number of prompt neutrons emitted per Cf252 fission. (author)

  6. Eosinophil count - absolute

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  7. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  8. Fission meter

    Rowland, Mark S.; Snyderman, Neal J.

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  9. Systematics in delayed neutron yields

    Ohsawa, Takaaki [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    1998-03-01

    An attempt was made to reproduce the systematic trend observed in the delayed neutron yields for actinides on the basis of the five-Gaussian representation of the fission yield together with available data sets for delayed neutron emission probability. It was found that systematic decrease in DNY for heavier actinides is mainly due to decrease of fission yields of precursors in the lighter side of the light fragment region. (author)

  10. Absorption cross section measurements for 252Cf spontaneous fission neutrons (LWBR development program)

    Absolute absorption cross sections have been measured for 232Th and 197Au for 252Cf spontaneous fission neutrons. Irradiations were performed in an exceptionally low mass source-foil arrangement, providing a ''pure'' spectrum with few corrections. Calibration of the activation detector was achieved by irradiating identical foils in the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Thermal Flux. A simple ratio technique was also used to obtain an independent estimate of the relative 232Th to 197Au integral cross sections, yielding a value in good agreement with that above. This technique was extended to 181Ta, 98Mo, and 63Cu. (5 tables, 3 figures) (U.S.)

  11. Experimental techniques for fission data measurements

    Progresses in the development of experimental techniques or fission data measurements are reviewed briefly. This review comprises techniques for the preparation of special compound nuclei leading to fission (fission entrance) as well as experimental techniques which permit the measurement of the diversified characteristics of the emitted radiations in fission (fission exit). The latter developments are only considered when also other parameters than yield, mass, and energy of fission fragments are determined. Ionization chambers developed at CBNM are described in more detail. A simple ionization chamber with Frisch grid was used to determine fission layer characteristics, e.g. the number of fissile nuclei of a sample with an accuracy of smaller than 0.3 %. A twin ionization chamber is described which has an advantageous 2 x 2π solid angle for fission fragment detection, a timing jitter of less than 0.7 ns, an energy resolution of smaller than 500 keV for fission fragments, and an angular resolution of ΔcosΘ < 0.005. Also the nuclear charge distribution of the fragments can be determined. A pulse pile-up rejection circuit was developed, which reduces pulse pile-up by more than a factor 30. This detector is well suited for correlation measurements between fission fragment parameters, like mass and total kinetic energy, and the characteristics of the different radiations emitted from the fragments. This type of ionization chamber was successfully used in several experiments and some results are shown to demonstrate its capabilities. (author)

  12. Progress towards the production of the 236gNp standard sources and competing fission fragment production

    Larijani, C.; Pickford, O. L.; Collins, S. M.; Ivanov, P.; Jerome, S. M.; Keightley, J. D.; Pearce, A. K.; Regan, P. H.

    2015-11-01

    The isobaric distribution of fission residues produced following the bombardment of a natural uranium target with a beam of 25 MeV protons has been evaluated. Decay analysis of thirteen isobarically distinct fission residues were carried out using high-resolution γ-spectrometry at the UK National Physical Laboratory. Stoichiometric abundances were calculated via the determination of absolute activity concentrations associated with the longest-lived members of each isobaric chain. This technique was validated by computational modelling of likely sequential decay processes through an isobaric decay chain. The results were largely in agreement with previously published values for neutron bombardments on 238U at energies of 14 MeV. Higher yields of products with mass numbers A~110-130 were found, consistent with the increasing yield of these radionuclides as the bombarding energy is increased.

  13. The measurement of extreme nuclear deformation of fission isomers

    Existence and properties of spontaneously fissioning isomers are discussed as consequences of a double fission barrier. The measurement of the quadrupole moment of the fission-isomeric state by the new developed method for the determination of lifetimes of excited states yields to a prolate shape of the the nucleus. The deformation ratio is 2:1 in the second minimum of the fission potential. (orig./WL)

  14. Applications of Event-by-Event Fission Modeling with FREYA

    Vogt R.; Randrup J.

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission events, consisting of two receding product nuclei as well as a number of neutrons and photons, all with complete kinematic information. Thus it is possible to calculate arbitrary correlation observables whose behavior may provide unique insight into the fission process. We first discuss the present status of FREYA, which has now been extended to include spontaneous fission. C...

  15. A transferable model for singlet-fission kinetics.

    Yost, Shane R; Lee, Jiye; Wilson, Mark W B; Wu, Tony; McMahon, David P; Parkhurst, Rebecca R; Thompson, Nicholas J; Congreve, Daniel N; Rao, Akshay; Johnson, Kerr; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Bawendi, Moungi G; Swager, Timothy M; Friend, Richard H; Baldo, Marc A; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-06-01

    Exciton fission is a process that occurs in certain organic materials whereby one singlet exciton splits into two independent triplets. In photovoltaic devices these two triplet excitons can each generate an electron, producing quantum yields per photon of >100% and potentially enabling single-junction power efficiencies above 40%. Here, we measure fission dynamics using ultrafast photoinduced absorption and present a first-principles expression that successfully reproduces the fission rate in materials with vastly different structures. Fission is non-adiabatic and Marcus-like in weakly interacting systems, becoming adiabatic and coupling-independent at larger interaction strengths. In neat films, we demonstrate fission yields near unity even when monomers are separated by >5 Å. For efficient solar cells, however, we show that fission must outcompete charge generation from the singlet exciton. This work lays the foundation for tailoring molecular properties like solubility and energy level alignment while maintaining the high fission yield required for photovoltaic applications. PMID:24848234

  16. Statistical theory of fission

    In nuclear reactions where a compound nucleus is formed at high excitation energies, one is forced to use a statistical theory to explain the observables of the reaction. The statistical theory of fission of Weisskopf-Ewing-Newton and Ericson is applied to binary spallation of 16O, 20Ne, and 14N by protons in the proton energy range of 20 to 150 MeV, 0 to 105 MeV, and 0 to 41.9 MeV, respectively. The capture cross section of the incident proton is calculated from the reaction cross section using appropriate optical model potentials. The differential and total cross sections for binary fragmentation into near symmetric mass nuclei are calculated which are in reasonable agreement with experimental results. The kinetic energy spectrum and decay widths in the final channels are also calculated, however these have not been measured experimentally for comparison. All of these calculations are done using three different ion-ion optical potentials suggested by others. One then reformulated the statistical theory to include the second law of thermodynamics. Both theories are applied to neutron induced fission of 239Pu, 235U, 233U, 229Th, and 226Ra at several different neutron and alpha energies using the recently proposed external barrier between the saddle and the scission point. The transmission functions are calculated using a set of coupled equations in the exit channels. The computed results indicate that the model can account for the observed variation of the percentage mass yield spectra. Furthermore one calculated the most probable kinetic energy in the fission in all cases and found it to agree with the observation. The spontaneous and isomer fission half lives are calculated giving good agreement with experimental data. The kinetic energy spectrums are also computed for some representative daughter pairs. The inclusion of the second law of thermodynamics improves the agreement between theory and experiment

  17. ABSOLUTE NEUTRINO MASSES

    Schechter, J.; Shahid, M. N.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos.......We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos....

  18. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Frégeau M.O.; Bryś T.; Gamboni Th.; Geerts W.; Oberstedt S.; Oberstedt A.; Borcea R.

    2013-01-01

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This conf...

  19. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    R A Gherghescu; D N Poenaru

    2015-09-01

    The macroscopic–microscopic method is extended to calculate the deformation energy and penetrability for binary nuclear configurations typical for fission processes. The deformed two-centre shell model is used to obtain single-particle energy levels for the transition region of two partially overlapped daughter and emitted fragment nuclei. The macroscopic part is obtained using the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential. The microscopic shell and pairing corrections are obtained using the Strutinsky and BCS approaches and the cranking formulae yield the inertia tensor. Finally, the WKB method is used to calculate penetrabilities and spontaneous fission half-lives. Calculations are performed for the decay of 282,292120 nuclei.

  20. Electron spectra from decay of fission products

    Dickens, J K

    1982-09-01

    Electron spectra following decay of individual fission products (72 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 162) are obtained from the nuclear data given in the compilation using a listed and documented computer subroutine. Data are given for more than 500 radionuclides created during or after fission. The data include transition energies, absolute intensities, and shape parameters when known. An average beta-ray energy is given for fission products lacking experimental information on transition energies and intensities. For fission products having partial or incomplete decay information, the available data are utilized to provide best estimates of otherwise unknown decay schemes. This compilation is completely referenced and includes data available in the reviewed literature up to January 1982.

  1. Fission investigations and evaluation activities at IRMM

    The IRMM has a longstanding tradition in the field of neutron induced fission physics studies. It is especially well equipped with world-class facilities as the high resolution neutron time-of-flight spectrometer GELINA and the 7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator for the quasi-monoenergetic neutron production. During the past decade several neutron induced fission reactions have been studied in the energy range from eV up to 6 MeV and spontaneous fission. The isotopes under investigation were 235,238 U(n,f), 239 Pu(n,f), 237 Np(n,f), 252 Cf(SF) and 233 Pa(n,f). For all isotopes but 233 Pa, the fission fragment mass-yield and total kinetic energy distributions were measured. 233 Pa was only investigated for the fission cross-section. The results have been described within the multi-modal fission model. The three most dominant fission modes, the two asymmetric standard I (S1) and standard II (S2) as well as the the symmetric superlong mode were used for all the isotopes but 252 Cf. For this isotope at least one other fission mode had to be taken into account, the so--called standard III (S3) mode. Since the theoretical interpretation of experimental results was rather successful also an attempt was made to improve the evaluation of the respective fission cross-section as well as their neutron multiplicities and spectra. Here, the statistical model for fission cross-section evaluation was extended by including the multi-modality concept for fission. Based on the underlying model, separate outer fission barriers have been considered for each mode, while the inner barriers and isomeric wells are assumed to be the same. The self-consistent calculations of the fission cross-section as well as total, capture, elastic and inelastic cross-sections were in good agreement with the experimental data and evaluated nuclear data libraries. As a side product, also fission fragment mass yield distributions have been deduced at incident neutron energies hitherto unaccessible. Very

  2. Statistical model investigation of nuclear fission

    To assist in the improvement of fission product yield data libraries, the statistical theory of fission was investigated. Calculation of the theory employs a recent nuclear mass formula and nuclear density of states expression. Yields computed with a simple statement of the theory do not give satisfactory results. A slowly varying empirical parameter is introduced to improve agreement between measured and calculated yields. The parameter is interpreted as the spacing between the tips of the fragments at the instant of scission or as the length of a neck in the fissioning nucleus immediately prior to scission. With this spacing parameter semi-quantitative agreement is obtained between calculated and measured mass chain yields for six cases investigated, 233U(n/sub th/, f), 235U(n/sub th, f), 239Pu(n/sub th/, f), 235U(n+14, f), 238U(n+14, f), and 252Cf(sf). An indication of the source of mass asymmetry in fission is presented. The model developed predicts a mass and energy dependence of some of the parameters of models currently in use in data generation. A procedure for the estimation of the fission product yields for an arbitrary fissioning system is proposed. 63 references

  3. SPIDER: A new instrument for fission fragment research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Tovesson Fredrik; Arnold Charles; Blakeley Rick; Hecht Adam; Laptev Alexander; Mader Drew; Meierbachtol Krista; Snyder Lucas; White Morgan

    2013-01-01

    The study of fission fragment yields and how they behave as a function of excitation energy provides insight into the process in which they are formed. Fission yields are also important for nuclear applications, as they can be used as a diagnostic tool. A new instrument, SPIDER (Spectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research), is being developed for measuring fission yields as a function of incident neutron energy at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The instrument employs a time...

  4. Fission Research at IRMM

    Al-Adili A.; Fabry I.; Borcea R.; Zeynalov S.; Kornilov N.; Hambsch F.-J.; Oberstedt S.

    2010-01-01

    Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f), 234 U(n,f), prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF) as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f) and is presenting the most important results.

  5. Fission-fragment and neutron data traced back to the macroscopic and microscopic properties of the fissioning systems

    Schmidt K.-H; Jurado B.

    2010-01-01

    A new model description of fission-fragment yields and prompt neutron emission is developed. The yields of the different fission channels and their properties are attributed to the number of relevant states above the potential-energy landscape on the fission path at the moment of dynamical freeze-out, which is specific to the collective coordinate considered. The model combines well established ideas with novel concepts. The separability principle of macroscopic properties of the compound nuc...

  6. NGS Absolute Gravity Data

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Absolute Gravity data (78 stations) was received in July 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Gravity Value, Uncertainty, and Vertical Gradient. The...

  7. Absolute Pitch on Music

    Çuhadar, C.Hakan

    2008-01-01

    Musicians are debated people in the academic circles with the claim of they have both various characteristics and different cognitive personalities on the analogy those other people. One of these different characteristics is absolute pitch ability. Absolute pitch (AP) is a cognitive ability which can be characterized as to identify any tones (labeling) at a given pitch without using any external references. According to the different studies which were held in different times, the prevalence ...

  8. Absolute polarimetry at RHIC

    Okada, H.; Alekseev, I.; Bravar, A; Bunce, G.; Dhawan, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Gill, R; Haeberli, W.; Huang, H.; Jinnouchi, O.; Makdisi, Y.; Nakagawa, I.; Nass, A.; Saito, N; Stephenson, E.

    2007-01-01

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy of $\\Delta P_{beam}/P_{beam} < 5%$. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detector...

  9. Absolute surface energy determination

    Metois, J. J.; Muller, P.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental determination of absolute surface energies remains a challenge. We propose a simple method based on two independent measurements on 3D and 2D equilibrium shapes completed by the analysis of the thermal fluctuation of an isolated step. Using then basic equations (Wulff' theorem, Gibbs-Thomson equation, thermodynamics fluctuation of an isolated step) allows us to extract the absolute surface free energy of a singular face. The so-proposed method can be applied when (i) all orientat...

  10. Physics of neutron emission in fission

    The document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the Physics of Neutron Emission in Fission, Mito City (Japan), 24-27 May 1988. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers cover the following topics: Energy dependence of the number of fission neutrons ν-bar (3 papers), multiplicity distribution of fission neutrons (3 papers), competition between neutron and γ-ray emission (4 papers), the fission neutron yield in resonances (2 papers) and the energy spectrum of fission neutrons in experiment (9 papers), theory (4 papers) and evaluation (1 paper). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Development of fission Mo-99 production technology

    Fission Mo-99 is the only parent nuclide of Tc-99m, an extremely useful tool for mdeical diagnosis, with an estimated usage of greater than 80% of nuclear medicine applicatons. HEU and LEU targets to optimize in HANARO irradiation condition suggested and designed for domestic production of fission Mo-99. The optimum process conditions are established in each unit process to meet quality requirements of fission Mo-99 products, and the results of performance test in combined process show Mo separation and purification yield of the above 97%. The concept of Tc generator production process is established, and the result of performance test show Tc production yield of 98.4% in Tc generator procuction process. The drafts is prepared for cooperation of technical cooperation and business investment with foreign country. Evaluation on economic feasibility is accompanied for fission Mo-99 and Tc-99m generator production

  12. Development of fission Mo-99 production technology

    Park, Jin Ho; Choung, W. M.; Lee, K. I. and others

    2000-05-01

    Fission Mo-99 is the only parent nuclide of Tc-99m, an extremely useful tool for mdeical diagnosis, with an estimated usage of greater than 80% of nuclear medicine applicatons. HEU and LEU targets to optimize in HANARO irradiation condition suggested and designed for domestic production of fission Mo-99. The optimum process conditions are established in each unit process to meet quality requirements of fission Mo-99 products, and the results of performance test in combined process show Mo separation and purification yield of the above 97%. The concept of Tc generator production process is established, and the result of performance test show Tc production yield of 98.4% in Tc generator procuction process. The drafts is prepared for cooperation of technical cooperation and business investment with foreign country. Evaluation on economic feasibility is accompanied for fission Mo-99 and Tc-99m generator production.

  13. Energy released in fission

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  14. Excitation-energy dependence of the nuclear fission characteristics

    Baba, H.; Saito, T.; Takahashi, N. [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science] [and others

    1996-03-01

    It is known that the width parameter of the fragment mass yield distribution follows a beautiful systematics with respect to the excitation energy. According to this systematics, the fission characteristics following the systematics should disappear when the excitation energy Ex goes down to 14 MeV. The present purpose is to elucidate if, where, how and why a transition takes place in the fission characteristics of the asymmetric fission of light actinide elements. Two types of experiments are performed, one is the double-energy measurement of the kinetic energies of complementary fragments in the thermal-neutron fission of {sup 235,233}U and proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U at 13.3- and 15.7-MeV excitations, and the other is the radiochemical study of proton-induced fission and photofission of {sup 238}U at various excitation energies. In conclusion, it has demonstrated that there are two distinctive fission mechanisms in the low-energy fission of light actinide elements and the transition between them takes place around 14-MeV excitation. The characteristics of proton fission and photofission in the energy range lower than the above transition point are the essentially the same as those of thermal-neutron fission and also spontaneous fission. The results of GDR fission indicates the fission in the high-energy side starts from the nuclear collective states, whereas the lower-energy fission is of non-collective nature. It is likely that thermal-neutron fission is rather of the barrier-penetrating type like spontaneous fission than the threshold fission. (S.Y.)

  15. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the seventh issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The sixth issue of this series has been published in June 1980 as INDC(NDS)-113/G+P. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1980 and 25 May 1981

  16. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Oberstedt A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  17. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the ninth issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The eighth issue of this series has been published in July 1982 as INDC(NDS)-130. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1982 and 25 June 1983

  18. The chemistry of the fission products

    This is a review of chemistry of some chemical elements in fission products. The elements mentioned are krypton, xenon, rubidium, caesium, silver, strontium, barium, cadmium, rare earth elements, zirconium, niobium, antimony, molybdenum, tellurium, technetium, bromine, iodine, ruthenium, rhodium and palladium. The chemistry of elements and their oxides is briefly given together with the chemical species in aqueous solution. The report also contains tables of the physical properties of the elements and their oxides, of fission products nuclides with their half-life and fission yields and of the permissible concentrations. (author)

  19. Absolute reaction rate measurement with D-D neutron source in polyethylene spherical shell

    The absolute reaction rate distribution measurements in a polyethylene spherical shell with 38.6 cm outside diameter and 10 cm thickness were performed with D-D neutron source. By combining fission method and activation method, rich-uranium fission chamber, depleted-uranium fission chamber, 237Np fission chamber and 115In activation foils were placed at several positions on the equatorial line of the inner face of the shell, and the absolute reaction rates were obtained. The uncertainty of fission rates is 2.5%-4.3%, while the uncertainty of activation rates is about 6.3%. The reaction rates were calculated by MCNP and ENDF/B-VII. 0. The calculated results are lower than the measured results and 238U is typical. (authors)

  20. Binary and ternary spontaneous fission of 252 Cf

    The high selectivity and sensitivity offered by large detector arrays such as GAMMASPHERE and EUROGAM enable one to identify several gamma-rays related to the binary and ternary spontaneous fission. The yields for Mo-Ba binary spontaneous fission were extracted again from the data with better statistics. A new experiment with the 252 Cf source has been done by using a Delta telescope and GAMMASPHERE arrays at Argonne National Laboratory. From these data and our older data, new relative alpha ternary spontaneous fission yields were extracted. These results and the emission of 10 Be in spontaneous fission and the existence of long lived nuclear molecule also will be discussed. (author)

  1. Nucleon-induced fission at intermediate energies

    The absence of a satisfactory theoretical description to predict isotope yields as well as the need for experimental fragment mass and charge distributions at intermediate-energies form the motivation of this work. Like the objects under study, the research presented in this thesis consists two main parts. Part 1 concerns an activation experiment that has been performed at the 'Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut' (Nuclear Physics Accelerator Institute) in Groningen, Netherlands, using the AGOR cyclotron. Fission product yields have been measured resulting from 190 MeV proton-induced fission of natW, 197Au, natPb, 208Pb and 232Th. In Chapter 2 the experimental set up is discussed, followed in Chapter 3 by a description of the data analysis. The results on the reconstructed mass yields and the total fission cross sections are presented in Chapter 4. Part 2 is of a theoretical nature. The objective is to compute fission product mass yields from intermediate-energy nucleon-induced reactions. In the approach presented here, two stages can be distinguished. In the first stage the fission cross section is determined for the various fissioning isotopes as a function of their excitation energy in competition with other processes like pre-equilibrium decay and particle evaporation. ALICE-91 is a nuclear reaction code that takes care of this first stage. The second stage consists of constructing the total fission-fragment mass and charge distributions from the different contributions of all the equilibrated fissioning systems. Hence, a model is needed that gives a prediction for the fission-product mass yields in a large range of mass, charge, and excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus. For this purpose, the multi-modal random neck-rupture model by Brosa is extended with temperature-dependent shell and pairing corrections and a temperature-dependent LDM. The combination of ALICE-91 and the modified Brosa approach is used for the analysis of the experiments given in the

  2. General Description of Fission Observables - JEFF Report 24. GEF Model

    The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) Project is a collaborative effort among the member countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank to develop a reference nuclear data library. The JEFF library contains sets of evaluated nuclear data, mainly for fission and fusion applications; it contains a number of different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, radioactive decay data, fission yield data and thermal scattering law data. The General fission (GEF) model is based on novel theoretical concepts and ideas developed to model low energy nuclear fission. The GEF code calculates fission-fragment yields and associated quantities (e.g. prompt neutron and gamma) for a large range of nuclei and excitation energy. This opens up the possibility of a qualitative step forward to improve further the JEFF fission yields sub-library. This report describes the GEF model which explains the complex appearance of fission observables by universal principles of theoretical models and considerations on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and mathematics. The approach reveals a high degree of regularity and provides a considerable insight into the physics of the fission process. Fission observables can be calculated with a precision that comply with the needs for applications in nuclear technology. The relevance of the approach for examining the consistency of experimental results and for evaluating nuclear data is demonstrated. (authors)

  3. Calibration with Absolute Shrinkage

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, penalized regression using the L-1 norm on the estimated parameters is proposed for chemometric je calibration. The algorithm is of the lasso type, introduced by Tibshirani in 1996 as a linear regression method with bound on the absolute length of the parameters, but a modification...

  4. Fission Research at IRMM

    Al-Adili A.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f, 234 U(n,f, prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f and is presenting the most important results.

  5. Complex fission phenomena

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena can be studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle-point) nuclear shapes, may be obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in cold fission phenomena can be explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined. Predictions of two alpha accompanied fission are experimentally confirmed.

  6. Progress in fission product nuclear data. No. 13

    This is the 13th issue of a report series published by the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross-sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products and bumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption, etc.). The first part of the report consists of unaltered original data which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The second part contains some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted, and selected papers from conferences. Part 3 contains requirements for further measurements

  7. Progress in fission product nuclear data. No. 14

    This is the 14th issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data published by the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of fission product yields, neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data from neutron induced and spontaneous fission, lumped fission product data. The first part of the report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The second part contains some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted, and selected papers from conferences. The third part contains requirements for further measurements

  8. Conservation of Isospin in Neutron-rich Fission Fragments

    On the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the fission phenomenon, we present a surprisingly simple result which highlights the important role of isospin and its conservation in neutron rich fission fragments. We have analysed the fission fragment mass distribution from two recent heavyion reactions 238U(18O,f) and 208Pb(18O,f) as well as a thermal neutron fission reaction 245Cm(nth,f). We find that the conservation of the total isospin explains the overall trend in the observed relative yields of fragment masses in each fission pair partition. The isospin values involved are very large making the effect dramatic. The findings open the way for more precise calculations of fission fragment distributions in heavy nuclei and may have far reaching consequences for the drip line nuclei, HI fusion reactions, and calculation of decay heat in the fission phenomenon

  9. Conservation of Isospin in Neutron-rich Fission Fragments

    Jain, A. K.; Choudhury, D.; Maheshwari, B.

    2014-06-01

    On the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the fission phenomenon, we present a surprisingly simple result which highlights the important role of isospin and its conservation in neutron rich fission fragments. We have analysed the fission fragment mass distribution from two recent heavyion reactions 238U(18O,f) and 208Pb(18O,f) as well as a thermal neutron fission reaction 245Cm(nth,f). We find that the conservation of the total isospin explains the overall trend in the observed relative yields of fragment masses in each fission pair partition. The isospin values involved are very large making the effect dramatic. The findings open the way for more precise calculations of fission fragment distributions in heavy nuclei and may have far reaching consequences for the drip line nuclei, HI fusion reactions, and calculation of decay heat in the fission phenomenon.

  10. Conservation of Isospin in Neutron-Rich Fission Fragments

    Jain, Ashok Kumar; Maheshwari, Bhoomika

    2014-01-01

    On the occasion of the $75^{th}$ anniversary of the fission phenomenon, we present a surprisingly simple result which highlights the important role of isospin and its conservation in neutron rich fission fragments. We have analysed the fission fragment mass distribution from two recent heavy-ion reactions $^{238}$U($^{18}$O,f) and $^{208}$Pb($^{18}$O,f) as well as a thermal neutron fission reaction $^{245}$Cm(n$^{th}$,f). We find that the conservation of the total isospin explains the overall trend in the observed relative yields of fragment masses in each fission pair partition. The isospin values involved are very large making the effect dramatic. The findings open the way for more precise calculations of fission fragment distributions in heavy nuclei and may have far reaching consequences for the drip line nuclei, HI fusion reactions, and calculation of decay heat in the fission phenomenon.

  11. New formulas for TKE release in nuclear fission process

    New TKE formulas that will replace the previous existing ones are obtained. Recently, three types of the final deformation of fissioning nuclei were found for actinides out off which only one was observed. The final deformations of the fissioning nuclei was found to be constant and independent of the mass and temperature of the fissioning system. These hence allow to deduce a new formula for the TKE release in nuclear fission process based on the invariance of scission deformations of fissioning nuclei. They yield, TKE(sym) = 0.1173 x (Zf2/Af1/3)+7.5 MeV for the symmetric fission and TKE(asym) = 0.1217 x (Zf2/Af1/3)+3.5 MeV for the asymmetric fission. Details for the new formulas and their comparison with the experimental data are given. (author)

  12. Validation of the neutron and gamma fields in the JSI TRIGA reactor using in-core fission and ionization chambers.

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Kaiba, Tanja; Radulović, Vladimir; Jazbec, Anže; Rupnik, Sebastjan; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-02-01

    CEA developed fission chambers and ionization chambers were utilized at the JSI TRIGA reactor to measure neutron and gamma fields. The measured axial fission rate distributions in the reactor core are generally in good agreement with the calculated values using the Monte Carlo model of the reactor thus verifying both the computational model and the fission chambers. In future, multiple absolutely calibrated fission chambers could be used for more accurate online reactor thermal power monitoring. PMID:25479432

  13. The Nature of Singlet Exciton Fission in Carotenoid Aggregates

    Musser, Andrew J.; Maiuri, Margherita; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Friend, Richard H.; Clark, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Singlet exciton fission allows the fast and efficient generation of two spin triplet states from one photoexcited singlet. It has the potential to improve organic photovoltaics, enabling efficient coupling to the blue to ultraviolet region of the solar spectrum to capture the energy generally lost as waste heat. However, many questions remain about the underlying fission mechanism. The relation between intermolecular geometry and singlet fission rate and yield is poorly understood and remains...

  14. Fission and Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    Hamilton, Joseph H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Carter, H. K.

    2008-08-01

    . Fission-fragment spectroscopy with STEFF / A. G. Smith ... [et al.]. Gamma ray multiplicity of [symbol]Cf spontaneous fission using LiBerACE / D. L. Bleuel ... [et al.]. Excitation energy dependence of fragment mass and total kinetic energy distributions in proton-induced fission of light actinides / I. Nishinaka ... [et al.]. A dynamical calculation of multi-modal nuclear fission / T. Wada and T. Asano. Structure of fission potential energy surfaces in ten-dimensional spaces / V. V. Pashkevich, Y. K Pyatkov and A. V. Unzhakova. A possible enhancement of nuclear fission in scattering with low energy charged particles / V. Gudkov. Dynamical multi-break processes in the [symbol]Sn + [symbol]Ni system at 35 MeV/Nucleon / M. Papa and ISOSPIN-RE VERSE collaboration -- New experimental techniques. MTOF - a high resolution isobar separator for studies of exotic decays / A. Piechaczek ... [et al.]. Development of ORRUBA: a silicon array for the measurement of transfer reactions in inverse kinematics / S. D. Pain ... [et al.]. Indian national gamma array: present & future / R. K. Bhowmik. Absolute intensities of [symbol] rays emitted in the decay of [symbol]U / H. C. Griffin -- Superheavy elements theory and experiments / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.]. Study of superheavy elements at SHIP / S. Hofinann. Heaviest nuclei from [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / Yu. Ts. Oaanessian. Superheavy nuclei and giant nuclear systems / W. Greiner and V. Zagrebaev. Fission approach to alpha-decay of superheavy nuclei / D.N. Poenaru and W. Greiner. Superheavy elements in the Magic Islands / C. Samanta. Relativistic mean field studies of superheavy nuclei / A. V. Afanas jev. Understanding the synthesis of the heaviest nuclei / W. Loveland -- Mass measurements and g-factors. G factor measurements in neutron-rich [symbol]Cf fission fragments, measured using the gammasphere array / R. Orlandi ... [et al.]. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors in neutron rich nuclei produced by the

  15. Fission studies at the IGISOL facility

    Studies of the properties of the fission products ant the induced fission reaction mechanism have been a significant part of the nuclear physics research program at the IGISOL for more than 20 years. For example, one of the key motivations behind the commitment of the JYFLTRAP was isobaric separation of the fission products for spectroscopic studies. Such experiments have indeed been performed, however, the JYFLTRAP twin trap has turned out to be even more versatile instrument anyone dared dream of in advantage. The precision atomic mass measurements of neutron rich fission products has thus far resulted in considerably improved mass value for more than 150 neutron-rich isotopes, on top of which becomes the work on proton rich side. The purification Penning trap has also proven to be an excellent tool for independent fission cross section measurements. This novel method employs ion counting after JYFLTRAP and is described in a detailed way. The method takes advantage of the fact that JYFLTRAP can be used as a mass filter with a precision such that it allows an unambiguous identification of most of the fragments produced in the low-energy fission of 238U. A satisfactory agreement with previous measurements was found for independent yields of Cs isotopes in 50 MeV proton induced fission

  16. Dynamical features of Coulomb-fission

    Fission following quasielastic scattering was investigated in the reactions 208Pb -> 238U below the Coulomb Barrier and 7.5 MeV/u 238U -> 238U at scattering angles forward of the grazing angle (870). A kinematically complete analysis of 3-body coincidences was carried out measuring position and time-of-flight of the scattered projectile-like particle and 2 fission fragments in large parallel plate detectors. In the reaction 208Pb -> 238U, measured at backward angles, the slope of the differential cross section at 5.4 MeV/u is in qualitative agreement with the theoretical expectation for Coulomb-fission. The angular distribution of the fission fragments, measured with respect to the semisector axis (apex line towards the projectile), is close to 1/sinTHETA and does not show any of the significant structures predicted by several theories. The anisotropy is smaller in all other coordinate systems investigated. The fission probability in the reaction 238U -> 238U, measured down to 5x10-4 at THETAsub(cm)=540 (corresponding to 75% Esub(cb) at the distance of closest approach) as well as the low excitation energy 0 as expected for Coulomb-fission. The absence of a detectable final state Coulomb interaction yields a lower limit of 1-2x10-20s for the lifetime of the fissioning nucleus. (orig./HSI)

  17. Multimodal nuclear fission model and its application

    As the nuclear fission models, the following are explained: random-neck rupture model; nuclear fission channel theory; breakpoint model, especially breakpoint model by Wilkins et al.; and multimodal random-neck rupture model. In addition, the prompt neutron spectrum analysis of multimodal model, and the application to the energy-dependent analysis of delayed neutron yield are also described. In the random-neck fracture model proposed by S. L. Whetstone, a nucleus has a form like 'elongated gourd' just before the rupture, and the mass distribution is determined by the part of the neck where cleavage occurs. The division of mass and charge in nuclear fission, according to the nuclear fission channel theory, is considered to be determined by which transition state the saddle point of fission barrier is passed through. On the other hand, the model, where the deformation of nucleus further proceeds and the division is determined by the breakpoint just before the division to two fissure pieces, is called the breakpoint model. The multimodal nuclear fission model is the concept to consider that there are several deformation channels for nucleus, and that each of them leads to a different rupture state. The model that combines the random-neck rapture model and multimodal fission model is the multimodal random-neck rupture model. (J.P.N.)

  18. Study of fission fragment trapping detector used in neutron detection

    To detect the absolute neutron flux in a weak neutron field and restricted space, the fission fragment trapping detector was fabricated and the properties of the detector were studied. In this paper, the detector and shielding chamber used in neutron detection were described and the experimental measurements of the fission rate in specific condition were performed with the detection system and the result has been compared with that obtained by fission chamber. The influence of the shielding chamber on the measured results was analyzed. (authors)

  19. Effects of variations on slopes of yield and average kinetic energy curves as a function of fragment mass on standard deviation of final kinetic energy distribution from thermal neutron induced fission of 235U

    The mass and kinetic energy distributions of fragments from thermal neutron induced fission of 233U have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. In our previous work [1] we reproduce the two pronounced broadenings in the standard deviation (SD) of the kinetic energy distribution of the final fragment at mass number around m=109, and m=125, respectively, which is agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. [2] (author).

  20. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of nitrogen in air. Consequences on the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Mesure precise du rendement absolu de la fluorescence de l'azote dans l'air. Consequences sur la detection des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie

    Lefeuvre, G

    2006-07-15

    The study of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (E > 10{sup 20} eV) requires to determine the energy with much more precision than what is currently achieved. The shower of particles created in the atmosphere can be detected either by sampling particle on the ground, or by detecting the fluorescence induced by the excitation of nitrogen by shower electrons. At present, the measurement of the fluorescence is the simplest and the most reliable method, since it does not call upon hadronic physics laws at extreme energies, a field still inaccessible to accelerators. The precise knowledge of the conversion factor between deposited energy and the number of fluorescence photons produced (the yield) is thus essential. Up to now, it has been determined with an accuracy of 15 % only. This main goal of this work is to measure this yield to better than 5 per cent. To do this, 1 MeV electrons from a radioactive source excite nitrogen of the air. The accuracy has been reached thanks to the implementation of a new method for the absolute calibration of the photomultipliers detecting the photons, to better than 2 per cent. The fluorescence yield, measured and normalized to 0.85 MeV, 760 mmHg and 15 Celsius degrees, is (4.23 {+-} 0.20) photons per meter, or (20.46 {+-} 0.98) photons per deposited MeV. In addition, and for the first time, the absolute fluorescence spectrum of nitrogen excited by a source has been measured with an optical grating spectrometer. (author)

  1. Absolute Neutrino Masses

    Since the recent convincing evidence for massive neutrinos in oscillation experiments, the next task is to determine the absolute masses of neutrinos. A unique pattern of neutrino masses will be hopefully fixed in the future superbeam experiments and neutrino factories. However, the determination of the exact scale is more complicated and depends on the mass of the lightest neutrino ( mμ )min . If ( mμ)min ≥ 0.35 eV, the future tritium β decay experiments ( e.g. KATRIN) will have a chance to establish absolute neutrino masses. For smaller masses, 0.004 eV ≤ (mμ)min ≤ 0.35 eV, if neutrinos are Majorana particles, an additional information can be derived from the neutrinoless double β decay (ββ)0μ of nuclei and again the absolute neutrino masses can be fixed. If, however, (mμ)min ≤ 0.004 eV, none of the present and foreseeable future experiments is known to be able to fix the mass scale. (author)

  2. Fission neutron statistical emission

    The statistical model approach FINESSE (FIssion NEutronS' Statistical Emission) for the description of fission neutron multiplicities, energy spectra and angular distributions is described. Based on an extended Weisskopf ansatz and on a realistic temperature distribution it provides a fragment mass number dependent description of fission neutron data. Model parameters (optical potential, n/γ competition) were fixed on the basis of the 252Cf(sf) (nuclear data standard). Combined with a phenomenological fission model for predicting relevant fragment data as function of asymmetry. FINESSE can be applied to any fission reaction of actinides in the Th-Cf region without further parameter adjustment. Results are presented for 252Cf(sf) and neutron induced fission of 235U, 239Pu, 232Th. Effects of multiple-chance fission are discussed for 232Th(n,xnf) reacation. (author). 46 refs, 11 figs

  3. Our 50-year odyssey with fission: Summary

    On the occasion of this International Conference on Fifty Years Research in Nuclear Fission, we summarize our present understanding of the fission process and the challenges that lie ahead. The basic properties of fission arise from a delicate competition between disruptive Coulomb forces, cohesive nuclear forces, and fluctuating shell and pairing forces. These static forces are primarily responsible for such experimental phenomena as deformed ground-state nuclear shapes, fission into fragments of unequal size, sawtooth neutron yields, spontaneously fissioning isomers, broad resonances and narrow intermediate structure in fission cross sections, and cluster radioactivity. However, inertial and dissipative forces also play decisive roles in the dynamical evolution of a fissioning nucleus. The energy dissipated between the saddle and scission points is small for low initial excitation energy at the saddle point and increases with increasing excitation energy. At moderate excitation energies, the dissipation of collective energy into internal single-particle excitation energy proceeds largely through the interaction of nucleons with the mean field and with each other in the vicinity of the nuclear surface, as well as through the transfer of nucleons between the two portions of the evolving dumbell-like system. These unique dissipation mechanisms arise from the Pauli exclusion principle for fermions and the details of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, which make the mean free path of a nucleon near the Fermi surface at low excitation energy longer than the nuclear radius. With its inverse process of heavy-ion fusion reactions, fission continues to yield surprises in the study of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion. 87 refs., 12 figs

  4. Fission-product burn-up in fast reactors

    In fast reactors where breeding is emphasized the burn-up of fission products can be of considerable importance. Statistical estimates of fission-product cross-sections are combined with recent yield data for the various fissionable species to estimate the gross fission-product cross-section as a function of irradiation time in a number of fast reactor spectra with various fuels. Because of gaps in yield data for some of the fuel species, it is necessary to interpolate on the yield curves in some cases. The chain yield for a given mass is then apportioned among the chain members through use of the equal charge displacement recipe. The cross-sections estimated for U235 fission products by previous authors are supplemented by estimates for fission products important for other fuels. A range of such spectra is considered. These spectra are characterized by the index (average (Ε-1/2)) in the spectra. The sensitivity of the gross poisoning and its burn-up with respect to spectrum variations are considered. The results are also expressed in terms of a few pseudo-fission products, so that changes in effective cross-section of fission products with irradiation can be taken into account in a simple computational fashion. (author)

  5. The use of fission foils for plasma neutron diagnostics

    Commonly used fission foil materials have been examined for their application to plasma diagnostics as activation foils. Such foils have been used extensively in the past for fission reactor dosiemetry. They have very well known fission cross sections, and in most cases the fission yields are reasonably well known. The materials included in this study are 226Ra, 228Th, 232Th, 231Pa, 233U, 235U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, and 239Pu. Of these materials 232Th, 235U, and 238U are considered to be very good candidates for this application. The others have been eliminated because of high background radioactivity, impurities which present high backgrounds, or lack of knowledge about yield distribution of fission products. Production cross sections for fission products in the vicinity of the yield maxima (A = 85 - 101, 133 143) have been calculated from known fission cross sections and independent or cumulative yields at thermal energies (where applicable) and 14 MeV. Recent measurements at 2.5 MeV are also included. For one foil (232Th) results for 3 MeV and 11 MeV are also available. The decay schemes of the more prominent fission products have been thoroughly studied and good measurement precision should result from their use

  6. Study of α and triton particles emission in Uranium 235, Uranium 238, Plutonium 239 fast neutron fission

    Fast neutrons up to 2.5 MeV have been used to induce light particle accompanied fission in 235U, 238U and 239Pu targets. The energy spectra and relative intensities of 3H and 4He have been measured with a ΔE-E telescope. Absolute particle yields were derived from the number of 4He particle per 1000 binary fissions of 235U and 239Pu induced by thermal neutrons measured under the same geometrical conditions. We observe that all the energy distributions are well reproduced by gaussian lineshape, the mean energies of which remain constant while varying the neutron incident energy. (For all nuclei, the 4He mean energies lie close to 16 MeV and the corresponding energies for 3H particle at about 8-9 MeV). The production rates of 3H and 4He show a decrease of about 30% between thermal energy and En = 2 MeV with a small maximum at En = 1 MeV. Conversely the 3H and 4He particle yields obtained in fast neutron fission of 239U remain constant between En = 1.5 MeV and En = 2.5 MeV. Some possible explanation for these observations are briefly and qualitatively explored

  7. Advanced Modeling of Prompt Fission Neutrons and Gamma Rays

    Kawano T.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prompt fission neutrons and gamma rays are computed using a Monte Carlo treatment of the statistical evaporation of the excited primary fission fragments. The assumption of two fragments in thermal equilibrium at the time of neutron emission is addressed by studying the neutron multiplicity as a function of fragment mass. Results for the neutron-induced fission of 235U are discussed, for incident neutron energies from 0.5 to 5.5 MeV. Recent experimental data on the fission fragment yields as a function of mass and total kinetic energy are used as input data.

  8. Advanced Modeling of Prompt Fission Neutrons and Gamma Rays

    Kawano T; Talou P.

    2010-01-01

    Prompt fission neutrons and gamma rays are computed using a Monte Carlo treatment of the statistical evaporation of the excited primary fission fragments. The assumption of two fragments in thermal equilibrium at the time of neutron emission is addressed by studying the neutron multiplicity as a function of fragment mass. Results for the neutron-induced fission of 235U are discussed, for incident neutron energies from 0.5 to 5.5 MeV. Recent experimental data on the fission fragment yield...

  9. The multi-step prompt particle emission from fission fragments

    The purpose of this work is the study of non-equilibrium high-energy gamma emission from 252 Cf. In the framework of the formalism of statistical multi-step compound processes in nuclear reactions. A relation was found between the shape of the high-energy part of the gamma spectrum and different mechanisms of excitation of the fission fragments. Agreement with experimental data for different groups of fission fragments was obtained. The analysis of the experimental high-energy part of gamma spectra yields information about the mechanism of excitation of fission fragments. The influence of dissipation of the deformation excess on intrinsic excitation of fission fragments was studied. (authors)

  10. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  11. Fast fission phenomena

    Experimental studies of fast fission phenomena are presented. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first part, problems associated with fast fission processes are examined in terms of interaction potentials and a dynamic model is presented in which highly elastic collisions, the formation of compound nuclei and fast fission appear naturally. In the second part, a description is given of the experimental methods employed, the observations made and the preliminary interpretation of measurements suggesting the occurence of fast fission processes. In the third part, our dynamic model is incorporated in a general theory of the dissipative processes studied. This theory enables fluctuations associated with collective variables to be calculated. It is applied to highly inelastic collisions, to fast fission and to the fission dynamics of compound nuclei (for which a schematic representation is given). It is with these calculations that the main results of the second part can be interpreted

  12. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  13. Absolute polarimetry at RHIC

    Okada, H; Bravar, A; Bunce, G; Dhawan, S; Eyser, K O; Gill, R; Haeberli, W; Huang, H; Jinnouchi, O; Makdisi, Y; Nakagawa, I; Nass, A; Saitô, N; Stephenson, E; Sviridia, D; Wise, T; Wood, J; Zelenski, A

    2007-01-01

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy of $\\Delta P_{beam}/P_{beam} < 5%$. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features \\textit{proton-proton} elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power $A_N$ of this process has allowed us to achieve $\\Delta P_{beam}/P_{beam} =4.2%$ in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of $A...

  14. Complex fission phenomena

    Poenaru, Dorin N.; Gherghescu, Radu A.; Greiner, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena are studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle point) nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are ou...

  15. Characteristics of light charged particle emission in spontaneous and neutron induced fission of Cm and Cf isotopes

    Vermote, Sofie

    2009-01-01

    Talking about fission, people think almost automatically about a nucleus that splits into two heavy pieces. However, in 1946 the phenomenon of ternary fission has been discovered, in which the two fission fragments are accompanied by a light charged particle. Ternary fission data are of interest for nuclear physics, however also the nuclear industry requests accurate data for ternary fission yields, especially 3H and 4He, since they are at the origin of the production of He gas and the radioa...

  16. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, Junchen

    2016-01-01

    The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective ...

  17. The discovery of uranium fission

    Uranium was discovered 200 years ago. Its radioactive character was first demonstrated in 1896 and two years later radium was extracted from uranium minerals. In 1911 studies with alpha rays from radioactive decay led to the unexpected discovery of the atomic nucleus. Exposure of beryllium to alpha rays yielded neutrons, first detected in 1932. Starting in 1934, neutron irradiation of uranium produced radioactive substances erroneously attributed to transuranium elements but with confusing properties. Painstaking experiments by chemists left no doubt on 17 December 1938 that barium was produced by these irradiations: the neutrons had split some uranium nuclei. The physics of the fission process was understood two weeks later; after a few months, neutron multiplication was found to be probable. This review deals with the eminent scientists involved, their successes, errors and disappointments, and the unexpected insights which occurred on the paths and detours of scientific research. It is, therefore, instructive also to discuss how fission was not discovered. The momentous discovery must be considered inevitable; the great tragedy was that Germany started World War II just at the time when the possibility of nuclear chain reactions and bombs became known. The consequences and anxieties that remain after 50 years of nuclear fission demand that mankind act with reason and conscience to maintain peace. (author)

  18. Optical tweezers absolute calibration

    Dutra, R S; Neto, P A Maia; Nussenzveig, H M

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past fifteen years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spo...

  19. Measurement of the absolute \

    Aunion, Jose Luis Alcaraz; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2010-07-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies around 1 GeV. This measurement has two main physical motivations. On one hand, the neutrino-nucleon interactions at few GeV is a region where existing old data are sparse and with low statistics. The current measurement populates low energy regions with higher statistics and precision than previous experiments. On the other hand, the CCQE interaction is the most useful interaction in neutrino oscillation experiments. The CCQE channel is used to measure the initial and final neutrino fluxes in order to determine the neutrino fraction that disappeared. The neutrino oscillation experiments work at low neutrino energies, so precise measurement of CCQE interactions are essential for flux measurements. The main goal of this thesis is to measure the CCQE absolute neutrino cross section from the SciBooNE data. The SciBar Booster Neutrino Experiment (SciBooNE) is a neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering off experiment. The neutrino energy spectrum works at energies around 1 GeV. SciBooNE was running from June 8th 2007 to August 18th 2008. In that period, the experiment collected a total of 2.65 x 10{sup 20} protons on target (POT). This thesis has used full data collection in neutrino mode 0.99 x 10{sup 20} POT. A CCQE selection cut has been performed, achieving around 70% pure CCQE sample. A fit method has been exclusively developed to determine the absolute CCQE cross section, presenting results in a neutrino energy range from 0.2 to 2 GeV. The results are compatible with the NEUT predictions. The SciBooNE measurement has been compared with both Carbon (MiniBoonE) and deuterium (ANL and BNL) target experiments, showing a good agreement in both cases.

  20. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  1. Products of fission, fusion and deep inelastic reactions

    Factors which influence the yields in heavy ion reactions such as fusion, fission fragment production and deep inelastic reactions are considered in the context of the design of spectroscopic experiments. Factors examined include the suitability of a reaction for a particular application, the expected yield of the required nucleus, and parameters responsible for uncertainties in predicted yields. (U.K.)

  2. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD) show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution. (authors)

  3. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  4. Study on Fission Blanket Fuel Cycling of a Fusion-Fission Hybrid Energy Generation System

    Full text: Direct application of ITER-scale tokamak as a neutron driver in a subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor to generate electric power is of great potential in predictable future. This paper reports a primary study on neutronic and fuel cycle behaviors of a fission blanket for a new type of fusion-driven system (FDS), namely a subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation aiming at energy generation fueled with natural or depleted uranium. Using COUPLE2 developed at INET of Tsinghua University by coupling the MCNP code with the ORIGEN code to study the neutronic behavior and the refueling scheme, this paper focuses on refueling scheme of the fissionable fuel while keeping some important parameters such as tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and energy gain. Different fission fuels, coolants and their volumetric ratios arranged in the fission blanket satisfy the requirements for power generation. The results show that soft neutron spectrum with optimized fuel to moderator ratio can yield an energy amplifying factor of M> 20 while maintaining the TBR > 1.1 and the CR > 1 (the conversion ratio of fissile materials) in a reasonably long refueling cycle. Using an in-site fuel recycle plant, it will be an attractive way to realize the goal of burning 238U with such a new type of fusion-fission hybrid reactor system to generate electric power. (author)

  5. Yields of the bombs

    The calculations reported in later chapters require knowing how many fissions took place in each bomb. The literature gives the average energy released per fission; so an equivalent quantity is the energy released by each bomb. The energy released is called the 'yield'. The yield is given in kilotons. Here 'kiloton' is used as a unit of energy, not of mass. It is defined as 1012 calories or approximately the energy released in the explosion of one kiloton (kt) of TNT. The bomb exploded over Hiroshima was a gun-type device using enriched uranium and was the only detonation ever made of this type of device. The bomb exploded over Nagasaki was an implosion device using plutonium and was the same type as the bombs tested at Trinity in New Mexico and at the Able and Baker tests of Operation Crossroads at Bikini Atoll in 1946. These test data were the primary source of information used in determining the yield of the Nagasaki bomb. The yield of the Hiroshima bomb was determined by comparison with effects observed in the two cities and by some of the other methods listed below. Because of the importance of the yields to the reassessment program, they have been studied many times

  6. Muon-induced fission

    A review of recent experimental results on negative-muon-induced fission, both of 238U and 232Th, is given. Some conclusions drawn by the author are concerned with muonic atoms of fission fragments and muonic atoms of the shape isomer of 238U. (author)

  7. Fission gas detection system

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  8. Fission Xenon on Mars

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Marty, B.

    2002-01-01

    Fission Xe components due to Pu-244 decay in the early history of Mars have been identified in nakhlites; as in the case of ALH84001 and Chassigny the fission gas was assimilated into indigenous solar-type Xe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  10. Fission 2009 4. International Workshop on Nuclear Fission and Fission Product Spectroscopy - Compilation of slides

    This conference is dedicated to the last achievements in experimental and theoretical aspects of the nuclear fission process. The topics include: mass, charge and energy distribution, dynamical aspect of the fission process, nuclear data evaluation, quasi-fission and fission lifetime in super heavy elements, fission fragment spectroscopy, cross-section and fission barrier, and neutron and gamma emission. This document gathers the program of the conference and the slides of the presentations

  11. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation based toy model for fission process

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear fission has been modeled notoriously using two approaches method, macroscopic and microscopic. This work will propose another approach, where the nucleus is treated as a toy model. The aim is to see the usefulness of particle distribution in fission yield calculation. Inasmuch nucleus is a toy, then the Fission Toy Model (FTM) does not represent real process in nature completely. The fission event in FTM is represented by one random number. The number is assumed as width of distribution probability of nucleon position in compound nuclei when fission process is started. By adopting the nucleon density approximation, the Gaussian distribution is chosen as particle distribution. This distribution function generates random number that randomizes distance between particles and a central point. The scission process is started by smashing compound nucleus central point into two parts that are left central and right central points. The yield is determined from portion of nuclei distribution which is proportional with portion of mass numbers. By using modified FTM, characteristic of particle distribution in each fission event could be formed before fission process. These characteristics could be used to make prediction about real nucleons interaction in fission process. The results of FTM calculation give information that the γ value seems as energy.

  13. Neutron induced fission of 234U

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Al-Adili, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.

    2012-02-01

    The fission fragment properties of 234U(n,f) were investigated as a function of incident neutron energy from 0.2 MeV up to 5 MeV. The fission fragment mass, angular distribution and kinetic energy were measured with a double Frisch-grid ionization chamber using both analogue and digital data acquisition techniques. The reaction 234U(n,f) is relevant, since it involves the same compound nucleus as formed after neutron evaporation from highly excited 236U*, the so-called second-chance fission of 235U. Experimental data on fission fragment properties like fission fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) as a function of incident neutron energy are rather scarce for this reaction. For the theoretical modelling of the reaction cross sections for Uranium isotopes this information is a crucial input parameter. In addition, 234U is also an important isotope in the Thorium-based fuel cycle. The strong anisotropy of the angular distribution around the vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV could be confirmed using the full angular range. Fluctuations in the fragment TKE have been observed in the threshold region around the strong vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV. The present results are in contradiction with corresponding literature values. Changes in the mass yield around the vibrational resonance and at En = 5 MeV relative to En = 2 MeV show a different signature. The drop in mean TKE around 2.5 to 3 MeV points to pair breaking as also observed in 235,238U(n,f). The measured two-dimensional mass yield and TKE distribution have been described in terms of fission modes. The yield of the standard 1 (S1) mode shows fluctuations in the threshold of the fission cross section due to the influence of the resonance and levels off at about 20% yield for higher incident neutron energies. The S2 mode shows the respective opposite behaviour. The mean TKE of both modes decreases with En. The decrease in mean TKE overrules the increase in S1 yield, so the mean TKE is dropping

  14. Neutron induced fission of 234U

    Pomp S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The fission fragment properties of 234U(n,f were investigated as a function of incident neutron energy from 0.2 MeV up to 5 MeV. The fission fragment mass, angular distribution and kinetic energy were measured with a double Frisch-grid ionization chamber using both analogue and digital data acquisition techniques. The reaction 234U(n,f is relevant, since it involves the same compound nucleus as formed after neutron evaporation from highly excited 236U*, the so-called second-chance fission of 235U. Experimental data on fission fragment properties like fission fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE as a function of incident neutron energy are rather scarce for this reaction. For the theoretical modelling of the reaction cross sections for Uranium isotopes this information is a crucial input parameter. In addition, 234U is also an important isotope in the Thorium-based fuel cycle. The strong anisotropy of the angular distribution around the vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV could be confirmed using the full angular range. Fluctuations in the fragment TKE have been observed in the threshold region around the strong vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV. The present results are in contradiction with corresponding literature values. Changes in the mass yield around the vibrational resonance and at En = 5 MeV relative to En = 2 MeV show a different signature. The drop in mean TKE around 2.5 to 3 MeV points to pair breaking as also observed in 235,238U(n,f. The measured two-dimensional mass yield and TKE distribution have been described in terms of fission modes. The yield of the standard 1 (S1 mode shows fluctuations in the threshold of the fission cross section due to the influence of the resonance and levels off at about 20% yield for higher incident neutron energies. The S2 mode shows the respective opposite behaviour. The mean TKE of both modes decreases with En. The decrease in mean TKE overrules the increase in S1 yield, so the mean

  15. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency

  16. Measurement/Evaluation Techniques and Nuclear Data Associated with Fission of 239Pu by Fission Spectrum Neutrons

    Baisden, P; Bauge, E; Ferguson, J; Gilliam, D; Granier, T; Jeanloz, R; McMillan, C; Robertson, D; Thompson, P; Verdon, C; Wilkerson, C; Young, P

    2010-03-16

    This Panel was chartered to review and assess new evaluations of work on fission product data, as well as the evaluation process used by the two U.S. nuclear weapons physics laboratories. The work focuses on fission product yields resulting from fission spectrum neutrons incident on plutonium, and includes data from measurements that had not been previously published as well as new or revised fission product cumulative yield data, and related quantities such as Q values and R values. This report documents the Panel's assessment of the work presented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on the work presented we have seven key observations: (1) Experiments conducted in the 1970s at LANL, some of which were performed in association with a larger, NIST-led, program, have recently been documented. A preliminary assessment of this work, which will be referred to in this document as ILRR-LANL, shows it to be technically sound. (2) LLNL has done a thorough, unbiased review and evaluation of the available literature and is in the process of incorporating the previously unavailable LANL data into its evaluation of key fission product yields. The results of the LLNL effort, which includes a preliminary evaluation of the ILRR-LANL data, have been documented. (3) LANL has also conducted an evaluation of fission product yields for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium including a meta-analysis of benchmark data as part of a planned upgrade to the ENDF/B compilation. We found that the approach of using meta-analysis provides valuable additional insight for evaluating the sparse data sets involved in this assessment. (4) Both laboratories have provided convincing evidence for energy dependence in the fission product yield of {sup 147}Nd produced from the bombardment of {sup 239}Pu with fission spectrum neutrons over an incident neutron energy range of 0.2 to 1.9 MeV. (5) Consistent, complete, and explicit treatment

  17. Fission Fragments Discriminator

    Nuclear fission reaction between Uranium-235 nucleus and thermal neutron caused the high energy fission fragments with uncertainly direction. The particle direction discrimination was determined. The 2.5 x 3.0 mm2 polyethylene gratings with 1-6 mm thickness were used. The grating was placed between uranium screen that fabricated from ammonium-diurinate compound and polycarbonate nuclear track film recorder irradiated by neutron from Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) facility. The nuclear track density was inversely with grating thickness. It's only fission fragments normal to uranium screen pass through film recorder when grating thickness was 4-6 mm

  18. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  19. Delayed Neutrons and Photoneutrons from Fission Products

    Delayed neutrons: Most studies of the delayed neutrons from fission have involved analysis of the kinetic behaviour of fusion chain- reacting systems, analysis of the gross neutron decay (resolved into six groups with approximate half-lives of 0.2, 0.5, 2, 6, 22 and 55 s) and some measurements of the neutron spectra (the energies extendfrom 0.1 to 1.2 MeV, peaking in the range 0.2 to 0.5 MeV). Rapid separations of fission-produced halogens have indicated seven isotopes (Br87,88,89,90 and I137,138,139). and rare gas analysis has indicated 1.5-s Kr and 6-s Rb as definite delayed neutron precursors. These identified precursors account for some 80% of the total delayed neutron yields. Theoretical predictions of possible precursors point to a few tens of such nuclides to be found mainly in regions just above closed neutron shells. Total neutron yields are observed to increase with mass number and decrease with atomic number of the fissioning nuclide. Yields are nearly independent of the energy of the incident fissioning neutron at energies up to several MeV. In this range observed group yields,-especially of the long-lived precursors, ate in fairly good agreement with fission mass and charge distributions, and calculated neutron emission probabilities. . Further detailed studies of delayed neutron precursors (particularly in the difficult short half-life region) require development of ultra-fast radiochemical separation procedures (or on-line isotope separation) and fast neutron spectroscopy of high resolution and efficiency. Photoneutrons; A knowledge of the intensities and gamma-ray spectra of fission products is of practical importance in reactor technology particularly with respect to gamma heating, shielding and radiation effects. Gamma-rays of energies greater than 2.23 and 1.67 MeV cause emission of photoneutrons from deuterium and beryllium respectively, and are important in the kinetics of heavy water and beryllium-moderated reactors. The rate of photoneutron

  20. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  1. Fission fragment rocket concept

    A new propulsion scheme is outlined which may permit interstellar missions for spacecraft. This scheme is based on the idea of allowing fission fragments to escape from the core of a nuclear reactor. (orig.)

  2. Fission Systems for Mars Exploration

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, T.; Dorney, D. J.; Swint, Marion Shayne

    2012-01-01

    Fission systems are used extensively on earth, and 34 such systems have flown in space. The energy density of fission is over 10 million times that of chemical reactions, giving fission the potential to eliminate energy density constraints for many space missions. Potential safety and operational concerns with fission systems are well understood, and strategies exist for affordably developing such systems. By enabling a power-rich environment and highly efficient propulsion, fission systems could enable affordable, sustainable exploration of Mars.

  3. Improved calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    An improved calculation is presented for the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. In this calculation the fission-spectrum model of Madland and Nix is used, but with several improvements leading to a physically more accurate representation of the spectrum. Specifically, the contributions to N(E) from the entire fission-fragment mass and charge distributions will be calculated instead of calculating on the basis of a seven-point approximation to the peaks of these distributions as has been done in the past. Therefore, values of the energy release in fission, fission-fragment kinetic energy, nuclear level density, and compound nucleus cross section for the inverse process will be considered on a point-by-point basis over the fragment yield distributions instead of considering averages of these quantities over the peaks of the distributions. Particular attention will be given to the energy-dependent compound nucleus cross sections and to the nuclear level density model. Other refinements to the calculation of N(E) will also be discussed. Results will be presented and compared with earlier calculations of the spectrum and with recent experimental measurements of the spectrum. 9 figs

  4. Review of Fission Theory

    A survey of the present state of fission theory is attempted. The basic requirements of a theory of a physical process are outlined and against this background the state of fission theory is summarized, with special emphasis on developments in the past few years. An attempt is made to bring out the most important outstanding problems to be settled by future experiments and theory. (author)

  5. Fission product detection

    The response of photovoltaic cells to heavy ions and fission products have been tested on beam. Their main advantages are their extremely low price, their low sensitivity to energetic light ions with respect to fission products, and the possibility to cut and fit them together to any shape without dead zone. The time output signals of a charge sensitive preamplifier connected to these cells allows fast coincidences. A resolution of 12ns (F.W.H.M.) have been measured between two cells

  6. Feasibility study of measuring the 238U fission rates by neutrons of 14 MeV in specifical experiment condition

    Using uranium fission chambers of minitype slab in the case of 14 MeV neutrons penetrating through the special experiment model, the pure 238U absolute fission rates are measured. Comparing the measurement results with and without reflect shell, the reflect coefficient of shell is gained. The calculate results are compared with experiment results, to prove the model calculate method and parameter. (author)

  7. Fission fragment mass distributions via prompt -ray spectroscopy

    L S Danu; D C Biswas; B K Nayak; R K Choudhury

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of fragment masses formed in nuclear fission is one of the most striking features of the process. Such measurements are very important to understand the shape evolution of the nucleus from ground state to scission through intermediate saddle points. The fission fragment mass distributions, generally obtained via conventional methods (i.e., by measuring the energy and/or the velocity of the correlated fission fragments) are limited to a mass resolution of 4–5 units. On the other hand, by employing the -ray spectroscopy, it is possible to estimate the yield of individual fission fragments. In this work, determination of the fission fragment mass distribution by employing prompt -ray spectroscopy is described along with the recent results on 238U(18O, f) and 238U(32S, f) systems.

  8. Characterization of the scission point from fission-fragment velocities

    Caamaño, M; Delaune, O; Schmidt, K -H; Schmitt, C; Audouin, L; Bacri, C -O; Benlliure, J; Casarejos, E; Derkx, X; Fernández-Domínguez, B; Gaudefroy, L; Golabek, C; Jurado, B; Lemasson, A; Ramos, D; Rodríguez-Tajes, C; Roger, T; Shrivastava, A

    2015-01-01

    The isotopic-yield distributions and kinematic properties of fragments produced in transfer-induced fission of 240Pu and fusion-induced fission of 250Cf, with 9 MeV and 45 MeV of excitation energy respectively, were measured in inverse kinematics with the spectrometer VAMOS. The kinematic properties of identified fission fragments allow to derive properties of the scission configuration such as the distance between fragments, the total kinetic energy, the neutron multiplicity, the total excitation energy, and, for the first time, the proton- and neutron-number sharing during the emergence of the fragments. These properties of the scission point are studied as functions of the fragment atomic number. The correlation between these observables, gathered in one single experiment and for two different fissioning systems at different excitation energies, give valuable information for the understanding and modeling of the fission process.

  9. Applications of Event-by-Event Fission Modeling with FREYA

    Vogt R.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The recently developed code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm generates large samples of complete fission events, consisting of two receding product nuclei as well as a number of neutrons and photons, all with complete kinematic information. Thus it is possible to calculate arbitrary correlation observables whose behavior may provide unique insight into the fission process. We first discuss the present status of FREYA, which has now been extended to include spontaneous fission. Concentrating on 239Pu(nth,f, 240Pu(sf and 252Cf(sf, we discuss the neutron multiplicity correlations, the dependence of the neutron energy spectrum on the neutron multiplicity, and the relationship between the fragment kinetic energy and the number of neutrons and their energies. We also suggest novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  10. Fission gas release (FGASRL)

    During irradiation of water reactor fuel rods, gaseous fission products are produced in the fuel and are slowly released to various voipd volumes in the fuel rods. The released fission gases degrade the initial fill gas thermal conductivity and thus change the thermal response of the fuel rods. Moreover, fuel rod internal pressure is increased so that the cladding mechanical response is affected. The fission gas release subcode FGASRL is intended for use in analytical codes which predict water reactor fuel pin behavior. The development effort was directed primarily at improving code predictions of the gas release model used in FRAP-S3 which overpredicts release of fuels irradiated at relatively low operating temperatures and therefore small gas release fractions. The fission gas release subcode (FGASRL) presented in the report describes a two-step gas release process: (a) fission gas release from fuel grains to the grain boundaries, and (b) fission gas release from the grain boundaries to internal free volume of the fuel pin

  11. Photo-fission of 232Th and 238U at intermediate energies

    Deppman, A.(Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, Brazil); Andrade-II, E.; Guimaraes, V.; Demekhina, N. A.; Karapetyan, G. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an analysis of the yields of fission fragments induced by bremsstrahlung photons with endpoint energies of 50 and 3500 MeV on 232Th and 238U targets using the simulation code CRISP. A multimodal fission option was added to this code and an extension of the calculation to the properties of the fission products is presented. By dividing the fissioning nuclei according to their fissionability, an approach is introduced which accounts for the contribution of symmetric and ...

  12. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. We obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both to the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic fission characteristics.

  13. Determination of nuclear fission number by high-energy delayed γ-rays

    Fission numbers of 235U samples irradiated in short time were obtained by fission yield method. The total emission rate of high-energy delayed γ-rays above 3 MeV per fission over time was measured by large volume NaI detector, and high-energy delayed γ-rays emission rate of pulse irradiation was gained. Fission numbers of two 235U samples were obtained by applying the emission rate of high-energy delayed γ-rays per fission, and the relative uncertainty is less than 4%. (authors)

  14. Locally Broken Crystal Symmetry Facilitates Singlet Exciton Fission.

    Petelenz, Piotr; Snamina, Mateusz

    2016-05-19

    Photovoltaic yield is normally limited to at most two charge carriers per photon. In solid pentacene this limit may be potentially bypassed owing to singlet exciton fission into a pair of triplets. The process occurs via a superexchange mechanism mediated by charge-transfer (CT) configurations and is sensitive to their energies. As demonstrated recently, these strongly depend on the local environment of the two molecules on which the charges reside. Using a multiscale model, here we show that in the crystal bulk approximate local symmetry affects CT state energetics in a way unfavorable for fission, so that at the places where this symmetry is broken the fission probability is enhanced by up to an order of magnitude. These fission-favorable locations entail the vicinity of vacancies, specific impurities, and interfaces, such as crystallite boundaries. Hence, photovoltaic yield might be substantially increased by using nanoscopically disordered pentacene rather than highly ordered specimens. PMID:27152577

  15. Nondestructive analysis of RA reactor fuel burnup, Program for burnup calculation base on relative yield of 106Ru, 134Cs and 137Cs in the irradiated fuel

    Burnup of low enriched metal uranium fuel of the RA reactor is described by two chain reactions. Energy balance and material changes in the fuel are described by systems of differential equations. Numerical integration of these equations is base on the the reactor operation data. Neutron flux and percent of Uranium-235 or more frequently yield of epithermal neutrons in the neutron flux, is determined by iteration from the measured contents of 106Ru, 134Cs and 137Cs in the irradiated fuel. The computer program was written in FORTRAN-IV. Burnup is calculated by using the measured activities of fission products. Burnup results are absolute values

  16. Radiometric dating of sediments using fission tracks in conodonts

    The possibility of counting fission tracks in conodonts and of computing reasonable age estimates from these data has been investigated. Fission tracks counted in thermal neutron irradiated, thermally unaltered (as indicated by colour alteration indices) middle Palaeozoic conodonts indicate typical uranium concentrations of approximately 1 part in 109, with some samples higher. A single specimen of Siphonodella from the Lower Mississippian yielded an age estimate of 380 +- 140 Myr consistent with conventional interpolations. (U.K.)

  17. Application of mercury cathode electrolysis to fission-product separation

    A method involving controlled potential mercury cathode electrolysis has been developed to separate fission products. It allows the radiochemical determination of Ag, Cd, Pd, Rh, Ru, Sn, Te, Sb and Mo from solutions of fission products highly concentrated in mineral salts. The general procedure consists in three main steps: electrolytic amalgam generation, destruction of amalgams and ultimate purification of elements by other means. Electrolytic operations last about five hours. Chemical yields lie between 10 per cent and 70 per cent. (authors)

  18. ROE Absolute Sea Level Changes

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This raster dataset represents changes in absolute sea level along U.S. coasts from 1993 to 2014. Data were provided by the University of Colorado at Boulder (2015)...

  19. Dependence of Fission-Fragment Properties On Excitation Energy For Neutron-Rich Actinides

    Ramos D.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic fission yields of 250Cf, 244Cm, 240Pu, 239Np and 238U are presented in this work. With this information, the average number of neutrons as a function of the atomic number of the fragments is calculated, which reflects the impact of nuclear structure around Z=50, N=80 on the production of fission fragments. The characteristics of the Super Long, Standard I, Standard II, and Standard III fission channels were extracted from fits of the fragment yields for different ranges of excitation energy. The position and contribution of the fission channels as function of excitation energy are presented.

  20. Numbers of prompt neutrons per fission for U233, U235, Pu239, and Cf252

    An absolute measurement of #-v#, the average number of prompt neutrons emitted per fission, is being made for the spontaneous fission of Cf262. The relative values of #-v# are being measured for neutron-induced fission of U233, U235, and Pu239, and are being compared with the spontaneous fission #-v# of Cf252. Neutrons with energies between thermal and 15 MeV are used. Particular emphasis is put on studying the dependence of #-v# on the incident neutron energy. A fission counter containing the appropriate isotope is placed in the centre of a large cadmium-loade d liquid scintillator. Through the fissionable isotope is passed a collimated beam of neutrons. Fission events, identified by pulses from the fission counter, open an electronic gate between the large liquid scintillator and a scaler. Scintillator pulses due to capture in the scintillating solution of thermalized fission neutrons are counted during the gate. The fission neutrons are detected almost independently of energy and with very high efficiency. With this technique values of #-v# to an accuracy of 1 % are expected. (author)

  1. Fission waves can oscillate

    Osborne, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Under the right conditions, self sustaining fission waves can form in fertile nuclear materials. These waves result from the transport and absorption of neutrons and the resulting production of fissile isotopes. When these fission, additional neutrons are produced and the chain reaction propagates until it is poisoned by the buildup of fission products. It is typically assumed that fission waves are soliton-like and self stabilizing. However, we show that in uranium, coupling of the neutron field to the 239U->239Np->239Pu decay chain can lead to a Hopf bifurcation. The fission reaction then ramps up and down, along with the wave velocity. The critical driver for the instability is a delay, caused by the half-life of 239U, between the time evolution of the neutron field and the production of 239Pu. This allows the 239Pu to accumulate and burn out in a self limiting oscillation that is characteristic of a Hopf bifurcation. Time dependent results are obtained using a numerical implementation of a reduced order r...

  2. {\\alpha}-accompanied cold ternary fission of $^{238-244}$Pu isotopes in equatorial and collinear configuration

    Santhosh, K P; Krishnan, Sreejith; Priyanka, B.

    2015-01-01

    The cold ternary fission of $^{238}$Pu, $^{240}$Pu, $^{242}$Pu and $^{244}$Pu isotopes, with $^{4}$He as light charged particle, in equatorial and collinear configuration has been studied within the Unified ternary fission model (UTFM). The fragment combination $^{100}$Zr+$^{4}$He+$^{134}$Te possessing the near doubly magic nuclei $^{134}$Te (N=82, Z=52) gives the highest yield in the alpha accompanied ternary fission of $^{238}$Pu. For the alpha accompanied ternary fission of $^{240}$Pu, $^{...

  3. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n,f) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verriere, M.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of ...

  4. Search for scission neutrons in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    In the spontaneous fission of 252Cf, we observed that the population of spin 2+ in 136Te is closely correlated with the population of spin 4+ of its partner 114Pd. We attribute our results to the emission of two neutrons at scission carrying away two units of angular momentum and the yield is 0.06(2) per 100 spontaneous fission (SF) events whereas the two neutron normal fission yield is 0.12(3) per 100 SF for the 136Te and 114Pd pair. The yield for fission with four scission neutrons for 136Te and 112Pd is observed to be ∼0 whereas the four neutron hot fission yield is 0.28(4) per 100 SF events. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Measurement of the Ratio of Fissions in U238 to Fissions in U233 Using 1.60 Mev Gamma Rays of the Fission Product La140

    This paper describes a method for measuring δ28, the ratios of fissions in U238 to fissions in U235. The method was developed as a part of the D2O lattice programme at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) ; however, it can be used for measurements in any thermal reactor of natural or slightly enriched uranium. The fast fission factor in uranium cannot be measured directly. It is, however, related to δ28 which can be measured: ϵ =1 + Cδ28 , where C is a constant involving nuclear properties of U238 and U235: Previous methods of measuring δ28 utilize a comparison of fission-product gamma or beta activity in foils of differing U235 concentration irradiated within a fuel rod in the lattice. A double fission chamber is then used to relate the U238 and U235 fission product activity to the ratio of the corresponding fission rates. Most of the experimental uncertainty associated with the measurement of δ28 a is generally attributed to the fission chamber calibration. The method developed at MIT avoids the need for a fission chamber calibration and is accomplished directly with foils irradiated within a fuel rod in the lattice. Two foils of differing U235 concentration are irradiated and allowed to cool for at least a week. The relative activity of the 1.60 MeV gamma ray of the fission product La140 is determined for the two foils. This ratio, the foil weights and atomic densities, and the ratio of fission yields β25/β28 for La140 are then used to determine δ28. This value of δ28 is used to calibrate simpler measurements in which the relative gamma activity above 0.72 MeV is determined for sets of foils irradiated in fuel rods of the lattices of interest. The energy 0.72 MeV is a convenient discrimination level, as it is the maximum energy of Bremsstrahlung from 2.3-d Np239. This method appears to offer the advantages of direct measurement and increased accuracy (the major uncertainty being the ratio of β25/β28 La140). In addition, the results can be

  6. Current position on fission product behavior

    The following phenomena are treated and modeled: fission product release from fuel, both in-vessel and ex-vessel; fission product deposition in the primary system, fission product deposition in the containment, and fission product revolatization

  7. On the possibilities and accuracy of fission fragment characteristics measuring by the method of semiconductor gamma spectrometry

    A method for determining the semiconductor detector absolute efficiency, based on the application radioactive nuclide γ radiation in the decay chains of spontaneous fissionable 252Cf fragments is proposed. Proceeding from the values of half-lives of the nuclides used and choosing the irradiation regimes according to gamma spectrum measurement data, the absolute efficiency is calculated. 8 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  8. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Léonie

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ , e-) . The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  9. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Leonie [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e{sup -}). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for

  10. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e-). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  11. Characteristics of Coulomb fission

    Oberacker, Volker; Greiner, Walter; Kruse, Hans; Pinkston, William T.

    2006-01-01

    Within an extended semiquantal theory we perform large-sized coupled-channel calculations involving 260 collective levels for Coulomb fission of 238U. Differential Coulomb fission cross sections are studied as a function of bombarding energy and impact parameter for several projectiles. In the Xe + U case, total cross sections are also given. We find a strong dependence on projectile charge number, PCF(180°)∼(Zp)6 in the region 50≤Zp≤92 for a fixed ratio E/ECoul, which might...

  12. Method of Fission Product Beta Spectra Measurements for Predicting Reactor Anti-neutrino Emission

    Asner, D. M.; Burns, K; Campbell, L. W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M. S.; Orrell, J. L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L. S.; Wootan, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron anti-neutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to current precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurem...

  13. Neutron Capture and Fission Measurement on ^238Pu at DANCE

    Chyzh, Andrii; Wu, Ching-Yen; Kwan, Elaine; Henderson, Roger; Gostic, Jolie; Couture, Aaron; Young, Hye; Ullmann, John; O'Donnell, John; Jandel, Marian; Haight, Robert; Bredeweg, Todd

    2012-10-01

    Neutron capture and fission reactions on actinides are important in nuclear engineering and physics. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Measurement, LANL) combined with PPAC (avalanche technique based fission tagging detector, LLNL) were used to study the neutron capture reactions in ^238Pu. Because of extreme spontaneous α-radioactivity in ^238Pu and associated safety issues, 3 separate experiments were performed in 2010-2012. The 1st measurement was done without fission tagging on a 396-μg thick target. The 2nd one was with PPAC on the same target. The 3rd final measurement was done on a thin target with a mass of 40 μg in order to reduce α-background load on PPAC. This was the first such measurement in a laboratory environment. The absolute ^238Pu(n,γ) cross section is presented together with the prompt γ-ray multiplicity in the ^238Pu(n,f) reaction.

  14. Nuclear fission viewed as a diffusion process: Case of very large friction

    Using a Fokker-Planck equation, we consider induced nuclear fission for large values of the friction constant. Then, the equation simplifies to the Smoluchowski equation which we solve using a method of van Kampen. We find that the fission rate obeys a scaling law. From our numerical results and those obtained previously, we estimate the transient time tau for fission. For small nuclear temperature, tau is defined as the time delay between the onset of a nuclear reaction and the attainment of the quasistationary probability flow over the fission barrier. For nuclear temperatures large compared to the fission barrier, the entire fission process is governed by transients, and tau essentially yields the fission lifetime. We speculate on the significance of our results for recent experimental observations

  15. Development of fission Mo-99 production technology

    Park, Jin Ho; Choung, W. M.; Lee, K. I. and others

    2001-05-01

    This R and D project is planed to supply domestic demands of Mo-99 through fission route, and consequently this project will be expected to rise up utilization of HANARO and KAERI's capability for marketing extension into domestic and oversea radiopharmaceutical market. HEU and LEU target types are decided and designed for fission Mo-99 production in domestic. Experimental study of target fabrication technology was performed and developed processing equipments. And conceptual design of target loading/unloading in/from HANARO device are performed. Tracer test of Mo-99 separation and purification process was performed, test results reach to Mo-99 recovery yield above 80% and decontamination factor above 1600. Combined Mo-99 separation and purification process was decided for hot test scheduled from next year, and performance test was performed. Conceptual design for modification of existing hot cell for fission Mo-99 production facility was performed and will be used for detail design. Assumption for the comparison of LEU and HEU target in fission Mo-99 production process were suggested and compared of merits and demerits in view of fabrication technology and economy feasibility.

  16. Dynamics of fission and heavy ion reactions

    Recent advances in a unified macroscopic-microscopic description of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion such as occurs in fission and heavy ion reactions are discussed. With the goal of finding observable quantities that depend upon the magnitude and mechanism of nuclear dissipation, one-body dissipation and two-body viscosity within the framework of a generalized Fokker-Planck equation for the time dependence of the distribution function in phase space of collective coordinates and momenta are considered. Proceeding in two separate directions, the generalized Hamilton equations of motion for the first moments of the distribution function with a new shape parametrization and other technical innovations are first solved. This yields the mean translational fission-fragment kinetic energy and mass of a third fragment that sometimes forms between the two end fragments, as well as the energy required for fusion in symmetric heavy-ion reactions and the mass transfer and capture cross section in asymmetric heavy-ion reactions. In a second direction, we specialize to an inverted-oscillator fission barrier and use Kramers' stationary solution to calculate the mean time from the saddle point to scission for a heavy-ion-induced fission reaction for which experimental information is becoming available. 25 references

  17. Fission dynamics of hot nuclei

    Santanu Pal; Jhilam Sadhukhan

    2014-04-01

    Experimental evidence accumulated during the last two decades indicates that the fission of excited heavy nuclei involves a dissipative dynamical process. We shall briefly review the relevant dynamical model, namely the Langevin equations for fission. Statistical model predictions using the Kramers’ fission width will also be discussed.

  18. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  19. Microscopic Description of Induced Fission

    Schunck, N

    2013-01-01

    Selected aspects of the description of neutron-induced fission in 240Pu in the framework of the nuclear energy density functional theory at finite temperature are presented. In particular, we discuss aspects pertaining to the choice of thermodynamic state variables, the evolution of fission barriers as function of the incident neutron energy, and the temperatures of the fission fragments.

  20. Absolute particle flux determination in absence of known detector efficiency. The “Influence Method”

    Rios, I.J.; Mayer, R.E., E-mail: mayer@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2015-03-01

    In this article we introduce a new method, which we call the “Influence Method”, to be employed in the absolute determination of a particle flux, most especially applicable to time-of-flight spectrum determination of a neutron beam. It yields not only the absolute number of particles but also an estimator of detectors efficiencies. It may be useful when no calibration standards are available. The different estimators are introduced along with some Monte Carlo simulations to further illustrate the method. - Highlights: • “Influence Method”, a new method for absolute particle flux determination. • Absolute detector efficiency determination. • Absolute time-of-flight particle flux determination.

  1. Fission properties of actinide nuclei from proton-induced fission at 26.5 and 62.9 MeV incident proton energies

    Demetriou, P.; Keutgen, Thomas; Prieels, René; El Masri, Youssef

    2010-01-01

    Fission properties of proton-induced fission on Th232, Np237, U238, Pu239, and Am241 targets, measured at the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility at proton energies of 26.5 and 62.9 MeV, are compared with the predictions of the state-of-the-art nuclear reaction code talys. The code couples the multimodal random neck-rupture model with the pre-equilibrium exciton and statistical models to predict fission fragment mass yields, pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities, and total fission cro...

  2. Calculation of fission reactions within the MM-RNR model

    In the past fission-fragment properties and cross-sections for 235,238U(n, f), 237Np(n, f), 239Pu(n, f) and 252Cf(SF) have been investigated. The interpretation of the experimental data in the frame of the multi-modal random neck-rupture (MM-RNR) model has been incorporated into the most recent evaluation exercise on neutron-induced fission cross-section and prompt-neutron emission data in the actinide region of the chart of nuclides. The three most dominant fission modes were considered, the two asymmetric standard I (S1) and standard II (S2) modes and the symmetric superlong (SL) mode, namely. Except for 252Cf, de-convoluted modal fission cross-sections as well as prompt neutron multiplicity and spectra have been calculated in the energy range from 0.01 MeV to 5.5 MeV in excellent agreement with experimental data. In addition, the obtained fission-mode branching ratios allow the calculation of fission-fragment yield and energy distributions where no experimental data exist. Most recently the first ever-direct measurement of the neutron-induced fission cross-section of 233Pa has been performed at IRMM. The subsequent evaluation suggests a radical revision of today's evaluated data files. (author)

  3. Nuclear fission: What have we learned in 50 years?

    Nuclear fission has captured the imagination of chemists and physicists for half a century now. There are several reasons for this. One of course is that it represents the most drastic rearrangement of nuclear matter known, challenged only recently by collisions induced by very heavy ions. Another is that both statistical and dynamical features come into play. Perhaps one of the most compelling reasons is its never-ending capacity to surprise us: asymmetric mass distributions, the sawtooth dependence of neutron yields in fragment mass, spontaneously fissioning isomers and intermediate structure resonances. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, fission is a rich laboratory within which one can explore the delicate interplay between the macroscopic aspects of bulk nuclear matter and the quantal effects of a finite number of Fermions. It will of course be impossible for me to cover all aspects of fission. I have chosen a limited number of topics to cover, with particular topics being chosen either because the have been associated with persistent puzzles in fission or because they have, or hopefully will, tell us something special about how nuclei behave. After a brief historical note, I organize these topics sequentially according to the various stages of the fission process, starting first with the probability for fission to occur and ending with scission phenomena. 56 refs., 11 figs

  4. Dependence of Fission-Fragment Properties On Excitation Energy For Neutron-Rich Actinides

    Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Audouin, L.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Clement, E.; Cortina, D.; Delaune, O.; Derkx, X.; Dijon, A.; Doré, D.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; de France, G.; Heinz, A.; Jacquot, B.; Navin, A.; Paradela, C.; Rejmund, M.; Roger, T.; Salsac, M. D.; Schmitt, C.

    2016-03-01

    Experimental access to full isotopic fragment distributions is very important to determine the features of the fission process. However, the isotopic identification of fission fragments has been, in the past, partial and scarce. A solution based on the use of inverse kinematics to study transfer-induced fission of exotic actinides was carried out at GANIL, resulting in the first experiment accessing the full identification of a collection of fissioning systems and their corresponding fission fragment distribution. In these experiments, a 238U beam at 6.14 AMeV impinged on a carbon target to produce fissioning systems from U to Am by transfer reactions, and Cf by fusion reactions. Isotopic fission yields of 250Cf, 244Cm, 240Pu, 239Np and 238U are presented in this work. With this information, the average number of neutrons as a function of the atomic number of the fragments is calculated, which reflects the impact of nuclear structure around Z=50, N=80 on the production of fission fragments. The characteristics of the Super Long, Standard I, Standard II, and Standard III fission channels were extracted from fits of the fragment yields for different ranges of excitation energy. The position and contribution of the fission channels as function of excitation energy are presented.

  5. Monte Carlo Based Toy Model for Fission Process

    Kurniadi, R; Viridi, S

    2014-01-01

    Fission yield has been calculated notoriously by two calculations approach, macroscopic approach and microscopic approach. This work will proposes another calculation approach which the nucleus is treated as a toy model. The toy model of fission yield is a preliminary method that use random number as a backbone of the calculation. Because of nucleus as a toy model hence the fission process does not represent real fission process in nature completely. Fission event is modeled by one random number. The number is assumed as width of distribution probability of nucleon position in compound nuclei when fission process is started. The toy model is formed by Gaussian distribution of random number that randomizes distance like between particle and central point. The scission process is started by smashing compound nucleus central point into two parts that are left central and right central points. These three points have different Gaussian distribution parameters such as mean ({\\mu}CN, {\\mu}L, {\\mu}R), and standard d...

  6. Accurate fission data for nuclear safety

    Solders, A; Jokinen, A; Kolhinen, V S; Lantz, M; Mattera, A; Penttila, H; Pomp, S; Rakopoulos, V; Rinta-Antila, S

    2013-01-01

    The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyvaskyla. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (10^12 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons...

  7. Fission modes of mercury isotopes

    Warda, M; Nazarewicz, W

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments on beta-delayed fission in the mercury-lead region and the discovery of asymmetric fission in $^{180}$Hg [1] have stimulated renewed interest in the mechanism of fission in heavy nuclei. Here we study fission modes and fusion valleys in $^{180}$Hg and $^{198}$Hg using the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory employing Skyrme and Gogny energy density functionals. We show that the observed transition from asymmetric fission in $^{180}$Hg towards more symmetric distribution of fission fragments in $^{198}$Hg can be explained in terms of competing fission modes of different geometries that are governed by shell effects in pre-scission configurations. The density distributions at scission configurations are studied and related to the experimentally observed mass splits.

  8. Dynamical features of nuclear fission

    Santanu Pal

    2015-08-01

    It is now established that the transition-state theory of nuclear fission due to Bohr and Wheeler underestimates several observables in heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions. Dissipative dynamical models employing either the Langevin equation or equivalently the Fokker–Planck equation have been developed for fission of heavy nuclei at high excitations (T ∼1 MeV or higher). Here, we first present the physical picture underlying the dissipative fission dynamics. We mainly concentrate upon the Kramers’ prescription for including dissipation in fission dynamics. We discuss, in some detail, the results of a statistical model analysis of the pre-scission neutron multiplicity data from the reactions 19F+194,196,198Pt using Kramers’ fission width. We also discuss the multi-dimensional Langevin equation in the context of kinetic energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments.

  9. Energy dissipation in the cold fission of 252Cf

    The conversion of energy of collective nuclear motion into internal single particle excitation energy is one of the modes of nuclear energy dissipation. Dissipation and its relation to pair breaking is one of the challenges in nuclear field. A characteristic of low energy fission is odd-even effect. Odd-even staggering in the mass or charge yields and in the total kinetic energies will be of useful to analyze dissipation energy. The odd even effects in the charge distribution of cold fission fragments can be analysed to extract information on the energy dissipation during the passage from the first potential well towards the scission point through the fission barrier. The Q value during a fission process is decomposed into the total kinetic and excitation energies (TKE and TXE)

  10. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  11. FALSTAFF: A new tool for fission studies

    The future NFS installation will produce high intensity neutron beams from hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. Taking advantage of this facility, data of particular interest for the nuclear community in view of the development of the fast reactor technology will be measured. The development of an experimental setup called FALSTAFF for a full characterization of actinide fission fragments has been undertaken. Fission fragment isotopic yields and associated neutron multiplicities will be measured as a function of the neutron energy. Based on time-of-flight and residual energy technique, the setup will allow the simultaneous measurement of the complementary fragments velocity and energy. The performances of TOF detectors of FALSTAFF will be presented and expected resolutions for fragment masses and neutron multiplicities, based on realistic simulations, will be shown. (authors)

  12. Fission fragment rockets -- a potential breakthrough

    A new reactor concept which has the potential of enabling extremely energetic and ambitious space propulsion missions is described. Fission fragments are directly utilized as the propellant by guiding them out of a very low density core using magnetic fields. The very high fission fragment exhaust velocities yield specific impulses of approximately a million seconds while maintaining respectable thrust levels. Specific impulses of this magnitude allow acceleration of significant payload masses to several percent of the velocity of light and enable a variety of interesting missions, e.g., payloads to the nearest star, Alpha Centauri, in about a hundred years or very rapid solar system transport. The parameters reported in this paper are based on a very preliminary analysis. Considerable trade-off studies will be required to find the optimum system

  13. FALSTAFF: A new tool for fission studies

    Dore D.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The future NFS installation will produce high intensity neutron beams from hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. Taking advantage of this facility, data of particular interest for the nuclear community in view of the development of the fast reactor technology will be measured. The development of an experimental setup called FALSTAFF for a full characterization of actinide fission fragments has been undertaken. Fission fragment isotopic yields and associated neutron multiplicities will be measured as a function of the neutron energy. Based on time-of-flight and residual energy technique, the setup will allow the simultaneous measurement of the complementary fragments velocity and energy. The performances of TOF detectors of FALSTAFF will be presented and expected resolutions for fragment masses and neutron multiplicities, based on realistic simulations, will be shown.

  14. Fission decay properties of ultra neutron-rich uranium isotopes

    L Satpathy; S K Patra; R K Choudhury

    2008-01-01

    The fission decay of highly neutron-rich uranium isotopes is investigated which shows interesting new features in the barrier properties and neutron emission characteristics in the fission process. 233U and 235U are the nuclei in the actinide region in the beta stability valley which are thermally fissile and have been mainly used in reactors for power generation. The possibility of occurrence of thermally fissile members in the chain of neutron-rich uranium isotopes is examined here. The neutron number = 162 or 164 has been predicted to be magic in numerous theoretical studies carried out over the years. The series of uranium isotopes around it with = 154-172 are identified to be thermally fissile on the basis of the fission barrier and neutron separation energy systematics; a manifestation of the close shell nature of = 162 (or 164). We consider here the thermal neutron fission of a typical representative 249U nucleus in the highly neutron-rich region. Semiempirical study of fission barrier height and width shows that 250U nucleus is stable against spontaneous fission due to increase in barrier width arising out of excess neutrons. On the basis of the calculation of the probability of fragment mass yields and the microscopic study in relativistic mean field theory, this nucleus is shown to undergo exotic decay mode of thermal neutron fission (multi-fragmentation fission) whereby a number of prompt scission neutrons are expected to be simultaneously released along with the two heavy fission fragments. Such properties will have important implications in stellar evolution involving -process nucleosynthesis.

  15. Fission product revaporization

    One of the major developmental advances in severe accident analysis since the Reactor Safety Study relates to the accounting for radionuclide retention in the reactor coolant system (RCS). The retention is predicted to occur as materials released during core heatup and degradation are transported through the RCS to the break (broken pipe, relief valve, etc.). For accidents involving relatively long RCS-transit times (e.g., station blackout in PWRs), the fraction of released material predicted to remain in the RCS can be large. For example, calculations for the Surry station blackout sequence showed retention of approximately 80% of the cesium and iodine species. Factors affecting fission product revaporization are post-vessel-failure thermal hydraulics, heat loss through vessel and pipe walls, and revaporization chemistry. The accident conditions relevant to this issue range from those present immediately after vessel failure to those present after containment failure. The factors that affect fission product revaporization are discussed

  16. 240Pu(n,f), 242Pu(n,f), 237Np(n,f), neutron fission cross sections, Esub(n) = 2.5 MeV

    Measurements of the absolute neutron fission cross section of 240Pu, 242Pu and 237Np have been made at 2.5 MeV using a hybrid detector. The fission events were detected in an ionization chamber (2π) and the neutron flux was determined by a proton recoil telescope and a directional long counter. Our values are compared to previous data

  17. Study of the production of fission fragments from neutron induced fission on uranium 238

    This work is devoted to the study of the mass and charge distributions of fission fragments from the fission induced on uranium 238 by neutrons from 1 to 150 MeV. An experimental program allowed us to gather and analyse new data. The obtained results were interpreted by an original model, based on a microscopic description of the reaction. Data were taken at the LANSCE laboratory of Los Alamos (USA) where we used the neutron source WNR and the germanium array GEANIE. The aim was to measure secondary fission fragment production yields from a spectroscopic analysis of the prompt gamma and x-rays. A device with photovoltaic cells used as fission fragment detectors was developed. The trigger created with this device allowed us to reduce the background from the other neutron induced reactions. Close to one hundred fragments were identified and excitation functions were extracted for about thirty of them. Mass and charge distributions at different incident energies were extracted from these measurements. These results were then compared to evaluated reference data (Wahl systematics). It showed that the calculations are consistent with the measurements at low energies (below 20 MeV) but partially fail to reproduce the data at higher energy. To go into more detail about the obtained results, the reaction was studied using an original model. It provided a dynamic and totally microscopic description of the fission from constrained self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations. This work was completed in two parts. First, a potential energy surface of the fissioning system was calculated in a deformation plane defined by the elongation and asymmetry variables. The second part was to use the resolution of the dynamic Schroedinger equation on this surface giving us a fragment mass distribution which we then compared to the low energy data. (author)

  18. Fission fragment angular distributions

    Recently a Letter appeared (Phys. Rev. Lett., 522, 414(1984)) claiming that the usual expression for describing the angula distribution of fission fragments from compound nuclear decay is not a necessarily valid limit of a more general expression. In this comment we wish to point out that the two expressions arise from distinctly different models, and that the new expression as used in the cited reference is internally inconsistent

  19. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be fn∼4.1x10-4 with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 108 neutrons per discharge.

  20. On the asymptotic distribution of the mean absolute deviation about the mean

    Segers, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The mean absolute deviation about the mean is an alternative to the standard deviation for measuring dispersion in a sample or in a population. For stationary, ergodic time series with a finite first moment, an asymptotic expansion for the sample mean absolute deviation is proposed. The expansion yields the asymptotic distribution of the sample mean absolute deviation under a wide range of settings, allowing for serial dependence or an infinite second moment. Key words: central limit theorem;...

  1. On the asymptotic distribution of the mean absolute deviation about the mean

    Segers, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The mean absolute deviation about the mean is an alternative to the standard deviation for measuring dispersion in a sample or in a population. For stationary, ergodic time series with a finite first moment, an asymptotic expansion for the sample mean absolute deviation is proposed. The expansion yields the asymptotic distribution of the sample mean absolute deviation under a wide range of settings, allowing for serial dependence or an infinite second moment.

  2. Extended optical model for fission

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  3. Orientations of fragments emitted in binary cold fission of 252Cf

    The dependence of the driving potential on the orientation of fragments at scission is investigated for the case of cold fission of 252Cf. It is shown that in the case of cold fission the fragments exclusively emerge at scission in the pole-pole configuration. However, quantum fluctuations enable small deviations from this configuration during the tunnelling process. The mass yields of fission fragment pairs in the cold fission of 252Cf are computed for pole-pole and equator-equator orientations and are compared to the experimental data

  4. Tables and figures from JNDC Nuclear Data Library of fission products, version 2

    The content of JNDC (Japanese Nuclear Data Committee) FP (Fission Product) Nuclear Data Library version 2 for 1227 fission products is presented in the form of tables and figures. The library is inclusive of evaluated decay data such as decay constant, Q-value, average energies of beta, gamma and internal conversion electron, spin-parity, branching ratio of each decay mode and fission yield. The neutron capture cross-sections are also contained for 166 nuclides. The mass number of the fission product nuclides ranges from A = 66 to A = 172. (author)

  5. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we outline a methodology to calculate microscopically mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multi-dimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. We obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both to the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic characteristics.

  6. Proton-induced fission at 190 MeV of W-nat, Au-197, Pb-nat, Pb-208, and Th-232

    Duijvestijn, MC; Koning, AJ; Beijers, JPM; Gastal, M; van Klinken, J; Ostendorf, RW

    1999-01-01

    Proton-induced fission at 190 MeV of W-nat, Au-197, Pb-nat, Pb-208, and Th-232 is studied by means of an innovative method based on activation analysis. The fission-product mass distribution is reconstructed from the fission-product yields, which are obtained from off-line observed gamma-ray spectra

  7. Low-energy ternary fission

    With the detector system DIOGENES thermal neutron induced and spontaneous α particle associated fission and spontaneous nuclear tripartition into three fragments of similar masses has been investigated. DIOGENES is a concentric arrangement of toroidal angular position sensitive ionization chambers and proportional counters to measure the kinetic energies and relative angular distributions of the three reaction products of ternary fission. For α-particle accompanied fission some of the many possible α particle fission-fragment parameter correlations will be discussed. For nearly symmetric low-energy nuclear tripartition new upper limits are presented. Former experimental results which pretended evidence for so called true ternary fission could be explained by charged-particle associated fission with a light particle in the mass range of 13 < A < 23

  8. General Description of Fission Observables: GEF Model Code

    Schmidt, K.-H.; Jurado, B.; Amouroux, C.; Schmitt, C.

    2016-01-01

    The GEF ("GEneral description of Fission observables") model code is documented. It describes the observables for spontaneous fission, neutron-induced fission and, more generally, for fission of a compound nucleus from any other entrance channel, with given excitation energy and angular momentum. The GEF model is applicable for a wide range of isotopes from Z = 80 to Z = 112 and beyond, up to excitation energies of about 100 MeV. The results of the GEF model are compared with fission barriers, fission probabilities, fission-fragment mass- and nuclide distributions, isomeric ratios, total kinetic energies, and prompt-neutron and prompt-gamma yields and energy spectra from neutron-induced and spontaneous fission. Derived properties of delayed neutrons and decay heat are also considered. The GEF model is based on a general approach to nuclear fission that explains a great part of the complex appearance of fission observables on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and general properties of microscopic systems and mathematical objects. The topographic theorem is used to estimate the fission-barrier heights from theoretical macroscopic saddle-point and ground-state masses and experimental ground-state masses. Motivated by the theoretically predicted early localisation of nucleonic wave functions in a necked-in shape, the properties of the relevant fragment shells are extracted. These are used to determine the depths and the widths of the fission valleys corresponding to the different fission channels and to describe the fission-fragment distributions and deformations at scission by a statistical approach. A modified composite nuclear-level-density formula is proposed. It respects some features in the superfluid regime that are in accordance with new experimental findings and with theoretical expectations. These are a constant-temperature behaviour that is consistent with a considerably increased heat capacity and an increased pairing condensation energy that is

  9. Fission-fragment and neutron data traced back to the macroscopic and microscopic properties of the fissioning systems

    Schmidt K.-H.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A new model description of fission-fragment yields and prompt neutron emission is developed. The yields of the different fission channels and their properties are attributed to the number of relevant states above the potential-energy landscape on the fission path at the moment of dynamical freeze-out, which is specific to the collective coordinate considered. The model combines well established ideas with novel concepts. The separability principle of macroscopic properties of the compound nucleus and microscopic properties of the fragments strongly reduces the number of model parameters and assures a high predictive power. The recently discovered energy-sorting mechanism in superfluid nuclear dynamics determines the sharing of intrinsic excitation energy at scission and the enhancement of even-odd structure in asymmetric splits.

  10. Estimation of number of fission events induced by fast neutrons for different converter-target geometries

    An estimation of the total number of fission events is presented for different converter-target geometries. The secondary neutron yields obtained in the converter are simulated within a phenomenological model based on Serber's formalism. (author)

  11. Systematics study of the ZP model for the 235U + n fission

    The ZP model was studied to evaluate the independent fission yields for 235U induced by thermal, fission, and about 14 MeV energy neutrons. The parameters of ZP model were deduced based upon measured data, and were used to calculate the yields and their errors. The yields were compared with those from TALYS calculations, ENDF/B7-FPY, JEFF-3.0/FPY and JENDL-3.3/FPY, the result showed that the present yields as well as their errors were improved. Due to the lack of measured data, the results for fission neutrons and 14 MeV energy neutrons have larger uncertainties and discrepancies than those for thermal fission. So more measurements and advanced theories are needed

  12. Systematics study of the Z{sub P} model for the {sup 235}U + n fission

    Shu, N.C.; Liu, T.J.; Yua, H.W.; Chen, Y.J. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, P.R. (China)

    2008-07-01

    The Z{sub P} model was studied to evaluate the independent fission yields for {sup 235}U induced by thermal, fission, and about 14 MeV energy neutrons. The parameters of Z{sub P} model were deduced based upon measured data, and were used to calculate the yields and their errors. The yields were compared with those from TALYS calculations, ENDF/B7-FPY, JEFF-3.0/FPY and JENDL-3.3/FPY, the result showed that the present yields as well as their errors were improved. Due to the lack of measured data, the results for fission neutrons and 14 MeV energy neutrons have larger uncertainties and discrepancies than those for thermal fission. So more measurements and advanced theories are needed.

  13. Fission in Rapidly Rotating Nuclei

    A. K. Rhine Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of rotation in fission of the atomic nucleus 256Fm using an independent-particle shell model with the mean field represented by a deformed Woods-Saxon potential and the shapes defined through the Cassinian oval parametrization. The variations of barrier height with increasing angular momentum, appearance of double hump in fission path are analysed. Our calculations explain the appearance of double hump in fission path of 256Fm nucleus. The second minimum vanishes with increase in angular momentum which hints that the fission barrier disappears at large spin.

  14. Fission approach to cluster radioactivity

    D N Poenaru; R A Gherghescu

    2015-09-01

    Fission theory is used to explain decay. Also, the analytical superasymmetric fission (ASAF) model is successfully employed to make a systematic search and to predict, with other models, cluster radioactivity. The macroscopic–microscopic method is illustrated for the superheavy nucleus 286Fl. Then a few results of the theoretical approach of decay (ASAF, UNIV and semFIS models), cluster decay (ASAF and UNIV) and spontaneous fission dynamics are described with Werner–Wheeler and cranking inertia. UNIV denotes universal curve and semFIS the fission-based semiempirical formula.

  15. Isotopic resolution of fission fragments from 238U + 12C transfer and fusion reactions

    Recent results from an experiment at GANIL, performed to investigate the main properties of fission-fragment yields and energy distributions in different fissioning nuclei as a function of the excitation energy, in a neutron-rich region of actinides, are presented. Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics between a 238U beam and a 12C target produced different actinides, within a range of excitation energy below 30 MeV. These fissioning nuclei are identified by detecting the target-like recoil, and their kinetic and excitation energy are determined from the reconstruction of the transfer reaction. The large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS was used to identify the mass, atomic number and charge state of the fission fragments in flight. As a result, the characteristics of the fission-fragment isotopic distributions of a variety of neutron-rich actinides are observed for the first time over the complete range of fission fragments. (authors)

  16. Subthreshold and near-subthreshold fission physics measurements at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator Facility

    This paper is an account of the work performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA), pertaining to the fission phenomena taking place at energies of the fissioning nucleus which are comparable to the fission barrier potential energy. In this energy region, fission cross-section measurements yield information on the physical properties of the barrier and on the nuclear states at high nuclear deformations. The ORELA facility intense pulsed neutron source and good energy resolution capabilities afford a convenient tool to carry out a program of measurements in the subthreshold and near-subthreshold regions. Extensive and precise measurements in the actinide region were performed at the ORELA facility by an international group of researchers. These measurements were unique in many respects: fission widths and areas were determined for many previously unreported resonances in the subthreshold region and a most detailed study was performed on the physical properties of the fission barrier at high nuclear deformations

  17. Properties of true quaternary fission of nuclei with allowance for its multistep and sequential character

    An analysis of basicmechanisms of binary and ternary fission of nuclei led to the conclusion that true ternary and quaternary fission of nuclei has a sequential two-step (three-step) character, where, at the first step, a fissile nucleus emits a third light particle (third and fourth light particles) under shakeup effects associated with a nonadiabatic character of its collective deformation motion, whereupon the residual nucleus undergoes fission to two fission fragments. Owing to this, the formulas derived earlier for the widths with respect to sequential two- and three-step decays of nuclei in constructing the theory of two-step twoproton decays and multistep decays in chains of genetically related nuclei could be used to describe the relative yields and angular and energy distributions of third and fourth light particles emitted in (α, α), (t, t), and (α, t) pairs upon the true quaternary spontaneous fission of 252Cf and thermal-neutron-induced fission of 235U and 233U target nuclei. Mechanisms that explain a sharp decrease in the yield of particles appearing second in time and entering into the composition of light-particle pairs that originate from true quaternary fission of nuclei in relation to the yields of analogous particles in true ternary fission of nuclei are proposed

  18. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of 242Es

    Electron-capture delayed fission of 242Es produced via the 233U(14N,5n)242Es reaction at 87 MeV (on target) was observed to decay with a half-life of 11±3 s, consistent with the reported α-decay half-life of 242Es of 16-4+6 s. The mass-yield distribution of the fission fragments is highly asymmetric. The average pre-neutron emission total kinetic energy of the fragments was measured to be 183±18 MeV. Based on the ratio of the measured number of fission events to the measured number of α decays from the electron-capture daughter 242Cf (100% α branch), the probability of delayed fission was determined to be 0.006±0.002. This value for the delayed fission probability fits the experimental trend of increasing delayed fission probability with increasing Q value for electron capture. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  19. Isospin effect on probing nuclear dissipation with fission cross sections

    Tian, J.; Ye, W.

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear dissipation retards fission. Using the stochastic Langevin model, we calculate the drop of fission cross section caused by friction over its standard statistical-model value, σfdrop, as a function of the presaddle friction strength for fissioning nuclei 195Bi, 202Bi, and 209Bi as well as for different angular momenta. We find that friction effects on σfdrop are substantially enhanced with increasing isospin of the Bi system and become greater with decreasing angular momentum. Our findings suggest that in experiments, to better constrain the strength of presaddle dissipation through the measurement of fission excitation functions, it is optimal to yield those compound systems with a high isospin and a low spin. Furthermore, we analyze the data of fission excitation functions of 210Po and 209Bi systems, which are populated in p +209Bi and p +208Pb reactions and which have a high isospin and a low spin, and find that Langevin calculations with a presaddle friction strength of (3-5) ×10-21 s-1 describe these experimental fission data very well.

  20. Effect of Shell Structure on Fission Isoscaling

    Veselsky, M.; Souliotis, G. A.; Jandel, M.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, the fragment yield ratios were investigated in the fission of 238,233U targets induced by 14 MeV neutrons [1]. The effect of the deformed shell structure around N=64 on the dynamics of scission was suggested as an explanation of the observed breakdown of the isoscaling behavior. As an alternative explanation, the effect of binding energy of final fragments, in particular the neutron shell closure of the complementary fragment around N=82, was suggested by Friedman [2]. When applying...

  1. Fast fission phenomenon

    In these lectures we have described two different phenomena occuring in dissipative heavy ion collisions : neutron-proton asymmetry and fast fission. Neutron-proton asymmetry has provided us with an example of a fast collective motion. As a consequence quantum fluctuations can be observed. The observation of quantum or statistical fluctuations is directly connected to the comparison between the phonon energy and the temperature of the intrinsic system. This means that this mode might also provide a good example for the investigation of the transition between quantum and statistical fluctuations which might occur when the bombarding energy is raised above 10 MeV/A. However it is by no means sure that in this energy domain enough excitation energy can be put into the system in order to reach such high temperatures over the all system. The other interest in investigating neutron-proton asymmetry above 10 MeV/A is that the interaction time between the two incident nuclei will decrease. Consequently, if some collective motion should still be observed, it will be one of the last which can be seen. Fast fission corresponds on the contrary to long interaction times. The experimental indications are still rather weak and mainly consist of experimental data which cannot be understood in the framework of standard dissipative models. We have seen that a model which can describe both the entrance and the exit configuration gives this mechanism in a natural way and that the experimental data can, to a good extend, be explained. The nicest thing is probably that our old understanding of dissipative heavy ion collisions is not changed at all except for the problems that can now be understood in terms of fast fission. Nevertheless this area desserve further studies, especially on the experimental side to be sure that the consistent picture which we have on dissipative heavy ion collisions still remain coherent in the future.

  2. Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinium-227, Protactinium-231 and Neptunium-237: Mass Distribution

    Results of radiochemical studies on the mass distribution in the neutron-induced fission of actinium-227, protactinium-231 and neptunium-237 have been presented. This work has been carried out as part of a programme to determine the mass distribution in the fission of heavy elements as a function of Z and A. All irradiations have been carried out in the core of the swimming-pool type reactor APSARA with cadmium shielding wherever necessary. Relative yields of several fission product nuclides have been obtained by a method involving a comparison of the fission product activities from the respective targets with those formed from uranium-235 simultaneously irradiated. Thermal-neutron fission yields of uranium-235 have been assumed. These results indicate a predominantly asymmetric mass distribution in all the three cases, and also a distinct though small symmetric peak in the case of actinium-227. (author)

  3. Determination of the Primary Nuclear Charge of Fission Fragments from their Characteristic K-X-Ray Emission in Spontaneous Fission of Cf252

    The distribution of nuclear charge in the spontaneous fission of Cf252 has been determined directly by simultaneous measurement of the masses and characteristic K-X-ray energies associated with the primary fission products. The X-rays were detected by a thin Nal (Tl) crystal (or by an argon-filled proportional counter) in coincidence with a pair of solid-state detectors for the complementary fission fragments. Preliminary to the three-parameter study of the charge-mass distribution the gross characteristics of the K-X-rays were examined in some detail. The average yield of K-X-rays is 0.55 ± 0.1 pet fission (the heavy group accounting fot 70% of the total). From delayed-coincidence and fragment time-of-flight experiments it was.found that about 30% of the X-rays are emitted within 0.1 ns after fission, another 30% between 0.1 and 1 ns, 25% between 1 and 10 ns, the remainder appearing as two delayed components of equal intensity with half-lives of ∼30 ns and ∼100 ns. These characteristics indicate that the X-rays arise from internal conversion during de-excitation of the primary fission fragments, an interpretation supported by the observed yield 1 per fission) of 50 - 300 - keV electrons emitted within 2 ps of fission. In the three-parameter experiments the yield and energy of K-X-rays emitted in the first centimeter (ns) of fragment flight were determined as a function of fragment mass. The yield of K-X-rays per fragment is a pronounced saw-tooth function of mass, rising from p) function in better agreement with the empirical rule of equal charge displacement (ECD) than with other postulates for charge division in nuclear fission. (author)

  4. Energy from nuclear fission(*

    Ripani M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  5. Improved calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum from the spontaneous fission of /sup 252/Cf: Preliminary results

    An improved calculation is presented for the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) from the spontaneous fission of /sup 252/Cf. In this calculation the fission-spectrum model of Madland and Nix is used, but with several improvements leading to a physically more accurate representation of the spectrum. Specifically, the contributions to N(E) from the entire fission-fragment mass and charge distributions will be calculated instead of calculating on the basis of a seven- point approximation to the peaks of these distributions as has been done in the past. Therefore, values of the energy release in fission, fission-fragment kinetic energy, and compound nucleus cross section for the inverse process will be considered on a point-by-point basis over the fragment yield distributions instead of considering averages of these quantities over the peaks of the distributions. Preliminary results will be presented and compared with a measurement, an earlier calculation, and a recent evaluation of the spectrum. 14 refs., 4 figs

  6. Android Apps for Absolute Beginners

    Jackson, Wallace

    2011-01-01

    Anybody can start building simple apps for the Android platform, and this book will show you how! Android Apps for Absolute Beginners takes you through the process of getting your first Android applications up and running using plain English and practical examples. It cuts through the fog of jargon and mystery that surrounds Android application development, and gives you simple, step-by-step instructions to get you started.* Teaches Android application development in language anyone can understand, giving you the best possible start in Android development * Provides simple, step-by-step exampl

  7. Entrance-channel dependence of fission transients

    Charity, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Fission transients describe the fission rate as it evolves towards the quasistationary value given by Kramers' formula. The nature of fission transients is dependent on the assumed initial distribution of the compound nuclei along the fission coordinate. Although the standard initial assumption of a near-spherical object leads to a transient suppression of the fission rate (fission delay), a moderate initial fissionlike deformation can reduce the magnitude of this suppression. For still large...

  8. Bias in Absolute Magnitude Determination from Parallaxes

    Feast, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Relations are given for the correction of bias when mean absolute magnitudes are derived by the method of reduced parallaxes. The bias in the case of the derivation of the absolute magnitudes of individual objects is also considered.

  9. Absolute calibration of JET ELE system

    The first Michelson channel of the JET ECE system has been calibrated absolutely using a new high temperature source. The estimated uncertainties are of order +- 20% in the absolute spectral response and +- 10% in the relative spectral shape

  10. Fission throughout the periodic table

    The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs

  11. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  12. Fission throughout the periodic table

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-04-01

    The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs.

  13. Fission of Halving Edges Graphs

    Khovanova, Tanya; Yang, Dai

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an operation on halving edges graph that we call fission. Fission replaces each point in a given configuration with a small cluster of k points. The operation interacts nicely with halving edges, so we examine its properties in detail.

  14. Fission Dynamics of Compound Nuclei

    Iwata, Yoritaka; Heinz, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Collisions between $^{248}$Cm and $^{48}$Ca are systematically investigated by time-dependent density functional calculations with evaporation prescription. Depending on the incident energy and impact parameter, fusion, deep-inelastic and quasi-fission events are expected to appear. In this paper, possible fission dynamics of compound nuclei is presented.

  15. 233U mass yield measurements around and within the symmetry region with the ILL Lohengrin spectrometer

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Sage, C.; Bernard, D.; Blanc, A.; Faust, H.; Köster, U.; Litaize, O.; Mutti, P.; Serot, O.

    2016-03-01

    The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. The LPSC in collaboration with ILL and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at the Lohengrin spectrometer of the ILL, with a special focus on the masses constituting the heavy peak. We will present in this paper our measurement of the very low fission yields in the symmetry mass region and the heavy mass wing of the distribution for 233U thermal neutron induced fission. The difficulty due to the strong contamination by other masses with much higher yields will be addressed in the form of a new analysis method featuring the required contaminant correction. The apparition of structures in the kinetic energy distributions and possible interpretations will be discussed, such as a possible evidence of fission modes.

  16. 233U mass yield measurements around and within the symmetry region with the ILL Lohengrin spectrometer

    Chebboubi A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. The LPSC in collaboration with ILL and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at the Lohengrin spectrometer of the ILL, with a special focus on the masses constituting the heavy peak. We will present in this paper our measurement of the very low fission yields in the symmetry mass region and the heavy mass wing of the distribution for 233U thermal neutron induced fission. The difficulty due to the strong contamination by other masses with much higher yields will be addressed in the form of a new analysis method featuring the required contaminant correction. The apparition of structures in the kinetic energy distributions and possible interpretations will be discussed, such as a possible evidence of fission modes.

  17. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    Karpeshin, F. F., E-mail: fkarpeshin@gmail.com [D.I. Mendeleev Institute forMetrology (VNIIM) (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values.

  18. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values

  19. Neutron-induced fission: properties of prompt neutron and γ rays as a function of incident energy

    Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.

    2016-06-01

    We have applied the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory, in a Monte-Carlo implementation, to the de-excitation of fission fragments, obtaining a reasonable description of the characteristics of neutrons and gamma rays emitted before beta decays toward stability. Originally implemented for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the neutroninduced fission of 235U and 239Pu at thermal neutron energy, in this contribution we discuss the extension of the formalism to incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV. For the emission of pre-fission neutrons, at incident energies beyond second-chance fission, we take into account both the pre-equilibrium and statistical pre-fission components. Phenomenological parameterizations of mass, charge and TKE yields are used to obtain the initial conditions for the fission fragments that subsequently decay via neutron and emissions. We illustrate this approach for 239Pu(n,f).

  20. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately