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Sample records for abscopal radiation effects

  1. Study of abscopal radiation effects on multicellular organisms

    Amongst the lesions brought about by total body irradiation, two basically different types can be distinguished: those appearing in the area which has absorbed radiant energy and those emerging in areas remote from the irradiated tissues (abscopal effects). The abscopal effects are produced by toxic tissue breakdown products, which are removed by the bloodstream and interfere with particularly sensitive structures (radiotoxins). The radiotoxins mobilize other biologically active substances, interfering with the same tissues which may display abscopal effects. This is well established for the hormones of the adrenal cortex. Furthermore, important fractions of the radiotoxins are neutralized by the reticuloendothelial system. Temporary blockade of this system enhances the efficiency of radiotoxins and greatly increases mortality of the irradiated animals. One can therefore conclude that the reticuloendothelial system affords a natural defense against an essential reaction of total body irradiation: the effect of the radiotoxins. (author)

  2. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1+/−) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1+/− and Cx43+/− mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1+/− mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases

  3. Dose and Spatial Effects in Long-Distance Radiation Signaling In Vivo: Implications for Abscopal Tumorigenesis

    Mancuso, Mariateresa, E-mail: mariateresa.mancuso@enea.it [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l' Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA) Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy); Giardullo, Paola [Guglielmo Marconi University, Rome (Italy); Leonardi, Simona [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l' Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA) Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy); Pasquali, Emanuela [Guglielmo Marconi University, Rome (Italy); Casciati, Arianna [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l' Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA) Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy); De Stefano, Ilaria [Guglielmo Marconi University, Rome (Italy); Tanori, Mirella; Pazzaglia, Simonetta [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l' Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA) Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy); Saran, Anna, E-mail: anna.saran@enea.it [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l' Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA) Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose and spatial dependence of abscopal radiation effects occurring in vivo in the mouse, along with their tumorigenic potential in the central nervous system (CNS) of a radiosensitive mouse model. Methods and Materials: Patched1 (Ptch1){sup +/−} mice, carrying a germ-line heterozygous inactivating mutation in the Ptch1 gene and uniquely susceptible to radiation damage in neonatal cerebellum, were exposed directly to ionizing radiation (1, 2, or 3 Gy of x-rays) or treated in a variety of partial-body irradiation protocols, in which the animals' head was fully protected by suitable lead cylinders while the rest of the body was exposed to x-rays in full or in part. Apoptotic cell death was measured in directly irradiated and shielded cerebellum shortly after irradiation, and tumor development was monitored in lifetime groups. The same endpoints were measured using different shielding geometries in mice irradiated with 3 or 10 Gy of x-rays. Results: Although dose-dependent cell death was observed in off-target cerebellum for all doses and shielding conditions tested, a conspicuous lack of abscopal response for CNS tumorigenesis was evident at the lowest dose of 1 Gy. By changing the amount of exposed body volume, the shielding geometry could also significantly modulate tumorigenesis depending on dose. Conclusions: We conclude that interplay between radiation dose and exposed tissue volume plays a critical role in nontargeted effects occurring in mouse CNS under conditions relevant to humans. These findings may help understanding the mechanisms of long-range radiation signaling in harmful effects, including carcinogenesis, occurring in off-target tissues.

  4. Radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report IV, 15 March 1976--15 May 1977. [Abscopal effects of radiation on parabiant rats

    Warren, S.; Gates, O.

    1977-01-01

    The series of parabiont and irradiated rats has been completed, the lesions diagnosed and the data pertinent to tumors computerized and partly analyzed. The same series yielded 74 percent incidence of cataract in the irradiated partner following a whole-body dose of 1000 R with 0.2 percent in the shielded partner and also in controls. There was no abscopal effect. Other structures of the eye beside the lens, particularly the retina, showed extensive radiation damage. Parabiosis increased the incidence rate of leukemia from one percent in control single rats to five percent. Irradiation of one partner decreased the rate to 2.5 percent. Similar effects were noted for solid lymphoid tumors. A pilot study of prostatic cancer in irradiated parabiont rats demonstrated a tenfold increase in incidence. Experimental protocols bearing on cocarcinogenesis have been initiated in mice and rats, using radiation, asbestos and chemical carcinogens, but no results have been as yet obtained. We have obtained additional evidence suggesting the importance of prolactin as a cocarcinogen with radiation for induction of mammary tumors in the rat and are continuing our collaborative study of hormonal aasays in the blood of parabiont rats.

  5. Bystander/abscopal effects induced in intact Arabidopsis seeds by low-energy heavy-ion radiation.

    Yang, Gen; Mei, Tao; Yuan, Hang; Zhang, Weiming; Chen, Lianyun; Xue, Jianming; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Yugang

    2008-09-01

    To date, radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed largely in in vitro single-cell systems; verification of both the effects and the mechanisms in multicellular systems in vivo is important. Previously we showed that bystander/ abscopal effects can be induced by irradiating the shoot apical meristem cells in Arabidopsis embryos. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects induced by 30 keV 40Ar ions in intact Arabidopsis seeds and traced the postembryonic development of both irradiated and nonirradiated shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem cells. Since the range of 30 keV 40Ar ions in water is about 0.07 microm, which is less than the distance from the testa to shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem in Arabidopsis seeds (about 100 microm), the incident low-energy heavy ions generally stop in the proximal surface. Our results showed that, after the 30 keV 40Ar-ion irradiation of shielded and nonshielded Arabidopsis seeds at a fluence of 1.5 x 10(17) ions/cm2, short- and long-term postembryonic development, including germination, root hair differentiation, primary root elongation, lateral root initiation and survival, was significantly inhibited. Since shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem cells were not damaged directly by radiation, the results suggested that a damage signal(s) is transferred from the irradiated cells to shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem cells and causes the ultimate developmental alterations, indicating that long-distance bystander/ abscopal effects exist in the intact seed. A further study of mechanisms showed that the effects are associated with either enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or decreased auxin-dependent transcription in postembryonic development. Treatment with the ROS scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) can significantly reverse both the alterations in postembryonic development and auxin

  6. The Abscopal Effect Associated With a Systemic Anti-melanoma Immune Response

    Stamell, Emily F. [Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Wolchok, Jedd D. [Melanoma and Sarcoma Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Gnjatic, Sacha [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Brownell, Isaac, E-mail: Isaac.brownell@nih.gov [Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Dermatology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The clearance of nonirradiated tumors after localized radiation therapy is known as the abscopal effect. Activation of an antitumor immune response has been proposed as a mechanism for the abscopal effect. Here we report a patient with metastatic melanoma who received palliative radiation to his primary tumor with subsequent clearance of all his nonirradiated in-transit metastases. Anti-MAGEA3 antibodies were found upon serological testing, demonstrating an association between the abscopal effect and a systemic antitumor immune response. A brain recurrence was then treated with a combination of stereotactic radiosurgery and immunotherapy with ipilimumab. The patient experienced a complete remission that included resolution of nodal metastases, with a concomitant increase in MAGEA3 titers and a new response to the cancer antigen PASD1. This case supports the immune hypothesis for the abscopal effect, and illustrates the potential of combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma.

  7. The Abscopal Effect Associated With a Systemic Anti-melanoma Immune Response

    The clearance of nonirradiated tumors after localized radiation therapy is known as the abscopal effect. Activation of an antitumor immune response has been proposed as a mechanism for the abscopal effect. Here we report a patient with metastatic melanoma who received palliative radiation to his primary tumor with subsequent clearance of all his nonirradiated in-transit metastases. Anti-MAGEA3 antibodies were found upon serological testing, demonstrating an association between the abscopal effect and a systemic antitumor immune response. A brain recurrence was then treated with a combination of stereotactic radiosurgery and immunotherapy with ipilimumab. The patient experienced a complete remission that included resolution of nodal metastases, with a concomitant increase in MAGEA3 titers and a new response to the cancer antigen PASD1. This case supports the immune hypothesis for the abscopal effect, and illustrates the potential of combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma.

  8. Study of abscopal radiation effects on multicellular organisms; Etudes sur les effets a distance dans les organismes multicellulaires irradies

    Ludwig, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Amongst the lesions brought about by total body irradiation, two basically different types can be distinguished: those appearing in the area which has absorbed radiant energy and those emerging in areas remote from the irradiated tissues (abscopal effects). The abscopal effects are produced by toxic tissue breakdown products, which are removed by the bloodstream and interfere with particularly sensitive structures (radiotoxins). The radiotoxins mobilize other biologically active substances, interfering with the same tissues which may display abscopal effects. This is well established for the hormones of the adrenal cortex. Furthermore, important fractions of the radiotoxins are neutralized by the reticuloendothelial system. Temporary blockade of this system enhances the efficiency of radiotoxins and greatly increases mortality of the irradiated animals. One can therefore conclude that the reticuloendothelial system affords a natural defense against an essential reaction of total body irradiation: the effect of the radiotoxins. (author) [French] Les lesions consecutives a une irradiation peuvent etre classees en deux categories: celles qui se produisent au niveau du tissu irradie et celles qui apparaissent en dehors de celui-ci. Ces dernieres - appelees -'effets a distance'- sont dues a l'action de produits d'histolyse apparaissant au niveau du volume tissulaire ayant absorbe l'energie radiante, emportes par le courant sanguin et agissant sur des structures specialement receptives (Radiotoxines). Ces corps provoquait, dans des structures eloignees du siege de l'action locale du rayonnement, la secretion d'autres corps biologiquement actifs, capables d'agir sur les memes tissus pouvant presenter des effets a distance, compliquant ainsi leur mecanisme. Ceci est etabli pour les corticosteroides. De plus, des fractions importantes des radiotoxines sont neutralisees par le systeme reticuloendothelial. Puisque le blocage de ce

  9. Immune Modulation and Stereotactic Radiation: Improving Local and Abscopal Responses

    Jing Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New and innovative treatment strategies for cancer patients in the fields of immunotherapy and radiotherapy are rapidly developing in parallel. Among the most promising preclinical treatment approaches is combining immunotherapy with radiotherapy where early data suggest synergistic effects in several tumor model systems. These studies demonstrate that radiation combined with immunotherapy can result in superior efficacy for local tumor control. More alluring is the emergence of data suggesting an equally profound systemic response also known as “abscopal” effects with the combination of radiation and certain immunotherapies. Studies addressing optimal radiation dose, fractionation, and modality to be used in combination with immunotherapy still require further exploration. However, recent anecdotal clinical reports combining stereotactic or hypofractionated radiation regimens with immunotherapy have resulted in dramatic sustained clinical responses, both local and abscopal. Technologic advances in clinical radiation therapy has made it possible to deliver hypofractionated regimens anywhere in the body using stereotactic radiation techniques, facilitating further clinical investigations. Thus, stereotactic radiation in combination with immunotherapy agents represents an exciting and potentially fruitful new space for improving cancer therapeutic responses.

  10. Therapeutic efficacy of pre-operative radiotherapy on breast carcinoma; In special reference to its abscopal effect on metastatic lymph-nodes

    Konoeda, Koichi (National Medical Center of Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    The abscopal effect is the radiation response in tissue at a distance from the irradiated site invoked by local irradiation. It is reported that the abscopal effect is observed occasionally in radiotherapy for malignant lymphoma, malignant melanoma and seminioma. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathophysiology and mechanism of the abscopal effect in patients with breast carcinoma. Sixty two female patients, from 29 to 84 years old (mean 54 years). Their stages were stage II 12 cases, stage IIIa 16 cases and stage IV 12 cases. They were irradiated pre-operatively using less fractionated large dose irradiation. They underwent mastectomy or tumor resection. The abscopal effect on metastatic lymph nodes was observed in 15 out of 42 cases (35.7%) by palpation. The histopathological abscopal effect was noted in 22 of 42 cases (52.4%). Incidence of the abscopal effect was significantly higher in patients under 55 years old than that in patients over 56 years old (p<0.05). The abscopal effect was highly observed in patients who had the infiltrating lymphocytes around the degenerated cancer cells in the irradiated primary tumor nests (p<0.01). The subsets of the infiltrative lymphocytes were analyzed immunohistologically using monoclonal antibodies. The infiltrative lymphocytes were found to be CD8 and CD4 positive lymphocytes. Those findings suggest that the abscopal effect was caused by activated cellular immunity in hosts. Both the five- and ten-year survival rates for stage IIIa was 71.4%. Stage IIIb showed 62.5% for 5 year survival rate and 54.7% for 10 year survival rate. The survival rate was higher in patients with the abscopal effect than those without it; however, this was not statistically significant. No complications such as pneumonia was observed. (author).

  11. PD-1 Restrains Radiotherapy-Induced Abscopal Effect

    Park, Sean S.; Dong, Haidong; Liu, Xin; Harrington, Susan M.; Krco, Christopher J.; Grams, Michael P.; Aaron S. Mansfield; Furutani, Keith M.; Olivier, Kenneth R; Kwon, Eugene D

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of PD-1 expression on the systemic antitumor response (abscopal effect) induced by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in preclinical melanoma and renal cell carcinoma models. We compared the SABR-induced antitumor response in PD-1-expressing wild-type (WT) and PD-1-deficient knockout (KO) mice, and found that PD-1 expression compromises the survival of tumor-bearing mice treated with SABR. None of the PD-1 WT mice survived beyond 25 days, whereas 20% of th...

  12. A Peculiar Case of the Abscopal Effect: Radioactive Iodine Therapy Incidentally Palliating Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    Kornas, Robert C.; Sarah-Kim Shields; Goldman, Lyle S.

    2015-01-01

    The abscopal effect is an extremely rare phenomenon occurring when irradiation or treatment of a primary tumor burden not only results in debulking of the targeted site but also reduces tumor size at distant sites from the intended treatment area. We present the abscopal effect occurring in a patient with low-grade marginal zone lymphoma who subsequently received radioactive iodine therapy for papillary thyroid carcinoma. She was 67 years old when a routine complete blood count at her primary...

  13. Abscopal signals mediated bio-effects in low-energy ion irradiated Medicago truncatula seeds

    The mutagenic effects of low-energy ions have been identified by genetic studies for decades. Due to the short penetration distance of ions, however, the underlying mechanism(s) is still not quite clarified. Recently, increasing data have been accumulated concerning the existence and manifestation of radiation induced bystander/abscopal effects in vivo in the whole-organism environment. In this study, the bio-effects and the preliminary mechanisms of low energy ion beam irradiation on Medicago truncatula were investigated. The results show that both development and biochemical parameters, such as seed germination, seedling, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) were significantly affected by ion beam irradiation. It was also found that ion beam irradiation significantly increased the ROS generation and DNA strand breaks in Medicago truncatula. To further investigate the mechanism(s) underlying the responses, seeds were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), an effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, and the results showed that DMSO treatment effectively rescued the seed germination and seedling rates and the morphological parameters of development, suggesting that ROS might play an essential role in the mechanisms of the bio-effects of ion-beam irradiated Medicago truncatula. (author)

  14. A peculiar case of the abscopal effect: radioactive iodine therapy incidentally palliating marginal zone lymphoma.

    Kornas, Robert C; Shields, Sarah-Kim; Goldman, Lyle S

    2015-01-01

    The abscopal effect is an extremely rare phenomenon occurring when irradiation or treatment of a primary tumor burden not only results in debulking of the targeted site but also reduces tumor size at distant sites from the intended treatment area. We present the abscopal effect occurring in a patient with low-grade marginal zone lymphoma who subsequently received radioactive iodine therapy for papillary thyroid carcinoma. She was 67 years old when a routine complete blood count at her primary care physician's office yielded a persistent leukocytosis of 14,500/μL with lymphocytosis of 9,870/μL. Immunophenotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed low-grade marginal zone lymphoma. Over eight years, her peak leukocyte and lymphocyte counts were 24,100/μL and 18,100/μL, respectively. Subsequently, she was diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma after presenting with a new complaint of dysphagia. A total thyroidectomy was performed, followed by 172.1 millicuries of oral I-131 sodium iodine radioactive ablation therapy. Following treatment, her leukocyte and lymphocyte counts were 3,100/μL and 1,100/μL, respectively. Over the next four years, her leukocyte and lymphocyte counts remained within normal limits and she remained symptom free. To our knowledge, there has never been a published report describing the use of radioactive iodine causing abscopal effect benefits for patients with underlying lymphoproliferative diseases. PMID:25709847

  15. A Peculiar Case of the Abscopal Effect: Radioactive Iodine Therapy Incidentally Palliating Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    Robert C. Kornas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The abscopal effect is an extremely rare phenomenon occurring when irradiation or treatment of a primary tumor burden not only results in debulking of the targeted site but also reduces tumor size at distant sites from the intended treatment area. We present the abscopal effect occurring in a patient with low-grade marginal zone lymphoma who subsequently received radioactive iodine therapy for papillary thyroid carcinoma. She was 67 years old when a routine complete blood count at her primary care physician’s office yielded a persistent leukocytosis of 14,500/μL with lymphocytosis of 9,870/μL. Immunophenotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis confirmed low-grade marginal zone lymphoma. Over eight years, her peak leukocyte and lymphocyte counts were 24,100/μL and 18,100/μL, respectively. Subsequently, she was diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma after presenting with a new complaint of dysphagia. A total thyroidectomy was performed, followed by 172.1 millicuries of oral I-131 sodium iodine radioactive ablation therapy. Following treatment, her leukocyte and lymphocyte counts were 3,100/μL and 1,100/μL, respectively. Over the next four years, her leukocyte and lymphocyte counts remained within normal limits and she remained symptom free. To our knowledge, there has never been a published report describing the use of radioactive iodine causing abscopal effect benefits for patients with underlying lymphoproliferative diseases.

  16. Radiation-induced abscopal stimulation of primary leaves in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Eight-day old seedlings of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) var. Vaghya were irradiated with X-rays at a dose rate of 100 R/min. Specific part-irradiation on the intact seedling was carried out subsequently giving 5 KR 60Co at 100 R/min dose rate. Results show that: (1) doses over 250 R stimulate dry weight accumulation in primary leaves, (2) the highest effect is seen in 2000 R and 5000 R which also significantly improve chlorophyll level expressed on per disc alone. The effect is comparable to detopping, (3) irradiation of apex is more stimulatory than that of whole plant, (4) irradiation of only primary leaves is slightly inhibitive in the early period but more inhibition is shown by 20th day. (M.G.B.)

  17. The relevance of radiation induced bystander effects for low dose radiation carcinogenic risk

    Full text: Where epidemiology studies lack the ability to prescribe radiation doses, customise sample sizes and replicate findings, radiobiology experiments provide greater flexibility to control experimental conditions. This control simplifies the process of answering questions concerning carcinogenic risk after low dose radiation exposures. However, the flexibility requires critical evaluation of radiobiology findings to ensure that the right questions are being asked, the experimental conditions are relevant to human exposure scenarios and that the data are cautiously interpreted in the context of the experimental model. In particular, low dose radiobiology phenomena such as adaptive responses, genomic instability and bystander effects need to be investigated thoroughly, with continual reference to the way these phenomena might occur in the real world. Low dose radiation induced bystander effects are of interest since their occurrence in vivo could complicate the shape of the radiation dose-response curve in the low dose range for a number of biological endpoints with subsequent effects on radiation-induced cancer risk. Conversely, radiation-induced abscopal effects implicate biological consequences of radiation exposure outside irradiated volumes, and complicate the notion of effective dose calculations. Achieving a consensus on the boundaries that distinguish the radiobiology phenomena of bystander and abscopal effects will aid progress towards understanding their relevance to in vivo radiation exposures. A proposed framework for discussing bystander effects and abscopal effects in their appropriate context will be outlined, with a discussion on the future investigation of radiation-induced bystander effects. Such frameworks can assist the integration of results from experimental radiobiology to risk evaluation and management practice. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, BioI. and Environ. Research, US Dept. of Energy, Grant DE

  18. The Effect of Radiation on the Immune Response to Cancers

    Bonggoo Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, the beneficial effects of radiation can extend beyond direct cytotoxicity to tumor cells. Delivery of localized radiation to tumors often leads to systemic responses at distant sites, a phenomenon known as the abscopal effect which has been attributed to the induction and enhancement of the endogenous anti-tumor innate and adaptive immune response. The mechanisms surrounding the abscopal effect are diverse and include trafficking of lymphocytes into the tumor microenvironment, enhanced tumor recognition and killing via up-regulation of tumor antigens and antigen presenting machinery and, induction of positive immunomodulatory pathways. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms of radiation-induced enhancement of the anti-tumor response through its effect on the host immune system and explore potential combinational immune-based strategies such as adoptive cellular therapy using ex vivo expanded NK and T cells as a means of delivering a potent effector population in the context of radiation-enhanced anti-tumor immune environment.

  19. Epistemology of radiation protection

    The scientific committee had assess Status of levels, effects and risks of ionizing radiation for General assembly, scientific community and public. The review of levels, sources and exposures. The natural sources of radiation include cosmic rays, terrestrial and artificial sources include medical issues, military activities, civil nuclear power occupational exposure and accidents. The global average exposure is 80% natural source, 20% medical examination 0.2% weapon fallout < 0.1% cherbonyl accidents and < 0.1 nuclear power. The effects of radiation incudes health effects, hereditable effects, bystander effects, and abscopal effects. The randon risks include lancer risk, plant and animal

  20. Communicating the non-targeted effects of radiation from irradiated to non-irradiated cells

    For many years, the central dogma in radiobiology has been that energy deposited in the cell nucleus is responsible for the biological effects associated with radiation exposure. However, non-targeted and delayed effects of radiation have shifted this belief. The studies of radiation-induced genomic instability, the bystander and abscopal effects, clastogenic factors, and the Death Inducing Effect have dominated the interest of the radiobiology field of late. The passing of signals from irradiated to non-irradiated cells can be accomplished through cell-to-cell gap junction communication or secretion of molecules, which in turn can elicit a response through activation of signal transduction pathways. Proposed mediators of this phenotype include proteins involved with inflammation. Given their size and connection with oxidative stress, cytokines are an attractive candidate as mediators of the induction of the non-targeted effects of radiation. Here we review the evidence for a possible connection between these delayed non-targeted effects of radiation and the cytokine cascades associated with inflammation. (author)

  1. Radiation effects and radiation risks

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig./MG) With 8 maps in appendix

  2. Contralateral effects following ipsilateral pulmonary radiation: gene expression and growth factor release

    Purpose/Objective: The abscopal effects of irradiation have not been well understood, but with the introduction of molecular biologic tools, new insights have been gained. An excellent illustration is the molecular evidence of contralateral inflammatory changes following ipsilateral lung irradiation shown in our unilateral rabbit model. Stimulated by recent findings of Morgan and Breit et al. (Ann. Int. Med. 118; 1993) who reported contralateral alveolar lymphocytosis induced by unilateral lung irradiation in breast cancer patients, we have more rigorously pursued similar studies in our laboratory. Materials/Methods: Using our established rabbit model, male New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to unilung radiation at varying doses (5, 10, 17.5 Gy); the animals were sacrificed between 1 to 24 weeks post-irradiation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) and were cultured in vitro in serum-free media. After 24 hrs., the AM conditioned media was evaluated for its effects on a fibroblast cell line through the measurement of [3H]thymidine incorporation. Surfactant apoprotein levels was analyzed by a immunoflourescent technique which identifies its gene expression. Results: The effect of irradiation on macrophage cell numbers, as obtained by BAL, showed a dramatic decline in numbers on the irradiated side at 1-2 weeks post-irradiation followed by a rebound to 2-3 times baseline values at 4 weeks. No change in macrophage numbers occurred on the contralateral side at these times. However, [3H]thymidine incorporation, which reflects growth factor expression, was increased on the ipsilateral side immediately, but was highest at 4 weeks whereas changes were noted at 8 weeks on the contralateral side and from 8 to 24 weeks, the signal for fibroblast proliferation persisted. Even more remarkable is that surfactant apoprotein gene was expressed immediately post-irradiation in the ipsilateral lung in type II pneumocytes. No gene expression was

  3. Molecular effects of radiation

    The basis of radiobiology based on the effects of radiation in cells and tissues. Though the primary constituents of tissues are DNA and chromosomes, thus we need to know the effects of radiation in its molecular level before going for its effect in tissue level. The most abundant molecule inside the body is water molecule, and any type of radiation effect to water molecule might affect the whole body functionality. Brief knowledge about the effect of radiation in molecular level on the basis of hydrolysis of water; and radiation damage to DNA and chromosome will be helpful to understand the basics of radiobiology. (author)

  4. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - A challenge to the current radiobiological paradigm

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, after exposure to ionising radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the primary target, are responsible for the harmful biological effects of radiation. The radiation-induced changes are thought to be fixed already in the first cell division following the radiation exposure and health effects are considered to result as a consequence of clonal proliferation of cells carrying mutations in specific genes. Since the initial damage induced in DNA has been shown to be directly proportional to dose, risk is also considered to be directly proportional to dose. Risk from multiple exposures is considered to be additive, and risk from high and low LET radiation exposure is assumed to be qualitatively the same. These assumptions are incorporated into the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) Hypothesis that is used in all radiation protection practices. A range of evidence has now emerged that challenges the universality of the target theory of radiation induced effects. These effects have also been termed 'non-(DNA)-targeted' and include radiation-induced bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive response, low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity, abscopal (out-of-field) effects of radiotherapy, clastogenic factors, delayed reproductive death and induction of genes by radiation. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences on the health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. The non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer

  5. Space radiation effects

    The authors briefly discusses the radiation environment in near-earth space and it's influences on material, and electronic devices using in space airship, also, the research developments in space radiation effects are introduced

  6. Radiation effects in space

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented

  7. Future radiation effects

    A review is given of the units used in radiation protection. The radiation hazards incurred by human populations can be divided into early and late somatic radiation effects and genetic radiation effects. Examples and motivations of risk analysis estimates are given. For genetic radiation effects, the siginificance dose and the doubling dose are defined. The minimum permissible dose for different human populations are compared with the doses received from natural radioactivity with medical applications. The risk caused by nuclear reactors and fall-out and its consequences are given for the year 1972 and estimated for the year 2000

  8. Biological effects of radiation

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  9. Biological radiation effects

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed

  10. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  11. Radiation effects in space

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  12. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    Radiation exposure causes damage to biological systems and these damages are mediated by the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species targeting vital cellular components such as DNA and membranes. DNA repair systems and the endogenous cellular biochemical defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species and antioxidants enzymes like reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione peroxidase catalase etc. fail upon exposures to higher as well as chronic radiation doses leading to alterations in cell functions, cell death or mutations. Radioprotectors prevent these alterations and protect cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiations. Radioprotectors are of great importance due to their possible and potential application during planned radiation exposures such as radiotherapy, diagnostic scanning, clean up operations in nuclear accidents, space expeditions etc. and Unplanned radiations exposures such as accidents in nuclear industry, nuclear terrorism, natural background radiation etc. Many of the available synthetic radioprotectors are toxic to mammalian system at doses required to be effective as radioprotector. Increasing uses of ionizing radiation have drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards their undesired side effects produced in various tissues and for modifying them to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiation. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Radioprotectors are chemicals that modify a cell's response to radiation. Radioprotectors are drugs that protect normal (non cancerous) cells from the damage caused by radiation therapy. These agents promote the repair of normal cells that are exposed to radiation. Various chemicals, like Cysteamine, MPG , WR-2721 have been tested for the protection against harmful effects of radiation. These radio

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on

  14. Biophysical radiation effects

    The biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation is based upon the absorption of energy in molecular structures of a cell. Because of the quantum nature of radiation large fluctuations of energy concentration in subcellulare regions has to be considered. In addition both the spatial distribution of a sensitive molecular target and cellulare repair processes has to be taken into consideration for an assessment of radiation action. In radiation protection the difference between the quality factor and the Relative Biological Effectiveness has a fundamental meaning and will be discussed in more detail. The present report includes a short review on some relevant models on radiation action and a short discussion on effects of low dose irradiation. (orig.)

  15. Effects of ionizing radiations

    After recalling radiation-matter interaction, influence on radiation effects of chemical composition, structure, irradiation atmosphere, dose rate, temperature of organic materials and evolution of electrical, mechanical and physical properties are reviewed. Then behaviour under irradiation of main organic materials: elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, oils and paints are examined. 68 refs

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation

    A sound evaluation of the consequences of releases of radioactivity into the environment, especially of those large amounts, and of the effectiveness of different protective measures, requires thorough concern of the various aspects of the radiological effects. The effects of ionizing radiation were reviewed according to the following characterization: Affected subject (somatic, genetic and psychological effects); Duration of irradiation (acute and chronic irradiation); Latent period (early and late effects); Dose-effect relationship (stochastic and non-stochastic effects); Population affected (e.g. children, pregnant women). In addition to the lethal effects which are generally considered extensively in all the evaluations of the consequences of radioactivity releases, such effects as early symptoms and morbidity are emphasized in this review. The dependence of the effects on dose rates, repair mechanism and medical treatment is discussed, and the uncertainties involved with their evaluation is highlighted. The differences between QF (quality factor) and RBE (relative biological effectiveness) of different radiation sources are interpreted. Synergystic effects and the effectiveness of various means of medication are discussed. It is suggested that all radiological effects, including those resulting from relatively low radiation doses, e.g. foetus deformations, fertility impairment, prodomal - leading to psychological effects, should be considered within the evaluation of the consequences of radioactivity releases and of the effectiveness of protective measures. Limits of the repair factors to be considered within the evaluation of the effects of chronic exposures are proposed

  17. Biological radiation effects

    The book covers all aspects of biological radiation effects and provides the fundamental basis for understanding the necessity of radiation protection as well as applications in radiotherapy. The physical basis is dealt with in some detail, and the effects at the subcellular and the cellular level are thoroughly discussed, taking into account modern developments and techniques. The effects on the human organism are reviewed, both from the point of view of applications in medicine as well as with regard to radiation hazards (teratogenic, gonadal and carcinogenic effects). It can be used by graduate students as an introduction and as a source book for all who want to become acquainted with this important field. It is an extended version of the original German book containing updated information and new material. (orig.) With 273 figs

  18. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  19. Radiation damage effects

    The summarized data suggest that both glass and crystalline waste forms may sustain substantial doses of α-decay damage and still retain their durability. Radiation effects in glasses are less pronounced and less complicated than that in single or poly-phase ceramics; thus, the latter category requires careful research and consideration. Perhaps the most important conclusion is that short-term actinide doping experiments in crystalline phases provide a realistic simulation of long-term effects based on the comparison of observed radiation effects in Pu-doped zircon and naturally damaged zircon (there is a 107 difference in dose rate). Deviations from the similarity in effect (e.g., saturation dose) may be attributed to low-temperature, long-term annealing effects

  20. Radiation effects on living systems

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  1. Genetic effects of radiation

    Data are reviewed from studies on the genetic effects of x radiation in mice and the extrapolation of the findings for estimating genetic hazards in man is discussed. Data are included on the frequency of mutation induction following acute or chronic irradiation of male or female mice at various doses and dose rates

  2. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  3. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    The last day of March 1978 marked the completion of the first 3 years of operation of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF was established on 1 April 1975 as successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which had been in continuous operation since 1947. This record of the first 3 years of operation consists of selected reports and other documents prepared in the course of conducting the business of RERF and includes a brief history, a late radiation effects that might be conducted at RERF. The wisdom and thought given to the research program and its operation by the Scientific Council and the Board of Directors is reflected in the minutes of their meetings which are included in the Appendix. (Mori, K.)

  4. Radiation effects in metals

    The current understanding of radiation damage in metals is reviewed, simplifying the actual complexity of the effects by considering some aspects separately. The production of point defects in metals, the primary damage state are first studied. The second part of the lecture is devoted to the evolution of this primary damage state as a function of temperature and dose: the steady state concentration of point defects, the nucleation of secondary defects and their growth are successively considered

  5. Cumulative radiation effect

    In five previous papers, the concept of Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) has been presented as a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Simple nomographic and tabular methods for the solution of practical problems in radiotherapy are now described. An essential feature of solving a CRE problem is firstly to present it in a concise and readily appreciated form, and, to do this, nomenclature has been introduced to describe schedules and regimes as compactly as possible. Simple algebraic equations have been derived to describe the CRE achieved by multi-schedule regimes. In these equations, the equivalence conditions existing at the junctions between schedules are not explicit and the equations are based on the CREs of the constituent schedules assessed individually without reference to their context in the regime as a whole. This independent evaluation of CREs for each schedule has resulted in a considerable simplification in the calculation of complex problems. The calculations are further simplified by the use of suitable tables and nomograms, so that the mathematics involved is reduced to simple arithmetical operations which require at the most the use of a slide rule but can be done by hand. The order of procedure in the presentation and calculation of CRE problems can be summarised in an evaluation procedure sheet. The resulting simple methods for solving practical problems of any complexity on the CRE-system are demonstrated by a number of examples. (author)

  6. Biological radiation effects

    This work examines ionizing radiations: what they are, where they come from, their actions and consequences, finally the norms and preventive measures necessary to avoid serious contamination, whether the individual or the population in general is involved. Man has always been exposed to natural irradiation, but owing to the growing use of ionizing radiations both in medicine and in industry, not to mention nuclear tests and their use as an argument of dissuasion, the irradiation of human beings is increasing daily. Radioactive contamination does remain latent, apart from acute cases, but this is where the danger lies since the consequences may not appear until long after the irradiation. Of all biological effects due to the action of radioelements the genetic risk is one of the most important, affecting the entire population and especially the generations to come. The risk of cancer and leukemia induction plays a substantial part also since a large number of people may be concerned, depending on the mode of contamination involved. All these long-term dangers do not of course exclude the various general or local effects to which the individual alone may be exposed and which sometimes constitute a threat to life. As a result the use of ionizing radiations must be limited and should only be involved if no other process can serve instead. The regulations governing radioelements must be stringent and their application strictly supervised for the better protection of man. This protection must be not only individual but also collective since pollution exists in air, water and land passes to plants and animals and finally reaches the last link in the food chain, man

  7. Effects of radiation

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  8. Radiation effects and radiation risks. 2. ed.

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig.) With 10 maps in appendix

  9. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    A summary is given of studies on radiation effects in light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, detectors, optical isolators and optical fibers. It is shown that the study of radiation damage in these devices can provide valuable information concerning the nature of the devices themselves, as well as methods of hardening these devices for applications in radiation environments

  10. Radiation effects on living systems

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. It is intended that the bibliography will be updated regularly

  11. Chemical effects of radiation

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  12. Health effects of ionizing radiation

    Ionizing radiation is energy that travels through space as electromagnetic waves or a stream of fast moving particles. In the workplace, the sources of ionizing radiation are radioactive substances, nuclear power plants, x-ray machines and nuclear devices used in medicine, research and industry. Commonly encountered types of radiation are alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Alpha particles have very little penetrating power and pose a risk only when the radioactive substance is deposited inside the body. Beta particles are more penetrating than alpha particles and can penetrate the outer body tissues causing damage to the skin and the eyes. Gamma rays are highly penetrating and can cause radiation damage to the whole body. The probability of radiation-induced disease depends on the accumulated amount of radiation dose. The main health effects of ionizing radiation are cancers in exposed persons and genetic disorders in the children, grandchildren and subsequent generations of the exposed parents. The fetus is highly sensitive to radiation-induced abnormalities. At high doses, radiation can cause cataracts in the eyes. There is no firm evidence that ionizing radiation causes premature aging. Radiation-induced sterility is highly unlikely for occupational doses. The data on the combined effect of ionizing radiation and other cancer-causing physical and chemical agents are inconclusive

  13. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given

  14. Radiation protection and health effects

    The use of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine carries with it a responsibility to both patient and personnel to maximize the diagnostic and therapeutic benefit while minimizing the potential for any adverse health effects. Shortly after the discovery of the x-ray in 1895 the potential for acute health hazards of ionizing radiation became apparent. However, the risks of ionizing radiation were poorly understood and many early users did not believe that anyone could be hurt by something that could not be detected by any of the human senses. Many experiments on the biologic effects of ionizing radiation began in the early 1900s, and the first radiation protection standards were proposed by the British Roentgen Society in 1915. We now realize that these pioneers had a very limited knowledge of the potential hazards and radiation protection principles. Today more scientific data are available on the health effects of, detection of, and protection from ionizing radiation than any other physical agent or chemical known. In addition, use of many forms of ionizing radiation is heavily regulated at both national and state levels. This paper discusses how maternal contamination with radionuclides may cause irradiation of the fetus even if the radionuclide is not transferred across the placenta. This is mostly true for radionuclides that decay yielding relatively penetrating radiations

  15. Genetic effects of radiation

    In this chapter, the BEIR Committee has reviewed and reevaluated the data that are pertinent to the estimation of genetic risks to humans from low levels of ionizing radiation. The present report summarizes the methods and conclusions of previous committees. In deriving new risk figures, it places rather more emphasis on the results of the studies of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors than have previous BEIR reports. However, the committee has also made use of the extensive radiation studies carried out with mice, which are briefly reviewed. 174 ref

  16. Effects of radiation; Effets des radiations

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  17. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  18. Radiation effects on structural materials

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support

  19. Effects of radiation on erythropoiesis

    Since the pioneer work of Heineke (1903; 1905) many workers have studied the effect of radiation on haemopoiesis. Their work has been reviewed by Bloom (1948), by Jacobson (1954) and more recently by Bond et al. (1965). The subject continues to stimulate much interest but is now more concerned with the effects of radiation on the multipotential stem cell pool than on radiation damage to the erythropoietic cells themselves. Death from haemopoietic failure following an LD50/30 dose of radiation is probably not attributable to failure of erythropoiesis; while damage to the erythropoietic system certainly plays a part in the syndrome, it is not a major factor contributing to the death of the animal. Although the severity and time course of the response vary with the species studied, the general effects of radiation on erythropoiesis are similar in all mammalian bone marrow studied to date. Likewise, though the severity of the reaction varies somewhat with the energy of the radiation and has been used to compare the relative biological effectiveness of different types of radiation (Sinclair et al., 1962; Sztanyik, 1967), the response is different only in degree and not in its fundamental pattern. The initial syndrome of depression and recovery will therefore be described largely by reference to work performed on the response of the rat to single acute exposures of either whole-body or partial-body irradiation with conventional X-rays

  20. Low level radiation: biological effects

    It is imperative that physicians and scientists using radiations in health care delivery continue to assess the benefits derived, vs. potential risk, to patients and radiation workers being exposed to radiation in its various forms as part of our health delivery system. Insofar as possible we should assure our patients and ourselves that the benefits outweigh the potential hazards involved. Inferences as to the possible biological effects of low level radiation are generally based on extrapolations from those effects observed and measured following acute exposures to considerably higher doses of radiation. Thus, in order to shed light on the question of the possible biological effects of low level radiation, a wide variety of studies have been carried out using cells in culture and various species of plant and animal life. This manuscript makes reference to some of those studies with indications as to how and why the studies were done and the conclusions that might be drawn there from. In addition reference is made to the handling of this information by scientists, by environmentalists, and by the news media. Unfortunately, in many instances the public has been misled by what has been said and/or written. It is hoped that this presentation will provide an understandable and reasonable perspective on the various appropriate uses of radiation in our lives and how such uses do provide significant improvement in our health and in our quality of life

  1. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed

  2. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  3. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  4. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Cory D. Cress

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  5. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Cory D. Cress; McMorrow, Julian J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Landi, Brian J.; Seth M. Hubbard; Messenger, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  6. Radon, radiation effects and radiation protection

    Epidemiological studies among Rn-exposed miners revealed a significant increase in lung tumour occurrence with increased exposure to radon daughters. Radiation exposure of the lungs also is given through inhalation of Rn-decay products released from the building material of residential houses. The resulting lung cancer risk is one of the major issues of radiation protection of the population. Extensive data collections are available on Rn-concentrations in room air. Building planning and design should make better use of these data, particularly for selection of materials and design of the basement and foundation of buildings, as radon daughters are the major source of radiation exposure of the population. (DG)

  7. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    The efficient dose of ionizing radiation (I.R.), expressed in sievert is a weighting of the deposited energy (absorbed dose in grays) by factors that take into account the radiation hazard and tissues radiosensitivity. it is useful in radiation protection because it allows to add exposures to ionizing radiation of different nature. for low doses, it has no probabilistic value. The determinist effects of ionizing radiation are observed from thresholds of several hundred of milli sievert. The seriousness grows with the dose. The whole-body doses exceeding 8 Sv are always lethal. The radio-induced cancers are observed only for doses exceeding 100 to 200 mSv for adults, delivered at a self important dose rate. Their seriousness does not depend on the dose. Their appear fortuity (stochastic effect) with a various individual susceptibility, genetically determined. The number of eventual radio-induced cancers coming from the exposure of a high number of persons to low dose of ionizing radiation (<100 mSv) cannot be evaluated with a linear without threshold model. these models, however usually used, do not take into account the biological reality of cell defense mechanisms, tissues or whole body defense mechanisms, these one being different against low or high doses of ionizing radiation. Against low doses, the preponderant mechanism is the elimination of potentially dangerous damaged cells. Against high doses, the repair of damaged cells is imperative to preserve the tissue functions. It can lead to DNA repair errors (radio-induced mutations) and canceration. The radio-induced congenital malformations are effects with threshold. The radio-induced carcinogenesis in utero is a stochastic effect. The radio-induced hereditary congenital malformations have never been highlighted for man. (N.C.)

  8. Genetic radiation effects

    Three types of genetic damage arising from irradiation are identified; (1) gene or point mutations at the level of the DNA molecule, which contains the genetic code. (2) chromosome breakage which may lead to translocations (3) uncontrolled distribution of the chromosomes into the daughter cells. Tabular information is drawn mainly from the UNSCEAR report, 1977, on the risk factors of genetic damage from various irradiation levels. Some detailed effects on genetic structure are described for recessive mutations, dominant mutations and trans-locations. Experimental work has in some cases been guided by X-ray irradiation with single and double dose effects, including tests on mice, for which subsequent herdity may be examined. (G.C.)

  9. The effects and control of radiation

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; ionising radiation (alpha and beta particles, gamma- and X-radiation, neutrons, half-life, sources of radiation); biological effects; risk estimates (somatic) (early effects, delayed effects); risk estimates (hereditary); control of radiation; risk estimates (accidents). (U.K.)

  10. Biopositive Effects of Ionizing Radiation?

    This paper was written for a talk given by E. Broda in Vienna for an event organised by the chemical physical society, the Austrian biochemical society and the Austrian biophysical society in December 1972. In this paper Broda analyses the question of biopositive effects of ionizing radiation. (nowak)

  11. Radiation Effects on Polymer Properties

    Bouquet, F. L.; Winslow, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Report compiles data on effects of radiation on physical properties of synthetic organic materials. Emphasis on materials of interest to nuclear-equipment and nuclear-reactor designers. Data covers five categories of polymeric materials: Insulators, elastomeric seals and gaskets, lubricants, adhesives, and coatings. More than 250 materials represented.

  12. Biological radiation effects

    Everyone is exposed to a complex mix of electromagnetic fields (EMF) of different frequencies that permeate our environment. Exposures to these EMF are increasing significantly as technology advances unabated and new applications are found. Technological progress in the broadest sense of the word has always been associated with various hazards and risks, both perceived and real. The industrial, commercial and household application on EMF is no exception. Throughout the world, the general public is concerned that exposure to EMF from such sources as high voltage power lines, broadcasting networks, mobile telephones and their base stations could lead to adverse health consequences, especially in children. As a result, the construction of new power lines and broadcasting and mobile telephone network has met with considerable opposition in many countries. Public exposure to EMF is regulated by a variety of voluntary and legal limits, together with various national safety standards. Guidelines are designed to avoid all identified hazards, from short and long term exposure, recommended limits. The aim of this paper is to report the summary of the actual scientific knowledge about the potential health effects and hazards due to man made EMF and the new tendencies of the social and political choices

  13. Space radiation effects and microgravity

    Humans in space are exposed both to space radiation and microgravity. The question whether radiation effects are modified by microgravity is an important aspect in risk estimation. No interaction is expected at the molecular level since the influence of gravity is much smaller than that of thermal motion. Influences might be expected, however, at the cellular and organ level. For example, changes in immune competence could modify the development of radiogenic cancers. There are no data so far in this area. The problem of whether intracellular repair of radiation-induced DNA lesions is changed under microgravity conditions was recently addressed in a number of space experiments. The results are reviewed; they show that repair processes are not modified by microgravity

  14. Radiation monitoring by radiation effect of aerosol

    The high energy and high intensity accelerator facilities need the radiation monitoring with temporal and spatial resolutions. Numerical estimations are made for the radiation monitoring using the sampling method of aerosol Alanine. The aerosol Alanine put into the monitoring area through the duct. The intensity of radicals in the collected throughput Alanine of about 50 mg after passing through the monitoring area is measured by the ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) method. Key parameters in the system are the aerosol particle diameter and its intensity, the duct diameter and length, and the aerosol flow rate inside the duct. The maximum dose rate more than 108 Gy/h is possible to measure assuming the duct of 100 cm2 in area and 10 m in length, and the aerosol flow rate of 1000 L/min. The temporal resolution of the order of minutes is obtainable when the aerosol particle size is 0.1 μm. As a result of numerical estimation based on empirical simulations, it is to be promising to apply a proposed scheme to the radiation monitoring for accelerator fields. (Y. Tanaka)

  15. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation

  16. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1984-10-21

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation.

  17. Research on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA

    Researches on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA have been carried out in different sections. In recent years, the organizations were rearranged to attain better research circumstances, and new research programs started. At present, radiation effect studies focus on radiation effect mechanisms at atomic, molecular and cellular levels including simulation studies, and protection studies focus on dosimetry for conditions difficult to cover with currently used methods and data as well as the related basic studies. The outlines of the whole studies and also some descriptions on selected subjects will be given in this paper. (author)

  18. Closing Remarks (by A. Gonzalez) [IRPA12: 12. Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association: Strengthening Radiation Protection Worldwide - Highlights, Global Perspective and Future Trends, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 19-24 October 2008

    The 12th International Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA12) has reconfirmed the strong scientific basis on which radiation protection is founded. On one hand, physical sciences characterizing radiation exposure have reached a high level of sophistication. On the other hand, the biological sciences that estimate radiation health effects have undergone a great deal of development in the last years, reaching a level of insight that was unimaginable just a few years ago. Significant advances in the description and quantification of ionizing radiation, as well as a better understanding of radiation exposure effects were presented at the Congress. They have transformed our related knowledge from implicit simplicity to intricate complexity. The final outcome of an exposure situation will probably continue to be simply described by a bare nominal radiation risk coefficient, expressed as probability per unit of effective dose incurred, but the biological mechanisms leading to health effects from radiation have proven to be extremely sophisticated and complex. IRPA12 has shown that radiobiology has come far from the simple target model for radiation effects, which was the preferred paradigm for expressing radiation induced harm as recently as the IRPA10 Congress just a decade ago. Plenty of papers were submitted to the Congress describing complex mechanisms for the interaction of radiation with living matter. Bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive responses, abscopal effects, and clastogenic plasma factors are among the great variety of recently discovered cell and tissue response mechanisms that were discussed at the Congress. A new understanding of radiation effects is emerging which describes how complex the outcome of radiation interaction with cell structure is. IRPA12 has shown how much is known about this complicated phenomenon, perhaps much more than is known about the interaction of other pollutants with cells; but the

  19. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space and a Rindler space with the surface gravity for acceleration.

  20. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space...

  1. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  2. Radiation effects on pharmaceuticals and related materials

    Radiation sterilization is the method of choice for many medical supplies and devices. However, because of the ionizing nature of gamma radiation, one must consider the effect of such radiation on the physical and chemical properties and on the biological behaviour of pharmaceutical and related materials before the feasibility of radiation sterilization for such products is established. The results of such feasibility studies can lead to an appropriate decision on the suitability of radiation sterilization for a particular pharmaceutical. (author)

  3. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1949-11-16

    This paper discusses procedures for research on biological effects of radiation, using mouse tissue: activation trace analysis including methods and proceedures for handling samples before during and after irradiation; methods and procedures for ion exchange study; method of separation and recovery of copper, iron, zinc, cobalt, pubidium and cesium. Also included are studies of trace elements with radioactive isotopes: the distribution of cobalt 60, zinc 65, and copper 64 in the cytoplasm and nuclei of normal mice and those with tumors. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H-, H/sup o/, and H+ beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 μs to 500 μs length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 σ) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs

  5. Radiation effects on superconducting materials

    Superconducting magnets will be used in plasma confinement of future fusion reactors. They will be subjected to neutron irradiation at low temperatures, so information is required on the effects of irradiation at low temperatures upon superconducting properties (critical current density, superconducting transition temperature, etc.) of the superconducting materials, electrical resistivity of the stabilizing materials such as Cu, multifilamentary composite materials of the magnets, and mechanical and electrical properties of the electrical insulating materials. A review is made of the existing data of radiation effects on the superconducting magnets. The superconducting transition temperature of the elements, alloys and compounds decreases with neutron irradiation, more in the compounds than in the alloys. The critical current density J sub(c) of the alloys decreases with fast neutron irradiation at low temperatures. In Nb3Sn, J sub(c) increases by low temperature fast neutron irradiation below the fluence of about 1018n/cm2, and the degradation of J sub(c) appears at over 1018n/cm2. Fast neutron irradiation causes resitivity increase of Cu and Al. Radiation damage in the materials may have large influence on stability characteristics of the composite wires. Extensive studies are necessary to clarify the problems, especially the irradiation effect at low temperatures. (auth.)

  6. Effects of Radiation on MEMS

    Shea, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of MEMS devices to radiation is reviewed, with an emphasis on radiation levels representative of space missions. While silicon and metals generally do not show mechanical degradation at the radiation levels encountered in most missions, MEMS devices have been reported to fail at doses of as few krad, corresponding to less than one year in most orbits. Radiation sensitivity is linked primarily to the impact on device operation of radiation-induced trapped charge in dielectrics...

  7. Effects of radiation upon gastrointestinal motility

    Mary F Otterson

    2007-01-01

    Whether due to therapeutic or belligerent exposure, the gastrointestinal effects of irradiation produce symptoms dreaded by a majority of the population. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping are hallmarks of the prodromal phase of radiation sickness, occurring hours to days following radiation exposure. The prodromal phase is distinct from acute radiation sickness in that the absorptive, secretory and anatomic changes associated with radiation damage are not easily identifiable. It is during this phase of radiation sickness that gastrointestinal motility significantly changes. In addition, there is evidence that motor activity of the gut contributes to some of the acute and chronic effects of radiation.

  8. Doses and biological effect of ionizing radiation

    Basic values and their symbols as well as units of physical dosimetry are given. The most important information about biological radiation effects is presented. Polish radiation protection standards are cited. (A.S.)

  9. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    ... yourself during radiation therapy Radiation therapy can damage healthy body tissues in or near the area being treated, which can cause side effects. Many people worry about this part of their cancer treatment. Before ...

  10. Interpretation of spin effects in Cherenkov radiation

    The Cherenkov radiation effect depends on correlation between electron polarization and photon spirality. This correlation in the given case is interpreted as interference of the charge radiation amplitudes and electron magnetic moment

  11. Stochastic and non-stochastic radiation effects

    Both the carcinogenic and the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation are thought to be induced by 'stochastic' mechanisms of action. It is generally accepted that the number of carcinogenic injury is proportional to the radiation dose applied, and that there is no direct relationship between radiation dose and severity of induced injury, so that no threshold dose can be defined. However, the severity of mutagenic effects, resulting for example from cell death or leading to functional disorders or malformations, has been observed to be a function of the radiation dose, so that in principle threshold doses can be defined. These latter effects are called non-stochastic radiation effects. (orig./DG)

  12. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  13. Cosmic Radiation Effects on Avionics

    The earth is bombarded by a nearly isotropic flux of energetic charged particles called cosmic rays which interact with air nuclei to generate a cascade of secondary particles building up to a maximum intensity at 60,000 feet. At normal cruising altitudes the radiation is still several hundred times the ground level intensity. These particles are sufficiently energetic and ionising that they can deposit enough charge in a small volume of semiconductor to change the state of a memory cell, while certain devices can be triggered into a state of high current drain, leading to burn-out and hardware failure. These deleterious interactions of individual particles are referred to as single event effects. The authors have flown Cosmic Radiation Effects detectors in a variety of spacecraft and aircraft and illustrative results are presented together with a review of published instances of such phenomena in flight systems. In the future there is likely to be increased susceptibility due to growing reliance on high performance computers using smaller devices operated at lower voltages and flying at higher altitudes. The influence of cosmic rays will have to be properly considered in the assessment of reliability. (author)

  14. RADIATION AND EFFECTS ON HUMAN HEALTH

    Hakan YAREN

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In modern world, living without radiation is impossible. Radiation is defined as ?energy transmitted through space as waves or particles? and also determined as ?particles or waves emitted from the nucleus of unstable radioactive atoms to become stable? Mainly two types of radiation are exist; ionising radiation and non-ionising radiation. Ionising radiation is consist of alpha, beta particules, neutrons, x rays and gamma rays. Ionising radiation which can be measured by ion chambers, geiger-Mueller detectors, Scintillation Counters, fluorescent counters etc. Has harmfull effects on human health in levels of molecular, cellular, tissue, organs and organ systems. These harmfull effects can also be named somatic and genetic. One of the most encountered problem is ?Acute Radiation Syndrom? which has three sub syndroms called haematopoetic syndrom, gastrointestinal syndrom and neurovascular syndrom. Exposure time, distance and armorisation are the key elements of protection from radiation. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(4.000: 199-208

  15. Systemic mechanisms and effects of ionizing radiation: A new 'old' paradigm of how the bystanders and distant can become the players.

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Mavragani, Ifigeneia V; Laskaratou, Danae A; Gika, Violeta; Moskvin, Vadim P; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vougas, Konstantinos; Stewart, Robert D; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2016-06-01

    Exposure of cells to any form of ionizing radiation (IR) is expected to induce a variety of DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs), single strand breaks (SSBs) and oxidized bases, as well as loss of bases, i.e., abasic sites. The damaging potential of IR is primarily related to the generation of electrons, which through their interaction with water produce free radicals. In their turn, free radicals attack DNA, proteins and lipids. Damage is induced also through direct deposition of energy. These types of IR interactions with biological materials are collectively called 'targeted effects', since they refer only to the irradiated cells. Earlier and sometimes 'anecdotal' findings were pointing to the possibility of IR actions unrelated to the irradiated cells or area, i.e., a type of systemic response with unknown mechanistic basis. Over the last years, significant experimental evidence has accumulated, showing a variety of radiation effects for 'out-of-field' areas (non-targeted effects-NTE). The NTE involve the release of chemical and biological mediators from the 'in-field' area and thus the communication of the radiation insult via the so called 'danger' signals. The NTE can be separated in two major groups: bystander and distant (systemic). In this review, we have collected a detailed list of proteins implicated in either bystander or systemic effects, including the clinically relevant abscopal phenomenon, using improved text-mining and bioinformatics tools from the literature. We have identified which of these genes belong to the DNA damage response and repair pathway (DDR/R) and made protein-protein interaction (PPi) networks. Our analysis supports that the apoptosis, TLR-like and NOD-like receptor signaling pathways are the main pathways participating in NTE. Based on this analysis, we formulate a biophysical hypothesis for the regulation of NTE, based on DNA damage and apoptosis gradients between the irradiation point and various distances

  16. Radiation effects in the environment

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  17. The radiation effects of nuclear weapons explosions

    The energy resulting from nuclear weapons explosions consists of thermal energy (heat radiation), shock waves, initial radiation (nuclear ray flash, gamma and neutron flash), and nuclear radiation of the fission products (fallout). The contribution of the different energy components depends on the energy amounts produced by fission or fusion reactions (A-weapon, H-weapon), on the components used for conversion to helium-4 (deuterium, tritium, lithium), the weapon design (radiation absorption and induced activity in auxiliaries), and on the type of employment (atmospheric, ground, or underground explosion). The damaging effects vary accordingly, consisting of thermal damage, blast effects, and radiation injuries. The effects are explained and compared. (orig.)

  18. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  19. Abscopal induction of leukaemia and osteosarcoma following administration of alpha-emitting radionuclides

    Lord, B.I. (Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    Alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides can induce leukaemia and/ or osteosarcoma in mice. Furthermore, plutonium-239, given to male mice before mating with normal females, while not directly leading to leukaemia in the progeny does lead to enhanced susceptibility to leukaemogenic agents. In the first case, the amounts of radionuclide are very small in experimental terms; and zero in the case of transgenerational activity. In both cases, the development of the disorders is remote in time and location relative to that of the contaminating radionuclide, making interpretation of the mechanisms and estimation of radiation risk problematic. It is necessary, then, to address questions involving the basis of haemopoiesis itself. Cellular kinetics of the development of blood from the pluripotent stem cells to the mature functional cells are outlined, describing compensatory proliferation mechanisms and extensive movement of cells throughout the marrow space. The locations of potential oncogenic target cells are identified and the nature of the stromal microenvironment that regulates haemopoiesis is defined. Plutonium-239, given to male mice, targets spermatogenesis at the stem cell level leaving unidentified damage that is inherited by his offspring. This leaves the offspring susceptible to a leukaemogenic agent encountered later in life. The characteristics of this, corroborated by consideration of the cellular kinetics, are of an inherited genomic instability. Cells of the microenvronment, inheriting the same genetic damage, probably act in the role of an enhancing 'bystander'. In adult mice, the mechanisms are different. Bone turnover results in radioactivity being gradually transported through the marrow by long-lived macrophages. A model based on temporal microdistributions of activity, defining specific target cell regions, is able to illustrate that considering bone marrow as a uniform mass of cells is inadequate to describe the observed

  20. Molecular and cellular effects of radiations

    This program is concerned with the basic nature of the biological effects of mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental radiations, including those solar ultraviolet and visible radiations responsible for the most common form of human cancer: cancer of the skin. Concentrating on the damages to DNA caused by these radiations, the program attempts to delineate the basic mechanisms whereby such damage may occur. 14 refs

  1. Applying radiation health effects data to radiation protection policies

    Data from the peer-reviewed scientific literature establish a sound basis to define a low-dose, low-dose-rate, dose-response. These data include human health dose-response studies; immunologically 'whole' animal studies; and cellular and molecular biological studies of complete biological systems for the relevant immunological and physiological responses. Initiatives are required to constructively apply these data to both radiation research and radiation protection policies. First, current low level radiation health effects research must apply existing data to define research projects to integrate and confirm existing dose-response data, with specific emphasis on the biological bases that exist in definitive and reproducible cellular and biological dose-response. Second, dose-response assessment must identify and incorporate all existing substantial and confirmed data, including natural radiation sources, to establish the bases for radiation protection policy for interventions to protect public health and safety. A preliminary assessment of these data is applied to: 1) Specify research that can be constructively applied to describe radiation health effects dose-response. 2) Apply health effects dose-response to radiation and radioactivity applications policies to maximize radiation health effects interventions for occupational applications, medical applications, and other radiation and radioactive materials applications controls to cost-effectively assure public health and safety. An assessment of the proposed revisions to ICRP radiation protection policies is provided that associates the basis for administrative limits with the previous proposal of the US NRC for a 'Below Regulatory Concern' (BRC) policy. This proposal ignores the context of the fact that very low levels of radiation exposure are far within the variations of natural radiation exposures, and therefore can have no gross net consequences. The equivalent failure of the BRC proposal resulted in quick

  2. Effects of Therapeutic Radiation on Polymeric Scaffolds

    Cooke, Shelley Lynn

    2014-01-01

    High levels of ionizing radiation are known to cause degradation and/or cross-linking in polymers. Lower levels of ionizing radiation, such as x-rays, are commonly used in the treatment of cancers. Material characterization has not been fully explored for polymeric materials exposed to therapeutic radiation levels. This study investigated the effects of therapeutic radiation on three porous scaffolds: polycaprolactone (PCL), polyurethane (PU) and gelatin. Porous scaffolds were fabricate...

  3. Radiation effect on ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) can be used at a substitute of the bone of human body skeleton. Before being set in to human body, it needs to be sterilized with high energy radiation. Therefore, it is of considerable significance to study the effect of radiation on UHMWPE. Because of ultrahigh molecular weight of this material, there would be a lot of entanglements at molecular chain, its radiation effect would be quite different from that of polyethylene with normal molecular weight. The radiation effect on UHMWPE was studied by means of density and DSC analysis. It has been shown that the density increases with the increase of radiation dose up to 1.13 MGy monotonically. The heat of fusion per unit weight of sample and melting point of UHMWPE increase with dose too, especially at the lower dose of radiation. It could be concluded that during the period of radiation, there would be additional crystallization or crystal perfection taken place

  4. Long-term effects of ionizing radiation

    This paper approaches the long-term effects of ionizing radiation considering the common thought that killing of cells is the basis for deterministic effects and that the subtle changes in genetic information are important in the development of radiation-induced cancer, or genetic effects if these changes are induced in germ cells

  5. Radiation hazards and their effects

    Radiation can be classified into ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation, based on whether it is capable of ionizing atoms and breaking chemical bonds. Ultraviolet and higher frequency such as X-rays, gamma rays are ionizing. These pose their own special hazards. Non ionizing radiation is associated with two major potential hazards. i.e. electrical and biological. Additionally includes electric current caused by radiation can generate sparks and create a fire or explosive hazards. Strong radiation can induce current capable of delivering an electric shock. Extremely high power electromagnetic radiation can cause electric currents strong enough to create sparks when an induced voltage exceeds the breakdown voltage of surrounding mediums. A 2009 study at the University of Basal in Switzerland found that intermitted exposure of human cells to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field at a flux density of 10 Gy induced a slight but significant increase of DNA fragmentation in the comet assay. Mobile phones radiation and health concerns have been raised, especially following the enormous increase in the use of wireless mobile telephony throughout the world. Mobile phones use electromagnetic radiation in the microwaves range and some believes this may be harmful to human health. (author)

  6. Potential health effects of space radiation

    Yang, Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.

    1993-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be exposed to radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, and possibly solar particle events. The potential health hazards due to these space radiations must be considered carefully to ensure the success of space exploration. Because there is no human radioepidemiological data for acute and late effects of high-LET (Linear-Energy-Transfer) radiation, the biological risks of energetic charged particles have to be estimated from experimental results on animals and cultured cells. Experimental data obtained to date indicate that charged particle radiation can be much more effective than photons in causing chromosome aberrations, cell killing, mutation, and tumor induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) varies with biological endpoints and depends on the LET of heavy ions. Most lesions induced by low-LET radiation can be repaired in mammalian cells. Energetic heavy ions, however, can produce large complex DNA damages, which may lead to large deletions and are irreparable. For high-LET radiation, therefore, there are less or no dose rate effects. Physical shielding may not be effective in minimizing the biological effects on energetic heavy ions, since fragments of the primary particles can be effective in causing biological effects. At present the uncertainty of biological effects of heavy particles is still very large. With further understanding of the biological effects of space radiation, the career doses can be kept at acceptable levels so that the space radiation environment need not be a barrier to the exploitation of the promise of space.

  7. Radiation effects on CCD image sensors

    In the past decade, the micro process technology has advanced and some elaborate semiconductor devices with many microscopic elements in a cell of about 10 μm x 10 μm can be successfully used as radiation detectors and related parts in the field of nuclear physics and engineering. A CCD image sensor, for example, effectively measures details of particle-beam profiles in accelerator applications. This paper describes radiation effects on CCD image sensors. Some CCD samples were irradiated with 60Co gamma-rays and DD and DT neutrons for the examination of the reliability of CCDs used in radiation environments. This paper shows experimental data on radiation effects on CCDs and then discusses the difference in the radiation effects between gamma-rays and neutrons. The following two radiation effects on CCDs are described. One is the transient effect, which is induced by the ionisation process of radiations and is not permanent but recoverable. A CCD responds to radiations as well as light and outputs pseudo signals induced by radiation reactions in the normal video signals during irradiation. The other is the permanent effect, which is caused by the generation of the defects. A CCD image sensor is easily influenced by the trapped holes produced by ionisation in the gate oxide. The defects cause the generation of the leakage current within the depletion region, the trapping of signal charge within the channel of the charge shift register, and the flat band voltage shift which affects the CCD operating bias. (author)

  8. Natural aerosol direct and indirect radiative effects

    Rap, Alexandru; Scott, Catherine E.; Spracklen, Dominick V; Bellouin, Nicolas; Forster, Piers M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Schmidt, Anja; Mann, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Natural aerosol plays a significant role in the Earth's system due to its ability to alter the radiative balance of the Earth. Here we use a global aerosol microphysics model together with a radiative transfer model to estimate radiative effects for five natural aerosol sources in the present-day atmosphere: dimethyl sulfide (DMS), sea-salt, volcanoes, monoterpenes, and wildfires. We calculate large annual global mean aerosol direct and cloud albedo effects especially for DMS-derived sulfate ...

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on hippocampus

    The present situation in studying effects of ionizing radiation on hippocampus of brain was reviewed in these topics, such as the kinetics of hippocampus, influences of ionizing radiation, on neutrons, biochemistry, enzymes, transmitters and synapses in hippocampus and on its electrophysiology, and the neuro-behavior after irradiation of hippocampus of brain, in order to provide information for clarifying the mechanism is radiation effect on hippocampus and for protection of human

  10. Some characteristics and effects of natural radiation

    Since life first appeared on the Earth, it has, in all its subsequent evolved forms including human, been exposed to natural radiation in the environment both from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources. Being an environmental mutagen, ionising natural radiation may have played a role of some significance in the evolution of early life forms on Earth. It has been estimated by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation that at the present time, exposure to natural radiation globally results in an annual average individual effective dose of about 2.4 mSv. This represents about 80 % of the total dose from all sources. The three most important components of natural radiation exposure are cosmic radiation, terrestrial radioactivity and indoor radon. Each of these components exhibits both geographical and temporal variabilities with indoor radon exposure being the most variable and also the largest contributor to dose for most people. In this account, an overview is given of the characteristics of the main components of the natural radiation environment and some of their effects on humans. In the case of cosmic radiation, these range from radiation doses to aircrew and astronauts to the controversial topic of its possible effect on climate change. In the case of terrestrial natural radiation, accounts are given of a number of human exposure scenarios. (author)

  11. High-Intensity Synchrotron Radiation Effects

    Suetsugu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Various effects of intense synchrotron radiation on the performance of particle accelerators, especially for storage rings, are discussed. Following a brief introduction to synchrotron radiation, the basic concepts of heat load, gas load, electron emission, and the countermeasures against these effects are discussed.

  12. Managing the adverse effects of radiation therapy.

    Berkey, Franklin J

    2010-08-15

    Nearly two thirds of patients with cancer will undergo radiation therapy as part of their treatment plan. Given the increased use of radiation therapy and the growing number of cancer survivors, family physicians will increasingly care for patients experiencing adverse effects of radiation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to significantly improve symptoms of depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy, although they have little effect on cancer-related fatigue. Radiation dermatitis is treated with topical steroids and emollient creams. Skin washing with a mild, unscented soap is acceptable. Cardiovascular disease is a well-established adverse effect in patients receiving radiation therapy, although there are no consensus recommendations for cardiovascular screening in this population. Radiation pneumonitis is treated with oral prednisone and pentoxifylline. Radiation esophagitis is treated with dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, and viscous lidocaine. Radiation-induced emesis is ameliorated with 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and steroids. Symptomatic treatments for chronic radiation cystitis include anticholinergic agents and phenazopyridine. Sexual dysfunction from radiation therapy includes erectile dysfunction and vaginal stenosis, which are treated with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and vaginal dilators, respectively. PMID:20704169

  13. Effect of gamma radiation on Campylobacter jejuni

    Radiation resistance of Campylobacter jejuni in broth, ground beef, and ground turkey meat was determined using dose levels from 0-200 Krad at -30 +/- 100C, at 0-50C, and at 30 +/- 100C. Irradiation at -300C increased radiation resistance of cultures in ground meats; broth cultures were not greatly influenced by temperature. The effect of culture age on radiation resistance was also evaluated using cells in various physiological phases. Age did not have a pronounced effect on radiation resistance. The largest D10 value for C. jejuni was 32 Krad, which was less than D10 values commonly reported for salmonellae. 20 references, 4 figures

  14. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  15. Radiation Effects on Polymers - XI

    Ghanem, N. A.; El-Awady, N. I.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius;

    1979-01-01

    With the aim of improving properties of cellulose acetate membranes for reverse osmosis desalination, grafting was performed using high energy electrons. In this paper, the grafting parameters (radiation dose and method, monomer concentration, solvents, chain transfer agent and redox system...

  16. Radiation effects in polycarbonate capacitors

    Vujisić Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine the influence of neutron and gamma irradiation on the dissipation factor and capacitance of capacitors with polycarbonate dielectrics. The operation of capacitors subject to extreme conditions, such as the presence of ionizing radiation fields, is of special concern in military industry and space technology. Results obtained show that the exposure to a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field causes a decrease of capacitance, while the loss tangent remains unchanged.

  17. Radiation friction vs ponderomotive effect

    Fedotov, A M; Gelfer, E G; Narozhny, N B; Ruhl, H

    2014-01-01

    The concept of ponderomotive potential is upgraded to a regime in which radiation friction becomes dominant. The radiation friction manifests itself in novel features of long-term capturing of the particles released at the focus and impenetrability of the focus from the exterior. We apply time scales separation to the Landau-Lifshitz equation splitting the particle motion into quivering and slow drift of a guiding center. The drift equation is deduced by averaging over fast motion.

  18. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic

  19. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  20. Incidence of radiation-induced cataract in single and parabiotic rats

    Grossly visible cataract developed by 500 days postradiation in 74 percent of the irradiated members of parabiotic pairs of NEDH rats, one of which had received 1000 R whole-body 250 kVp x radiation while the other was shielded to assure survival of the pair. The earliest time at which induced cataract was noted was 106 days postradiation, with the peak rate of occurrence between 300 and 400 days. Other ocular components than the lens, notably the iris and ciliary body, also showed radiation effects. The incidence of cataract in the shielded partners was 0.2 percent, the same as in control parabiont pairs. No spontaneous cataracts were found in single control rats. There was no abscopal effect on the eyes of the shielded partners. Conversely, presence of the shielded partner offered no protection to the irradiated eyes. A few single rats survived a whole-body dose of 1000 R. Three hundred days after radiation 3 percent of such rats developed cataract. By 600 days 82 percent of the survivors had developed cataract. As the dose was increased in several experiments from 700 to 1100 R, the incidence of cataract in survivors also increased from 31 percent to 90 percent

  1. Radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report IV, 15 March 1976--15 May 1977

    The series of parabiont and irradiated rats has been completed, the lesions diagnosed and the data pertinent to tumors computerized and partly analyzed. The same series yielded 74 percent incidence of cataract in the irradiated partner following a whole-body dose of 1000 R with 0.2 percent in the shielded partner and also in controls. There was no abscopal effect. Other structures of the eye beside the lens, particularly the retina, showed extensive radiation damage. Parabiosis increased the incidence rate of leukemia from one percent in control single rats to five percent. Irradiation of one partner decreased the rate to 2.5 percent. Similar effects were noted for solid lymphoid tumors. A pilot study of prostatic cancer in irradiated parabiont rats demonstrated a tenfold increase in incidence. Experimental protocols bearing on cocarcinogenesis have been initiated in mice and rats, using radiation, asbestos and chemical carcinogens, but no results have been as yet obtained. We have obtained additional evidence suggesting the importance of prolactin as a cocarcinogen with radiation for induction of mammary tumors in the rat and are continuing our collaborative study of hormonal aasays in the blood of parabiont rats

  2. Total aerosol effect: radiative forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    U. Lohmann

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of precipitation formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical properties, a quantification of the aerosol forcings in the traditional way is difficult to define properly. Here we argue that fast feedbacks should be included because they act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP, that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Based on our results, we recommend RFP as a valid option to compare different forcing agents, and to compare the effects of particular forcing agents in different models.

  3. Total aerosol effect: radiative forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    D. Koch

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical properties, a quantification of the aerosol forcings in the traditional way is difficult to properly define. Here we argue that fast feedbacks should be included because they act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP, that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Based on our results, we recommend RFP as a valid option to compare different forcing agents, and to compare the effects of particular forcing agents in different models.

  4. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  5. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma r...

  6. Radiative effects in gauge theories

    Borisov, A. V.; Zhukovskii, V. Ch.

    1987-10-01

    The definitions of the vacuum state and the analysis of the radiative processes reffer to fundamental problems of non-abelian gayge theories. On the basis of the functional integration in the proper time representation a model of vacuum is examined of the quantum chromodynamics, proposed by Savvidy and Matinyan (Nuclear Physics B, Volume 134, Issue 3, p. 539-545). The supersimmetry of the Dirac equation for fermions in an external constant homogeneous magnetic field is examined. The radiative shift is calculated for the Dirac neutrino mass in an arbitrary external constant electromagnetic field in the framework of the Weinberg-Salam theory. An interpretation of the sign of the neutrino's anomalous magnetic moment is given. The power of the electromagnetic radiation of the moment and characteristic time of the neutrino spirality flipp in an external magnetic field is calculated. Bibliography: 24; Ill. 2

  7. Nuclear radiation and its effect on man

    A brief presentation is made of the biological effects on man of nuclear radiation. The sources of such radiation, natural and artificial, are summarised. The philosophy on which the maximum permissible doses to various groups and to the population are based is briefly described. Tables are given illustrating the various aspects discussed. (JIW)

  8. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  9. Radiation effects after exposure during prenetal development

    The embryo and fetus are very radiosensitive during the total prenatal development period. The quality and extent of radiation effects depend strongly on the developmental stage at which the exposure occurs. During the preimplantation period radiation exposure can cause death of the embryo after radiation doses of 0.2 Gy and higher. Malformations are only observed in very rare cases when genetic predispositions exist. Macroscopic-anatomical malformations are induced only after irradiation during the major organogenesis. On the basis of experimental data with mammals it is assumed that a radiation dose of about 0.2 Gy doubles the malformation risk. Studies in humans give rise to the assumption that the human embryo is more radioresistant than the embryos of mice and rats. Radiation exposure during the major organogenesis and the early fetal period lead to disturbances in the growth and developmental processes. During early fetogenesis (week 8-15 post coruption) high radiosensitity exists for the development of the central nervous system. Radiation doses of 1 Gy cause severe mental retardation in about 50% of exposed fetuses. Analysis of the dose-effect curves shows that there is probably a dose-effect curve with a threshold for this effect. It must be taken into account that radiation exposure during the fetal period also induces cancer. The studies, however, do not allow quantitative estimate of this radiation risk at present. It is therefore generally assumed that the risk is about the same level as for children. (orig.)

  10. Chernobyl health effects: radiation or stress?

    Consideration is given to results of wide-scale examination of human population, subjected to the effect of radiation in result of Chernobyl accident. The examined contingents consisted of liquidators, evacuated from 30-km zone, people still living in contamination territories, children of irradiated parents and children, who received large radiation doses. High levels of respiratory system diseases, digestive system diseases, cardiovascular diseases and nervous system diseases were revealed for these people. It was revealed that stress, socio-economic and chemical factors played sufficient role in disease incidence. It is shown that fair of radiation may damage more, than radiation itself

  11. Physics of radiation effects in crystals

    Johnson, RA

    1986-01-01

    ``Physics of Radiation Effects in Crystals'' is presented in two parts. The first part covers the general background and theory of radiation effects in crystals, including the theory describing the generation of crystal lattice defects by radiation, the kinetic approach to the study of the disposition of these defects and the effects of the diffusion of these defects on alloy compositions and phases. Specific problems of current interest are treated in the second part and include anisotropic dimensional changes in x-uranium, zirconium and graphite, acceleration of thermal creep in reactor ma

  12. Toxicity risk of non-target organs at risk receiving low-dose radiation: case report

    The spine is the most common site for bone metastases. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for palliation of pain and for prevention or treatment of spinal cord compression. Helical tomotherapy (HT), a new image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), delivers highly conformal dose distributions and provides an impressive ability to spare adjacent organs at risk, thus increasing the local control of spinal column metastases and decreasing the potential risk of critical organs under treatment. However, there are a lot of non-target organs at risk (OARs) occupied by low dose with underestimate in this modern rotational IMRT treatment. Herein, we report a case of a pathologic compression fracture of the T9 vertebra in a 55-year-old patient with cholangiocarcinoma. The patient underwent HT at a dose of 30 Gy/10 fractions delivered to T8-T10 for symptom relief. Two weeks after the radiotherapy had been completed, the first course of chemotherapy comprising gemcitabine, fluorouracil, and leucovorin was administered. After two weeks of chemotherapy, however, the patient developed progressive dyspnea. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed an interstitial pattern with traction bronchiectasis, diffuse ground-glass opacities, and cystic change with fibrosis. Acute radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of radiation toxicities caused by low dose off-targets and abscopal effects even with highly conformal radiotherapy

  13. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    Fried, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels.

  14. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels

  15. Effects of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    Wiendl, Toni A.; Wiendl, Fritz W.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Franco, Jose G.; Althur, Valter, E-mail: tawiendl@hotmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' F1 were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from Co-60 source at 0,509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2,5; 5,0; 7,5; 10,0; 12,5; 15,0; 20,0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  16. Biological effects of proton radiation: an update

    Proton radiation provides significant dosimetric advantages when compared with gamma radiation due to its superior energy deposition characteristics. Although the physical aspects of proton radiobiology are well understood, biological and clinical endpoints are understudied. The current practice to assume the relative biological effectiveness of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons to be a generic value of about 1.1 relative to photons likely obscures important unrecognised differentials in biological response between these radiation qualities. A deeper understanding of the biological properties induced by proton radiation would have both radiobiological and clinical impact. This article briefly points to some of the literature pertinent to the effects of protons on tissue-level processes that modify disease progression, such as angiogenesis, cell invasion and cancer metastasis. Recent findings hint that proton radiation may, in addition to offering improved radio-therapeutic targeting, be a means to provide a new dimension for increasing therapeutic benefits for patients by manipulating these tissue-level processes. (authors)

  17. Effect of radiation processing on meat tenderisation

    The effect of radiation processing (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on the tenderness of three types of popularly consumed meat in India namely chicken, lamb and buffalo was investigated. In irradiated meat samples dose dependant reduction in water holding capacity, cooking yield and shear force was observed. Reduction in shear force upon radiation processing was more pronounced in buffalo meat. Protein and collagen solubility as well as TCA soluble protein content increased on irradiation. Radiation processing of meat samples resulted in some change in colour of meat. Results suggested that irradiation leads to dose dependant tenderization of meat. Radiation processing of meat at a dose of 2.5 kGy improved its texture and had acceptable odour. - Highlights: • Effect of radiation processing on tenderness of three meat systems was evaluated. • Dose dependant reduction in shear force seen in buffalo meat. • Collagen solubility increased with irradiation

  18. Effects of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' F1 were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from Co-60 source at 0,509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2,5; 5,0; 7,5; 10,0; 12,5; 15,0; 20,0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  19. Sterilizing radiation effects on selected polymers

    The mechanism of radiation effects and their industrial applications are discussed for the following classes of polymers: thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers, films and fibers, and adhesives/coatings/potting compounds. 35 references, 3 tables

  20. Effects of solar radiation on glass

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Kinser, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation of selected glasses are reported. Optical property degradation is studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Strength changes are measured using a concentric ring bend test. Direct fracture toughness measurements using an indentation test are planned.

  1. Radiation effects blamed on Chernobyl

    Strictly speaking, the nature of an epidemiological study would not permit the same causal links to be established as an experimental study does. Instead, it merely provides circumstantial evidence, from which some conclusions can be drawn as to the causative factors in the occurrences recorded. To summarize it may be stated that as fas as the Germans are concerned no scientific evidence has so far been provided to prove health impairments attributable to an added radiation load from the Chernobyl fallout. On the other hand, it can not be denied that there are indications of health damage in a few individuals unreasonably changing their eating habits for fear of radiation injuries. The question as to whether the event instilled a permanent feeling of unease in some population groups still remains largely obscure. (orig.)

  2. Radiation effects on blood coagulation

    Haemorrhage is an important and ominous sign in acute radiation disease. While it is overwhelmingly evident that thrombocytopenia is the major cause of the haemorrhagic diathesis, detailed observations of all of the changes in the coagulation mechanism, fibrinolytic elements and platelet function are lacking. The current knowledge is reviewed in this chapter. In general, changes should be considered in relation to the course of the disease, that is early or late, and whether the observations were made in man or animals

  3. Predicted solar cell edge radiation effects

    The Advanced Solar Cell Orbital Test (ASCOT) will test six types of solar cells in a high energy proton environment. During the design of the experiment a question was raised about the effects of proton radiation incident on the edge of the solar cells and whether edge radiation shielding was required. Historical geosynchronous data indicated that edge radiation damage is not detectable over the normal end of life solar cell degradation; however because the ASCOT radiation environment has a much higher and more energetic fluence of protons, considerably more edge damage is expected. A computer analysis of the problem was made by modeling the expected radiation damage at the cell edge and using a network model of small interconnected solar cells to predict degradation in the cell's electrical output. The model indicated that the deepest penetration of edge radiation was at the top of the cell near the junction where the protons have access to the cell through the low density cell/cover adhesive layer. The network model indicated that the cells could tolerate high fluences at their edge as long as there was high electrical resistance between the edge radiated region and the contact system on top of the cell. The predicted edge radiation related loss was less than 2% of maximum power for GaAs/Ge solar cells. As a result, no edge radiation protection was used for ASCOT

  4. Fast Neutron Radiation Effects on Bacillus Subtili

    CHEN Xiaoming; REN Zhenglong; ZHANG Jianguo; ZHENG Chun; TAN Bisheng; YANG Chengde; CHU Shijin

    2009-01-01

    To examine the sterilizing effect and mechanism of neutron radiation, Bacillus sub-tilis vat. niger, strain (ATCC 9372) spores were irradiated with the fast neutron from the Chinese fast burst reactor Ⅱ(CFBR-Ⅱ). The plate-count results indicated that the D10 value was 384.6 Gy with a neutron radiation dose rate of 7.4 Gy/min. The rudimental catalase activity of the spores declined obviously with the increase in the radiation dose. Meanwhile, under the scanning electron microscope, no visible influence of the neutron radiation on the spore configuration was detected even if the dose was increased to 4 kGy. The content and distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by neutron radiation at different doses were measured and quantified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Further analysis of the DNA release percentage (PR), the DNA breakage level (L), and the average molecular weight, indicated that DNA fragments were obvi-ously distributed around the 5 kb regions at different radiation doses, which suggests that some points in the DNA molecule were sensitive to neutron radiation. Both PR and L varied regularly to some extent with the increase in radiation dose. Thus neutron radiation has a high sterilization power, and can induce falling enzyme activity and DNA breakage in Bacillus subtilis spores

  5. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    We update previously published Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 data set. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux data sets. Our results clearly show that the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave, and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles, to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance data sets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  6. Radiation effects on biodegradable polyesters

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] and its copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] are microbial biodegradable polyesters produced by many types of bacteria. Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(E-caprolactone) (PCL) are also biodegradable synthetic polyesters which have been commercialized. These thermoplastics are expected for wide usage in environmental protection and blocompatible applications. Radiation grafting of hydrophilic monomers onto many polymers, e.g., polyethylene and polypropylene has been studied mainly for biomedical applications. In the present study, radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl monomers onto PHB and P(3HB-co-3HV) was carried out and improvement of their properties was studied. Changes in the properties and biodegradability were compared with the degree of grafting. Radiation-induced crosslinking of PBS and PCL which relatively show thermal and irradiation stability was also carried out to improve their thermal stability or processability. Irradiation to PBS and PCL mainly resulted in crosslinking and characterization of these crosslinked polyesters was investigated

  7. Inverse Faraday Effect driven by Radiation Friction

    Liseykina, T V; Macchi, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of extremely intense ($>10^{23}~\\mbox{W cm}^{-2}$), circularly polarized laser pulses with thick targets, theory and simulations show that a major fraction of the laser energy is converted into incoherent radiation because of collective electron motion during the "hole boring" dynamics. The effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of an axial magnetic field of tens of gigagauss value. This peculiar "inverse Faraday effect" is demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations including radiation friction.

  8. Effects of radiations on ornamental fish

    Radiation is a process in which energetic particles or energetic waves travel through a medium or space. There are two distinct types of radiations: ionizing and non-ionizing. Ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays are some examples of radiation. 'Ornamental fish' is designed for aquatic hobbyists and the aquatic industry for several purposes. UV light has two primary uses in fish culture: Controlling green water and disinfecting the water supply. Many proponents of UV disinfection sometimes overlook the additional benefits relating to ornamental fish; those being that cleaner water reduces the stress on the fish by not having to fight off diseases, thus enhancing its immune system and leading to faster growth and more brilliant colors. Ultraviolet sterilizers are often used in aquaria to help control unwanted microorganisms in the water. UV radiation also ensures that exposed pathogens cannot reproduce, thus decreasing the likelihood of a disease outbreak in an aquarium. Despite of these benefits, the ill-effects of radiations cannot be ruled out. Ultraviolet Radiation-induced DNA Damage is seen in the skin of the Platyfish Xiphophorus. Higher radiation doses may cause the gastrointestinal syndrome that leads to defects of the intestinal mucosa barrier with successive contamination of musculature. Exposure to UV radiation can kill the fish and induce sublethal effects in embryos, larvae and adults. The change in skin includes irregularity of skin surface, epidermal oedema, necrosis etc. Irradiation may badly influence the textural attributes of fish muscle. (author)

  9. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects and genomic instability. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm would cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (orig.)

  10. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  11. Radiation abuse and its effects

    This paper delves into overuse practiced in diagnostic radiography. The conventional attitudes to low-dose irradiation are critically examined, as is the MPD related to individual radiosensitivity. Concern is expressed that a sizeable proportion of radiologists ignore important aspects of the Code of Practice and this attitude is readily emulated in the hospital setting. The author advocates education within the medical profession and the community on the risks involved in radiation abuse and the benefits derived from justified exposures to x rays. (author)

  12. Biological effects and hazards of radiation exposure

    Radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis form the main risk to health from exposure to low levels of radiation. This risk effects can be at least qualitatively understood by considering the effects of radiation on cell DNA. Whilst exposure to high levels of radiation results in a number of identifiable effects, exposure to low levels of radiation may result in effects which only manifest themselves after many years. Risk estimates for low levels of radiation have been derived on the basis of a number of assumptions. In the case of uranium mine workers a major hazard arises from the inhalation of radon daughters. Whilst the correlation between radon daughter exposure and lung cancer incidence is well established, the numerical value of the risk factor is the subject of controversy. ICRP 50 gives a value of 10 cases per 106 person-years at risk per WLM (range 5-15 x 10-6 PYR-1 WLM-1). The effect of smoking on lung cancer incidence rates amongst miners is also controversial. Nevertheless, smoking by miners should be discouraged

  13. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells.A wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was chosen as the biological target.As a parameter to quantify the sensibility of the target to radiation, the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 ) was observed. In our experimental condition a value of (60 ± 1) Gy was measured for LD50 with Dose Rate of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy/min. The method employed to show up the adaptive response phenomenon consisted in exposing the sample to low ''conditioning'' doses, which would initiate these mechanisms. Later the samples with and without conditioning were exposed to higher ''challenging'' doses (such as LD50), and the surviving fractions were compared. In order to maximize the differences, the doses and the time between irradiations were varied. The best results were obtained with both a conditioning dose of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy and a waiting time of 2 hs until the application of the challenging dose. Following this procedures the 80% of the conditioned samples has survived, after receiving the application of the LD50. The adaptive response phenomenon was also verified for a wide range of challenging doses

  14. Radiation effects on fiber-reinforced plastics

    The advances in the research on the latent deterioration caused by radiation, not leading to any change in static mechanical features for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) were reviewed aiming to assess a static mechanical characteristics of the epoxide resin, FRP. The deterioration of FRP due to radiation is known to be related to the radiation resistancy of its matrix. The bending strength of CFRP laminated with epoxide was determined as a function of radiation dose and tetraglycidyl-diaminodiphenyl methan (TGDDM) was found to be more resistant to radiation than diglycidyl ether of bisphenol (DGEBA). The bending strength was decreased by heat treatment at a higher temperature following the radiation in both CFRP. So, heat treatment was thought to be useful to detect the latent deterioration which fails to appear in any changes in static characteristics at room temperature. In addition, it is necessary to noninvasively observe the material with regard to the conditions to generate damages due to the fatigue. The results of three-point bending experiment show that when 3 different stressing; compression pressure, and shearing and stretching forces were loaded simultaneously, cracks develop easily. Further, electron radiation caused to increase water absorption of GFRP, suggesting that some damages developed on the interface of GFRP treated with silane coupling reagent might cause occurrence of crack. The latent deterioration due to radiation is detectable in part by estimation of water absorbance and heat treatment effects on FRP. (M.N.)

  15. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references

  16. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references.

  17. Radiation effects on DNA methylation in mice

    Effects of ionizing radiation on DNA methylation in liver, brain and spleen were examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total methylated cytosine level in the genome was reduced within 8 hours after 3.8 Gy of irradiation in liver of adult mice. But no appreciable effect was observed in brain and spleen. When mice were irradiated at newborn, liver DNA revealed no change in methylated cytosine level. Even though slight effects of radiation were detected in he methylation of the c-myc and c-fos genes, they were only temporary and no long-term effects were observed. These data suggest that the effect of radiation on DNA methylation in vivo is not prevailing a DNA damage, but rather influenced much through biological parameters. (author)

  18. Measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers

    We propose a new method for measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers on a nanosecond timescale. The method, which incorporates a streak camera, allows more precise time resolution than other methods and has the advantage of measuring the radiation-induced attenuation as a function of wavelength and time simultaneously. By choosing different light sources and sweep speeds, radiation-induced attenuation may be measured under a variety of experimental configurations. Examples of the type of output obtained with our method are given

  19. Effect of gamma radiation on Campylobacter jejuni

    Lambert, J.D.; Maxcy, R.B.

    Radiation resistance of Campylobacter jejuni in broth, ground beef, and ground turkey meat was determined using dose levels from 0-200 Krad at -30 +/- 10/sup 0/C, at 0-5/sup 0/C, and at 30 +/- 10/sup 0/C. Irradiation at -30/sup 0/C increased radiation resistance of cultures in ground meats; broth cultures were not greatly influenced by temperature. The effect of culture age on radiation resistance was also evaluated using cells in various physiological phases. Age did not have a pronounced effect on radiation resistance. The largest D/sub 10/ value for C. jejuni was 32 Krad, which was less than D/sub 10/ values commonly reported for salmonellae. 20 references, 4 figures.

  20. Radiation effects on the integrity of paper

    Books and documents attacked by fungi and insects have already been treated by radiation for disinfestations purposes. However, there is still need to investigate the influence of radiation on the cellulose paper structure. The aim of this research was to study the effects of radiation on paper properties, especially those related to strength and appearance. Paper sheets for this study were prepared in the laboratory, using bleached eucalyptus pulp as raw material. No additives were used to concentrate the attention only on the effects of irradiation on the pure cellulose matrix. The samples were irradiated at IPEN's 60Co Gammacell irradiator with six radiation doses, from 3 to 15 kGy at the dose rate 0.817 Gy/s. The properties of paper sheets were tested after irradiation and compared with unirradiated samples according to ISO methods. No significant changes were detected in paper samples irradiated up to 15 kGy.

  1. Additive effects of ultraviolet radiation

    A xenon-mercury high pressure lamp and a double monochromator were used to produce ultraviolet (uv) radiation at 295 nm. Pigmented rabbit eyes were irradiated and evaluated by slitlamp biomicroscopy. Corneal threshold (Hc) was 0.05 J.cm-2 and lens threshold (hL) was 0.75 J.cm-2. Other eyes were irradiated with 2 Hc and evaluated from 4 to 24 h at 4 h intervals. Corneal damage was only greater than that expected from a single Hc exposure if the separation between the two Hc exposures did not exceed 8 h. The most repeatable and reliable corneal response to these levels of uv was the development of corneal epithelial granules

  2. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis.

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma rays. There is however, another type of less well-known radiation - charged ion particles, and these atoms stripped of electrons, have different physical properties to the photons of electromagnetic radiation. They are either found in space or created on earth by particle collider facilities, and are of significant recent interest due to their enhanced effectiveness and increasing use in cancer radiotherapy, as well as a health risk to the growing number of people spending time in the space environment. Although there is to date, relatively few studies on the effects of charged particles on the vascular system, a very different picture of the biological effects of these particles compared to photons is beginning to emerge. These under researched biological effects of ion particles have a large impact on the health consequences of exposure. In this short review, we will discuss the effects of charged particles on an important biological process of the vascular system, angiogenesis, which creates and maintains the vasculature and is highly important in tumor vasculogenesis. PMID:24160185

  3. The radiation effects on the living cell

    This publication is a presentation of particular points discussed during the colloquium of the 15-18 june 1999, for which scientific researches are performed at the CEA/CNRS. They deal with the radiobiology, for the radiation effects on living matter; with the DNA, for the knowledge and repair mechanisms on cells submitted to ionizing radiations; with the exposition to UV in correlation with neoplasms; with the P53 gene which is a tumour suppressor. (A.L.B.)

  4. Evidence for beneficial low level radiation effects and radiation hormesis

    Low doses in the mGy range cause a dual effect on cellular DNA. One effect concerns a relatively low probability of DNA damage per energy deposition event and it increases proportional with dose, with possible bystander effects operating. This damage at background radiation exposure is orders of magnitudes lower than that from endogenous sources, such as ROS. The other effect at comparable doses brings an easily obeservable adaptive protection against DNA damage from any, mainly endogenous sources, depending on cell type, species, and metabolism. Protective responses express adaptive responses to metabolic perturbations and also mimic oxygen stress responses. Adaptive protection operates in terms of DNA damage prevention and repair, and of immune stimulation. It develops with a delay of hours, may last for days to months, and increasingly disappears at doses beyond about 100 to 200 mGy. Radiation-induced apoptosis and terminal cell differentiation occurs also at higher doses and adds to protection by reducing genomic instability and the number of mutated cells in tissues. At low doses, damage reduction by adaptive protection against damage from endogenous sources predictably outweighs radiogenic damage induction. The analysis of the consequences of the particular low-dose scenario shows that the linear-no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis for cancer risk is scientifically unfounded and appears to be invalid in favor of a threshold or hormesis. This is consistent with data both from animal studies and human epidemiological observations on low-dose induced cancer. The LNT hypothesis should be abandoned and be replaced by a hypothesis that is scientifically justified. The appropriate model should include terms for both linear and non-linear response probabilities. Maintaining the LNT-hypothesis as basis for radiation protection causes unressonable fear and expenses. (author)

  5. Biological effect of radiation on human

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved

  6. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  7. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  8. Medical exposure and the effects of radiation

    Radiation gives cracks to genes. The influence is divided into deterministic effect with a threshold value, and the stochastic effect (tumor and genetic effect) which increases according to the exposure amount. Although we are put to various non-artificial radiations, which we cannot be avoided, on the earth, the contamination by artificial radiation can be defended. Artificial radioactive exposure includes medical exposure and non-medical exposure for example by nuclear power plant. As to medical examinations using radiation, the inquiry about the radiation exposure is increasing after the occurrence of the first nuclear power plant disaster of Fukushima. While concern about non-medical radioactive exposure increases, the uneasiness to medical irradiation is also increasing. The dose limit by artificial radioactive exposure other than medical exposure is set up in order to prevent the influence on the health. While the dose limit of the public exposure is set to the lower value than the total dose of non-artificial exposure concerning of a safety margin for all people, the dose limit of medical exposure is not defined, since it is thought that medical irradiation has a benefit for those who receive irradiation. Making an effort to decrease the radiation dose in performing the best medical treatment is the responsibility with which we are burdened. (author)

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of pre-operative radiotherapy on breast carcinoma

    The abscopal effect is the radiation response in tissue at a distance from the irradiated site invoked by local irradiation. It is reported that the abscopal effect is observed occasionally in radiotherapy for malignant lymphoma, malignant melanoma and seminioma. However, pathophysiology and mechanism of the abscopal effect have not been well defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathophysiology and mechanism of the abscopal effect in patients with breast carcinoma. Sixty two patients entered this study. Age distribution was from 29 to 84 years old (mean 54.0 years old) and all cases were females. Their stages were as follows: stage II 12 cases, stage IIIa 16 cases and stage IV 12 cases. They were irradiated pre-operatively using less fractionated large dose irradiation. They underwent mastectomy or tumor resection. The abscopal effect on metastatic lymph nodes was observed in 15 out of 42 cases (35.7%) by palpation. The histopathological abscopal effect was noted in 22 of 42 cases (52.4%). Incidence of the abscopal effect was significantly higher in patients under 55 years old than that in patients over 56 years old (p<0.05). The abscopal effect was highly observed in patients who had the infiltrating lymphocytes around the degenerated cancer cells in the irradiated primary tumor nests (p<0.01). The subsets of the infiltrative lymphocytes were analyzed immunohistologically using monoclonal antibodies. The infiltrative lymphocytes were found to be CD8 and CD4 positive lymphocytes. Those findings suggest that the abscopal effect was caused by activated cellular immunity in hosts. Both the five- and ten-year survival rates for stage IIIa was 71.4%. Stage IIIb showed 62.5% for 5 year survival rate and 54.7% for 10 year survival rate. The survival rate was higher in patients with the abscopal effect than those without it; however, this was not statistically significant. No complications such as pneumonia was observed. (author)

  10. Effects of radiation on aquatic organisms

    With the onset of nuclear age, nuclear fuel cycle products, nuclear medicine techniques, disposal of radio active wastes on land or in water, fall out of testing nuclear weapons has contributed large amount of radio nuclides to the water bodies. Radio nuclides can imbalance aquatic ecosystem resulting in danger to natural life. The biological effects of radiation on aquatic life are mortality, pathophysiological, reproductive, developmental and genetic changes. A broad review of the results obtained about the aquatic organisms related to different phyla indicates that the lower or less developed or more primitive organisms are more resistant than the higher or more advanced, developed and complex organisms to ionizing radiation. The algae, protozoa are more resistant than the insects, crustaceans, molluscs and fishes. The changes in sensitivity between different stages of development have also been noted. A review of the results of exposing salmonoid gametes, eggs, fingerlings and adults to X-rays supports the concepts that radio sensitivity decreases with age. This paper presents a selective review on effects of radiation and radio nuclides on the aquatic life. It include uses and sources of radiation, effective quantity of radiation, lethal and sub lethal effect, effects on survival, growth, reproduction, behaviour, metabolism, carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. (author)

  11. Health effects of low level radiation

    In 1982, Prof. Thomas Don Luckey of Missouri Univ. asserted 'Radiation Hormesis' on the Journal of Health Physics and he published two books. CRIEPI initiated the research program on Radiation Hormesis following his assertion to confirm 'is it true or not?' After nearly ten year research activities on data surveys and animal tests with many Universities, we are realizing scientific truth of bio-positive effects by low level radiation exposures. The interesting bio-positive effects we found could be categorized in following five groups. 1) Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 2) Moderation of psychological stress through response of key enzymes, 3) Suppression and therapy of adult-diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, 4) Suppression of cancer through enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes, 5) Suppression of cancer and ratio-adaptive response by activation of DNA repair and apoptosis. In the responses of many specialists to our initiation of radiation hormesis research program following T.D. Luckey's claim about low level radiation, I have to pick up for the first, the great success of Prof. Sakamoto. Prof. Sakamoto had been already applying whole body low dose irradiation for ten years before our radiation hormesis research started on the therapy to suppress the cancer reappearing after treatment. He reported about his successful trial to real patients and showed an enhancement of immune system. (author)

  12. Effect of radiation processing on meat tenderisation

    Kanatt, Sweetie R.; Chawla, S. P.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The effect of radiation processing (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on the tenderness of three types of popularly consumed meat in India namely chicken, lamb and buffalo was investigated. In irradiated meat samples dose dependant reduction in water holding capacity, cooking yield and shear force was observed. Reduction in shear force upon radiation processing was more pronounced in buffalo meat. Protein and collagen solubility as well as TCA soluble protein content increased on irradiation. Radiation processing of meat samples resulted in some change in colour of meat. Results suggested that irradiation leads to dose dependant tenderization of meat. Radiation processing of meat at a dose of 2.5 kGy improved its texture and had acceptable odour.

  13. The late biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Full text: The principal objective of the symposium was to review the current status of understanding of the late biological effects of ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. A second objective was to critically evaluate information obtained from epidemiological studies of human population groups as well as from animal experimentation in order to provide a solid scientific basis upon which problems of current concern, such as radiation protection standards and risk-benefit analysis, could be deliberated. Eighty-one papers were presented in 10 sessions which covered epidemiological studies of late effects in human populations exposed to internal and/or external ionizing radiation; quantitative and qualitative data from animal experimentation of late effects; methodological problems and modern approaches; factors influencing susceptibility or expression of late radiation injury; comparative evaluation of late effects induced by radiation and other environmental pollutants, and problems of risk assessment. In addition, there were two evening sessions for free discussion of problems of interpreting animal data, and of the epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations. Reports on atomic bomb survivors showed that these epidemiological studies are providing dependable data, such as dose-related excess infant mortality. The reports also revealed the need for consensus in the method employed in the interpretation of data. That was also the case with studies on occupationally exposed populations at Hanford plant, where disparate results were presented on radiation-induced neoplasia among radiation workers. These data are, however, considered not so significant in relative terms when compared to risks involved in other industries. It was recommended that national registry systems for the dosimetry and medical records of radiation workers be established and co-ordinated internationally in order to facilitate reliable epidemiological

  14. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  15. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  16. Radiation Effect Mechanisms in Electronic Devices

    The development of the electronics industry worldwide achieved great advances from the 70s, with studies on oxidation process in field effect silicon transistors. Thus, there was a need for knowledge of the mechanisms that are present in oxides and interfaces between silicon and silicon oxides, as well as other compound semiconductors due to critical differences between the properties of silicon. Against this background, many studies have been performed to understand reliability and ionization radiation effects on electronic devices. Reliability problems and effects of ionizing radiation on electronic devices are critical, depending on the environment in which the devices are exposed. This is the case of space, avionics, particle accelerators, nuclear reactors. This research area is strategic for space and defense areas. Thus, it is of fundamental importance to conduct tests to qualify electronic devices submitted to irradiation, based on Total Ionizing Dose (Tid), Single Event Effects (SEE) and Displacement Damage (D D). This work shows tests using X-ray and ion beams to test commercial MOS(Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor). The integrated circuits, CD4007, were exposed to 60 MeV 35Cl ion beams using the Sao Paulo 8UD Pelletron Accelerator and 10 keV X-ray radiation using a Shimadzu XRD-7000. The total dose effects due to ionizing radiation in MOSFET devices can lead to trapping of charges in the oxide and at the interface Si/SiO2, which increases or decreases the transistors off-current and leakage currents, and shifts the threshold voltage. Characteristic curves of current as a function of gate voltage, in different irradiation conditions, for p and n-MOSFET transistors, which compose the commercial device, were studied. In Figure it is possible to note different behaviors of the devices as a function of radiation dose due to X-ray radiation and the incidence a 60 MeV 35Cl ion beam

  17. Radiation damage effects in zircon

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin; Salje, Ekhard

    2002-03-01

    Zircon, ZrSiO_4, is important for geology and geochronology, and has been proposed as a host material to immobilize highly radioactive materials from dismantled weapons and nuclear waste from power stations [1]. In these applications zircon is exposed to alpha-irradiation. Computer simulations have started to be employed to simulate radiation damage in zircon [2], but the origin and microscopic mechanisms of the most important structural changes in zircon - unit cell expansion and large macroscopic swelling at higher doses, strong shear deformation of the crystalline lattice, and polymerization of SiOn units [3], remain unknown. Here, we perform the molecular dynamics simulation of highly energetic recoils in zircon. Basing on the simulation results, we propose the simple picture of the density change in the damaged region that consists of the depleted and densified matter. We find that the experimentally observed structural changes originate from the interaction of the damaged region with the surrounding crystalline lattice: the shear of the lattice around the damaged region causes shear deformation and expansion of the unit cells. The polymers of connected SiOn polyhedra are most commonly present in the densified shell at the periphery of the damaged region. [1] R C Ewing et al, J. Mater. Res. 10, 243 (1995); W J Weber et al, B E Burakov et al, in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XIX, 25-32 and 33-40 (Plenum, New York, 1996); R C Ewing, et al in Crystalline Ceramics: Waste Forms for the Disposal of Weapons Plutonium, NATO Workshop Proceedings 65 (Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1996). [2] B Park et al, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 174108 (1-16) (2001); J P Crocombette and D Ghaleb, J. Nucl. Mater., 295, 167 (2001); K Trachenko et al, J. Appl. Phys., 87, 7702 (2000); K Trachenko et al, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt., 13, 1947 (2001). [3] T Murakami et al, Am. Min., 76, 1510 (1991); H D Holland and D Gottfried, Acta Cryst. 8, 291 (1955).; W J Weber, J. Am

  18. Radiation effects on custom MOS devices

    This Thesis consists of four chapters: The first is primarily for background information on the effects of radiation on MOS devices and the theory of wafer bonding; the second gives a full discussion of all practical work carried out for manufacture of Field Effect test Capacitors, the third discusses manufacture of vacuum insulator Field Effect Transistors (FET's) and the fourth discusses the testing of these devices. Using a thermally bonded field effect capacitor structure, a vacuum dielectric was studied for use in high radiation environments with a view to manufacturing a CMOS compatible, micro machined transistor. Results are given in the form of high frequency C-V curves before and after a 120 kGy(Si), 12 MRad(Si), dose from a Co60 source showing a 1 Volt shift. The work is then extended to the design and manufacture of a micro machined, under-etch technique, Field Effect Transistor for use in high radiation areas. Results are shown for Threshold, Subthreshold and Transfer characteristics before and after irradiation up to a total dose of 100kGy or 10MRad. The conclusion from this work is that it should be possible to commercially manufacture practical vacuum dielectric field effect transistors which are radiation hard to at least 120 kGy(Si). (author)

  19. Biological effect of low dose radiation

    This document describes the recent findings in studies of low dose radiation effect with those by authors' group. The low dose radiation must be considered in assessment of radiation effects because it induces the biological influence unexpected hitherto; i.e., the bystander effect and genetic instability. The former is a non-targeted effect that non-irradiated cells undergo the influence of directly irradiated cells nearby, which involves cell death, chromosome aberration, micronucleus formation, mutation and carcinogenesis through cellular gap junction and/or by signal factors released. Authors' group has found the radical(s) possessing as long life time as >20 hr released from the targeted cells, a possible mediator of the effect; the generation of aneuploid cells as an early carcinogenetic change; and at dose level <10 Gy, activation of MAPK signal pathway leading to relaxation of chromatin structure. The genetic instability means the loss of stability where replication and conservation of genome are normally maintained, and is also a cause of the late radiation effect. The group has revealed that active oxygen molecules can affect the late effect like delayed cell death, giant cell formation and chromosome aberration, all of which lead to the instability, and is investigating the hypothesis that the telomere instability resulted from the abnormal post-exposure interaction with its nuclear membrane or between chromatin and nuclear matrix, is enhanced by structural distortion of nuclear genes. As well, shown is the possible suppression of carcinogenesis by p53. The group, to elucidate the mechanism underlying the low dose radiation effect, is conducting their studies in consideration of the sequential bases of physical, chemical and biological processes. (R.T.)

  20. Genetic Effects of Pile Radiations in Rice

    In attempts to utilize radiation-induced mutations for rice breeding, it is of primary interest to obtain the fundamental data of the biological effects of pile radiations. Although considerable variation of radiosensitivity was found among rice varieties, Japanese rice was comparatively more susceptible to pile radiations than foreign varieties, and tetraploids were less susceptible as compared with the diploid varieties after irradiation. From die observation of the radiation injury of F1, hybrids it was concluded that, in addition to the contribution of a gene or a gene system, the cytoplasm was related to the intervarietal difference of radiosensitivity. Sterility was more easily induced by pile radiations than X-irradiation. In the X-ray series, chlorophyll mutations on the X1-ear basis reached a maximum frequency at middle doses and decreased at higher doses. In the pile radiation series the frequency increased with increasing doses. The cause of differences of these two series seemed to be a difference of the mean size of mutated sectors between both the radiations. The increment of induced variation on quantitative characters occurred in plus and minus direction with similar frequencies after the treatment of pile radiations. However, the heritable variations did not increase in accordance with neutron flux. The amount of induced variation was more in the progenies of partially sterile X1 ear and less in those which segregated chlorophyll mutants in X2 generation. It was calculated that 1 r of X- and gamma-rays was equivalent to 1-2 x 109 thermal neutrons per cm2 for induction of chlorophyll mutations and of variation on quantitative characters. (author)

  1. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    Rubin, P.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Siemann, D.W.; Shapiro, D.L.; Van Houtte, P.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve.

  2. Effects of gamma radiation in annatto seeds

    The annatto bixin has emerged as a major source of natural dyes used in the world notably by the substitution of synthetics harmful to human health and ecologic tendency in obtaining industrial products free of additives with applications in industries textiles; cosmetics; pharmaceutical and food mainly. The aim of this research was to obtain increased of germination rate and dormancy breaking on annatto seeds by gamma radiation. Annatto dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.456 kGy/hour dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination rate and dormancy breaking in the seeds. Five treatments with gamma radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 100; 125; 150 and 175 Gy. After irradiation the annatto seeds were planted as for usual seed production. According to the results obtained in this experiment we can conclude that the low doses of gamma radiation utilized on the annatto seeds did not presented significantly effect on the germination of plants. But the best dose to increase the germination of seeds was 150 Gy. (author)

  3. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve

  4. Effects of gamma radiation in annatto seeds

    Franco, Camilo F. de Oliveira, E-mail: camilo.urucum@hotmail.com [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA/EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Harder, Marcia N.C., E-mail: marcia.harder@fatec.sp.gov.br [Centro Paula Souza, Curso Superior de Tecnologia em Bicombustiveis (FATEC), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Filho, Jose C.; Neto, Miguel B., E-mail: jorgecazefilho@yahoo.com.br [Empresa Estadual de Pesquisa Agropecuaria da Paraiba (EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The annatto bixin has emerged as a major source of natural dyes used in the world notably by the substitution of synthetics harmful to human health and ecologic tendency in obtaining industrial products free of additives with applications in industries textiles; cosmetics; pharmaceutical and food mainly. The aim of this research was to obtain increased of germination rate and dormancy breaking on annatto seeds by gamma radiation. Annatto dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.456 kGy/hour dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination rate and dormancy breaking in the seeds. Five treatments with gamma radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 100; 125; 150 and 175 Gy. After irradiation the annatto seeds were planted as for usual seed production. According to the results obtained in this experiment we can conclude that the low doses of gamma radiation utilized on the annatto seeds did not presented significantly effect on the germination of plants. But the best dose to increase the germination of seeds was 150 Gy. (author)

  5. Effects of gamma radiation in soybean

    Franco, Jose Gilmar; Franco, Suely Salumita Haddad; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula Bergamin, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio Haddad [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (LNBio/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia, E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Soya dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.245 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. Five treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 25; 50; 75 and 100 Gy. Seed germination and harvest of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were doses of 25, 50 and 75 Gy. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  6. Effects of gamma radiation in soybean

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Soya dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.245 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. Five treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 25; 50; 75 and 100 Gy. Seed germination and harvest of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were doses of 25, 50 and 75 Gy. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  7. The effects and control of radiation

    Written for the layman, this booklet describes the effects of ionising radiation on people, and discusses the somatic hereditary risk estimates, and the measures taken to ensure the safe operation of the nuclear industry. New edition based on the sievert. (U.K.)

  8. Effect of neutron radiation on LED's

    The effect was tested of neutron radiation with a fission energy spectrum and accompanying photons from a 252Cf source, on semiconductor green LED's (Tesla LQ 470). The results are presented. The diode luminosity decreased and a change in light penetrability through the plastic cover material was observed with doses of up to 300 Gy. (author). 2 figs., 1 ref

  9. Soft photon radiation effects in monopole processes

    The infrared problem of the quantum field theory of monopoles and charges is reviewed and discussed in explicit terms. It is shown that the related radiation effects yield a superstrong damping of the cross-section in the relativistic kinematic region, which leads to a possible mechanism for partial monopole confinement. (author)

  10. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  11. Effects of Low Dose Radiation on Mammals 1

    Okumura, Yutaka; Mine, Mariko; Kishikawa, Masao

    1991-01-01

    Radiation has been applied widely to clinics, researches and industries nowadays. Irradiation by atomic bomb produced many victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Radiation effects on animals and human belings have been reported extensively, especially at a dose range of high amount of radiation. As radiation effects at low dose have not been well studied, it is believed that even a small amount of radiation produces hazardous effects. However, it might not be true. Beneficial effects of a low dos...

  12. Biological effects of synchrotron radiation on crops

    唐掌雄; 董保中; 等

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of germinating seeds of barley,winter wheat and spring one to synchrotron ultraviolet radiation is barley>winter wheat and spring one.But when dry seeds of the three crops are irradiated by 3.5-22keV X-rays,the sequence of their sensitivity to radiation can be changed.for irradiation of 0.6-3keV ultra soft X-rays,0.40-0.90 of the seedlings of the first generation appear mutation of striped chlorophyll defect.This biological effect has never been found for irradiation of other rays.

  13. Laser radiation effects on Mycoplasma agalactiae

    Dinu, Cerasela Z.; Grigoriu, Constantin; Dinescu, Maria; Pascale, Florentina; Popovici, Adrian; Gheorghescu, Lavinia; Cismileanu, Ana; Avram, Eugenia

    2002-08-01

    The biological effects of the laser radiation emitted by the Nd:YAG laser (second harmonic, wavelength 532 nm /fluence 32 mJ/cm2/pulse duration 6 ns) on the Mycoplasma agalactiae bacterium were studied. The radiation was found to intensify the multiplication of the bacteria irradiated in TRIS buffer (0.125 M), without however affecting the proteinic composition of the cell membrane. When the bacteria were irradiated in their growth medium (PPLO broth) being later cultivated on a solid medium (PPLO agar), the exclusive presence of the atypical colonies (granular and T-like ones) was noticed.

  14. Ionizing radiation effects on biological macromolecules

    Ionizing radiation is one of the main environmental factors for life, particularly for human beings. The primary effects of ionizing radiation produce the perturbation of biomacromolecules functionality (DNA and proteins). This effect occurs by direct action and by the indirect way of water molecules radiolysis. These primary effects result in a cascade of biochemical and biological consequences that may finally influence the general functions of the organism. In the last five decades the research activity in this field was focused on the detailed description of the effects on DNA molecules and their biochemical and biological consequences. The reason for this is the importance of the integrity of DNA for the cell life evolution, especially for the cell recovery processes or for the programmed cell death after irradiation. These aspects have main applications in very important fields as radioprotection and radiotherapy. In the present paper the mechanisms of ionizing radiation action at the molecular level will be reviewed, with focus on the protein level effects. Although comparatively a lower number of results was reported concerning the effects of ionizing radiation on the proteins, during the last years this field was reconsidered in the context of a new research trend in the field of genomics and proteomics. The structural changes which occur most often in the proteins are the breaks of chemical links, the chemical moieties ionization (for instance, the oxidation of the proteins) and the inter - protein new links (cross-linking). These changes result in a gradual loss of protein functionality, influencing particularly the ionic transport, the signal transduction across the membrane or intermolecular recognition processes of antibody-antigen type. Some studies on the ion artificial channels (as gramicidin and amphotericin) incorporated in model membranes (BLM-s or liposomes) describe structural and functional changes of the peptides after the exposure to

  15. Radiation effects in mammalian cells in vitro

    The purpose of this research effort is to elucidate the mechanisms for the radiation-induced changes in mammalian cells that lead to cell death, mutation, neoplastic transformation, DNA damage, and chromosomal alterations. Of particular interest are the effects of low-dose-rate and fractionated irradiation on these end points with respect to the mechanisms whereby these effects are influenced by cellular repair processes, inhibitors, and promoters that act at the genetic or biochemical level. 17 refs

  16. Radiation effects in brain and spinal cord

    Radiation sensitivity of both the brain and spinal cord in prenatal and postnatal stages, in infancy and adult age is represented also in consideration of a combined treatment with methotrexate. In adults, application of important doses of high-energy radiation increases the risk of injurious effects to the central nervous system. If the spinal cord is involved, more than 60% of the radiolesions have a progredient course ending with death. The pathogenesis and disposing factors are referred to, and the incidence of radiation necrosis with regard to age and sex, the degrees of injury and their frequence within different ranges of dosage are analyzed on the basis of data from universal literature. An examination of 'tolerance doses' for the spinal cord is made by means of Strandquist-diagrams and of the Ellis-formula. The slopes of regression lines are reported for various 'degrees of response' in skin, brain and spinal cord following radiation therapy. In the Strandquist-diagram, slopes of regression lines are dependent on the 'degree of response', flattening if skin and spinal cord are affected by radiation in the same degree, necroses having the same slope for both the organs. (orig./MG)

  17. Radiation effects and crystallinity in polyethylene

    Keller, A.; Ungar, G.

    A survey is presented of a series of works on the influence of crystallinity on the radiation induced effects, cross-linking in particular, in polyethylene and paraffins. The principal theme is that the usual conception of random introduction of cross-links into a random assembly of chains needs to be modified in the presence of crystallinity in general and chain folding in particular. A long series of varied investigations on polyethylene have indeed demonstrated through a series of conspicuous effects that not only the ordering intrinsic to crystals and the increased intrachain contacts due to chain folding, but the higher level morphology, the nature and mutual arrangement in particular, have a major influence on the effectivity of the radiation leading to networks. Extension of the works to paraffins identified unsuspected mobility of both the radiation precursor species and the paraffin molecule itself (cross-linked and uncross-linked) within the crystal lattice, leading to phase segregation of the cross-linked species into microscopically identifiable domains together with identifying a trend for the cross-links themselves to form non-randomly in groups. The latter phenomenon, observed also in the molten state, indicates that the departure from randomness in the cross-linking process is much more deep-rooted than originally anticipated, and calls for a general reassessment of our knowledge of cross-linking. Other topics included as part of the general enquiry are the destruction of crystallinity, the promotion of hexagonal phase through radiation, the effect of morphology on chain scission and the general, still unsolved issue of how to assess cross-links by a direct analytical method (involving NMR). The hope is expressed that the bringing together of these varied pieces of work will serve the unification of presently widely diverse areas of experience and might influence developments in the radiation studies of paraffinoid substances.

  18. Working group written presentation: Trapped radiation effects

    Vampola, Alfred L.; Stuckey, Wayne K.; Coulter, D.; Friebele, E. J.; Hand, K. J.; Hardy, D. A.; Higby, P.; Kolasinski, W. A.; Santoro, R. T.; Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the Trapped Radiation Effects Panel for the Space Environmental Effects on Materials Workshop are presented. The needs of the space community for new data regarding effects of the space environment on materials, including electronics are listed. A series of questions asked of each of the panels at the workshop are addressed. Areas of research which should be pursued to satisfy the requirements for better knowledge of the environment and better understanding of the effects of the energetic charged particle environment on new materials and advanced electronics technology are suggested.

  19. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  20. Radiation effect on PVC/ENR blends

    The effect of irradiation on the physical properties of Polyvinyl Chloride / Epoxidised Natural Rubber Blends (PVC/ENR blends) were investigated. The enhancement in tensile strength, elongation at break, hardness and aging properties of the blends have confirmed the positive effect of irradiation on the blends. It is evident from gel fraction and infra red spectroscopic studies that the blends of PVC and ENR cross-linked upon irradiation. The results also revealed that at any blend composition, the enhancement in properties depend on irradiation dose which controls the degree of radiation induced cross-linking. In an attempt to maximize the constructive effect of irradiation, the influence of various additives such as stabilizers, radiation sensitizers, fillers and processing aids on the blend properties were studied. The changes in blend properties upon irradiation with the presents of above additives were also presented in this paper

  1. Risk from deterministic effects of ionising radiation

    This publication provides a review of information for assessing deterministic effects on human health likely to arise from serious overexposure to ionising radiation. It updates information in previous Board publications NRPB-R226 and NRPB-M246. It constitutes a parallel document to Documents of the NRPB, 4, No. 4 (1993), which deals with stochastic effects. These two documents, together with Documents of the NRPB, 6, No. 1 (1995), which deals specifically with stochastic risk at low dose rates, give the current Board view on all health consequences of exposure to ionising radiation. Little new primary information on deterministic effects has become available in recent years. However, advances in techniques for data analysis have been made and are incorporated in the present report. These are presented in a form suitable for use in modelling the consequences to populations of serious radiological incidents. (author)

  2. Combined effects, ionizing radiation plus other agents

    It is clear from cell studies, and confirmed in a general way by animal sudies, that radiation produces effects that are interactive with those due to other physical agents, chemicals of various types, and viruses. Our understanding is limited, however, in respect to the mechanisms of action in cells and, accordingly, even less penetrating in respect to our comprehension of effects in animals. Thus, the conclusion follows at this time, that we are unable to predict responses in humans due to combined action because of our incomplete understanding of individual and combined responses of radiation and other agents in experimental systems. The study of possible public health hazards due to the combined effects of radiation plus other agents is one that should be coverged upon simultaneously by the laboratory investigator and the epidemiologist-public health specialist. What is clear is the likelihood that agents biologically active in their own right may interact. Indeed, an important and significant guiding principle can be extracted from current knowledge. Relative to induced cellular changes, agents that register lesions in the genetic substance of a cell are likely to produce interactive effects. Such effects may become expressed in individual cells, in tissues, or in whole organisms

  3. Microwave radiation - Biological effects and exposure standards

    Lindsay, I.R.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal and nonthermal effects of exposure to microwave radiation are discussed and current standards for microwave exposure are examined in light of the proposed use of microwave power transmission from solar power satellites. Effects considered include cataractogenesis at levels above 100 mW/sq cm, and possible reversible disturbances such as headaches, sleeplessness, irritability, fatigue, memory loss, cardiovascular changes and circadian rhythm disturbances at levels less than 10 mW/sq cm. It is pointed out that while the United States and western Europe have adopted exposure standards of 10 mW/sq cm, those adopted in other countries are up to three orders of magnitude more restrictive, as they are based on different principles applied in determining safe limits. Various aspects of the biological effects of microwave transmissions from space are considered in the areas of the protection of personnel working in the vicinity of the rectenna, interactions of the transmitted radiation with cardiac pacemakers, and effects on birds. It is concluded that thresholds for biological effects from short-term microwave radiation are well above the maximal power density of 1 mW/sq cm projected at or beyond the area of exclusion of a rectenna.

  4. Literature survey: health effects of radiation

    This report was originally written as a chapter of a report entitled 'Air pollution effects of electric power generation, a literature survey', written jointly by the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) and the Institutt for Atomenergi (IFA). (INIS RN242406). A survey is presented of the health effects of radiation. It has not, however, been the intention of the authors to make a complete list of all the literature relevant to this subject. The NILU/IFA report was meant as a first step towards a method of comparing the health effects of electric power generation by fission, gas and oil. Consequently information relevant to quantification of the health effects on humans has been selected. It is pointed out that quantitative information on the health effects of low radiation and dose rates, as are relevant to routine releases, does not exist for humans. The convention of linear extrapolation from higher doses and dose rates is used worldwide, but it is felt by most that the estimates are conservative. As an example of the use of the current best estimates, a calculation of normal release radiation doses is performed. (Auth.)

  5. Exploring gamma radiation effect on exoelectron emission properties of bone

    Zakaria, M.; Dekhtyar, Y.; Bogucharska, T.; Noskov, V. [Riga Technical Univ., Biomedical Engineering and Nanotechnology Institute (Latvia)

    2006-07-01

    Gamma radiation is used for radiation therapy to treat carcinogenic diseases including bone cancer. Ionising radiation kills carcinogenic calls. However, there are side effects of the gamma radiation on the bone surface electron structure. One of the effects is in the form of altering electron density of states of bone that, with time, influences biomedical reactions on bone life condition. (authors)

  6. Review of the radiation effects research foundation

    Full text: The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), funded jointly by the Japanese and US governments, was formed in 1972 as the successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualties Commission, which had been established in 1947 to study the effects of the two bombs on the surviving populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF has a major research center in Hiroshima and a smaller branch in Nagasaki. Its total staff is about 330 and its total budget 4.2 billion yen (∼ A$ 50 million). Recently the two governments appointed an international Blue Ribbon Panel to conduct a thorough review of RERF activities and to make recommendations regarding its future research. I was invited to be a member of this Panel which reported to the two governments in July 1996. RERF has a worldwide reputation for its research, most notably for its comprehensive epidemiological and clinical studies of a large well defined population subjected to an instantaneous and wide range of radiation exposures. Its estimates of radiation risk coefficients underpin the radiation protection recommendations of ICRP and, in consequence, those applying in Australia. The research activities of RERF and its likely future directions are briefly described

  7. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of δ- and β- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both θ- and α-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author)

  8. Effects of radiation damage on SYNROC

    Concern has been expressed in several quarters that the integrity of SYNROC as a waste form might be compromised by the effects of alpha radiation damage on its constituent minerals. The evidence discussed herein addresses that concern. Radiation damage to crystal lattices is caused dominantly by alpha emitters (actinide elements) present in zirconolite and perovskite phases. We have seen that the zirconolite phase in SYNROC containing 10% of HLW would require about 106 years before becoming completely metamict, i.e., losing the capacity to diffract X-rays. By this time, the alpha activity in SYNROC would have declined to a value smaller than that present in a natural uranium ore body. This level of activity can be considered effectively safe for a waste form buried in a suitable geologic repository. Moreover, even when metamict, the zirconolite continues to demonstrate a remarkable capacity to immobilize U, Th and their decay daughter products. The isotopic measurements on Sri Lanka and Jimberlana zirconolites demonstrated that these metamict minerals had behaved as closed systems for U, Th and Pb for periods of 560 and 2500 million years, respectively, despite intense radiation damage (SYNROC equivalent ages, about or greater than 109 years). Moreover, the Sri Lanka zirconolite was sufficiently tight to immobilize a considerable proportion of radiogenic helium, one of the most mobile of elements, for 560 million years. Our data on perovskite are limited and more work remains to be done. Nevertheless, present results indicate that perovskites are even more resistant to radiation damage than zirconolite

  9. Radiation doses and possible radiation effects of low-level, chronic radiation in vegetation

    Measurements were made of radiation doses in soil and vegetation in Pu-contaminated areas at the Nevada Test Site with the objective of investigating low-level, low-energy gamma radiation (with some beta radiation) effects at the cytological or morphological level in native shrubs. In this preliminary investigation, the exposure doses to shrubs at the approximate height of stem apical meristems were estimated from 35 to 140 R for a ten-year period. The gamma exposure dose estimated for the same period was 20.7 percent +- 6.4 percent of that recorded by the dosimeters used in several kinds of field instrument surveys. Hence, a survey instrument reading made at about 25 cm in the tops of shrubs should indicate about 1/5 the dosimeter-measured exposures. No cytology has yet been undertaken because of the drought since last winter. (auth)

  10. Anomalous radiation effects on oxide material surface

    Various different kind of radiation influence on surface properties, in particular, adsorptive, was revealed and at some cases the general observation regularity of the radiation adsorption is upset. So, the hydrogen photo-adsorption is not observed on silicon dioxide and on some other oxides. At the same time hydrogen adsorption takes place at the same oxides irradiation by more power nuclear particles, such as gamma-rays, protons of high energies, alpha-particles, neutrons, high-velocity electrons, and also at a X-ray irradiation. At the same time oxygen adsorption takes place on the majority of the studied oxides. So it is possible to conclude that at the irradiated adsorbents the formation of electronic centers is general regularity. The radiation adsorption of oxygen is well studied on many systems and its regularities are established on numerous experiments. On an example of such oxide systems, as silicon dioxide, oxides of rare-earth elements, beryllium oxide, aluminum oxide, the zeolites we have studied a general regularity of the oxygen and hydrogen radiation adsorption, i.e. their electron-hole properties at irradiation by protons with energy 30 MeV, alpha-particles and ions of helium-3 with energy 40 and 50 MeV, gamma-rays and ultra-violet-radiation, and also neutrons from the nuclear reactor. Parallel with adsorptive properties of oxides their paramagnetic properties and thermal desorption characteristics in a wide range of temperatures were studied. The received data have allowed to find the dependence of paramagnetic centers from adsorptive centers. It was established that the adsorptive centers do not always coincide with paramagnetic ones and vise versa. It was established that the anomalous effects in a radiation adsorption at irradiation of the oxide rare-earth elements on of scandium, lanthanum, erbium and dysprosium oxides are observed. It was found out that radiation adsorption of hydrogen is absent on oxides of a lanthanum, erbium and

  11. Helical Cerenkov effect, a novel radiation source

    The observability of the helical Cerenkov effect as a novel radiation source is discussed. Depending on the value of the index of refraction of the medium, the strength of the uniform magnetic field, and the electron beam energy, helical Cerenkov radiation can occur in the same spectral regions as the ordinary Cerenkov effect, that is, from microwave to visible wavelengths. From the kinematics point of view, the author argues that for a microwave wavelength of 10-1 cm this effect should be observable in a medium with an index of refraction of 1.4, with a beam energy of 3 MeV, and a uniform magnetic field of 4 T. On the specific level, however, for the sake of simplicity, he discusses the observability of this effect for visible light with the central wavelength of 5 x 10-5 cm which can be achieved with 2 MeV in beam energy, silica aerogel as a medium (with an index of refraction of 1.075), and uniform magnetic fields from 5 to 10 T. For a 10-T magnetic field, he calculates that in the visible region of 250 to 750 nm an electron will produce a photon per 10 cm of traveled length. As to the stimulated helical Cerenkov emission, the author estimates that respectable gains are possible even if the beam passes close to the dielectric rather than through it. In addition to being potentially a new radiation source, the helical Cerenkov effect could possibly be used as a detector of radiation by energetic electrons that are trapped in a medium by strong magnetic fields

  12. Radiation effects in IRAS extrinsic infrared detectors

    Varnell, L.; Langford, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    During the calibration and testing of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) focal plane, it was observed that the extrinsic photoconductor detectors were affected by gamma radiation at dose levels of the order of one rad. Since the flight environment will subject the focal plane to dose levels of this order from protons in single pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly, an extensive program of radiation tests was carried out to measure the radiation effects and to devise a method to counteract these effects. The effects observed after irradiation are increased responsivity, noise, and rate of spiking of the detectors after gamma-ray doses of less than 0.1 rad. The detectors can be returned almost to pre-irradiation performance by increasing the detector bias to breakdown and allowing a large current to flow for several minutes. No adverse effects on the detectors have been observed from this bias boost, and this technique will be used for IRAS with frequent calibration to ensure the accuracy of observations made with the instrument.

  13. Microwave radiation: biological effects and exposure standards

    Lindsay, I.R.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal effects of microwave radiation are well recognized and are discussed with particular reference to cataractogenesis; the possibility of an association cannot be questioned. Postulated nonthermal effects comprise an asthenic syndrome, and for the most part the disturbances lie within clinical norms and tolerances, and are reversible. World opinion on safe exposure levels for microwave radiation is varied, and this had led to national standards disparate by three to four orders of magnitude. The US and UK exposure standard of 10 mW/cm/sup 2/ was determined over two decades ago; the possibility of a change to a more restrictive level, in line with other countries, in the near future is examined. It is concluded that such a change, without scientific rationale, is not justified. Some biological implications of the microwave radiation from the solar power satellite are considered in terms of precautions to be taken by personnel working in the vicinity of the rectenna, effects on cardiac pacemakers, and any potential effects on birds. 14 references.

  14. Thermal radiation effects on hydromagnetic flow

    Numerical results are presented for the effects of thermal radiation, buoyancy and heat generation or absorption on hydromagnetic flow over an accelerating permeable surface. These results are obtained by solving the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy by a perturbation technique. This qualitatively agrees with the expectations, since the magnetic field exerts a retarding force on the free convection flow. A parametric study is performed to illustrate the influence of the radiation parameter, magnetic parameter, Prandtl number, Grashof number and Schmidt number on the profiles of the velocity components and temperature. The effects of the different parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction and wall heat transfer are presented graphically. Favorable comparisons with previously published work confirm the correctness of numerical results

  15. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space

  16. Effect of laser radiation on rat radiosensitivity

    Laprun, I.B.

    1979-03-01

    Quite a few experimental data have been obtained to date indicating that radioresistance of the organism is enhanced under the influence of electromagnetic emissions in the radiofrequency and optical ranges. But no studies were made of the possible radioprotective properties of coherent laser radiation. At the same time, it was demonstrated that the low-energy emission of optical quantum generators (lasers) in the red band stimulates the protective forces of the organism and accelerates regenerative processes; i.e., it induces effects that are the opposite of that of ionizing radiation. Moreover, it was recently demonstrated that there is activation of catalase, a radiosensitive enzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of peroxide compounds, under the influence of lasers. For this reason, the effect of pre-exposure to laser beams on radiosensitivity of rats was tested.

  17. Ionizing radiation: effects of low doses

    This article deals with the important and delicate subject posed by the study of the action on Man's health of low doses of ionizing radiation. A number of fundamental notions whose knowledge is indispensable in order to avoid doubtful meanings or misunderstandings are noted in this article. Following the reminder of these notions, the characteristics of the various types of pathological effects of radiation are indicated, as well as how it is possible for effects which are named ''aleatory'' to be evaluated with care so as to limit risks at low doses. The reader will easily understand that this article has to be somewhat didactic - it seemed best to proceed by well defined stages and to clearly specify numerous concepts whose meanings are not always clearly defined when such problems are treated

  18. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-05-17

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space.

  19. Transistor Small Signal Analysis under Radiation Effects

    A Small signal transistor parameters dedicate the operation of bipolar transistor before and after exposed to gamma radiation (1 Mrad up to 5 Mrads) and electron beam(1 MeV, 25 mA) with the same doses as a radiation sources, the electrical parameters of the device are changed. The circuit Model has been discussed.Parameters, such as internal emitter resistance (re), internal base resistance, internal collector resistance (re), emitter base photocurrent (Ippe) and base collector photocurrent (Ippe). These parameters affect on the operation of the device in its applications, which work as an effective element, such as current gain (hFE≡β)degradation it's and effective parameter in the device operation. Also the leakage currents (IcBO) and (IEBO) are most important parameters, Which increased with radiation doses. Theoretical representation of the change in the equivalent circuit for NPN and PNP bipolar transistor were discussed, the input and output parameters of the two types were discussed due to the change in small signal input resistance of the two types. The emitter resistance(re) were changed by the effect of gamma and electron beam irradiation, which makes a change in the role of matching impedances between transistor stages. Also the transistor stability factors S(Ico), S(VBE) and S(β are detected to indicate the transistor operations after exposed to radiation fields. In low doses the gain stability is modified due to recombination of induced charge generated during device fabrication. Also the load resistance values are connected to compensate the effect

  20. Radiation effects on algae and its application

    The effects of radiation on algae have been summarized in this article. Today, algae are being considered to have the great potential to fulfill the demand of food, fodder, fuel and various pharmaceutical products. Red algae are particularly rich in the content of polysaccharides present in their cell wall. For isolation of these polysaccharides, separation of cells cemented together by middle lamella is essential. The gamma rays are known to bring about biochemical changes in the cell wall and cause the breakdown of the middle lamella. These rays ate also known to speed up the starch sugar inter-conversion in the cells which is very useful for the tapping the potential of algae to be used as biofuel as well as in pharmaceutical industries. Cyanobacteria, among algae and other plants are more resistant to the radiation. In some cyanobacteria the radiation treatment is known to enhance the resistance against the antibiotics. Radiation treatment is also known to enhance the diameter of cell and size of the nitrogen fixing heterocyst. (author)

  1. Effect of γ-radiation on the saccharification of cellulose

    The effect of gamma radiation on the acid and saccharification of agricultural cellulosic wastes was investigated. Radiation doses of 200 KGy and higher significantly increased the saccharification of rice straw, rice hull and corn husk. The observed radiation effects varied with the cellulosic material. Rice straw exhibited the greatest radiosensitivity while rice hull showed the least susceptibility to gamma radiation. Possible mechanisms for the radiation-induced degradation of cellulose and agricultural cellulosic wastes are discussed. (author)

  2. 47 CFR 22.867 - Effective radiated power limits.

    2010-10-01

    ... Effective radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of ground and airborne stations... peak ERP of airborne mobile station transmitters must not exceed 12 Watts. (b) The peak ERP of...

  3. On unintended effects of radiation protection rules

    Absorbed dose equivalents from low-level ionising radiations and some of their effects are discussed. Possible reasons for the absence of deleterious effects from low-level radiation are mentioned. Numerous comparisons made over recent decades have failed to show that large population groups whose members absorbed dose equivalents several times greater than the average natural background have been proportionately more subject to radiation-induced cancers than population groups whose members absorbed no more that the average natural background (about 2 mSv per year). This is at variance with emphatic assertions that even the lowest absorbed dose equivalents are potentially carcinogenic. The pessimistic prediction appears to have the backing of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), expressed as the linear hypothesis. In fact, everyone with experience in the field knows that the linear hypothesis is simply nothing more than an hypothesis. The ICRP adopted it as an essential step in setting acceptably safe limits to allowed dose equivalents. Since this could not have been done without the linear hypothesis, the latter is an extremely useful device but not a scientifically established fact. Anti-nuclear activists have consistently misused the hypothesis, claiming it to represent facts. They have been highly successful in employing these alleged facts as powerful weapons to obtain public support for their policy of banning all nuclear applications no matter what their purpose. The nervousness engendered by conflicting claims over carcinogenic effects of even the lowest levels of ionising radiation has gravely weakened education in the experimental nuclear sciences, notably in secondary school but also at the tertiary level

  4. UV radiation and its effects. Proceedings

    The National Science Strategy Committee for Climate Change was established in 1991 by the New Zealand Minister of Research, Science and Technology. It advises government through the Minister on research priorities and on levels of expenditure appropriate in various topics relating to climate change. An additional role is to promote coordination between research groups and the user communities to ensure an appropriate range of research strategies. To assist with implementing the latter aspects the NSS Committee will organise workshops on specific aspects of atmosphere and climate change, with a broad spectrum of participants. The first of these was the Workshop on UV Radiation and its Effects held in Christchurch on 20-21 May 1993. The workshop had 40 participants, including representatives from specialist science groups, medicine, veterinary science, farming, forestry and environmental groups. This publication will update the interested reader, whether scientist or lay-person, on the current state of knowledge on changing UV radiation levels and potential problems. As the summaries of papers show, research on ozone levels and on UV radiation and its effects is particularly appropriate for New Zealand scientists with their access to sites covering a wide range of latitudes from Antarctica to the Pacific Islands. New Zealand is part of an important international monitoring network, measuring local stratospheric ozone levels and related surface UV radiation levels. There are concerns about increasing UVB levels and the consequent effects on human health, plant and tree growth, and phytoplankton growth in the oceans. Priorities for further work on these areas are included in the summary of the workshop. (author). 13 figs.; 5 tabs

  5. The impact of the new biology on radiation risks in space

    Dicello, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation is considered to be one of three or four major hazards for personnel in space and has emerged as the most critical issue to be resolved for long-term missions, both orbital and interplanetary. Space habitats are stressful and dangerous environments. Health and medical consequences arising from microgravity, stress, and trauma include weakened immune systems, increased viral activity, and loss of bone mass. The greatest risks from radiation are generally assumed to be cancers and possibly damage to the central nervous system. Synergistic effects arising from the other environmental hazards along with abscopal and exogenic factors are likely. Space programs represent an exceptional opportunity for examining the biological consequences of low-dose exposures of humans to radiation at every level of progression. Although astronauts are a relatively small population, they are healthy, physically active volunteers who undergo extensive testing and medical examinations before, during, and after protracted exposures with periodic follow-up examinations. The radiation environments along with other hazards are likewise monitored and documented. Extensive international research programs are in progress. Seven years ago the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration established the National Space Biomedical Research Institute through a cooperative agreement with a consortium of research and academic institutions in order to address radiation issues through a concerted, programmatic effort. Advanced technologies are rapidly being incorporated into these programs to determine the significance of new biological data and to evaluate the interplay among the different medical hazards. Programmatic in vivo and in vitro studies of the processes leading to carcinogenesis are in progress. Drugs and dietary supplements are being examined at the cellular and in vivo levels to assess their potential as dose-modifying agents. The infrastructure of this new approach, recent

  6. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  7. Gamma radiation effects on nestling Tree Swallows

    The sensitivity of Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) to the stress of ionizing radiation was investigated with growth analysis. Freshly hatched nestlings were temporarily removed from nests, taken to the laboratory and acutely exposed to 0.9, 2.7, or 4.5 Gy gamma radiation. Some of the unirradiated control nestlings were also taken to the laboratory whereas others were left in the nests. Growth of all the nestlings was measured daily and analyzed by fitting growth models. There was no detectable radiation-induced mortality up to fledgling, approx. = 20 d after irradiation. Radiation exposure did not affect the basic growth pattern; the logistic growth model was most suitable for body mass and foot length, and the von Bertalanffy model for primary-feather length, irrespective of treatment. Parameter values from these models indicated pronounced growth depression in the 2.7-Gy and 4.5-Gy groups, particularly for body mass. Radiation also affected the timing of development. The growth depression of the 2.7-Gy group was similar to that caused by hatching asynchrony in unirradiated nestlings. The 4.5-Cy nestlings grew as well as unexposed nestlings that died from natural causes. Chronic irradiation at approx. = 1.0 Cy/d caused more severe growth effects than acute exposure to 4.5 Gy and may have caused permanent stunting. Growth analysis is a potent tool for assessing man-made environmental stresses. Observed body-mass statistics and model parameters seem to be most sensitive to environmental stresses, but coefficients of variation are not necessarily correlated with sensitivity. 34 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  8. Radiation and transmutation effects relevant to solid nuclear waste forms

    Radiation effects in insulating solids are discussed in a general way as an introduction to the quite sparse published work on radiation effects in candidate nuclear waste forms other than glasses. Likely effects of transmutation in crystals and the chemical mitigation strategy are discussed. It seems probable that radiation effects in solidified HLW will not be serious if the actinides can be wholly incorporated in such radiation-resistant phases as monazite or uraninite

  9. Effects of gluon radiation in hadronic collisions

    In this talk I discuss effects of gluon emission in soft collisions, the so-called 'soft radiation' in the Fritjof model. It is seen e.g. that the pT in the fragmentation regions, the seagull effect, increases with energy in fair agreement with experiments. I also discuss the content of strange and heavier quarks in high-pT gluon jets. Within the dipole scheme for QCD cascades on finds a larger production of heavier quarks than in previous approaches. Qualitative agreement with data is obtained for the K/π ratio and D meson production

  10. Effect of Gamma radiation on mycotoxins solutions

    Calado, Thalita; António, Amilcar L.; Rodrigues, Paula; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Abrunhosa, Luís; Venâncio, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high toxicity of mycotoxins, many methods have been used to reduce or eliminate them from food and feed. Gamma radiation is one technique that has been investigated with some promising results in degradation of some mycotoxins from food. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of gamma irradiation on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2), ochatoxin A (OTA) and zearelone (ZEA). The effect of the presence of moisture during the i...

  11. Effect of gamma radiation on mycotoxins solutions

    Calado, Thalita; Antonio, Amilcar L.; Rodrigues, Paula; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Venâncio, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high toxicity of mycotoxins, many methods have been used to reduce or eliminate them from food and feed. Gamma radiation is one technique that has been investigated with some promising results in degradation of some mycotoxins from food. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of gamma irradiation on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2), ochatoxin A (OTA) and zearelone (ZEA). The effect of the presence of moisture during the i...

  12. Effective radiation exposure in digital volume tomography

    Measurements of the effective doses and the organ doses using head phantoms are supposed to study the effects of different resolutions, volumes and field of view positions on the patient's radiation exposure during digital volume tomography. The details of the measuring instruments and the different volume tomography devices from KaVo are described. All the resulting dose values are related to the specific phantom and were calculated using the average values from ICRP, i.e. these values can be used as reference but cannot be transferred to patients. Therefore significant differences can be seen in comparison with other studies.

  13. Nonlocal Effects in Black Body Radiation

    Bremm, G N

    2016-01-01

    Nonlocal electrodynamics is a formalism developed to include nonlocal effects in the measurement process caused by the non-inertial state of the observers. This theory modifies Maxwell's electrodynamics by eliminating the hypothesis of locality that assumes an accelerated observer simultaneously equivalent to a comoving inertial frame of reference. In this scenario, the transformation between an inertial and accelerated observer is generalized which affects the properties of physical fields. In particular, we analyze how an uniformly accelerated observer perceives a homogeneous and isotropic blackbody radiation. We show that all nonlocal effects are transient and most relevant in the first period of acceleration.

  14. Effective spectrum width of the synchrotron radiation

    Bagrov, V. G., E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.ru [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gitman, D. M., E-mail: gitman@if.usp.br [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); P.N.Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Levin, A. D., E-mail: alevin@if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Loginov, A. S.; Saprykin, A. D. [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-25

    For an exact quantitative description of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation (SR), the concept of effective width of the spectrum is introduced. In the most interesting case, which corresponds to the ultrarelativistic limit of SR, the effective width of the spectrum is calculated for the polarization components, and new physically important quantitative information on the structure of spectral distributions is obtained. For the first time, the spectral distribution for the circular polarization component of the SR for the upper half-space is obtained within classical theory.

  15. Annual report of Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation was established in April, 1975, as a private nonprofit Japanese Foundation supported equally by the Government of Japan through the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the Government of the United States through the National Academy of Sciences under contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. First, the messages from the chairman and the vice-chairman are described. In the annual report, the review of ABCC-RERF studies of atomic bomb survivors, the summary of research activities, the research projects, the technical report abstracts, the research papers published in Japanese and foreign journals, and the oral presentation and lectures, all from April 1, 1978, to March 31, 1979, are reported. Also the report from the Secretariat and the appendixes are given. The surveys and researches carried out in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have offered very valuable informations to the atomic bomb survivors. Many fears were eliminated, medical interests were given to the serious effects of the exposure to atomic bombs, and many things concerning the cancer induced by radiation were elucidated. The knowledges obtained will save many human lives in future by utilizing them for setting up the health and safety standard in the case of handling ionizing radiation. The progress in researches such as life span study, adult health study, pathology study, genetics program, special cancer program and so on is reported. (Kako, I.)

  16. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    Ben-Zvi I.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

  17. Reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors

    Johnston, Allan

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors, which have evolved rapidly during the last 15 years. Johnston's perspective in the book focuses on high-reliability applications in space, but his discussion of reliability is applicable to high reliability terrestrial applications as well. The book is important because there are new reliability mechanisms present in compound semiconductors that have produced a great deal of confusion. They are complex, and appear to be major stumbling blocks in the application of these types of devices. Many of the reliability problems that were prominent research topics five to ten years ago have been solved, and the reliability of many of these devices has been improved to the level where they can be used for ten years or more with low failure rates. There is also considerable confusion about the way that space radiation affects compound semiconductors. Some optoelectronic devices are so sensitive to damage in space that they are very difficu...

  18. Radiation effects on active pixel sensors (APS)

    Active pixel sensor (APS) is a new generation of image sensors which presents several advantages relatively to charge coupled devices (CCDs) particularly for space applications (APS requires only 1 voltage to operate which reduces considerably current consumption). Irradiation was performed using 60Co gamma radiation at room temperature and at a dose rate of 150 Gy(Si)/h. 2 types of APS have been tested: photodiode-APS and photoMOS-APS. The results show that photoMOS-APS is more sensitive to radiation effects than photodiode-APS. Important parameters of image sensors like dark currents increase sharply with dose levels. Nevertheless photodiode-APS sensitivity is one hundred time lower than photoMOS-APS sensitivity

  19. Effect of radiation on hydrotalcites with chromates

    Nowadays the generation of radioactive wastes is matter of several studies. In this work anion material, chromates, in hydrotalcite are retained which are anion exchangers. It was proposed to heat the hydrotalcite until temperature of 1200 C with the purpose to form the (MgAl2O4) spinel is very stable and in this way to immobilize strongly the anions. The effect of radiation on this compound and in particular the chromium lixiviation with solution 1N NaCl. It was found that in all case, the anions are strongly retained in the spinel formed. The radiation dose used for this was 100 Mrad, the samples were treated with NaCl 1N for studying the Cr lixiviation. The results show that for the calcined samples at 1200 C and irradiated there are not chromium escapes, which indicates that it is strongly retained in the spinel that is the formed structure after of the material calcination. (Author)

  20. Ionizing radiation response effects on optical fibers in radiation therapy dosimetry applications

    Radiation effects on optical fibers result in two different effects: accumulated radiation damage resulting in a substantial loss of transmission and transient radiation response in which light is generated in the fiber material itself during exposure to radiation. In various medical applications, optical fibers are often exposed to radiation during certain clinical procedures which makes their radiation response and effect of concern to the medical community. Thus, this effect needs to be studied and quantified in that king of environment. This study involves radiation-resistant fibers and the quantification of their light emission response as a function of dose rate and irradiation field size for photon and electron beams at the various energies used in radiation therapy

  1. Radiation in the human environment: health effects, safety and acceptability

    This paper reports selectively on three other aspects of radiation (used throughout to mean ionizing radiation) in the human environment: the human health effects of radiation, radiation safety policy and practices, and the acceptability of scientifically justified practices involving radiation exposures. Our argument is that the science of radiation biology, the judgemental techniques of radiation safety, and the social domain of radiation acceptability express different types of expertise that should complement - and not conflict with or substitute for - one another. Unfortunately, communication problems have arisen among these three communities and even between the various disciplines represented within a community. These problems have contributed greatly to the misperceptions many people have about radiation and which are frustrating a constructive dialogue on how radiation can be harnessed to benefit mankind. Our analysis seeks to assist those looking for a strategic perspective from which to reflect on their interaction with practices involving radiation exposures. (author)

  2. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    Adriano Costa de Camargo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ. Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h, measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  3. Basic radiation effects in nuclear power electronics technology

    An overview is presented of the effects of radiation in microelectronics technology. The approach taken throughout these notes is to review microscopic phenomena associated with radiation effects and to show how these lead to macroscopic effects in semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. Bipolar integrated circuits technology is reviewed in Appendix A. Appendix B gives present and future applications of radiation-tolerant microelectronics in nuclear power applications as well as the radiation tolerance requirements of these applications

  4. Radiation effects on livestock: physiological effects, dose response

    Farm livestock show no measurable effects from being exposed to ionizing radiation unless the level is greatly in excess of the natural background radiation. Possible sources of ionizing radiation which might affect livestock or contribute to radioactivity in the food chain to humans are reactor accidents, fuel reprocessing plant accidents and thermonuclear explosions. Most data on ionizing radiation effects on livestock are from whole body gamma doses near the LD 50/60 level. However, grazing livestock would be subjected to added beta exposure from ingested and skin retained radioactive particles. Results of attempts to simulate exposure of the Hereford cattle at Alamogardo, NM show that cattle are more sensitive to ingested fallout radiation than other species. Poultry LD 50/60 for gamma exposure is about twice the level for mammals, and swine appear to have the most efficient repair system being able to withstand the most chronic gamma exposure. Productivity of most livestock surviving an LD 50/60 exposure is temporarily reduced and longterm effects are small. Livestock are good screeners against undesirables in our diet and with the exception of radiosotopes of iodine in milk, very little fission product radioactivity would be expected to be transferred through the food chain in livestock products for humans. Feeding of stored feed or moving livestock to uncontaminated pastures would be the best protective action to follow. 29 references

  5. The FASSET radiation effects database: A demonstration

    FASSET (Framework for ASSessment of Environmental impacT) is an EC funded project, within the 5th framework programme (Euratom) in the field of nuclear energy. Its main objective is to create a framework for assessing the impact of radioactive contamination on non-human biota. Effects analysis forms an integral part of the framework, taking account of available data on the biological effects of radiation. For the purpose of FASSET, dose rates need to be estimated, and dose (rate) - effect relationships need to be identified: both will form an important input into the overall framework. This will provide the basis for determining dose rates at which different degrees of effects in the environment may be expected. In order to start identifying relevant biological effects for different organisms and different environments, a Microsoft Access database is being assembled in which data from the literature for a number of wildlife groups (e.g. birds, plants, fish) are being compiled. This information is grouped under four umbrella effects (morbidity, mortality, reproduction, and mutation). The database also records whether data are suitable for use in deriving RBE (relative biological effectiveness) values for different types of radiation. The database is divided into two main functions: data entry and query reports. Its aim, under FASSET, is to develop dose-effect and dose-response-relationships, which can be used to judge environmental consequences resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation. Quality assurance exercises have been used for both data entry consistency by the various organisations taking part, and for detecting numerical inaccuracy. A number of constraints in data entry were necessary in order for the database to be manageable and reasonably focused, recognizing that judgement will need to be applied for the purposes of FASSET. The structure and use of the database will be demonstrated including examples of its application using the query options. The

  6. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d’Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Solange Guidolin CANNIATTI-BRAZACA

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to...

  7. Radiation damage effects in silicon detectors

    Radiation damage in silicon detectors produced by monoenergetic 14 MeV neutrons, 25 MeV protons and 20 keV X-rays was investigated. The irradiation was performed up to fluences of 1012 particles per cm2 resp. 5 kGy in short time exposures of less than 1 hour. The resulting increase of the leakage current (damage rate), change of the resistivity (impurity removal) and charge collection deficiency (decrease of trapping time constant) is discussed. Long term storage at room temperature and short term heat treatments showed appreciable annealing effects

  8. Space storms and radiation causes and effects

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2010-01-01

    Heliophysics is a fast-developing scientific discipline that integrates studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and the environment and climate of planets. The Sun is a magnetically variable star and for planets with intrinsic magnetic fields, planets with atmospheres, or planets like Earth with both, there are profound consequences. This 2010 volume, the second in this series of three heliophysics texts, integrates the many aspects of space storms and the energetic radiation associated with them - from causes on the Sun to effects in planetary environments. It reviews t

  9. Effects of ionizing radiations on insects

    The most traditional effects caused by irradiation are development and morphogenesis disorders since on the whole the sensitivity of the developing organism to ionizing radiations is all the greater as the growth rate is faster. During the development of higher insects two categories of cell divide: larval cells on the one hand, which differentiate immediately after segmentation and give rise to larval organisms, and embryonic cells on the other which divide actively to form various islets or imaginal discs destined, each to its own extent, to provide the organs of the adult. Two cell categories thus coexist in the larva, one undergoing differentiation and the other multiplication, the radiosensitivity of which will be quite different for this very reason and will account at least partly, where the lethal effect of ionizing radiations is concerned, for the results observed. Three chapters deal in turn with effects on longevity, on regeneration and restoration and on morphogenesis and development. Strong doses give rise beyond a certain threshold to the appearance of acute radiodermatitis; their clinical signs and different degrees of seriousness liken them to burns of a special type

  10. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  11. Radiation effects on foodstuffs. Pt. 1

    In this report, results of irradiation experiments at about 30 foodstuffs are compiled and analyzed. The only objective was to obtain a survey of the chemical changes of irradiated foodstuffs; therefore, neither microbiological nor toxicological aspects were considered. The results were taken from the original publications and compiled in a type of dictionary of foodstuffs listing all relevant data for each substance (foodstuff, irradiation conditions, investigation procedures, results etc.) in a defined order. The main radiation source was Co 60, and the doses ranged between 0,006 and 10 Mrad. The investigations were related not only to the effects of irradiation (in some cases using different absorbed doses per foodstuff), but also to the effects of storage after irradiation (for 16 foodstuffs) and the effects of temperature (for 3 foodstuffs). (orig./MG)

  12. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human mission to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  13. MEDICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF UV RADIATION.

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Organisms living on the earth are exposed to solar radiation, including its ultraviolet (UV) components (for general reviews, the reader is referred to Smith [1] and Young et al. [2]). UV wavelength regions present in sunlight are frequently designated as UVB (290-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). In today's solar spectrum, UVA is the principal UV component, with UVB present at much lower levels. Ozone depletion will increase the levels of UVB reaching the biosphere, but the levels of UVA will not be changed significantly [3]. Because of the high efficiency of UVB in producing damage in biological organisms in the laboratory experiments, it has sometimes been assumed that UVA has little or no adverse biological effects. However, accumulating data [4, 5], including action spectra (efficiency of biological damage as a function of wavelength of radiation; see Section 5) for DNA damage in alfalfa seedlings [6], in human skin [7], and for a variety of plant damages (Caldwell, this volume) indicate that UVA can induce damage in DNA in higher organisms. Thus, understanding the differential effects of UVA and UVB wavebands is essential for estimating the biological consequences of stratospheric ozone depletion.

  14. Radiation effects on polymer matrix composites

    As the structural material and the electric and heat insulators for the superconducting magnets of nuclear fusion reactors, large quantity of polymer matrix composites is used. The radiation resistance of the polymer matrix composite insulators determines practically the operation life of superconducting magnets. This is the review of the results of research from 1983 to 1991 carried out in Takasaki Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and mainly the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites at 77 K, 4.2 K and room temperature after the irradiation with 60Co gamma ray or neutrons are introduced. The reinforcement was the plain fabrics of E glass or T glass fibers, and the matrix was epoxy resin. The load-deflection curves by three-point bending test are shown. The breaking mode was bending mode or shearing mode or their mixed mode. The effect of the degree of hardening of matrix resin, and the deteriorating behavior due to gamma ray irradiation are reported. The mechanism of the deterioration is the radiation damage of matrix or the interface between matrix and fibers. The determination of absorbed neutron dose, the effects of the kinds of reinforcement and the atmosphere of irradiation are discussed. (K.I.)

  15. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. II

    The effects of gamma radiation on the efficacy of chymotrypsin in pancreatin prepared by the separation of enzymes from an activated pancreas extract, in the same sample in which the content of lipids was increased to 16.55%, and in pancreatin prepared by drying an incompletely activated ground pancreas were compared with the effect of radiation on crystaline lyophilized chymotrypsin. The working conditions were identical with those described in the previous communication, all samples possessed nearly identical humidity on irradiation. The efficacy of chymotrypsin was determined by the method of PhBs 3, ethyl ester L-tyrosine hydrochloride being used as the substrate. The results were statistically evaluated and after calculation for dried lipid-free substance represented in graphs. The sequence of the loss of efficacy in pancreatin corresponded to the sequence of the loss of the total proteolytic efficacy found in the previous communication. The lowest remaining efficacy was found in crystalline lyophilized chymotrypsin. Percent losses of chymotrypsin efficacy in pancreatin determined by the synthetic substrate were in good agreement with the loss of the total proteolytic efficacy of the same samples determined by casein. (author)

  16. Deterministic effects of the ionizing radiation

    Full text: The deterministic effect is the somatic damage that appears when radiation dose is superior to the minimum value or 'threshold dose'. Over this threshold dose, the frequency and seriousness of the damage increases with the amount given. Sixteen percent of patients younger than 15 years of age with the diagnosis of cancer have the possibility of a cure. The consequences of cancer treatment in children are very serious, as they are physically and emotionally developing. The seriousness of the delayed effects of radiation therapy depends on three factors: a)- The treatment ( dose of radiation, schedule of treatment, time of treatment, beam energy, treatment volume, distribution of the dose, simultaneous chemotherapy, etc.); b)- The patient (state of development, patient predisposition, inherent sensitivity of tissue, the present of other alterations, etc.); c)- The tumor (degree of extension or infiltration, mechanical effects, etc.). The effect of radiation on normal tissue is related to cellular activity and the maturity of the tissue irradiated. Children have a mosaic of tissues in different stages of maturity at different moments in time. On the other hand, each tissue has a different pattern of development, so that sequelae are different in different irradiated tissues of the same patient. We should keep in mind that all the tissues are affected in some degree. Bone tissue evidences damage with growth delay and degree of calcification. Damage is small at 10 Gy; between 10 and 20 Gy growth arrest is partial, whereas at doses larger than 20 Gy growth arrest is complete. The central nervous system is the most affected because the radiation injuries produce demyelination with or without focal or diffuse areas of necrosis in the white matter causing character alterations, lower IQ and functional level, neuro cognitive impairment,etc. The skin is also affected, showing different degrees of erythema such as ulceration and necrosis, different degrees of

  17. Radiation effects in SYNROC-D

    This paper describes SYNROC-D and the irradiation it will be subjected to over the first million years of storage. This will include about 8 x 1024 alpha decays per m3 and a total ionization dose of about 1 x 1011 rads. Methods of simulating the radiation effects are discussed. Previous work by others is reviewed and compared on a dpa basis. 238Pu doping experiments to simulate internal alpha decay are described, and the progress is discussed. It is concluded that dose rate effects on swelling and metamictization of perovskite and zirconolite are small over a wide range of dose rate, and that swelling and metamictization in these minerals does not anneal significantly over geological time periods

  18. Effect of radiation environment on radiation use efficiency and growth of sunflower

    The level of incident radiation and the proportion of radiation that is diffuse affects radiation use efficiency (RUE) in crops. However, the degree of this effect, and its importance to growth and yield of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) have not been established. A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of radiation environment on RUE, growth, and yield of sunflower. A fully irrigated crop was sown on an alluvial-prairie soil (Fluventic Haplustoll) and was exposed to three distinct radiation environments. In two treatments, the level of incident radiation was reduced by 14 and 20% by suspending two different types of polyethylene plastic films well above the crop. In addition to the reductions in incident radiation, the proportion of radiation that was diffuse was increased by about 14% in these treatments. Lower incident radiation and increased proportion of diffuse radiation had no effect on total biomass, phenology, leaf area, and the canopy light extinction coefficient (k = 0.89). However, yield was reduced in shaded treatments due to smaller grain size and lower harvest index. Although crop RUE measured over the entire crop cycle (1.25 g/MJ) did not differ significantly among treatments, there was a trend where RUE compensated for less intercepted incident radiation. Theoretical derivations of the response of RUE to different levels of incident radiation supported this finding. Shaded sunflower crops have the ability to produce biomass similar to unshaded crops by increasing RUE, but have lower harvest indices

  19. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  20. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  1. Radiation effects on relativistic electrons in strong external fields

    The effects of radiation of high energy electron beams are a major issue in almost all types of charged particle accelerators. The objective of this thesis is both the analytical and numerical study of radiation effects. Due to its many applications the study of the self force has become a very active and productive field of research. The main part of this thesis is devoted to the study of radiation effects in laser-based plasma accelerators. Analytical models predict the existence of radiation effects. The investigation of radiation reaction show that in laser-based plasma accelerators, the self force effects lower the energy gain and emittance for moderate energies electron beams and increase the relative energy spread. However, for relatively high energy electron beams, the self radiation and retardation (radiation effects of one electron on the other electron of the system) effects increase the transverse emittance of the beam. The energy gain decreases to even lower value and relative energy spread increases to even higher value due to high radiation losses. The second part of this thesis investigates with radiation reaction in focused laser beams. Radiation effects are very weak even for high energy electrons. The radiation-free acceleration and the simple practical setup make direct acceleration in a focused laser beam very attractive. The results presented in this thesis can be helpful for the optimization of future electron acceleration experiments, in particular in the case of laser-plasma accelerators.

  2. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a 60Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  3. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    Camargo, Adriano Costa de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d' Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia, E-mail: sgcbraza@usp.b, E-mail: tvieira@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: mabra@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: macdomin@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2011-07-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a {sup 60}Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  4. Radiation effects in wild terrestrial vertebrates - the EPIC collection

    The paper presents data on radiation effects in populations of wild vertebrate animals inhabiting contaminated terrestrial ecosystems. The data were extracted from the database 'Radiation effects on biota', compiled within the framework of the EC Project EPIC (2000-2003). The data collection, based on publications in Russian, demonstrates radiation effects in the areas characterized with high levels of radionuclides (Kyshtym radioactive trace; 'spots' of enhanced natural radioactivity in the Komi region of Russia; territories contaminated from the Chernobyl fallout). The data covers a wide range of exposures from acute accidental irradiation to lifetime exposures at relatively low dose rates. Radiation effects include mortality, changes in reproduction, decrease of health, ecological effects, cytogenetic effects, adaptation to radiation, and others. Peculiarities of radiation effects caused by different radionuclides are described, also the severity of effects as they appear in different organisms (e.g. mice, frogs, birds, etc.)

  5. Health effects of atomic-bomb radiation

    This review described carcinogenic and genetic effects of A-bomb radiation. Effects have been investigated on 120,000 exposed people for their life span, 20,000 for health examinations, 3,000 people exposed in the womb and 80,000 second-generations of the exposed people. Epidemiological data revealed the presence of carcinogenic effects: Cancer death amounted to 9% from 1950 to 1990. However, carcinogenic mechanism is unknown yet. Genetic effects have been studied from the points of lesion at birth, sex ratio, chromosome aberration, biochemical test and mortality rate of children of exposed people and, although the effects have been experimentally shown in animals, are not observed in those children. This may be derived from the fact that there are few people who were exposed to such a high dose as used experimentally (0.2 Sv exposure to people within 2.5 km diameter-area from the explosion point vs >3 Sv in animals). Data are presented in Research Foundation home page. (K.H.)

  6. Ambient radiation exposure: measurements and effects

    A brief review of the available literature, data and reports of various radiation exposure and protection studies and various measurements techniques are presented. A linear quadratic model has been given illustrating the validity of radiation hormesis

  7. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. I

    The effect was studied of gamma radiation on the proteolytic activity of pancreatin prepared either by separating enzymes from an activated extract of the pancreas, containing 2.15% of lipids, or by drying the not completely activated ground pancreas, containing 6.14% of lipids. A part of the first sample in which the proportion of lipids was additionally increased to 16.55% was also irradiated. The moisture content was practically the same in all three samples. The source of radiation was 60Co, the dose rate 1.27 kGy/h. The samples of pancreatin in test-tubes were irradiated at 25 degC, doses ranging from 1x104 to 12x104 Gy. The results were statistically evaluated and are given in tables, and converted to the dried lipid-free substance they are expressed in graphs. The technological procedure of pancreatin preparation and the content of lipids do not influence the decrease in proteolytic activity (Graph 3). (author)

  8. Effects of radiation treatment on foodstuffs

    The purpose of this study is to discuss and compile methods and results of irradiation experiments carried out on 54 plant and animal foodstuffs in order to obtain a survey on chemical changes, in particular as regards the reduction of nutritional value and savoriness of irradiated foodstuffs. According to this task, microbiological aspects as well as an interpretation of the experimental results as to the physiology of nutrition and toxicology were not included. The results published by the authors of the original papers were compiled in a kind of dictionary which contains all relevant information such as radiation sources, irradiation conditions, investigation methods, results of chemical or organoleptical changes etc. The most important results were summarized in tables and can be found at the end of this study. Because of the abundance of existing literature the series 'Effects of radiation treatment on foodstuffs' will be continued in Part IV, and the final discussion of the results will be published separately after further data have been included. (orig.)

  9. Statistical issues in modelling radiation effects on disease incidence

    The author attempts to outline an overview of some models which have proven useful in recent work with radiation effects data. Topics addressed are mathematical models for radiation effects on disease incidence, modelling of background rates, relative versus excess risk models, dose-response effects, dose effect modification (sex and age at exposure), temporal variation in risks. (Author)

  10. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses, yet few of these studies meet the required standard. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high. Since no adequate experimental studies have been performed nothing is known about the mechanisms of these therapeutic radiation

  11. E. Biological effects of radiation on man

    This report firstly summarises information on the biological hazards of radiation and their relation to radiation dose, and hence estimates the biological risks associated with nuclear power production. Secondly, it describes the basis and present status of radiation protection standards in the nuclear power industry

  12. Stimulatory effects of low ionizing radiation on plant

    Yoshida, S.; Kurisu, Y.; Murata, I.; Takahashi, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Masui, H.; Iida, T. [Department of Electronic, Information Systems and Energy Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis was strongly carried out for animals and plants; subharmful dose of radiation may stimulate any organism. The concept of radiation hormesis effect consists of 1) biopositive effects of low dose radiation; influence caused by low dose radiation is totally different from one caused by high dose radiation, low dose radiation produces physiological useful effects against high dose radiation, and 2) radio-adaptive response; radiation also acts the organism as stress. Irradiated with small dose radiation previously, it raises its own defense response against the stress (radiation), resulting in the phenomenon that radiation influence decreases in appearance. In this paper we have investigated the phenomenon of radiation hormesis effects for plants through irradiation experiments with neutrons and gamma-rays to find out the mechanism. In the present experiment, dry seeds of Raphanus sativus were irradiated with D-T neutrons (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 100 kGy), D-D neutrons (1 mGy {approx} 100 mGy), thermal and fast neutrons (irradiation in a nuclear reactor: 100 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy), 60Co gamma-rays (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy). To confirm existence of the radiation hormesis effects, germination percentage, length of hypocotyl, length of root and total weight of seed leaf were measured at 7th day after starting cultivation. We estimated relative effectiveness as the hormesis effect, that is the ratio of mean values of measured subjects for the irradiated and control groups. For Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effect on seed leaf growth has been observed in the seed group irradiated by D-T neutrons and D-D neutrons. The observed hormesis effect is from 5 to 25 percents. (author)

  13. Stimulatory effects of low ionizing radiation on plant

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis was strongly carried out for animals and plants; subharmful dose of radiation may stimulate any organism. The concept of radiation hormesis effect consists of 1) biopositive effects of low dose radiation; influence caused by low dose radiation is totally different from one caused by high dose radiation, low dose radiation produces physiological useful effects against high dose radiation, and 2) radio-adaptive response; radiation also acts the organism as stress. Irradiated with small dose radiation previously, it raises its own defense response against the stress (radiation), resulting in the phenomenon that radiation influence decreases in appearance. In this paper we have investigated the phenomenon of radiation hormesis effects for plants through irradiation experiments with neutrons and gamma-rays to find out the mechanism. In the present experiment, dry seeds of Raphanus sativus were irradiated with D-T neutrons (10 μGy ∼ 100 kGy), D-D neutrons (1 mGy ∼ 100 mGy), thermal and fast neutrons (irradiation in a nuclear reactor: 100 μGy ∼ 10 Gy), 60Co gamma-rays (10 μGy ∼ 10 Gy). To confirm existence of the radiation hormesis effects, germination percentage, length of hypocotyl, length of root and total weight of seed leaf were measured at 7th day after starting cultivation. We estimated relative effectiveness as the hormesis effect, that is the ratio of mean values of measured subjects for the irradiated and control groups. For Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effect on seed leaf growth has been observed in the seed group irradiated by D-T neutrons and D-D neutrons. The observed hormesis effect is from 5 to 25 percents. (author)

  14. Effects of radiation and chemical substances on cells and organism

    The book treats the radiation chemistry part of biophysics and applied biophysics in the sphere of ionizing radiation. Discussed are the concepts of radiation units and radioactivity units and the relative biological efficiency. The effects of ionizing and UV radiations are analyzed at the level of macromolecular changes. Chapters dealing with genetic radiation effects discuss the effects at the cellular level with respect to cell proliferation. All these problems are used to illustrate the effect on the organism as a whole. The chapters on applied biophysics deal with the indications of radiation and chemical damage, sensitivity of cells and the organism, and the study and influencing of growth at the cellular level. The concluding chapter is devoted to the environmental impact of radiation. (J.P.)

  15. Recent research on the effects of low dose radiation: implications to radiation protection

    Radiation protection specialists unanimously agree that radiation at high dose levels can cause cancer. At low dose levels, the results are not conclusive. Specialists accept the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) dose-effect relationship as a practical approach in radiation protection. That means that the dose-effect relation is linear without a threshold; any dose however small will have some deleterious effect. Application of LNT without appreciating that it is just a pragmatic concept leads to unreasonable fear about radiation. This adversely impact acceptance of nuclear power as a source of energy

  16. Radiation effects in ceramic nuclear waste forms

    This paper reports on alpha-decay event damage (a particle and recoil-nucleus) that results in atomic-scale disorder which causes changes in the molar volume, corrosion rate, stored energy, mechanical properties, and macrostructure of ceramics. These changes particularly of volume and corrosion rate, have critical implications for the long-term durability of nuclear waste forms, such as the polyphase. Ti-based ceramic Synroc. This paper reviews data on actinide-bearing (U and Th) phases of great age (>100 m.y.) found in nature and compares these results to observation on actinide-doped phases (Pu and Cm) of nearly equivalent α-decay doses. Of particular interest is evidence for annealing of radiation damage effects over geologic periods of time under ambient conditions

  17. Gamma radiation effects on silicon photonic waveguides.

    Grillanda, Stefano; Singh, Vivek; Raghunathan, Vivek; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea; Kimerling, Lionel; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2016-07-01

    To support the use of integrated photonics in harsh environments, such as outer space, the hardness threshold to high-energy radiation must be established. Here, we investigate the effects of gamma (γ) rays, with energy in the MeV-range, on silicon photonic waveguides. By irradiation of high-quality factor amorphous silicon core resonators, we measure the impact of γ rays on the materials incorporated in our waveguide system, namely amorphous silicon, silicon dioxide, and polymer. While we show the robustness of amorphous silicon and silicon dioxide up to an absorbed dose of 15 Mrad, more than 100× higher than previous reports on crystalline silicon, polymer materials exhibit changes with doses as low as 1 Mrad. PMID:27367099

  18. Actinide Waste Forms and Radiation Effects

    Ewing, R. C.; Weber, W. J.

    Over the past few decades, many studies of actinides in glasses and ceramics have been conducted that have contributed substantially to the increased understanding of actinide incorporation in solids and radiation effects due to actinide decay. These studies have included fundamental research on actinides in solids and applied research and development related to the immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex, and the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities. Thus, the immobilization of actinides has become a pressing issue for the twenty-first century (Ewing, 1999), and plutonium immobilization, in particular, has received considerable attention in the USA (Muller et al., 2002; Muller and Weber, 2001). The investigation of actinides and

  19. Stimulating effects of low doses of radiation

    Different ionizing radiations cause biochemical and biophysical changes in the cells of the genotypes according to the application of the doses applied to different organs of the plants, and the manner of their application (acute, chronic, or acute and chronic). The sensitivity of different genotypes, and their tissues, depends on the stage at which their tissues were irradiated as well as on the environmental conditions under which the irradiation was made. Relatively strong doses usually cause some genetic changes in the somatic and generative cells. Small doses can, in some genotypes, stimulate the growth of some tissues to some extent. The stimulating effect on the growth of seedlings of the M2 generation, developed from acute seed irradiation of some genotypes of wheat, barley, and inbred lines of maize and their hybrids is described here. 3 refs, 5 tabs

  20. Radiation effects in zircon and apatite

    Zircon and apatite form as actinide host phases in several high-level waste forms and have been proposed as host phases for the immobilization of plutonium and other actinides. Self-radiation damage from α-decay of the incorporated Pu (or other actinides) can affect the durability and performance of these actinide-bearing phases. Natural zircons and apatites, with ages up to 4 billion years, provide abundant evidence for their long-term durability because of their wide spread use in geochronology and fission-track dating. Detailed studies of natural zircons and apatites, 238Pu-containing zircon, a 244Cm-containing silicate apatite, and ion-irradiated zircon, natural apatite, and synthetic silicate apatites provide a unique basis for the analysis of α-decay effects over broad time scales. Recent results of some of these studies are presented here

  1. Effect of ionizing radiation on enzymes. VII

    The effect was examined of gamma radiation on the efficacy of cellulase irradiated with doses graded from 10 to 120 kGy. The results were statistically evaluated. The dose dependence of inactivation corresponds to the course of the decrease in efficacy of pancreatic proteolytic enzymes and pepsin investigated in previous communications. In the semilogarithmical arrangement of the graph this dependence is linear. It can be seen from the graph that a dose of 10 kGy, usually sufficient to achieve microbiological indefectibility, produces an approximately 7% loss in efficacy. With a dose of 25 kGy necessary to achieve sterility, cellulase already loses approximately 17% of its efficacy. With 120 kGy, the largest dose used, the efficacy was reduced to only 47.9%. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  2. Effects of radiation on MOS structures and silicon devices

    A comprehensive view of radiation effects on MOS structures and silicon devices is given. In the introduction, the interaction of radiation with semiconductor material is presented. In the next section, the electrical degradation of semiconductor devices due to this interaction is discussed. The commonly used hardening techniques are shown. The last section deals with testing of radiation hardness of devices. (orig.)

  3. Effects of fallout radiation on crop production

    The vulnerability of selected food crops to radioactive fallout as affected by radiation dose, dose rate, kind of radiation, plant species, developmental stage, and postirradiation interval was studied. Data are presented on barley, wheat, soybeans, corn, potatoes, alfalfa, and rice. Results showed that morphological development influenced radiosensitivity of the plants in terms of seed or grain yield, and high radiation dose rates were more damaging to plants than low dose rates. Beta radiation was equivalent to γ radiation for specific indices of damage. Annual plants showed sublethal damage at maturity but damage in perennials sometimes did not appear for several years. (U.S.)

  4. Paradoxical effect of radiation on tumor incidence in the rat: implications for radiation therapy

    The high incidence of leukemia in the Fischer rat is reduced by radiation to an incidence below that seen spontaneously. Fractionating the radiation decreased this effect. In contrast, mammary tumors increased with dose until reaching a plateau at the highest doses. Fractionation had little effect. These results are consistent with a hypothesis suggesting that tumor incidence due to radiation is the result of competing processes of tumor induction and cell killing

  5. Effect of gamma radiation on chrome-tanned sheepskin

    Effect of 60 γ-radiation on chrome-tanned, blue-stock sheepskin was investigated. Radiation was applied between 0.35-10.5 Mrad and the resultant physical and mechanical changes were observed. Radiation did not change the water adsorption capability of leather but caused significant reductions in shrinkage temperature and tensile strength. The correlations between dose and radiation hazards were determined. (author)

  6. Effect of AZO on GO-NO-GO radiation indicator

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of Azo group dyes as an radiation indicator. Dimethyl Yellow, Alizarin Red, Congo Red, Methyl Violet and Bromophenol Blue dyes were used to compare the capability of each dye to change colour in response to radiation. Sensitivity of single and incorporated dyes were identified by exposing them to 5-50 kGy gamma radiation. The result shows that the Azo group is more sensitive to radiation compare to other groups. (Author)

  7. 2.3.1 Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations

    Kaul, A.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Subsection '2.3.1 Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations' of the Section '2.3 Biological Effects' of the Chapter '2 Radiation and Biological Effects' with the comtents:

  8. Radiation effects on impurity diffusion in silicon

    Coherently combined experiments have been made in order to investigate certain parameters of the problem of diffusion under hydrogen irradiation. The physical basis of the problem (diffusion in semiconductors, particle irradiation, defect creation) is reviewed and the characterisation methods are then presented whilst laying emphasis on the way they restrict those experiments that are possible. The role of the parameters which are made to vary (temperature, current of the irradiation beam, irradiation time) is shown, using boron, arsenic or phosphorus as doping agent. The limitations of the single two-impurity model (one slow, one fast) is shown. It is also shown that with this model it is not possible to account integrally for the profiles obtained by ionic analysis. To complete the model, it was necessary to introduce defect precipitation as well as its effect on the diffusion length of the impurities. It was also possible to show the fundamental importance of the irradiation current parameter (and not of the total dose) and its interconnexion with the irradiation temperature parameter. With electric measurements an endeavour was also made to show the effect of residual defects on the conductivity and mobility of irradiated layers. The balancing of these layers led to studying the annealing of the defects and the experiments enabled the radiation enhanced to be oberved. The effect of the Fermi level position on the exo-diffusion of fast impurities was also shown, interpreted in terms of the formation and fast diffusion of a vacancy-impurity complex

  9. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  10. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015–15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design. - Highlights: • Radiation shielding properties of superconductors were investigated. • µ/ρ, mean free path, and exposure buildup factor were calculated. • CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 were found superior for γ-ray shielding. • Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 was found superior for fast neutron shielding

  11. Method of neutralising the effects of electromagnetic radiation in a radiation detector and a radiation detector applying the procedure

    Circuitry is described by means of which radiation detectors of the Neher-White type, employing ionisation chambers can be unaffected by electromagnetic radiation which would otherwise cause inductive effects leading to erroneous signals. It is therefore unnecessary to use shielded cables for these instruments. (JIW)

  12. Aerosol radiative effects over BIMSTEC regions

    Kumar, Sumit; Kar, S. C.; Mupparthy, Raghavendra S.

    Aerosols can have variety of shapes, composition, sizes and other properties that influence their optical characteristics and thus the radiative impact. The visible impact of aerosol is the formation of haze, a layer of particles from vehicular, industrial emissions and biomass burning. The characterization of these fine particles is important for regulators and researchers because of their potential impact on human health, their ability to travel thousands of kilometers crossing international borders, and their influence on climate forcing and global warming. The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) with Member Countries Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand has emerged as an important regional group for technical and economic Cooperation. Continuing the quest for a deeper understanding of BIMSTEC countries weather and climate, in this paper we focused on aerosols and their direct radiative effects. Because of various contrasts like geophysical, agricultural practices, heterogeneous land/ocean surface, population etc these regions present an excellent natural laboratory for studying aerosol-meteorology interactions in tropical to sub-tropical environments. We exploited data available on multiple platforms (such as MISR, MODIS etc) and models (OPAC, SBDART etc) to compute the results. Ten regions were selected with different surface characteristics, also having considerable differences in the long-term trends and seasonal distribution of aerosols. In a preliminary analysis pertaining to pre-monsoon (March-April-May) of 2013, AOD _{555nm} is found to be maximum over Bangladesh (>0.52) and minimum over Bhutan (0.22), whereas other regions have intermediate values. Concurrent to these variability of AOD we found a strong reduction in incoming flux at surface of all the regions (> -25 Wm (-2) ), except Bhutan and Sri Lanka (< -18Wm (-2) ). The top of the atmosphere (TOA) forcing values are

  13. Numerical analysis of radiation effects in a metallic foam by means of the radiative conductivity model

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the radiation contribution to the steady-state heat transfer in metallic foams by means of the radiative conductivity model. Because of the complexity of the structure, reference is made to a simplified physical radiative model, where the elementary cell of the foams is treated as a cubic cell. The contribution of the radiation heat transfer is investigated on a local basis. The local radiative conductivity has been used to evaluate the influence of radiative heat transfer in a two dimensional conductive-convective-radiative problem involving a forced fluid flow within a heated channel filled with a metallic foam. The effect of the solid emissivity and the foam porosity is pointed out for different foams.

  14. Light-Cone Effect of Radiation Fields in Cosmological Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel method to implement time-delayed propagation of radiation fields in cosmological radiative transfer simulations. Time-delayed propagation of radiation fields requires construction of retarded-time fields by tracking the location and lifetime of radiation sources along the corresponding light-cones. Cosmological radiative transfer simulations have, until now, ignored this "light-cone effect" or implemented ray-tracing methods that are computationally demanding. We show that radiative transfer calculation of the time-delayed fields can be easily achieved in numerical simulations when periodic boundary conditions are used, by calculating the time-discretized retarded-time Green's function using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and convolving it with the source distribution. We also present a direct application of this method to the long-range radiation field of Lyman-Werner band photons, which is important in the high-redshift astrophysics with first stars.

  15. Radiation effects on electronic devices in space

    Duzellier, S. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA/DESP), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2005-01-01

    The natural space environment is responsible for many disturbances on electronics systems on-board spacecraft. This paper focuses on the Single Event Effects (SEE) at the origin of most observed in-flight anomalies. SEE are probabilistic failures induced by single high-energy ionising particles (protons, heavy ions and electrons) in any kind of devices. Insight on the underlying physical mechanisms and criticality of such events is provided through actual examples. The methodologies to assess the devices sensitivities (testing and modelling) and to predict the mission operation are described with emphasis on the critical parameters to deal with. The trend towards higher integration of devices may lead to abnormal response of devices to radiation. The inappropriateness of standard models when dealing with modern devices lies in the size reduction to the point that dimensions of sensitive volume are now of the order of the particle track size. During the past 20 years, SEE rates of devices dropped by several order of magnitude. In fact, the critical charge to trigger an event got fainter leading to an enhanced sensibility but this effect was compensated by a strong decrease in the cross-section due to the reduction of dimensions. However, as on-board electronics is developing, it concerns now computation and storage and as it uses advanced and high-performance devices (mainly COTS), the criticality remains and new failure modes can be observed. (A.C.)

  16. Radiation effects on electronic devices in space

    The natural space environment is responsible for many disturbances on electronics systems on-board spacecraft. This paper focuses on the Single Event Effects (SEE) at the origin of most observed in-flight anomalies. SEE are probabilistic failures induced by single high-energy ionising particles (protons, heavy ions and electrons) in any kind of devices. Insight on the underlying physical mechanisms and criticality of such events is provided through actual examples. The methodologies to assess the devices sensitivities (testing and modelling) and to predict the mission operation are described with emphasis on the critical parameters to deal with. The trend towards higher integration of devices may lead to abnormal response of devices to radiation. The inappropriateness of standard models when dealing with modern devices lies in the size reduction to the point that dimensions of sensitive volume are now of the order of the particle track size. During the past 20 years, SEE rates of devices dropped by several order of magnitude. In fact, the critical charge to trigger an event got fainter leading to an enhanced sensibility but this effect was compensated by a strong decrease in the cross-section due to the reduction of dimensions. However, as on-board electronics is developing, it concerns now computation and storage and as it uses advanced and high-performance devices (mainly COTS), the criticality remains and new failure modes can be observed. (A.C.)

  17. Radiative Effect on Particle Acceleration via Relativistic Electromagnetic Expansion

    Noguchi, K

    2005-01-01

    The radiation damping effect on the diamagnetic relativistic pulse accelerator (DRPA) is studied in two-and-half dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation with magnetized electron-positron plasmas. Self-consistently solved radiation damping force converts particle energy to radiation energy. The DRPA is still robust with radiation, and the Lorentz factor of the most high energy particles reach more than two thousand before they decouple from the electromagnetic pulse. Resulted emitted power from the pulse front is lower in the radiative case than the estimation from the non-radiative case due to the radiation damping. The emitted radiation is strongly linearly polarized and peaked within few degrees from the direction of Poynting flux.

  18. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Cyclotron and Synchrotron Radiations

    Bagrov, V G; Levin, A; Tlyachev, V B

    2000-01-01

    We study the impact of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid on the radiation of a charged particle moving in a constant uniform magnetic field. With this aim in view, exact solutions of Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are found in the magnetic-solenoid field. Using such solutions, we calculate exactly all the characteristics of one-photon spontaneous radiation both for spinless and spinning particle. Considering non-relativistic and relativistic approximations, we analyze cyclotron and synchrotron radiations in detail. Radiation peculiarities caused by the presence of the solenoid may be considered as a manifestation of Aharonov-Bohm effect in the radiation. In particular, it is shown that new spectral lines appear in the radiation spectrum. Due to angular distribution peculiarities of the radiation intensity, these lines can in principle be isolated from basic cyclotron and synchrotron radiation spectra

  19. Genetic effects of radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    The possible effects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on the genetic material of cells are considered very important since damage to the DNA of somatic cells can be linked to cancer development or cell death whereas damage to germ cells can lead to genetic damage in next and subsequent generations. This is why the scientific literature reports many investigations on the subject. According to a number of review papers, the conclusion so far is that there is little evidence that RFR is directly mutagenic and that adverse effects that were reported in some of the papers are predominantly the result of hyperthermia. Yet, some subtle indirect effects on DNA replication and/or transcription of genes under relatively restricted exposure conditions cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, the possibility of combined effects of RFR with environmental carcinogens/mutagens merits further attention. The present paper takes into account more recent investigations but the conclusion remains the same. A majority of studies report no increased (cyto)genetic damage but yet, a considerable number of investigations do. However, many studies were not sufficiently characterized, are therefore difficult to replicate and cannot be compared to others. Experimental protocols were very different from one study to another and investigations from a single laboratory were very often limited in the sample size or number of cells investigated, preventing a robust statistical analysis. Subtle, but significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed cells cannot be found in such conditions. For the above reasons, it was concluded at a workshop in Loewenstein (November 2002) that further investigations by individual laboratories most probably will not add much to the discussion of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) genotoxicity. Large, well coordinated, international collaborative studies involving participation of several experienced scientists are considered an alternative of uttermost importance

  20. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 104 rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 105 rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects

  1. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    Bruce, M B; Davis, M V

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10/sup 4/ rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10/sup 5/ rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects.

  2. Terrestrial radiation effects in ULSI devices and electronic systems

    Ibe, Eishi H

    2014-01-01

    A practical guide on how mathematical approaches can be used to analyze and control radiation effects in semiconductor devices within various environments Covers faults in ULSI devices to failures in electronic systems caused by a wide variety of radiation fields, including electrons, alpha -rays, muons, gamma rays, neutrons and heavy ions. Readers will learn the environmental radiation features at the ground or avionics altitude. Readers will also learn how to make numerical models from physical insight and what kind of mathematical approaches should be implemented to analyze the radiation effects. A wide variety of mitigation techniques against soft-errors are reviewed and discussed. The author shows how to model sophisticated radiation effects in condensed matter in order to quantify and control them. The book provides the reader with the knowledge on a wide variety of radiation fields and their effects on the electronic devices and systems. It explains how electronic systems including servers and rout...

  3. Radiation

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  4. Effects of turbulence on radiative properties of Tokamak edge plasmas

    The effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the radiative losses in tokamak edge and divertor plasmas is investigated. A statistical model is developed. The formalism involves both the probability density function of the fluid quantities and the expression of the emitting energy level population in terms of these quantities. We apply the statistical model to calculations of radiative power losses, successively for lithium and hydrogen radiation. In the former case, the energy level populations are obtained with an analytical collisional-radiative model accounting for non-coronal and transport effects. In the hydrogen case, the emitting level population is calculated by a collisional-radiative code. The role of electron temperature fluctuations is discussed in detail. Application to hydrogen line radiation in JET conditions reveals the significant role of turbulence in the repartition of the radiated energy inside the divertor (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Acute radiation syndrome and delayed effects of radiation exposure

    The results of the overall irradiation of the body with large doses are described. Effects of irradiation are presented separately for central nervous, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Damages of cellular level and late effects in the whole body scale are shown. 7 refs, 2 figs

  6. Effects of model resolution on entrainment (inversion heights), cloud-radiation interactions, and cloud radiative forcing

    H. Guo; Y. LIU; P. H. Daum; Zeng, X.; Li, X.; Tao, W.-K.

    2008-01-01

    We undertook three-dimensional numerical studies of a marine stratus deck under a strong inversion using an interactive shortwave- and longwave-radiation module. A suite of sensitivity tests were conducted to address the effects of model resolution on entrainment (inversion heights), cloud-radiation interactions, and cloud radiative-forcings by varying model horizontal resolution only, varying vertical resolution only, and varying horizontal- and vertical-resolution simultan...

  7. 2001 international symposium on radiation and health (2001 ISRH): low dose radiation effects on human health

    The symposium was co-organised by the Radiation Health Research Institute (RHRI) of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co Ltd (KHNP) and the Institute of Radiation Medicine of Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and supported by the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. The main topic of the meeting was the health effects of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation and this was presented and discussed in two sessions dealing with epidemiological and molecular studies

  8. Effective education in radiation safety for nurses

    In order to establish an efficient training program of radiation safety for nurses, studies have been carried out on the basis of questionnaires. Collaboration of nurses, who are usually standing closest to the patient, is necessary in order to offer safe radiological diagnostics/treatment. The authors distributed the questionnaire to 134 nurses in five polyclinic hospitals in Japan. Important questions were: fear of radiation exposure, knowledge on the radiation treatment, understanding the impact on pregnancy, and so on. Most of the nurses feel themselves uneasy against exposure to radiation. They do not have enough knowledge of radiological treatment. They do not know exactly what is the impact of the radiation on pregnant women. Such tendency is more pronounced, when nurses spend less time working in the radiological department. Nurses play important roles in radiological diagnostics/treatment. Therefore, a well-developed education system for radiation safety is essential. The training for the radiation safety in medicine should be done in the context of general safety in medicine. Education programs in undergraduate school and at the working place should be coordinated efficiently in order to ensure that both nurses and patients are informed about the meaning of radiation safety. (authors)

  9. Biophysical models for the effectiveness of different radiations

    The aim of the project is a better understanding of the biological effects of different radiation fields with particular emphasis on low doses and low dose rates. An improvement in our present knowledge should be achieved of somatic and genetic radiation risks in man, and radiation protection instrumentation should be developed which measures the characteristic properties with regard to these endpoints in mixed radiation fields. In addition, the combined action of radiation and chemicals are investigated on a mechanistic level. Objectives and results of the four contributions of the project for the reporting period are presented. (R.P.) 21 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs

  10. Low radiation dose effects - is it a myth or reality?

    The effects of low-level radiation are very difficult to observe and highly controversial. The radiation doses that result from chronic exposures but does not manifest in deterministic effects could be categorised as low radiation doses. These doses result in only potential stochastic effects which are probabilistic in nature. On the other hand, high radiation doses result in both deterministic effects and stochastic effects. Stochastic effects from higher doses are extrapolated linearly to the low doses on the basis of a hypothesis that the dose response curve is linear at all doses. This is what is termed as 'Linear No Threshold (LNT)' hypothesis. Based on this hypothesis, all regulatory agencies stipulate regulatory limits for radiation workers and for members of public. Particularly, the optimisation principle of radiation protection 'as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)' is insisted on by regulatory bodies resulting in the often asked question as to whether it is really evidence based hypothesis or fear based regulatory concern. Many studies of high background areas in India, Iran, Brazil, etc. have not resulted in proof of excess cancer risk at radiation doses encountered in these areas of high background. Studies on large population of radiation workers who have received higher radiation doses than stipulated in the earlier periods of radiation safety limits have also not shown any increase in cancer incidence ascribable to radiation dose. On the contrary studies have shown, documented by many reputed scientific journals, American Nuclear Society, World Nuclear Agency and BEIR Committee that at low radiation doses the dose response curve is not only nonlinear but also shows a threshold for any harmful effect. (author)

  11. Biological effects of radiation and health risks from exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation

    The very fact that ionizing radiation produces biological effects is known from many years. The first case of injury reported by Sir Roentgen was reported just after a few months after discovery of X-rays in 1895. As early as 1902, the first case of X-ray induced cancer was reported in the literature. Early human evidence of harmful effects as a result of exposure to radiation in large amounts existed in the 1920s and 1930s, based upon the experience of early radiologists, miners exposed to airborne radioactivity underground, persons working in the radium industry, and other special occupational groups. The long-term biological significance of smaller, repeated doses of radiation, however, was not widely appreciated until relatively recently, and most of our knowledge of the biological effects of radiation has been accumulated since World War II. The mechanisms that lead to adverse health effects after exposure to ionizing radiation are still not fully understood. Ionizing radiation has sufficient energy to change the structure of molecules, including DNA, within the cells of the body. Some of these molecular changes are so complex that it may be difficult for the body's repair mechanisms to mend them correctly. However, the evidence is that only a small fraction of such changes would be expected to result in cancer or other health effects. The most thoroughly studied individuals for the evaluation of health effects of ionizing radiation are the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings, a large population that includes all ages and both sexes.The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Japan has conducted followup studies on these survivors for more than 50 years. An important finding from these studies is that the occurrence of solid cancers increases in proportion to radiation dose. More than 60% of exposed survivors received a dose of radiation of less than 100 mSv (the definition of low dose used by the BEIR VII report). (author)

  12. Electronic effects in radiation damage simulations

    A methodology for including electronic effects in classical radiation damage simulations is presented. The method is used to calculate the number of residual defects for low energy (10 keV) cascades in Fe, as a function of the electron-phonon coupling strength. It was found that strong electron-phonon coupling reduced the number of residual defects by rapidly removing energy from the cascade and reducing the thermal spike. Intermediate coupling increased the number of defects by quenching the thermal spike and reducing defect recombination. Thermostatting the cascade with the local, time dependent electronic temperature, rather than the ambient temperature, reduced the number of residual defects by enhancing defect recombination. Swift heavy ion irradiation in tungsten was modeled using the same methodology. In this case we found that the number of residual defects created by a given electronic stopping power was strongly dependent on the temperature variation of the electronic heat capacity. In contrast to cascade simulations, the interstitials were located closer to the core of the ion track than the vacancies.

  13. Effect of ionizing radiation on enzymes. X

    The effect was examined of ionizing radiation (60Co source) within a range of doses from 10 to 120 kGy, on the amylolytic efficiency of pancreatin of two types: pancreatin obtained by isolation from an extract of the pancreas (sample 1) and pancreatin containing parts of the pancreatic tissue but with higher amylolytic efficiency (sample 2). Efficiency was expressed in F.I.P. units. As shown in a chart, the relative decrease in efficiency was higher in the more active sample 2. The graphical representation is in good agreement with the statistical assessment of the significance of the differences in efficiency decreases for both samples irradiated with doses of 30 and 120 kGy, if the median test was used and probability was calculated using Fischer's test. This was not, however, the case for irradiation with a dose of 10 kGy. The residual, graphically corrected efficiency after irradiation with a sterilizing dose of 25 kGy was 84.1 % (sample 1) and 80.3 % (sample 2). With the maximal dose used, the residual efficiency was 43.7 % (sample 1) and 36.7 % (sample 2). (author) 5 tabs., 3 figs., 18 refs

  14. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. IV

    The effect was studied of 60Co gamma radiation on the total proteolytic efficacy of pancreatin with gradually differentiated humidity, both in a preparation obtained by separating the active ingredients from an extract from the pancreas destroyed by autolysis, and in a preparation containing the remains of the pancreatic tissue, where the basic operation of manufacture was drying of the ground pancreas. The samples were irradiated with doses of 2.5x104 and 12x104, or 14.2x104 Gy. The mean values found of the residual proteolytic efficacy expressed in the units of PhBs 3, calculated to the dried substance, are tabulated. At the same time the efficacy of samples before irradiation was tested. The evaluation of results included in the individual tables by variance analysis and Lord's u-test shows that there is no statistically significant difference between the mean values of the efficacy of samples with the initial humidity and the samples with increased humidity (maximally 16.20%). (author)

  15. Enhancements in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation following volcanic eruptions

    Vogelmann, A. M.; Ackerman, T. P.; Turco, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to estimate the changes in biologically effective radiation (UV-BE) at the earth's surface produced by the El Chichon (1982) and Mount Pinatubo (1991) eruptions. It is found that in both cases surface intensity can increase because the effect of ozone depletion outweighs the increased scattering.

  16. 47 CFR 22.1013 - Effective radiated power limitations.

    2010-10-01

    ... PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1013 Effective radiated power limitations. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters in the Offshore Radiotelephone Service must not... operations will occur. (1) Co-channel protection. The ERP of offshore stations must not exceed the limits...

  17. Effects of low levels of radiation on humans

    The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed

  18. Field-ion-microscope observations of radiation effects

    This article briefly reviews the unique advantages and capabilities of the field-ion microscope (FIM) and atom-probe FIM for the study of the effects of particle radiation on metals, discusses some contrast effects caused by radiation-induced defects, and gives a number of problems that have been studied using these techniques

  19. ANNUAL REPORT. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study will provide the underpinning science to develop improved gl...

  20. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Salomaa, S. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  1. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  2. Combined effects of radiation and trauma

    Messerschmidt, Otfried

    Injuries, caused by both whole-body irradiation and wounds or burns, have been relatively little studied. Possibly because many investigators think that these injuries are just modified radiation-induced diseases for which the same treatment principles are valid. Other authors had the impression that, for instance, the radiation burn trauma is a new kind of disease which differs significantly from either radiation syndrome alone or from burn disease. There are many experimental data on animals which suggest that the pathology of combined injuries differs significantly from that of radiation-induced disease or of thermal or mechanical traumas. Wounds or burns which, in general, do not cause septicaemia could become entrance ports for bacteria when animals are exposed to whole-body irradiation. Thrombocytopenia is the reason for hemorrhages in wounds. The susceptibility to shock is increased considerably in combined injuries and the formation of callus in the bone fractures is significantly delayed. The healing of wounds and burns in the initial phase of the radiation syndrome does not always differ from healing in the non-irradiated organism. However, a few days or weeks later very serious wound infections and hemorrhages can occur. The additional injuries almost always worsen the development and prognosis of radiation-induced disease. The recommended treatment for combined injuries will differ in many respects from the treatment of wounds and burns or the radiation syndrome.

  3. Late effects of radiation on mature and growing bone

    The physiopathology of radiation-induced bone damage is no completely elucidated. Ionizing radiation may induce an inhibition or an impairment of growing bone. This fact is of particular importance in children, and represents one of the most important dose-limiting factors in the radiotherapeutic management of children with malignant diseases. Scoliosis, epiphyseal slippage, avascular necrosis, abnormalities of craniofacial growth may be observed after radiation. Child's age at the time of treatment, location of irradiated bone and irradiation characteristics may influence the radiation related observed effects. In adults, pathological analysis of mature bone after ionizing radiation exposure are rare, suggesting that it is difficult to draw a clear feature of the action of radiation on the bone. Osteoporosis, medullary fibrosis and cytotoxicity on bone cells lead to fracture or necrosis. Various factors can influence bone tolerance to radiation such as bone involvement by tumor cells or infection, which is frequent is mandibulary osteoradionecrosis. Technical improvements in radiation techniques have also decreased radio-induced bone complications : the volume, fractionation and total dose are essential to consider. The absence of a consistent radiation-induced late effects evaluation scale has hampered efforts to analyze the influence of various therapeutic maneuvers and the comparison of results from different reported series. The currently proposed evaluation scale may help harmonizing the classification of radiation-induced bone late effects. (author)

  4. Non-targeted effects of radiation: applications for radiation protection and contribution to LNT discussion

    According to the target theory of radiation induced effects (Lea, 1946), which forms a central core of radiation biology, DNA damage occurs during or very shortly after irradiation of the nuclei in targeted cells and the potential for biological consequences can be expressed within one or two cell generations. A range of evidence has now emerged that challenges the classical effects resulting from targeted damage to DNA. These effects have also been termed non-(DNA)-targeted (Ward, 1999) and include radiation-induced bystander effects (Iyer and Lehnert, 2000a), genomic instability (Wright, 2000), adaptive response (Wolff, 1998), low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) (Joiner, et al., 2001), delayed reproductive death (Seymour, et al., 1986) and induction of genes by radiation (Hickman, et al., 1994). An essential feature of non-targeted effects is that they do not require a direct nuclear exposure by irradiation to be expressed and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a new paradigm for radiation biology that challenges the universality of target theory. In this paper we will concentrate on the radiation-induced bystander effects because of its particular importance for radiation protection

  5. Current issues in carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation

    A review of publications dealing with study of radiation sources and biological evaluation of increasing doses of people irradiation under occupational and usual living conditions is presented. The existing natural and artifial irradiation sources are considered. It is noted that all types of ionizing radiations are characterized by high carcinogenic efficiency and can induce benign and malignant tumors practically in all organs. Statistically reliable data in experimental and epidemiological investigations were recorded under the effect of large and mean doses. Minor radiation doses not responsible for visible functional and morphological changes in early periods can cause pathological changes in delayed periods. The data on carcinogenic effect of relatively small radiation doses are available

  6. Studies on EB radiation effect on PA610

    Yang Kebin; Zhang Huaming; Li Xiurong; Xiong Ruilin [Sichuan Forever Group Co. Ltd., China Academy of Engineering Physics, Miangany (China)

    2000-03-01

    Radiation effect of PA610 with polyfunctional monomer trially isocyanurate (TAIC) was studied, the results show that crosslinking effect of EB radiation on PA610 is obvious. After the PA610 samples were radiated by EB with dosage 75KGY, the physical characters of PA610 materials were greatly improved, especially their tensile strength being increased about 18% and their impact strength about 50%, but their water and oil absorption were decreased. So, EB radiation can enhance PA610 materials physical strength, resistance to solvents and water and increase their thermal-deformation temperature. (author)

  7. Biological effects of high energy radiations

    The author present the first results obtained by the determination of the survival of germ cells of mice exposed to X- and γ-radiation, to 400-600 MeV neutron beams, and irradiation by negative pions. (HSI)

  8. Radiation irradiation effects: knowledge and doubts

    People are ever submitted to natural ionizing radiations. But nuclear power plant workers have this natural exposure and one complementary irradiation, in case of nuclear installation serious accident. In normal running, people, people, particularly those in neighbourhood of the installation, are exposed permanently to liquid and gaseous disposal. In case of accident, exposure increases mainly according to usual state. Only the accident states may induce for people or one worker exposure to high dose ionizing radiations. 1 tab

  9. The effects of small doses of radiation

    The following topics were discussed in outline at a two day conference organized by I.B.C. Technical Services Ltd, February 1989, in London: radiation carcinogenesis mechanisms, environmental exposure, occupational exposure trends and comparisons, ICRP risk assessment and use of data including that of A-Bomb survivors, the ankylosing spondylitis study, UKAEA and AWE mortality studies, Sellafield, leukemia clusters and radiation hormesis. (UK)

  10. Radiation effects on the drosophila melanogaster genoma

    When DNA of living beings has been damaged, the cells show different responses depending on their physiological state. Repair mechanisms can be classified into two groups: constitutive which are always present in the cells and inductible, which must be stimulated to show themselves. It is suggested that a repair mechanism exists in the drosophila ovules which act upon the damage present in mature spermatozoids. Our aim is to verify whether or not a radiation dosis applied to the female drosophila will modify the frequency of individuals which have lost the paternal sex chromosomes. YW/YW virgin females and XEZ males and fbb-/bS Y y+ y were mated for two days in order to collect radiation treated spermatozoids. The results were consistent as to the parameters being evaluated and lead one to suppose that the radiation applied to the female drosophila produced some changes in the ovule metabolism which reduced the frequency of individuals with lost chromosomes. It is believed that ionizing radiation interferes with the repair mechanisms that are existent and constitutive, retarding and hindering the restoration of chromosome fragments and this brings about death of the zygote or death of the eggs which lessens the frequencies of individuals carriers of chromosomic aberrations. Ionizing radiations applied to the female drosophila modifies the frequency of loss of patternal chromosomes and comes about when the radiation dose to the female is 700 rad. (Author)

  11. Health Effects of Exposure to Low Dose of Radiation

    Human beings are exposed to natural radiation from external sources include radionuclides in the earth and cosmic radiation, and by internal radiation from radionuclides, mainly uranium and thorium series, incorporated into the body. Living systems have adapted to the natural levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources enhance these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are the outcomes of physical and chemical processes that occur immediately after the exposure, then followed by biological process in the body. These processes will involve successive changes in the molecular, cellular, tissue and whole organism levels. Any dose of radiation, no matter how small, may produce health effects since even a single ionizing event can result in DNA damage. The damage to DNA in the nucleus is considered to be the main initiating event by which radiation causes damage to cells that results in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. It has also been indicated that cytogenetic damage can occur in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure, known as bystander effects. This paper reviews health risks of low dose radiation exposure to human body causing stochastic effects, i.e. cancer induction in somatic cells and hereditary disease in genetic cells. (author)

  12. Space radiation effects on plant and mammalian cells

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Macaeva, E.; Quintens, R.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the effects of ionizing radiation on organisms is related to different research aims. The current review emphasizes the studies on the effects of different doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation on living organisms, with the final purpose of highlighting specific and common effects of space radiation in mammals and plants. This topic is extremely relevant in the context of radiation protection from space environment. The response of different organisms to ionizing radiation depends on the radiation quality/dose and/or the intrinsic characteristics of the living system. Macromolecules, in particular DNA, are the critical targets of radiation, even if there is a strong difference between damages encountered by plant and mammalian cells. The differences in structure and metabolism between the two cell types are responsible for the higher resistance of the plant cell compared with its animal counterpart. In this review, we report some recent findings from studies performed in Space or on Earth, simulating space-like levels of radiation with ground-based facilities, to understand the effect of ionizing radiation on mammalian and plant cells. In particular, our attention is focused on genetic alterations and repair mechanisms in mammalian cells and on structures and mechanisms conferring radioresistance to plant cells.

  13. The effect of ionizing radiation on a photomultiplier

    This paper investigates the effect of high-intensity radiation on the FEU-10 photomultiplier. The authors investigated the direct effect of ionizing radiation on the FEU-10 with an antimony-potassium-sodium-cesium photocathode with recording of activities exceeding tens to hundreds of megabecquerels, and examined possible ways to decrease this effect in order to decrease measurement error. To diminish the effect it is proposed that the operating mode of the photomultiplier be controlled by means of a modulator

  14. Epistemological limitation for attributing health effects to natural radiation exposure

    The attribution of health effects to prolonged radiation exposure situations, such as those experienced in nature, is a challenging problem. The paper describes the epistemological limitations for such attribution it demonstrate that in most natural exposure situations, the theory of radiation-related sciences is not capable to provide the scientific evidence that health effects actually occur (or do not occur) and, therefore, that radiation effects are attributable to natural exposure situations and imputable to nature. Radiation exposure at high levels is known to provoke health effects as tissue reactions. If individuals experience these effects they can be attributed to the specific exposure with a high degree of confidence under the following conditions: the dose incurred have been higher that the relevant dose-threshold for the specific effect; and an unequivocal pathological diagnosis is attainable ensuring that possible competing causes have been eliminated. Only under these conditions, the occurrence of the effect may be properly attested and attributed to the exposure. However, even high levels of natural radiation exposure are lower than relevant dose-thresholds for tissue reactions and, therefore, natural radiation exposure is generally unable to cause these type of effects. One exception to this general rule could be situations of high levels of natural radiation exposure that might be sufficient to induce opacities in the lens of the eyes (which could be considered a tissue-reaction type of effect)

  15. Implications of radiation-induced bystander effects and other non-targeted radiation effects for multi pollutant environmental exposures

    Environmentally relevant low doses of ionizing radiation are now accepted to induce a variety of biological effects at levels where it is difficult to implicate direct (targeted) DNA damage. These effects include bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive responses and low dose hypersensitivity. The importance of these effects is that all are induced at very low doses. Typically one track of high LET radiation or less than 5 mGy of low LET radiation can trigger these effects. Once induced the level of effect does not increase with increasing dose and is persistent. The mechanisms underlying these effects are not known but it is accepted that genetic background is crucial in determining what the consequences of the exposure will be. This presentation will show 1. That chemical pollutants (heavy metals and micro-organics) can also induce these low dose responses, 2. That these effects can be induced in vivo as well as in vitro using mouse models exposed to whole body doses, 3. That the mechanism involves persistent elevation of ROS and that the effect can persist over many cell generations, 4. That chronic low dose exposures may actually be more effective than acute doses at inducing certain types of response, 5. That combinations of these inducers (whether radiation or chemical) and classical mutagens, can enhance the frequency of mutations due to the mutagen. There are implications for radiation and environmental protection which at present treat radiation as a 'stand alone' agent and assume a linear correlation between radiation dose and effect. (author)

  16. The effects of radiation on gallium arsenide radiation detectors

    Semi-insulating, undoped, liquid encapsulated Czochralski (SI-U LEC) GaAs detectors have been irradiated with 1 MeV neutrons, 24 GeV/c protons, and 300 MeV/c pions. The maximum fluences used were 6 x 1014, 3 x 1014, and 1.8 x 1014 particles/cm2, respectively. For all three types of irradiation, the charge collection efficiencies (cce) of the detector are reduced due to the reduction in the electron and hole mean free paths. Pion and proton irradiations produce a greater reduction in cce than neutron irradiation, with the pions having the greatest effect. The effect of annealing the detectors at room temperature, at 200 C and at 450 C with a flash lamp have been shown to reduce the leakage current and increase the cce of the irradiated detectors. The flash-lamp anneal produced the greatest increase in the cce from 26% to 70% by increasing the mean free path of the electrons. Two indium-doped samples were irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons and demonstrated no improvement over SI-U GaAs with respect to post-irradiation cce. (orig.)

  17. Radiation effect studies on anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin for radiation sterilization

    Varshney, L. E-mail: lalitv@magnum.barc.ernet.in; Dodke, P.B

    2004-12-01

    Two anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide (CPH) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOXO), in powder form were exposed to a range of doses of {sup 60}Co gamma and electron beam radiation to study the effects of ionizing radiation. Pharmacopoeia tests, discolouration, degradation products, effect of irradiation temperature and dose rate were investigated. CPH undergoes less than 2% degradation at 30 kGy. Chromatographic studies revealed formation of several trace level degradation products, discolouration and free radicals in the irradiated CPH. N,N-bis (2-chloroethyl) group in the molecule is particularly sensitive to radiation degradation. Irradiation to 5 kGy at low temperature (77 K) did not result in significant changes. DOXO was observed to be quite radiation resistant and did not undergo significant changes in its physico-chemical properties and degradation product profile. It can be radiation sterilized at normal sterilization dose of 25 kGy.

  18. Radiation effect studies on anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin for radiation sterilization

    Two anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide (CPH) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOXO), in powder form were exposed to a range of doses of 60Co gamma and electron beam radiation to study the effects of ionizing radiation. Pharmacopoeia tests, discolouration, degradation products, effect of irradiation temperature and dose rate were investigated. CPH undergoes less than 2% degradation at 30 kGy. Chromatographic studies revealed formation of several trace level degradation products, discolouration and free radicals in the irradiated CPH. N,N-bis (2-chloroethyl) group in the molecule is particularly sensitive to radiation degradation. Irradiation to 5 kGy at low temperature (77 K) did not result in significant changes. DOXO was observed to be quite radiation resistant and did not undergo significant changes in its physico-chemical properties and degradation product profile. It can be radiation sterilized at normal sterilization dose of 25 kGy

  19. Review of radiation effects in solid-nuclear-waste forms

    Radiation effects on the stability of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) forms are an important consideration in the development of technology to immobilize high-level radioactive waste because such effects may significantly affect the containment of the radioactive waste. Since the required containment times are long (103 to 106 years), an understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of radiation damage on the waste forms is essential. Radiation damage of nuclear waste forms can result in changes in volume, leach rate, stored energy, structure/microstructure, and mechanical properties. Any one or combination of these changes might significantly affect the long-term stability of the nuclear waste forms. This report defines the general radiation damage problem in nuclear waste forms, describes the simulation techniques currently available for accelerated testing of nuclear waste forms, and reviews the available data on radiation effects in both glass and ceramic (primarily crystalline) waste forms. 76 references

  20. Review of radiation effects in solid-nuclear-waste forms

    Weber, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Radiation effects on the stability of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) forms are an important consideration in the development of technology to immobilize high-level radioactive waste because such effects may significantly affect the containment of the radioactive waste. Since the required containment times are long (10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 6/ years), an understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of radiation damage on the waste forms is essential. Radiation damage of nuclear waste forms can result in changes in volume, leach rate, stored energy, structure/microstructure, and mechanical properties. Any one or combination of these changes might significantly affect the long-term stability of the nuclear waste forms. This report defines the general radiation damage problem in nuclear waste forms, describes the simulation techniques currently available for accelerated testing of nuclear waste forms, and reviews the available data on radiation effects in both glass and ceramic (primarily crystalline) waste forms. 76 references.

  1. The induction of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo by alpha-particle irradiation in whole Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    Li, Fanghua; Liu, Ping; Wang, Ting; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-08-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated distant/abscopal bystander effects in A. thaliana seeds and embryos; the postembryonic development of bystander tissues, such as root hair differentiation, primary root elongation, lateral root initiation and survival, were inhibited significantly by localized irradiation with microbeam protons and low-energy ions. In the present study, we further investigated radiation-induced bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in A. thaliana plants using homologous recombination (HR) and the expression level of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene as mutagenic end points. We found that alpha-particle irradiation of distal primary roots of young seedlings resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of HR in the aerial plants; the increased induction of HR occurred in every true leaf over the course of rosette development. Moreover, we also found that localized alpha-particle irradiation of roots induced a short-term up-regulated expression of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene in the nonirradiated aerial plants. These results suggested the existence of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in plants. Treatment with the ROS scavenger DMSO dramatically reduced the effects of localized root irradiation on the induction of HR and expression of the AtRAD54 gene in bystander tissues, suggesting that ROS play a critical role in mediating the bystander mutagenic effects in plants. PMID:20681789

  2. Radiative budget and cloud radiative effect over the Atlantic from ship-based observations

    J. Kalisch

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine cloud-type resolved cloud radiative budgets and cloud radiative effects from surface measurements of broadband radiative fluxes over the Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, based on simultaneous observations of the state of the cloudy atmosphere, a radiative closure study has been performed by means of the ECHAM5 single column model in order to identify the model's ability to realistically reproduce the effects of clouds on the climate system.

    An extensive database of radiative and atmospheric measurements has been established along five meridional cruises of the German research icebreaker Polarstern. Besides pyranometer and pyrgeometer for downward broadband solar and thermal radiative fluxes, a sky imager and a microwave radiometer have been utilized to determine cloud fraction and cloud type on the one hand and temperature and humidity profiles as well as liquid water path for warm non-precipitating clouds on the other hand.

    Averaged over all cruise tracks, we obtain a total net (solar + thermal radiative flux of 144 W m−2 that is dominated by the solar component. In general, the solar contribution is large for cirrus clouds and small for stratus clouds. No significant meridional dependencies were found for the surface radiation budgets and cloud effects. The strongest surface longwave cloud effects were shown in the presence of low level clouds. Clouds with a high optical density induce strong negative solar radiative effects under high solar altitudes. The mean surface net cloud radiative effect is −33 W m−2.

    For the purpose of quickly estimating the mean surface longwave, shortwave and net cloud effects in moderate, subtropical and tropical climate regimes, a new parameterisation was created, considering the total cloud amount and the solar zenith angle.

    The ECHAM5 single column model provides a surface net cloud effect that is more

  3. Nonreciprocal light transmission based on the thermal radiative effect

    Liu, Li; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong;

    2015-01-01

    the fiber-chip-fiber optomechanical structure, which is based on the thermal radiative effect, is effective at achieving a broad operation bandwidth of 24 nm and an ultra-high nonreciprocal transmission ratio up to 63 dB. These satisfactory nonreciprocal performances can mostly be attributed to the...... significant characteristics of the thermal radiative effect, which could cause a fiber displacement up to tens of microns. This powerful thermal radiative effect opens up a new opportunity for nonreciprocal light transmission which is promising to be used in complete on-chip nonreciprocal devices in the...

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation; Effecten van ioniserende straling

    Loos, M.; Hardeman, F.; Holmstock, L.; Hurtgen, C.; Mahieu, L.; Sohier, A.; Vandecasteele, C.; Vanhavere, F.; Vanmaercke, H.; Zeevaert, T

    1998-12-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on.

  5. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  6. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  7. Effect of. gamma. radiation on sorption properties of polymethylphenylsiloxane films

    Eremina, N.S.; Minakova, T.S.; Komissarova, V.N.

    1988-11-01

    The effect of ..gamma.. radiation in the 0.01-1 MGy dose range on the capacity of polymethylphenylsiloxane films to sorb water vapors was studied. It was shown that the character of the change in the sorption capacity of the polymer films is a function of the dose of radiation. The results of measurements of the IR spectra were used in discussing the causes of the change in the sorption properties of the films on exposure to ..gamma.. radiation.

  8. Methodological aspects of hygienic standardization of complex radiation and non-radiation effects on human organizm

    Considered are the necessary requirements for the methodics of substantiating the hygienic standards for a combined effect of radiation and nonradiation factors on workers engaged in electronic, radio engineering branches of industry and a number of nuclear-physical units. These approaches were used in planning and conducting of investigations on hygienic evaluation of a combined effect of ionizing radiation, electromagnetic UHF radiation, noise and other factors. Along with experimental investigations on small laboratory animals, clinico-physiological examinations of people affected by a combined or predominantely separate effect of the above-mentioned factors have been carried out for many years. The material obtaed has been subjected to mathematical treatment with the use of dispersion analysis. The results testify to the intensification of the effect under conditions of a combined action of X-ray and UHF radiations and noise

  9. INSREC: Computational System for Quantitative Analysis of Radiation Effects Covering All Radiation field

    Computational system for quantitative analysis of radiation effects (INSREC Program) was developed. To develop this program, essential methods and theories suitable to analysis steps or phenomena of radiation effects were gathered according to each program features. Also, to improve user's convenience, this program adopted the form of window based program and included database searching system based on AI(artificial intelligence) technology. In case of using searching system, terms, explanation, laws and theories for radiation field can be searched very easily through server systems constructed in our laboratory. Reliability for each program was verified by using methodology suitable to each algorithms applied to program

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  11. Effects of radiation on DNA's double helix

    2003-01-01

    The blueprint of life, DNA's double helix is found in the cells of everything from bacteria to astronauts. Exposure to radiation(depicted at right) such as X-rays (upper) or heavy ion particles (lower), can damage DNA and cause dire consequences both to the organism itself and to future generations. One of NASA's main goals is to develop better radiation shielding materials to protect astronauts from destructive radiation in space. This is particularly important for long space missions. NASA has selected researchers to study materials that provide better shielding. This research is managed by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research and is supported by the Microgravity Science and Applications Department at NASA's Marshall Center. During International Space Station Expedition Six, the Extravehicular Activity Radiation Monitoring (EVARM) will continue to measure radiation dosage encountered by the eyes, internal organs and skin during specific spacewalks, and relate it to the type of activity, location and other factors. An analysis of this information may be useful in mitigating potential exposure to space walkers in the future. (Illustration by Dr. Frank Cucinotta, NASA/Johnson Space Center, and Prem Saganti, Lockheed Martin)

  12. Coherent Radiation Effects in the LCLS Undulator

    For X-ray Free-Electron Lasers such as LCLS and TESLA FEL, a change in the electron energy while amplifying the FEL radiation can shift the resonance condition out of the bandwidth of the FEL. The largest sources of energy loss is the emission of incoherent undulator radiation. Because the loss per electron depends only on the undulator parameters and the beam energy, which are fixed for a given resonant wavelength, the average energy loss can be compensated for by a fixed taper of the undulator. Coherent radiation has a strong enhancement proportional to the number of electrons in the bunch for frequencies comparable to or longer than the bunch dimension. If the emitted coherent energy becomes comparable to that of the incoherent emission, it has to be included in the taper as well. However, the coherent loss depends on the bunch charge and the applied compression scheme and a change of these parameters would require a change of the taper. This imposes a limitation on the practical operation of Free-Electron Lasers, where the taper can only be adjusted manually. In this presentation we analyze the coherent emission of undulator radiation and transition undulator radiation for LCLS, and estimate whether the resulting energy losses are significant for the operation of LCLS.

  13. Effects of low dose radiation and epigenetic regulation

    Purpose: To conclude the relationship between epigenetics regulation and radiation responses, especially in low-dose area. Methods: The literature was examined for papers related to the topics of DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNA modulation in low-dose radiation responses. Results: DNA methylation and radiation can regulate reciprocally, especially in low-dose radiation responses. The relationship between histone methylation and radiation mainly exists in the high-dose radiation area; histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors show a promising application to enhance radiation sensitivity, no matter whether in low-dose or high-dose areas; the connection between γ-H2AX and LDR has been remained unknown, although γ-H2AX has been shown no radiation sensitivities with 1-15 Gy irradiation; histone ubiquitination play an important role in DNA damage repair mechanism. Moreover, chromatin remodeling has an integral role in DSB repair and the chromatin response, in general, may be precede DNA end resection. Finally, the effect of radiation on miRNA expression seems to vary according to cell type, radiation dose, and post-irradiation time point. Conclusion: Although the advance of epigenetic regulation on radiation responses, which we are managing to elucidate in this review, has been concluded, there are many questions and blind blots deserved to investigated, especially in low-dose radiation area. However, as progress on epigenetics, we believe that many new elements will be identified in the low-dose radiation responses which may put new sights into the mechanisms of radiation responses and radiotherapy. (authors)

  14. Radiation protection and antitumor effects in Hatakeshimeji (Lyophyllum decastes sing)

    The effect on an anti-tumor is admitted in the lyophyllum decastes sing extraction thing, and it has the action mechanism cleared to depend on the immunity action. The existence of the synergistic effect in effect on an anti-tumor radiation irradiation, an individual with the medication of lyophyllum decastes sing and effect on combination and the effect on protection of the leukocyte decrease by the radiation was examined by this research. After about 2x106 inoculated sarcoma 180 on the ICR mice, a lyophyllum decastes sing extraction thing gave 100mg/kg for 2 weeks in endoceliac at the every other day. After that, the radiation irradiation of 2 Gy was done three times, and it went to the sutra time target the number of the leukocytes, the lymph node ball some prizes of measurement. And, weight and tumor size were measured after the cancer cell inoculation two weeks. The decrease of the clear tumor size was recognized by the group that only a cancer cell was inoculated by the radiation independent irradiation group, lyophyllum decastes sing and the radiation combination group though tumor size increased as it passed. It faced by the group that only a cancer cell was inoculated after the irradiation 15 days though it died the precedent, and a half existed by lyophyllum decastes sing and the radiation combination group. And, the numbers of the leukocytes, the number of the lymphocyte were on the increase regardless of the existence of the radiation irradiation by the medication of lyophyllum decastes sing. It thinks with the thing that the effect is shown for the effect on immunity recovery in the radiotherapy and the prevention of a side effect of the radiation from this result. Showing the effect for not only effect on prevention of the cancer and effect on healing but also the effect on immunity recovery in the radiotherapy, the prevention of a side effect by taking lyophyllum decastes sing is considered

  15. Study on effects of vitamin E on radiation effect

    The effect of Vitamin E on radiation effect was studied. The X-ray (190 kV, 25 mA, 0.7 mmCu + 0.5 mmAl filter, dose rate 78 R/min) was irradiated to the whole body one hour after the administration of 1.0 g/kg of Vitamin E. The LD 50 (30) was larger in the group receiving Vitamin E than in the group which did not receive it. The rate at which tumor cells were killed was smaller in Vitamin E-treated group than in untreated group. The anoxic cell proportion in the tumor was 13% in the untreated group, and 35% in the treated group. The LD 50 (30) was largest in the group receiving 1.0 g/kg of Vitamin E. (Serizawa, K.)

  16. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  17. Collective effects in the radiation pressure force

    Bachelard, R; Guerin, W; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the role of diffuse, Mie and cooperative scattering on the radiation pressure force acting on the center of mass of a cloud of cold atoms. Even though a mean-field Ansatz (the `timed Dicke state'), previously derived from a cooperative scattering approach, has been shown to agree satisfactorily with experiments, diffuse scattering also describes very well most features of the radiation pressure force on large atomic clouds. We compare in detail an incoherent, random walk model for photons and a diffraction approach to the more complete description based on coherently coupled dipoles. We show that a cooperative scattering approach, although it provides a quite complete description of the scattering process, is not necessary to explain the previous experiments on the radiation pressure force.

  18. Study of radiation effects on semiconductor devices

    The new structure of recent semiconductor devices could make them more sensitive to space radiation, and understanding the mechanism of errors or failures caused by radiation is becoming more and more important. Trench type power MOSFET with a new gate structure is one of the attractive power devices because of its better electric performance than ones with conventional gate structure. However its high sensitivity to radiation, such as the decrease in turn-on threshold voltage on gate, needs to be improved for space applications. The decrease in threshold voltage is due to the microdose damage introduced by an ion passage through the gate oxide along the drain current path. To characterize the microdose damage induced by heavy ions, irradiation tests were performed and its dependence on linear energy transfer (LET) of ions were examined. (author)

  19. The effects of cosmic radiation on implantable medical devices

    Metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuits, with the benefits of low power consumption, represent the state of the art technology for implantable medical devices. Three significant sources of radiation are classified as having the ability to damage or alter the behavior of implantable electronics; Secondary neutron cosmic radiation, alpha particle radiation from the device packaging and therapeutic doses(up to 70 Gγ) of high energy radiation used in radiation oncology. The effects of alpha particle radiation from the packaging may be eliminated by the use of polyimide or silicone rubber die coatings. The relatively low incidence of therapeutic radiation incident on an implantable device and the use of die coating leaves cosmic radiation induced secondary neutron single event upset (SEU) as the main pervasive ionising radiation threat to the reliability of implantable devices. A theoretical model which predicts the susceptibility of a RAM cell to secondary neutron cosmic radiation induced SEU is presented. The model correlates well within the statistical uncertainty associated with both the theoretical and field estimate. The predicted Soft Error Rate (SER) is 4.8 x l0-12 upsets/(bit hr) compared to an observed upset rate of 8.5 x 10-12 upsets/(bit hr) from 20 upsets collected over a total of 284672 device days. The predicted upset rate may increase by up to 20% when consideration is given to patients flying in aircraft The upset rate is also consistent with the expected geographical variations of the secondary cosmic ray neutron flux, although insufficient upsets precluded a statistically significant test. This is the first clinical data set obtained indicating the effects of cosmic radiation on implantable devices. Importantly, it may be used to predict the susceptibility of future to the implantable device designs to the effects of cosmic radiation

  20. The effects of cosmic radiation on implantable medical devices

    Bradley, P. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) integrated circuits, with the benefits of low power consumption, represent the state of the art technology for implantable medical devices. Three significant sources of radiation are classified as having the ability to damage or alter the behavior of implantable electronics; Secondary neutron cosmic radiation, alpha particle radiation from the device packaging and therapeutic doses(up to 70 G{gamma}) of high energy radiation used in radiation oncology. The effects of alpha particle radiation from the packaging may be eliminated by the use of polyimide or silicone rubber die coatings. The relatively low incidence of therapeutic radiation incident on an implantable device and the use of die coating leaves cosmic radiation induced secondary neutron single event upset (SEU) as the main pervasive ionising radiation threat to the reliability of implantable devices. A theoretical model which predicts the susceptibility of a RAM cell to secondary neutron cosmic radiation induced SEU is presented. The model correlates well within the statistical uncertainty associated with both the theoretical and field estimate. The predicted Soft Error Rate (SER) is 4.8 x l0{sup -12} upsets/(bit hr) compared to an observed upset rate of 8.5 x 10{sup -12} upsets/(bit hr) from 20 upsets collected over a total of 284672 device days. The predicted upset rate may increase by up to 20% when consideration is given to patients flying in aircraft The upset rate is also consistent with the expected geographical variations of the secondary cosmic ray neutron flux, although insufficient upsets precluded a statistically significant test. This is the first clinical data set obtained indicating the effects of cosmic radiation on implantable devices. Importantly, it may be used to predict the susceptibility of future to the implantable device designs to the effects of cosmic radiation.

  1. Chronic radiation effects on dental hard tissue (''radiation carries''). Classification and therapeutic strategies

    Objectives: Since the first description of rapid destruction of dental hard tissues following head and neck radiotherapy 80 years ago, 'radiation caries' is an established clinical finding. The internationally accepted clinical evaluation score RTOG/EORTC however is lacking a classification of this frequent radiogenic alteration. Material and Methods: Medical records, data and images of radiation effects on the teeth of more than 1,500 patients, who underwent periradiotherapeutic care, were analyzed. Macroscopic alterations regarding the grade of late lesions of tooth crowns were used for a classification into 4 grades according to the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. Results: No early radiation effects were found by macroscopic inspection. In the first 90 days following radiotherapy 1/3 of the patients complained of reversible hypersensitivity, which may be related to a temporary hyperemia of the pulp. It was possible to classify radiation caries as a late radiation effect on a graded scale as known from RTOG/EORTC for other organ systems. This is a prerequisite for the integration of radiation caries into the international nomenclature of the RTOG/EORTC classification. Conclusions: The documentation of early radiation effects on dental hard tissues seems to be neglectable. On the other hand the documentation of late radiation effects has a high clinical impact. The identification of an initial lesion at the high-risk areas of the neck and incisal part of the tooth can lead to a successful therapy as a major prerequisite for orofacial rehabilitation. An internationally standardized documentation is a basis for the evaluation of the side effects of radiooncotic therapy as well as the effectiveness of protective and supportive procedures. (orig.)

  2. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  3. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Sisko Salomaa [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  4. Ionizing radiation effects on implanted pacemakers

    Fourteen multi-programmable pacemakers and 2 intercardial defibrillators were exposed to 60Co radiation, to 9 MeV electrons and to 6 MV and 10 MV photon radiation. The pacemakers were placed into a water phantom. The following parameters were examined: telemetry, battery, pulse frequency, pulse amplitude, and period at accumulated doses from 2 Gy to 100 Gy. It is concluded that pacemakers in CMOS/Bipolar technology and in 8μ CMOS technology should not be exposed to an absorbed dose exceeding 5 Gy, the latest generation of pacemakers in the 3μm technology will perform satisfactorily up to 70 Gy. (P.A.)

  5. Radiative Corrections to the Casimir Force and Effective Field Theories

    Melnikov, Kirill

    2001-07-25

    Radiative corrections to the Casimir force between two parallel plates are considered in both scalar field theory of one massless and one massive field and in QED. Full calculations are contrasted with calculations based on employing ''boundary-free'' effective field theories. The difference between two previous results on QED radiative corrections to the Casimir force between two parallel plates is clarified and the low-energy effective field theory for the Casimir effect in QED is constructed.

  6. Radiative corrections to the Casimir force and effective field theories

    Melnikov, Kirill

    2001-08-15

    Radiative corrections to the Casimir force between two parallel plates are considered in both scalar field theory of one massless and one massive field and in QED. Full calculations are contrasted with calculations based on employing 'boundary-free' effective field theories. The difference between two previous results on QED radiative corrections to the Casimir force between two parallel plates is clarified and the low-energy effective field theory for the Casimir effect in QED is constructed.

  7. 47 CFR 22.913 - Effective radiated power limits.

    2010-10-01

    ... radiated power (ERP) of transmitters in the Cellular Radiotelephone Service must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. In general, the effective radiated power (ERP) of base transmitters and... areas, as those areas are defined in § 22.949, the ERP of base transmitters and cellular repeaters...

  8. 47 CFR 22.659 - Effective radiated power limits.

    2010-10-01

    ... radiated power limits. The purpose of the rules in this section, which limit effective radiated power (ERP... subsequently relocated. (a) Maximum ERP. The ERP of base transmitters must not exceed 100 Watts under any circumstances. The ERP of mobile transmitters must not exceed 60 Watts under any circumstances. (b)...

  9. 47 CFR 22.627 - Effective radiated power limits.

    2010-10-01

    ... radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels listed in § 22.621 must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. The ERP must not exceed the applicable limits in this paragraph under any circumstances. Frequency range (MHz) Maximum ERP (watts)...

  10. Late effects of radiation on the eye and ocular adnexa

    A clinically useful classification system is suggested that can be used in prospective trials to evaluate the effects of radiation on the visual system. We review radiation-induced pathophysiological and clinical changes of the various ocular structures as well as dose-response data and management of ocular complications. The rationale for the classification scheme chosen is also discussed

  11. For the first time: Moessbauer effect with synchrotron radiation

    After 9 years of preparation a group of scientists under the leadership of Prof. Erich Gerdau from the University of Hamburg succeeded in observing the Moessbauer Effect (recoilless emission of a gamma quantum) with the help of synchrotron radiation in October last year. The experiments were carried out at the Hamburg Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, HASYLAB, at the DORIS II storage ring. (orig.)

  12. On the instability effects in radiation-sensitive chalcogenide glasses

    Balitska, V. [Lviv State University for Vital Activity Safety, 35 Kleparivska str., Lviv, UA-79007 (Ukraine); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); International Materials Institute for New Functionality in Glass, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); International Materials Institute for New Functionality in Glass, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua; Vakiv, M. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)

    2007-04-15

    The features of application of radiation-sensitive media based on chalcogenide glasses of As-Ge-S system for registration of high-energy {gamma}-radiation are analysed. It is shown that compositional features of the observed time-instability effect should be taken into account in order to ensure a higher accuracy of the developed dosimeters.

  13. On the instability effects in radiation-sensitive chalcogenide glasses

    The features of application of radiation-sensitive media based on chalcogenide glasses of As-Ge-S system for registration of high-energy γ-radiation are analysed. It is shown that compositional features of the observed time-instability effect should be taken into account in order to ensure a higher accuracy of the developed dosimeters

  14. Effects produced by nuclear radiation in powdery milk

    The objective of this work is to determine the chemical effects produced by the gamma rays and beta particles radiations on the powdery milk. This work treats on the Pre-dose analysis, sampling radiating, electron spin resonance, acidity, proteins, aminoacids, lactose, fatty acids, peroxides, as well as its experimental results. (Author)

  15. Radiation hydrodynamics of triggered star formation: the effect of the diffuse radiation field

    Haworth, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of including diffuse field radiation when modelling the radiatively driven implosion of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere (BES). Radiation-hydrodynamical calculations are performed by using operator splitting to combine Monte Carlo photoionization with grid-based Eulerian hydrodynamics that includes self-gravity. It is found that the diffuse field has a significant effect on the nature of radiatively driven collapse which is strongly coupled to the strength of the driving shock that is established before impacting the BES. This can result in either slower or more rapid star formation than expected using the on-the-spot approximation depending on the distance of the BES from the source object. As well as directly compressing the BES, stronger shocks increase the thickness and density in the shell of accumulated material, which leads to short, strong, photo-evaporative ejections that reinforce the compression whenever it slows. This happens particularly effectively when the diffuse field is includ...

  16. Effects of space-relevant radiation on pre-osteoblasts

    Hu, Yueyuan

    2014-02-12

    Until now limited research has been conducted to address the mechanisms leading ionizing radiation exposure induced bone loss. This is relevant for cancer radiotherapy and human spaceflight. Exposure to radiation can result in elevated bone fracture risk in patients receiving cancer radiotherapy. In human spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to space radiation which is a very complex mixture consisting primarily of high-energy charged particles. Osteoblasts are of mesenchymal origin and responsible for creating and maintaining skeletal architecture; these cells produce extracellular matrix proteins and regulators of matrix mineralization during initial bone formation and later bone remodeling. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on pre-osteoblasts including cellular survival, cell cycle regulation and differentiation modification. Experiments with the pre-osteoblast cell line OCT-1 and the mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 showed that radiation cell killing depends on dose and linear energy transfer (LET) and is most effective at an LET of ∝150 keV/μm. High-LET radiation has a much more pronounced ability to induce cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. After both X-rays and heavy ions exposure, expression of the cell cycle regulator CDKN1A was significantly up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner. The findings suggest that cell cycle regulation is more sensitive to high-LET radiation than cell survival, which is not solely regulated through elevated CDKN1A expression. Radiation exposure enhances osteoblastic differentiation and maturation, and mediates Runx2 and TGF-β1 expression during early differentiation of pre-osteoblasts. Osteogenic differentiation did not alter cellular radiosensitivity, DNA repair of radiation-induced damages and the effects of radiation on proliferation. Further experiments are needed to elucidate possible synergistic effects of microgravity and radiation on osteoblast differentiation. This may

  17. Effects of space-relevant radiation on pre-osteoblasts

    Until now limited research has been conducted to address the mechanisms leading ionizing radiation exposure induced bone loss. This is relevant for cancer radiotherapy and human spaceflight. Exposure to radiation can result in elevated bone fracture risk in patients receiving cancer radiotherapy. In human spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to space radiation which is a very complex mixture consisting primarily of high-energy charged particles. Osteoblasts are of mesenchymal origin and responsible for creating and maintaining skeletal architecture; these cells produce extracellular matrix proteins and regulators of matrix mineralization during initial bone formation and later bone remodeling. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on pre-osteoblasts including cellular survival, cell cycle regulation and differentiation modification. Experiments with the pre-osteoblast cell line OCT-1 and the mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 showed that radiation cell killing depends on dose and linear energy transfer (LET) and is most effective at an LET of ∝150 keV/μm. High-LET radiation has a much more pronounced ability to induce cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. After both X-rays and heavy ions exposure, expression of the cell cycle regulator CDKN1A was significantly up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner. The findings suggest that cell cycle regulation is more sensitive to high-LET radiation than cell survival, which is not solely regulated through elevated CDKN1A expression. Radiation exposure enhances osteoblastic differentiation and maturation, and mediates Runx2 and TGF-β1 expression during early differentiation of pre-osteoblasts. Osteogenic differentiation did not alter cellular radiosensitivity, DNA repair of radiation-induced damages and the effects of radiation on proliferation. Further experiments are needed to elucidate possible synergistic effects of microgravity and radiation on osteoblast differentiation. This may

  18. Data error effects on net radiation and evapotranspiration estimation

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential error in estimating the net radiation and reference evapotranspiration resulting from errors in the measurement or estimation of weather parameters. A methodology for estimating the net radiation using hourly weather variables measured at a typical agrometeorological station (e.g., solar radiation, temperature and relative humidity) is presented. Then the error propagation analysis is made for net radiation and for reference evapotranspiration. Data from the Raimat weather station, which is located in the Catalonia region of Spain, are used to illustrate the error relationships. The results show that temperature, relative humidity and cloud cover errors have little effect on the net radiation or reference evapotranspiration. A 5°C error in estimating surface temperature leads to errors as big as 30 W m−2 at high temperature. A 4% solar radiation (Rs) error can cause a net radiation error as big as 26 W m−2 when Rs ≈ 1000 W m−2. However, the error is less when cloud cover is calculated as a function of the solar radiation. The absolute error in reference evapotranspiration (ETo) equals the product of the net radiation error and the radiation term weighting factor [W = Δ(Δ1+γ)] in the ETo equation. Therefore, the ETo error varies between 65 and 85% of the Rn error as air temperature increases from about 20° to 40°C. (author)

  19. Cooperative Effect Radiation Loss of Optical Pump Solid Laser

    NING Guo-bin; SONG Gui-cai

    2006-01-01

    The cooperative effect radiation loss of the optical pumped solid laser has been investigated. The characteristics and the cause of coherent spontaneous are discussed using Maxwell-Bloch equation in the paper. By laser rate equation, the expression of upper energy level lifetime shortening due to the cooperative effect radiation is given.The influence of the cooperative effect on laser threshold and the loss are analyzed. By a series of experiments, the relation ship of coherent spontaneous radiation intensity and direction with reversal population and the power of optical pump are obtained.

  20. Basic mechanisms of radiation effects on electronic materials and devices

    Many defense and nuclear reactor systems require complementary metal-oxide semiconductor integrated circuits that are tolerant to high levels of radiation. This radiation can result from space, hostile environments or nuclear reactor and accelerator beam environments. In addition, many techniques used to fabricate today's complex very-large-scale integration circuits expose the circuits to ionizing radiation during the process sequence. Whatever its origin, radiation can cause significant damage to integrated-circuit materials. This damage can lead to circuit performance degradation, logic upset, and even catastrophic circuit failure. This paper provides a brief overview of the basic mechanisms for radiation damage to silicon-based integrated circuits. Primary emphasis is on the effects of total-dose ionizing radiation on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures

  1. A study of the radiation cataract as late effects of radiation therapy

    In a review of 61 patients irradiated their eye balls in the Department of Radiology, Fukuoka University, from 1973 to 1997, radiation cataract as late effect occurred in 17 patients (27.9%), in 25 eye balls (22.1%). The periods from irradiation to appearance the cataract were related closely with total radiation doses to the lens. The radiation cataract developed earlier on cases irradiation with large total dose than with small total dose. According to the fraction size, the radiation cataract rates were higher in the patients irradiated over 1.5 Gy than the patients irradiated under 1.5 Gy, with significant difference. Five percent radiation cataract dose after 5 year was TDF 13 (95% confidence limits 11-14), 50% dose was 21 (19-23), and 95% dose was 35 (31-39). (author)

  2. Radiation induced effects in carbon materials

    Full text: The level of safe exploiting nuclear reactor depends on radiation-induced changes of the neutron-absorbing material shape. The dimensional effects in carbon materials including those containing boron carbides B4C, irradiated in the water-water cooled reactor of the INP AS RUz operating at the power of 10 MW were studied in the temperature interval of 300-1500 K up to the integral fluence of 4·1021 neutrons per cm2. Two methods of dimensional control were used: dilatometry (change of linear dimensions and calculation of the volume change) and X-ray diffraction analysis (determination of the lattice parameters and the elementary unit volume). In all samples of low-ash and pyrolytic graphite (oriented parallel and normal to the pressing axis), irradiated up to the fluences above 1021 n/cm2 in the temperature range of 700-1100 K the shrinkage of linear dimensions was found from 6 to 8 %. While there occurred the primary swelling of graphite in the temperature interval of 300-700 K. The secondary swelling began at the fluence of 4·1021 cm-2 and 1100 K. Basing on these data, the neutron-absorbing graphite rods, containing B4C particles, were tested under the analogous irradiation conditions. The comparison of the rates of B4C swelling and graphite matrix shrinkage showed, that unfortunately, there was not gained the complete compensation of the swelling at the expense of shrinkage. The samples of fiber graphite, which were studied under the same conditions as the above mentioned, turned out stable in dimensions - changes in linear dimensions did not exceed 2 %. The X-diffraction study of ultra disperse amorphous carbon film irradiated in the water reactor discovered the formation of a denser carbon phase. The position of the observed structure reflection with d/n = 7.5 A did not correspond to the peaks of stable single phases of fullerenes C60 and C70. Perhaps, the irradiation creates a mixture of these phases in the amorphous matrix

  3. Radiation Effects on Polymers-X

    Aly, M. I.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius; Ghanem, N. A.;

    1978-01-01

    obtained at radiation doses between 2 and 3 Mrad, at acrylic acid concentrations of 40–60% and at FeSO4 · 7H2O concentrations of 0.25-0.5% by weight. The grafted films were tested for reverse osmosis properties. A membrane with 60% polyacrylic acid content gave 87% salt rejection and a water flux of 0...

  4. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants – Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    Highlights: • Neutron and gamma rays fields in concrete biological shield are calculated. • An extensive database on irradiated concrete properties has been collected. • Concrete mechanical properties decrease beyond 1.0 × 1019 n/cm2 fluence. • Loss of properties appears correlated with radiation induced-aggregate swelling. • Commercial reactor bio-shield may experience long-term irradiation damage. - Abstract: A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review of the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation

  5. Radiation

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  6. The study of the radiation protection of propolis to the radiation effects in mice

    The profit which radiation brought to the Homo sapiens is very big. But, radiation has even harmful parameter for the human besides one case. After effect on man to the radiation is thought about, the individual of which sensibility is the highest is a fetus. Therefore, even an effects to this fetus is grasped precisely, and protection criterion and resource are decided from the viewpoint of the protection of radiation as well. If it does so, a child and maturitas aren't so difficult as in the protection of radiation and the managerial side. It was examined about control group, propolis administration chisels for medical use group, 1.5 Gy independent exposure group and propolis pluse 1.5 Gy group in this study. It was examined about the protection of radiation of propolis which to malformation, fetal death, arrested development, and so on in the organogenesis (8 days post conception) being done when sensibility is the highest against the teratogenesis. Preimplantation death rate was compared with the control group and the sham control group, and statistical significant difference wasn't recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group, propolis administration 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group. As for the embryonic death rate, propolis was administered, and obviously embryonic death rate was poorer than the 1.5 Gy independent exposure group, and significant difference was recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group (p<0.001). It has a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group made clear by this research fetal death rate propolis administer more only 1.5 Gy exposure fetal death rate development low (p<0.001). Fetal death rate wasn't recognized by propolis administration group (Sham control). As for the teratogenesis rate, propolis was administered, and the teratogenesis rate of the 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group was higher than the 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group. But, this is thought anamorphosis appear by propolis administration so long as there was

  7. Radiation effects of electron-beam metal depositions on IGFET's

    Electron-beam radiation effects on n-channel IGFET parameters were studied. This paper summarizes the resulting surface- and dielectric-radiation effects obtained with a series of experiments incorporating e-gun metal deposition on MOS, MNOS, and SNOS structures. The results are compared with those using resistance-heated metal deposition for various thin-film compositions between the metal and silicon surfaces. A comparison is also made with the effects of controlled direct e-beam irradiation of the structures. The efficiency of quartz and aluminum thin films over MNOS structures, in reducing e-gun radiation effects, is evaluated for double-level metallurgy structures. The effect of different thermal-annealing conditions for offsetting the radiation effects is determined. It is concluded that e-gun metallization causes large negative voltage shifts in MOS, MNOS, and SNOS devices. While MOS threshold shifts are fully ''annealable'', residual MNOS and SNOS V/sub T/ shifts are observed after an anneal of 3500/4500C. Thin films of quartz and aluminum over MOS and MNOS structures effectively reduce radiation effects. Other IGFET parameters are not substantially affected by e-gun radiation

  8. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-05-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  9. Effectiveness of topical steroids in the control of radiation dermatitis

    Radiation dermatitis often presents as a problem for patients and radiotherapists during treatment. Topical corticosteroids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory effect in the treatment of many skin diseases and are commonly prescribed during a course of radiation treatment. A comparison of two different steroid creams, 1% hydrocortisone cream and 0.05% clobetasone butyrate (Eumovate), in a double blind trial was carried out in 54 patients undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer. 'The cream' was administered when patients reached a given dose of 2000 rad (or earlier if required) whether a skin reaction was present or not. The aim of the trial was to evaluate the general effectiveness of steroids in controlling radiation dermatitis and whether one type of cream was superior to the other. The majority of patients using either cream derived benefit in its soothing effect. There was, however, a significant difference in the intensity of reactions seen, patients using clobetasone butyrate developed more severe radiation reactions despite both groups having similar radiation doses. The possibility of two differing populations having different responses to radiation is discussed as is the 'breakthrough phenomenon' described in the literature. It is concluded that neither cream should be used as first choice in the control of radiation dermatitis. (author)

  10. Quantifying Aerosol influences on the Cloud Radiative Effect

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Sena, Elisa; Yamaguchi, Takanobu

    2016-04-01

    Although evidence of aerosol influences on the microphysical properties of shallow liquid cloud fields abounds, a rigorous assessment of aerosol effects on the radiative properties of these clouds has proved to be elusive because of adjustments in the evolving cloud system. We will demonstrate through large numbers of idealized large eddy simulation and 14 years of surface-based remote sensing at a continental US site that the existence of a detectable cloud microphysical response to aerosol perturbations is neither a necessary, nor a sufficient condition for detectability of a radiative response. We will use a new framework that focuses on the cloud field properties that most influence shortwave radiation, e.g., cloud fraction, albedo, and liquid water path. In this framework, scene albedo is shown to be a robust function of cloud fraction for a variety of cloud systems, and appears to be insensitive to averaging scale. The albedo-cloud fraction framework will be used to quantify the cloud radiative effect of shallow liquid clouds and to demonstrate (i) the primacy of cloud field properties such as cloud fraction and liquid water path for driving the cloud radiative effect; and (ii) that the co-variability between meteorological and aerosol drivers has a strong influence on the detectability of the cloud radiative effect, regardless of whether a microphysical response is detected. A broad methodology for systematically quantifying the cloud radiative effect will be presented.

  11. Gas phase radiative effects in diffusion flames

    Bedir, Hasan

    Several radiation models are evaluated for a stagnation point diffusion flame of a solid fuel in terms of accuracy and computational time. Narrowband, wideband, spectral line weighted sum of gray gases (SLWSGG), and gray gas models are included in the comparison. Radiative heat flux predictions by the nongray narrowband, wideband, and SLWSGG models are found to be in good agreement with each other, whereas the gray gas models are found to be inaccurate. The narrowband model, the most complex among the models evaluated, is then applied first to a solid fuel and second to a pure gaseous diffusion flame. A polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) diffusion flame in a stagnation point geometry is solved with the narrowband model with COsb2, Hsb2O, and MMA vapor included in participating species. A detailed account of the emission and absorption from these species as well as the radiative heat fluxes are given as a function of the stretch rate. It is found that at low stretch rate the importance of radiation is increased due to an increase in the optical thickness, and a decrease in the conductive heat flux. Results show that COsb2 is the biggest emitter and absorber in the flame, MMA vapor is the second and Hsb2O is the least important. A pure gaseous flame in an opposed jet configuration is solved with the narrowband radiation model with CO as the fuel, and Osb2 as the oxidizer. Detailed. chemical kinetics and transport are incorporated into the combustion model with the use of the CHEMKIN and TRANSPORT software packages. The governing equations are solved with a modified version of the OPPDIF code. Dry and wet CO flames as well as COsb2 dilution are studied. Comparison of the results with and without the consideration of radiation reveals that the radiation is important for the whole flammable range of dry CO flames and for the low stretch rates of wet flames. Without the consideration of radiation the temperature and the species mole fractions (especially of minor species

  12. A new solvent suppression method via radiation damping effect

    Cui Xiao-Hong; Peng Ling; Zhang Zhen-Min; Cai Shu-Hui; Chen Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damping effects induced by the dominated solvent in a solution sample can be applied to suppress the solvent signal.The precession pathway and rate back to equilibrium state between solute and solvent spins are different under radiation damping.In this paper,a series of pulse sequences using radiation damping were designed for the solvent suppression in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.Compared to the WATERGATE method,the solute signals adjacent to the solvent would not be influenced by using the radiation damping method.The one-dimensional (1D) 1H NMR,two-dimensional (2D) gCOSY,and J-resolved experimental results show the practicability of solvent suppression via radiation damping effects in 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

  13. Effect of low doses of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' Fl were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from 60Co source at 0. 509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments of different radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0, 12.5, 15.0, 20.0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) in the treatment of radiation side effects

    Aim: Many reports show that late complications of radiotherapy can be successfully treated by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). This synopsis attempts to review the literature to identify areas of clinical use and further research. Patients and Methods: Clinical and experimental data about HBO treatment of radiation late effects are analysed. Mechanisms of hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of late radiation side effects are discussed. Results: There is evidence in the literature that HBO is beneficial in the treatment of radiation cystitis, osteoradionecrosis of the mandible, hemorrhagic proctitis, soft tissue necrosis and neurologic deficits. The prophylactic use of HBO has shown to prevent the development of osteoradionecrosis after tooth removal and the loss of titanium implants in irradiated facial bones. The physiologic basis of HBO can be referred to induction of neoangiogenesis and revascularisation. Conclusions: Clinicians can be encouraged to use hyperbaric oxygen for the treatment of radiation cystitis, osteonecrosis of the mandible, hemorrhagic proctitis, soft tissue necrosis and neurologic deficits following radiation therapy. (orig.)

  15. Effects of Nuclear Interactions on Accuracy of Space Radiation Transport

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts and electronic equipments is one major obstacle in long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials. These results tell us at what energies nuclear cross sections are the most important for radiation risk evaluations, and how uncertainties in our knowledge about nuclear fragmentations relate to uncertainties in space transport predictions.

  16. Environmental radiation effects. A need to question old paradigms and to enhance collaboration between radiation biologists and radiation ecologists

    The radiological sciences are a real enigma- the maturity and depth of understanding concerning human dosimetry contrasts sharply with our shallow understanding about radiological effects to biota. The richness of the radiological sciences is apparent by looking at the refinements made to the fundamental unit used in human dosimetry. The radiological sciences have developed to where probabilistic risk factors can now be applied that predict specific deleterious effects to humans per unit dose. And yet, these same radiological sciences that have made such advances in human dosimetry, are primitive when effects to biota are concerned. There are no specialized units, no agreed upon weighting factors, no factors that account for distributions within an organism's body, and certainly no risk factors. There are no internationally agreed upon criteria or policies that explicitly address protection of the environment from ionizing radiation. There is not even agreement as to what endpoint should be measured to quantify an environmental effect. The bold aspect of the ICRP framework is the inclusion of sub-lethal effects (reduced reproductive success, scorable DNA damage) as endpoints. A major research consortium funded by the European Union, is also recommending that cytogenetic damage be used as an effect endpoint. The inclusion of sub-lethal endpoints begs for a linkage between molecular effects and those observed in individuals and populations. To do so, will require a strengthening of what has traditionally been separated disciplines of radiation biology and radiation ecology. The impacts of phenomena studied in the petri dishes of radiation biologists (such as genomic instability, adaptive response, and bystander effects) need to be explored and correlated to effects observed in whole organisms and populations, in collaboration with radiation ecologists. (M. Suetake)

  17. X-ray diffraction radiation in conditions of Cherenkov effect

    Tishchenko, A. A.; Potylitsyn, A. P.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction radiation from ultra-relativistic electrons moving near an absorbing target is considered. The emission yield is found to increase significantly in conditions of Cherenkov effect. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling of radiation effects in cells and tissues

    Friedland, W.; Kundrát, Pavel

    1. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2014 - (Brahme, A.), s. 105-142 ISBN 978-0444536327. - (Reference Module in Biomedical Sciences) Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ionizing radiation * iological effects * athematical modeling * echanistic simulations * onte Carlo simulations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  19. Proceedings of a Workshop on Genetic Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Nine papers were presented at this workshop held to mark the retirement of Dr. D.K. Myers. The papers reviewed recent literature on the heritable effects of ionizing radiation and identified areas of uncertainty. (L.L.)

  20. Effect of impurity radiation on tokamak equilibrium

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to the radiation from impurities is of great importance in the overall energy balance. Taking the temperature dependence of this loss for two impurities characteristic of those present in existing tokamak plasmas, the condition for radial power balance is derived. For the impurities considered (oxygen and iron) it is found that the radiation losses are concentrated in a thin outer layer of the plasma and the equilibrium condition places an upper limit on the plasma paraticle number density in this region. This limiting density scales with mean current density in the same manner as is experimentally observed for the peak number density of tokamak plasmas. The stability of such equilibria is also discussed. (author)

  1. Study of radiation effects on semiconductor devices

    Due to the demand for high integration and scaling down, recent integrated circuits have been designed with the design rule less than 100 nm. SEUs (Single-Event Upset) and SETs (Single-Event Transient) are serious problems for those devices because of the lower supply voltage and the lower threshold voltage of the transistors that makes more sensitive to smaller charge generated by an ion passage. To attain higher radiation tolerance for high integrated circuits, a DICE (Dual Interlocked Storage Cell)-based flip-flop with an SET pulse discriminator circuit on a 90-nm bulk CMOS was designed and fabricated and its performance was examined through radiation testing. SEU/SET sensitivity in the angular irradiation was measured and analyzed in this study. The test of edge-on irradiation was performed for the first time and the importance of the angular irradiation for the memory cells that have redundant memory nodes was demonstrated. (author)

  2. FALLOUT RADIATION: EFFECTS ON THE SKIN

    Conard, R. A.; Cronkite, E. P.; Bond, V. P.

    1963-02-06

    Until recently it has been generally assumed that injury to the skin from ionizing radiation was not a serious hazard associated with the detonation of nuclear dcvices. However, in 1954 the importance of this hazard became apparent when widespread lesions of the skin developed in a large group of people accidentally exposed to fallout radiation in the Marshall Islands following the experimental detonation of a large nuclear device. The accident in the Marshall Islands affords an example of large numbers of lesions of the skin in human beings from the fallout. Studies have been documented and will be referred to frequently in this chapter. The possibility of such accidents must be considered seriously in view of the increasingly widespread use of radioisotopes.

  3. Effect of gamma radiation on retroviral recombination.

    Hu, W S; Temin, H M

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of retroviral recombination, we exposed virions to gamma radiation prior to infecting target cells. By using previously described spleen necrosis virus-based vectors containing multiple markers, recombinant proviruses were studied after a single round of retrovirus replication. The current models of retroviral recombination predict that breaking virion RNA should promote minus-strand recombination (forced copy-choice model), decrease or not affect plus-strand rec...

  4. Effects of gamma radiation on potato meristems

    The development of buds in potato tubers subjected to gamma radiation at doses of 3, 6, 8 and 12 Krad is studied at histological level. The irradiation was supplied at the beguining and end of the resting period, and the irradiated buds were observed at different stages of their development. Meristem's sensitivity depends on the state of activity involved at the moment of irradiation. Different parts of the meristem present different radiosensitivity, being the most radioresistant. (author)

  5. Application of radiation damage effects in dosimetry

    some general aspects of radiation dosimetry are outlined. The techniques of radiophotoluminescence, radiothermoluminescence and exo-electron emission are discussed individually. It is thought that the trend in personnel dosimetry is such that thermoluminescence will steadily replace film and photoluminescence techniques over the next decade, and that more unusual techniques, such as exo-electron emission, will make inroads only for special purposes. (B.R.H.)

  6. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Oil Recovery

    Esmaeili, Abdollah

    2011-12-01

    A variety of oil recovery methods have been developed and applied to mature and depleted reservoirs in order to improve the efficiency. Microwave radiation oil recovery method is a relatively new method and has been of great interest in the recent years. Crude oil is typically co-mingled with suspended solids and water. To increase oil recovery, it is necessary to remove these components. The separation of oil from water and solids using gravitational settling methods is typically incomplete. Oil-in-water and oil-water-solid emulsions can be demulsified and separated into their individual layers by microwave radiation. The data also show that microwave separation is faster than gravity separation and can be faster than conventional heating at many conditions. After separation of emulsion into water and oil layers, water can be discharged and oil is collected. High-frequency microwave recycling process can recover oil and gases from oil shale, residual oil, drill cuttings, tar sands oil, contaminated dredge/sediments, tires and plastics with significantly greater yields and lower costs than are available utilizing existing known technologies. This process is environmentally friendly, fuel-generating recycler to reduce waste, cut emissions, and save energy. This paper presents a critical review of Microwave radiation method for oil recovery.

  7. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  8. Studies on chronic effect on radiation

    This experiment was carried out to evaluate the chronic harzard of Co-60 low dose irradiation on ICR mice. There is now considerable evidence from human studies that age, both at exposure to radiation and at observation for risk, can be a major determinant of radiation induced cancer risk. For this reason, ICR mice at different ages as specified below were exposed to 60 m rads/week, 500 m rads/biweek of whole body Co-60 radiation at a dose rate of 3.6 rads/min. ICR mice were irradiated during pregnant period and each period from the 1st week to the 3rd week to the 52nd week, from the 6th week to the 52nd week and from the 22nd week to the 52nd week after the birth. All the experimental mice were autopsied immediately after sacrificed at the 52nd week. And all of their major organs were examined grossly and weighed. After fixation histo-pathological preparations were made for microscopical study. Blood cells-W.B.C., R.B.C., Hb-from eye's vein were counted by hemocytometer and hemometer. (Author)

  9. Radiation

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  10. Effective temperature and exergy of monochromic blackbody radiation

    2007-01-01

    A new parameter named monochromic effective temperature Tλ is proposed, which represents the thermodynamic quality of monochromic blackbody radiation. The exergy of the monochromic blackbody radiation is expressed by Tλ. The monochromic effective temperature equation is developed, which shows that the produci of Tλ and the wavelength is constant, which equals 5.33016×10-3 tion in photosynthesis can be explained by the results of this work.

  11. The effects of temperature on the radiation chemistry of polymers

    Hill, D.J.T. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on polymers is dependent on a number of factors. One of the most important factors is the radiolysis temperature. This paper discusses the effects of the {alpha}-transition and the other secondary transitions, as well as the ceiling and melting temperatures, on the nature of the radiolysis reactions which occur for a number of polymers. Some implications of changes in the radiation chemistry of polymers with a change in the temperature are also considered. (author).

  12. The effects of temperature on the radiation chemistry of polymers

    The effects of high energy radiation on polymers is dependent on a number of factors. One of the most important factors is the radiolysis temperature. This paper discusses the effects of the α-transition and the other secondary transitions, as well as the ceiling and melting temperatures, on the nature of the radiolysis reactions which occur for a number of polymers. Some implications of changes in the radiation chemistry of polymers with a change in the temperature are also considered. (author)

  13. Numerical simulation of neutron radiation effects in avalanche photodiodes

    Osborne, M.; Hobson, PR; Watts, SJ

    2000-01-01

    A new one-dimensional (1-D) device model developed for the simulation of neutron radiation effects in silicon avalanche photodiodes is described. The model uses a finite difference technique to solve the time-independent semiconductor equations across a user specified structure. The model includes impact ionization and illumination allowing accurate simulation with minimal assumptions. The effect of neutron radiation damage is incorporated via the introduction of deep acceptor levels subject ...

  14. Parameterisation of radiation effects on CVD diamond for proton irradiation

    Hartjes, F.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M

    1999-08-01

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation hardness of CVD diamond for 24 GeV/c proton irradiation at fluences up to 5{sup *}10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. The results not only show radiation damage but also an annealing effect that is dominant at levels around 10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. A model describing both effects is introduced, enabling a prediction of the distribution curve of the charge signal for other levels.

  15. Parameterisation of radiation effects on CVD diamond for proton irradiation

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation hardness of CVD diamond for 24 GeV/c proton irradiation at fluences up to 5*1015 protons/cm2. The results not only show radiation damage but also an annealing effect that is dominant at levels around 1015 protons/cm2. A model describing both effects is introduced, enabling a prediction of the distribution curve of the charge signal for other levels

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle precursor cells

    Marš, Tomaž; Čemažar, Maja; Jurdana, Mihaela; Pegan, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Background. Long term effects of different doses of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle myoblast proliferation, cytokine signalling and stress response capacity were studied in primary cell cultures.Materials and methods. Human skeletal muscle myoblasts obtained from muscle biopsies were cultured and irradiated with a Darpac 2000 X-ray unit at doses of 4, 6 and 8 Gy. Acute effects of radiation were studied by interleukin - 6 (IL-6) release and stress response detected by the heat shoc...

  17. Effective UV radiation dose in polyethylene exposed to weather

    González-Mota, R.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Rosales-Candelas, I.; Calero Marín, S. P.; Vega-Durán, J. T.; Moreno-Virgen, R.

    2009-09-01

    In this work we quantified the effective UV radiation dose in orange and colorless polyethylene samples exposed to weather in the city of Aguascalientes, Ags. Mexico. The spectral distribution of solar radiation was calculated using SMART 2.9.5.; the samples absorption properties were measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy and the quantum yield was calculated using samples reflectance properties. The determining factor in the effective UV dose is the spectral distribution of solar radiation, although the chemical structure of materials is also important.

  18. Effect of absorbing grounds on acoustic radiation of tyres

    Duhamel, D.; HAMET,JF; Klein, P; ANFOSSO,F; YIN, HP; GAUTIER,JL; MAUNIER,Y

    2006-01-01

    Tyre noise is generated by surface vibrations or by air pumping and can be amplified by the horn effect which is the increase in radiation by the geometric horn between the tyre and the ground. The global efficiency of this radiation depends on the absorbing properties of the ground and an accurate model of tyre noise radiation must take this effect into account. Here the results of a detailed boundary element model including three dimensional real geometries and the impedance of the ground a...

  19. Effect of absorbing grounds on acoustic radiation of tyres

    Duhamel, D.; HAMET,JF; Klein, P; ANFOSSO LEDEE, F; Yin , H.; GAUTIER,JL; Meunier, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Tyre noise is generated by surface vibrations or by air pumping and can be amplified by the horn effect which is the increase in radiation by the geometric horn between the tyre and the ground. The global efficiency of this radiation depends on the absorbing properties of the ground and an accurate model of tyre noise radiation must take this effect into account. Here the results of a detailed element model including three dimensional real geometries and the impedance of the ground are presen...

  20. Effect of radiation resistance additives for insulation materials

    For the electric wires and cables used in radiation environment such as nuclear power stations and fuel reprocessing facilities, the properties of excellent radiation resistance are required. For these insulators and sheath materials, ethylene propylene rubber, polyethylene and other polymers have been used, but it cannot be said that they always have good radiation resistance. However, it has been well known that radiation resistance can be improved with small amount of additives, and heat resistance and burning retarding property as well as radiation resistance are given to the insulators of wires and cables for nuclear facilities by mixing various additives. In this research, the measuring method for quantitatively determining the effect of Anti-rad (radiation resistant additive) was examined. Through the measurement of gel fraction, radical formation and decomposed gas generation, the effect of Anti-rad protecting polymers from radiation deterioration was examined from the viewpoint of chemical reaction. The experimental method and the results are reported. The radiation energy for cutting C-H coupling is polymers is dispersed by Anti-rad, and the probability of cutting is lowered. Anti-rad catches and extinguishes radicals that start oxidation reaction. (K.I.)

  1. Some hazardous effects of radiations on human body

    The radiation hazards and its dangers has been increasing by leaps and bounds. Certain elements and particles are capable of degrading by themselves and releasing energy in the form of radiations. Such types of radiations can not be seen by naked eyes, but are capable of penetrating our body and can produce serious ill effects. Acute radiation syndrome can be divided into three main categories: (1) Hematopoietic:- In this type of syndrome there is fall in blood cells, causes infections, bleeding and anemia (2) Gastrointestinal:- It occurs at the exposures of 600-1000 rad. Nausea, loss of appetite, vomiting and abdominal pain are main symptoms. (3) Neurovascular:- When exposure greater than 1000 rad occurs it effects nervous system which results in dizziness, headache or decreased level of consciousness. The various organs or parts of body are affected by exposure to radiations such as the losing of hair and clumping of hairs with radiation exposure above 200 rems or higher, same way the thyroid gland is susceptible to radioactive iodine, in sufficient amount iodine can destroy some parts or fully the thyroid. When a person is exposed to radiations around 100 rems the blood lymphocyte cell count will be reduced, leaving the victim more susceptible to infection. If the exposure is between 1000-5000 rems blood vessels got damage resulting into heart failure, in short, we can say that in order to prevent body from radiation the only way to keep away from them. (author)

  2. Effects of high let radiation at the cellular level

    The complete evaluation of the impact of nuclear energy technologies on human health requires: identification and characterization of hazardous agents and their effects, which is well advanced; quantitative dose-effect relations for important effects under various conditions of radiation exposure and biological variation, which needs more work but which has been advancing fairly well, particularly in experimental animal research; an understanding of the cellular and tissue mechanisms of the hazardous effects in relation to the microdosimetry of the agents, which has advanced slowly and to a relatively limited degree; and integration of the dose-effect relations and mechanistic knowledge into theories and models which are intended to be predictive for estimation of human health risks at pertinent low levels of exposure. Several theories, hypotheses or models of radiation carcinogenesis, and some for alpha radiation in particular, have been developed on the basis of dose-effect relations in the necessary attempt to predict the hazards of low levels of radiation exposure for purposes of radiation protection in advance of adequate data on dose-effect relations and mchanisms. As such these theories or models have necessarily involved strings of explicit and implicit assumptions concerning mechanisms and the nature of dose-effect relations below the dose regions at which effects have been observed. Nevertheless, they have been useful in stimulating research to test their assumptions and in assuming the interpretation of data

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems

    A panel of experts in November 1971 specifically considered the effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems and formulated detailed suggestions for research in the area. A further panel meeting took place in April 1974. The results of the work are presented in this report which is divided into 3 chapters in the first chapter the concentrations of natural and artificial radionuclides in aquatic environments and the radiation dose rates received by aquatic organisms are discussed. In particular, simple dosimetry models for phytoplankton, zooplankton, mollusca, crustacea and fish are presented which permit the estimation of the dose rates from incorporated radionuclides and from radionuclides in the external environment. In the second chapter the somatic and genetic effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms are reviewed. Somatic effects are discussed separately as effects due to short-term (acute) exposure to near-lethal doses of radiation. Great attention is paid to the effects due to long-term (chronic) exposure at lower doses rates. Consideration is given to behaviour, repair mechanisms and metabolic stimulation after exposure, and also the influence of environmental factors on radiation effects. In the third chapter the potential effects of low-level irradiation on aquatic populations are considered. First, the possible consequences of somatic effects on egg and larval mortality, stock-recruitment, fecundity and ecosystem stability are discussed. Subsequently, the assessment of genetic effects as they relate to population genetics and increased mutation rates are considered

  4. Extension lectures: the effects of radiation from atomic bombing

    About 56,000 A-bomb survivors are living in Nagasaki city even today. Nagasaki citizens, whether they are A-bomb survivors or not, can not live without concerns on the existence of radiation effects. They have fears of any amount of radiation and are afraid that it may harm their life. As results of studies in the university on radiation effects are not familiar to the citizens, we have started extension lectures on 'the effects of radiation from A-bombing' to them since 1990. We discuss the problems as well as significance of the extension lectures by reporting the details of the extension lectures which we have managed in the past. (author)

  5. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  6. Environmental Radiation Effects on Mammals A Dynamical Modeling Approach

    Smirnova, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    This text is devoted to the theoretical studies of radiation effects on mammals. It uses the framework of developed deterministic mathematical models to investigate the effects of both acute and chronic irradiation in a wide range of doses and dose rates on vital body systems including hematopoiesis, small intestine and humoral immunity, as well as on the development of autoimmune diseases. Thus, these models can contribute to the development of the system and quantitative approaches in radiation biology and ecology. This text is also of practical use. Its modeling studies of the dynamics of granulocytopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis in humans testify to the efficiency of employment of the developed models in the investigation and prediction of radiation effects on these hematopoietic lines. These models, as well as the properly identified models of other vital body systems, could provide a better understanding of the radiation risks to health. The modeling predictions will enable the implementation of more ef...

  7. Short-term effects of radiation in glioblastoma spheroids

    Asferg Petterson, Stine; Pind Jakobsen, Ida; Jensen, Stine Skov;

    2016-01-01

    investigate the short-term effects of radiation of spheroids containing tumor-initiating stem-like cells. We used a patient-derived glioblastoma stem cell enriched culture (T76) and the standard glioblastoma cell line U87. Primary spheroids were irradiated with doses between 2 and 50 Gy and assessed after two...... capacity. Gene expression analysis of nine stem cell- and two hypoxia-related genes did not reveal any upregulation after radiation. In conclusion, this study suggests that a major short-term effect of radiation is pronounced reduction of tumor cell proliferation. We found no upregulation of stem cell......-related genes. This may suggest a limited effect of targeting these genes within the first days after radiation therapy....

  8. Current research in Canada on biological effects of ionizing radiation

    A survey of current research in Canada on the biological effects of ionizing radiation has been compiled. The list of projects has been classified according to structure (organizational state of the test system) as well as according to the type of effects. Using several assumptions, ballpark estimates of expenditures on these activities have been made. Agencies funding these research activities have been tabulated and the break-down of research in government laboratories and in academic institutions has been designated. Wherever possible, comparisons have been made outlining differences or similarities that exist between the United States and Canada concerning biological radiation research. It has been concluded that relevant research in this area in Canada is inadequate. Wherever possible, strengths and weaknesses in radiation biology programs have been indicated. The most promising course for Canada to follow is to support adequately fundamental studies of the biological effects of radiation. (auth)

  9. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  10. Spatial interpolation of biologically effective UV radiation over Poland

    Walawender, J.; Ustrnul, Z.

    2010-09-01

    The ultraviolet(UV) radiation plays an important role in the Earth-Atmosphere System. It has a positive influence on both human health and natural environment but it may also be very harmful if UV exposure exceeds "safe" limits. For that reason knowledge about spatial distribution of biologically effective UV doses seems to be crucial in minimization or complete elimination of the negative UV effects. The main purpose of this study is to find the most appropriate interpolation method in order to create reliable maps of the biologically effective UV radiation over Poland. As the broadband UV measurement network in Poland is very sparse, erythemaly weighted UV radiation data reconstructed from homogeneous global solar radiation records were used. UV reconstruction model was developed in Centre of Aerology (Institute of Meteorology and Water Management) within COST Action 726 - ‘Long term changes and climatology of UV radiation over Europe'. The model made it possible to reconstruct daily erythemal UV doses for 21 solar radiation measurement stations in the period 1985 - 2008. Mapping methodology included the following processing steps: exploratory spatial data analysis, verification of additional variables, selection and parameterization of interpolation model, accuracy assessment and cartographic visualization. Several different stochastic and deterministic interpolation methods along with various empirical semivariogram models were tested. Multiple regression analysis was performed in order to examine statistical relationship between UV radiation and additional environmental variables such as: elevation, latitude, stratospheric ozone content and cloud cover. The data were integrated, processed and visualized within GIS environment.

  11. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved

  12. Enigma of radiation effects in Drosophila

    Linear relations between induced mutation and x-ray dose and related inconsistencies are discussed. Some of the inconsistencies are concerned with the frequency of induced sex-linked lethal mutations in ring chromosomes and the frequency of whole-body mutations after irradiation. The hypothesis of totipotency or the developmental competence of a single first-cleavage product after loss of the other by its involvement in chromatid rearrangements suggests that interchanges predominantly involve the chromatids within each of the two nuclei and not between the two nuclei. It is concluded that the hypothesis of totipotency of the cleavage products in Drosophila explains many puzzling results from radiation experiments

  13. The combined carcinogenic effects of ionising radiation and chemical molecules

    Studies of the combined effects of ionizing radiation and chemicals on the incidence of cancer are briefly reviewed. Results (mainly animal data) are presented for the combined effects of; 1) X-radiation and urethane on the incidence of leukaemia and lymphomas; 2) X-radiation and N-N'-2,7 fluorenylenebisacetamide, X-radiation and carbon tetrachloride, neutron radiation and carbon tetrachloride and cerium-144 and DAB on the incidence of cancer of the liver; 3) 131I and methylthiouracil on the incidence of thyroid cancer; and 4) inhaled radon and cigarette smoking, inhaled plutonium and beryllium oxide, inhaled plutonium oxide and benzopyrene, inhaled plutonium and dimethylnitrosamine, and inhaled radon and 5-6 benzoflavone on the incidence of lung cancer. Many of the studies showed that the combined effects of radiation and chemicals had a potentiating effect on tumour formation; there was often a shortening of the latency period before tumour induction and an increase in the size and the malignancy of the tumours. The mechanism of action of these combined effects on tumour incidence are considered. (UK)

  14. More Abstracts on Effects of Radiation on Electronic Devices

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1987-01-01

    Second volume of bibliography summarizes literature on radiation effects on new electronic devices. Includes those of protons, electrons, neutrons, gamma rays, and cosmic rays at energies up to about 20 GeV. Volume contains 219 abstracts from unclassified sources. Organized into four sections: dose-rate effects, new technology, post-irradiaton effects, and test environments.

  15. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  16. Study on the radiation preservation of apples and the radiation effects

    The radiation effects on respiration and ethylene production in apple and its radiation preservation were reported in this paper. It shows that, when irradiation was applied immediately after harvest, the respiratory rate and ethylene production increase with the increasing of irradiation dose. When irradiation was applied after 7-10 days of storage, the respiratory rate still rises with the dose, while there is a decrease in ethylene production with the increasing of dose. If the irradiation dose is less than 800 Gy the rise of respiratory rate of irraadiated apple returns to the level of the control within 5 days, but ethylene production of irradiated apple keeps a lower level. According to the above results, dose of 300-500 Gy may be recommended for radiation preseration of apple. Ascorbic acid is unstable and sensitive to radiation. The radiation effects on ascorbic acid in apple is very small because the saccharides and some organic acid in apple, especially malic acid, are able to protect ascorbic acid from radiation damage. From measuring the saccharides and acids in apple, it is obvious that there is no significant difference between irradiated and non-irradiated apple. Long-life free radical in apple was not detected after irradiation. The scald of apple is reduced from 60% to less than 15% after cold storage for 8 monthes. The taste results indicated, tasting them without knowing which is irradiated or not, that the irradiated apple is superior to controlled sample

  17. Radiation Effects in Functional Materials for Nuclear Fusion Application

    Radiation effects can be grouped into three major events: atomic displacement, electronic excitation and nuclear transmutation. In the meantime, radiation effects have two aspects, accumulation and dynamic effects. The diagnostic components developing group of the ITER Engineering Design Activities clearly declared that the only in-situ type radiation effects studies, preferably with a fission reactor, will be relevant to nuclear fusion development. As a background, the evolution of radiation effects as functions of time and environmental parameters such as temperatures, chemical potentials, and electrical and magnetic fields could be categorized into several domains: linear radiation effects dominating, environment effects dominating, synergistic effects modifying, multi-scale modelling effective and finally non-linear effects dominating. Among major irradiation tools such as spallation and fusion neutron sources charged particle accelerators, gamma ray facilities and fission reactors, as well as computer based simulations, only fission reactor irradiation can give an overall perspective of radiation effects in nuclear fusion materials with abundant and uniform irradiation volumes. In the meantime, fission reactor irradiation is handicapped by relatively low neutron fluence except for some very high neutron flux reactors, which will be needed for evaluation of structural materials. For the study of functional materials, some handicaps of fission reactor irradiation can be neglected such as primary knock-on cascade profiles, and the demanded neutron fluence is within the attainable range. The paper will describe some examples of irradiation tests of nuclear fusion functional materials in fission reactors, the electrical conductivity of ceramic insulators and hydrogen isotope mobility in solid breeders. Also, a recent attempt to evaluate nuclear fusion relevant irradiation effects in superconductive magnets will be briefly reported, noting that a cryogenic

  18. Radiation and man - evaluation of biological and environmental low level radiation effects

    The harmful effects of acute radiation cannot be resolved by statistical means and require clearer knowledge of mechanisms of action and much wider collection of human experience before any definite sound stand can be taken. Much information has accumulated from animal experiments, and still the interpretations are not always clearcut, but for human experience it is only the occasional accident which can give a direct answer. Some of the phenomena attributed to low dose radiation are summarized. There are regions of radiation exposure about which we have only limited positive knowledge, an all low-dose risk estimates have been based on effects observed at relatively high doses. Much information has been gathered which does not support the severity of former basic principles, especially our knowledge of mechanisms of repair existing in most cells as natural defence against the damages caused by radiation as well as by many chemicals which act as mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. Understanding these mechanism, their scope of action and their availability to a damaged cell and organism will lead towards modification of the acceptable permissible exposures, in some cases towards severity, but in most cases towards leniency and higher values. For the evaluation of the effects of low level low dose-rate radiations, whether external, or from internal deposition of isotopes, only late somatic and genetic effects should be considered. (B.G.)

  19. Effect of gamma radiation on retroviral recombination.

    Hu, W S; Temin, H M

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of retroviral recombination, we exposed virions to gamma radiation prior to infecting target cells. By using previously described spleen necrosis virus-based vectors containing multiple markers, recombinant proviruses were studied after a single round of retrovirus replication. The current models of retroviral recombination predict that breaking virion RNA should promote minus-strand recombination (forced copy-choice model), decrease or not affect plus-strand recombination (strand displacement/assimilation model), and shift plus-strand recombination towards the 3' end of the genome. However, we found that while gamma irradiation of virions reduced the amount of recoverable viral RNA, it did not primarily cause breaks. Thus, the frequency of selected recombinants was not significantly altered with greater doses of radiation. In spite of this, the irradiation did decrease the number of recombinants with only one internal template switch. As a result, the average number of additional internal template switches in the recombinant proviruses increased from 0.7 to 1.4 as infectivity decreased to 6%. The unselected internal template switches tended to be 5' of the selected crossover even in the recombinants from irradiated viruses, inconsistent with a plus-strand recombination mechanism. PMID:1602553

  20. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue

  1. Risk calculations for hereditary effects of ionizing radiation in humans.

    Vogel, F

    1992-05-01

    A prediction of the extent to which an additional dose of ionizing radiation increases the natural germ cell mutation rate, and how much such an increase will affect the health status of future human populations is part of the service that human geneticists are expected to offer to human society. However, more detailed scrutiny of the difficulties involved reveals an extremely complex set of problems. A large number of questions arises before such a prediction can be given with confidence; many such questions cannot be answered at our present state of knowledge. However, such predictions have recently been attempted. The 1988 report of the United Nations Scientific Committee for the Effects of Atomic Radiation and the fifth report of the Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation of the US National Research Council have presented a discussion of the human genetics problems involved. Empirical data from studies on children of highly radiation-exposed parents, e.g. parents exposed to the atomic bombs of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or parents belonging to populations living on soil with high background radiation, have been mentioned in this context. Whereas precise predictions are impossible as yet because of deficiencies in our knowledge of medical genetics at various levels, the bulk of the existing evidence points to only small effects of low or moderate radiation doses, effects that will probably be buried in the "background noise" of changing patterns of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:1587523

  2. Analytical approach to the modeling of radiation effects in tissue

    This paper reports the application of reactor physics calculational methods to the analysis of the interaction of radiation with tissue with the objective of developing a radiation effects model that is equivalent to the reactor point kinetics equations in mathematical rigor and utility. A primary motivation for this effort is that concerns about exposure to low levels of radiation have caused enormous expense to the nuclear industry in terms of both lack of public acceptance and regulation of activities involving minor amounts of radioactivity. These concerns might be alleviated if there were a rigorous yet mathematically tractable model of the effects of radiation on tissue. Our understanding of such effects is derived by extrapolation from high-level exposures. These extrapolations involve statistical considerations that are not readily understood by the public. Regulators also have difficulty in that existing mathematical models of the biological effects of radiation do little to promote understanding by the nonspecialist. There are two approaches. At one extreme are simple calculational methods that combine the definition of dose with information on the range of the radiation. For example, for charged particles, all of the energy is deposited locally

  3. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  4. Radiation induced effects in the developing central nervous system

    The embryo and the human foetus are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation and this sensitivity presents various qualitative and quantitative functional changes during intra-uterine development. Apart from radiation induced carcinogenesis, the most serious consequence of prenatal exposure in human beings is severe mental retardation. The principal data on radiation effects on human beings in the development of the central nervous system come form epidemiological studies carried out in individuals exposed in utero during the atomic explosion at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These observations demonstrate the existence of a time of maximum radiosensitivity between the weeks 8 and 15 of the gestational period, a period in which the proliferation and neuronal migration takes place. Determination of the characteristics of dose-response relationship and the possible existence of a threshold dose of radiation effects on the development of the central nervous system is relevant to radiation protection against low dose radiation and the establishment of dose limits for occupational exposure and the public. Studies were conducted on the generation of nitrous-oxide and its relation with the production of active species of oxygen in brains of exposed rats in utero exposed to doses of up to 1 Gy during their maximum radiosensitivity. The possible role of the mechanism of radiation induced damage in the development of the central nervous system is discussed

  5. Effects of gamma radiation on commercial operational amplifiers

    The operational amplifiers are widely used in nuclear instrumentation. Their applications span the signal conditioning circuits, analog instrumentation, amplifiers, converters, oscillators and others. If an operational amplifier is used to work in a radiation environment, the device suffers degradation in its performance leading to the bad work in the systems. Some of these devices are designed as rad-hard components and therefore the effects of radiation damage are minimized, however its main disadvantage is the high cost and difficult to find in the market. As an alternative one can use the conventional electronic components available in the market and named COTS (Commercially Available Off-The-Shelf) but they must be tested under a radiation environment. In this work the effect of the radiation damage is studied in two typical operational amplifiers. Some electric parameters of these devices were measured for different gamma radiation doses and they were working at different input signal frequencies. A 60Co isotopic radiation source was used and the results show that there is a certain degradation of the device depending on the radiation absorbed dose. (author)

  6. Internal Radiation Effects in Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Using thermal barrier coatings on combustor liners, turbine vanes, and rotating blades is important for reducing metal temperatures in current and advanced aircraft engines. Zirconia is a common coating material, and it is partially transparent to thermal radiation. Radiation becomes more significant as temperatures are raised for higher efficiency in advanced engines. Calculations are often made with radiation effects neglected inside the coating. The effect of radiation is illustrated here, where an analytical procedure is provided by using the two-flux method for the radiative contribution. A detailed study was made of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for diesel engines, and a two-flux analysis was developed for radiation in semitransparent multilayer composites. These efforts provide the basis for the present analysis where illustrative solutions are obtained for typical conditions in an aircraft engine. The formulation and solution of the exact spectral radiative transfer equations including large scattering, as is characteristic of zirconia, are rather complicated. The two-flux method is used here to provide a simplified method.

  7. Effect of radiative cooling on collapsing charged grains

    B P Pandey; Vinod Krishan; M Roy

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the radiative cooling of electrons on the gravitational collapse of cold dust grains with fluctuating electric charge is investigated. We find that the radiative cooling as well as the charge fluctuations, both, enhance the growth rate of the Jeans instability. However, the Jeans length, which is zero for cold grains and nonradiative plasma, becomes finite in the presence of radiative cooling of electrons and is further enhanced due to charge fluctuations of grains resulting in an increased threshold of the spatial scale for the Jeans instability.

  8. Effects of gamma-Radiation on Select Lipids and Antioxidants

    Gandolph, Jacob; Mauer, Lisa; Perchonok, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Radiation encountered on an extended duration space mission (estimates of 3 Sieverts for a mission to Mars) poses a threat not only to human health, but also to the quality, nutritional value, and palatability of the food system. Free radicals generated by radiation interaction with foods may initiate many unwanted reactions including: 1) autoxidation in lipids that alters flavor, odor, and concentrations of essential fatty acids, and 2) depletion of antioxidants food products and dietary supplements. Studies have shown that antioxidants may provide long term health protection from oxidative stress caused by radiation exposure; therefore, consumption of antioxidants will be important. Stability of essential fatty acids is also important for astronauts long-term health status. The objectives of this study were to characterize the effects of low dose gamma-radiation on lipids and antioxidants by monitoring oxidation and reducing power, respectively, in model systems. Select oils and antioxidants were exposed to levels of gamma-radiation ranging from 0 to 1000 Gy (1 Gy = 1 Sv) using a Gammacell 220 and stored at ambient or elevated temperatures (65 C) for up to 3 months prior to analysis. A Fricke dosimeter was used to verify differences between the radiation doses administered. Primary and secondary products of lipid oxidation in soybean and peanut oils were monitored using conjugated diene and 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBARs) assays. Changes in fatty acid composition and formation and vitamin E levels were also measured. The reducing power of antioxidant compounds, including vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, was determined using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Significant differences (alpha =0.05) were present between all radiation doses tested using the Fricke dosimeter. Increasing radiation doses above 3 Sv resulted in significantly (alpha =0.05) elevated levels of oxidation and free fatty acids in soybean and peanut oils. Decreases in

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on gelatine films added with antioxidant

    This work evaluates the effect of ionizing radiation on the gelatin films in presence of antioxidant. Gelatin solutions of glycerine and poly vinil alcohol, with and without the addition were prepared until the complete homogenization. The films were irradiated with 20 and 40 kGy in a electron accelerator, in the presence of air and at the room temperature. The use of ionizing radiation and the addition of antioxidant changed the properties of the film. The result of water absorption test revealed that with increasing of radiation dose occurred a reduction in the absorption, suggesting that happen a reticulation

  10. Controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers

    The interest of Member States of the IAEA in introducing radiation technology into the polymer and plastics industry is growing. This publication summarizes a number of studies conducted in the framework of a coordinated research project (CRP) on controlling of degradation effects on polymers by radiation processing technologies. It reviews a variety of applications and details the most important results and achievements of the participating centres and laboratories during the course of the CRP. The publication is intended to be of use to scientists implementing the technology and managers of radiation processing facilities

  11. Radiation Damage to Artemia Cysts:Effects of Water Vapor.

    Snipes, W C; Gordy, W

    1963-10-25

    Water vapor altered the form and greatly increased the rate of decay of the electron-spin resonance pattern of long-lived free radicals obtained upon gamma irradiation of Artemia salina cysts ( brine shrimp eggs). These results, combined with data on radiation survival, indicate that the water vapor protects the cysts from radiation damage, or heals the damage. They also indicate that water protects the cysts from the effect of oxygen by neutralizing the radiation-induced free radicals before they can interact with oxygen to produce irreversible damage. PMID:17748168

  12. A consideration of low dose radiation effects on human health

    On March 11, 2011, an earthquake categorized as 9 Mw occurred off the northeast coast of Japan. The subsequent destructive tsunami disabled emergency units of Fukushima Dai'ichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused partial meltdown of reactors and explosions. Resulting radiation releases forced large evacuations, bore concerns about food and water and fears against human health. In this manuscript, we described the effect of radiation, especially low dose radiation below 100 mSv, on cancer risk, focusing on fetuses and children. (author)

  13. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1 – absence of effects (stress recognition), 2 – activation (adaptive response), and 3 – inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure. - Highlights: • Luminous bacteria demonstrate nonlinear dose-effect relation in radioactive solutions. • Response to low-dose radiation includes 3 stages: threshold, activation, inhibition. • ROS are responsible for low-dose effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides. • Luminous marine bacteria are a convenient tool to study radiation hormesis

  14. Delayed effects of ionizing radiation on the ear

    Bohne, B.A.; Marks, J.E.; Glasgow, G.P.

    1985-07-01

    The question of damage to the ear from exposure to ionizing radiation was addressed by exposing groups of chinchillas to fractioned doses of radiation (2 Gy per day) for total doses ranging from 40 to 90 Gy. In order to allow any delayed effects of radiation to become manifest, the animals were sacrificed two years after completion of treatment and their temporal bones were prepared for microscopic examination. The most pronounced effect of treatment was degeneration of sensory and supporting cells and loss of eighth nerve fibers in the organ of Corti. Damage increased with increasing dose of radiation. The degree of damage found in many of these ears was of sufficient magnitude to produce a permanent sensorineural hearing loss.

  15. Delayed effects of ionizing radiation on the ear

    The question of damage to the ear from exposure to ionizing radiation was addressed by exposing groups of chinchillas to fractioned doses of radiation (2 Gy per day) for total doses ranging from 40 to 90 Gy. In order to allow any delayed effects of radiation to become manifest, the animals were sacrificed two years after completion of treatment and their temporal bones were prepared for microscopic examination. The most pronounced effect of treatment was degeneration of sensory and supporting cells and loss of eighth nerve fibers in the organ of Corti. Damage increased with increasing dose of radiation. The degree of damage found in many of these ears was of sufficient magnitude to produce a permanent sensorineural hearing loss

  16. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed. PMID:25722878

  17. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation

    Li Zhao; Yan-Hui Hao; Rui-Yun Peng

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  18. Oxygen effect in radiation biology: caffeine and serendipity

    The 'hit theory' developed in 1920s to explain the actions of ionizing radiation on cells and organisms was purely physical, and its limitation was its inadequacy to address the contemporary findings such as the oxygen enhancement of radiobiological damage, and the increased radio- sensitivity of dividing compared to non-dividing cells. The textbooks written prior to 1970s did not either refer at all to oxygen as a radiosensitizer, or had mentioned it only in a passing manner; yet 'oxygen effect' was emerging as the central dogma in radiation biology. The oxygen effect in radiation biology is highly interdisciplinary encompassing atomic physics (i.e. interaction of photon with matter), radiation chemistry (formation of reactive oxygen species), molecular signalling, gene expression and genetic alterations in cells (mutation, cancer) or the cell death (apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic catastrophe, etc.). Cell death in higher organisms is now recognized as the precursor of possible error-free cell replacement repair. (author)

  19. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (1070K) and an electron density N = 3 x 1023cm-3, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm3 and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 1022 cm-3). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas

  20. Radiation effects in LiYF4

    Radiation-induced defects in LiYF4 have been studied using optical and ESR techniques. A π-polarised absorption band at 3.99 eV is identified as the [F2-] centre. An optical band at 3.70 eV has polarisation properties characteristic of dipoles oriented in the direction of Y3+ - Y3+ pairs. This band is a candidate for the F centre. Other optical bands with π-polarisation at 3.02 eV and with σ polarisation at 2.29 eV and 2.88 eV were not identified. These optical bands occur in nominally pure samples and also in samples doped with 1% Pr3+ and Er3+. (author)

  1. Hematological effects of low dose radiation

    Results of an analysis of the leukemia incidence in children of Belarus in 1979-2006 are discussed in the present report. It was found that approximately 244 (95% CI from 149 to 348) additional leukemias manifested in children of Belarus in 1986-1997. Assuming radiation origin of additional leukemias the following risks were established in the report for this period: RR = 1.28 (95% CI from 1.17 to 1.39); ERR = 17.7% per 1 mSv (95% CI from 10.8 to 25.2% per 1 mSv), EAR = 57/104 PYSv (95% CI from 34.8 to 81.3/ 104 PYSv), AR = 21.6% (95%CI is from 13.2 to 30.8%). (authors)

  2. Radiation effects on lead silicate glass surfaces

    Radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of lead silicate glass were investigated in situ under Mg Kα irradiation in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lead-oxygen bond breaking resulting in the formation of pure lead was observed. The segregation, growth kinetics and the structural relaxation of the lead, with corresponding changes in the oxygen and silicon on the glass surfaces were studied by measuring the time-dependent changes in concentration, binding energy shifts, and the full width at half maximum. A bimodal distribution of the oxygen XPS signal, caused by bridging and non-bridging oxygens, was found during the relaxation process. All experimental data indicate a reduction of the oxygen concentration, a phase separation of the lead from the glass matrix, and the metallization of the lead occurred during and after the X-ray irradiation. (author)

  3. Effects of gamma radiation on snake venoms

    Nascimento, N.; Spencer, P. J.; Andrade, H. F.; Guarnieri, M. C.; Rogero, J. R.

    1998-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is able to detoxify several venoms, including snake venoms, without affecting significantly their immunogenic properties. Inn order to elucidate this phenomena, we conceived a comparative pharmacological study between native and irradiated (2,000 Gy) crotoxin, the main toxin of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Crotoxin was isolated and purified by molecular exclusion chromatography, pI precipitation and, susbequentely submitted to irradiaiton. Gel filtration of the irradiated toxin resulted in some high molecular weight aggregates formation. Crotoxin toxicity decreased two folds after irradiation, as determined by LD 50 in mice. Native and irradiated crotoxin biodistribution ocured in the same general manner, with renal elimination. However, in contrast to irradiated crotoxin, the native form was initially retained in kidneys. A later concentration (2-3 hr) appeared in phagocytic mononuclear cells rich organs (liver and spleen) and neural junction rich organs (muscle and brain).

  4. Comparison of the dose-effect relationship for UV radiation and ionizing radiation

    Ionizing radiation and ultraviolet radiation (UV) are both physical agents with mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. However, there are some basic differences in the fundamental mechanism of their interaction with biological material that may have consequences for risk assessment. In this paper the dose-effect relationships for gamma radiation and UV at cellular level will be used to demonstrate the different radio-biological effectiveness of both agents. The results will be discussed in the framework of a biophysical model, based on the assumption that DNA doublestranded lesions are crucial for the cytotoxic action. After exposure to ionizing radiation, the lesions are fixed immediately following irradiation, but after UV exposure the lethal lesions are recognized only in the next DNA synthesis phase. The combination of this concept with the mechanism of lesion induction and the possibility of repair, leads to different dose and time relationships for the radiation effects of both agents. The possible consequences for risk assessment at low levels will be discussed. (author). 9 refs.; 5 figs

  5. Unravelling the effects of radiation forces in water

    Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Malacarne, Luis C.; Mauro L. Baesso; Lukasievicz, Gustavo V. B.; Bialkowski, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of radiation forces at the interface between dielectric materials has been a long-standing debate for over a century. Yet there has been so far only limited experimental verification in complete accordance with the theory. Here we measure the surface deformation at the air–water interface induced by continuous and pulsed laser excitation and match this to rigorous theory of radiation forces. We demonstrate that the experimental results are quantitatively described by the numerical ...

  6. Biologic discussions augmenting radiation effects and model systems

    It appears that there is a great deal of indirect evidence that hypoxic cells exist in human tumors, and that they affect the dose of radiation required to control the tumor. Given a suitable method for decreasing the effect of hypoxic cells the way is open to the possible use of lower doses of radiation. This should decrease complication rates, or allow an increased volume to be treated and a consequent increase in control rates

  7. The diamagnetic effect on the intensity of helium radiation lines

    The changes of the radiation matrix elements, probabilities, and line intensities in a strong magnetic field are studied for the helium lines, corresponding to transitions between Zeeman manifolds with |m| ≤3. The effect of a selective field action on radiation lines is discovered that may reduce and enhance corresponding matrix elements and induce the dipole-forbidden transitions with the selection rule |Δl = 3. (author)

  8. The global land Cryosphere Radiative Effect during the MODIS era

    Singh, D; M. G. Flanner; J. Perket

    2015-01-01

    Cryosphere Radiative Effect (CrRE) is the instantaneous influence of snow- and ice-cover on Earth's top of atmosphere (TOA) solar energy budget. Here, we apply measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), combined with microwave retrievals of snow presence and radiative kernels produced from 4 different models, to derive CrRE over global land during 2001–2013. We estimate global annual mean land CrRE during this period of −2.6 W m...

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation in ginkgo and guarana

    Rabelo Soriani, Renata [Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida professor Lineu Prestes, 580-Bloco13, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Satomi, Lucilia Cristina [Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida professor Lineu Prestes, 580-Bloco13, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus A. [Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida professor Lineu Prestes, 580-Bloco13, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: tjapinto@usp.br

    2005-07-01

    Raw plant materials normally carry high bioburden due to their origin, offering potential hazards to consumers. The use of decontamination processes is therefore an important step towards the consumer safety and therapeutical efficiency. Several authors have reported the treatment of medicinal herbs with ionizing radiation. This work evaluated the effects of different radiation doses on the microbial burden and chemical constituents of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) and guarana (Paullinia cupana H.B.K.)

  10. Influence of p53-regulated energy metabolism in radiation effects

    p53 is a hot spot in the studies of tumor etiology and radiobiology, but the function of p53-regulated energy metabolism in radiation biological effects still remains many uncertainties. The in-depth study of p53-regulated energy metabolism is of great significance to investigate the tumor radiotherapy efficacy, radiation damage, carcinogenesis and even molecular epidemiology. The current research progress at this point was stated in this article. (authors)

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation in ginkgo and guarana

    Raw plant materials normally carry high bioburden due to their origin, offering potential hazards to consumers. The use of decontamination processes is therefore an important step towards the consumer safety and therapeutical efficiency. Several authors have reported the treatment of medicinal herbs with ionizing radiation. This work evaluated the effects of different radiation doses on the microbial burden and chemical constituents of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) and guarana (Paullinia cupana H.B.K.)

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation in ginkgo and guarana [rapid communication

    Rabelo Soriani, Renata; Cristina Satomi, Lucilia; Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus A.

    2005-07-01

    Raw plant materials normally carry high bioburden due to their origin, offering potential hazards to consumers. The use of decontamination processes is therefore an important step towards the consumer safety and therapeutical efficiency. Several authors have reported the treatment of medicinal herbs with ionizing radiation. This work evaluated the effects of different radiation doses on the microbial burden and chemical constituents of ginkgo ( Ginkgo biloba L.) and guaraná ( Paullinia cupana H.B.K.).

  13. Effects of electron radiation on properties of PLA

    Malinowski, R.; P. Rytlewski; M. Żenkiewicz

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper was to examine the effects of electron radiation on physicochemical properties of pristine poly(lactic acid) (PLA), or polylactide, and of polylactide containing a selected crosslinking agent.Design/methodology/approach: Samples to be examined were prepared in granulated forms or as moulded pieces and then treated with the high-energy electron radiation (ca. 10 MeV). The methods of gel permeation chromatography (GPC), rheology, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) s...

  14. Some results of simulation on radiation effects in crystals

    Simulations concerning radiation in oriented silicon and tungsten crystals of different thicknesses are developed. Conditions are those of experiments done at Kharkov (Ukraine) and Tomsk (Russia) with electron beams in the 1 GeV range. Systematic comparisons between experimental and simulated spectra associated to real spectrum, radiation energy and angular distribution of the photons are developed. The ability of the simulation program to describe crystal effects in the considered energy range is analysed. (author) 11 refs.; 8 figs

  15. Radiation pressure on a moving body: beyond the Doppler effect

    Horsley, S. A. R.; Artoni, M.; La Rocca, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    The dependence of macroscopic radiation pressure on the velocity of the object being pushed is commonly attributed to the Doppler effect. This need not be the case, and here we highlight velocity-dependent radiation pressure terms that have their origins in the mixing of s and p polarizations brought about by the Lorentz transformation between the lab and the material rest frame, rather than in the corresponding transformation of frequency and wavevector. The theory we develop may be relevant...

  16. Doppler effect in the oscillator radiation process in the medium

    Gevorgian, Lekdar; Vardanyan, Valeri

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the radiation process of the charged particle passing through an external periodic field in a dispersive medium. In the optical range of spectrum we will consider two cases: first, the source has not eigenfrequency, and second, the source has eigenfrequency. In the first case, when the Cherenkov radiation occurs, the non-zero eigenfrequency produces a paradox for Doppler effect. It is shown that the absence of the eigenfrequency solves the paradox k...

  17. Radiation in the living environment: sources, exposure and effects

    We are living in a milieu of radiations and continuously exposed to radiations from natural sources from conception to death. We are exposed to radiation from Sun and outer space, radioactive materials present in the earth, house we live in, buildings and workplace, food we eat and air we breath. Each flake of snow, grain of soil, drop of rain, a flower, and even each man in the street is a source of this radiation. Even our own bodies contain naturally occurring radioactive elements. The general belief is that the radiations are harmful and everybody is scared of the same. The cancer is the most important concern on account of exposure to Ionizing Radiation which is initiated by the damage to DNA. The level of exposure depends on the environmental and working conditions and may vary from low to moderate to high and depending on the same the exposed humans can be classified as general public, non nuclear workers (NNW) and nuclear workers (NW). Though, the LNT theory which is considered to be the radiation paradigm considers all radiation at all levels to be harmful and the -severity of the deleterious effect increases with the increase in dose, however, the available literature, data and reports (epidemiological and experimental) speaks otherwise particularly at low levels. The purpose of this paper is to address the question, whether the radiation is harmful at all levels or it is simply media hype and the truth is different, and to promote harmony with nature and to improve our quality of life with the knowledge that cancer mortality rates decrease following exposure to LLIR. Various sources of radiation exposure and the subsequent consequences will be discussed. (author)

  18. Fundamental radiation effects parameters in metals and ceramics

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Useful information on defect production and migration can be obtained from examination of the fluence-dependent defect densities in irradiated materials, particularly when a transition from linear to sublinear accumulation is observed. Further work is needed on several intriguing reported radiation effects in metals. The supralinear defect cluster accumulation regime in thin foil irradiated metals needs further experimental confirmation, and the physical mechanisms responsible for its presence need to be established. Radiation hardening and the associated reduction in strain hardening capacity in FCC metals is a serious concern for structural materials. In general, the loss of strain hardening capacity is associated with dislocation channeling, which occurs when a high density of small defect clusters are produced (stainless steel irradiated near room temperature is a notable exception). Detailed investigations of the effect of defect cluster density and other physical parameters such as stacking fault energy on dislocation channeling are needed. Although it is clearly established that radiation hardening depends on the grain size (radiation-modified Hall-Petch effect), further work is needed to identify the physical mechanisms. In addition, there is a need for improved hardening superposition models when a range of different obstacle strengths are present. Due to a lack of information on point defect diffusivities and the increased complexity of radiation effects in ceramics compared to metals, many fundamental radiation effects parameters in ceramics have yet to be determined. Optical spectroscopy data suggest that the oxygen monovacancy and freely migrating interstitial fraction in fission neutron irradiated MgO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are {approximately}10% of the NRT displacement value. Ionization induced diffusion can strongly influence microstructural evolution in ceramics. Therefore, fundamental data on ceramics obtained from highly ionizing radiation sources

  19. Radiation-induced bystander effect: The important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications

    Maria Wideł

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available It has long been a central radiobiological dogma that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell death, cytogenetic changes, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, are the results of the direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or indirect damage via water radiolysis products. However, several years ago attention turned to a third mechanism of radiation, termed the “bystander effect” or “radiation-induced bystander effect” (RIBE. This is induced by agents and signals emitted by directly irradiated cells and manifests as a lowering of survival, cytogenetic damage, apoptosis enhancement, and biochemical changes in neighboring non-irradiated cells. The bystander effect is mainly observed in in vitro experiments using very low doses of alpha particles (range; mGy, cGy, but also after conventional irradiation (X-rays, gamma rays at low as well as conventional doses. The mechanisms responsible for the bystander effect are complex and still poorly understood. It is believed that molecular signals released from irradiated cells induce different signaling ways in non-irradiated neighboring cells, leading to the observed events. The molecular signals may be transmitted through gap junction intercellular communication and through a medium transfer mechanism. The nature of these transmitted factors are diverse, and still not defi nitely established. It seems that RIBE may have important clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure. Potentially, this effectmay have important implications in the creation of whole-body or localized side effects in tissues beyond the irradiation fi eld and also in low-dose radiological and radioisotope diagnostics. Factors emitted by irradiated cells may result in the risk of genetic instability, mutations, and second primary cancer induction. They might also have their own part in inducing and extending post-radiation side effects in normal tissue. The

  20. Radiation Damage Effect on Si and SiC Detectors

    Silicon is an extraordinary semiconductor suited for the fabrication of radiation detector. Charge carrier lifetime and mobility are high, which is very important to make the radiation detector with low noise and good time behavior. Since the fabrication technology of the silicon was mature, one could easily make a radiation detector with a sophisticated structure. Therefore, silicon detector could be the best choice for the various application areas. The depletion layers of the reverse bias rectifying barriers are used to make the silicon radiation detector with low noise. The depletion layer could be made by a silicon surface barrier (SSB) structure or a PIN junction structure. SSB detector was made by depositing the metal electrode on the n or p type silicon wafer. The p-n junction could be made with the semiconductor fabrication process, and the X-ray or α particles could be measured with the detector. The radiation tolerance of the radiation detector is also very important for the application of the detector to the harsh environment. A study on the effect of the structure of the depletion layer on the radiation tolerance was rare in most of the previous works In the present work, the silicon detectors with two types were fabricated, and their operation characteristics are compared. The dependency of the radiation damage on the detector type was studied. We also fabricated SiC detector and the neutron and gamma irradiation effect on the detector was studied. The radiation tolerance of the detector was studied. One could see the change of the leakage current and the energy resolution in SSB detector, and the operating performance of the Si PIN detector was more stable than Si Schottky detector.

  1. Neuropsychological effects of cranial radiation: current knowledge and future directions

    Radiation is an invaluable therapeutic tool in the treatment of cancer, with well-established palliative and curative efficacy. As patient survival has improved, attention has focused on long-range treatment side effects. One such adverse effect, neuropsychological impairment, is incompletely understood. Much of the extant research has been directed at childhood leukemia survivors treated with low-dose whole-brain radiation. Less is known about the effects of high-dose focal or whole-brain radiation used in the treatment of brain lesions. This article reviews the scientific literature in this area, with greatest emphasis on methodologically rigorous studies. Research design considerations are discussed. Review findings suggest that low-dose whole-brain radiation (18 to 24 Gy) in children is associated with mild delayed IQ decline, with more substantial deficits occurring in children treated at a young age. A high incidence of learning disabilities and academic failure is observed in this population and may be caused by poor attention and memory rather than low intellectual level. Children who receive higher dose radiation for treatment of brain tumors experience more pronounced cognitive decline. At higher doses, whole-brain radiation, in particular, is linked to deleterious cognitive outcomes. Remarkably little is known about cognitive outcomes in irradiated adults. Preliminary findings indicate that certain cognitive functions, including memory, may be more vulnerable to decline than others. Suggestions for future research are proposed

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on plants and animals at levels implied by current radiation protection standards

    The 1977 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection stated that the commission believes that if man is adequately protected from radiation, other organisms are also likely to be sufficiently protected. The present report examines this statement by considering the effects of ionizing radiation on animals and plants in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The conclusions are that chronic dose rates of IMGy.d-1 or less are unlikely to cause measurable deleterious effects in terrestrial populations, and that in the aquatic environment limiting chronic dose rates to 10MGy.d-1 to the maximally exposed individuals would provide adequate protection for the population. Thus specific radiation protection standards for non-human organisms are not needed. 193 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  3. Radiation hormesis. Stimulatory effects of low level ionizing radiation on plant

    Kinoshita, Shigenobu; Masui, Hisashi; Yoshida, Shigeo; Murata, Isao [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-04-01

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis has been executed against animals and plants; subharmful doses of radiation may evoke a stimulatory response in any organism. We executed irradiating experiments of dry seeds with fusion (D-T) neutron, fission neutron, cobalt-60 gamma-ray and investigated existence of the radiation hormesis effects by measuring germination, the length of a stalk and the total weight of a seed leaf on the 7th day after starting cultivation. And we estimated radiation hormesis effects by relative effectiveness, the ratio of the mean value of measurement subjects for the irradiated group to that of non-irradiated group. In relation to Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effects on seed leaf growth from irradiated seeds have only turned up in seed groups irradiated by the fusion (D-T) neutron. We have confirmed that absorbed dose range which revealed the effects is from 1 cGy to 10 Gy and the increasing rate is from 5 percent to 25 percent against a control group. (author)

  4. Radiation hormesis. Stimulatory effects of low level ionizing radiation on plant

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis has been executed against animals and plants; subharmful doses of radiation may evoke a stimulatory response in any organism. We executed irradiating experiments of dry seeds with fusion (D-T) neutron, fission neutron, cobalt-60 gamma-ray and investigated existence of the radiation hormesis effects by measuring germination, the length of a stalk and the total weight of a seed leaf on the 7th day after starting cultivation. And we estimated radiation hormesis effects by relative effectiveness, the ratio of the mean value of measurement subjects for the irradiated group to that of non-irradiated group. In relation to Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effects on seed leaf growth from irradiated seeds have only turned up in seed groups irradiated by the fusion (D-T) neutron. We have confirmed that absorbed dose range which revealed the effects is from 1 cGy to 10 Gy and the increasing rate is from 5 percent to 25 percent against a control group. (author)

  5. Radiation-induced non-targeted effects: some open questions

    The existence of non-targeted effects (NTEs) of radiation (genomic instability and bystander effects) has been generally accepted for >20 y; however, there is research, which was largely ignored going back to 1915 reporting these effects. Despite today's general acceptance of the phenomenon of NTE, there is little agreement about the mechanisms involved and the implications in radiation biology and radiation protection. The aim of this review was to consider some of the odd data, which have been published in the field with a view to obtaining insights or stimulating new ways of thinking about this field. By highlighting some key challenges and controversies, concerning the mechanisms and more importantly, the reason these effects exist, current ideas about the wider implications of NTEs in evolution and biology are also discussed. (authors)

  6. Cytogenetic effect of low dose radiation and contrast agent

    The effect of the X-ray contrast medium Amidotrizoate on radiation-induced chromosomal damage was investigated in peripheral human lymphocytes, in vitro. The blood undergoes treatment in one of three ways: 1) Amidotriozate alone at concentrations 1, 3 and 5%; 2) X-irradiation alone at dose 0,2 Gy; 3) X-irradiation in the presence of the contrast medium. Given alone Amidotrisoate was not effective in producing chromosomal aberrations. The cytogenetic effect of 0,2 Gy X-ray was statistically significant. The presence of Amidotrisoate during irradiation potentiates radiation-induced chromosomal damage depending on the concentration used. (author)

  7. Effect of ionizing radiation on starch and cellulose

    The investigation is reported of the effects of ionizing radiation both on macromolecular systems generally and on polysaccharides, starch and cellulose. Attention is focused on changes in the physical and physico-chemical properties of starch and cellulose, such as starch swelling, gelation, viscosity, solubility, reaction with iodine, UV, IR and ESR spectra, chemical changes resulting from radiolysis and from the effect of amylases on irradiated starch, changes in cellulose fibre strength, water absorption, stain affinity, and also the degradation of cellulose by radiation and the effect of cellulases on irradiated cellulose. Practical applications of the findings concerning cellulose degradation are discussed. (author)

  8. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  9. Effects of total dose of ionizing radiation on integrated circuits

    Full text: The study of ionizing radiation effects on materials used in electronic devices is of great relevance for the progress of global technological development and, particularly, it is a necessity in some strategic areas in Brazil. Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by radiation and the need for IC's featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics. On the other hand, aerospace agencies are encouraging both scientific community and semiconductors industry to develop hardened-by-design components using standard manufacturing processes to achieve maximum performance, while significantly reducing costs. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the integrated circuits are usually divided into two categories: total ionizing dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; single events effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits. TID is one of the most common effects and may generate degradation in some parameters of the CMOS electronic devices, such as the threshold voltage oscillation, increase of the sub-threshold slope and increase of the off-state current. The effects of ionizing radiation are the creation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide layer changing operation mode parameters of the electronic device. Indirectly, there will be also changes in the device due to the formation of secondary electrons from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the material, since the charge carriers can be trapped both in the oxide layer and in the interface with the oxide. In this work we have investigated the behavior of MOSFET devices fabricated with different

  10. Long-term effects of radiation exposure on health.

    Kamiya, Kenji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Akiba, Suminori; Niwa, Ohstura; Kodama, Kazunori; Takamura, Noboru; Zaharieva, Elena K; Kimura, Yuko; Wakeford, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Late-onset effects of exposure to ionising radiation on the human body have been identified by long-term, large-scale epidemiological studies. The cohort study of Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (the Life Span Study) is thought to be the most reliable source of information about these health effects because of the size of the cohort, the exposure of a general population of both sexes and all ages, and the wide range of individually assessed doses. For this reason, the Life Span Study has become fundamental to risk assessment in the radiation protection system of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and other authorities. Radiation exposure increases the risk of cancer throughout life, so continued follow-up of survivors is essential. Overall, survivors have a clear radiation-related excess risk of cancer, and people exposed as children have a higher risk of radiation-induced cancer than those exposed at older ages. At high doses, and possibly at low doses, radiation might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and some other non-cancer diseases. Hereditary effects in the children of atomic bomb survivors have not been detected. The dose-response relation for cancer at low doses is assumed, for purposes of radiological protection, to be linear without a threshold, but has not been shown definitively. This outstanding issue is not only a problem when dealing appropriately with potential health effects of nuclear accidents, such as at Fukushima and Chernobyl, but is of growing concern in occupational and medical exposure. Therefore, the appropriate dose-response relation for effects of low doses of radiation needs to be established. PMID:26251392

  11. Radiation induced effects and annealing methods in fiberoptics and glasses

    Radiation induced effects in glass-rods and fiberoptics have been studied to determine parameters affecting the application of these materials in nuclear technology, i.e. as fiberscopes for visual inspection in severe radiation environments. Different glass and fibertypes have been exposed to fission product gamma radiation. The radiation induced transmission loss was measured with a spectrophotometer and then different annealing methods were examined to improve the transmission properties again. Especially the changes in glass and fiber recovery vs. time as a function of radiation dose and annealing temperature were investigated. Annealing experiments were performed exposing the samples either to temperature treatment or to various light sources such as quartz lamp, arc lamp or UV-laser for optical annealing. The transmission recovery was then investigated either as a function of annealing temperature or of exposure time to the light sources. The results allow conclusions on the design and composition of optical fiber endoscopes to be used in severe radiation environment where image transmission is required in the presence of high level nuclear radiation. (author)

  12. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. III

    A decrease in the efficacy of trypsin (determination according to PhBs 3 with the use of L-lysine ethyl ester chloride) was investigated in pancreatin obtained by enzyme precipitation from a pancreas extraction after autolysis, in the identical sample with an additionally increased content of lipids, in pancreatin containing parts of the pancreatic tissue, in crystalline trypsin, and in crystalline salt-free and lyophilized trypsine after irradiation with gamma rays from 60Co, doses ranging from 1x104 Gy to 12x104 Gy. The results were statistically evaluated and after the conversion to dried or lipid-free substance expressed in graphs. The dependence of the efficacy on the radiation dose has a linear course in semi-logarithmic arrangement, similarly as it occurred in chymotrypsin and in the total proteolytic efficacy. The decrease in the efficacy of trypsin in the samples of pancreatin in percentage maintains the same sequence in the samples under study as it was in the decrease in the efficacy of chymotrypsin and the total proteolytic efficacy, but it is smaller. The decrease in the efficacy of pure enzyme is, similarly to chymotrypsin, greater than the decrease in the efficacy of the enzyme in pancreatin. The present ballast substances thus significantly influence stability. (author)

  13. Low-level radiation effects on plants. Biochemical aspects of radiation stimulation

    Low-dose irradiation of seeds or seedlings of crop plants often results in biopositive effects, such as earliness and higher yield on better plant constituents. Though this effect is being used in large-scale field experiments, only little is known of the underlying metabolic and biochemical processes of plant stimulation by irradiation. Experiments have therefore been performed on plant and bacterial model systems to elucidate some basic mechanisms of early radiation effects. Studies on the stimulation of pine pollen tube growth by u.v. and X rays showed that the effect is strongly dose-rate dependent, indicating the participation of repair mechanisms. It could be shown that after irradiation the production of hydroxyproline is increased as well as the rate of RNA synthesis, while the action of long-life RNA is slightly reduced. In bacteria, a radiation-produced stimulation of RNA production could also be proved, possibly triggered by initiating the hexose-monophosphate shunt for additional production of ribose-5-phosphate as precursor. Ultra-violet difference spectra between alcoholic extracts of radiated and unirradiated leaves and roots of barley seedlings showed a significant reduction in NADH content caused by radiation, which corresponds well with the increased need of NADH for hydroxyproline production and with the requirement of a NADH sink for operating the hexosemonophosphate shunt. (author)

  14. New Scientific Pearl about Biologic Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    S. A. Alamdaran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Soon after the discovery of X-ray by Rontgen in 1895, it became evident that radiation can cause some somatic damage to tissues. The hazards of X-ray exposure were clearly known when many large hospitals had radiology departments. The greatest increased in knowledge about X-ray risks had accrued from the dropping of the two atomic bombs in Japan in 1945 and some other atomic accident. For example, among the Japanese bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there have been about 400 extra cancer deaths. These were the origin of radiology personnel and people fear from radiation exposure and resistant in against simple X-ray exam (radiophobia. However, new scientific data on the effects radiation on survivors, especially about biologic effect of ionizing rays, background radiation exposure, amount of endogenous radiation, hormosis phenomenon and comparison radiation risk with other risk over lifetime are still being continuously revised and risk estimates updated. Fundamentally, this risk is much"nlower than whatever already estimated and it is insignificant in diagnostic domain. Better perception of physician from these instances help to prevent of false radiophobia and to make proper use of diagnostic and therapeutic advantages of ionizing beam.

  15. Delayed effects of radiation on enzymes in erythrocytes

    Objective: To study the delayed effects of radiation on the enzymes in erythrocytes. Methods: The activity of 8 enzymes, related glycolysis, hexose monophosphate shunt, nucleotide metabolism, redox reaction and esterase in erythrocytes of five patients with bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were assayed at 1,2,3 and 6 years after exposure to 60Co radiation. Results: The decreased activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), pyruvate kinase (PK), NADH-methemoglobin reductase (MR) during the stage of crisis and of acetylcholinesterase (ACE) during the stage of convalescence were recovered to varying extent, whereas the lowered activities of the first three enzymes in some cases remained unchanged. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and the radiation dose as well as the age of the patients. Conclusion: It is demonstrated that the delayed effects of radiation damage to erythrocyte enzymes are most significant in PK of glycolysis, G6PD of hexose monophosphate shunt and MR of redox reaction. It is suggested that the genes related to the synthesis of erythrocyte enzymes may be damaged by radiation

  16. Genomic instability. New insight into the health effects of radiation

    New research findings question the validity of some traditionally accepted theories in radiobiology. It has been discovered that new chromosome damage and gene mutations, as well as cell death, occur frequently in the descendants of cells that have survived radiation exposure. These late effects of radiation cannot be explained using the previous model, because the phenomena occur much more often than direct mutations among individual genes. It has commonly been thought that the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of radiation result from radiation-derived damage to DNA. During the division of DNA, or as a consequence of faulty correction, the damage becomes permanent and is transferred to the next cell generations (cloning). It has been assumed that the changes occur in cell divisions that take place immediately after the exposure to radiation. The new observations concerning genomic instability force researchers to reconsider the correctness of their theories and to seek new explanations of old, sometimes even 'odd' observations. They also give reason to exercise caution when making generalizations about epidemiological data and risk estimates form one population to another, or from one type of radiation to another. (orig.)

  17. Effect of ionizing radiation on the living body

    Since the Fukushima nuclear plant accident following the great East Japan earthquake on March 11, 2011, we have been warned to be careful about possible radiation exposure almost every day in newspapers and on TV. Radioactive iodine (131I) and cesium (134Cs, 137Cs) produced by nuclear reactions were released into the air during and after the accident, and have been scattered by the winds in Tohoku and in the Kanto district. Even today, 2 years after the accident, there is great public concern about possible pollution of foodstuffs and fishery products with radioactive cesium, not only in Japan, but also in other countries. On the other hand, decontamination work has been proceeding, including removal of contaminated soil near the accident site. Since the accident, many media reports have continued to tell us only that current dose levels of radiation are not dangerous to human health. But, many people are not satisfied with such vague statements, and want to understand the situation in more detail. So, it is important to provide basic education about the effects of radiation to the general public. I am a professor of the Department of Radiation Biosciences at Tokyo University of Science, and so I am very familiar with radiation and its dangers. So, in my lecture today, we would like to explain the effects of radiation and put the present situation into perspective, so that people will better understand the risks, and not be unnecessarily afraid. (author)

  18. Effects of high LET radiation on radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    It is known that Deinococcus radiodurans is extremely resistant to ionizing and ultraviolet (UV) radiations, as well as chemical agents and hyperthermia (heat treatment) which cause DNA damage. It was reported in this paper that studies on the synergistic killing effect of high LET (linear energy transfer) radiation and hyperthermia in D. radiodurans were performed in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University as the Visiting Researcher's Program. The difference of cellular response in this bacterium against low LET (i.e. gamma) and high LET (i.e. BNC beam and heavy ion beam) radiations was analyzed by using Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) operated at 5 MW and AVF cyclotron in Takasaki Ion Accelerator for Radiation Application (TIARA). Also, The DNA sequence specificity (hot spot) for mutation on supF gene of a shuttle vector plasmid pZ189 induced by BNC beam is being researched using Escherichia coli DNA repair capability. (author)

  19. Radiative instabilities in plasmas: impurity motion and recombination effects

    Radiative instabilities in an impurity-seeded plasma are investigated when the plasma is supposed to be highly but partially ionized. Since in such plasmas radiative losses strongly depend on neutral and impurity densities, their dynamics are taken into account. As a result, a new radiative-recombination instability is found and described. We show that the influence of the ionization-recombination balance on plasma stability is sufficient for plasma densities above 1014 cm-3. The effects of a finite impurity Larmor radius are not small and play a stabilizing role as well as the thermal forces. On the other hand, compressibility of the magnetic field leads to plasma destabilization. We note that this radiative-recombination instability accumulates impurities in a cold zone while cleaning other regions. (Author)

  20. The effects of acute radiation exposure on the serum components

    The blood samples were collected from the experimental animals 24 hrs after irradiation of gamma doses upto 80 Gy. Native PAGE showed a decreasing trend in gamma globulin fraction of serum from the irradiated group compared to control, while SDS PAGE indicated an enhanced tendency in protein of molecular weight 30,000 to 40,000. Serum albumin slightly decreased with radiation doses as a result of decrease in total protein amount. Radiation exposure had little or no effects on such lipid related components as phospholipid, triglyceride, and cholesterol, respectively. Among others, glutamic pyryvic transaminase (GPT) showed a drastic decrease in its amount 24 hrs after radiation exposure, which can be applied to the health care program for radiation workers. (Author)