WorldWideScience

Sample records for aboveground biota implications

  1. Long-term organic farming fosters below and aboveground biota: Implications for soil quality, biological control and productivity

    Birkhofer, Klaus; Bezemer, TM; . Bloem, J.; Bonkowski, M.; Christensen, S; Dubois, David; Ekelund , F; Fließbach, Andreas; Gunst, Lucie; K. Hedlund; Mäder, Paul; Mikola, J.; Robin, C.; Setälä, Heikki; Tatin-Froux , F

    2008-01-01

    Organic farming may contribute substantially to future agricultural production worldwide by improving soil quality and pest control, thereby reducing environmental impacts of conventional farming. We investigated in a comprehensive way soil chemical, as well as below and aboveground biological parameters of two organic and two conventional wheat farming systems that primarily differed in fertilization and weed management strategies. Contrast analyses identified management related differences ...

  2. Long-term organic farming fosters below- and aboveground biota: Implications for soil quality, biological control and productivity

    Birkhofer, K.; Bezemer, TM; . Bloem, J.; Bonkowski, M.; Christensen, S; Dubois, D; Ekelund , F; Fließbach, A.; Gunst , L; K. Hedlund; Mäder, P.; Mikola, J.; Robin, C.; Setälä , H; Tatin-Froux , F

    2008-01-01

    Organic farming may contribute substantially to future agricultural production worldwide by improving soil quality and pest control, thereby reducing environmental impacts of conventional farming. We investigated in a comprehensive way soil chemical, as well as below and aboveground biological parameters of two organic and two conventional wheat farming systems that primarily differed in fertilization and weed management strategies. Contrast analyses identified management related differenc...

  3. Long-term organic farming fosters below- and aboveground biota: Implications for soil quality, biological control, and productivity

    Birkhofer, Klaus; Bezemer, T. Martijn; Bloem, Jaap; Bonkowski, Michael; Christensen, Søren; Dubois, David; Ekelund, Fleming; Fließbach, Andreas; Gunst, Lucie; Hedlund, Katarina; Mäder, Paul; Mikola, Juha; Robin, Christophe; Setälä, Heikki; Tatin-Froux, Fabienne

    2008-01-01

    Organic farming may contribute substantially to future agricultural production worldwide by improving soil quality and pest control, thereby reducing environmental impacts of conventional farming. We investigated in a comprehensive way soil chemical, as well as below and aboveground biological parameters of two organic and two conventional wheat farming systems that primarily differed in fertilization and weed management strategies. Contrast analyses identified management related differences ...

  4. Long-term organic farming fosters below and aboveground biota: Implications for soil quality, biological control and productivity

    Birkhofer, K.; Bezemer, TM; Bloem, J;

    2008-01-01

    parameters, such as microbial basal respiration and nitrogen mineralization, showed an opposite pattern, suggesting that soil carbon in the conventional system (CONFYM) was more easily accessible to microorganisms than in organic systems. Bacterivorous nematodes and earthworms were most abundant in systems...... Organic farming may contribute substantially to future agricultural production worldwide by improving soil quality and pest control, thereby reducing environmental impacts of conventional farming. We investigated in a comprehensive way soil chemical, as well as below and aboveground biological...... (CONFYM) or without manure (CONMIN) and herbicide application within a long-term agricultural experiment (DOK trial, Switzerland). Soil carbon content was significantly higher in systems receiving farmyard manure and concomitantly microbial biomass (fungi and bacteria) was increased. Microbial activity...

  5. Relationships at the aboveground-belowground interface: plants, soil biota and soil processes

    Porazinska, D.L.; Bardgett, R.D.; Postma-Blaauw, M.B.; Hunt, H.W.; Parsons, A.N.; Seastedt, T.R.; Wall, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Interactions at the aboveground-below ground interface provide important feedbacks that regulate ecosystem processes. Organisms within soil food webs are involved in processes of decomposition and nutrient mineralization, and their abundance and activity have been linked to plant ecophysiological tr

  6. Development of soil, soil biota and above-ground vegetation at post mining sites under different afforestation management

    Tajovský, Karel; Frouz, Jan; Pižl, Václav; Velichová, Václava; Starý, Josef; Háněl, Ladislav

    Greifswald : University of Greifswald, 2006. s. 171. [Land use changes in Europe as a challenge for restoration . Ecological, economical and ethical dimensions. European Conference on Ecological Restoration /5./. 21.08.2006-25.08.2006, Greifswald] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS600660505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : development of soil * soil biota * post mining sites Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF ANIMAL MANURE – IMPLICATIONS FOR CROP YIELDS AND SOIL BIOTA IN ORGANIC FARMING

    Johansen, Anders; Pommeresche, Reidun; Riely, Hugh;

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of farmyard manures may help farmers to produce bioenergy instead of using fossil fuels, support cycling of nutrients and reduce greenhouse gas emission. However, compared to pristine slurry, digested slurry has a reduced content of organic carbon which may impact the soil biota...... of digestates affects crop yields, soil characteristics and soil biota (earthworms, springtails, microbiota). The grass-clover system showed comparable yield levels over 3 years when digested slurry was compared to untreated slurry. Digested slurries had no influence on soil nutrient concentrations or on soil...... and microorganisms seemed only little affected by application of digested slurry....

  8. Bystander effects and biota: implications of radiation-induced bystander effects for protection of the environment from ionising radiation

    Bystander effects are now known to be induced by both high and low LET in a variety of cells in culture. They have been proven to occur in vivo in mice following 0.5Gy total body irradiation and in blood from humans being treated for cancer by radiotherapy. Effects have also been detected in fish, crustacea and molluscs. The important questions now are not whether bystander effects occur but why and what implications they have, if any, for radiation protection. Different species and different genetic backgrounds within a species produce different types of bystander effect, different organs also produce different effects. This paper will review the data in this field and will discuss likely implications for protection of man and non-human biota. In particular it will look at the potential long-term outcomes for different organisational levels, from cell to ecosystem, of bystander mechanisms. In view of new concerns about the effects of low level radiation on non-human biota, emphasis will be placed on considering how bystander effects might operate at chronic low doses versus acute accidental low doses. Problems of radiation interaction with chemicals, whether chemicals can also induce 'bystander effects' , and how regulators might handle these situations which occur all the time in real environments, will be presented for discussion. Finally the paper will discuss likely implications of these mechanisms for evolutionary biology

  9. Abiotic Protein Fragmentation by Manganese Oxide: Implications for a Mechanism to Supply Soil Biota with Oligopeptides.

    Reardon, Patrick N; Chacon, Stephany S; Walter, Eric D; Bowden, Mark E; Washton, Nancy M; Kleber, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The ability of plants and microorganisms to take up organic nitrogen in the form of free amino acids and oligopeptides has received increasing attention over the last two decades, yet the mechanisms for the formation of such compounds in soil environments remain poorly understood. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to distinguish the reaction of a model protein with a pedogenic oxide (Birnessite, MnO2) from its response to a phyllosilicate (Kaolinite). Our data demonstrate that birnessite fragments the model protein while kaolinite does not, resulting in soluble peptides that would be available to soil biota and confirming the existence of an abiotic pathway for the formation of organic nitrogen compounds for direct uptake by plants and microorganisms. The absence of reduced Mn(II) in the solution suggests that birnessite acts as a catalyst rather than an oxidant in this reaction. NMR and EPR spectroscopies are shown to be valuable tools to observe these reactions and capture the extent of protein transformation together with the extent of mineral response. PMID:26974439

  10. Impacts of Sample Design on Estimation of Aboveground Biomass: Implications for the Assimilation of Lidar and Forest Inventory Data

    Duffy, P.; Keller, M. M.; Morton, D. C.; Schimel, D.

    2015-12-01

    The availability of lidar data that can be used to characterize forest structure and estimate aboveground biomass (AGB) is rapidly increasing. When lidar data are considered in conjunction with forest inventory data to estimate AGB, the order of acquisition for these data products may impact the quality of the resulting estimates. In this work, we address this question in the context of uncertainty reduction with respect to estimation of AGB in a degraded forest in Paragominas, Brazil. We have developed a simulation framework that quantitatively assesses the uncertainty associated with estimation of AGB for different sampling strategies that combine forest inventory and lidar data. We utilize a Bayesian hierarchical modeling (BHM) data assimilation framework to combine information from the forest inventory and lidar data products into a higher order data product of AGB. Spatially explicit realizations of AGB are generated under different sampling strategies. Sampling strategies are assessed using the distributional properties of the assimilated higher order data product in the context of uncertainty reduction. We consider both spatially explicit maps of uncertainty as well as the standard deviation of the posterior predictive distributions of AGB as endpoints for the quantification of uncertainty. This framework allows for the explicit characterization of important sources of uncertainty. Our results show that a significant reduction in the uncertainty associated with estimation of AGB can be realized when design optimization is utilized in this context.

  11. Aboveground mammal and invertebrate exclusions cause consistent changes in soil food webs of two subalpine grassland types, but mechanisms are system-specific

    Vandegehuchte, Martijn L.; Putten, Van Der Wim H.; Duyts, Henk; Schütz, Martin; Risch, Anita C.

    2016-01-01

    Ungulates, smaller mammals, and invertebrates can each affect soil biota through their influence on vegetation and soil characteristics. However, direct and indirect effects of the aboveground biota on soil food webs remain to be unraveled. We assessed effects of progressively excluding aboveground

  12. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers.

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ(199)Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ(15)N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ(13)C and Δ(199)Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:27151563

  13. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions.

  14. Pyrite framboids associated with the Mesozoic Jehol Biota in northeastern China: Implications for microenvironment during early fossilization

    2003-01-01

    Despite of the recent influx of reports describing important fossil specimens from the Mesozoic Jehol Biota, detailed information on the mechanism of fossilization and paleoenvironment in which these fossils were deposited is scanty. We present an analysis of microenvironment based upon scanning electron microscope observations of in situ pyrite framboids and microcrystallines of plant and vertebrate feather fossils in the Jehol Biota. Pyrite microcrystallines and framboids occur extensively inside and on surface of plant fossils.Framboids found on feathers and in sedimentary matrix were in a lower abundance. These framboids have diameters ranging from 6 μm to 31 μm with an average of 20 μm, indicating a dysoxic aqueous condition with free oxygen level less than 30 μmol/L for the microenvironment where these framboids were formed. The outgrowth of framboids inside plant tissues suggests the presence of water molecules and free oxygen at the cellular level during pyritization; the relative timing between tissue decay and framboid formation implies a rapid tissue degradation occurred during the very early stage of fossilization. This line of reasoning is consistent with the observation that cell level structure of plant fossils from these deposits is rarely preserved. We propose a "fossil envelop" model to accommodate the different geochemical conditions between the microenvironment surrounding the fossil material and the macroenvironment of background lake bottom water.

  15. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:27151563

  16. The aquatic and semiaquatic biota in Miocene amber from the Campo LA Granja mine (Chiapas, Mexico): Paleoenvironmental implications

    Serrano-Sánchez, María de Lourdes; Hegna, Thomas A.; Schaaf, Peter; Pérez, Liseth; Centeno-García, Elena; Vega, Francisco J.

    2015-10-01

    Amber from the Campo La Granja mine in Chiapas, Mexico, is distinct from other sources of amber in Chiapas. Campo La Granja amber has distinct layers created by successive flows of resin with thin layers of sand on most surfaces. Aquatic and semi-aquatic arthropods are commonly found. Together these pieces of evidence suggest an estuarine environment similar to modern mangrove communities. The aquatic crustaceans are the most intriguing aspect of the biota. A large number of ostracods have been found in the amber-many with their carapaces open, suggesting that they were alive and submerged in water at the time of entombment. The only known examples of brachyuran crabs preserved in amber are found in the Campo La Granja amber. Amphipods, copepods, isopods, and tanaids are also members of the crustacean fauna preserved in amber.

  17. Variation in stem mortality rates determines patterns of above-ground biomass in Amazonian forests: implications for dynamic global vegetation models

    Johnson, Michelle; Galbraith, David; Gloor, Manuel; De Deaurwaerder, Hannes; Guimberteau, Mattieu; Rammig, Anja; Thonicke, Kristin; Verbeeck, Hans; von Randow, Celso; Monteagudo Mendoza, Abel; Phillips, Oliver L; Brienen, Roel; Feldpausch, Ted R.; Lopez Gonzales, Gabriela; Fauset, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the processes that determine above-ground biomass (AGB) in Amazonian forests is important for predicting the sensitivity of these ecosystems to environmental change and for designing and evaluating dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). AGB is determined by inputs from woody productivity [woody net primary productivity (NPP)] and the rate at which carbon is lost through tree mortality. Here, we test whether two direct metrics of tree mortality (the absolute rate of woody biom...

  18. Transfers to freshwater biota

    It remains important to monitor the fate of radionuclides, particularly in environmental compartments that comprise human pathways. Therefore, an extensive literature survey has been conducted to compile available data on the transfer of radionuclides and their analogues to edible freshwater biota. Focus was placed on compilation of steady state transfer parameters for two freshwater pathways, including water-to-biota and sediment-to-biota. In general, although in many cases, extensive data were available for fishes and invertebrates, relatively fewer data were available for freshwater primary producers, amphibians and reptiles. To fill in these gaps, data were also compiled on the internal partitioning of elements in the body with respect to tissue masses, which could be used to estimate radionuclide concentrations between compartments in the body. (author)

  19. Influence of tree size, taxonomy, and edaphic conditions on heart rot in mixed-dipterocarp Bornean rainforests: implications for aboveground biomass estimates

    K. D. Heineman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fungal decay of heartwood creates hollows and areas of reduced wood density within the stems of living trees known as heart rot. Although heart rot is acknowledged as a source of error in forest aboveground biomass estimates, there are few datasets available to evaluate the environmental controls over heart rot infection and severity in tropical forests. Using legacy and recent data from drilled, felled, and cored stems in mixed dipterocarp forests in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, we quantified the frequency and severity of heart rot, and used generalized linear mixed effect models to characterize the association of heart rot with tree size, wood density, taxonomy, and edaphic conditions. Heart rot was detected in 55% of felled stems > 30 cm DBH, while the detection frequency was lower for stems of the same size evaluated by non-destructive drilling (45% and coring (23% methods. Heart rot severity, defined as the percent stem volume lost in infected stems, ranged widely from 0.1–82.8%. Tree taxonomy explained the greatest proportion of variance in heart rot frequency and severity among the fixed and random effects evaluated in our models. Heart rot frequency, but not severity, increased sharply with tree diameter, ranging from 56% infection across all datasets in stems > 50 cm DBH to 11% in trees 10–30 cm DBH. The frequency and severity of heart rot increased significantly in soils with low pH and cation concentrations in topsoil, and heart rot was more common in tree species associated with dystrophic sandy soils than with nutrient-rich clays. When scaled to forest stands, the percent of stem biomass lost to heart rot varied significantly with soil properties, and we estimate that 7% of the forest biomass is in some stage of heart rot decay. This study demonstrates not only that heart rot is a significant source of error in forest carbon estimates, but also that it strongly covaries with soil resources, underscoring the need to account for

  20. Influence of tree size, taxonomy, and edaphic conditions on heart rot in mixed-dipterocarp Bornean rainforests: implications for aboveground biomass estimates

    Heineman, K. D.; Russo, S. E.; Baillie, I. C.; Mamit, J. D.; Chai, P. P.-K.; Chai, L.; Hindley, E. W.; Lau, B.-T.; Tan, S.; Ashton, P. S.

    2015-05-01

    Fungal decay of heartwood creates hollows and areas of reduced wood density within the stems of living trees known as heart rot. Although heart rot is acknowledged as a source of error in forest aboveground biomass estimates, there are few datasets available to evaluate the environmental controls over heart rot infection and severity in tropical forests. Using legacy and recent data from drilled, felled, and cored stems in mixed dipterocarp forests in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, we quantified the frequency and severity of heart rot, and used generalized linear mixed effect models to characterize the association of heart rot with tree size, wood density, taxonomy, and edaphic conditions. Heart rot was detected in 55% of felled stems > 30 cm DBH, while the detection frequency was lower for stems of the same size evaluated by non-destructive drilling (45%) and coring (23%) methods. Heart rot severity, defined as the percent stem volume lost in infected stems, ranged widely from 0.1-82.8%. Tree taxonomy explained the greatest proportion of variance in heart rot frequency and severity among the fixed and random effects evaluated in our models. Heart rot frequency, but not severity, increased sharply with tree diameter, ranging from 56% infection across all datasets in stems > 50 cm DBH to 11% in trees 10-30 cm DBH. The frequency and severity of heart rot increased significantly in soils with low pH and cation concentrations in topsoil, and heart rot was more common in tree species associated with dystrophic sandy soils than with nutrient-rich clays. When scaled to forest stands, the percent of stem biomass lost to heart rot varied significantly with soil properties, and we estimate that 7% of the forest biomass is in some stage of heart rot decay. This study demonstrates not only that heart rot is a significant source of error in forest carbon estimates, but also that it strongly covaries with soil resources, underscoring the need to account for edaphic variation in

  1. Evaluation of stem rot in 339 Bornean tree species: implications of size, taxonomy, and soil-related variation for aboveground biomass estimates

    Heineman, K. D.; Russo, S. E.; Baillie, I. C.; Mamit, J. D.; Chai, P. P.-K.; Chai, L.; Hindley, E. W.; Lau, B.-T.; Tan, S.; Ashton, P. S.

    2015-10-01

    Fungal decay of heart wood creates hollows and areas of reduced wood density within the stems of living trees known as stem rot. Although stem rot is acknowledged as a source of error in forest aboveground biomass (AGB) estimates, there are few data sets available to evaluate the controls over stem rot infection and severity in tropical forests. Using legacy and recent data from 3180 drilled, felled, and cored stems in mixed dipterocarp forests in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, we quantified the frequency and severity of stem rot in a total of 339 tree species, and related variation in stem rot with tree size, wood density, taxonomy, and species' soil association, as well as edaphic conditions. Predicted stem rot frequency for a 50 cm tree was 53 % of felled, 39 % of drilled, and 28 % of cored stems, demonstrating differences among methods in rot detection ability. The percent stem volume infected by rot, or stem rot severity, ranged widely among trees with stem rot infection (0.1-82.8 %) and averaged 9 % across all trees felled. Tree taxonomy explained the greatest proportion of variance in both stem rot frequency and severity among the predictors evaluated in our models. Stem rot frequency, but not severity, increased sharply with tree diameter, ranging from 13 % in trees 10-30 cm DBH to 54 % in stems ≥ 50 cm DBH across all data sets. The frequency of stem rot increased significantly in soils with low pH and cation concentrations in topsoil, and stem rot was more common in tree species associated with dystrophic sandy soils than with nutrient-rich clays. When scaled to forest stands, the maximum percent of stem biomass lost to stem rot varied significantly with soil properties, and we estimate that stem rot reduces total forest AGB estimates by up to 7 % relative to what would be predicted assuming all stems are composed strictly of intact wood. This study demonstrates not only that stem rot is likely to be a significant source of error in forest AGB estimation

  2. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology

    Putten, van der W.H.; Bardgett, R.D.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Hol, W.H.G.; Meyer, K.M.; Bezemer, T.M.; Bradford, M.A.; Christensen, S.; Eppinga, M.B.; Fukami, T.; Hemerik, L.; Molofsky, J.; Schädler, M.; Scherber, C.; Strauss, S.Y.; Vos, M.; Wardle, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that aboveground and belowground communities and processes are intrinsically linked, and that feedbacks between these subsystems have important implications for community structure and ecosystem functioning. Almost all studies on this topic have been carried out from

  3. Physicochemical and spectroscopic properties of natural organic matter (NOM) from various sources and implications for ameliorative effects on metal toxicity to aquatic biota

    Natural organic matter (NOM), expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC in mg C L-1), is an ubiquitous complexing agent in natural waters, and is now recognized as an important factor mitigating waterborne metal toxicity. However, the magnitude of the protective effect, judged by toxicity measures (e.g. LC50), varies substantially among different NOM sources even for similar DOC concentrations, implying a potential role of NOM physicochemical properties or quality of NOM. This review summarizes some key quality parameters for NOM samples, obtained by reverse osmosis, and by using correlation analyses, investigates their contribution to ameliorating metal toxicity towards aquatic biota. At comparable and environmentally realistic DOC levels, molecular spectroscopic characteristics (specific absorbance coefficient, SAC, and fluorescence index, FI) as well as concentrations of fluorescent fractions obtained from mathematical mixture resolution techniques (PARAFAC), explain considerable variability in the protective effects. NOM quality clearly influences the toxicity of copper (Cu) and lead (Pb). NOM quality may also influence the toxicity of silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd) and inorganic mercury (Hg), but as yet insufficient data are available to unequivocally support the latter correlations between toxicity reduction and NOM quality predictors. Cu binding capacities, protein-to-carbohydrate ratio, and lipophilicity, show insignificant correlation to the amelioration offered by NOMs, but these conclusions are based on data for Norwegian NOMs with very narrow ranges for the latter two parameters. Certainly, various NOMs alleviate metal toxicity differentially and therefore their quality measures should be considered in addition to their quantity.

  4. The Rhynie hot-spring system: implications for the Devonian timescale, development of Devonian biota, gold mineralization, evolution of the atmosphere and Earth outgassing

    Mark, D.; Rice, C.; Stuart, F.; Trewin, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhynie cherts are hot spring sinters that contain world-renowned plant and animal remains and anomalously high quantities of heavy metals, including gold. The biota in several beds is preserved undeformed with plants in life positions thus establishing that they and the indurating hydrothermal fluids were coeval. Despite the international importance of the Rhynie cherts their age has been poorly constrained for three reasons: (1) lack of a precise radio-isotopic age, (2) low resolution of spore biostratigraphic schemes for Devonian terrestrial deposits, with only one to a few zones per stage, and (3) poor resolution of the early Devonian timescale. Wellman (2004) assigned a Pragian-?earliest Emsian age to the Rhynie cherts on the basis of the spore assemblage. An 40Ar/39Ar dating study targeting Rhynie chert yielded an age of 395 ± 12 Ma (1σ) (Rice et al., 1995). This contribution discusses a new high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age (407.1 ± 2.2 Ma, 2σ) for the Devonian hot-spring system at Rhynie (Mark et al., 2011) and demonstrates that a proposed U-Pb age (411.5 ± 1.1 Ma, 2σ) for the Rhynie cherts (Parry et al., 2011) is inconsistent with both field evidence and our interpretation of the U-Pb data. The 40Ar/39Ar age provides a robust marker for the polygonalis-emsiensis Spore Assemblage Biozone within the Pragian-?earliest Emsian. It also constrains the age of a wealth of flora and fauna preserved in life positions as well as dating gold mineralization. Furthermore, we have now determined the Ar isotope composition of pristine samples of the Rhynie chert using an ARGUS multi-collector mass spectrometer and a low blank laser extraction technique. 40Ar/36Ar are systematically lower than the modern air value (Lee et al., 2006), and are not accompanied by non-atmospheric 38Ar/36Ar ratios. We conclude that the Rhynie chert captured and has preserved Devonian atmosphere-derived Ar. The data indicate that the 40Ar/36Ar of Devonian atmosphere was at least 3 % lower

  5. Computerizing marine biota: a rational approach

    Chavan, V.S.; Chandramohan, D.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Data on marine biota while being extensive are also patchy and scattered; thus making retrieval and dissemination of information time consuming. This emphasise the need for computerizing information on marine biota with the objective to collate...

  6. Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factor Data

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factor contains approximately 20,000 biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) from 20 locations (mostly Superfund sites) for...

  7. Environmental pathways and radiological dosimetry for biota

    Radionuclides entering the environment as a result man's activities may be transported, cycled, and/or concentrated in the biotic and abiotic compartments of the ecosystem. Organisms in an environment contaminated with radioactive waste may be irradiated externally by radionuclides in air, water, vegetation, soil or sediment and internally by radionuclides accumulated within their bodies by inhalation or by direct absorption through their skin. The purpose of this paper is to examine the pathways in which biota are exposed to radioactive releases to the environment and to review the methods used to calculate radiation doses to the biota. In general, the methodology for estimating radiation doses to biota in their natural environment is better developed for aquatic biota than for terrestrial biota. The different methodologies which have been used for calculating radiation doses to aquatic biota were reviewed. If the protection of non-human biota is an issue in addressing environmental assessments of nuclear facilities, then the methodology for estimating radiation doses to biota should be improved. It is recommended that dose calculations should be simplified and standardized by developing dose conversion factors for a number of generic aquatic and terrestrial organisms. (author)

  8. The effect of wildfire and clear-cutting on above-ground biomass, foliar C to N ratios and fiber content throughout succession: Implications for forage quality in woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou)

    Mallon, E. E.; Turetsky, M.; Thompson, I.; Noland, T. L.; Wiebe, P.

    2013-12-01

    Disturbance is known to play an important role in maintaining the productivity and biodiversity of boreal forest ecosystems. Moderate to low frequency disturbance is responsible for regeneration opportunities creating a mosaic of habitats and successional trajectories. However, large-scale deforestation and increasing wildfire frequencies exacerbate habitat loss and influence biogeochemical cycles. This has raised concern about the quality of the under-story vegetation post-disturbance and whether this may impact herbivores, especially those vulnerable to change. Forest-dwelling caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) are declining in several regions of Canada and are currently listed as a species at risk by COSEWIC. Predation and landscape alteration are viewed as the two main threats to woodland caribou. This has resulted in caribou utilizing low productivity peatlands as refuge and the impact of this habitat selection on their diet quality is not well understood. Therefore there are two themes in the study, 1) Forage quantity: above-ground biomass and productivity and 2) Forage quality: foliar N and C to N ratios and % fiber. The themes are addressed in three questions: 1) How does forage quantity and quality vary between upland forests and peatlands? 2) How does wildfire affect the availability and nutritional quality of forage items? 3) How does forage quality vary between sites recovering from wildfire versus timber harvest? Research sites were located in the Auden region north of Geraldton, ON. This landscape was chosen because it is known woodland caribou habitat and has thorough wildfire and silviculture data from the past 7 decades. Plant diversity, above-ground biomass, vascular green area and seasonal foliar fiber and C to N ratios were collected across a matrix of sites representing a chronosequence of time since disturbance in upland forests and peatlands. Preliminary findings revealed productivity peaked in early age stands (0-30 yrs) and biomass peaked

  9. Proposed Release Guides to Protect Aquatic Biota

    Marter, W.L.

    2001-03-28

    At the request of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), the Savannah River Laboratory was assigned the task of developing the release guides to protect aquatic biota. A review of aquatic radioecology literature by two leading experts in the field of radioecology concludes that exposure of aquatic biota at one rad per day or less will not produce detectable deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. On the basis of this report, DOE recommends the use of one rad per day as an interim dose standard to protect aquatic biota.

  10. Part 7: Monitoring of biota

    The present state of the biota, in respect to the previous state and in respect to the development after the realised technical measures on both sides, was evaluated according to the data included in the Slovak-Hungarian joint monitoring covering the period from 1992 to 1996. The river branch water supply on the Slovak side was introduced in May 1993 through the intake structure at Dobrohost. On the Hungarian side the water supply is accomplished by the underwater weir put into operation in June 1995. The biological monitoring on the Slovak side was performed at six monitoring areas, where all the groups agreed in the joint monitoring were monitored. On the Hungarian side each group were monitored on different monitoring sites. The water supply introduced on the Hungarian side by the underwater weir operation has no impact on the Slovak side. Similar impact as it is now observed on the Hungarian side has been observed on the Slovak side since introduction of water supply in 1993. The increased amount of water discharged to the Danube was reflected by changes of the habitat of aquatic communities. The water supply on the Hungarian side was accomplished by the construction of the underwater weir and therefore a connection of the river branch system with the Danube at two factors have had very significant influence on the bio-tops existing in the river branch system and subsequently to the fauna and flora. Generally large amount of water became available, which was reflected in change of stagnant or slowly flowing water into water flow with higher velocity or in increase of the water surface. In some locations the water level returned to the state before damming, in others new bio-tops were created, and in some locations the previous bio-tops disappeared. To these changed conditions the aquatic fauna reacted the most rapidly.The terrestrial communities prove the necessity of flooding and raising of ground water level on some of the inundation areas, because in spite

  11. Defoliation reduces soil biota - and modifies stimulating effects of elevated CO2.

    Dam, Marie; Christensen, Søren

    2015-11-01

    To understand the responses to external disturbance such as defoliation and possible feedback mechanisms at global change in terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to examine the extent and nature of effects on aboveground-belowground interactions. We studied a temperate heathland system subjected to experimental climate and atmospheric factors based on prognoses for year 2075 and further exposed to defoliation. By defoliating plants, we were able to study how global change modifies the interactions of the plant-soil system. Shoot production, root biomass, microbial biomass, and nematode abundance were assessed in the rhizosphere of manually defoliated patches of Deschampsia flexuosa in June in a full-factorial FACE experiment with the treatments: increased atmospheric CO 2, increased nighttime temperatures, summer droughts, and all of their combinations. We found a negative effect of defoliation on microbial biomass that was not apparently affected by global change. The negative effect of defoliation cascades through to soil nematodes as dependent on CO 2 and drought. At ambient CO 2, drought and defoliation each reduced nematodes. In contrast, at elevated CO 2, a combination of drought and defoliation was needed to reduce nematodes. We found positive effects of CO 2 on root density and microbial biomass. Defoliation affected soil biota negatively, whereas elevated CO 2 stimulated the plant-soil system. This effect seen in June is contrasted by the effects seen in September at the same site. Late season defoliation increased activity and biomass of soil biota and more so at elevated CO 2. Based on soil biota responses, plants defoliated in active growth therefore conserve resources, whereas defoliation after termination of growth results in release of resources. This result challenges the idea that plants via exudation of organic carbon stimulate their rhizosphere biota when in apparent need of nutrients for growth. PMID:26640664

  12. Regional contingencies in the relationship between aboveground Bbomass and litter in the world’s grasslands

    O’Halloran, Lydia R.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Cleland, Elsa E.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; Hobbie, Sarah; Harpole, W. Stan; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Davies, Kendi F.; Du, Guozhen; Firn, Jennifer; Hagenah, Nicole; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Li, Wei; Melbourne, Brett A.; Morgan, John W.; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Stevens, Carly J.

    2013-01-01

    Based on regional-scale studies, aboveground production and litter decomposition are thought to positively covary, because they are driven by shared biotic and climatic factors. Until now we have been unable to test whether production and decomposition are generally coupled across climatically dissimilar regions, because we lacked replicated data collected within a single vegetation type across multiple regions, obfuscating the drivers and generality of the association between production and decomposition. Furthermore, our understanding of the relationships between production and decomposition rests heavily on separate meta-analyses of each response, because no studies have simultaneously measured production and the accumulation or decomposition of litter using consistent methods at globally relevant scales. Here, we use a multi-country grassland dataset collected using a standardized protocol to show that live plant biomass (an estimate of aboveground net primary production) and litter disappearance (represented by mass loss of aboveground litter) do not strongly covary. Live biomass and litter disappearance varied at different spatial scales. There was substantial variation in live biomass among continents, sites and plots whereas among continent differences accounted for most of the variation in litter disappearance rates. Although there were strong associations among aboveground biomass, litter disappearance and climatic factors in some regions (e.g. U.S. Great Plains), these relationships were inconsistent within and among the regions represented by this study. These results highlight the importance of replication among regions and continents when characterizing the correlations between ecosystem processes and interpreting their global-scale implications for carbon flux. We must exercise caution in parameterizing litter decomposition and aboveground production in future regional and global carbon models as their relationship is complex.

  13. Application of biota dose assessment tools for Japan environment

    We examined applicability of two biota assessment tools RESRAD-BIOTA and ERICA assessment tool, to Japanese environment. We considered paddy field as the typical Japan environment and used maximum of global fallout nuclide concentrations. The case studies showed that graded approaches used in RESRAD-BIOTA and ERICA assessment tool are effective to apply Japanese environment. In addition, we concluded that it is important to clarify the suitability of some parameter values used in biota dose assessment. Further study is necessary on the recommendation of environmental parameter values for biota dose assessment for Japan environment. (author)

  14. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  15. Dynamics of aboveground phytomass of the circumpolar Arctic tundra during the past three decades

    Numerous studies have evaluated the dynamics of Arctic tundra vegetation throughout the past few decades, using remotely sensed proxies of vegetation, such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). While extremely useful, these coarse-scale satellite-derived measurements give us minimal information with regard to how these changes are being expressed on the ground, in terms of tundra structure and function. In this analysis, we used a strong regression model between NDVI and aboveground tundra phytomass, developed from extensive field-harvested measurements of vegetation biomass, to estimate the biomass dynamics of the circumpolar Arctic tundra over the period of continuous satellite records (1982–2010). We found that the southernmost tundra subzones (C–E) dominate the increases in biomass, ranging from 20 to 26%, although there was a high degree of heterogeneity across regions, floristic provinces, and vegetation types. The estimated increase in carbon of the aboveground live vegetation of 0.40 Pg C over the past three decades is substantial, although quite small relative to anthropogenic C emissions. However, a 19.8% average increase in aboveground biomass has major implications for nearly all aspects of tundra ecosystems including hydrology, active layer depths, permafrost regimes, wildlife and human use of Arctic landscapes. While spatially extensive on-the-ground measurements of tundra biomass were conducted in the development of this analysis, validation is still impossible without more repeated, long-term monitoring of Arctic tundra biomass in the field. (letter)

  16. Stimulation of the Salicylic Acid Pathway Aboveground Recruits Entomopathogenic Nematodes Belowground

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S.; Junior, Alcides Moino; Pareja, Martin; Borai, Fahiem El; Dickson, Donald W.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Duncan, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways play a critical role in mediating tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. While the impact of plant defense pathway stimulation on natural enemies has been extensively explored aboveground, belowground ramifications of plant defense pathway stimulation are equally important in regulating subterranean pests and still require more attention. Here we investigate the effect of aboveground stimulation of the salicylic acid pathway through foliar application of the elicitor methyl salicylate on belowground recruitment of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema diaprepesi. Also, we implicate a specific root-derived volatile that attracts S. diaprepesi belowground following aboveground plant stimulation by an elicitor. In four-choice olfactometer assays, citrus plants treated with foliar applications of methyl salicylate recruited S. diaprepesi in the absence of weevil feeding as compared with negative controls. Additionally, analysis of root volatile profiles of citrus plants receiving foliar application of methyl salicylate revealed production of d-limonene, which was absent in negative controls. The entomopathogenic nematode S. diaprepesi was recruited to d-limonene in two-choice olfactometer trials. These results reinforce the critical role of plant defense pathways in mediating tritrophic interactions, suggest a broad role for plant defense pathway signaling belowground, and hint at sophisticated plant responses to pest complexes. PMID:27136916

  17. The RESRAD-BIOTA code for application in biota dose evaluation

    The RESRAD-BIOTA code was developed through a partnership among U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. RESRAD-BIOTA provides a full spectrum of analysis capabilities, from cost-effective conservative screening methods (using biota concentration guides) to realistic, organism-specific dose assessment. A beta version of the RESRAD-BIOTA code is currently available for use and testing. Continued coordination and partnerships with U.S. agencies and international organizations is providing opportunities for the inclusion of additional evaluation approaches and capabilities, such as (1) development of biota concentration guides for additional radionuclides, (2) additional flexibility for specifying and expanding organism options, (3) improvements to parameter datasets of environmental transfer factors, (4) inclusion of additional ''reference organism geometries'' (e.g., dose conversion factors for ellipsoids of appropriate size and shielding properties for different sized organisms, appropriate for specific ecosystem types), and (5) the capability to perform sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for calculated dose estimates

  18. Impacts on non-human biota from a generic geological disposal facility for radioactive waste: some key assessment issues

    This paper provides an overview of key issues associated with the application of currently available biota dose assessment methods to consideration of potential environmental impacts from geological disposal facilities. It explores philosophical, methodological and practical assessment issues and reviews the implications of test assessment results in the context of recent and on-going challenges and debates.

  19. Redistribution of soil biota by rainfall erosion

    Baxter, Craig; Rowan, John; McKenzie, Blair; Neilson, Roy

    2013-04-01

    Soil is central to the provision of multiple ecosystem services that sustain life through a myriad of chemical, physical and biological processes. One of the greatest threats to soil is erosion, a natural process accelerated by human activities. Elevated erosion rates are common in agro-ecosystems causing both direct physical impacts (e.g. soil loss), and indirect biogeochemical consequences, which ultimately leads to impaired ecosystem functioning. The consequences of erosion on soil biota have hitherto been ignored, yet biota have fundamental roles in the provision of soil ecosystem services. To our knowledge few studies have addressed the gap between erosion and impacts on soil biota. Here we use soil nematodes as a model organism for assessing erosion impacts on soil (micro) fauna in temperate agro-ecosystems. Soil nematodes are ubiquitous, abundant, are represented at all levels in soil food webs and can be categorised into a range of trophic or functional groups. To quantify transport of nematodes and gain a better understanding of erosive mechanisms responsible, we measured their export from small erosion plots (0.0625m2) under a fixed-intensity design rainstorm (6mm min-1 duration: 3 min) over six slope angles (4° - 24°) and three soil texture classes (sandy silt, silty sand, silt). Runoff and eroded sediment were collected for each plot (four replicate runs), and a suite of biological and physico-chemical parameters measured. Results confirmed that, similar to soil particles, nematodes were exported at rates influenced by slope angle and soil texture. These experiments, linked with field and catchment-scale equivalents, are designed to elucidate the links between soil erosion and provision of ecosystem services and to inform biodiversity-sensitive soil and water conservation practices.

  20. Biota-sediment accumulation factors for radionuclides and sediment associated biota of the Ottawa River

    Rowan, D.; Silke, R.; Carr, J., E-mail: rowand@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    As Ottawa River contamination is historical and resides in sediment, ecological risk and trophic transfer depend on linkages between sediment and biota. One of the ways in which this linkage is quantified is through the use of the biota sediment accumulation factor (BSAF). In this study, we present the first field estimates of BSAF for a number of radionuclides. The strongest and most consistent BSAFs were those for {sup 137}Cs in deposit feeding taxa, suggesting that sediment concentrations rather than dissolved concentrations drive uptake. For crayfish and unionid bivalves that do not feed on sediment, biota radionuclide concentrations were not related to sediment concentrations, but rather reflected concentrations in water. BSAFs would not be appropriate for these non-deposit feeding biota. BSAFs for {sup 137}Cs were not significantly different among deposit feeding taxa, suggesting similar processes for ingestion, assimilation and elimination. These data also show that the concentration factor approach used for guidance would have led to spurious results in this study for deposit feeding benthic invertebrates. Concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in Hexagenia downstream of the CRL process outfall range by about 2-orders of magnitude, in comparison to relatively uniform water concentrations. The concentration factor approach would have predicted a single value downstream of CRL, underestimating exposure to Hexagenia by almost 2-orders of magnitude at sites close to the CRL process outfall. (author)

  1. Interactions of radionuclides with marine biota

    Uptake of radioactivity by marine biota can occur through consumption of radioactive food or via direct incorporation from the seawater. As uptake occurs, radioactivity begins to distribute into and onto various body tissues, or ''compartments'', at different rates. A composite uptake curve therefore is curvilinear with time. Elimination can occur via various pathways, including fecal deposition, molting, and excretion of dissolved substances, and therefore a composite loss curve also is curvilinear. Uptake and elimination can occur simultaneously, and under constant conditions over a long time period a steady-state body burden will be achieved. Many factors can affect uptake and loss rates, as well as steady-state body burdens, and some major ones are discussed. Design of radioactivity experiments involving marine biota is explored, and a case study of a ''natural experiment'' involving both reactor-produced and fallout radionuclides in a coastal environment is presented to show how much nuclide introductions can be used to learn about nuclide biomagnification, trophic level relationships, and biological distribution of radioactivity in the sea. (author)

  2. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology

    W.H. van der Putten,; R.D. Bardgett; P.C. de Ruiter;

    2009-01-01

    from an empirical perspective and in specific ecological settings or contexts. Belowground interactions operate at different spatial and temporal scales. Due to the relatively low mobility and high survival of organisms in the soil, plants have longer lasting legacy effects belowground than aboveground...... and environmental settings, we explore where and how they can be supported by theoretical approaches to develop testable predictions and to generalise empirical results. We review four key areas where a combined aboveground-belowground approach offers perspectives for enhancing ecological...

  3. ACCUMULATION OF HEAVY METALS IN BIOTA OF VYRLYTSA LAKE

    Bilyk, Tetiana; Tsurkan, Katerina; Koren, Lyudmila

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. The main task was to investigate the pollution by heavy metals of biota of Vyrlytsa Lake. Thecontents of movable forms of heavy metals in aquatic plants, fish and snails was determined by atomicabsorbtion method and were made the conclusions about general state of the water object.Keywords: heavy metals, accumulation, biota, pollution, atomic absorption spectroscopy.

  4. Decline of radionuclides in Columbia River biota

    In January 1971, the last of nine plutonium production reactors using direct discharge of once-through cooling waters into the Columbia River was closed. Sampling was initiated at three stations on the Columbia River to document the decline of the radionuclide body burdens in the biota of the Columbia River ecosystem. The data show that in a river-reservoir complex, the measurable body burden of fission-produced radionuclides decreased to essentially undetectable levels within 18 to 24 mo after cessation of discharge of once-through cooling water into the river. On the basis of data from the free-flowing station, we believe that this decrease would be even more rapid in an unimpounded river

  5. Ecosystem services of soil biota: In what context is a focus on soil biota meaningful?

    Baveye, Philippe C.

    2016-04-01

    Over the last few years, the topic of the ecosystem services of soils has attracted considerable attention, in particular among researchers working on soil biota. A direct link is established explicitly in numerous articles between soil biota and specific ecosystem services, or between soil biodiversity and ecosystem services. A careful review of the literature indicates however that these links are, more often than not, strictly axiomatic, rather than based on actual observations. In fact, there are still at the moment virtually no measurements of ecosystem services of soils at any scale, measurements that would be required to establish such links. Furthermore, at a conceptual level, it is not clear to what extent the effect of soil biota in the delivery of ecosystem services can be separated from the contribution of other components of soil systems. Soil microorganisms, in particular, proliferate and are metabolically active in a pore space whose characteristics and dynamics could in principle have a profound effect on their activity. So also could the composition and spatial distribution of soil organic matter, or the spatial pattern of plant root propagation. By emphasizing the role of soil biota, at the exclusion of other aspects of soil systems, there is a risk that important features of the provision of ecosystem services by soils will be missed. In this talk (based in part on a workshop organized recently in France, and of a follow-up review article), an analysis of this general problem will be presented, as well as suggestions of how to avoid it by promoting truly interdisciplinary research involving not only soil ecologists but also physicists, hydrologists, and chemists.

  6. Transport of root-derived CO2 via the transpiration stream affects aboveground tree physiology

    Bloemen, J.; McGuire, M. A.; Aubrey, D. P.; Teskey, R. O.; Steppe, K.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research on soil CO2 efflux has shown that belowground autotrophic respiration is largely underestimated using classical net CO2 flux measurements. Aubrey & Teskey (2009) found that in forest ecosystems a substantial portion of the CO2 released from root respiration remained within the root system and was transported aboveground in the stem via the transpiration stream. The magnitude of this upward movement of CO2 from belowground tissues suggested important implications for how we measure above- and belowground respiration. If a considerable fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported aboveground, where it might be fixed in woody and leaf tissues, then we are routinely underestimating the amount of C needed to sustain belowground tissues. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the base of field-grown poplar trees as a surrogate for root-respired CO2 to investigate the possible role of root-derived CO2 as substrate for carbon fixation. The label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and fixed by chlorophyll-containing woody (young bark and xylem) and leaf (petiole) tissues. Moreover, based on 13C analysis of gas samples, we observed that up to 88 ± 0.10 % of the label applied was lost to the atmosphere by stem and branch efflux higher in the trees. Given that one-half of root-respired CO2 may follow this internal flux pathway (Aubrey & Teskey, 2009), we calculated that up to 44% of the root-respired CO2 could diffuse to the atmosphere once transported to the stem and branches. Thus, a large portion of CO2 that diffuses out of aboveground tissues may actually result from root respiration. Our results show that CO2 originating belowground can be transported internally to aboveground parts of trees, where it will have an important impact on tree physiology. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the gas exchange approach to estimating above- and

  7. Central Northwest Pacific biota and their radioactivity

    Ecological and radiological surveys of biota around a proposed dumping site have been carried out by the Japanese Fisheries Agency. Micronekton were collected with a KOC net towed at prescribed depths. Fish nekton were collected with a KMT net towed from 1 to 2 hours either obliquely or horizontally at prescribed depths. This large net enabled the collection of larger organisms not collectable with KOC nets. Benthos were collected via benthos nets. Deep sea rattails and gammarids were collected with trapnets. In 1985, larger gear with mouth diameters of 1.8m were used with older gear having mouth diameters of 0.9m and used previously. New large gear allowed better collecting efficiency. Radioactivity measurements were carried out by gammaspectrometry with GeLi detectors on ashed samples. In almost all samples, Cs-137 was detected. In addition Co-60 was detected in some samples. Data obtained by the Tokai Regional Fisheries Research Laboratory were examined and summarized by the Ecology Working Group under the Executive Committee on Environmental Safety Assessment of Sea Dumping of Low level Radioactive Wastes in the Radioactive Waste Management Center

  8. Enhanced activities of organically bound tritium in biota samples

    Světlík, Ivo; Fejgl, Michal; Malátová, I.; Tomášková, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, NOV (2014), s. 82-86. ISSN 0969-8043 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : NE-OBT * HTO * NPPs * combustion * biota Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  9. Estimates of forest canopy height and aboveground biomass using ICESat

    Lefsky, Michael A; Harding, David J.; Keller, Michael; Cohen, Warren B.; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Espirito-Santo, Fernando Del Bom; Hunter, Maria O.; de Oliveira, Raimundo

    2005-01-01

    Exchange of carbon between forests and the atmosphere is a vital component of the global carbon cycle. Satellite laser altimetry has a unique capability for estimating forest canopy height, which has a direct and increasingly well understood relationship to aboveground carbon storage. While the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) has collected an unparalleled dataset of lidar waveforms over terrestrial targets, processing of IC...

  10. MODIS Based Estimation of Forest Aboveground Biomass in China

    Guodong Yin; Yuan Zhang; Yan Sun; Tao Wang; Zhenzhong Zeng; Shilong Piao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of forest biomass C stock is essential to understand carbon cycles. However, current estimates of Chinese forest biomass are mostly based on inventory-based timber volumes and empirical conversion factors at the provincial scale, which could introduce large uncertainties in forest biomass estimation. Here we provide a data-driven estimate of Chinese forest aboveground biomass from 2001 to 2013 at a spatial resolution of 1 km by integrating a recently reviewed plot-level gr...

  11. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites. PMID:27147449

  12. Underground or aboveground storage tanks - A critical decision

    With the 1988 promulgation of the comprehensive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for underground storage of petroleum and hazardous substances, many existing underground storage tank (UST) owners have been considering making the move to aboveground storage. While on the surface, this may appear to be the cure-all to avoiding the underground leakage dilemma, there are many other new and different issues to consider with aboveground storage. The greatest misconception is that by storing materials above ground, there is no risk of subsurface environmental problems. It should be noted that with the aboveground storage tank (AGST) systems, there is still considerable risk of environmental contamination, either by the failure of onground tank bottoms or the spillage of product onto the ground surface where it subsequently finds its way to the ground water. In addition, there are added safety concerns that must be addressed. The greatest interest in AGSTs comes from managers with small volumes of used oil, fresh oil, solvents, chemicals, or heating oil. Dealing with small capacity tanks is not so different than large bulk storage - and, in fact, it lends itself to more options, such as portable storage, tank within tank configurations and inside installations. So what are the other specific areas of concern besides environmental to be addressed when making the decision between underground and aboveground tanks? The primary issues that will be addressed in this presentation are: (1) safety; (2) product losses; (3) cost comparison of USTs vs AGSTs; (4) space availability/accessibility; (5) precipitation handling; (6) aesthetics and security; (7) pending and existing regulations

  13. Uncertainty Analysis in Large Area Aboveground Biomass Mapping

    Baccini, A.; Carvalho, L.; Dubayah, R.; Goetz, S. J.; Friedl, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite and aircraft-based remote sensing observations are being more frequently used to generate spatially explicit estimates of aboveground carbon stock of forest ecosystems. Because deforestation and forest degradation account for circa 10% of anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere, policy mechanisms are increasingly recognized as a low-cost mitigation option to reduce carbon emission. They are, however, contingent upon the capacity to accurately measures carbon stored in the forests. Here we examine the sources of uncertainty and error propagation in generating maps of aboveground biomass. We focus on characterizing uncertainties associated with maps at the pixel and spatially aggregated national scales. We pursue three strategies to describe the error and uncertainty properties of aboveground biomass maps, including: (1) model-based assessment using confidence intervals derived from linear regression methods; (2) data-mining algorithms such as regression trees and ensembles of these; (3) empirical assessments using independently collected data sets.. The latter effort explores error propagation using field data acquired within satellite-based lidar (GLAS) acquisitions versus alternative in situ methods that rely upon field measurements that have not been systematically collected for this purpose (e.g. from forest inventory data sets). A key goal of our effort is to provide multi-level characterizations that provide both pixel and biome-level estimates of uncertainties at different scales.

  14. Approaches to estimating the transfer of radionuclides to arctic biota

    There is increasing concern over potential radioactive contamination of the Arctic due to the wide range of nuclear sources. Environmental characteristics of the Arctic also suggest that it may be comparatively vulnerable to contaminants. Here we review collated data and available models for estimating the transfer of radionuclides to terrestrial biota within the Arctic. The most abundant data are for radiocaesium and radiostrontium although many data for natural radionuclides were available from studies in the Arctic. For some radionuclides no data are available for describing transfer to Arctic biota. Allometric-kinetic models have been used to provide estimates of transfer for radionuclide biota combinations for which data were lacking. Predicted values were in good agreement with observed data for some radionuclides (e.g. Cs, U) although less so for others. However, for some radionuclides where comparison appeared poor there were relatively little observed data with which to compare and the models developed were simplistic excluding some potentially important transfer pathways (e.g. soil ingestion). There are no bespoke models to enable the dynamic prediction of radionuclide transfer to Arctic biota. A human food chain model is available which includes limited parameterization for Cs and Sr transfer in Arctic ecosystems. This has been relatively easily adapted to estimate 137Cs and 90Sr transfer to some Arctic biota and could be readily adapted to other radionuclide-biota combinations. There are many factors of Arctic ecosystems which may influence radionuclide behaviour including short growing seasons, prolonged freezing of soil, and effects of low temperatures on biological rates. However, these are not included within existing predictive models (for human or biota exposure). If exposure to ionising radiation within Arctic ecosystems is to be robustly predicted such factors must be fully understood and properly incorporated into models. (author)

  15. Landscape Patterns of Wood Density and Aboveground Biomass Along a Tropical Elevation Gradient in Costa Rica

    Robinson, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    This research sought to understand how tree wood density and taxonomic diversity relate to topography and three-dimensional vegetation structure in the tropical montane forest of Braulio Carrillo National Park in Costa Rica. The study utilized forest inventory and botanical data from twenty 1-ha plots ranging from 55 m to 2800 m above sea level and remote sensing data from an airborne lidar sensor (NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor [LVIS]) to quantify variations in forest structure. There is growing evidence that ecosystem structure may help to control the functional variations across landscapes. This study relates patterns of tree functional wood density and alpha diversity to three-dimensional structure using remote sensing observations of forest structure. We were able to test the effect of the gradient on wood density measured from collected tree cores and on the subsequent aboveground biomass estimations. We sought to determine if there was a significant pattern of wood density across the altitudinal gradient, which has implications for conservation of both ecosystem services and biodiversity. We also wanted to determine how many random individuals could be sampled to accurately estimate aboveground biomass in a one-hectare plot. Our results indicate that there is a strong relationship between LVIS-derived forest 3D-structure and alpha diversity, likely controlled by variations in abiotic factors and topography along the elevation. Using spatial analysis with the aid of remote sensing data, we found patterns along the environmental gradients defining species composition and forest structure. Wood density values were found to vary significantly from database values for the same species. This variation in tree growth has repercussions on overall forest structure, and subsequent carbon estimates extrapolated from field measurements. Because these wood density values are directly tied to biomass estimates, it is possible that carbon storage has been

  16. Plot-level aboveground woody biomass modeling using canopy height and auxiliary remote sensing data in a heterogeneous savanna

    Gwenzi, David; Lefsky, Michael Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing studies aiming at assessing woody biomass have demonstrated a strong relationship between canopy height and plot-level aboveground biomass, but most of these studies focused on closed canopy forests. To date, a few studies have examined the strength and reliability of this relationship using large footprint lidar in savannas. Furthermore, there have been few studies of appropriate methods for the comparison of models that relate aboveground biomass to canopy height metrics without consideration of variation in species composition (generic models) to models developed for individual species composition or vegetation types. We developed generic models using the classical least-squares regression modeling approach to relate selected canopy height metrics to aboveground woody biomass in a savanna landscape. Hierarchical Bayesian analysis (HBA) was then used to explore the implications of using generic or composition-specific models. Our study used the estimates of aboveground biomass from field data, canopy height estimates from airborne discrete return lidar, and a proxy for canopy cover (the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper data, collected from the oak savannas of Tejon Ranch Conservancy in Kern County, California. Models were developed and analyzed using estimates of canopy height and aboveground biomass calculated at the level of 50-m diameter plots, comparable with footprint diameter of existing large footprint spaceborne lidar data. The two generic models that incorporated canopy cover proxies performed better than one model that did not use canopy cover information. From the HBA, we found out that for all models both the intercept and slope had interspecific variability. The valley oak dominated plots consistently had higher slopes and intercepts, whereas the plots dominated by blue oaks had the lowest. However, the intercept and slope values of the composition-specific models did not differ much from the

  17. The problem of permissible doses of irradiation for biota

    The dose of acute irradiation or of chronic irradiation under which the biota's functioning is not disturbed is suggested as a permissible dose of irradiation for biota. On the basis of many separate experiments and observations, doses of chronic irradiation 1-3 gy/year are supposed to be permissible for higher plants and animals. The irradiation tolerance of microorganisms is considerably higher. The permissible doses of irradiation for the biota and for human beings are compared. The accepted maximum tolerance dose of irradiation of 10-3 gy/year for humans is determined to be groundless. We propose substituting the term open-quotes permissible dose.close quotes 28 refs., 3 figs

  18. Putative linkages between below- and aboveground mutualisms during alien plant invasions

    Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Traveset, Anna

    2015-01-01

    © The Authors 2015. Evidence of the fundamental role of below-aboveground links in controlling ecosystem processes is mostly based on studies done with soil herbivores or mutualists and aboveground herbivores. Much less is known about the links between belowground and aboveground mutualisms, which have been studied separately for decades. It has not been until recently that these mutualisms-mycorrhizas and legume-rhizobia on one hand, and pollinators and seed dispersers on the other hand-have...

  19. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 134: Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 134 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Aboveground Storage Tanks' and consists of the following four Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 3, 15, and 29 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) CAS 03-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; (2) CAS 03-01-04, Tank; (3) CAS 15-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (4) CAS 29-01-01, Hydrocarbon Stain

  20. Biota and biological principles of the aquatic environment

    The first of several compilations of briefing papers on water quality prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey is presented. Each briefing paper is prepared in a simple, nontechnical, easy to understand manner. This U.S. Geological Survey Circular contains papers on selected biota and biological principles of the aquatic environment. Briefing papers are included on Why biology in water quality studies , Stream biology, Phytoplankton, Periphyton, Drift organisms in streams, Family Chironomidae (Diptera), Influences of water temperature on aquatic biota, and Stream channelization: Effects on stream fauna

  1. Radio biophysical studies on some fresh water biota

    The present study includes biophysical measurements of uptake and release of Co-60 by aquatic biota, water hyacinth plant (Eichhronia Crassipes ) and biomphalaria alexandrina snails placed in ismailia canal water. The uptake of co-60 was studied under different experimental conditions, namely the effect of contact time, variation of p H of the cobalt solution, the presence of competing ions and variation of cobalt carrier concentration. The experimental results of Co-60 uptake and release by the aquatic biota are described using the compartmental model, and also using the well known freudlich isotherm equation model

  2. What are the toxicological effects of mercury in Arctic biota?

    Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Basu, Niladri;

    2012-01-01

    This review critically evaluates the available mercury (Hg) data in Arctic marine biota and the Inuit population against toxicity threshold values. In particular marine top predators exhibit concentrations of mercury in their tissues and organs that are believed to exceed thresholds for biological...... to be one of the most vulnerable groups, with high concentrations of mercury recorded in brain tissue with associated signs of neurochemical effects. Evidence of increasing concentrations in mercury in some biota in Arctic Canada and Greenland is therefore a concern with respect to ecosystem health....

  3. Vertebrate radiations of the Jehol Biota and their environmental background

    ZHOU Zhonghe

    2004-01-01

    @@ Significant progress has been made in recent years in the studies of various groups of the Jehol Biota, particularly concerning the origin of birds and their flight as well as the evolution of Early Cretaceous birds, dinosaurs, mammals, insects and flowering plants[1-5]. As a result, the Jehol Biota has become well known to both the scientific community and the public. The studies on the Jehol Biota also revealed the patterns and processes of the evolutionary radiations of many major groups of Early Cretaceous animals and plants, such as the earliest known radiation of angiosperms and birds, early differentiation of mammals and many Cretaceous dinosaurian groups. Notably, the radiations of the Jehol vertebrates share some similar patterns attributable to the particular environmental background. For instance, the Jehol vertebrate radiations are highlighted by the presence of abundant arboreal adaptations and herbivorous forms, thus closely linked to the forest environments. In addition, the differentiation of habitats and diets is also characteristic of the evolutionary radiations of pterosaurs, dinosaurs, birds and mammals in the Jehol Biota.

  4. Selenium accumulation in aquatic biota downstream of a uranium mining and milling operation

    Uranium mining and milling operations have the potential to release trace elements such as arsenic, molybdenum, nickel, selenium and uranium and ions (e.g., sulfate, ammonium) into the receiving aquatic ecosystem. The major implication of elevated environmental selenium is its propensity to accumulate in the aquatic food chain, potentially impairing fish reproduction. The objective of this study was to investigate the accumulation of selenium in the major compartments of aquatic ecosystems (lakes) upstream and downstream of a uranium mine in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Selenium concentrations in aquatic biota were elevated in the exposure lake although water and sediment concentrations were low (0.43 μg/L and 0.54 μg/g dry weight, respectively). Biomagnification of selenium resulted in approximately 1.5 to 6 fold increase in the selenium concentration between plankton, invertebrates and fish. However, no biomagnification was observed between forage and predatory fish. Although some aquatic biota (e.g., forage fish) exceeded the lower limit of the proposed 3 to 11 μg/g (dry weight) dietary toxicity threshold for fish, no adverse effects of selenium could be identified in this aquatic system. Continued environmental monitoring is recommended to avoid potential selenium impacts

  5. Assessment of doses to biota in the river system

    Doses to aquatic biota in the hydrological system Techa - Ob are estimated.The following water bodies with different levels of radioactive contamination are considered: industrial reservoirs, Techa, Iset, Tobol and Irtysh Rivers. Doses to biota are calculated using the observed data on the content of radionuclides in various environmental components, with consideration for geometric characteristics of the organisms and the exposure sources. The following groups of the river biota are considered: aquatic plants, mollusks and fish. Simplified geometric models (ellipsoids) are used in the internal dose calculations for fish and mollusks. Aquatic plants are approximated either with spheres or with a layer of finite depth. For the external doses assessment the water was considered as an infinite source with the uniform distribution of radionuclides. Sediments were represented as a source with the uniformly distributed activity. Concentration factor of scattered radiation was taken into account for gamma emitters. Sources and levels of radioactive contamination of the Techa - Ob system are analyzed. Data on the activity concentration of radionuclides in water, bottom sediments and aquatic biota are used for the dose assessment. Assessment of doses to biota in the Techa -Ob river system in the period from 1949 to the present time are performed.The highest doses (over 0.01 Gy/day) were received by aquatic organisms in the upper reaches of the Techa River in the period of maximum discharges of radionuclides (1950-1951). In that period, a major contribution to the dose to aquatic organisms was due to the incorporated radionuclides: 89 Sr, 90 Sr, 106 Ru,137 Cs, 144 Ce and others. During 1950-1951, the doses to aquatic organisms were estimated, on average, at 0.003-0.1 Gy/day. After the cessation of intensive radioactive discharges and the construction of a system of protective water bodies, the doses to aquatic biota noticeably decreased. Current levels of exposure to fish in

  6. Aboveground biomass investments and light interception of tropical forest trees early in succession

    Selaya, N.G.; Anten, N.P.R.; Mathies, M.; Oomen, R.J.; Werger, M.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims: Crown structure and above-ground biomass investment was studied in relation to light interception of trees and lianas growing in a 6-month-old regenerating forest. Methods: The vertical distribution of total above-ground biomass, height, diameter, stem density, leaf angles and c

  7. Evaluating lidar point densities for effective estimation of aboveground biomass

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Stoker, Jason; Vogel, John M.; Velasco, Miguel G.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) was recently established to provide airborne lidar data coverage on a national scale. As part of a broader research effort of the USGS to develop an effective remote sensing-based methodology for the creation of an operational biomass Essential Climate Variable (Biomass ECV) data product, we evaluated the performance of airborne lidar data at various pulse densities against Landsat 8 satellite imagery in estimating above ground biomass for forests and woodlands in a study area in east-central Arizona, U.S. High point density airborne lidar data, were randomly sampled to produce five lidar datasets with reduced densities ranging from 0.5 to 8 point(s)/m2, corresponding to the point density range of 3DEP to provide national lidar coverage over time. Lidar-derived aboveground biomass estimate errors showed an overall decreasing trend as lidar point density increased from 0.5 to 8 points/m2. Landsat 8-based aboveground biomass estimates produced errors larger than the lowest lidar point density of 0.5 point/m2, and therefore Landsat 8 observations alone were ineffective relative to airborne lidar for generating a Biomass ECV product, at least for the forest and woodland vegetation types of the Southwestern U.S. While a national Biomass ECV product with optimal accuracy could potentially be achieved with 3DEP data at 8 points/m2, our results indicate that even lower density lidar data could be sufficient to provide a national Biomass ECV product with accuracies significantly higher than that from Landsat observations alone.

  8. Above-ground biomass functions for Scots pine in Lithuania

    Miksys, Virgilijus; Varnagiryte-Kabasinskiene, Iveta; Armolaitis, Kestutis [Lithuanian Forest Research Institute, Liepu 1, Girionys, LT-53101 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Stupak, Inge [Forest and Landscape Denmark, Hoersholm Kongevej 11, DK-2970 Hoersholm (Denmark); Kukkola, Mikko [The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Centre, Vantaa Unit, PL 18, 01301 Vantaa (Finland); Wojcik, Josef [Forest Research Institute, Sekocin-Las, 05-090 Raszyn (Poland)

    2007-10-15

    This study presents biomass functions applicable to Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) on Arenosols in Lithuania, and exemplifies the potential biomass removal from Scots pine stands during thinnings. Scots pine is the most common tree species on Arenosols in Lithuania. Stands of ages 10, 20, 40, 50 and 65 years were chosen for the biomass study. We sampled 5 Scots pine trees per plot (in total 25 trees) that were stratified according to the basal area. The sampling was performed in April 2003, before the vegetative period. The following components of each tree were sampled for the above-ground biomass measurements: (1) 5 stem discs, (2) 1 branch with needles from each whorl and (3) 1 dead branch per tree. Observed biomasses of above-ground components were examined using a non-linear regression model, using stem diameter (D), tree height (H) and D{sup 2}H as independent variables. For stemwood biomass, the best approximation was D{sup 2}H. However, D{sup 2}H was not the best parameter for crown biomass because it does not allow evaluation of the opposite effects of diameter and height on crown biomass. The calculations at stand level showed that crown biomass changed insignificantly with the increase in stand age. However, the total stand biomass increased with age due to the growth of the stem. The removal of all logging residues from the Scots pine stand over a 100-year rotation could increase extraction of forest fuel by 15-20% compared with conventional harvesting. (author)

  9. THE EDIACARA BIOTA: Neoproterozoic Origin of Animals and Their Ecosystems

    Narbonne, Guy M.

    2005-01-01

    The Ediacara biota (575-542 Ma) marks the first appearance of large, architecturally complex organisms in Earth history. Present evidence suggests that the Ediacara biota included a mixture of stem- and crown-group radial animals, stem-group bilaterian animals, "failed experiments" in animal evolution, and perhaps representatives of other eukaryotic kingdoms. These soft-bodied organisms were preserved under (or rarely within) event beds of sand or volcanic ash, and four distinct preservational styles (Flinders-, Fermeuse-, Conception-, and Nama-style) profoundly affected the types of organisms and features that could be preserved. Even the earliest Ediacaran communities (575-565 Ma) show vertical and lateral niche subdivision of the sessile, benthic, filter-feeding organisms, which is strikingly like that of Phanerozoic and modern communities. Later biological and ecological innovations include mobility (>555 Ma), calcification (550 Ma), and predation (extinction andor biological interactions with the rapidly evolving animals of the Cambrian explosio

  10. What are the toxicological effects of mercury in Arctic biota?

    Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Basu, Niladri; Braune, Birgit; O'Hara, Todd; Letcher, Robert J; Scheuhammer, Tony; Andersen, Magnus; Andreasen, Claus; Andriashek, Dennis; Asmund, Gert; Aubail, Aurore; Baagøe, Hans; Born, Erik W; Chan, Hing M; Derocher, Andrew E; Grandjean, Philippe; Knott, Katrina; Kirkegaard, Maja; Krey, Anke; Lunn, Nick; Messier, Francoise; Obbard, Marty; Olsen, Morten T; Ostertag, Sonja; Peacock, Elizabeth; Renzoni, Aristeo; Rigét, Frank F; Skaare, Janneche Utne; Stern, Gary; Stirling, Ian; Taylor, Mitch; Wiig, Øystein; Wilson, Simon; Aars, Jon

    2013-01-15

    This review critically evaluates the available mercury (Hg) data in Arctic marine biota and the Inuit population against toxicity threshold values. In particular marine top predators exhibit concentrations of mercury in their tissues and organs that are believed to exceed thresholds for biological effects. Species whose concentrations exceed threshold values include the polar bears (Ursus maritimus), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), pilot whale (Globicephala melas), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), a few seabird species, and landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). Toothed whales appear to be one of the most vulnerable groups, with high concentrations of mercury recorded in brain tissue with associated signs of neurochemical effects. Evidence of increasing concentrations in mercury in some biota in Arctic Canada and Greenland is therefore a concern with respect to ecosystem health. PMID:23231888

  11. Aboveground carbon loss in natural and managed tropical forests from 2000 to 2012

    Tropical forests provide global climate regulation ecosystem services and their clearing is a significant source of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and resultant radiative forcing of climate change. However, consensus on pan-tropical forest carbon dynamics is lacking. We present a new estimate that employs recommended good practices to quantify gross tropical forest aboveground carbon (AGC) loss from 2000 to 2012 through the integration of Landsat-derived tree canopy cover, height, intactness and forest cover loss and GLAS-lidar derived forest biomass. An unbiased estimate of forest loss area is produced using a stratified random sample with strata derived from a wall-to-wall 30 m forest cover loss map. Our sample-based results separate the gross loss of forest AGC into losses from natural forests (0.59 PgC yr−1) and losses from managed forests (0.43 PgC yr−1) including plantations, agroforestry systems and subsistence agriculture. Latin America accounts for 43% of gross AGC loss and 54% of natural forest AGC loss, with Brazil experiencing the highest AGC loss for both categories at national scales. We estimate gross tropical forest AGC loss and natural forest loss to account for 11% and 6% of global year 2012 CO2 emissions, respectively. Given recent trends, natural forests will likely constitute an increasingly smaller proportion of tropical forest GHG emissions and of global emissions as fossil fuel consumption increases, with implications for the valuation of co-benefits in tropical forest conservation. (letter)

  12. Aboveground carbon loss in natural and managed tropical forests from 2000 to 2012

    Tyukavina, A.; Baccini, A.; Hansen, M. C.; Potapov, P. V.; Stehman, S. V.; Houghton, R. A.; Krylov, A. M.; Turubanova, S.; Goetz, S. J.

    2015-07-01

    Tropical forests provide global climate regulation ecosystem services and their clearing is a significant source of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and resultant radiative forcing of climate change. However, consensus on pan-tropical forest carbon dynamics is lacking. We present a new estimate that employs recommended good practices to quantify gross tropical forest aboveground carbon (AGC) loss from 2000 to 2012 through the integration of Landsat-derived tree canopy cover, height, intactness and forest cover loss and GLAS-lidar derived forest biomass. An unbiased estimate of forest loss area is produced using a stratified random sample with strata derived from a wall-to-wall 30 m forest cover loss map. Our sample-based results separate the gross loss of forest AGC into losses from natural forests (0.59 PgC yr-1) and losses from managed forests (0.43 PgC yr-1) including plantations, agroforestry systems and subsistence agriculture. Latin America accounts for 43% of gross AGC loss and 54% of natural forest AGC loss, with Brazil experiencing the highest AGC loss for both categories at national scales. We estimate gross tropical forest AGC loss and natural forest loss to account for 11% and 6% of global year 2012 CO2 emissions, respectively. Given recent trends, natural forests will likely constitute an increasingly smaller proportion of tropical forest GHG emissions and of global emissions as fossil fuel consumption increases, with implications for the valuation of co-benefits in tropical forest conservation.

  13. Functionally and phylogenetically diverse plant communities key to soil biota

    Milcu, Alexandru; Allan, Eric; Roscher, Christiane; Jenkins, Tania; Meyer, Sebastian T.; Flynn, Dan; Bessler, Holger; Buscot, François; Engels, Christof; Gubsch, Marlén; König, Stephan; Lipowsky, Annett; Loranger, Jessy; Renker, Carsten; Scherber, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies assessing the role of biological diversity for ecosystem functioning indicate that the diversity of functional traits and the evolutionary history of species in a community, not the number of taxonomic units, ultimately drives the biodiversity–ecosystem-function relationship. Here, we simultaneously assessed the importance of plant functional trait and phylogenetic diversity as predictors of major trophic groups of soil biota (abundance and diversity), six years from the onset ...

  14. Modes of interactions between environmental drivers and marine biota

    Boyd, Philip W.; Brown, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The responses of marine biota to global ocean change is characterized by multiple environmental drivers that interact to cause non-linear changes in organismal performance. Characterizing interactions is critical for us to predict whether multiple drivers will accelerate or mitigate future biological responses. There is now a large body of evidence that drivers do not act independently, a common null model, but rather have synergistic or antagonistic effects on organisms. We review the litera...

  15. Estimating Above-Ground Carbon Biomass in a Newly Restored Coastal Plain Wetland Using Remote Sensing

    Riegel, Joseph B.; Emily Bernhardt; Jennifer Swenson

    2013-01-01

    Developing accurate but inexpensive methods for estimating above-ground carbon biomass is an important technical challenge that must be overcome before a carbon offset market can be successfully implemented in the United States. Previous studies have shown that LiDAR (light detection and ranging) is well-suited for modeling above-ground biomass in mature forests; however, there has been little previous research on the ability of LiDAR to model above-ground biomass in areas with young, aggradi...

  16. Regional Mapping, Modelling, and Monitoring of Tree Aboveground Biomass Carbon

    Hudak, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Airborne lidar collections are preferred for mapping aboveground biomass carbon (AGBC), while historical Landsat imagery are preferred for monitoring decadal scale forest cover change. Our modelling approach tracks AGBC change regionally using Landsat time series metrics; training areas are defined by airborne lidar extents within which AGBC is accurately mapped with high confidence. Geospatial topographic and climate layers are also included in the predictive model. Validation is accomplished using systematically sampled Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plot data that have been independently collected, processed and summarized at the county level. Our goal is to demonstrate that spatially and temporally aggregated annual AGBC map predictions show no bias when compared to annual county-level summaries across the Northwest USA. A prominent source of bias is trees outside forest; much of the more arid portions of our study area meet the FIA definition of non-forest because the tree cover does not exceed their minimum tree cover threshold. We employ detailed tree cover maps derived from high-resolution aerial imagery to extend our AGBC predictions into non-forest areas. We also employ Landsat-derived annual disturbance maps into our mapped AGBC predictions prior to aggregation and validation.

  17. Progress and significance in research on the early Middle Cambrian Kaili Biota, Guizhou Province,China

    2002-01-01

    Important progress in research on the Kaili Biota has been made recently. Many interesting components from Chengjiang Biota and Burgess Shale Biota have been discovered, e.g. Microdictyon of lobopodia; Ottoia, Palaeoscolex of worms; Naraoia, Marrella of Trilobitioidea, Mollisonia, anamalocarids and other non-trilobite arthropods; and new sorts of echinoder-mas, macroalage fossils and so on. Recent work on the Kaili Biota has resulted in the following developments: (i) an increase in the number of animal genera, up to more than 100 genera in total, so that the Kaili Biota has become the third most diverse of the Burgess Shale-type Biota after the Burgess Shale and Chengjiang Biotas; and (ii) the most noteworthy fossils in the Kaili Biota are echinoderms, non-trilobite arthropods and soft-bodied medusiform fossils, especially the most diverse echinoderms. The progress provides envidence for the biodiversity of marine organisms presented after the "Cambrian Explosion" and serves as a link between the earlist Cambrian Chengjiang Biota and late early Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale Biota. It is of great significance in the reconstruction of the Cambrian palaeoplate, palaeongeography and in research on taphonomy.

  18. Vertebrate diversity of the Jehol Biota as compared with other lagersttten

    2010-01-01

    In the last twenty years,the extraordinary discoveries of vertebrate fossils from the Jehol Biota not only have important impli-cations for studying the evolution of major Mesozoic vertebrate groups,their paleobiostratigraphy and paleoenvironmentology,but also provide critical evidence for understanding the biodiversity changes of the Early Cretaceous ecosystem.Currently,the Jehol Biota in a narrow sense(i.e.,distribution limited to western Liaoning,northern Hebei,and southeastern Inner Mongolia) comprises a vertebrate assemblage of at least 121 genera and 142 species.Among them are 13 genera and 15 species of mammals,33 genera and 39 species of birds,30 genera and 35 species of dinosaurs,17 genera and species of pterosaurs,5 genera and species of squamates,5 genera and 7 species of choristoderes,2 genera and species of turtles,8 genera and species of am-phibians,7 genera and 13 species of fishes as well as 1 genus and species of agnathan.All these known 121 genera are extinct forms,and only a small percentage of them(e.g.,agnathans,some fishes and amphibians) can be referred to extant families.The Jehol vertebrate diversity already exceeds that of the contemporaneous lagersttten such as Santana Fauna from Brazil and the Las Hoyas Fauna from Spain,and is nearly as great as that of the Jurassic Solnhofen Fauna and the Eocene Messel Fauna from Germany.Therefore,The Jehol Biota undoubtedly represents a world class lagerst?tte in terms of both fossil preservation and vertebrate diversity.The success of the Jehol vertebrate diversity had a complex biological,geological,and paleoenviron-mental background.Analysis of the habitat and diet of various vertebrate groups also indicates that the habitat and dietary dif-ferentiation had played a key role in the success of the taxonomic diversity of vertebrates of various ranks.Furthermore,the interactions among vertebrates,plants,and invertebrates as well as the competitions among various vertebrate groups and some key

  19. Root-fed Salicylic Acid in Grape Involves the Response Caused by Aboveground High Temperature

    Hong-Tao Liu; Yue-Ping Liu; Wei-Dong Huang

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the transportation and distribution of salicylic acid (SA) from root to aboveground tissues in response to high temperature, the roots of grape plant were fed with 14C-SA before high temperature treatment. Radioactivity results showed that progressive increase in SA transportation from root to aboveground as compared with the control varied exactly with the heat treatment time. Radioactivity results of leaves at different stem heights indicated that the increase in SA amount at the top and middle leaves during the early period was most significant in comparison with the bottom leaves. The up-transportation of SA from root to aboveground tissues was dependent on xylem rather than phloem. Auto-radiographs of whole grape plants strongly approved the conclusions drawn above. Root-derived SA was believed to be a fundamental source in response to aboveground high temperature.

  20. Interactions of ectomycorrhizas and above-ground insect herbivores on silver birch

    Nerg, Anne-Marja; Kasurinen, Anne; Holopainen, Toini; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Neuvonen, Seppo; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2009-01-01

    Mycorrhizas are mostly beneficial to host plant growth and survival, e.g., due to improved water and nutrient uptake and enhanced pathogen protection, but also a significant amount of host plant carbon is allocated below-ground to support the mycorrhizal growth. These facts and on the other hand the possibility of mycorrhizas to mediate changes in above-ground defensive chemistry may affect performance of above-ground insect herbivores with different feeding guilds. To see the functionality o...

  1. Aboveground biomass investments and light interception of tropical forest trees early in succession.

    Selaya, N. G.; Anten, N. P. R.; Mathies, M.; Oomen, R. J.; Werger, M.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims: Crown structure and above-ground biomass investment was studied in relation to light interception of trees and lianas growing in a 6-month-old regenerating forest. Methods: The vertical distribution of total above-ground biomass, height, diameter, stem density, leaf angles and crown depth were measured for individual plants of three short-lived pioneers (SLPs), four long-lived pioneers (LLPs) and three lianas. Daily light interception per individual Fd was calculated with...

  2. Stimulation of the Salicylic Acid Pathway Aboveground Recruits Entomopathogenic Nematodes Belowground

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S.; Junior, Alcides Moino; Pareja, Martin; Borai, Fahiem El; Dickson, Donald W.; Lukasz L Stelinski; Duncan, Larry W

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways play a critical role in mediating tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. While the impact of plant defense pathway stimulation on natural enemies has been extensively explored aboveground, belowground ramifications of plant defense pathway stimulation are equally important in regulating subterranean pests and still require more attention. Here we investigate the effect of aboveground stimulation of the salicylic acid pathway through fol...

  3. Evolution of insect diversity in the Jehol Biota

    2010-01-01

    Insects of the Jehol Biota,also known as the Jehol Entomofauna,can be divided into three phases,approximately corresponding to the early,middle,and late Jehol Biota.The early phase of the entomofauna is found in the Dabeigou Formation and its coeval horizons(ca.135-130 Ma).The middle phase is recorded from the lower-middle Yixian Formation(underlying the Jingangshan Bed) and its coeval strata(ca.130-122.5 Ma).The late phase is found in the lower Jiufotang Formation,the upper Yixian Formation(the Jingangshan and Huanghuashan beds) and their coeval horizons(ca.122.5-120 Ma).In major distribution areas of the Jehol Biota,the entomofauna changed greatly in species diversity with about 150 species in about 40 families and 11 orders in the early phase,a great increase up to about 500 species in about 100 families and 16 orders in the middle phase,and a decline to about 300 species in about 80 families and 14 orders in the late phase.The entomofauna can also be divided into four insect communities based on habitats or five insect groups based on feeding habits.Each community or group varied in species diversity in a similar trend to the whole entomofauna.However,it kept a comparatively stable position in the ecosystem.Of the four communities,the highest species diversity occurred in the forest community,followed by the aquatic,the soil,and the alpine communities.Of the five groups,the highest species diversity appeared in the phytophagous group,followed by the carnivorous,the parasitic,the saprophagous,and the heterophagous groups.

  4. Community structure and composition of the Cambrian Chengjiang biota

    2010-01-01

    Based on previously published species data(228 species in over 18 phyla) and field sampling(114 species and 18406 individuals) in the Chengjiang-Haikou-Anning area,we analyzed quantitatively the paleocommunity composition and structure of the Cambrian Chengjiang biota(Cambrian Series 2,eastern Yunnan,China).Arthropods dominate the community both in species diversity(species:37%) and in abundance(individuals:51.8%).Priapulids(individuals:22.6%) and brachiopods(individuals:16.3%) follow in abundance rank.The arthropod Kunmingella douvillei(26.2%),the priapulid Cricocosmia jinning-ensis(15.4%),and the brachiopod Diandongia pista(11%) are the three most abundant species.Ecological analyses show that the community was dominated by epifaunal organisms(species:63%,individuals:68.4%) followed by infaunal organisms(species:11.9%,individuals:25.9%),nektobenthic organisms(species:11.5%,individuals:2.6%),and pelagic organisms(species:5.3%,individuals:3.1%).The diverse feeding strategies,dominated by suspension feeders(species:35.6%,individuals:26.1%) and hunter/scavengers(species:31.1%,individuals:40.4%),indicate the former existence of a complex food chain and intense competition.Epifaunal vagrant omnivores(28.2%),infaunal vagrant hunter/scavengers(19.8%),epifaunal sessile suspension feeders(17.7%),and epifaunal vagrant hunter/scavengers(15.3%) were the most abundant ecological groups,represented primarily by arthropods,poriferans,priapulids,and brachiopods.Ecological group analyses reveal that the early Cambrian Chengjiang biota is similar in community patterns and functional relations to modern biotas in shallow marine settings.

  5. Distribution of Aboveground Live Biomass in the Amazon Basin

    Saatchi, S. S.; Houghton, R. A.; DosSantos Alvala, R. C.; Soares, J. V.; Yu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The amount and spatial distribution of forest biomass in the Amazon basin is a major source of uncertainty in estimating the flux of carbon released from land-cover and land-use change. Direct measurements of aboveground live biomass (AGLB) are limited to small areas of forest inventory plots and site-specific allometric equations that cannot be readily generalized for the entire basin. Furthermore, there is no spaceborne remote sensing instrument that can measure tropical forest biomass directly. To determine the spatial distribution of forest biomass of the Amazon basin, we report a method based on remote sensing metrics representing various forest structural parameters and environmental variables, and more than 500 plot measurements of forest biomass distributed over the basin. A decision tree approach was used to develop the spatial distribution of AGLB for seven distinct biomass classes of lowland old-growth forests with more than 80% accuracy. AGLB for other vegetation types, such as the woody and herbaceous savanna and secondary forests, was directly estimated with a regression based on satellite data. Results show that AGLB is highest in Central Amazonia and in regions to the east and north, including the Guyanas. Biomass is generally above 300Mgha(sup 1) here except in areas of intense logging or open floodplains. In Western Amazonia, from the lowlands of Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia to the Andean mountains, biomass ranges from 150 to 300Mgha(sup 1). Most transitional and seasonal forests at the southern and northwestern edges of the basin have biomass ranging from 100 to 200Mgha(sup 1). The AGLB distribution has a significant correlation with the length of the dry season. We estimate that the total carbon in forest biomass of the Amazon basin, including the dead and below ground biomass, is 86 PgC with +/- 20% uncertainty.

  6. Stratified aboveground forest biomass estimation by remote sensing data

    Latifi, Hooman; Fassnacht, Fabian E.; Hartig, Florian; Berger, Christian; Hernández, Jaime; Corvalán, Patricio; Koch, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Remote sensing-assisted estimates of aboveground forest biomass are essential for modeling carbon budgets. It has been suggested that estimates can be improved by building species- or strata-specific biomass models. However, few studies have attempted a systematic analysis of the benefits of such stratification, especially in combination with other factors such as sensor type, statistical prediction method and sampling design of the reference inventory data. We addressed this topic by analyzing the impact of stratifying forest data into three classes (broadleaved, coniferous and mixed forest). We compare predictive accuracy (a) between the strata (b) to a case without stratification for a set of pre-selected predictors from airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data obtained in a managed mixed forest site in southwestern Germany. We used 5 commonly applied algorithms for biomass predictions on bootstrapped subsamples of the data to obtain cross validated RMSE and r2 diagnostics. Those values were analyzed in a factorial design by an analysis of variance (ANOVA) to rank the relative importance of each factor. Selected models were used for wall-to-wall mapping of biomass estimates and their associated uncertainty. The results revealed marginal advantages for the strata-specific prediction models over the unstratified ones, which were more obvious on the wall-to-wall mapped area-based predictions. Yet further tests are necessary to establish the generality of these results. Input data type and statistical prediction method are concluded to remain the two most crucial factors for the quality of remote sensing-assisted biomass models.

  7. Root absorption of 222Rn and its transfer into above-ground plant organs

    Experimental data are given on the content of genetically related pairs of radionuclides (226Ra and 222Rn; 224Ra and 220Rn) in soils and the above-ground phytomass of plants growing on plots with differing genesis of the higher concentrations of natural radionuclides in soils. Methods for determining gaseous radionuclides in the above-ground phytomass are described. Different transport routes of 222Rn and 220Rn into above-ground plant organs are considered. The noted absence of balance between 222Rn and 226Ra in plants as well as higher 222Rn/226Ra ratios in the above-ground phytomass as compared to that of the root-containing soil layer (25- to 185-fold) appears to be accounted for by the root pathway of 222Rn uptake and transport of this radionuclide to above-ground plants organs. The existence of the root pathway for 222Rn uptake is proved by direct observations of daily radionuclide movement with bleeding sap in experiments on pumpkins. For the short-lived Rn isotopes, 220Rn and 218Rn, the root pathway of uptake and transport to the above-ground phytomass is less probable, and this causes a notable redistribution of gaseous radionuclides during their movement along the soil-plant route

  8. Anthropogenic radionuclides in biota samples from the Caspian Sea

    The Caspian Sea has been recently a subject of many scientific studies mainly related to sea level changes and pollution. For this purpose, two sampling expeditions were organised by IAEA in the Caspian Sea in 1995 and 1996. The aim was to investigate oceanographic conditions, water dynamics and the distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides 90Sr, 137Cs and 239,240Pu in the water column. Considering the unique biodiversity of the Caspian Sea, there has also been interest to obtain information on radionuclide concentrations in biota samples, first of all in sturgeons and in caviar as their production is strongly linked to economical regional needs. The radioactive contamination of Caspian Sea biota has been investigated by analyzing natural 210Po and anthropogenic 137Cs, 239,240Pu and 241Am in biota samples collected in April 1999 offshore of Astrakhan, in the north Caspian Sea. More biota samples from the South West Caspian Sea (Artom Island, June 1999; Devechi District and Neftechala, November 1999) were collected and analyzed for 210Po, 137Cs, 90Sr, 239,240Pu and 241Am. The sampled species were different types of sturgeons (Sevruga, Russkyi Osyotr and Beluga) as well as fresh spawn and caviar. Other fish species (e.g. Cyprinidae) and one algae sample (Cladofila) have also been analysed. Flesh parts have only been analysed in the case of fish samples. The samples were freeze-dried, ground sieved and canned to be counted by gamma-spectrometry for determination of 137Cs. Analytical separation and purification procedures were carried out later. 210Po, 239,240Pu as well as 241Am were measured by alpha-spectrometry whereas 90Sr was measured by beta-spectrometry. The data are reported. In general, radionuclide activities in fish and caviar do not represent any risk for their consumption as they are very low. 239,240Pu and 241Am were close to the limit of detection. When measurable, the 238Pu/239,240Pu ratio is close to the fallout value. 90Sr activities are quite

  9. Biodiversity and taphonomy of the Early Cambrian Guanshan biota,eastern Yunnan

    Michael; STEINER

    2010-01-01

    The Guanshan biota from eastern Yunnan(Cambrian Series 2,early Stage 4) is a Burgess Shale-type fossil biota with abundant exceptionally preserved soft-bodied fossils after the discovery of the well-known Cambrian Chengjiang fauna and Kaili biota in South China.The geological settings,sedimentology,taphonomy,and the fossil assemblage of the Guanshan biota are briefly summarized here.The Guanshan biota consists of about 60 taxa belonging to more than 10 metazoan groups and algae,among which the lobopods,eldonids,hyolithids with helens,and green algae are reported for the first time.The common occurrence of soft-bodied preservation in many groups,notably the trilobites and brachiopods,makes the Guanshan biota a significant fossil lagersttte for understanding the metazoan evolution during Cambrian explosion and taphonomy of the Burgess Shale-type fossils.

  10. Population Dynamics of Biota on the Roots of Azolla microphylla Kaulfuss

    NITA ETIKAWATI; JUTONO

    2000-01-01

    Azolla was a special fern that their associations with Anabaena azollae able to fix free nitrogen from air, to produce protein. Although by the ages, biota diversity those habits on the roots of Azolla increased and effected to protein concentration. The research was to find out population dynamics of biota on the roots of Azolla microphylla Kaulfuss and the growth peak. This study used Completely Randomized Design with 10 kinds of biota, i.e. bacteria, Fungi, Actinomycetes, Protozoa, Alga, C...

  11. Exploitation of soil biota ecosystem services in agriculture: a bioeconomic approach.

    Foudi, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the interactions between soil biota and agricultural practices in the exploitation of soil ecosystem services. A theoretical bioeconomic model stylized this set of interactions and combined a production function approach with optimal control theory. In the model, a farmer decides his optimal use of external input and land use given that (i) land uses modify soil biota composition, (ii) the external input reduces soil biota population. The results show how the combination o...

  12. Developing a generalized allometric equation for aboveground biomass estimation

    Xu, Q.; Balamuta, J. J.; Greenberg, J. A.; Li, B.; Man, A.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A key potential uncertainty in estimating carbon stocks across multiple scales stems from the use of empirically calibrated allometric equations, which estimate aboveground biomass (AGB) from plant characteristics such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and/or height (H). The equations themselves contain significant and, at times, poorly characterized errors. Species-specific equations may be missing. Plant responses to their local biophysical environment may lead to spatially varying allometric relationships. The structural predictor may be difficult or impossible to measure accurately, particularly when derived from remote sensing data. All of these issues may lead to significant and spatially varying uncertainties in the estimation of AGB that are unexplored in the literature. We sought to quantify the errors in predicting AGB at the tree and plot level for vegetation plots in California. To accomplish this, we derived a generalized allometric equation (GAE) which we used to model the AGB on a full set of tree information such as DBH, H, taxonomy, and biophysical environment. The GAE was derived using published allometric equations in the GlobAllomeTree database. The equations were sparse in details about the error since authors provide the coefficient of determination (R2) and the sample size. A more realistic simulation of tree AGB should also contain the noise that was not captured by the allometric equation. We derived an empirically corrected variance estimate for the amount of noise to represent the errors in the real biomass. Also, we accounted for the hierarchical relationship between different species by treating each taxonomic level as a covariate nested within a higher taxonomic level (e.g. species < genus). This approach provides estimation under incomplete tree information (e.g. missing species) or blurred information (e.g. conjecture of species), plus the biophysical environment. The GAE allowed us to quantify contribution of each different

  13. Exceptional vertebrate biotas from the Triassic of China, and the expansion of marine ecosystems after the Permo-Triassic mass extinction

    Benton, Michael J.; Zhang, Qiyue; Hu, Shixue; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Wen, Wen; Liu, Jun; Huang, Jinyuan; Zhou, Changyong; Xie, Tao; Tong, Jinnan; Choo, Brian

    2013-10-01

    The Triassic was a time of turmoil, as life recovered from the most devastating of all mass extinctions, the Permo-Triassic event 252 million years ago. The Triassic marine rock succession of southwest China provides unique documentation of the recovery of marine life through a series of well dated, exceptionally preserved fossil assemblages in the Daye, Guanling, Zhuganpo, and Xiaowa formations. New work shows the richness of the faunas of fishes and reptiles, and that recovery of vertebrate faunas was delayed by harsh environmental conditions and then occurred rapidly in the Anisian. The key faunas of fishes and reptiles come from a limited area in eastern Yunnan and western Guizhou provinces, and these may be dated relative to shared stratigraphic units, and their palaeoenvironments reconstructed. The Luoping and Panxian biotas, both from the Guanling Formation, are dated as Anisian (Pelsonian) on the basis of conodonts and radiometric dates, the former being slightly older than the latter. The Xingyi biota is from the Zhuganpo Formation, and is Ladinian or early Carnian, while the Guanling biota is from the overlying Xiaowa Formation, dated as Carnian. The first three biotas include extensive benthos and burrowing in the sediments, and they were located in restricted basins close to shore. Further, even though the Luoping and Panxian biotas are of similar age, their faunas differ significantly, reflecting perhaps palaeogeographically isolated basins. Between the time of the Xingyi and Guanling biotas, there was a major transgression, and the Guanling biota is entirely different in character from the other three, being dominated by pelagic forms such as large floating crinoids attached to logs, very large ichthyosaurs and thalattosaurs, and pseudoplanktonic bivalves, with no benthos and no burrowing. Phylogenetic study of the fishes and marine reptiles shows apparently explosive diversification among 20 actinopterygian lineages very early in the Early Triassic

  14. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect.

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  15. Some metals in aboveground biomass of Scots pine in Lithuania

    Varnagiryte-Kabašinskiene, Iveta; Armolaitis, Kestutis; Stupak, Inge;

    2014-01-01

    content of metals in forest biomass fuel ash was relatively small to compare with their total removals. The findings of this study have an important implications for future practice, i.e. the recommended maximum forest biomass fuel ash dose for the compensating fertilising could be increased with respect...

  16. Soil nutrients affect spatial patterns of aboveground biomass and emergent tree density in southwestern Borneo.

    Paoli, Gary D; Curran, Lisa M; Slik, J W F

    2008-03-01

    Studies on the relationship between soil fertility and aboveground biomass in lowland tropical forests have yielded conflicting results, reporting positive, negative and no effect of soil nutrients on aboveground biomass. Here, we quantify the impact of soil variation on the stand structure of mature Bornean forest throughout a lowland watershed (8-196 m a.s.l.) with uniform climate and heterogeneous soils. Categorical and bivariate methods were used to quantify the effects of (1) parent material differing in nutrient content (alluvium > sedimentary > granite) and (2) 27 soil parameters on tree density, size distribution, basal area and aboveground biomass. Trees > or =10 cm (diameter at breast height, dbh) were enumerated in 30 (0.16 ha) plots (sample area = 4.8 ha). Six soil samples (0-20 cm) per plot were analyzed for physiochemical properties. Aboveground biomass was estimated using allometric equations. Across all plots, stem density averaged 521 +/- 13 stems ha(-1), basal area 39.6 +/- 1.4 m(2) ha(-1) and aboveground biomass 518 +/- 28 Mg ha(-1) (mean +/- SE). Adjusted forest-wide aboveground biomass to account for apparent overestimation of large tree density (based on 69 0.3-ha transects; sample area = 20.7 ha) was 430 +/- 25 Mg ha(-1). Stand structure did not vary significantly among substrates, but it did show a clear trend toward larger stature on nutrient-rich alluvium, with a higher density and larger maximum size of emergent trees. Across all plots, surface soil phosphorus (P), potassium, magnesium and percentage sand content were significantly related to stem density and/or aboveground biomass (R (Pearson) = 0.368-0.416). In multiple linear regression, extractable P and percentage sand combined explained 31% of the aboveground biomass variance. Regression analyses on size classes showed that the abundance of emergent trees >120 cm dbh was positively related to soil P and exchangeable bases, whereas trees 60-90 cm dbh were negatively related to these

  17. Estimating forest and woodland aboveground biomass using active and passive remote sensing

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Vogel, John M.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Aboveground biomass was estimated from active and passive remote sensing sources, including airborne lidar and Landsat-8 satellites, in an eastern Arizona (USA) study area comprised of forest and woodland ecosystems. Compared to field measurements, airborne lidar enabled direct estimation of individual tree height with a slope of 0.98 (R2 = 0.98). At the plot-level, lidar-derived height and intensity metrics provided the most robust estimate for aboveground biomass, producing dominant species-based aboveground models with errors ranging from 4 to 14Mg ha –1 across all woodland and forest species. Landsat-8 imagery produced dominant species-based aboveground biomass models with errors ranging from 10 to 28 Mg ha –1. Thus, airborne lidar allowed for estimates for fine-scale aboveground biomass mapping with low uncertainty, while Landsat-8 seems best suited for broader spatial scale products such as a national biomass essential climate variable (ECV) based on land cover types for the United States.

  18. A conodont-based Middle Triassic age assignment for the Luoping Biota of Yunnan, China

    2009-01-01

    The Luoping Biota consists of abundant and well-preserved marine fishes, reptiles, invertebrates, and plants. It occurs in the Middle Triassic Guanling Formation in Daaozi Village of Luoping County, Yun-nan Province, China. Based on conodonts, the Luoping Biota is determined to lie within the Nicoraella kockeli Zone, which is assigned to the Pelsonian substage of the Anisian.

  19. Radiation protection of natural ecosystems: Primary and secondary dose limits to biota

    A methodological approach is proposed for developing criteria for the radiation protection of natural ecosystems, based on establishing the general (primary) and site-specific (secondary) limits of chronic radiation dose rates to biota. The screening procedure is described for the radiation protection of biota on the territories with the increased levels of radioactive contamination

  20. A conodont-based Middle Triassic age assignment for the Luoping Biota of Yunnan, China

    ZHANG QiYue; ZHOU ChangYong; LU Tao; XIE Tao; LOU XiongYing; LIU Wei; SUN YuanYuan; HUANG JinYuan; ZHAO LaiShi

    2009-01-01

    The Luoping Biota consists of abundant and well-preserved marine fishes, reptiles, Invertebrates, and plants. It occurs in the Middle Triassic Guanling Formation in Daaozi Village of Luoping County, Yun-nan Province, China. Based on conodonts, the Luoping Biota is determined to lie within the Nicoraella kockeli Zone, which is assigned to the Pelsonian substage of the Anisian.

  1. Taiwan's industrial heavy metal pollution threatens terrestrial biota

    The bioconcentration levels of essential (Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn) and non-essential (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Sn) elements have been investigated in different terrestrial biota such as fungi, plant, earthworm, snail, crab, insect, amphibian, lizard, snake, and bat including the associated soil, to investigate the ecosystem health status in Kenting National Park, Taiwan. High bioconcentrations of Cd, Hg, and Sn in snail, earthworm, crab, lizard, snake, and bat indicated a contaminated terrestrial ecosystem. High concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Sn in plant species, effective bioaccumulation of Cd by earthworm, snail, crab and bat, as well as very high levels of Hg found in invertebrates, amphibians, and reptiles revealed a strong influence from industrial pollution on the biotic community. This study for the first time presents data on the impact of heavy metal pollution on various terrestrial organisms in Taiwan. - Metal effects occur at any terrestrial levels in Taiwan

  2. Agrochemical residue-biota interactions in soil and aquatic ecosystems

    Two FAO/IAEA coordinated research programmes are concerned with isotopic tracer-aided studies of agrochemical residue-biota interactions in soils and aquatic ecosystems. They currently involve 18 studies in 14 countries: Brazil, Canada, Egypt, F.R. Germany, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, Malaysia, Thailand, Turkey, USA and USSR. The aim was to develop, standardize and apply labelled substrate techniques for comparative assays of primary autotrophic and microheterotrophic production and decay, and complementary tracer techniques to determine the fate, persistence and bioconcentration of trace contaminants. Comparable data were studied concerning the current status of water bodies and likely changes due to contaminants. Soil capacity to decompose undesirable contaminants and residues, and to promote desirable transformations were studied. The techniques were also applied as a diagnostic and prognostic tool, with priority given to rice ecosystems

  3. The human vaginal bacterial biota and bacterial vaginosis.

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fredricks, David N

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial biota of the human vagina can have a profound impact on the health of women and their neonates. Changes in the vaginal microbiota have been associated with several adverse health outcomes including premature birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of HIV infection. Cultivation-independent molecular methods have provided new insights regarding bacterial diversity in this important niche, particularly in women with the common condition bacterial vaginosis (BV). PCR methods have shown that women with BV have complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include many fastidious species, particularly from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Healthy women are mostly colonized with lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, though a variety of other bacteria may be present. The microbiology of BV is heterogeneous. The presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae coating the vaginal epithelium in some subjects with BV suggests that biofilms may contribute to this condition. PMID:19282975

  4. Burgess shale-type biotas were not entirely burrowed away

    Gaines, Robert R.; Droser, Mary L.; Orr, Patrick J.;

    2012-01-01

    Burgess Shale-type biotas occur globally in the Cambrian record and offer unparalleled insight into the Cambrian explosion, the initial Phanerozoic radiation of the Metazoa. Deposits bearing exceptionally preserved soft-bodied fossils are unusually common in Cambrian strata; more than 40 are now...... known. The well-documented decline of soft-bodied preservation following the Middle Cambrian represents the closure of a taphonomic window that was only intermittently open in marine environments thereafter. The prevailing hypothesis for this secular shift in taphonomic conditions of outer shelf......, however, suggest a more complex scenario. Ichnologic and microstratigraphic data from Burgess Shale-type deposits indicate that (1) bioturbation exerts a limiting effect on soft-bodied preservation; (2) the observed increase in the depth and extent or bioturbation following the Middle Cambrian would have...

  5. Population Dynamics of Biota on the Roots of Azolla microphylla Kaulfuss

    NITA ETIKAWATI

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Azolla was a special fern that their associations with Anabaena azollae able to fix free nitrogen from air, to produce protein. Although by the ages, biota diversity those habits on the roots of Azolla increased and effected to protein concentration. The research was to find out population dynamics of biota on the roots of Azolla microphylla Kaulfuss and the growth peak. This study used Completely Randomized Design with 10 kinds of biota, i.e. bacteria, Fungi, Actinomycetes, Protozoa, Alga, Crustacean, Rotifers, Coelenterate, Insect and Molluscs, and it was used 3 replications. Research was conducted within 4 weeks and the populations of biota were observed every week. Data were statistically analyzed using Analysis Variant and Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. The population dynamics of biota on the roots of Azolla microphylla Kaulfuss were influenced on its quantity and composition, and the growth peak is done in 2nd week.

  6. Contrasting food web factor and body size relationships with Hg and Se concentrations in marine biota.

    Karimi, Roxanne; Frisk, Michael; Fisher, Nicholas S

    2013-01-01

    Marine fish and shellfish are primary sources of human exposure to mercury, a potentially toxic metal, and selenium, an essential element that may protect against mercury bioaccumulation and toxicity. Yet we lack a thorough understanding of Hg and Se patterns in common marine taxa, particularly those that are commercially important, and how food web and body size factors differ in their influence on Hg and Se patterns. We compared Hg and Se content among marine fish and invertebrate taxa collected from Long Island, NY, and examined associations between Hg, Se, body length, trophic level (measured by δ(15)N) and degree of pelagic feeding (measured by δ(13)C). Finfish, particularly shark, had high Hg content whereas bivalves generally had high Se content. Both taxonomic differences and variability were larger for Hg than Se, and Hg content explained most of the variation in Hg:Se molar ratios among taxa. Finally, Hg was more strongly associated with length and trophic level across taxa than Se, consistent with a greater degree of Hg bioaccumulation in the body over time, and biomagnification through the food web, respectively. Overall, our findings indicate distinct taxonomic and ecological Hg and Se patterns in commercially important marine biota, and these patterns have nutritional and toxicological implications for seafood-consuming wildlife and humans. PMID:24019976

  7. Contrasting food web factor and body size relationships with Hg and Se concentrations in marine biota.

    Roxanne Karimi

    Full Text Available Marine fish and shellfish are primary sources of human exposure to mercury, a potentially toxic metal, and selenium, an essential element that may protect against mercury bioaccumulation and toxicity. Yet we lack a thorough understanding of Hg and Se patterns in common marine taxa, particularly those that are commercially important, and how food web and body size factors differ in their influence on Hg and Se patterns. We compared Hg and Se content among marine fish and invertebrate taxa collected from Long Island, NY, and examined associations between Hg, Se, body length, trophic level (measured by δ(15N and degree of pelagic feeding (measured by δ(13C. Finfish, particularly shark, had high Hg content whereas bivalves generally had high Se content. Both taxonomic differences and variability were larger for Hg than Se, and Hg content explained most of the variation in Hg:Se molar ratios among taxa. Finally, Hg was more strongly associated with length and trophic level across taxa than Se, consistent with a greater degree of Hg bioaccumulation in the body over time, and biomagnification through the food web, respectively. Overall, our findings indicate distinct taxonomic and ecological Hg and Se patterns in commercially important marine biota, and these patterns have nutritional and toxicological implications for seafood-consuming wildlife and humans.

  8. Estimating Aboveground Biomass of Oil Palm Trees by Using the Destructive Method

    Sunaryathy, Putri Ida; Suhasman; Kanniah, Kasturi Devi; Tan, Kian Pang

    2015-01-01

    Palm oil is one of the important commodities in Indonesia. Estimating the aboveground biomass of oil palms is one of the most important oil palm carbon studies. The objective of this study was to estimate the aboveground biomass of oil palm trees at plot scale for three age classes namely, class 1 (1 to 3 years), class 2 (4 to 10 years) and class 3 (11 to 20 years) in South Sulawesi, Indonesia using destructive method. The AGB for each age class: class 1, class 2, and class 3 they are 5.84 kg...

  9. Compartmentalisation Strategies for Hydrocarbon-based Biota on Titan

    Norman, L.; Fortes, A. D.; Skipper, N.; Crawford, I.

    2013-05-01

    The goal of our study is to determine the nature of compartimentalisation strategies for any organisms inhabiting the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan (the largest moon of Saturn). Since receiving huge amounts of data via the Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturnian system astrobiologists have speculated that exotic biota might currently inhabit this environment. The biota have been theorized to consume acetylene and hydrogen whilst excreting methane (1,2) leading to an anomalous hydrogen depletion near the surface; and there has been evidence to suggest this depletion exists (3). Nevertheless, many questions still remain concerning the possible physiological traits of biota in these environments, including whether cell-like structures can form in low temperature, low molecular weight hydrocarbons. The backbone of terrestrial cell membranes are vesicular structures composed primarily of a phospholipid bilayer with the hydrophilic head groups arranged around the periphery and are thought to be akin to the first protocells that terrestrial life utilised (4). It my be possible that reverse vesicles composed of a bilayer with the hydrophilic head groups arranged internally and a nonpolar core may be ideal model cell membranes for hydrocarbon-based organisms inhabiting Titan's hydrocarbon lakes (5). A variety of different surfactants have been used to create reverse vesicles in nonpolar liquids to date including; non-ionic ethers (7) and esters (6, 8); catanionic surfactant mixtures (9); zwitterionic gemini surfactants (10); coblock polymer surfactants (11); and zwitterionic phospholipid surfactants (12). In order to discover whether certain phospholipids can exhibit vesicular behaviour within hydrocarbon liquids, and to analyse their structure, we have carried out experimental studies using environmental conditions that are increasing comparable to those found on the surface of Titan. Experimental methods that have been used to determine the presence of vesicles include the

  10. Effects of root herbivory on pyrrolizidine alkaloid content and aboveground plant-herbivore-parasitoid interactions in Jacobaea vulgaris

    Kostenko, O.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of root herbivory is increasingly recognized in ecological studies, and the effects of root herbivory on plant growth, chemistry, and performance of aboveground herbivores have been relatively well studied. However, how belowground herbivory by root feeding insects affects aboveground

  11. Effects of Root Herbivory on Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Content and Aboveground Plant-Herbivore-Parasitoid Interactions in Jacobaea Vulgaris

    Kostenko, O.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of root herbivory is increasingly recognized in ecological studies, and the effects of root herbivory on plant growth, chemistry, and performance of aboveground herbivores have been relatively well studied. However, how belowground herbivory by root feeding insects affects aboveground

  12. Above-ground biomass investments and light interception of tropical forest trees and lianas early in succession

    Selaya, N.G.; Anten, N.P.R.; Oomen, R.J.; Matthies, M.; Werger, M.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Crown structure and above-ground biomass investment was studied in relation to light interception of trees and lianas growing in a 6-month-old regenerating forest. Methods The vertical distribution of total above-ground biomass, height, diameter, stem density, leaf angles and cro

  13. Capabilities and limitations of Landsat and land cover data for aboveground woody biomass estimation of Uganda

    Avitabile, V.; Baccini, A.; Friedl, M.A.; Schmullius, C.

    2012-01-01

    Aboveground woody biomass for circa-2000 is mapped at national scale in Uganda at 30-m spatial resolution on the basis of Landsat ETM + images, a National land cover dataset and field data using an object-oriented approach. A regression tree-based model (Random Forest) produces good results (cross-v

  14. Modeling compatible single-tree aboveground biomass equations for masson pine (Pinus massoniana) in southern China

    ZENG Wei-sheng; TANG Shou-zheng

    2012-01-01

    Because of global climate change,it is necessary to add forest biomass estimation to national forest resource monitoring.The biomass equations developed for forest biomass estimation should be compatible with volume equations.Based on the tree volume and aboveground biomass data of Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) in southern China,we constructed one-,two-and three-variable aboveground biomass equations and biomass conversion functions compatible with tree volume equations by using error-in-variable simultaneous equations.The prediction precision of aboveground biomass estimates from one variable equation exceeded 95%.The regressions of aboveground biomass equations were improved slightly when tree height and crown width were used together with diameter on breast height,although the contributions to regressions were statistically insignificant.For the biomass conversion function on one variable,the conversion factor decreased with increasing diameter,but for the conversion function on two variables,the conversion factor increased with increasing diameter but decreased with increasing tree height.

  15. Aboveground biomass estimation with airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR data in Tesinske Beskydy Mountains

    Brovkina, Olga; Zemek, František; Fabiánek, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2015), s. 35-46. ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk OC09001 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : forest aboveground biomass * hyperspectral data * airborne LiDAR * Beskydy Mountains Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. Nondestructive estimates of above-ground biomass using terrestrial laser scanning

    Calders, K.; Newnham, G.; Burt, A.; Murphy, S.; Raumonen, P.; Herold, M.; Culvenor, D.; Avitabile, V.; Disney, M.; Armston, J.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Allometric equations are currently used to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) based on the indirect relationship with tree parameters. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can measure the canopy structure in 3D with high detail. In this study, we develop an approach to estimate AGB from TLS data, which

  17. Estimation of Aboveground Biomass Using Manual Stereo Viewing of Digital Aerial Photographs in Tropical Seasonal Forest

    Katsuto Shimizu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to: (1 evaluate accuracy of tree height measurements of manual stereo viewing on a computer display using digital aerial photographs compared with airborne LiDAR height measurements; and (2 develop an empirical model to estimate stand-level aboveground biomass with variables derived from manual stereo viewing on the computer display in a Cambodian tropical seasonal forest. We evaluate observation error of tree height measured from the manual stereo viewing, based on field measurements. RMSEs of tree height measurement with manual stereo viewing and LiDAR were 1.96 m and 1.72 m, respectively. Then, stand-level aboveground biomass is regressed against tree height indices derived from the manual stereo viewing. We determined the best model to estimate aboveground biomass in terms of the Akaike’s information criterion. This was a model of mean tree height of the tallest five trees in each plot (R2 = 0.78; RMSE = 58.18 Mg/ha. In conclusion, manual stereo viewing on the computer display can measure tree height accurately and is useful to estimate aboveground stand biomass.

  18. Putative linkages between below- and aboveground mutualisms during alien plant invasions.

    Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Traveset, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of the fundamental role of below-aboveground links in controlling ecosystem processes is mostly based on studies done with soil herbivores or mutualists and aboveground herbivores. Much less is known about the links between belowground and aboveground mutualisms, which have been studied separately for decades. It has not been until recently that these mutualisms-mycorrhizas and legume-rhizobia on one hand, and pollinators and seed dispersers on the other hand-have been found to influence each other, with potential ecological and evolutionary consequences. Here we review the mechanisms that may link these two-level mutualisms, mostly reported for native plant species, and make predictions about their relevance during alien plant invasions. We propose that alien plants establishing effective mutualisms with belowground microbes might improve their reproductive success through positive interactions between those mutualists and pollinators and seed dispersers. On the other hand, changes in the abundance and diversity of soil mutualists induced by invasion can also interfere with below-aboveground links for native plant species. We conclude that further research on this topic is needed in the field of invasion ecology as it can provide interesting clues on synergistic interactions and invasional meltdowns during alien plant invasions. PMID:26034049

  19. Allometric equations for aboveground and belowground biomass estimations in an evergreen forest in Vietnam

    Nam, Vu Thanh; Kuijk, Van Marijke; Anten, Niels P.R.

    2016-01-01

    Allometric regression models are widely used to estimate tropical forest biomass, but balancing model accuracy with efficiency of implementation remains a major challenge. In addition, while numerous models exist for aboveground mass, very few exist for roots. We developed allometric equations fo

  20. Aboveground Biomass Production of Rhizophora apiculata Blume in Sarawak Mangrove Forest

    I. A. Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Mangrove forests are found in tropical and subtropical coastal tidal regions. Rhizophora apiculata Blume is one of the most important species in mangrove forest. It is also one of the commercial mangrove timber species in Asia-Pacific region which dominates large areas of mangrove in this region. In order to understand forest ecosystem characteristics and to establish the proper management system, a precise estimation of biomass is necessary. The objective of this study is to quantify the aboveground biomass production and stem volume of R. apiculata in Awat-Awat mangrove forest, Sarawak. Approach: Seven representative trees were used in this study for sampling from February 2011 to March 2011. Allometric relationships were examined using either independent variable Diameter (D or combination of quadratic of D and Height (D2H. Results: The best fit of allometric equations were developed from the combination of quadratic of D and H (y = 0.055×0.948, R2 = 0.98 which is more recommended to estimate biomass and stem volume of R. apiculata in Awat-Awat mangrove forest, Sarawak. Total aboveground biomass and stem volume of R. apiculata were 116.79 t h-1 and 65.55 m3 h-1, respectively. Conclusion: Aboveground biomass and stem volume is closely related with tree diameter and height which indicates that aboveground biomass and stem volume will increase with increasing diameter and height of R. apiculata.

  1. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  2. Grass allometry and estimation of above-ground biomass in tropical alpine tussock grasslands

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Eynden, van der M.; Malhi, Y.; Cahuana, N.; Menor, C.; Zamora, F.; Haugaasen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The puna/páramo grasslands span across the highest altitudes of the tropical Andes, and their ecosystem dynamics are still poorly understood. In this study we examined the above-ground biomass and developed species specific and multispecies power-law allometric equations for four tussock grass speci

  3. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure and associated represented hazardous conditions

    The purpose of the Technical Basis Document is to determine the consequences and FR-equency of aboveground structure failures. These failures include drops of contained equipment, such as a pump, FR-om a SST or DST, a crane failure resulting in a load drop onto a HEPA filter. These failures can result in an uncontrolled release of radiological and toxicological material

  4. Aboveground to root biomass ratios in pea and vetch after treatment with organic fertilizer

    V. Vasileva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Some growth parameters of pea (cv. Pleven 4 and vetch (cv. Obrazets 666 after treatment with organic fertilizer were studied in a field trial carried out at the Institute of Forage Crops, Pleven, Bulgaria. Humustim as organic fertilizer was applied through presowing treatment of seeds, treatment during vegetation and combination between both, at different doses. Ratios of aboveground weight to root system weight, aboveground height to root system length, as well as specific root length were determined. It was found that the growth variables of plants were positively influenced by organic fertilizer. The aboveground weight to root system weight ratios of pea ranged from 4.80 to 6.29 and was higher than vetch. Aboveground height to root system length ratio in pea ranged from 6.95 to 7.93, and in vetch from 5.30 to 7.39. The use of organic fertilizer at the dose of 1.2 L/t and treatment during vegetation resulted in better performance of root system and specific root length was 78.6 for pea and 84.3 for vetch.

  5. Footprints of climate change on Mediterranean Sea biota

    Marbà, Núria

    2015-08-13

    The Mediterranean Sea ranks among the ocean regions warming fastest. There is evidence for impacts of climate change on marine Mediterranean organisms but a quantitative assessment is lacking. We compiled the impacts of warming reported in the literature to provide a quantitative assessment for the Mediterranean Sea. During the last three decades the summer surface temperature has increased 1.15°C. Strong heat wave events have occurred in years 1994, 2003, and 2009. Impacts of warming are evident on growth, survival, fertility, migration and phenology of pelagic and benthic organisms, from phytoplankton to marine vegetation, invertebrates and vertebrates. Overall, 50% of biological impacts in the Mediterranean Sea occur at summer surface temperature anomaly ≤ 4.5°C and at summer surface temperature of 27.5°C. The activation energy (geometric mean 1.58 ± 0.48 eV), the slope of the Arrhenius equation describing the temperature-dependence of biological processes, for the response of Mediterranean marine biota to warming reveals that these responses in the Mediterranean are far steepest than possibly explained by the direct effect of warming alone. The observations are biased toward the northern and western sectors of the basin, likely underestimating the impacts of warming in areas where warming is particularly intense.

  6. Organophosphorous flame retardants in biota from Svalbard, Norway.

    Hallanger, Ingeborg G; Sagerup, Kjetil; Evenset, Anita; Kovacs, Kit M; Leonards, Pim; Fuglei, Eva; Routti, Heli; Aars, Jon; Strøm, Hallvard; Lydersen, Christian; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing

    2015-12-15

    Eight arctic species, including fish, birds and mammals, from diverse habitats (marine and terrestrial) within the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway, were screened for 14 organophosphorus flame retardant (PFR) compounds. Ten PFRs were detected: tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate (TCIPP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP); 2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP); tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate (TBOEP); tritolyl phosphate (TCrP); triisobutyl phosphate (TIBP); tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (TEHP); and butyl diphenyl phosphate (DPhBP). The greatest number of different PFR compounds, and the highest detection frequency were measured in capelin (Mallotus villotus), and the lowest in Brünnich's guillemot (Uria lomvia). The highest concentrations of ΣPFR, as well as the highest concentration of a single PFR compound, TBOEP, were measured in arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus). The presence of PFR compounds in arctic biota indicates that these compounds can undergo long-range transport and are, to some degree, persistent and bioaccumulated. The potential for biomagnification from fish to higher trophic levels seems to be limited. PMID:26453403

  7. Estimating above-ground carbon biomass in a newly restored coastal plain wetland using remote sensing.

    Joseph B Riegel

    Full Text Available Developing accurate but inexpensive methods for estimating above-ground carbon biomass is an important technical challenge that must be overcome before a carbon offset market can be successfully implemented in the United States. Previous studies have shown that LiDAR (light detection and ranging is well-suited for modeling above-ground biomass in mature forests; however, there has been little previous research on the ability of LiDAR to model above-ground biomass in areas with young, aggrading vegetation. This study compared the abilities of discrete-return LiDAR and high resolution optical imagery to model above-ground carbon biomass at a young restored forested wetland site in eastern North Carolina. We found that the optical imagery model explained more of the observed variation in carbon biomass than the LiDAR model (adj-R(2 values of 0.34 and 0.18 respectively; root mean squared errors of 0.14 Mg C/ha and 0.17 Mg C/ha respectively. Optical imagery was also better able to predict high and low biomass extremes than the LiDAR model. Combining both the optical and LiDAR improved upon the optical model but only marginally (adj-R(2 of 0.37. These results suggest that the ability of discrete-return LiDAR to model above-ground biomass may be rather limited in areas with young, small trees and that high spatial resolution optical imagery may be the better tool in such areas.

  8. Soil Seed Bank and Aboveground Vegetation in Grazing Lands of Southern Marmara, Turkey

    Altıngül ÖZASLAN PARLAK

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The composition and conservation of plant communities is greatly influenced by the soil seed bank. Information on the soil seed banks and the remaining vegetation in these ecosystems is crucial for guiding the restoration efforts. This study examines the size, species richness, diversity, uniformity, and similarity of soil seed banks and aboveground vegetation in 6 different grazing lands including coastal pasture, reseeded pasture, artificial pasture, lowland shrubland, ungrazed pasture, and hillside shrubland. Forty-eight soil samples were taken by cores with a diameter and depth of 10 cm from each of grazing lands in August of 2007. A vegetation survey was conducted using a 0.5 x 0.5-m quadrant in both the spring and fall. Eighty species were observed in soil seed banks and aboveground vegetation. The largest seed bank was observed in reseeded pasture (7,715 seed/m2, while the smallest seed bank was found in coastal pasture (2,755 seed/m2. Coastal pasture also possessed the least amount of aboveground vegetation (131 plants/m2. The most aboveground vegetation was found in ungrazed pasture (155 plants/m2. The most common species in seed banks were annual and perennial grasses in reseeded pasture, annual forbs in artificial pasture and hillside shrubland, and perennial forbs in low shrubland and ungrazed pasture. Species richness, diversity, and uniformity in seed banks were highest in lowland shrubland and lowest in artificial pasture. The seed bank and aboveground vegetation were similar in ungrazed pasture, coastal pasture, reseeded pasture, low shrubland, hillside shrubland and artificial pasture. Shrublands play an important role in species richness and the number of germinated seeds from seed banks of grazing lands in southern Marmara. The results showed that reseeding or a decrease in grazing pressure may improve the condition of grazing lands.

  9. Facilitation and inhibition: changes in plant nitrogen and secondary metabolites mediate interactions between above-ground and below-ground herbivores

    Huang, Wei; Siemann, Evan; Yang, Xuefang; Wheeler, Gregory S.; Ding, Jianqing

    2013-01-01

    To date, it remains unclear how herbivore-induced changes in plant primary and secondary metabolites impact above-ground and below-ground herbivore interactions. Here, we report effects of above-ground (adult) and below-ground (larval) feeding by Bikasha collaris on nitrogen and secondary chemicals in shoots and roots of Triadica sebifera to explain reciprocal above-ground and below-ground insect interactions. Plants increased root tannins with below-ground herbivory, but above-ground herbivo...

  10. Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by Fukushima coastal biota - Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by marine biota: application to Fukushima assessment

    Radiological assessments to non-human marine biota are usually carried out by assuming that the activity concentration in an organism is proportional to the activity concentration in an adjacent volume of water, via a concentration factor (CF). It is also assumed that radionuclides in the water are in isotopic equilibrium with the sediments via a sediment distribution coefficient (Kd). These assumptions are not valid in accidental situations where the biota and the sediments react with a time delay to large variations of activity concentration in seawater. A simple dynamic model was developed to factorise the dynamics of radionuclide uptake and turnover in biota and sediments, as determined by a balance between the residence time of radionuclides in seawater/sediments and the biological half-life of elimination in the biota. The model calculates activity concentration of 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs and 90Sr in seabed sediment, fish, crustaceans, molluscs and macro-algae from surrounding activity concentrations in seawater, with which to derive internal and external dose rates. A central element of this new model is the inclusion of sediment processes in dynamic transfer modelling. The model is adapted to include depletion of radionuclides adsorbed onto suspended particulates (particle scavenging), molecular diffusion, pore water mixing and bioturbation (modelled effectively as a diffusive process) represented by a simple set of differential equations that is coupled with the biological uptake/turnover processes. In this way, the model is capable of reproducing activity concentration in sediment to give a more realistic calculation of the external dose to biota compared with the simpler approach based on CF and Kd values used in previous assessments. The model is applied to the assessment of the radiological impact of the Fukushima accident on marine biota in the early phase of the accident. It is shown that previous assessment of the external doses to marine biota using a

  11. Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by Fukushima coastal biota - Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by marine biota: application to Fukushima assessment

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Radiological assessments to non-human marine biota are usually carried out by assuming that the activity concentration in an organism is proportional to the activity concentration in an adjacent volume of water, via a concentration factor (CF). It is also assumed that radionuclides in the water are in isotopic equilibrium with the sediments via a sediment distribution coefficient (K{sub d}). These assumptions are not valid in accidental situations where the biota and the sediments react with a time delay to large variations of activity concentration in seawater. A simple dynamic model was developed to factorise the dynamics of radionuclide uptake and turnover in biota and sediments, as determined by a balance between the residence time of radionuclides in seawater/sediments and the biological half-life of elimination in the biota. The model calculates activity concentration of {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in seabed sediment, fish, crustaceans, molluscs and macro-algae from surrounding activity concentrations in seawater, with which to derive internal and external dose rates. A central element of this new model is the inclusion of sediment processes in dynamic transfer modelling. The model is adapted to include depletion of radionuclides adsorbed onto suspended particulates (particle scavenging), molecular diffusion, pore water mixing and bioturbation (modelled effectively as a diffusive process) represented by a simple set of differential equations that is coupled with the biological uptake/turnover processes. In this way, the model is capable of reproducing activity concentration in sediment to give a more realistic calculation of the external dose to biota compared with the simpler approach based on CF and K{sub d} values used in previous assessments. The model is applied to the assessment of the radiological impact of the Fukushima accident on marine biota in the early phase of the accident. It is shown that previous assessment of the

  12. Metals in New Jersey's Pinelands National Reserve Sediments, Surface Water and Biota: An Emphasis on Mercury

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Technical data on the nature and extent of chemical contaminants in sediments and biota of the streams comprising the Pinelands National Reserve (Pinelands) in New...

  13. Evaluation of clean-up agents for total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis in biota and sediments.

    Muijs, B.; Jonker, M.T.O.

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (oil) are common environmental contaminants. For risk assessment purposes, their concentrations in environmental matrixes, such as biota and soils/sediments are frequently determined by solvent extraction and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography (GC) equipped with flame

  14. Survey of contaminants in soils and biota at the Seney National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey was conducted in 1987 to assess the presence and degree of contamination in soils and various biota at Seney National Wildlife Refuge, located in the...

  15. Linking stormflow hydrology and biota in suburban streams

    Shuster, W. D.; Roy, A.; Zhang, Y.; Morrison, M.

    2005-12-01

    Suburban land development has been found to alter the hydrology of landscapes, changing streamflow transient behavior (i.e., storm "flashiness"), which may contribute to some of the commonly observed and typically negative impacts of development on aquatic ecosystems. The linkages between residential development, hydrologic response, and the structure of biotic assemblages in receiving waters, however, remain poorly characterized. The Shepherd Creek catchment in Cincinnati, Ohio (USA) is approximately 20 km2, half of which lies within an undeveloped city park. The other half of the catchment represents a mix of 1960-1980s era residential parcels in the headwaters, and horse and cattle pastures downstream. We use baseline monitoring data from five subcatchments (drainages with varying coverage in residential land use) where hydrologic, habitat, and biological monitoring is conducted. Flow transient behavior was characterized by deriving rise and fall rates from continuous (5-min.) gage records and macroinvertebrate and periphyton assemblages were assessed using metrics and ordination. Subcatchments exhibited scoured streambeds, high algal cell counts that were dominated by blue-green algae, and generally tolerant macroinvertebrate assemblages. These impairments appear to be related in part to a combination of rapid rise and fall rates for storm events, poor water quality, and a pronounced lack of benthic habitat for some of the sites. Flow transients may offer a mechanistic explanation for the structure of biological assemblages, linking land use to biological condition. We discuss how stormwater infiltration via parcel-level best management practices may restore some aspects of hydrology and biota within these degraded stream ecosystems.

  16. Natural radioactivity in some specimens of the marine biota

    Marine environment contamination by natural radionuclides (uranium and 238U daughters) is evaluated using marine -fauna and flora elements concentrating fission - and radioactivated products released by nuclear facilities. Total alpha and beta radiometry is done in the the biota to determine the radionuclide concentration. Uranium, 226Ra and 210PO assay is done to estimate their contribution to natural radioactivity in the chosen biological indicators. Several analytical techniques required by each radionuclide are used. Potassium assay is done to evaluate the contribution of 40K to the natural radioactivity, and calcium assay to determine Ra/Ca and U/Ca ratios in the samples. For total alpha radiometry in algae the higher average value is detected in Phaeophyta (84.1 pCi/kg fresh weight); maximum concentration in animals is registered in Bunodosoma caissarum (43.1 pCi/kg fresh weight). For algae, the higher average total beta radiometry detected is in Chlorophyta (6.9 nCi/kg fresh weight); the maximum value found in animals refers to Thais Haemastoma (7.54 nCi/kg fresh weight). Potassium higher average ratio for algae occurs in Chlorophyta (12.77% ashes); for animals, the maximum value is found in Bunodosoma caissarum (13.80% ashes). The uranium concentration factor is maximum in Perna perna bissus (684) while the minimum is registered in Thais haemastoma and Sargassum vulgare (44). The 226Ra concentration factor is maximum in Sargassum vulgare (2143) and minimum in Bunodosoma caissarum (32). Maximum average ratio for 210PO in algae occurs in Phaephyta (11.5 pCi/g dry weight) and the maximum concentration for animals in Perna perna (31.5 pCi/g dry weight). The techniques employed proved to be efficient for the objectives aimed at. (Author)

  17. Marine biota sightings during 3D marine seismic surveys

    Oliveira, Joao Luiz Martinez de; Uller, George A. [CGG do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Derntl, Jose Renato; Ribeiro, Camila Castroviejo da Silva; Pereira, Edisio [GEOCOOP Cooperativa de Trabalho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Miranda, Cristina Maschio de [Nautilus Cooperativa de Trabalho (Brazil); Ferraz, Alexandre Almeida; Costa, Leandro Damiao Soares da [Okeanos Consultoria e Meio Ambiente Ltda. (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This work intends to make a correlation between the presence of the marine biota and the seismic source activity (air guns) during seismic surveys, in Campos (BM-C-25 and BM-C-16) and Santos (BM-S-3) Basin, since July 2003 until March 2004. Environmental data were acquired onboard of the Seismic Vessel CGG Harmattan by a team of four oceanographers (environmental technicians), working on the highest place of the Vessel to record and identify the animals whenever was possible. The data were recorded in forms where fields about the biotic and environmental aspects were filled. In 212 days of observations, 2580,1 hours of sighting's effort were recorded; the air guns worked during 37,6% of the time of the effort. These efforts were made during the daylight reaching an average value of 11,35 hours/day. Sightings were divided into the suborders Odontocetes and Mysticetes, and others (fishes, turtles and non identified mammals). 175 sightings were recorded, being 54% when the air gun was off (24% Mysticetes, 56% Odontocetes, 20% others). Similarly, when the air gun was working, 46% of the records were made (24% Mysticetes, 61% Odontocetes, 6% others); the major concentration (58%) of individuals was inside the 1000 m radius around the ship, followed by 14% of the individuals occurring between 3001-4000 m radius away from the ship. The analysis of the data suggests a non-evasive behavior related to the working of the seismic source, corroborating the results reached by other publications using the data collected onboard CGG Vessels. (author)

  18. Contribution of aboveground plant respiration to carbon cycling in a Bornean tropical rainforet

    Katayama, Ayumi; Tanaka, Kenzo; Ichie, Tomoaki; Kume, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ohashi, Mizue; Kumagai, Tomo'omi

    2014-05-01

    Bornean tropical rainforests have a different characteristic from Amazonian tropical rainforests, that is, larger aboveground biomass caused by higher stand density of large trees. Larger biomass may cause different carbon cycling and allocation pattern. However, there are fewer studies on carbon allocation and each component in Bornean tropical rainforests, especially for aboveground plant respiration, compared to Amazonian forests. In this study, we measured woody tissue respiration and leaf respiration, and estimated those in ecosystem scale in a Bornean tropical rainforest. Then, we examined carbon allocation using the data of soil respiration and aboveground net primary production obtained from our previous studies. Woody tissue respiration rate was positively correlated with diameter at breast height (dbh) and stem growth rate. Using the relationships and biomass data, we estimated woody tissue respiration in ecosystem scale though methods of scaling resulted in different estimates values (4.52 - 9.33 MgC ha-1 yr-1). Woody tissue respiration based on surface area (8.88 MgC ha-1 yr-1) was larger than those in Amazon because of large aboveground biomass (563.0 Mg ha-1). Leaf respiration rate was positively correlated with height. Using the relationship and leaf area density data at each 5-m height, leaf respiration in ecosystem scale was estimated (9.46 MgC ha-1 yr-1), which was similar to those in Amazon because of comparable LAI (5.8 m2 m-2). Gross primary production estimated from biometric measurements (44.81 MgC ha-1 yr-1) was much higher than those in Amazon, and more carbon was allocated to woody tissue respiration and total belowground carbon flux. Large tree with dbh > 60cm accounted for about half of aboveground biomass and aboveground biomass increment. Soil respiration was also related to position of large trees, resulting in high soil respiration rate in this study site. Photosynthesis ability of top canopy for large trees was high and leaves for

  19. Impact of changing DOC concentrations on the potential distribution of acid sensitive biota in a boreal stream network

    H. Laudon

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DOC concentrations have increased in many surface waters in Europe and North America over the past few decades. As DOC exudes a strong influence on pH this DOC increase could have detrimental effects on acid sensitive biota in many streams and lakes. To investigate the potential implications of changes in the DOC concentration on stream water biota, we have used a mesoscale boreal stream network in northern Sweden as a case study. The network was sampled for stream water chemistry at 60 locations during both winter base flow and spring flood periods, representing the extremes experienced annually in these streams both in terms of discharge and acidity. The effect of changing DOC on pH was modeled for all sampling locations using an organic acid model, with input DOC concentrations for different scenarios adjusted by between −30% and +50% from measured present concentrations. The resulting effect on pH was then used to quantify the proportion of stream length in the catchment with pH below the acid thresholds of pH 5.5 and pH 5.0. The results suggest that a change in stream water DOC during base flow would have only a limited effect on pH and hence on the stream length with pH below the acid thresholds. During the spring flood on the other hand a change in DOC would strongly influence pH and the stream length with pH below the acid thresholds. For example an increase in DOC concentration of 30% at all sites would increase the proportion of stream length with pH below 5.5 from 37% to 65%, and the proportion of stream length with pH below 5.0 would increase from 18% to 27%. The results suggest that in high DOC waters, even a marginal change in the DOC concentration could impact acid sensitive biota in a large portion of the aquatic landscape.

  20. Impact of changing DOC concentrations on the potential distribution of acid sensitive biota in a boreal stream network

    H. Laudon

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available DOC concentrations have increased in many surface waters in Europe and North America over the past few decades. As DOC exerts a strong influence on pH this DOC increase could have detrimental effects on acid sensitive biota in many streams and lakes. To investigate the potential implications of changes in the DOC concentration on stream water biota, we have used a mesoscale boreal stream network in northern Sweden as a case study. The network was sampled for stream water chemistry at 60 locations during both winter base flow and spring flood periods, representing the extremes experienced annually in these streams both in terms of discharge and acidity. The effect of changing DOC on pH was modeled for all sampling locations using an organic acid model, with input DOC concentrations for different scenarios adjusted by between –30% and +50% from measured present concentrations. The resulting effect on pH was then used to quantify the proportion of stream length in the catchment with pH below the acid thresholds of pH 5.5 and pH 5.0. The results suggest that a change in stream water DOC during base flow would have only a limited effect on pH and hence on the stream length with pH below the acid thresholds. During the spring flood on the other hand a change in DOC would strongly influence pH and the stream length with pH below the acid thresholds. For example an increase in DOC concentration of 30% at all sites would increase the proportion of stream length with pH below 5.5 from 37% to 65%, and the proportion of stream length with pH below 5.0 would increase from 18% to 27%. The results suggest that in poorly-buffered high DOC waters, even a marginal change in the DOC concentration could impact acid sensitive biota in a large portion of the aquatic landscape.

  1. Adiciones a la Biota de Uredinales (fungi de Colombia Addictions to the Uredinales Biota (fungi in Colombia

    Katherin Maritza Vanegas Berrouet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Colecciones de plantas con síntomas de hongos royas (Uredinales, Basidiomycota realizadas en los últimos años en los departamentos de Amazonas, Antioquia, Caldas, Cundinamarca, Tolima y Valle del Cauca han sido estudiadas y depositadas en el Museo Micológico de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín (MMUNM. Entre las novedades encontradas, se registran por primera vez para Colombia las royas: Puccinia investita, Sphenospora pallida, Crossopsora piperis, Uredo psychotriicola y Pucciniosira solani. Se adiciona la familia botánica Dioscoreaceae para la Biota de Uredinales colombianos. Se hace la corrección del nombre anamórfico Uredo parthenii publicado para Colombia en 2003, por el nombre teliomorfico válido Puccinia schileana. Son registrados seis nuevos hospedantes parasitados por royas en Colombia, entre estos reviste importancia la colección sobre Origanum vulgare L. una planta aromática y medicinal cultivada mundialmente.Plant collections with symptoms of rusts fungi (Uredinales, Basidiomycota made during recent years in provinces of Amazonas, Antioquia, Caldas, Cundinamarca, Tolima and Valle del Cauca have been studied and deposited in Museo Micológico of Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín (MMUNM. The rusts species Puccinia investita, Sphenospora pallida, Crossopsora piperis, Uredo psychotriicola and Pucciniosira solani are new records for Colombia. A first record for this country of rust fungi in plants of family Dioscoreaceae has been also made. The anamorphic name Uredo parthenii published in 2003 in Colombia, has been corrected by the valid teleomorph Puccinia schileana. Finally, six new hosts parasitized by rusts are recorded, including Origanum vulgare L. a world-wide important aromatic and medicinal plant.

  2. Below-ground herbivory limits induction of extrafloral nectar by above-ground herbivores

    Huang, Wei; Siemann, Evan; Carrillo, Juli; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Many plants produce extrafloral nectar (EFN), and increase production following above-ground herbivory, presumably to attract natural enemies of the herbivores. Below-ground herbivores, alone or in combination with those above ground, may also alter EFN production depending on the specificity of this defence response and the interactions among herbivores mediated through plant defences. To date, however, a lack of manipulative experiments investigating EFN production induc...

  3. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenho...

  4. Plant diversity impacts decomposition and herbivory via changes in aboveground arthropods

    Anne Ebeling; Meyer, Sebastian T.; Maike Abbas; Nico Eisenhauer; Helmut Hillebrand; Markus Lange; Christoph Scherber; Anja Vogel; Alexandra Weigelt; Weisser, Wolfgang W.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plant diversity influences essential ecosystem processes as aboveground productivity, and can have cascading effects on the arthropod communities in adjacent trophic levels. However, few studies have examined how those changes in arthropod communities can have additional impacts on ecosystem processes caused by them (e.g. pollination, bioturbation, predation, decomposition, herbivory). Therefore, including arthropod effects in predictions of the impact of plant diversity loss on such ...

  5. Shifts in Aboveground Biomass Allocation Patterns of Dominant Shrub Species across a Strong Environmental Gradient

    Kumordzi, Bright B.; Gundale, Michael J.; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Wardle, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Most plant biomass allocation studies have focused on allocation to shoots versus roots, and little is known about drivers of allocation for aboveground plant organs. We explored the drivers of within-and between-species variation of aboveground biomass allocation across a strong environmental resource gradient, i.e., a long-term chronosequence of 30 forested islands in northern Sweden across which soil fertility and plant productivity declines while light availability increases. For each of the three coexisting dominant understory dwarf shrub species on each island, we estimated the fraction of the total aboveground biomass produced year of sampling that was allocated to sexual reproduction (i.e., fruits), leaves and stems for each of two growing seasons, to determine how biomass allocation responded to the chronosequence at both the within-species and whole community levels. Against expectations, within-species allocation to fruits was least on less fertile islands, and allocation to leaves at the whole community level was greatest on intermediate islands. Consistent with expectations, different coexisting species showed contrasting allocation patterns, with the species that was best adapted for more fertile conditions allocating the most to vegetative organs, and with its allocation pattern showing the strongest response to the gradient. Our study suggests that co-existing dominant plant species can display highly contrasting biomass allocations to different aboveground organs within and across species in response to limiting environmental resources within the same plant community. Such knowledge is important for understanding how community assembly, trait spectra, and ecological processes driven by the plant community vary across environmental gradients and among contrasting ecosystems. PMID:27270445

  6. Belowground induction by delia radicum or phytohormones affect aboveground herbivore communities on field-grown broccoli

    Pierre, S.P.; Dugravot, S.; Hervé, M. R.; Hassan, H M; Dam, N.M. van; Cortesero, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Induced plant defence in response to phytophagous insects is a well described phenomenon. However, so far little is known about the effect of induced plant responses on subsequently colonizing herbivores in the field. Broccoli plants were induced in the belowground compartment using (i) infestation by the root-herbivore Delia radicum, (ii) root application of jasmonic acid (JA) or (iii) root application of salicylic acid (SA). The abundance of D. radicum and six aboveground herbivores display...

  7. ESTIMATING INTERNAL CORROSION RATE AND INTERNAL INSPECTION INTERVAL OF ABOVEGROUND HYDROCARBON STORAGE TANKS

    MARTINEZ, Sanja

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of aboveground storage tanks (AST) in hydrocarbon service shortens the tank’s life cycle and can lead to leaks and release of hazardous materials into the environment. Internal inspection is one of the main means to keep the tank’s integrity. Determination of internal inspection interval is imminent for balancing the safe operation requirement and inspection costs. In most instances, the area most vulnerable to corrosion in upright atmospheric AST is the tank bottom. In this paper w...

  8. Tree aboveground carbon storage correlates with environmental gradients and functional diversity in a tropical forest

    Yong Shen; Shixiao Yu; Juyu Lian; Hao Shen; Honglin Cao; Huanping Lu; Wanhui Ye

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests play a disproportionately important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but it remains unclear how local environments and functional diversity regulate tree aboveground C storage. We examined how three components (environments, functional dominance and diversity) affected C storage in Dinghushan 20-ha plot in China. There was large fine-scale variation in C storage. The three components significantly contributed to regulate C storage, but dominance and diversity of traits we...

  9. Effect of plant row spacing and herbicide use on weed aboveground biomass and corn grain yield

    Acciaresi, Horacio A.; M. S. Zuluaga

    2006-01-01

    The use of narrow plant spacing in corn (Zea mays) has been suggested as a technological alternative to obtain grain yield increases, due to a better use of resources. The regular pattern could diminish intraspecific competition while favoring interspecific competition with weeds. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of corn row spacing on weed aboveground biomass and corn grain yield. Field experiments were conducted during 2002/2003 and 2003/2004 growing seasons. Three corn...

  10. Topographic variation in aboveground biomass in a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest in China.

    Dunmei Lin

    Full Text Available The subtropical forest biome occupies about 25% of China, with species diversity only next to tropical forests. Despite the recognized importance of subtropical forest in regional carbon storage and cycling, uncertainties remain regarding the carbon storage of subtropical forests, and few studies have quantified within-site variation of biomass, making it difficult to evaluate the role of these forests in the global and regional carbon cycles. Using data for a 24-ha census plot in east China, we quantify aboveground biomass, characterize its spatial variation among different habitats, and analyse species relative contribution to the total aboveground biomass of different habitats. The average aboveground biomass was 223.0 Mg ha(-1 (bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals [217.6, 228.5] and varied substantially among four topographically defined habitats, from 180.6 Mg ha(-1 (bootstrapped 95% CI [167.1, 195.0] in the upper ridge to 245.9 Mg ha(-1 (bootstrapped 95% CI [238.3, 253.8] in the lower ridge, with upper and lower valley intermediate. In consistent with our expectation, individual species contributed differently to the total aboveground biomass of different habitats, reflecting significant species habitat associations. Different species show differently in habitat preference in terms of biomass contribution. These patterns may be the consequences of ecological strategies difference among different species. Results from this study enhance our ability to evaluate the role of subtropical forests in the regional carbon cycle and provide valuable information to guide the protection and management of subtropical broad-leaved forest for carbon sequestration and carbon storage.

  11. Signal signature of aboveground-induced resistance upon belowground herbivory in maize

    Erb, Matthias; Flors, Victor; Karlen, Danielle; De Lange, Elvira S.; Planchamp, Chantal; D’Alessandro, Marco; Turlings, Ted C. J.; Ton, Jurriaan

    2012-01-01

    Plants activate local and systemic defence mechanisms upon exposure to stress. This innate immune response is partially regulated by plant hormones, and involves the accumulation of defensive metabolites. Although local defence reactions to herbivores are well studied, less is known about the impact of root herbivory on shoot defence. Here, we examined the effects of belowground infestation by the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera on aboveground resistance in maize. Belowgr...

  12. Soil Biota and Litter Decay in High Arctic Ecosystems

    González, G.; Rivera, F.; Makarova, O.; Gould, W. A.

    2006-12-01

    Frost heave action contributes to the formation of non-sorted circles in the High Arctic. Non-sorted circles tend to heave more than the surrounding tundra due to deeper thaw and the formation of ice lenses. Thus, the geomorphology, soils and vegetation on the centers of the patterned-ground feature (non-sorted circles) as compared to the surrounding soils (inter-circles) can be different. We established a decomposition experiment to look at in situ decay rates of the most dominant graminoid species on non-sorted circles and adjacent inter-circle soils along a climatic gradient in the Canadian High Arctic as a component of a larger study looking at the biocomplexity of small-featured patterned ground ecosystems. Additionally, we investigated variation in soil chemical properties and biota, including soil microarthropods and microbial composition and biomass, as they relate to climate, topographic position, and litter decay rates. Our three sites locations, from coldest to warmest, are Isachsen, Ellef Ringnes Island (ER), NU (bioclimatic subzone A); Mould Bay (MB), Prince Patrick Island, NT (bioclimatic subzone B), and Green Cabin (GC), Aulavik National Park, Thomsen River, Banks Island, NT (bioclimatic subzone C). Our sample design included the selection of 15 non-sorted circles and adjacent inter-circle areas within the zonal vegetation at each site (a total of 90 sites), and a second set of 3 non-sorted circles and adjacent inter-circle areas in dry, mesic and wet tundra at each of the sites. Soil invertebrates were sampled at each site using both pitfall traps, soil microbial biomass was determined using substrate induced respiration and bacterial populations were determined using the most probable number method. Decomposition rates were measured using litterbags and as the percent of mass remaining of Carex misandra, Luzula nivalis and Alopecuris alpinus in GC, MB and ER, respectively. Our findings indicate these graminoid species decayed significantly over

  13. Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples: method validation.

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory authorities are expected to measure concentration of contaminants in foodstuffs, but the simple determination of total amount cannot be sufficient for fully judging its impact on the human health. In particular, the methylation of metals generally increases their toxicity; therefore validated analytical methods producing reliable results for the assessment of methylated species are highly needed. Nowadays, there is no legal limit for methylmercury (MeHg) in food matrices. Hence, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg exists within the international jurisdiction. Contemplating the possibility of a future legislative limit, a method for low level determination of MeHg in marine biota matrixes, based on aqueous-phase ethylation followed by purge and trap and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Py-AFS) detection, has been developed and validated. Five different extraction procedures, namely acid and alkaline leaching assisted by microwave and conventional oven heating, as well as enzymatic digestion, were evaluated in terms of their efficiency to extract MeHg from Scallop soft tissue IAEA-452 Certified Reference Material. Alkaline extraction with 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) with 5M HCl and enzymatic digestion with protease XIV yielded the highest extraction recoveries. Standard addition or the introduction of a dilution step were successfully applied to overcome the matrix effects observed when microwave-assisted extraction using 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol or 25% (w/v) aqueous TMAH were used. ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines were followed to perform the validation of the methodology. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration curve, linearity (0.9995), working range (1-800pg), recovery (97%), precision, traceability, limit of detection (0.45pg), limit of quantification (0.85pg) and expanded uncertainty (15.86%, k=2) were assessed with Fish protein Dorm-3 Certified

  14. Relationships among the Stem,Aboveground and Total Biomass across Chinese Forests

    2007-01-01

    Forest biomass plays a key role in the global carbon cycle.In the present study,a general allometric model was derived to predict the relationships among the stem biomass Ms,aboveground biomass MA and total biomass Mr.based on previously developed scaling relationships for leaf,stem and root standing biomass.The model predicted complex scaling exponents for MT and/or MA with respect to MS.Because annual biomass accumulation in the stem,root and branch far exceeded the annual increase in standing leaf biomass,we can predict that MT∝MA∝Ms as a simple result of the model.Although slight variations existed in different phyletic affiliations(I.e.conifers versus angiosperms),empirical results using Model Type Ⅱ (reduced major axis) regression supported the model's predictions.The predictive formulas among stem,aboveground and total biomass were obtained using Model Type Ⅰ(ordinary least squares) regression to estimate forest biomass.Given the low mean percentage prediction errors for aboveground(and total biomass) based on the stem biomass.the results provided a reasonable method to estimate the biomass of forests at the individual level.which was insensitive to the variation in local environmental conditions (e.g.precipitation,tempereture,etc.).

  15. Allometric Equations for Aboveground and Belowground Biomass Estimations in an Evergreen Forest in Vietnam.

    Vu Thanh Nam

    Full Text Available Allometric regression models are widely used to estimate tropical forest biomass, but balancing model accuracy with efficiency of implementation remains a major challenge. In addition, while numerous models exist for aboveground mass, very few exist for roots. We developed allometric equations for aboveground biomass (AGB and root biomass (RB based on 300 (of 45 species and 40 (of 25 species sample trees respectively, in an evergreen forest in Vietnam. The biomass estimations from these local models were compared to regional and pan-tropical models. For AGB we also compared local models that distinguish functional types to an aggregated model, to assess the degree of specificity needed in local models. Besides diameter at breast height (DBH and tree height (H, wood density (WD was found to be an important parameter in AGB models. Existing pan-tropical models resulted in up to 27% higher estimates of AGB, and overestimated RB by nearly 150%, indicating the greater accuracy of local models at the plot level. Our functional group aggregated local model which combined data for all species, was as accurate in estimating AGB as functional type specific models, indicating that a local aggregated model is the best choice for predicting plot level AGB in tropical forests. Finally our study presents the first allometric biomass models for aboveground and root biomass in forests in Vietnam.

  16. Temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass decreases as spatial variability increases.

    McGranahan, Devan Allen; Hovick, Torre J; Elmore, R Dwayne; Engle, David M; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D; Winter, Stephen L; Miller, James R; Debinski, Diane M

    2016-03-01

    Ecological theory predicts that diversity decreases variability in ecosystem function. We predict that, at the landscape scale, spatial variability created by a mosaic of contrasting patches that differ in time since disturbance will decrease temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass. Using data from a multi-year study of seven grazed tallgrass prairie landscapes, each experimentally managed for one to eight patches, we show that increased spatial variability driven by spatially patchy fire and herbivory reduces temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass. This pattern is associated with statistical evidence for the portfolio effect and a positive relationship between temporal variability and functional group synchrony as predicted by metacommunity variability theory. As disturbance from fire and grazing interact to create a shifting mosaic of spatially heterogeneous patches within a landscape, temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass can be dampened. These results suggest that spatially heterogeneous disturbance regimes contribute to a portfolio of ecosystem functions provided by biodiversity, including wildlife habitat, fuel, and forage. We discuss how spatial patterns of disturbance drive variability within and among patches. PMID:27197382

  17. Allometric Equations for Aboveground and Belowground Biomass Estimations in an Evergreen Forest in Vietnam.

    Nam, Vu Thanh; van Kuijk, Marijke; Anten, Niels P R

    2016-01-01

    Allometric regression models are widely used to estimate tropical forest biomass, but balancing model accuracy with efficiency of implementation remains a major challenge. In addition, while numerous models exist for aboveground mass, very few exist for roots. We developed allometric equations for aboveground biomass (AGB) and root biomass (RB) based on 300 (of 45 species) and 40 (of 25 species) sample trees respectively, in an evergreen forest in Vietnam. The biomass estimations from these local models were compared to regional and pan-tropical models. For AGB we also compared local models that distinguish functional types to an aggregated model, to assess the degree of specificity needed in local models. Besides diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height (H), wood density (WD) was found to be an important parameter in AGB models. Existing pan-tropical models resulted in up to 27% higher estimates of AGB, and overestimated RB by nearly 150%, indicating the greater accuracy of local models at the plot level. Our functional group aggregated local model which combined data for all species, was as accurate in estimating AGB as functional type specific models, indicating that a local aggregated model is the best choice for predicting plot level AGB in tropical forests. Finally our study presents the first allometric biomass models for aboveground and root biomass in forests in Vietnam. PMID:27309718

  18. Biota and Biomolecules in Extreme Environments on Earth: Implications for Life Detection on Mars

    Aerts, Joost W.; Röling, Wilfred F. M.; Andreas Elsaesser; Pascale Ehrenfreund

    2014-01-01

    The three main requirements for life as we know it are the presence of organic compounds, liquid water, and free energy. Several groups of organic compounds (e.g., amino acids, nucleobases, lipids) occur in all life forms on Earth and are used as diagnostic molecules, i.e., biomarkers, for the characterization of extant or extinct life. Due to their indispensability for life on Earth, these biomarkers are also prime targets in the search for life on Mars. Biomarkers degrade over time; in situ...

  19. Biota and biomolecules in extreme environments on Earth: implications for life detection on Mars.

    Aerts, Joost W; Röling, Wilfred F M; Elsaesser, Andreas; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The three main requirements for life as we know it are the presence of organic compounds, liquid water, and free energy. Several groups of organic compounds (e.g., amino acids, nucleobases, lipids) occur in all life forms on Earth and are used as diagnostic molecules, i.e., biomarkers, for the characterization of extant or extinct life. Due to their indispensability for life on Earth, these biomarkers are also prime targets in the search for life on Mars. Biomarkers degrade over time; in situ environmental conditions influence the preservation of those molecules. Nonetheless, upon shielding (e.g., by mineral surfaces), particular biomarkers can persist for billions of years, making them of vital importance in answering questions about the origins and limits of life on early Earth and Mars. The search for organic material and biosignatures on Mars is particularly challenging due to the hostile environment and its effect on organic compounds near the surface. In support of life detection on Mars, it is crucial to investigate analogue environments on Earth that resemble best past and present Mars conditions. Terrestrial extreme environments offer a rich source of information allowing us to determine how extreme conditions affect life and molecules associated with it. Extremophilic organisms have adapted to the most stunning conditions on Earth in environments with often unique geological and chemical features. One challenge in detecting biomarkers is to optimize extraction, since organic molecules can be low in abundance and can strongly adsorb to mineral surfaces. Methods and analytical tools in the field of life science are continuously improving. Amplification methods are very useful for the detection of low concentrations of genomic material but most other organic molecules are not prone to amplification methods. Therefore, a great deal depends on the extraction efficiency. The questions "what to look for", "where to look", and "how to look for it" require more of our attention to ensure the success of future life detection missions on Mars. PMID:25370528

  20. Biota and Biomolecules in Extreme Environments on Earth: Implications for Life Detection on Mars

    Joost W. Aerts

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The three main requirements for life as we know it are the presence of organic compounds, liquid water, and free energy. Several groups of organic compounds (e.g., amino acids, nucleobases, lipids occur in all life forms on Earth and are used as diagnostic molecules, i.e., biomarkers, for the characterization of extant or extinct life. Due to their indispensability for life on Earth, these biomarkers are also prime targets in the search for life on Mars. Biomarkers degrade over time; in situ environmental conditions influence the preservation of those molecules. Nonetheless, upon shielding (e.g., by mineral surfaces, particular biomarkers can persist for billions of years, making them of vital importance in answering questions about the origins and limits of life on early Earth and Mars. The search for organic material and biosignatures on Mars is particularly challenging due to the hostile environment and its effect on organic compounds near the surface. In support of life detection on Mars, it is crucial to investigate analogue environments on Earth that resemble best past and present Mars conditions. Terrestrial extreme environments offer a rich source of information allowing us to determine how extreme conditions affect life and molecules associated with it. Extremophilic organisms have adapted to the most stunning conditions on Earth in environments with often unique geological and chemical features. One challenge in detecting biomarkers is to optimize extraction, since organic molecules can be low in abundance and can strongly adsorb to mineral surfaces. Methods and analytical tools in the field of life science are continuously improving. Amplification methods are very useful for the detection of low concentrations of genomic material but most other organic molecules are not prone to amplification methods. Therefore, a great deal depends on the extraction efficiency. The questions “what to look for”, “where to look”, and “how to look for it” require more of our attention to ensure the success of future life detection missions on Mars.

  1. Abiotic protein fragmentation by manganese oxide: implications for a mechanism to supply soil biota with oligopeptides

    Reardon, Patrick N.; Chacon, Stephany S.; Walter, Eric D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Washton, Nancy M.; Kleber, Markus W.

    2016-03-14

    Proteins facilitate a wide range of chemical transformations important in soil as well as being a major reservoir of soil nitrogen themselves. The interactions and reactions of proteins with soils and minerals are of key importance to our understanding of their functional persistence in the environment. We combined NMR and EPR spectroscopies to distinguish the reaction of a model protein with a redox active mineral surface (Birnessite, MnO2) from its response to a redox neutral phyllosilicate (Kaolinite). Our data demonstrate that birnessite fragments the model protein while kaolinite has little impact on the protein structure. NMR and EPR spectroscopies are shown to be valuable tools to observe these reactions and capture the extent of protein transformation together with the extent of mineral response. These data suggest that mineral surfaces can have both promoting and retarding roles in terrestrial nitrogen cycling, with redox active minerals acting as accelerators by catalyzing the breakdown of proteins and proteinaceous materials while phyllosilicates are more likely to act as preservative media.

  2. Effects of root herbivory on pyrrolizidine alkaloid content and aboveground plant-herbivore-parasitoid interactions in Jacobaea vulgaris

    O. Kostenko; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of root herbivory is increasingly recognized in ecological studies, and the effects of root herbivory on plant growth, chemistry, and performance of aboveground herbivores have been relatively well studied. However, how belowground herbivory by root feeding insects affects aboveground parasitoid development is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of root herbivory by wireworms (Agriotes lineatus) on the expression of primary and secondary compounds in the lea...

  3. Fine root longevity and carbon input into soil from below- and aboveground litter in climatically contrasting forests

    Leppalammi-Kujansuu, Jaana; Aro, Lasse; Salemaa, Maija; Hansson, Karna; Kleja, Dan Berggren; Helmisaari, Helja-Sisko

    2014-01-01

    The major part of carbon (C) flow into forest soil consists of continually renewed fine roots and aboveground litterfall. We studied the belowground C input from the fine root litter of trees and understorey vegetation in relation to their aboveground litterfall in two Norway spruce (Picea abies L) stands located in northern and southern Finland. The production of fine roots was estimated by using turnover and biomass data from minirhizotrons and soil cores. The foliage litter production of t...

  4. Variability of aboveground litter inputs alters soil physicochemical and biological processes: a meta-analysis of litterfall-manipulation experiments

    Xu, S.; Liu, L; E. J. Sayer

    2013-01-01

    Global change has been shown to greatly alter the amount of aboveground litter inputs to soil, which could cause substantial cascading effects on belowground biogeochemical cyling. Although having been studied extensively, there is uncertainty about how changes in aboveground litter inputs affect soil carbon and nutrient turnover and transformation. Here, we conducted a comprehensive compilation of 68 studies on litter addition or removal experiments, and used meta-analysis to assess t...

  5. Mapping Aboveground Biomass in the Amazon Basin: Exploring Sensors, Scales, and Strategies for Optimal Data Linkage

    Walker, W. S.; Baccini, A.

    2013-05-01

    Information on the distribution and density of carbon in tropical forests is critical to decision-making on a host of globally significant issues ranging from climate stabilization and biodiversity conservation to poverty reduction and human health. Encouraged by recent progress at both the international and jurisdictional levels on the design of incentive-based policy mechanisms to compensate tropical nations for maintaining their forests intact, governments throughout the tropics are moving with urgency to implement robust national and sub-national forest monitoring systems for operationally tracking and reporting on changes in forest cover and associated carbon stocks. Monitoring systems will be required to produce results that are accurate, consistent, complete, transparent, and comparable at sub-national to pantropical scales, and satellite-based remote sensing supported by field observations is widely-accepted as the most objective and cost-effective solution. The effectiveness of any system for large-area forest monitoring will necessarily depend on the capacity of current and near-future Earth observation satellites to provide information that meets the requirements of developing monitoring protocols. However, important questions remain regarding the role that spatially explicit maps of aboveground biomass and carbon can play in IPCC-compliant forest monitoring systems, with the majority of these questions stemming from doubts about the inherit sensitivity of satellite data to aboveground forest biomass, confusion about the relationship between accuracy and resolution, and a general lack of guidance on optimal strategies for linking field reference and remote sensing data sources. Here we demonstrate the ability of a state-of-the-art satellite radar sensor, the Japanese ALOS/PALSAR, and a venerable optical platform, Landsat 5, to support large-area mapping of aboveground tropical woody biomass across a 153,000-km2 region in the southwestern Amazon

  6. Bioaccumulation factor of 137Cs in some marine biotas from West Bangka Indonesia

    Radionuclides may be released from nuclear facilities to the marine environment. Concentrations of radionuclides within marine biotic systems can be influenced by a number of factors, including the type of biota, its source, the radionuclide, and specific characteristics of the sampled specimens and the marine environment (salinity, etc.). The bioconcentration factor for a marine organism is the ratio of the concentration of a radionuclide in that organism to the concentration found in its marine water environment - under conditions of equilibrium. Information on the bioaccumulation of Cs-137 in marine organisms is required to risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health. Bioaccumulation of Cs was investigated in marine biota from west Bangka such as Marine cat fish (Arius thalassinus), Baramundi (Lates calcarifer), Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson), Striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus), eel tailed fish (Euristhmus microceps), Yellowtail fusilier (Caesio erythrogaster), Coastal crab (Scylla sp), White shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and marine bivalve mollusk (Anadara granosa). Muscle of these marine biota, sediments and water were assayed for Cs-137 by HPGe gamma spectrometer. The bioaccumulation factor for fishes were calculated by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in water. The bioaccumulation factor for mollusks were calculates by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in sediments. The bioaccumulation factor were range 4.99 to 136.34

  7. Bioaccumulation factor of {sup 137}Cs in some marine biotas from West Bangka Indonesia

    Suseno, Heny, E-mail: henis@batan.go.id [Radioactive Waste Technology Center - The Indonesia Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Radionuclides may be released from nuclear facilities to the marine environment. Concentrations of radionuclides within marine biotic systems can be influenced by a number of factors, including the type of biota, its source, the radionuclide, and specific characteristics of the sampled specimens and the marine environment (salinity, etc.). The bioconcentration factor for a marine organism is the ratio of the concentration of a radionuclide in that organism to the concentration found in its marine water environment - under conditions of equilibrium. Information on the bioaccumulation of Cs-137 in marine organisms is required to risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health. Bioaccumulation of Cs was investigated in marine biota from west Bangka such as Marine cat fish (Arius thalassinus), Baramundi (Lates calcarifer), Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson), Striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus), eel tailed fish (Euristhmus microceps), Yellowtail fusilier (Caesio erythrogaster), Coastal crab (Scylla sp), White shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and marine bivalve mollusk (Anadara granosa). Muscle of these marine biota, sediments and water were assayed for Cs-137 by HPGe gamma spectrometer. The bioaccumulation factor for fishes were calculated by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in water. The bioaccumulation factor for mollusks were calculates by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in sediments. The bioaccumulation factor were range 4.99 to 136.34.

  8. Aboveground-belowground biodiversity linkages differ in early and late successional temperate forests

    Hui Li; Xugao Wang; Chao Liang; Zhanqing Hao; Lisha Zhou; Sam Ma; Xiaobin Li; Shan Yang; Fei Yao; Yong Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ecological linkages between above- and below-ground biota is critical for deepening our knowledge on the maintenance and stability of ecosystem processes. Nevertheless, direct comparisons of plant-microbe diversity at the community level remain scarce due to the knowledge gap between microbial ecology and plant ecology. We compared the α- and β- diversities of plant and soil bacterial communities in two temperate forests that represented early and late successional stages. We do...

  9. Linking soil biodiversity and vegetation: implications for a changing planet.

    Sylvain, Zachary A; Wall, Diana H

    2011-03-01

    Soil biota are intimately tied to plant communities through herbivory and symbiosis and indirectly by the decomposition of dead organic plant material. Through both roots and aboveground organic material (e.g., leaves and wood), plants provide substantial inputs of organic matter to soil systems. Plants are the basis for most biotic soil food webs that comprise an enormous diversity of species whose multiple interactions function to help regulate nutrient cycling, which in turn influences plant growth. Many factors govern the biogeography of soil biota, including the physical and chemical properties of soil, climate, the composition and type of vegetation, and interactions with other soil biota. Despite awareness of factors influencing soil communities, no single factor allows predictions of soil animal diversity or distribution. However, research is showing that plants can have unique soil biotic communities. Degradation of soil, which removes predators and biotic regulation that occurs in less managed ecosystems, can result in increased pathogens and pests that affect humans, other animals and plants. Global changes such as land use, desertification, and soil pollution all have been shown to alter soil animal diversity and abundance. Because of our dependence on soils and plant production, studies linking soil biotic communities to primary productivity are needed to assure long-term soil sustainability. PMID:21613143

  10. Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by marine biota: application to the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic model D-DAT was developed to study the dynamics of radionuclide uptake and turnover in biota and sediments in the immediate aftermath of the Fukushima accident. This dynamics is determined by the interplay between the residence time of radionuclides in seawater/sediments and the biological half-lives of elimination by the biota. The model calculates time-variable activity concentration of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (90)Sr in seabed sediment, fish, crustaceans, molluscs and macroalgae from surrounding activity concentrations in seawater, with which to derive internal and external dose rates. A central element of the model is the inclusion of dynamic transfer of radionuclides to/from sediments by factorising the depletion of radionuclides adsorbed onto suspended particulates, molecular diffusion, pore water mixing and bioturbation, represented by a simple set of differential equations coupled with the biological uptake/turnover processes. In this way, the model is capable of reproducing activity concentration in sediment more realistically. The model was used to assess the radiological impact of the Fukushima accident on marine biota in the acute phase of the accident. Sediment and biota activity concentrations are within the wide range of actual monitoring data. Activity concentrations in marine biota are thus shown to be better calculated by a dynamic model than with the simpler equilibrium approach based on concentration factors, which tends to overestimate for the acute accident period. Modelled dose rates from external exposure from sediment are also significantly below equilibrium predictions. The model calculations confirm previous studies showing that radioactivity levels in marine biota have been generally below the levels necessary to cause a measurable effect on populations. The model was used in mass-balance mode to calculate total integrated releases of 103, 30 and 3 PBq for (131)I, (137)Cs and (90)Sr, reasonably in line with previous

  11. Comparative analysis of doses to aquatic biota in water bodies impacted by radioactive contamination

    Comparative analysis of doses to the reference species of freshwater biota was performed for the following water bodies in Russia or former USSR: Chernobyl NPPs cooling pond, Lakes Uruskul and Berdenish located in the Eastern Urals Radioactive Trace, Techa River, Yenisei River. It was concluded that the doses to biota were considerably different in the acute and chronic periods of radioactive contamination. The most vulnerable part of all considered aquatic ecosystems was benthic trophic chain. A numerical scale on the “dose rate – effects” relationships for fish was formulated. Threshold dose rates above which radiation effects can be expected in fish were evaluated to be the following: 1 mGy d−1 for appearance of the first morbidity effects in fish; 5 mGy d−1 for the first negative effects on reproduction system; 10 mGy d−1 for the first effects on life shortening of fish. The results of dose assessment to biota were compared with the scale “dose rate – effects” and the literature data on the radiobiological effects observed in the considered water bodies. It was shown that in the most contaminated water bodies the dose rates were high enough to cause the radiobiological effects in fish. - Highlights: ► Comparative analysis of dose rates to biota in different water bodies was performed. ► A numerical scale on the dose rates – effects relationships for fish was formulated. ► Results of assessment of exposure to biota were compared with the dose rates – effects scale. ► In the most contaminated water bodies the doses were high enough to cause radiobiological effects in fish. ► Current dose rates to biota in all considered water bodies are below the safety level of 1 mGy/day.

  12. Assessment of radiation-ecological impact on aquatic biota in the area of NPP location

    The methodology of Assessment of radiation-ecological impact (REI) on the natural environments according to the Roshydromet radiometric data developed by RPA Typhoon is described. In the document the following procedure of assessment of radiation impact on biota is suggested: identification of REI sources; analysis of radiation monitoring data and model estimations of radionuclide transfer in environment; feasibility and choice of representative environment objects for REI assessment; estimation of the REI value on representative environment objects; presentation of results of REI assessment. The results of REI on aquatic biota of Kalinin NPP cooling pond (1999-2012) are presented

  13. Preliminary Study on Coral Reef and Its Associated Biota in Qatari Waters, Arabian Gulf

    Al Ansi, Mohsin A. [محسن عبد الله العنسي; AL-KHAYAT, Jassim A.

    1999-01-01

    Coral reef grounds and their associated biota m Qatari waters were investigated by Scuba diving. Four selected reef-sites were studied. Coral was presented by 17 species. Descriptive notes of each site and an initial list of associated fauna and flora were presented. The associated biota composed mainly of Algae 23 sp, Porifera 5 sp, Bryozoa 4 sp, Polychaeta 17 sp, Echinodermata 21 sp, Mollusca 102 sp, Chordata 4 sp, and Crustacea 15 sp. Mollusca was the predominant group in all visited sites...

  14. Net changes in aboveground woody carbon stock in western juniper woodlands, 1946-1998

    Strand, Eva K.; Vierling, Lee A.; Smith, Alistair M. S.; Bunting, Stephen C.

    2008-03-01

    Although regional increases in woody plant cover in semiarid ecosystems have been identified as a worldwide phenomenon affecting the global carbon budget, quantifying the impact of these vegetation shifts on C pools and fluxes is challenging. Challenges arise because woody encroachment is governed by ecological processes that occur at fine spatial resolutions (1-10 m) and, in many cases, at slow (decadal-scale) temporal rates over large areas. We therefore analyzed time series aerial photography, which exhibits both the necessary spatial precision and temporal extent, to quantify the expansion of western juniper into sagebrush steppe landscapes in southwestern Idaho. We established upper and lower bounds of aboveground woody carbon change across the landscape via two-dimensional spatial wavelet analysis, image texture analysis, and field data collection. Forty-eight 100-ha blocks across a 330,000-ha region were stratified by topography, soil characteristics, and land stewardship for analyses. Across the area we estimate aboveground woody carbon accumulation rates of 3.3 gCm-2yr-1 and 10.0 gCm-2yr-1 using the wavelet and texture method, respectively, during the time period 1946-1998. Carbon accumulation rates were significantly affected by soil properties and were highly dependent on the spatial and temporal scales of analysis. For example, at a 100-ha scale the aboveground carbon accumulation varied from -1.7 to 9.9 gCm-2yr-1, while at the 1-ha scale the range of variability increased to -11 to 22 gCm-2yr-1. These values are an order of magnitude lower than those previously suggested due to woody encroachment, highlighting the need for examining multiple spatial scales when accounting for changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

  15. Plant diversity and functional groups affect Si and Ca pools in aboveground biomass of grassland systems.

    Schaller, Jörg; Roscher, Christiane; Hillebrand, Helmut; Weigelt, Alexandra; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Anne; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity is an important driver of nitrogen and phosphorus stocks in aboveground plant biomass of grassland ecosystems, but plant diversity effects on other elements also important for plant growth are less understood. We tested whether plant species richness, functional group richness or the presence/absence of particular plant functional groups influences the Si and Ca concentrations (mmol g(-1)) and stocks (mmol m(-2)) in aboveground plant biomass in a large grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). In the experiment including 60 temperate grassland species, plant diversity was manipulated as sown species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16) and richness and identity of plant functional groups (1-4; grasses, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes). We found positive species richness effects on Si as well as Ca stocks that were attributable to increased biomass production. The presence of particular functional groups was the most important factor explaining variation in aboveground Si and Ca stocks (mmol m(-2)). Grass presence increased the Si stocks by 140 % and legume presence increased the Ca stock by 230 %. Both the presence of specific plant functional groups and species diversity altered Si and Ca stocks, whereas Si and Ca concentration were affected mostly by the presence of specific plant functional groups. However, we found a negative effect of species diversity on Si and Ca accumulation, by calculating the deviation between mixtures and mixture biomass proportions, but in monoculture concentrations. These changes may in turn affect ecosystem processes such as plant litter decomposition and nutrient cycling in grasslands. PMID:27164912

  16. Bangladesh Sundarbans: Present status of the environment and Biota

    Abdul Aziz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Sundarbans is a deltaic mangrove forest, formed about 7000 years ago by the deposition of sediments from the foothills of the Himalayas through the Ganges river system, and is situated southwest of Bangladesh and south of West Bengal, India. However, for the last 40 years, the discharge of sediment-laden freshwater into the Bay of Bengal through the Bangladesh part of the Sundarbans Mangrove Forests (BSMF has been reduced due to a withdrawal of water during the dry period from the Farakka Barrage in India. The result is two extremes of freshwater discharge at Gorai, the feeding River of the BSMF: a mean minimum monthly discharge varies from 0.00 to 170 m3·s−1 during the dry period with a mean maximum of about 4000 to 8880 m3·s−1 during the wet period. In the BSMF, about 180 km downstream, an additional low discharge results in the creation of a polyhaline environment (a minimum of 194.4 m3·s−1 freshwater discharge is needed to maintain an oligohaline condition during the dry period. The Ganges water carries 262 million ton sediments/year and only 7% is diverted in to southern distributaries. The low discharge retards sediment deposition in the forestlands’ base as well as the formation of forestlands. The increase in water flow during monsoon on some occasions results in erosion of the fragile forestlands. Landsat Satellite data from the 1970s to 2000s revealed a non-significant decrease in the forestlands of total Sundarbans by 1.1% which for the 6017 km2 BSMF is equivalent to 66 km2. In another report from around the same time, the estimated total forestland loss was approximately 127 km2. The Sundarbans has had great influence on local freshwater environments, facilitating profuse growth of Heritiera fomes (sundri, the tallest (at over 15 m and most commercially important plant, but now has more polyhaline areas threatening the sundri, affecting growth and distribution of other mangroves and biota. Landsat images and GIS data

  17. Aboveground biomass of three conifers in the Qianyanzhou plantation, Jiangxi Province, China

    Xuanran LI; Qijing LIU; Yongrui CHEN; Lile HU; Fengting YANG

    2008-01-01

    Regressive models of the aboveground bio-mass for three conifers in subtropical China-slash pine (Pinus elliottii), Masson pine (P. massoniana) andChinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata)-were established. Regression analysis of leaf biomass and total biomass of each branch against branch diameter (d), branch length (L), d3 and d2L was conducted with functions of linear, power and exponent. A power law equation with a single parameter (d) was proved to be better than the rest for Masson pine and Chinese fir, and a linear equation with parameter (d3) is better for slash pine. The canopy biomass was derived by adopting the regression equa-tions to all branches of each individual tree. These kinds of equations were also used to fit the relationship between total tree biomass, branch biomass, foliage biomass and tree diameter at breast height (D), tree height (H), D3 and D2H, respectively. D2H was found to be the best parameter for estimating total biomass. However, for foliage biomass and branch biomass, both parameters and equation forms showed some differences among species. Correlations were highly significant (P<0.001) for foliage biomass, branch biomass and total biomass, among which the equation of the total biomass was the highest. With these equations, the aboveground biomass of Masson pine forest, slash pine forest and Chinese fir forest were estimated, in addition to the allocation of aboveground biomass. The above-ground biomass of Masson pine forest, slash pine forest and Chinese fir forest was 83.6, 72.1 and 59 t/hm2 respectively, and the stem biomass was more than the foliage biomass and the branch biomass. The under-ground biomass of these three forests which estimated with others' research were 10.44, 9.42 and 11.48 t/hm2, and the amount of carbon-fixed were 47.94, 45.14 and 37.52 t/hm2, respectively.

  18. Aboveground vertebrate and invertebrate herbivore impact on net N mineralization in subalpine grasslands.

    Risch, Anita C; Schotz, Martin; Vandegehuchte, Martijn L; Van Der Putten, Wim H; Duyts, Henk; Raschein, Ursina; Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J; Busse, Matt D; Page-dumroese, Deborah S; Zimmermann, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Aboveground herbivores have strong effects on grassland nitrogen (N) cycling. They can accelerate or slow down soil net N mineralization depending on ecosystem productivity and grazing intensity. Yet, most studies only consider either ungulates or invertebrate herbivores, but not the combined effect of several functionally different vertebrate and invertebrate herbivore species or guilds. We assessed how a diverse herbivore community affects net N mineralization in subalpine grasslands. By using size-selective fences, we progressively excluded large, medium, and small mammals, as well as invertebrates from two vegetation types, and assessed how the exclosure types (ET) affected net N mineralization. The two vegetation types differed in long-term management (centuries), forage quality, and grazing history and intensity. To gain a more mechanistic understanding of how herbivores affect net N mineralization, we linked mineralization to soil abiotic (temperature; moisture; NO3-, NH4+, and total inorganic N concentrations/pools; C, N, P concentrations; pH; bulk density), soil biotic (microbial biomass; abundance of collembolans, mites, and nematodes) and plant (shoot and root biomass; consumption; plant C, N, and fiber content; plant N pool) properties. Net N mineralization differed between ET, but not between vegetation types. Thus, short-term changes in herbivore community composition and, therefore, in grazing intensity had a stronger effect on net N mineralization than long-term management and grazing history. We found highest N mineralization values when only invertebrates were present, suggesting that mammals had a negative effect on net N mineralization. Of the variables included in our analyses, only mite abundance and aboveground plant biomass explained variation in net N mineralization among ET. Abundances of both mites and leaf-sucking invertebrates were positively correlated with aboveground plant biomass, and biomass increased with progressive exclusion

  19. Applications of above-ground gas stores. Demand-oriented supply; Einsatzmoeglichkeiten von Obertagespeichern. Kundenorientierte Bedarfsdeckung

    Deschkan, Peter [Wien Energie Speicher GmbH, Wien (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    From the view of municipal utilities in Austria, the applications and uses of above-ground gas stores have changed considerably during the past few years as a result of the deregulation of the natural gas markets. While it used to be normal to consider spherical or tubular natural gas reservoirs as part of the gas grid, new legal and commercial aspects have since then come to the fore and must be taken into account if these niche products of the natural gas store market are to be used successfully. (orig.)

  20. BiodivERsA project VineDivers: Analysing interlinkages between soil biota and biodiversity-based ecosystem services in vineyards across Europe

    Zaller, Johann G.; Winter, Silvia; Strauss, Peter; Querner, Pascal; Kriechbaum, Monika; Pachinger, Bärbel; Gómez, José A.; Campos, Mercedes; Landa, Blanca; Popescu, Daniela; Comsa, Maria; Iliescu, Maria; Tomoiaga, Liliana; Bunea, Claudiu-Ioan; Hoble, Adela; Marghitas, Liviu; Rusu, Teodor; Lora, Ángel; Guzmán, Gema; Bergmann, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Essential ecosystem services provided by viticultural landscapes result from diverse communities of above- and belowground organisms and their interactions. For centuries traditional viticulture was part of a multifunctional agricultural system including low-input grasslands and fruit trees resulting in a high functional biodiversity. However, in the last decades intensification and mechanisation of vineyard management caused a separation of production and conservation areas. As a result of management intensification including frequent tilling and/or use of pesticides several ecosystem services are affected leading to high rates of soil erosion, degradation of soil structure and fertility, contamination of groundwater and high levels of agricultural inputs. In this transdisciplinary BiodivERsA project we will examine to what extent differently intensive managed vineyards affect the activity and diversity of soil biota (e.g. earthworms, collembola, soil microorganisms) and how this feed back on aboveground biodiversity (e.g. weeds, pollinators). We will also investigate ecosystem services associated with soil faunal activity and biodiversity such as soil structure, the formation of stable soil aggregates, water infiltration, soil erosion as well as grape quality. These effects will become increasingly important as more extreme precipitation events are predicted with climate change. The socio-economic part of the project will investigate the role of diversely structured, species-rich viticultural landscapes as a cultural heritage providing aesthetic values for human well-being and recreation. The project objectives will be analysed at plot, field (vineyard) and landscape scales in vineyards located in Spain, France, Romania and Austria. A detailed engagement and dissemination plan for stakeholder at the different governance levels will accompany scientific research and will contribute to the implementation of best-practice recommendations for policy and farmers.

  1. Observation of radionuclides in marine biota off the coast of Fukushima prefecture after TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Monitoring and surveying radioactivity in seawater and biota in the marine environment off the coast of Fukushima prefecture in the Pacific are important for understanding the dispersion of artificial radionuclides after TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1NPP) accident. Marine biota were collected in the coastal area of Fukushima prefecture after this accident due to investigate the activities of 134Cs, 137Cs, and 110mAg in marine biota, including not only fish and shellfish but also benthos. It is well known that 108mAg, one of the radioactive isotopes of Ag, was observed in some kinds of squid and octopus before this accident. As the results, 110mAg was observed in many kinds of marine biota off the coastal area of Fukushima. It is suggested that rapid change in the radioactivities in seawater, resuspension of particles from sediments and food chain effects led to high radionuclide activities in marine biota after this accident. (author)

  2. Concordant biogeographic patterns among multiple taxonomic groups in the Mexican freshwater biota.

    Benjamín Quiroz-Martínez

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the degree of concordance in species richness and taxonomic distinctness (diversity patterns among different freshwater taxonomic groups in order to test three long held patterns described in Mexican freshwater biogeography: 1. The aquatic biota of Mexico includes two distinct faunas, a rich Neotropical component in the south and a south-eastern region and a less rich Nearctic component towards central and northern latitudes of the country. 2. A hotspot of species richness and diversity has been recorded in the Usumacinta, including the Yucatan Peninsula. 3. The presence of two distinct biotas in Mexico, an eastern one distributed along the Gulf of Mexico slope, and a western one associated to the Pacific versant. We use species richness and taxonomic distinctness to explore patterns of diversity and how these patterns change between zoogeographical regions. This paper points out a clear separation between Neotropical and Nearctic drainage basins but also between eastern (Gulf of Mexico and western (Pacific drainage basins. Present data gives additional empirical support from freshwater biota for three long held beliefs regarding distributional patterns of the Mexican biota. The neotropical basins of Mexico are generally host to a richest and more diversified fauna, that includes more families, genera and species, compared to the less rich and less diverse fauna in the nearctic basins.

  3. The uptake of radiationless by some fresh water aquatic biota review

    The work presented in this paper reviews many studies carried out by the authors along the last thirty years. The behaviour of the radionuclides in the aquatic ecology of Ismailia Canal stream is of great interest for the evaluation of the possible hazards that may occur to man through the movement of such radionuclides via food chain. Laboratory investigations have been carried out in order to understand the accumulation and release of some radionuclide by some aquatic biota (aquatic macrophyte aquatic plants, some snails species and some fish species) inhabiting this fresh water stream. Different parameters such as water ph, contact time, water salinity, etc. were used in these investigations. The kinetic analysis of the uptake process of some radio nuclides by certain biota was performed. From this analysis, it was possible (through the statistical methods) to investigate that the uptake process proceeded through different steps with different rates depending on the radionuclide and the biota species. It was possible to conclude that some of the selected biota can be used as biological indicators for certain radionuclides

  4. Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung coastal area

    Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been intensively studied due to the accumulation of radionuclides in marine ecosystem. Manjung area is affected by rapid population growth and socio-economic development such as heavy industrial activities including coal fired power plant, iron foundries, port development and factories, agricultural runoff, waste and toxic discharge from factories.It has radiological risk and toxic effect when effluent from the industries in the area containing radioactive materials either being transported to the atmosphere and deposited back over the land or by run off to the river and flow into coastal area and being absorbed by marine biota. Radionuclides presence in the marine ecosystem can be adversely affect human health when it enters the food chain. This study is focusing on the radionuclides [thorium (Th), uranium (U), radium-226 (226Ra), radium-228 (228Ra) and potassium-40 (40K)] content in marine biota and sea water from Manjung coastal area. Five species of marine biota including Johnius dussumieri (Ikan Gelama), Pseudorhombus malayanus (Ikan Sebelah), Arius maculatus (Ikan Duri), Portunus pelagicus (Ketam Renjong) and Charybdis natator (Ketam Salib) were collected during rainy and dry seasons. Measurements were carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICPMS). The results show that the concentration of radionuclides varies depends on ecological environment of respective marine biota species. The concentrations and activity concentrations are used for the assessment of potential internal hazard index (Hin), transfer factor (TF), ingestion dose rate (D) and health risk index (HRI) to monitor radiological risk for human consumption

  5. Contaminant Assessment of Biota and Sediments in the Albermarle-Pamlico region

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a baseline contaminants study of the aquatic biota and sediments in the Albemarle-Pamlico region in 1987-88. Sites in...

  6. Assessment of doses and risk due to natural radionuclides in edible biota of Domiasiat, Meghalaya.

    Kumar, N; Chaturvedi, S S; Jha, S K

    2012-07-01

    A radiation dose assessment exercise was carried out for the edible biota Solanum nigrum, Carica papaya, Raphnus sativum and Phaseolus domesticus due to naturally available radionuclides (40)K, (238)U and (232)Th in the Domiasiat area in Meghalaya, India. The concentration of radionuclides in biota and corresponding soil was measured by the NaI(Tl) detector having a minimum detection limit (efficiency, 32.4%) and machine counting time of 3000 s. The obtained transfer factor for (40)K was 0.3061, 0.7163, 0.1988 and 0.1279, for (232)Th 0.0003, 2.22E-05, 2.71E-05 and 3.45E-05 and for (238)U 1.46E-05, 9.73E-05, 1.46E-05 and 3.11E-05 (ratio) in each biota, respectively. The detailed physiological and morphological study of the biota was carried out. The point source dose distribution (source↔target) hypothesis was applied for the radiation absorbed fraction. The generated data were modelled using FASSET and obtained un-weighted total dose was 1.78E-04, 6.84E-03, 8.46E-03 and 1.73E-04 μGy h(-1), respectively, finally compared with the IAEA and UNSCEAR data set for screening level dose risk assessment. PMID:22155750

  7. Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung coastal area

    Abdullah, Anisa; Hamzah, Zaini; Saat, Ahmad; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-01

    Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been intensively studied due to the accumulation of radionuclides in marine ecosystem. Manjung area is affected by rapid population growth and socio-economic development such as heavy industrial activities including coal fired power plant, iron foundries, port development and factories, agricultural runoff, waste and toxic discharge from factories.It has radiological risk and toxic effect when effluent from the industries in the area containing radioactive materials either being transported to the atmosphere and deposited back over the land or by run off to the river and flow into coastal area and being absorbed by marine biota. Radionuclides presence in the marine ecosystem can be adversely affect human health when it enters the food chain. This study is focusing on the radionuclides [thorium (Th), uranium (U), radium-226 (226Ra), radium-228 (228Ra) and potassium-40 (40K)] content in marine biota and sea water from Manjung coastal area. Five species of marine biota including Johnius dussumieri (Ikan Gelama), Pseudorhombus malayanus (Ikan Sebelah), Arius maculatus (Ikan Duri), Portunus pelagicus (Ketam Renjong) and Charybdis natator (Ketam Salib) were collected during rainy and dry seasons. Measurements were carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICPMS). The results show that the concentration of radionuclides varies depends on ecological environment of respective marine biota species. The concentrations and activity concentrations are used for the assessment of potential internal hazard index (Hin), transfer factor (TF), ingestion dose rate (D) and health risk index (HRI) to monitor radiological risk for human consumption.

  8. Pesticide Interactions with N source and Tillage: Effects on soil biota and ecosystem services

    Jensen, John; Petersen, Søren O; Elsgaard, Lars;

    Pesticide effects on soil biota must be interpreted in the context of the specific management practice, including rotation, fertilization, tillage, and pest control. Tillage, foe example, has been shown to reduce earthworm populations by up to 80%, depending on timing and specific tillage technique...

  9. Effect of long term cropping hybrid sorrel (Rumex patientia x Rumex tianshanicus) on soil biota

    Heděnec, Petr; Novotný, D.; Usťak, S.; Honzík, R.; Váňa, V.; Petříková, V.; Frouz, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, July (2015), s. 92-98. ISSN 0961-9534 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08081 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : basal soil respiration * composition of soil biota * hybrid sorrel * microbial biomass C * specific microbial respiration (qCO2) Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 3.394, year: 2014

  10. Estimating aboveground biomass of broadleaved woody plants in the understory of Florida Keys pine forests

    Sah, J.P.; Ross, M.S.; Koptur, S.; Snyder, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Species-specific allometric equations that provide estimates of biomass from measured plant attributes are currently unavailable for shrubs common to South Florida pine rocklands, where fire plays an important part in shaping the structure and function of ecosystems. We developed equations to estimate total aboveground biomass and fine fuel of 10 common hardwood species in the shrub layer of pine forests of the lower Florida Keys. Many equations that related biomass categories to crown area and height were significant (p Estimates based on species-specific equations indicated clearly that total aboveground shrub biomass and shrub fine fuel increased with time since last fire, but the relationships were non-linear. The relative proportion of biomass constituted by the major species also varied with stand age. Estimates based on mixed-species regressions differed slightly from estimates based on species-specific models, but the former could provide useful approximations in similar forests where species-specific regressions are not yet available. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MS-Based Metabolite Profiling of Aboveground and Root Components of Zingiber mioga and Officinale

    Ji Soo Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zingiber species are members of the Zingiberaceae family, and are widely used for medicinal and food purposes. In this study aboveground and root parts of Zingiber mioga and Zingiber officinale were subjected to metabolite profiling by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS and gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS in order to characterize them by species and parts and also to measure bioactivities. Both primary and secondary metabolites showed clear discrimination in the PCA score plot and PLS-DA by species and parts. Tetrahydrocurcumin, diarylheptanoid, 8-gingerol, and 8-paradol were discriminating metabolites between Z. mioga and Z. officinale that were present in different quantities. Eleven flavonoids, six amino acids, six organic acids, four fatty acids, and gingerenone A were higher in the aboveground parts than the root parts. Antioxidant activities were measured and were highest in the root part of Z. officinale. The relatively high contents of tetrahydrocurcumin, diarylheptanoid, and galanganol C in the root part of Z. officinale showed highly positive correlation with bioactivities based on correlation assay. On the basis of these results, we can suggest different usages of structurally different parts of Zingiber species as food plants.

  12. Study on forest above-ground biomass synergy inversion from GLAS and HJ-1 data

    Fang, Zhou; Cao, Chunxiang; Ji, Wei; Xu, Min; Chen, Wei

    2012-10-01

    The need exists to develop a systematic approach to inventory and monitor global forests, both for carbon stock evaluation and for land use change analysis. The use of freely available satellite-based data for carbon stock estimation mitigates both the cost and the spatial limitations of field-based techniques. Spaceborne lidar data have been demonstrated as useful for forest aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation over a wide range of biomass values and forest types. However, the application of these data is limited because of their spatially discrete nature. Spaceborne multispectral sensors have been used extensively to estimate AGB, but these methods have been demonstrated as inappropriate for forest structure characterization in high-biomass mature forests. This study uses an integration of ICESat Geospatial Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) lidar and HJ-1 satellites data to develop methods to estimate AGB in an area of Qilian Mountains, Northwest China. Considering the study area belongs to mountainous terrain, the difficulties of this article are how to extract canopy height from GLAS waveform metrics. Combining with HJ-1 data and ground survey data of the study area, we establish forest biomass estimation model for the GLAS data based on BP neural network model. In order to estimate AGB, the training sample data includes the canopy height extracted from GLAS, LAI, vegetation coverage and several kinds of vegetation indices from HJ-1 data. The results of forest aboveground biomass are very close to the fields measured results, and are consistent with land cover data in the spatial distribution.

  13. Deep Neural Networks for Above-Ground Detection in Very High Spatial Resolution Digital Elevation Models

    Marmanis, D.; Adam, F.; Datcu, M.; Esch, T.; Stilla, U.

    2015-03-01

    Deep Learning techniques have lately received increased attention for achieving state-of-the-art results in many classification problems, including various vision tasks. In this work, we implement a Deep Learning technique for classifying above-ground objects within urban environments by using a Multilayer Perceptron model and VHSR DEM data. In this context, we propose a novel method called M-ramp which significantly improves the classifier's estimations by neglecting artefacts, minimizing convergence time and improving overall accuracy. We support the importance of using the M-ramp model in DEM classification by conducting a set of experiments with both quantitative and qualitative results. Precisely, we initially train our algorithm with random DEM tiles and their respective point-labels, considering less than 0.1% over the test area, depicting the city center of Munich (25 km2). Furthermore with no additional training, we classify two much larger unseen extents of the greater Munich area (424 km2) and Dongying city, China (257 km2) and evaluate their respective results for proving knowledge-transferability. Through the use of M-ramp, we were able to accelerate the convergence by a magnitude of 8 and achieve a decrease in above-ground relative error by 24.8% and 5.5% over the different datasets.

  14. Distinguishing geology from biology in the Ediacaran Doushantuo biota relaxes constraints on the timing of the origin of bilaterians.

    Cunningham, John A; Thomas, Ceri-Wyn; Bengtson, Stefan; Kearns, Stuart L; Xiao, Shuhai; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2012-06-22

    The Ediacaran Doushantuo biota has yielded fossils that include the oldest widely accepted record of the animal evolutionary lineage, as well as specimens with alleged bilaterian affinity. However, these systematic interpretations are contingent on the presence of key biological structures that have been reinterpreted by some workers as artefacts of diagenetic mineralization. On the basis of chemistry and crystallographic fabric, we characterize and discriminate phases of mineralization that reflect: (i) replication of original biological structure, and (ii) void-filling diagenetic mineralization. The results indicate that all fossils from the Doushantuo assemblage preserve a complex mélange of mineral phases, even where subcellular anatomy appears to be preserved. The findings allow these phases to be distinguished in more controversial fossils, facilitating a critical re-evaluation of the Doushantuo fossil assemblage and its implications as an archive of Ediacaran animal diversity. We find that putative subcellular structures exhibit fabrics consistent with preservation of original morphology. Cells in later developmental stages are not in original configuration and are therefore uninformative concerning gastrulation. Key structures used to identify Doushantuo bilaterians can be dismissed as late diagenetic artefacts. Therefore, when diagenetic mineralization is considered, there is no convincing evidence for bilaterians in the Doushantuo assemblage. PMID:22319125

  15. Isotope-aided studies of residue/biota interactions

    Current trends in population, demands per capita and land use imply a continuing need and growing use of agrochemicals, especially in developing countries. Studies of the nature, magnitude and persistence of agrochemical residues that find their way into food, the environment and non-target organisms are now an internationally recognized prerequisite for acceptable use. Isotope techniques play a vital role in these studies, as conventional tracers and as monitoring tools for both intended effects and non-intended side effects. They often provide the only effective technique for the detection and characterization of 'bound' residues in soils or plants, which would not be included in conventional chemical analysis based on solvent extraction. Isotope techniques, like all others, have their limitations and certain pitfalls exist. The latter are largely due to an inadequate understanding of the isotope behaviour or biochemistry of the system being studied. It is important to recognize the possibility of effective isotope exchange reactions, whether studying radioisotopically labelled pesticides or 15N-labelled fertilizers. Extensive literature now exists on the fate of agrochemical residues. This indicates that all agrochemical residues tend to undergo chemical modification, biodegradation, dispersion, etc., but some halogenated ring structures appear to be relatively intractable. When considering the significance of known residues it is important to distinguish between acute toxicological effects indicated in the laboratory and the longer term effects on field populations of both 'target' and 'non-target' organisms. The phenomena of pest resistance to pesticides have important implications in this context. (author)

  16. Fate of 60Co and 134Cs added to the hypolimnion of a Canadian Shield lake: accumulation in biota

    The addition of 60Co and 134Cs to the anaerobic hypolimnion of a thermally stratified Canadian Shield lake in summer initially isolated the exposure of biota to only zooplankton that undergo vertical migration into this region of the lake. Once the radionuclides became mixed throughout the water column with autumn turnover, other biota were exposed to the radionuclides. In general, 60Co concentrations in biota were low because of the rapid loss to the sediments. Exceptions were for initial 60Co concentrations in filter-feeders (cladocerans and clams) during autumn turnover. Concentrations of 134CS were higher in biota the following spring and summer, reflecting the tendency of 134Cs to remain in the water column. Concentrations of 134Cs still continued to increase in forage fish 1 year following the radionuclide addition. The addition of radionuclides to the hypolimnion resulted in higher concentrations in forage fish than when added to the epilimnion. Radionuclide concentrations in biota varied with taxon and were greatest in periphyton. This study demonstrates that radionuclides that may enter the bottom waters of a lake as a result of nuclear fuel waste disposal will be available to biota and result in a radiation dose to aquatic biota and to humans via the water-fish-human pathway. (author)

  17. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar age for the Jehol Biota

    Chang, S.; Zhang, H.; Renne, P. R.; Fang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Abundant fossils of the terrestrial Jehol Biota, including plants, insects, dinosaurs, birds, mammals and freshwater invertebrates, were discovered from the Yixian Formation and the overlying Jiufotang Formation in Inner Mongolia, Hebei Province and Liaoning Province, northeastern China. Because of the exceptional preservation of fossils, the Jehol Biota is one of the most important Mesozoic fossil outcrops and referred to as a "Mesozoic Pompeii". The Jehol Biota has provided a rare opportunity to address questions about the origin of birds, the evolution of feathers and flight, the early diversification of angiosperms and the timing of the radiation of placental mammals. The Tuchengzi Formation, which lies unconformably just below the Yixian Formation and consists mainly of variegated sandstones, is less fossiliferous than the two overlying formations. However, dinosaur tracks, silicified wood and compressed plants are found in this formation. A systematic 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations was undertaken to provide a framework for understanding the timing and duration of the Jehol Biota and evolutionary events represented within it. Furthermore, determining the absolute age of the Tuchengzi Formation provides information to interpret abundant dinosaur tracks within and provide better age constrains for the beginning of the Jehol Biota. Here we present robust high-precision 40Ar/39Ar data for six tuff samples and two basalt samples collected from the Tuchengzi, the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations near the classic outcrops in western Liaoning, NE China. We obtain an age of 139.5 ± 1.0 Ma for the uppermost Tuchengzi Formation, an age of 129.7 ± 0.5 Ma for a basaltic lava from the bottom of the Yixian Formation and an age of 122.1 ± 0.3 Ma for a tuff from the base of the overlying Jiufotang Formation. Our data indicate that the Yixian Formation was deposited during the Early Cretaceous, the Barremian to early Aptian, within a time span

  18. Open minded and open access : introducing NeoBiota,a new peer-reviewed journal of biological invasions

    Ingolf Kühn; Ingo Kowarik; Johannes Kollmann; Uwe Starfinger; Sven Bacher; Tim Blackburn; Ramiro Bustamante; Laura Celesti-Grapow; Milan Chytrý; Robert Colautti; Franz Essl; Llewellyn Foxcroft; Stephan Gollasch; Emili García-Berthou; José Hierro

    2011-01-01

    The Editorial presents the focus, scope, policies, and the inaugural issue of NeoBiota, a new open access peer-reviewed journal of biological invasions. The new journal NeoBiota is a continuation of the former NEOBIOTA publication series. The journal will deal with all aspects of invasion biology and impose no restrictions on manuscript size neither on use of color. NeoBiota implies an XML-based editorial workflow and several cutting-edge innovations in publishing and dissemination, such as s...

  19. Estimating aboveground biomass for broadleaf woody plants and young conifers in Sierra Nevada, California forests.

    McGinnis, Thomas W.; Shook, Christine D.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of biomass is fundamental to a wide range of research and natural resource management goals. An accurate estimation of plant biomass is essential to predict potential fire behavior, calculate carbon sequestration for global climate change research, assess critical wildlife habitat, and so forth. Reliable allometric equations from simple field measurements are necessary for efficient evaluation of plant biomass. However, allometric equations are not available for many common woody plant taxa in the Sierra Nevada. In this report, we present more than 200 regression equations for the Sierra Nevada western slope that relate crown diameter, plant height, crown volume, stem diameter, and both crown diameter and height to the dry weight of foliage, branches, and entire aboveground biomass. Destructive sampling methods resulted in regression equations that accurately predict biomass from one or two simple, nondestructive field measurements. The tables presented here will allow researchers and natural resource managers to easily choose the best equations to fit their biomass assessment needs.

  20. Statewide Mapping of Aboveground Biomass by Integrating Airborne Lidar Data and National Forestry Inventory Plots

    Chen, Q.; McRoberts, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The freely available airborne lidar data at the sub-national level in the United States provide unprecedented opportunities for mapping large-area yet accurate information about vegetation structure, biomass, and carbon. However, the challenge of processing massive lidar data and extracting useful information is huge. This study is to conduct a statewide mapping study of aboveground biomass (AGB) by integrating airborne lidar data and FIA (Forest Inventory and Analysis) plot data for the whole state of Minnesota. We will share our experience and lessons in issues including 1) automatic generation of Digital Terrain Model from point cloud, 2) classification of vegetation returns, 3) calculation of AGB from FIA plots using different allometric models, 4) statistical modeling of AGB by integrating with FIA plots, and 5) assessing the uncertainty of mapped AGB.

  1. A first map of tropical Africa's above-ground biomass derived from satellite imagery

    Observations from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) were used in combination with a large data set of field measurements to map woody above-ground biomass (AGB) across tropical Africa. We generated a best-quality cloud-free mosaic of MODIS satellite reflectance observations for the period 2000-2003 and used a regression tree model to predict AGB at 1 km resolution. Results based on a cross-validation approach show that the model explained 82% of the variance in AGB, with a root mean square error of 50.5 Mg ha-1 for a range of biomass between 0 and 454 Mg ha-1. Analysis of lidar metrics from the Geoscience Laser Altimetry System (GLAS), which are sensitive to vegetation structure, indicate that the model successfully captured the regional distribution of AGB. The results showed a strong positive correlation (R2 = 0.90) between the GLAS height metrics and predicted AGB.

  2. Estimating Stand Volume and Above-Ground Biomass of Urban Forests Using LiDAR

    Vincenzo Giannico

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessing forest stand conditions in urban and peri-urban areas is essential to support ecosystem service planning and management, as most of the ecosystem services provided are a consequence of forest stand characteristics. However, collecting data for assessing forest stand conditions is time consuming and labor intensive. A plausible approach for addressing this issue is to establish a relationship between in situ measurements of stand characteristics and data from airborne laser scanning (LiDAR. In this study we assessed forest stand volume and above-ground biomass (AGB in a broadleaved urban forest, using a combination of LiDAR-derived metrics, which takes the form of a forest allometric model. We tested various methods for extracting proxies of basal area (BA and mean stand height (H from the LiDAR point-cloud distribution and evaluated the performance of different models in estimating forest stand volume and AGB. The best predictors for both models were the scale parameters of the Weibull distribution of all returns (except the first (proxy of BA and the 95th percentile of the distribution of all first returns (proxy of H. The R2 were 0.81 (p < 0.01 for the stand volume model and 0.77 (p < 0.01 for the AGB model with a RMSE of 23.66 m3·ha−1 (23.3% and 19.59 Mg·ha−1 (23.9%, respectively. We found that a combination of two LiDAR-derived variables (i.e., proxy of BA and proxy of H, which take the form of a forest allometric model, can be used to estimate stand volume and above-ground biomass in broadleaved urban forest areas. Our results can be compared to other studies conducted using LiDAR in broadleaved forests with similar methods.

  3. Belowground interactions with aboveground consequences: Invasive earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Paudel, Shishir; Longcore, Travis; MacDonald, Beau; McCormick, Melissa K; Szlavecz, Katalin; Wilson, Gail W T; Loss, Scot R

    2016-03-01

    A mounting body of research suggests that invasive nonnative earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about (1) the mechanisms behind earthworms' effects on AMF and (2) the factors that determine the outcomes of earthworm-AMF interactions (i.e., whether AMF abundance is increased or decreased and subsequent effects on plants). We predict that AMF-mediated effects of nonnative earthworms on ecosystems are nearly universal because (1) AMF are important components of most terrestrial ecosystems, (2) nonnative earthworms have become established in nearly every type of terrestrial ecosystem, and (3) nonnative earthworms, due to their burrowing and feeding behavior, greatly affect AMF with potentially profound concomitant effects on plant communities. We highlight the multiple direct and indirect effects of nonnative earthworms on plants and review what is currently known about the interaction between earthworms and AMF. We also illustrate how the effects of nonnative earthworms on plant-AMF mutualisms can alter the structure and stability of aboveground plant communities, as well as the vertebrate communities relying on these habitats. Integrative studies that assess the interactive effects of earthworms and AMF can provide new insights into the role that belowground ecosystem engineers play in altering aboveground ecological processes. Understanding these processes may improve our ability to predict the structure of plant and animal communities in earthworm-invaded regions and to develop management strategies that limit the numerous undesired impacts of earthworms. PMID:27197388

  4. Controls over aboveground forest carbon density on Barro Colorado Island, Panama

    J. Mascaro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of tropical forests to the global carbon cycle, ecological controls over landscape-level variation in live aboveground carbon density (ACD in tropical forests are poorly understood. Here, we conducted a spatially comprehensive analysis of ACD variation for a mainland tropical forest – Barro Colorado Island, Panama (BCI – and tested site factors that may control such variation. We mapped ACD over 98% of BCI (~1500 ha using airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR, which was well-correlated with ground-based measurements of ACD in Panamanian forests of various ages (r2 = 0.77, RMSE = 29 Mg C ha−1, P < 0.0001. We used multiple regression to examine controls over LiDAR-derived ACD, including slope angle, bedrock, soil texture, and forest age. Collectively, these variables explained 14% of the variation in ACD at 30-m resolution, and explained 33% at 100-m resolution. At all resolutions, slope (linked to underlying bedrock variation was the strongest driving factor; standing carbon stocks were generally higher on steeper slopes, where erosion rates tend to exceed weathering rates, compared to gentle slopes, where weathering in place produces deep, oxic soils. This result suggests that physiography may be more important in controlling ACD variation in Neotropical forests than currently thought. Although BCI has been largely undisturbed by humans for a century, past land-use over approximately half of the island still influences ACD variation, with younger forests (80–130 years old averaging ~15% less carbon storage than old-growth forests (>400 years old. If other regions of relatively old tropical secondary forests also store less carbon aboveground than primary forests, the effects on the global carbon cycle could be substantial and difficult to detect with satellite monitoring.

  5. Effect of stand structure on models for volume and aboveground biomass assessment (Castelfusano pinewood, Roma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research was to analyse the effects of stand structure on biomass allocation and on the accurancy of estimation models for volume and aboveground biomass of Italian stone pine (Pinus pinea L.. Although the species is widely distributed on Mediterranean coasts, few studies on forest biomass estimation have focused on pinewoods. The research was carried out in the Castelfusano’s pinewood (Rome and concerned the two most common structural types: (a 50 years-old pinewood originated by broadcast seeding; and (b 62 years-old pinewood originated by partial seeding alternating worked strips to firm strips. Some 83 sample trees were selected for stem volume estimation and a subset of 32 trees used to quantify the total epigeous biomass, the wooden biomass compartment, including stem and big branches (diameter > 3 cm and the photosynthetic biomass, including thin branches (diameter < 3 cm and needles. Collected data were used to elaborate allometric relations for stem volume, total biomass and specific relations for both compartments, based on one (d2 or two (d2h indipendent variables, for both structural types. Furthermore, pinewood specific biomass expansion factors (BEF - indexes used to estimate carbon stocks starting from stem biomass data - were obtained. The achieved estimation models were subjected to both parallelism and coincidence tests, showing significant effects of stand structure on the accurancy of the allometric relations. The effects of stand structure and reliability of tree height curves on the accurancy of estimation models for volume and aboveground biomass and on biomass allocation in different compartments are analysed and discussed.

  6. A National, Detailed Map of Forest Aboveground Carbon Stocks in Mexico

    Oliver Cartus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A spatially explicit map of aboveground carbon stored in Mexico’s forests was generated from empirical modeling on forest inventory and spaceborne optical and radar data. Between 2004 and 2007, the Mexican National Forestry Commission (CONAFOR established a network of ~26,000 permanent inventory plots in the frame of their national inventory program, the Inventario Nacional Forestal y de Suelos (INFyS. INFyS data served as model response for spatially extending the field-based estimates of carbon stored in the aboveground live dry biomass to a wall-to-wall map, with 30 × 30 m2 pixel posting using canopy density estimates derived from Landsat, L-Band radar data from ALOS PALSAR, as well as elevation information derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM data set. Validation against an independent set of INFyS plots resulted in a coefficient of determination (R2 of 0.5 with a root mean square error (RMSE of 14 t∙C/ha in the case of flat terrain. The validation for different forest types showed a consistently low estimation bias (<3 t∙C/ha and R2s in the range of 0.5 except for mangroves (R2 = 0.2. Lower accuracies were achieved for forests located on steep slopes (>15° with an R2 of 0.34. A comparison of the average carbon stocks computed from: (a the map; and (b statistical estimates from INFyS, at the scale of ~650 km2 large hexagons (R2 of 0.78, RMSE of 5 t∙C/ha and Mexican states (R2 of 0.98, RMSE of 1.4 t∙C/ha, showed strong agreement.

  7. Mapping aboveground forest biomass combining dendrometric data and spectral signature of forest species

    Avocat, H.; Tourneux, F.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measures and explicit spatial representations of forest biomass compose an important aspect to model the forest productivity and crops, and to implement sustainable forest management. Several methods have been developed to estimate and to map forest biomass, combining point-sources measurements of biophysical variables such as diameter-at-breast height (DBH), tree height, crown size, crown length, crown volume and remote sensing data (spectral vegetation index values). In this study, we propose a new method for aboveground biomass (AGB) mapping of forests and isolated trees. This method is tested on a 1100 km2 area located in the eastern France. In contrast to most of studies, our model is not calibrated using field plot measurements or point-source inventory data. The primary goal of this model is to propose an accessible and reproducible method for AGB mapping of temperate forests, by combining standard biomass values coming from bibliography and remotely sensed data. This method relies on three steps. (1) The first step consists of produce a map of wooded areas including small woods and isolated trees, and to identify the major forest stands. To do this, we use an unsupervised classification of a Landsat 7 ETM+ image. Results are compared and improved with various land cover data. (2) The second step consists of extract the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values of main forest stands. (3) Finally, these values are combined with standard AGB values provided by bibliography, to calibrate four AGB estimation models of different forest types (broadleaves, coniferous, coppices, and mixed stands). This method provides a map of aboveground biomass for forests and isolated trees with a 30 meters spatial resolution. Results demonstrate that 71 % of AGB values for hardwoods vary between 143 and 363 t.ha-1, i.e. × 1 standard deviation around the average. For coniferous stands, most of values of AGB range from 167 to 256 t.ha-1.

  8. Comparative uptake of uranium, thorium, and plutonium by biota inhabiting a contaminated Tennessee floodplain

    The uptake of 238U, 232Th, and 239Pu from soil by fescue, grasshoppers, and small mammals was compared at the contaminated White Oak Creek floodplain in East Tennessee. Comparisons of actinide uptake were based on analyses of radionuclide ratios (U/Pu and Th/Pu) in soil and biota. U:Pu ratios in small mammal carcasses (shrews, mice, and rats) and bone samples from larger mammals (rabbit, woodchuck, opossum, and raccoon) were significantly greater (P less than or equal to 0.05) than U/Pu ratios in soil (based on 8M HNO3 extractable). There was no significant difference between Th/Pu ratios in animals and soil. The order of actinide accumulation by biota from the site relative to contaminated soil was U > Th approx. = Pu

  9. Comparative uptake of uranium, thorium, and plutonium by biota inhabiting a contaminated Tennessee floodplain

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Bondietti, E.A.; Walker, R.L.

    1981-04-01

    The uptake of /sup 238/U, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 239/Pu from soil by fescue, grasshoppers, and small mammals was compared at the contaminated White Oak Creek floodplain in East Tennessee. Comparisons of actinide uptake were based on analyses of radionuclide ratios (U/Pu and Th/Pu) in soil and biota. U:Pu ratios in small mammal carcasses (shrews, mice, and rats) and bone samples from larger mammals (rabbit, woodchuck, opossum, and raccoon) were significantly greater (P less than or equal to 0.05) than U/Pu ratios in soil (based on 8M HNO/sub 3/ extractable). There was no significant difference between Th/Pu ratios in animals and soil. The order of actinide accumulation by biota from the site relative to contaminated soil was U > Th approx. = Pu.

  10. Methods for calculating dose conversion coefficients for terrestrial and aquatic biota

    Plants and animals may be exposed to ionizing radiation from radionuclides in the environment. This paper describes the underlying data and assumptions to assess doses to biota due to internal and external exposure for a wide range of masses and shapes living in various habitats. A dosimetric module is implemented which is a user-friendly and flexible possibility to assess dose conversion coefficients for aquatic and terrestrial biota. The dose conversion coefficients have been derived for internal and various external exposure scenarios. The dosimetric model is linked to radionuclide decay and emission database, compatible with the ICRP Publication 38, thus providing a capability to compute dose conversion coefficients for any nuclide from the database and its daughter nuclides. The dosimetric module has been integrated into the ERICA Tool, but it can also be used as a stand-alone version

  11. A method for calculation of dose per unit concentration values for aquatic biota

    A dose per unit concentration database has been generated for application to ecosystem assessments within the FASSET framework. Organisms are represented by ellipsoids of appropriate dimensions, and the proportion of radiation absorbed within the organisms is calculated using a numerical method implemented in a series of spreadsheet-based programs. Energy-dependent absorbed fraction functions have been derived for calculating the total dose per unit concentration of radionuclides present in biota or in the media they inhabit. All radionuclides and reference organism dimensions defined within FASSET for marine and freshwater ecosystems are included. The methodology has been validated against more complex dosimetric models and compared with human dosimetry based on ICRP 72. Ecosystem assessments for aquatic biota within the FASSET framework can now be performed simply, once radionuclide concentrations in target organisms are known, either directly or indirectly by deduction from radionuclide concentrations in the surrounding medium

  12. SUPPRESSION ABILITY OF CRUDE EXTRACT DERIVED FROM MARINE BIOTA AGAINST FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM F.SP. VANILLAE

    I Ketut Suada

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to investigate suppression ability of marine biota extracts against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vanillae of vanilla stem rot. Samples were collected at intertidal zones and in the depth of 1-7 m from seven beaches in Bali. Screening of active compounds of biota extracts were conducted using inhibition zone of well diffusion method on Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA. The extract was tested in-vitro in PDA medium using completely randomized design with three replicates. The methanolic extract of Aglaophenia sp. was able to suppress the growth of F. oxysporum f.sp. vanillae effectively, with minimum inhibition concentration (MIC of 0.05 %. The extract inhibited colony growth diameter and total mycelial dry weight.

  13. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group

  14. Can above-ground ecosystem services compensate for reduced fertilizer input and soil organic matter in annual crops?

    van Gils, Stijn; van der Putten, Wim H; Kleijn, David

    2016-01-01

    1.Above-ground and below-ground environmental conditions influence crop yield by pollination, pest pressure, and resource supply. However, little is known about how interactions between these factors contribute to yield. Here, we used oilseed rape Brassica napus to test their effects on crop yield.2

  15. Effect of nitrogen addition and drought on above-ground biomass of expanding tall grasses Calamagrostis epigejos and Arrhenatherum elatius

    Fiala, Karel; Tůma, Ivan; Holub, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 2 (2011), s. 275-281. ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : nitrogen * drought * above-ground biomass Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.557, year: 2011

  16. Aboveground carbon stocks in oil palm plantations and the threshold for carbon-neutral vegetation conversion on mineral soils

    Khasanah, N.; Noordwijk, van M.; Ningsih, H.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon (C) footprint of palm oil production is needed to judge emissions from potential biofuel use. Relevance includes wider sustainable palm oil debates. Within life cycle analysis, aboveground C debt is incurred if the vegetation replaced had a higher C stock than oil palm plantations. Our st

  17. L-Band SAR Backscatter Related to Forest Cover, Height and Aboveground Biomass at Multiple Spatial Scales across Denmark

    Joshi, Neha P.; Mitchard, Edward T A; Schumacher, Johannes;

    2015-01-01

    Mapping forest aboveground biomass (AGB) using satellite data is an important task, particularly for reporting of carbon stocks and changes under climate change legislation. It is known that AGB can be mapped using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), but relationships between AGB and radar backscatter...

  18. Arthropod visual predators in the early pelagic ecosystem: evidence from the Burgess Shale and Chengjiang biotas

    Vannier, J; García-Bellido, D.C.; Hu, S.-X.; Chen, A.-L.

    2009-01-01

    Exceptional fossil specimens with preserved soft parts from the Maotianshan Shale (ca 520 Myr ago) and the Burgess Shale (505 Myr ago) biotas indicate that the worldwide distributed bivalved arthropod Isoxys was probably a non-benthic visual predator. New lines of evidence come from the functional morphology of its powerful prehensile frontal appendages that, combined with large spherical eyes, are thought to have played a key role in the recognition and capture of swimming or epibenthic prey...

  19. Historical records of radioactive contamination in biota at the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site

    Johnson, A.R.; Markes, B.M.; Schmidt, J.W.; Shah, A.N.; Weiss, S.G.; Wilson, K.J.

    1994-06-01

    This document summarizes and reports a literature search of 85 environmental monitoring records of wildlife and vegetation (biota) at the 200 East Area and the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site since 1965. These records were published annually and provided the majority of the data in this report. Additional sources of data have included records of specific facilities, such as site characterization documents and preoperational environmental surveys. These documents have been released for public use. Records before 1965 were still being researched and therefore not included in this document. The intent of compiling these data into a single source was to identify past and current concentrations of radionuclides in biota at specific facilities and waste sites within each operable unit that may be used to help guide cleanup activities in the 200 Areas to be completed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA). The 200 East Area and 200 West Area were the locations of the Hanford Site separation and process facilities and waste management units. For the purposes of this document, a sample was of interest if a Geiger-Mueller counter equipped with a pancake probe-indicated beta/gamma emitting radioactivity above 200 counts per minute (cpm), or if laboratory radioanalyses indicated a radionuclide concentration equaled or exceeded 10 picocuries per gram (pCi/g). About 4,500 individual cases of monitoring for radionuclide uptake or transport in biota in the 200 Areas environs were included in the documents reviewed. About 1,900 (i.e., 42%) of these biota had radionuclide concentrations in excess of 10 pCi/g. These radionuclide transport or uptake cases were distributed among 45 species of wildlife (primarily small mammals and feces) and 30 species of vegetation. The wildlife species most commonly associated with radioactive contamination were the house mouse and the deer mouse and of vegetation species, the Russian thistle.

  20. A Modelling Framework to Assess the Effect of Pressures on River Abiotic Habitat Conditions and Biota.

    Jochem Kail

    Full Text Available River biota are affected by global reach-scale pressures, but most approaches for predicting biota of rivers focus on river reach or segment scale processes and habitats. Moreover, these approaches do not consider long-term morphological changes that affect habitat conditions. In this study, a modelling framework was further developed and tested to assess the effect of pressures at different spatial scales on reach-scale habitat conditions and biota. Ecohydrological and 1D hydrodynamic models were used to predict discharge and water quality at the catchment scale and the resulting water level at the downstream end of a study reach. Long-term reach morphology was modelled using empirical regime equations, meander migration and 2D morphodynamic models. The respective flow and substrate conditions in the study reach were predicted using a 2D hydrodynamic model, and the suitability of these habitats was assessed with novel habitat models. In addition, dispersal models for fish and macroinvertebrates were developed to assess the re-colonization potential and to finally compare habitat suitability and the availability/ability of species to colonize these habitats. Applicability was tested and model performance was assessed by comparing observed and predicted conditions in the lowland Treene River in northern Germany. Technically, it was possible to link the different models, but future applications would benefit from the development of open source software for all modelling steps to enable fully automated model runs. Future research needs concern the physical modelling of long-term morphodynamics, feedback of biota (e.g., macrophytes on abiotic habitat conditions, species interactions, and empirical data on the hydraulic habitat suitability and dispersal abilities of macroinvertebrates. The modelling framework is flexible and allows for including additional models and investigating different research and management questions, e.g., in climate impact

  1. Sustainable management and conservation of biota in agricultural soils of the Republic of Moldova

    Senicovscaia, Irina

    2012-01-01

    In present research the ways and methods of the sustainable management and conservation of the soil biota in the modern agricultural ecosystems of the Republic of Moldova are considered. The database of invertebrates, microorganisms and enzymatic activities of different zonal soils in the long-term field experiments has been developed and constantly is updated with a view to the operative evaluation of the degradation processes and ecological effectiveness of the land management. The current ...

  2. The impact of agricultural practices on soil biota : a regional study

    Ponge, Jean-François; Pérès, Guénola; Guernion, Muriel; Ruiz-Camacho, Nuria; Cortet, Jérôme; Pernin, Céline; Villenave, Cécile; Chaussod, Rémi; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Bispo, Antonio; Cluzeau, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A gradient of agricultural intensification (from permanent meadows to permanent crops, with rotation crops and meadows as intermediary steps) was studied in the course of the RMQS-Biodiv program, covering a regular grid of 109 sites spread over the whole area of French Brittany. Soil biota (earthworms, other macrofauna, microarthropods, nematodes, microorganisms) were sampled according to a standardized procedure, together with visual assessment of a Humus Index. We hypothesized that soil ani...

  3. Biota of a Pennsylvanian muddy coast: habitat within the Mazonian delta complex, northeast Illinois

    Baird, G.C.

    1985-03-01

    The Mazon Creek biota (Westphalian D) is composed of plants and animals from terrestrial fresh water and marginal marine habitats. Fossil animals, including jellyfish, worms, crustaceans, holothurians, insects, chordates, and problematica occur in sideritic concretions on spoilpiles of more than 100 abandoned coal mines in a five county region (Mazon Creek area) of northeast Illinois. These fossils record rapid burial and early diagenesis in a muddy, delta-influenced coastal setting submerged during marine transgression.

  4. Historical records of radioactive contamination in biota at the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site

    This document summarizes and reports a literature search of 85 environmental monitoring records of wildlife and vegetation (biota) at the 200 East Area and the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site since 1965. These records were published annually and provided the majority of the data in this report. Additional sources of data have included records of specific facilities, such as site characterization documents and preoperational environmental surveys. These documents have been released for public use. Records before 1965 were still being researched and therefore not included in this document. The intent of compiling these data into a single source was to identify past and current concentrations of radionuclides in biota at specific facilities and waste sites within each operable unit that may be used to help guide cleanup activities in the 200 Areas to be completed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA). The 200 East Area and 200 West Area were the locations of the Hanford Site separation and process facilities and waste management units. For the purposes of this document, a sample was of interest if a Geiger-Mueller counter equipped with a pancake probe-indicated beta/gamma emitting radioactivity above 200 counts per minute (cpm), or if laboratory radioanalyses indicated a radionuclide concentration equaled or exceeded 10 picocuries per gram (pCi/g). About 4,500 individual cases of monitoring for radionuclide uptake or transport in biota in the 200 Areas environs were included in the documents reviewed. About 1,900 (i.e., 42%) of these biota had radionuclide concentrations in excess of 10 pCi/g. These radionuclide transport or uptake cases were distributed among 45 species of wildlife (primarily small mammals and feces) and 30 species of vegetation. The wildlife species most commonly associated with radioactive contamination were the house mouse and the deer mouse and of vegetation species, the Russian thistle

  5. Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung coastal area

    Abdullah, Anisa, E-mail: coppering@ymail.com; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Saat, Ahmad [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Alias, Masitah [TNB Reasearch Sdn. Bhd., Kawasan Institusi Penyelidikan, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been intensively studied due to the accumulation of radionuclides in marine ecosystem. Manjung area is affected by rapid population growth and socio-economic development such as heavy industrial activities including coal fired power plant, iron foundries, port development and factories, agricultural runoff, waste and toxic discharge from factories.It has radiological risk and toxic effect when effluent from the industries in the area containing radioactive materials either being transported to the atmosphere and deposited back over the land or by run off to the river and flow into coastal area and being absorbed by marine biota. Radionuclides presence in the marine ecosystem can be adversely affect human health when it enters the food chain. This study is focusing on the radionuclides [thorium (Th), uranium (U), radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra), radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra) and potassium-40 ({sup 40}K)] content in marine biota and sea water from Manjung coastal area. Five species of marine biota including Johnius dussumieri (Ikan Gelama), Pseudorhombus malayanus (Ikan Sebelah), Arius maculatus (Ikan Duri), Portunus pelagicus (Ketam Renjong) and Charybdis natator (Ketam Salib) were collected during rainy and dry seasons. Measurements were carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICPMS). The results show that the concentration of radionuclides varies depends on ecological environment of respective marine biota species. The concentrations and activity concentrations are used for the assessment of potential internal hazard index (H{sub in}), transfer factor (TF), ingestion dose rate (D) and health risk index (HRI) to monitor radiological risk for human consumption.

  6. Soil and soil biota in reclaimed and non-reclaimed post mining sites

    Frouz, Jan; Pižl, Václav; Elhottová, Dana

    Lexington : BLRS, 2006, s. 215-220. [Billings Land Reclamation Symposium /10./. Billings (US), 04.06.2006-08.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/01/1055; GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0728; GA AV ČR 1QS600660505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : soil * soil biota * post mining sites Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. TOXIC EFFECT OF PESTICIDES ON THE BIOTA OF FRESHWATER RESERVOIRS OF UKRAINE (A REVIEW)

    N. Kolesnyk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze scientific sources on the studies of toxic and lethal concentrations of pesticides on phytoplankton, zooplankton, zoobenthos and fish in current conditions of Ukraine. Findings. A review of works of a variety of scientists showed that pesticides with different chemical origins have disastrous effects on everyone without the exception of freshwater biota organisms. The article highlights the peculiarities of the toxic effects of pesticides of major chemical groups, whic...

  8. An adaptation of human food chain models to predicting internal exposure of biota: the Faster model

    There is an acknowledged lack of available data to derive parameters describing the transfer of many radionuclides from soil to wild species. Furthermore, many approaches to estimating the internal exposure of biota assume equilibrium transfer from soil to biota. However, as environmental impact assessments may need to be conducted for many scenarios (e.g. chronic or acute releases to air and ground waters) assumptions of equilibrium soil to biota transfer many be neither sufficient nor conservative. Much effort has previously been devoted to derive semi-mechanistic models to enable the transfer of radionuclides through human food chains to be predicted dynamically. A logical first step to addressing the data gaps in our ability to predict internal activity concentrations of biota is to consider adapting these models for wild species. Here we describe the development of a semi-mechanistic model to estimate activity concentrations in wild mammals by adaptation of existing human food chain models. Interception, weathering, plant uptake and soil migration parameters are derived from previously published models or collations such as IAEA Technical Report Series No. 364. Allometric relationships dependent on body mass are used to estimate wild animal parameters including, for most radionuclides, biological half-life. Comparison of predictions with observed data allows limited comment on the validity of model predictions. For instance, predicted Cs values are within observed ranges, and an increase in Cs activity concentrations from prey-carnivore as observed by many authors is predicted. Predicted values for 90Sr, 226Ra and U also appear reasonable whilst those for the actinide elements are low compared with the limited available data. To date a simple source-grass-herbivore-carnivore food chain has been considered; the potential for further development of the model is discussed. (author)

  9. A case study in the Chernobyl exclusion zone - Part 2: predicting radiation induced effects in biota

    In recent years national and international programmes have proposed a number of frameworks and methodologies to assess the protection of wildlife from ionising radiations. Whilst some of these are now being used by national authorities there has been little attempt to rigorously test their predictions against available data. In part this is because there are few sites where radiation induced effects have been observed. The Chernobyl exclusion zone represents a site where assessment framework predictions from exposure through to effects can be thoroughly tested. In a separate paper, we have tested predictions of terrestrial radionuclide transfer models developed within the EC FP5 project FASSET against available radionuclide activity concentration database for terrestrial biota in the exclusion zone. In this paper we use the dose conversion factors developed within the FASSET project to estimate internal and external doses to biota within the exclusion zone. The estimated doses are then used to predict effects at different biological levels of organisation using the FASSET Radiation Effects Database (FRED); predicted effects are compared to observed effects within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. The observed effects data for the exclusion zone covers organisms from soil biota through to fish and mammals. Results of the comparison are used to make recommendations for future improvements to assessment frameworks. (author)

  10. The biology and functional morphology of Macoma biota (Bivalvia: Tellinidae: Macominae

    Pedro Ribeiro Piffer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Macoma biota Arruda & Domaneschi, 2005, is a recently described species known only from the intertidal zone of Praia da Cidade, Caraguatatuba Bay, in the state of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. The main purpose of the present paper is to describe the biology of M. biota, beginning with a detailed analysis of its anatomy and functional morphology and how these attributes are correlated with its habitat and life history. The morphology of the organs in the pallial cavity and their sorting devices indicate that this species has efficient mechanisms to process large amounts of particles that enter this cavity via the inhalant current. M. biota can rapidly select the material suitable for ingestion and direct the undesired excess to the rejection mantle tracts. These characteristics along with the siphon's behavior and the digestive tract configuration reveal that this species can be classified primarily as a deposit feeder, like other species of the genus; however, it can also behave as a suspension feeder, depending on the environmental conditions.

  11. Reviewing the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) footprint in the aquatic biota: Uptake, bioaccumulation and ecotoxicology

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are amongst the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. Their presence, already described in different environmental compartments such as wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments, and their remarkable effects on non-target organisms justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. A comprehensive review of the literature data with focus on their footprint in the aquatic biota, namely their uptake, bioaccumulation and both acute and chronic ecotoxicology is presented. Long-term multigenerational exposure studies, at environmental relevant concentrations and in mixtures of related compounds, such as oestrogenic endocrine disruptors, continue to be sparse and are imperative to better know their environmental impact. - Highlights: • Current knowledge of uptake and bioaccumulation of SSRIs. • Ecotoxicology and effects of SSRIs in the aquatic biota. • Identification of existing knowledge gaps. - A comprehensive review focussing SSRIs antidepressants footprint in the aquatic biota, namely their uptake, bioaccumulation, and both acute and chronic ecotoxicology is presented

  12. Radioactivity in produced water from oil and gas installations - doses to biota and humans

    Substantial amounts of produced water containing elevated levels of 226Ra and 228Ra are discharged into the sea as a result of oil and gas production on the Norwegian continental shelf. The average concentration in the discharges is 3.3 and 2.8 Bq/L of 226Ra and 228Ra, respectively. The main objective of the project described in the paper is to establish radiological safe discharge limits for radium, lead and polonium in produced water produced by oil and gas installations on the Norwegian continental shelf. One of the objectives of the study is to provide information to enable risk assessment based on doses from ionizing radiation to marine biota and man. Reference organisms for the North Sea area have been chosen for calculation of absorbed dose to biota. The dose calculations rely on specific knowledge of activity concentration in the reference organism, activity concentration in seawater and sediments, dose conversion factors and time spent at different locations relative to the point of discharge. Based on the calculated doses to marine biota, 'potential no effect concentrations' are recommended. (author)

  13. Concentrations and characteristics of organochlorine pesticides in aquatic biota from Qiantang River in China

    The Qiantang River is a typical river flowing through an agricultural area in China. It was studied in 2006 for its aquatic biota quality by determining 13 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the edible parts of crabs, clams, shrimp, fish, aquatic plants, as well as water and sediments collected from seven sites along its upper reaches all the way downstream. The levels of all insecticides were in the range of 17 ± 13 (water plants), 35 ± 36 (shrimp), 32 ± 14 (crabs), 39 ± 21 (clams), 47±35 (fish) ng/g wet weight (ww) and in the range of 2936 ± 2356 (water plants), 5827 ± 6013 (shrimp), 2102 ± 966 (crabs), 1859 ± 1018 (clams), 3624 ± 11331 (fish) ng/g lipid. DDT and its metabolites were the predominant contaminants in most biota. A linear relationship was observed between the log bio-concentration factor (BCF) and log octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) for fish, clams and shrimp. Composition analyses in various environmental media indicated a recent usage of lindane and dicofol into the river. - OCP residues still exist in aquatic biota from Qiantang River after the ban of OCPs twenty years ago

  14. Non-human biota dose assessment. Sensitivity analysis and knowledge quality assessment

    This report provides a summary of a programme of work, commissioned within the BIOPROTA collaborative forum, to assess the quantitative and qualitative elements of uncertainty associated with biota dose assessment of potential impacts of long-term releases from geological disposal facilities (GDF). Quantitative and qualitative aspects of uncertainty were determined through sensitivity and knowledge quality assessments, respectively. Both assessments focused on default assessment parameters within the ERICA assessment approach. The sensitivity analysis was conducted within the EIKOS sensitivity analysis software tool and was run in both generic and test case modes. The knowledge quality assessment involved development of a questionnaire around the ERICA assessment approach, which was distributed to a range of experts in the fields of non-human biota dose assessment and radioactive waste disposal assessments. Combined, these assessments enabled critical model features and parameters that are both sensitive (i.e. have a large influence on model output) and of low knowledge quality to be identified for each of the three test cases. The output of this project is intended to provide information on those parameters that may need to be considered in more detail for prospective site-specific biota dose assessments for GDFs. Such information should help users to enhance the quality of their assessments and build greater confidence in the results. (orig.)

  15. Making sense of ocean biota: How evolution and biodiversity of land organisms differ from that of the plankton

    Smetacek, V.

    The oceans cover 70% of the planet’s surface, and their planktonic inhabitants generate about half the global primary production, thereby playing a key role in modulating planetary climate via the carbon cycle. The ocean biota have been under...

  16. The effect of cassava-based bioethanol production on above-ground carbon stocks: A case study from Southern Mali

    Increasing energy use and the need to mitigate climate change make production of liquid biofuels a high priority. Farmers respond worldwide to this increasing demand by converting forests and grassland into biofuel crops, but whether biofuels offer carbon savings depends on the carbon emissions that occur when land use is changed to biofuel crops. This paper reports the results of a study on cassava-based bioethanol production undertaken in the Sikasso region in Southern Mali. The paper outlines the estimated impacts on above-ground carbon stocks when land use is changed to increase cassava production. The results show that expansion of cassava production for bioethanol will most likely lead to the conversion of fallow areas to cassava. A land use change from fallow to cassava creates a reduction in the above-ground carbon stocks in the order of 4–13 Mg C ha−1, depending on (a) the age of the fallow, (b) the allometric equation used and (c) whether all trees are removed or the larger, useful trees are preserved. This ‘carbon debt’ associated with the above-ground biomass loss would take 8–25 years to repay if fossil fuels are replaced with cassava-based bioethanol. - Highlights: ► Demands for biofuels make production of cassava-based bioethanol a priority. ► Farmers in Southern Mali are likely to convert fallow areas to cassava production. ► Converting fallow to cassava creates reductions in above-ground carbon stocks. ► Estimates of carbon stock reductions include that farmers preserve useful trees. ► The carbon debt associated with above-ground biomass loss takes 8–25 years to repay.

  17. Preliminary study on the relationships between aboveground storage and remotely sensed data at Pingdong plain afforestation land in Southern Taiwan

    Wei, C.; Chen, J. M.; Yu, J.; Cheng, C.; Lai, Y.; Chiang, P.; Hong, C.; Chang, C.; Wey, T.; Tsai, M.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This research aims on the relationships between LAI and five vegetation index (BR, SRBR, BD, NDVI and TNDVI) from remotely sensed images, in situ measurements and aboveground storage for 10-11yr old plain afforestation (14 species) located at Wanlong farm of subtropical-tropical region at the southern part of Taiwan which originally governed by Taiwan Sugar Corporation. The preliminary results show the aboveground storage is 14.19×9.19 m3 ha-1 and the correlation coefficient between aboveground storage and BR, SRBR, BD, NDVI and TNDVI is 0.331 (p=0.211), 0.317 (p=0.232), 0.310 (p=0.244), 0.714 (p=0.002) and 0.706 (p=0.002) while NDVI performs the best correlation. LAI value using Fisheye or Tracing Radiation and Architecture of Canopies (TRAC) is 0.76×0.37 and 3.89×2.81, respectively. Besides, CI measured by TRAC is 0.83×0.09 and the correlation coefficient with LAI is 0.868 (p<0.001). It shows feasible to estimate aboveground storage using ground investigation incorporating remotely sensed data for young plain afforestation stand. Due to the mixed-plantation and difference between growing and non-growing season at the sample site, the relationship between aboveground storage, LAI and VI is yet to be developed for independent species and may need to modify due to seasonally and inter-annually variation.

  18. Vegetation stands structure and aboveground biomass after the shifting cultivation practices of Karo People in Leuser Ecosystem, North Sumatra

    T. ALIEF ATHTHORICK

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available T. ALIEF ATHTHORICK1,2,, DEDE SETIADI3, YOHANES PURWANTO4, EDI GUHARDJA31 Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, North Sumatra University (USU, Medan 20155, North Sumatra, Indonesia. Jl. Bioteknologi No.1 Kampus USU Medan, Tel.: 061-8223564, Fax.: 061-8214290, email: talief@lycos.comAththorick TA, Setiadi D, Purwanto Y, Guhardja E. 2012. Vegetation stands structure and aboveground biomass after the shifting cultivation practices of Karo People in Leuser Ecosystem, North Sumatra. Biodiversitas 13: 92-97. Vegetation stands structure and aboveground biomass after the shifting cultivation practices of Karo People in Leuser Ecosystem, North Sumatra. Shifting cultivation has been practiced by Karo People in Leuser Ecosystem for a very long time and caused a mosaic of patches that shift over time between traditional agriculture and secondary forest. The objectives of this study were to investigated the recovery of vegetation stands structure and aboveground biomass in four age classes of secondary forest, i.e. 5-years old, 10-years old, 20-years old, 30-years old and primary forest as a control. In total, 496 subplots were surveyed. Saplings contributed 62.82% of basal area in 5-years forest and still important in 10 and 20-years forest, but density decreased in 30-years and primer forest whereas tree stands dominated in 30-years and primary forest and shared basal area of 96.36% and 97.03%, respectively. Aboveground biomass of trees achieved its highest values in primary forest, i.e. 659.22 t/ha and contributed to total aboveground biomass of 99.38%.

  19. Radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in water, sediments and biota in the vicinity of Cluff mining operations

    Data is presented on the concentrations of U, Ra-226, Pb-210, Th-230, Th, As, Cu, Pb, Mo, Ni and Zn in water, sediments, aquatic macrophytes and fish near a high grade uranium mining facility. Baseline data acquired in 1975 and 1978-79 is compared to post-development environmental monitoring data from 1980 to 1985. Distribution coefficients (KD) for sediment, and transfer coefficients (T.C.) for biota and derived from the water, sediment and biota concentrations

  20. Scoping assessment of groundwater doses to biota at the Sellafield site, UK

    In the current climate of investigating the impact of discharges from the nuclear industry on non-human biota, much attention has been given to biota in marine and terrestrial environments in receipt of authorised discharges of liquid and gaseous effluent. Relatively little attention to date has been given to the exposure of biota to groundwater containing man-made radio-nuclides. This area of interest is growing especially in the field of nuclear waste repositories. A scoping assessment has been performed here to determine the impacts due to radiological contamination on organisms living within or coming into contact with groundwater at the Sellafield site, UK. The following potential exposure routes to biota were identified: 1) Organisms living within groundwater; 2) Groundwater discharges to the surface at beach springs (i.e. emerging above the low water line; 3) Groundwater discharges to nearby surface water bodies (e.g. rivers); 4) Groundwater discharges directly to the Irish Sea.. In order to evaluate impacts on organisms living within, contacting or ingesting groundwater, it was necessary to determine the activity concentration of radio-nuclides in the groundwater. For time periods up to 2120, modeling of contaminant release from in-ground inventories and transport in groundwater was carried out for this scoping study using a relatively simple assessment methodology with the MONDRIAN modeling suite. Screening assessments of radiological impacts upon wildlife have been performed for liquid discharges to groundwater from the Sellafield Ltd reprocessing plant at Sellafield, Cumbria. Impacts have been considered for biota at sites within reach of the groundwater flow network. Most calculated total weighted absorbed doses appear to be of no radiological significance whatsoever in relation to the new Environment Agency freshwater ecosystem trigger level (40 microGy h-1), thereby obviating the need to conduct further investigations. The one exception to this is for

  1. Determining aboveground biomass of the forest successional chronosequence in a test-site of Brazilian Amazon through X- and L-band data analysis

    Santos, João. R.; Silva, Camila V. d. J.; Galvão, Lênio S.; Treuhaft, Robert; Mura, José C.; Madsen, Soren; Gonçalves, Fábio G.; Keller, Michael M.

    2014-08-01

    Secondary succession is an important process in the Amazonian region with implications for the global carbon cycle and for the sustainable regional agricultural and pasture activities. In order to better discriminate the secondary succession and to characterize and estimate the aboveground biomass (AGB), backscatter and interferometric SAR data generally have been analyzed through empirical-based statistical modeling. The objective of this study is to verify the capability of the full polarimetric PALSAR/ALOS (L-band) attributes, when combined with the interferometric (InSAR) coherence from the TanDEM-X (X-band), to improve the AGB estimates of the succession chronosequence located in the Brazilian Tapajós region. In order to perform this study, we carried out multivariate regression using radar attributes and biophysical parameters acquired during a field inventory. A previous floristic-structural analysis was performed to establish the chronosequence in three stages: initial vegetation regrowth, intermediate, and advanced regrowth. The relationship between PALSAR data and AGB was significant (pstands.

  2. Carbon sequestration potential in aboveground biomass of Thong Pha Phum National Forest, Thailand

    Terakunpisut, J. [Kasetsart Univ. Kamphaeng Saen, Nakornpratom (Thailand). Faculty of Liberal Arts and Science; Gajaseni, N.; Ruankawe, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Biology Dept.

    2007-07-01

    Increasingly convincing evidence shows that the Earth is getting warmer and in the future warming could have serious effects on humans. Atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), the primary and best studied greenhouse gas, has increased by about 30% from the start of the industrial revolution to 1992 due to fossil fuel combustion and changes in land use. The ultimate objective of the United Nations Framework, in which Thailand is a member, is to stabilize the atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations at a level that will not cause dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. The emission reduction of greenhouse gases from members of industrialized countries is called for in the Kyoto Protocol. Thailand ratified the Kyoto Protocol August 28, 2002, and therefore will voluntarily participate in CO{sub 2} reduction. There are two alternatives to reduce CO{sub 2}: decreasing carbon source and increasing carbon sink. The world's forests are prominent sites to study climate change, not only in terms of total net carbon emissions but also in terms of global storage capacity, important for climatic regulation. This study assessed the potential of carbon sequestration on aboveground biomass in the different forest ecosystems in Thong Pha Phum National Forest, Thailand. The assessment was based on a total inventory for woody stem at {>=}4.5 cm diameter at breast height (DBH). Aboveground biomass was estimated using allometric equation and aboveground carbon stock was calculated by multiplying the 0.5 conversion factor to the biomass. As the results, carbon sequestration showed varied in different types of forests. Tropical rain forest (Ton Mai Yak station) higher carbon stock than dry evergreen forest (KP 27 station) and mixed deciduous forest (Pong Phu Ron station) as 137.73 {+-} 48.07, 70.29 {+-} 7.38 and 48.14 {+-} 16.72 tonne C/ha, respectively. Habitat variability caused differences of biomass accumulation, species composition and the

  3. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  4. An Integrated Functional Genomics Consortium to Increase Carbon Sequestration in Poplars: Optimizing Aboveground Carbon Gain

    Karnosky, David F (deceased); Podila, G Krishna; Burton, Andrew J (for DF Karnosky)

    2009-02-17

    This project used gene expression patterns from two forest Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments (Aspen FACE in northern Wisconsin and POPFACE in Italy) to examine ways to increase the aboveground carbon sequestration potential of poplars (Populus). The aim was to use patterns of global gene expression to identify candidate genes for increased carbon sequestration. Gene expression studies were linked to physiological measurements in order to elucidate bottlenecks in carbon acquisition in trees grown in elevated CO2 conditions. Delayed senescence allowing additional carbon uptake late in the growing season, was also examined, and expression of target genes was tested in elite P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids. In Populus euramericana, gene expression was sensitive to elevated CO2, but the response depended on the developmental age of the leaves. Most differentially expressed genes were upregulated in elevated CO2 in young leaves, while most were downregulated in elevated CO2 in semi-mature leaves. In P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids, leaf development and leaf quality traits, including leaf area, leaf shape, epidermal cell area, stomatal number, specific leaf area, and canopy senescence were sensitive to elevated CO2. Significant increases under elevated CO2 occurred for both above- and belowground growth in the F-2 generation. Three areas of the genome played a role in determining aboveground growth response to elevated CO2, with three additional areas of the genome important in determining belowground growth responses to elevated CO2. In Populus tremuloides, CO2-responsive genes in leaves were found to differ between two aspen clones that showed different growth responses, despite similarity in many physiological parameters (photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf area index). The CO2-responsive clone shunted C into pathways associated with active defense/response to stress, carbohydrate/starch biosynthesis and subsequent growth. The CO2

  5. Assessment of marine biota doses arising from radioactive discharges to the sea by the COGEMA La Hague facility: A comprehensive case study

    The paper presents an assessment of radiation doses to marine biota arising from the radioactive sea discharges (as liquid effluents) of the COGEMA La Hague facility. The primary objective of this study was to select a representative set of marine biota for the study area (i.e. the Nord-Cotentin Peninsula coast) and to assess the potential radiological impacts, in terms of biota dose rates and their related potential health effects on marine biota, arising from the radioactive sea discharges of the COGEMA La Hague facility. For assessing potential effects to biota, the predicted biota dose rates were compared to the available guidance for the protection of populations of non-human biota. The guidance values are based on published data by international organizations (e.g. UNSCEAR and IAEA) and on a screening review of a recent database (by FASSET) on biological effects of ionizing radiation on non-human biota. The major conclusion of the case study was that the predicted dose rates to marine biota attributable to radioactive sea discharges from the La Hague facility are small, and in general, well below comparison guidance levels at which deleterious and observable health effects to populations of marine biota might, according to current knowledge, be expected. The predicted incremental dose rates arising from the La Hague facility are also, in general, well below those caused by the background radioactivity in the region. (author)

  6. Ability of LANDSAT-8 Oli Derived Texture Metrics in Estimating Aboveground Carbon Stocks of Coppice Oak Forests

    Safari, A.; Sohrabi, H.

    2016-06-01

    The role of forests as a reservoir for carbon has prompted the need for timely and reliable estimation of aboveground carbon stocks. Since measurement of aboveground carbon stocks of forests is a destructive, costly and time-consuming activity, aerial and satellite remote sensing techniques have gained many attentions in this field. Despite the fact that using aerial data for predicting aboveground carbon stocks has been proved as a highly accurate method, there are challenges related to high acquisition costs, small area coverage, and limited availability of these data. These challenges are more critical for non-commercial forests located in low-income countries. Landsat program provides repetitive acquisition of high-resolution multispectral data, which are freely available. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of multispectral Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) derived texture metrics in quantifying aboveground carbon stocks of coppice Oak forests in Zagros Mountains, Iran. We used four different window sizes (3×3, 5×5, 7×7, and 9×9), and four different offsets ([0,1], [1,1], [1,0], and [1,-1]) to derive nine texture metrics (angular second moment, contrast, correlation, dissimilar, entropy, homogeneity, inverse difference, mean, and variance) from four bands (blue, green, red, and infrared). Totally, 124 sample plots in two different forests were measured and carbon was calculated using species-specific allometric models. Stepwise regression analysis was applied to estimate biomass from derived metrics. Results showed that, in general, larger size of window for deriving texture metrics resulted models with better fitting parameters. In addition, the correlation of the spectral bands for deriving texture metrics in regression models was ranked as b4>b3>b2>b5. The best offset was [1,-1]. Amongst the different metrics, mean and entropy were entered in most of the regression models. Overall, different models based on derived texture metrics

  7. Estimating aboveground biomass in interior Alaska with Landsat data and field measurements

    Ji, Lei; Wylie, Bruce K.; Nossov, Dana R.; Peterson, Birgit; Waldrop, Mark P.; McFarland, Jack W.; Rover, Jennifer; Hollingsworth, Teresa N.

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial plant biomass is a key biophysical parameter required for understanding ecological systems in Alaska. An accurate estimation of biomass at a regional scale provides an important data input for ecological modeling in this region. In this study, we created an aboveground biomass (AGB) map at 30-m resolution for the Yukon Flats ecoregion of interior Alaska using Landsat data and field measurements. Tree, shrub, and herbaceous AGB data in both live and dead forms were collected in summers and autumns of 2009 and 2010. Using the Landsat-derived spectral variables and the field AGB data, we generated a regression model and applied this model to map AGB for the ecoregion. A 3-fold cross-validation indicated that the AGB estimates had a mean absolute error of 21.8 Mg/ha and a mean bias error of 5.2 Mg/ha. Additionally, we validated the mapping results using an airborne lidar dataset acquired for a portion of the ecoregion. We found a significant relationship between the lidar-derived canopy height and the Landsat-derived AGB (R2 = 0.40). The AGB map showed that 90% of the ecoregion had AGB values ranging from 10 Mg/ha to 134 Mg/ha. Vegetation types and fires were the primary factors controlling the spatial AGB patterns in this ecoregion.

  8. Total aboveground biomass (TAGB) estimation using IFSAR: speckle noise effect on TAGB in tropical forest

    Total Aboveground Biomass (TAGB) estimation is critically important to enhance understanding of dynamics of carbon fluxes between atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystem. For humid tropical forest, it is a challenging task for researchers due to complex canopy structure and predominant cloud cover. Optical sensors are only able to sense canopy crown. In contrast, radar technology is able to sense sub-canopy structure of the forest with penetration ability through the cloud for precise biomass estimation with validation from field data including diameter at breast height (DBH) of trees. This study is concerned about estimation of TAGB through the utilization of Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR). Based on this study, it is found that the stand parameters such as DBH and backscattered on IFSAR image has high correlation, R2=0.6411. The most suitable model for TAGB estimation on IFSAR is Chave Model with R2=0.9139. This study analyzes the impact brought by speckle noises on IFSAR image. It is found that filtering process has improves TAGB estimation about +30% using several filtering schemes especially Gamma filter for 11×11 window size. Using field data obtained from a primary tropical forest at Gerik, Perak, TAGBestimation can be validated and the assessment has been carried out

  9. Allometric Models Based on Bayesian Frameworks Give Better Estimates of Aboveground Biomass in the Miombo Woodlands

    Shem Kuyah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The miombo woodland is the most extensive dry forest in the world, with the potential to store substantial amounts of biomass carbon. Efforts to obtain accurate estimates of carbon stocks in the miombo woodlands are limited by a general lack of biomass estimation models (BEMs. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of most commonly employed allometric models for estimating aboveground biomass (AGB in miombo woodlands, and to develop new models that enable more accurate estimation of biomass in the miombo woodlands. A generalizable mixed-species allometric model was developed from 88 trees belonging to 33 species ranging in diameter at breast height (DBH from 5 to 105 cm using Bayesian estimation. A power law model with DBH alone performed better than both a polynomial model with DBH and the square of DBH, and models including height and crown area as additional variables along with DBH. The accuracy of estimates from published models varied across different sites and trees of different diameter classes, and was lower than estimates from our model. The model developed in this study can be used to establish conservative carbon stocks required to determine avoided emissions in performance-based payment schemes, for example in afforestation and reforestation activities.

  10. Landscape-scale analysis of aboveground tree carbon stocks affected by mountain pine beetles in Idaho

    Bright, B. C.; Hicke, J. A.; Hudak, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks kill billions of trees in western North America, and the resulting tree mortality can significantly impact local and regional carbon cycling. However, substantial variability in mortality occurs within outbreak areas. Our objective was to quantify landscape-scale effects of beetle infestations on aboveground carbon (AGC) stocks using field observations and remotely sensed data across a 5054 ha study area that had experienced a mountain pine beetle outbreak. Tree mortality was classified using multispectral imagery that separated green, red, and gray trees, and models relating field observations of AGC to LiDAR data were used to map AGC. We combined mortality and AGC maps to quantify AGC in beetle-killed trees. Thirty-nine per cent of the forested area was killed by beetles, with large spatial variability in mortality severity. For the entire study area, 40-50% of AGC was contained in beetle-killed trees. When considered on a per-hectare basis, 75-89% of the study area had >25% AGC in killed trees and 3-6% of the study area had >75% of the AGC in killed trees. Our results show that despite high variability in tree mortality within an outbreak area, bark beetle epidemics can have a large impact on AGC stocks at the landscape scale.

  11. Landscape-scale analysis of aboveground tree carbon stocks affected by mountain pine beetles in Idaho

    Bark beetle outbreaks kill billions of trees in western North America, and the resulting tree mortality can significantly impact local and regional carbon cycling. However, substantial variability in mortality occurs within outbreak areas. Our objective was to quantify landscape-scale effects of beetle infestations on aboveground carbon (AGC) stocks using field observations and remotely sensed data across a 5054 ha study area that had experienced a mountain pine beetle outbreak. Tree mortality was classified using multispectral imagery that separated green, red, and gray trees, and models relating field observations of AGC to LiDAR data were used to map AGC. We combined mortality and AGC maps to quantify AGC in beetle-killed trees. Thirty-nine per cent of the forested area was killed by beetles, with large spatial variability in mortality severity. For the entire study area, 40–50% of AGC was contained in beetle-killed trees. When considered on a per-hectare basis, 75–89% of the study area had >25% AGC in killed trees and 3–6% of the study area had >75% of the AGC in killed trees. Our results show that despite high variability in tree mortality within an outbreak area, bark beetle epidemics can have a large impact on AGC stocks at the landscape scale. (letter)

  12. Inventory-based estimation of aboveground net primary production in Japan's forests from 1980 to 2005

    Y. Wang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies based on remote sensing and carbon process models have revealed that terrestrial net primary production (NPP in the middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere has increased significantly; this is crucial for explaining the increased terrestrial carbon sink in the past several decades. Regional NPP estimation based on significant field data, however, has been rare. In this study, we estimated the long-term changes in aboveground NPP (ANPP for Japan's forests from 1980 to 2005, using forest inventory data, direct field measurements, and an allometric method. The overall ANPP for all forest types averaged 10.5 Mg ha−1 yr−1, with a range of 9.6 to 11.5 Mg ha−1 yr−1, and ANPP for the whole country totaled 249.1 Tg yr−1 (range: 230.0 to 271.4 Tg yr−1 during the study period. Over the 25 years, the net effect of increased ANPP in needle-leaf forests and decreased ANPP in broadleaf forests has led to an increase of 1.9 Mg ha−1 yr−1 (i.e., 0.79% yr−1. This increase may be mainly due to the establishment of plantations and the rapid early growth of these planted forests.

  13. Carbon dynamics in aboveground coarse wood biomass of wetland forests in the northern Pantanal, Brazil

    J. Schöngart

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This is the first estimation on carbon dynamics in the aboveground coarse wood biomass (AGWB of wetland forests in the Pantanal, located in Central Southern America. In four 1-ha plots in stands characterized by the pioneer species Vochysia divergens Pohl (Vochysiaceae forest inventories (trees ≥10 cm diameter at breast height, DBH have been performed and converted to predictions of AGWB by five different allometric models using two or three predicting parameters (DBH, tree height, wood density. Best prediction has been achieved using allometric equations with three independent variables. Carbon stocks (50% of AGWB vary from 7.4 to 100.9 Mg C ha−1 between the four stands. Carbon sequestration differs 0.50–4.24 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 estimated by two growth models derived from tree-ring analysis describing the relationships between age and DBH for V. divergens and other tree species. We find a close correlation between estimated tree age and C-stock, C-sequestration and C-turnover (mean residence of C in AGWB.

  14. Modeling aboveground tree woody biomass using national-scale allometric methods and airborne lidar

    Chen, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Estimating tree aboveground biomass (AGB) and carbon (C) stocks using remote sensing is a critical component for understanding the global C cycle and mitigating climate change. However, the importance of allometry for remote sensing of AGB has not been recognized until recently. The overarching goals of this study are to understand the differences and relationships among three national-scale allometric methods (CRM, Jenkins, and the regional models) of the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program in the U.S. and to examine the impacts of using alternative allometry on the fitting statistics of remote sensing-based woody AGB models. Airborne lidar data from three study sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA were used to predict woody AGB estimated from the different allometric methods. It was found that the CRM and Jenkins estimates of woody AGB are related via the CRM adjustment factor. In terms of lidar-biomass modeling, CRM had the smallest model errors, while the Jenkins method had the largest ones and the regional method was between. The best model fitting from CRM is attributed to its inclusion of tree height in calculating merchantable stem volume and the strong dependence of non-merchantable stem biomass on merchantable stem biomass. This study also argues that it is important to characterize the allometric model errors for gaining a complete understanding of the remotely-sensed AGB prediction errors.

  15. Mapping Aboveground Biomass using Texture Indices from Aerial Photos in a Temperate Forest of Northeastern China

    Shili Meng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical remote sensing data have been considered to display signal saturation phenomena in regions of high aboveground biomass (AGB and multi-storied forest canopies. However, some recent studies using texture indices derived from optical remote sensing data via the Fourier-based textural ordination (FOTO approach have provided promising results without saturation problems for some tropical forests, which tend to underestimate AGB predictions. This study was applied to the temperate mixed forest of the Liangshui National Nature Reserve in Northeastern China and demonstrated the capability of FOTO texture indices to obtain a higher prediction quality of forest AGB. Based on high spatial resolution aerial photos (1.0 m spatial resolution acquired in September 2009, the relationship between FOTO texture indices and field-derived biomass measurements was calibrated using a support vector regression (SVR algorithm. Ten-fold cross-validation was used to construct a robust prediction model, which avoided the over-fitting problem. By further comparison the performance of the model estimates for greater coverage, the predicted results were compared with a reference biomass map derived from LiDAR metrics. This study showed that the FOTO indices accounted for 88.3% of the variance in ground-based AGB; the root mean square error (RMSE was 34.35 t/ha, and RMSE normalized by the mean value of the estimates was 22.31%. This novel texture-based method has great potential for forest AGB estimation in other temperate regions.

  16. {sup 40}K/{sup 137}Cs discrimination ratios to the aboveground organs of tropical plants

    Sanches, N. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, CEP 24210-346, RJ (Brazil); Anjos, R.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, CEP 24210-346, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: meigikos@if.uff.br; Mosquera, B. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, CEP 24210-346, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-15

    In the present work, the accumulation of caesium and potassium in aboveground plant parts was studied in order to improve the understanding on the behaviour of monovalent cations in several compartments of tropical plants. We present the results for activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K, measured by gamma spectrometry, from five tropical plant species: guava (Psidium guajava), mango (Mangifera indica), papaya (Carica papaya), banana (Musa paradisiaca), and manioc (Manihot esculenta). Caesium and potassium have shown a high level of mobility within the plants, exhibiting the highest values of concentration in the growing parts (fruits, leaves, twigs, and barks) of the woody fruit and large herbaceous shrub (such as manioc) species. In contrast, the banana and papaya plants exhibited the lowest levels of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K in their growing parts. However, a significant correlation between activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K was observed in these tropical plants. The {sup 40}K/{sup 137}Cs discrimination ratios were approximately equal to unity in different compartments of each individual plant, suggesting the possibility of using caesium to predict the behaviour of potassium in several tropical species.

  17. Sparse Density, Leaf-Off Airborne Laser Scanning Data in Aboveground Biomass Component Prediction

    Ville Kankare

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The demand for cost-efficient forest aboveground biomass (AGB prediction methods is growing worldwide. The National Land Survey of Finland (NLS began collecting airborne laser scanning (ALS data throughout Finland in 2008 to provide a new high-detailed terrain elevation model. Similar data sets are being collected in an increasing number of countries worldwide. These data sets offer great potential in forest mapping related applications. The objectives of our study were (i to evaluate the AGB component prediction accuracy at a resolution of 300 m2 using sparse density, leaf-off ALS data (collected by NLS derived metrics as predictor variables; (ii to compare prediction accuracies with existing large-scale forest mapping techniques (Multi-source National Forest Inventory, MS-NFI based on Landsat TM satellite imagery; and (iii to evaluate the accuracy and effect of canopy height model (CHM derived metrics on AGB component prediction when ALS data were acquired with multiple sensors and varying scanning parameters. Results showed that ALS point metrics can be used to predict component AGBs with an accuracy of 29.7%–48.3%. AGB prediction accuracy was slightly improved using CHM-derived metrics but CHM metrics had a more clear effect on the estimated bias. Compared to the MS-NFI, the prediction accuracy was considerably higher, which was caused by differences in the remote sensing data utilized.

  18. Aboveground biomass and carbon stocks modelling using non-linear regression model

    Ain Mohd Zaki, Nurul; Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Nazip Suratman, Mohd; Zainee Zainal, Mohd

    2016-06-01

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) is an important source of uncertainty in the carbon estimation for the tropical forest due to the variation biodiversity of species and the complex structure of tropical rain forest. Nevertheless, the tropical rainforest holds the most extensive forest in the world with the vast diversity of tree with layered canopies. With the usage of optical sensor integrate with empirical models is a common way to assess the AGB. Using the regression, the linkage between remote sensing and a biophysical parameter of the forest may be made. Therefore, this paper exemplifies the accuracy of non-linear regression equation of quadratic function to estimate the AGB and carbon stocks for the tropical lowland Dipterocarp forest of Ayer Hitam forest reserve, Selangor. The main aim of this investigation is to obtain the relationship between biophysical parameter field plots with the remotely-sensed data using nonlinear regression model. The result showed that there is a good relationship between crown projection area (CPA) and carbon stocks (CS) with Pearson Correlation (p order to quantify the AGB and carbon stocks for a larger sample area of the lowland Dipterocarp forest.

  19. Combination of SPOT-5 and ALOS PALSAR images in estimating aboveground biomass of lowland Dipterocarp forest

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) of forests is the one of the key parameters for carbon accounting. However, estimating AGB by using remote sensing approach has been challenging as it is constrained by various limitations, especially in a complex tropical forest ecosystem. Optical or radar system has its potential in retrieving AGB but issues such as cloud cover, complex forest ecosystem and saturation at certain biomass levels remain unanswered and are continuously being studied. The study was conducted to investigate the possibility of combining both optical and radar to improve the accuracy of AGB estimation in lowland dipterocarp forest. SPOT-5 and ALOS PALSAR data were used and regression models were developed between the measured AGB and variables derived from both satellite images. The study found that the best performing model was from the multivariate regression from incorporating both normalized difference fraction index (NDFI) with HV-polarized backscatter with R2 of 0.803 and RMSE of 32.6 Mg ha−1. The study found that the combination of optical and radar images can counter limitations of each other and has improved slightly the estimate

  20. 40K/137Cs discrimination ratios to the aboveground organs of tropical plants

    In the present work, the accumulation of caesium and potassium in aboveground plant parts was studied in order to improve the understanding on the behaviour of monovalent cations in several compartments of tropical plants. We present the results for activity concentrations of 137Cs and 40K, measured by gamma spectrometry, from five tropical plant species: guava (Psidium guajava), mango (Mangifera indica), papaya (Carica papaya), banana (Musa paradisiaca), and manioc (Manihot esculenta). Caesium and potassium have shown a high level of mobility within the plants, exhibiting the highest values of concentration in the growing parts (fruits, leaves, twigs, and barks) of the woody fruit and large herbaceous shrub (such as manioc) species. In contrast, the banana and papaya plants exhibited the lowest levels of 137Cs and 40K in their growing parts. However, a significant correlation between activity concentrations of 137Cs and 40K was observed in these tropical plants. The 40K/137Cs discrimination ratios were approximately equal to unity in different compartments of each individual plant, suggesting the possibility of using caesium to predict the behaviour of potassium in several tropical species

  1. Aboveground roofed design for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in Maine

    Alexander, J.A. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The conceptual designs proposed in this report resulted from a study for the Maine Low-level Radioactive Waste Authority to develop conceptual designs for a safe and reliable disposal facility for Maine`s low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Freezing temperatures, heavy rainfall, high groundwater tables, and very complex and shallow glaciated soils found in Maine place severe constraints on the design. The fundamental idea behind the study was to consider Maine`s climatic and geological conditions at the beginning of conceptual design rather than starting with a design for another location and adapting it for Maine`s conditions. The conceptual designs recommended are entirely above ground and consist of an inner vault designed to provide shielding and protection against inadvertent intrusion and an outer building to protect the inner vault from water. The air dry conditions within the outer building should lead to almost indefinite service life for the concrete inner vault and the waste containers. This concept differs sharply from the usual aboveground vault in its reliance on at least two independent, but more or less conventional, roofing systems for primary and secondary protection against leakage of radioisotopes from the facility. Features include disposal of waste in air dry environment, waste loading and visual inspection by remote-controlled overhead cranes, and reliance on engineered soils for tertiary protection against release of radioactive materials.

  2. Inventory-based estimation of aboveground net primary production in Japan's forests from 1980 to 2005

    Y. Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies based on remote sensing and carbon process models have revealed that terrestrial net primary production (NPP in the middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere has increased significantly; this is crucial for explaining the increased terrestrial carbon sink in the past several decades. Regional NPP estimation based on significant field data, however, has been rare. In this study, we estimated the long-term changes in aboveground NPP (ANPP for Japan's forests from 1980 to 2005 using forest inventory data, direct field measurements, and an allometric method. The overall ANPP for all forest types averaged 10.5 Mg ha−1 yr−1, with a range of 9.6 to 11.5 Mg ha−1 yr−1, and ANPP for the whole country totaled 249.1 Tg yr−1 (range: 230.0 to 271.4 Tg yr−1 during the study period. Over the 25 years, the net effect of increased ANPP in needle-leaf forests and decreased ANPP in broadleaf forests has led to an increase of 1.9 Mg ha−1 yr−1 (i.e., 0.79 % yr−1. This increase may be mainly due to the establishment of plantations and the rapid early growth of these planted forests.

  3. National Forest Aboveground Biomass Mapping from ICESat/GLAS Data and MODIS Imagery in China

    Hong Chi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Forest aboveground biomass (AGB was mapped throughout China using large footprint LiDAR waveform data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS onboard NASA’s Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS imagery and forest inventory data. The entire land of China was divided into seven zones according to the geographic characteristics of the forests. The forest AGB prediction models were separately developed for different forest types in each of the seven forest zones at GLAS footprint level from GLAS waveform parameters and biomass derived from height and diameter at breast height (DBH field observation. Some waveform parameters used in the prediction models were able to reduce the effects of slope on biomass estimation. The models of GLAS-based biomass estimates were developed by using GLAS footprints with slopes less than 20° and slopes ≥ 20°, respectively. Then, all GLAS footprint biomass and MODIS data were used to establish Random Forest regression models for extrapolating footprint AGB to a nationwide scale. The total amount of estimated AGB in Chinese forests around 2006 was about 12,622 Mt vs. 12,617 Mt derived from the seventh national forest resource inventory data. Nearly half of all provinces showed a relative error (% of less than 20%, and 80% of total provinces had relative errors less than 50%.

  4. Impacts of Tree Height-Dbh Allometry on Lidar-Based Tree Aboveground Biomass Modeling

    Fang, R.

    2016-06-01

    Lidar has been widely used in tree aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation at plot or stand levels. Lidar-based AGB models are usually constructed with the ground AGB reference as the response variable and lidar canopy indices as predictor variables. Tree diameter at breast height (dbh) is the major variable of most allometric models for estimating reference AGB. However, lidar measurements are mainly related to tree vertical structure. Therefore, tree height-dbh allometric model residuals are expected to have a large impact on lidar-based AGB model performance. This study attempts to investigate sensitivity of lidar-based AGB model to the decreasing strength of height-dbh relationship using a Monte Carlo simulation approach. Striking decrease in R2 and increase in relative RMSE were found in lidar-based AGB model, as the variance of height-dbh model residuals grew. I, therefore, concluded that individual tree height-dbh model residuals fundamentally introduce errors to lidar-AGB models.

  5. Total aboveground biomass (TAGB) estimation using IFSAR: speckle noise effect on TAGB in tropical forest

    Misbari, S.; Hashim, M.

    2014-02-01

    Total Aboveground Biomass (TAGB) estimation is critically important to enhance understanding of dynamics of carbon fluxes between atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystem. For humid tropical forest, it is a challenging task for researchers due to complex canopy structure and predominant cloud cover. Optical sensors are only able to sense canopy crown. In contrast, radar technology is able to sense sub-canopy structure of the forest with penetration ability through the cloud for precise biomass estimation with validation from field data including diameter at breast height (DBH) of trees. This study is concerned about estimation of TAGB through the utilization of Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR). Based on this study, it is found that the stand parameters such as DBH and backscattered on IFSAR image has high correlation, R2=0.6411. The most suitable model for TAGB estimation on IFSAR is Chave Model with R2=0.9139. This study analyzes the impact brought by speckle noises on IFSAR image. It is found that filtering process has improves TAGB estimation about +30% using several filtering schemes especially Gamma filter for 11×11 window size. Using field data obtained from a primary tropical forest at Gerik, Perak, TAGBestimation can be validated and the assessment has been carried out.

  6. Aboveground Biomass Estimation Using Structure from Motion Approach with Aerial Photographs in a Seasonal Tropical Forest

    Tetsuji Ota

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the capabilities of a canopy height model (CHM derived from aerial photographs using the Structure from Motion (SfM approach to estimate aboveground biomass (AGB in a tropical forest. Aerial photographs and airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data were simultaneously acquired under leaf-on canopy conditions. A 3D point cloud was generated from aerial photographs using the SfM approach and converted to a digital surface model (DSMP. We also created a DSM from airborne LiDAR data (DSML. From each of DSMP and DSML, we constructed digital terrain models (DTM, which are DTMP and DTML, respectively. We created four CHMs, which were calculated from (1 DSMP and DTMP (CHMPP; (2 DSMP and DTML (CHMPL; (3 DSML and DTMP (CHMLP; and (4 DSML and DTML (CHMLL. Then, we estimated AGB using these CHMs. The model using CHMLL yielded the highest accuracy in four CHMs (R2 = 0.94 and was comparable to the model using CHMPL (R2 = 0.93. The model using CHMPP yielded the lowest accuracy (R2 = 0.79. In conclusion, AGB can be estimated from CHM derived from aerial photographs using the SfM approach in the tropics. However, to accurately estimate AGB, we need a more accurate DTM than the DTM derived from aerial photographs using the SfM approach.

  7. Tree aboveground carbon storage correlates with environmental gradients and functional diversity in a tropical forest.

    Shen, Yong; Yu, Shixiao; Lian, Juyu; Shen, Hao; Cao, Honglin; Lu, Huanping; Ye, Wanhui

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests play a disproportionately important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but it remains unclear how local environments and functional diversity regulate tree aboveground C storage. We examined how three components (environments, functional dominance and diversity) affected C storage in Dinghushan 20-ha plot in China. There was large fine-scale variation in C storage. The three components significantly contributed to regulate C storage, but dominance and diversity of traits were associated with C storage in different directions. Structural equation models (SEMs) of dominance and diversity explained 34% and 32% of variation in C storage. Environments explained 26-44% of variation in dominance and diversity. Similar proportions of variation in C storage were explained by dominance and diversity in regression models, they were improved after adding environments. Diversity of maximum diameter was the best predictor of C storage. Complementarity and selection effects contributed to C storage simultaneously, and had similar importance. The SEMs disengaged the complex relationships among the three components and C storage, and established a framework to show the direct and indirect effects (via dominance and diversity) of local environments on C storage. We concluded that local environments are important for regulating functional diversity and C storage. PMID:27278688

  8. Cretaceous biota of the Triângulo Mineiro region (Brazil: A review of recent finds

    Candeiro, C. R. A.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bauru Group (Adamantina, Uberaba, and Marília Formations crop out in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, and yield a rich continental biota. Invertebrate and vertebrate taxa from underlying and overlying strata, as well as biostratigraphical correlations with other fossil sites in Argentina, suggest an Upper Cretaceous age for this biota. The diversity of the fossil assemblage recorded in these formations is summarized here and includes: frogs, lizards, crocodiles, titanosaurs, abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid dinosaurs. This fossil assemblage provides important clues to understand faunas from other southern landmasses, particularly those from the Cretaceous of the African continent.Los afloramientos del Grupo Bauru (formaciones Adamantina, Uberaba y Marília en la región del Triângulo Mineiro, Provincia de Minas Gerais, Brasil, posee un rico contenido de biota continental. Los taxa de invertebrados y vertebrados de estos estratos, así como las correlaciones biostratigráficas con otros yacimientos fósiles de Argentina, sugieren una edad del Cretácico Tardío. La diversidad de la asociación fósil registrada en las formaciones del Triângulo Mineiro se resume en el presente trabajo e incluye: sapos, lagartos, tortugas, cocodrilianos, titanosaurideos, dinosaurios abelisaurideos y carcharodontosaurideos. Esta asociación es importante para la comprensión de las faunas del sur de América y también de las del Cretácico de África.

  9. INSTITUIÇÕES DE PESQUISA EM MEIO AMBIENTE: o caso do BIOTA e do LBA

    2010-01-01

    O questionamento que se faz neste artigo é se programas de pesquisa em meio ambiente podem ser considerados e analisados como instituições. Para analisar este questionamento não basta só explorar em termos teóricos a relação programas de pesquisa-instituições, mas cotejar a analise teórica com estudo de caso. Este artigo fará esta analise a partir de dois programas de pesquisa em meio ambiente o BIOTA e o LBA. Desta analise tem-se que o desenho ou formato do programa é essencial para que se ...

  10. Lack of observed impacts of gas production of Bongkot Field, Thailand on marine biota

    Windom, H.L. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States); Cranmer, G. [Metoc plc, Liphook (United Kingdom)

    1998-10-01

    The impact of metal releases, associated with gas production, on biota in the Lower Gulf of Thailand was evaluated based on metal concentrations in finfish and on the composition of sediment fauna. Results indicate that metal concentrations, particularly Hg, in species of snapper and grouper collected near the gas production platform were not significantly different from those of the same species of fish caught from the regional, presumably non-impacted, fishery. Also, there were no significant differences in faunal communities in sediments collected near petroleum production activities from those in sediments collected at remote sites. (author)

  11. Chlorinated hydrocarbon residues in biota, sediments and water collected from the Ligurian Sea

    A series of samples were collected for measurement of DDT and its derivatives DDE and DDD, lindane and polychlorinated biphenyls and for assessment of their presence in biota, sediments and water of the Ligurian sea. Retention times of chlorinated hydrocarbons relative to that of aldrin in the samples are reported. Comparisions are made of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations in fresh and freeze dried samples and also in zooplankton and seaplant. The hydrocarbon concentrations are measured in mussels, Mytillus galloprovincialis, sediments and water. The Σ DDT/PCB ratios are determined for mussels and sediment samples

  12. Natural radioactivity status in mining settling ponds: Bioaccumulation of Radium in biota and the derived dose

    A radiological survey has been carried out in two mining settling ponds in Upper Silesia in Poland based on natural radionuclide inventory in abiotic environment and the consequent dose rate assessment for representative species of biota. The distribution of natural radionuclides in the two mining settling ponds was studied in relation to the abiotic environment and the biotic environment interaction. More specific, the study was focused at the abandoned settling ponds of Rontok and Bojszowy, characterized by the presence of high salinity levels and enhanced Radium concentrations, in comparison with the wide Polish territory

  13. Radioactive contamination of the environment and biota on Novaya Zemlya following nuclear weapon tests

    Data of radiochemical studies have shown that in key elements of ecosystems on the archipelago (lake and sea waters, bottom deposits, mosses lichens, birds and deer) the content of Cs137 and other radioisotopes is within the background level. Bottom deposits and soils of local territories of the abandoned nuclear test sites are the exception (the concentration of radioisotopes in the environment and biota amounts to 5000 Bq/rg and more). It is recommended that mosses and lichens on the ground and benthonic organisms in the sea should be used as biological indicators of artificial radiological background

  14. BIOTA DO SOLO E SUAS RELAÇÕES ECOLÓGICAS COM O SISTEMA RADICULAR

    Carmen Maria Coimbra Manhães

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil is a natural resource essential to human survival. Its we pulled our food, for the food prodution to be more balanced, it is necessary manage and conserve well this natural resource. Especially in regard to soil biota, for being active life is very sensitive to anthropogenic soil management, becoming an easy target in the process of degradation and soil impoverishment. The soil fauna is characterized as individuals who spend most of their life cycle in the soil. This article aimed at reporting the various specific ecological relationships that occur between soil biota and the root system and its main consequences for the soil-rhizosphere, using for this purpose a literature review. The study of the ecology of the rhizosphere can be considered as a multidisciplinary study, very important to unravel mysteries that occur within the soil and elucidate important issues that have not yet been completely elucidated. O solo é um recurso natural essencial para a sobrevivência humana. dele retiramos o nosso alimento, para que a produção de alimentos seja mais equilibrada, é necessário manejar e conservar bem este recurso natural. Principalmente no que se refere à biota do solo, pois por se tratar de vida ativa é muito sensível ás ações antrópicas de manejo do solo, se tornando um alvo fácil no processo de degradação e empobrecimento do solo. A fauna do solose caracteriza como indivíduos que passam a maior parte do seu ciclo de vida no solo. este artigo objetivo relatar as várias relações ecológicas específicas que ocorrem entre a biota do solo e o sistema radicular e suas principais consequências para o sistema solo-rizosfera, utilizando para isto de uma revisão de literatura. O estudo da ecologia da rizosfera pode ser considerado como um estudo multidisciplinar, muito importante para se desvendar mistérios que ocorrem dentro do solo e elucidar questões importantes que até agora não foram completamente elucidadas.

  15. Soil organic matter quality: Definition, quantification and implications for modeling (Invited)

    Plante, A. F.

    2010-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is an important component of the global C cycle. It contains more C than plant biomass and the atmosphere combined, and contributes to a C flux to and from the atmosphere ten times larger than the C flux due to fossil fuel combustion. Increasing interest in SOM is driven by questions about the permanence of soil C during sequestration, the vulnerability of soil C stocks in response to disturbance or climate change, and its role as an energy and nutrient source/sink for soil biota. Recent research has suggested that the quality of SOM may be as important as its quantity in influencing ecosystem function. Soil organic matter quality is frequently defined as a set of properties meant to characterize how easily SOM can be mineralized. This definition is much too vague to be useful. Part of our conceptualization of SOM quality has been inherited from that of substrate quality when considering above-ground litter decomposition. However, the concept must go beyond biochemical composition and encompasses all of the mechanisms that act to stabilize organic matter in soil. The ambiguity of what comprises SOM quality is reflected in the wide range of approaches used to measure or quantify it. Various physical, chemical and biological fractionation techniques as well as analytical and instrumental chemical techniques have been used to characterize SOM quality to varying degrees, though correlations between various methods are not frequently reported or apparent. While SOM quality may not be a singular property, its implications in the dynamics of SOM make it important to express in a quantitative manner, likely through the use of indices. While this may seem unsatisfying, the goal, ultimately, is to model and predict how SOM will respond to climate change and changes in land use and management. SOM quality is essentially embedded in current models through the use of multiple compartments. Multiple compartments reflect the composite nature of SOM with

  16. The importance of aboveground-belowground interactions on the evolution and maintenance of variation in plant defence traits

    Moniek evan Geem

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades a growing body of empirical research has shown that many ecological processes are mediated by a complex array of indirect interactions occurring between rhizosphere-inhabiting organisms and those found on aboveground plant parts. Aboveground - belowground studies have thus far focused on elucidating processes and underlying mechanisms that mediate the behavior and performance of invertebrates in opposite compartments. Less is known about genetic variation in plant traits as this applies to an above- belowground framework. For instance, although the field of genetic variation in aboveground plant traits on community-level interactions is well developed, most studies have ignored genetic variation in plant traits – such as defence - that may have evolved in response to pressures from the combined effects of above- and below ground interactions from antagonists and mutualists. Here, we discuss gaps in our understanding of genetic variation in plant- and consumer-related traits as they relate to aboveground and belowground multitrophic interactions. When metabolic resources are limiting, then multiple attack by antagonists in both domains may lead to trade-offs in where these resources are optimally invested. In nature, these trade-offs may critically depend upon their effects on plant fitness. Natural enemies of herbivores may also influence selection for different traits via top-down control. At larger scales these interactions may generate evolutionary ‘hotspots’ where the expression of various plant traits is the result of strong reciprocal selection via direct and indirect interactions. The role of abiotic factors in driving genetic variation in plant traits is also discussed.

  17. Structure, Aboveground Biomass, and Soil Characterization of Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park, Abu Dhabi

    Alsumaiti, Tareefa Saad Sultan

    Mangrove forests are national treasures of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and other arid countries with limited forested areas. Mangroves form a crucial part of the coastal ecosystem and provide numerous benefits to society, economy, and especially the environment. Mangrove trees, specifically Avicennia marina, are studied in their native habitat in order to characterize their population structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties. This study focused on Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park in Abu Dhabi, which was the first mangrove protected area to be designated in UAE. In situ measurements were collected to estimate Avicennia marina status, mortality rate (%), height (m), crown spread (m), stem number, diameter at breast height (cm), basal area (m), and aboveground biomass (t ha-1 ). Small-footprint aerial light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data acquired by UAE were processed to characterize mangrove canopy height and aboveground biomass density. This included extraction of LIDAR-derived height percentile statistics, segmentation of the forest into structurally homogenous units, and development of regression relationships between in situ reference and remote sensing data using a machine learning approach. An in situ soil survey was conducted to examine the soils' physical and chemical properties, fertility status, and organic matter. The data of soil survey were used to create soil maps to evaluate key characteristics of soils, and their influence on Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park. The results of this study provide new insights into Avicennia marina canopy population, structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties in Abu Dhabi, as data in such arid environments is lacking. This valuable information can help in managing and preserving this unique ecosystem.

  18. Response of Plant Height, Species Richness and Aboveground Biomass to Flooding Gradient along Vegetation Zones in Floodplain Wetlands, Northeast China

    Lou, Yanjing; Pan, Yanwen; Gao, Chuanyu; Jiang, Ming; Lu, Xianguo; Xu, Y. Jun

    2016-01-01

    Flooding regime changes resulting from natural and human activity have been projected to affect wetland plant community structures and functions. It is therefore important to conduct investigations across a range of flooding gradients to assess the impact of flooding depth on wetland vegetation. We conducted this study to identify the pattern of plant height, species richness and aboveground biomass variation along the flooding gradient in floodplain wetlands located in Northeast China. We found that the response of dominant species height to the flooding gradient depends on specific species, i.e., a quadratic response for Carex lasiocarpa, a negative correlation for Calamagrostis angustifolia, and no response for Carex appendiculata. Species richness showed an intermediate effect along the vegetation zone from marsh to wet meadow while aboveground biomass increased. When the communities were analysed separately, only the water table depth had significant impact on species richness for two Carex communities and no variable for C. angustifolia community, while height of dominant species influenced aboveground biomass. When the three above-mentioned communities were grouped together, variations in species richness were mainly determined by community type, water table depth and community mean height, while variations in aboveground biomass were driven by community type and the height of dominant species. These findings indicate that if habitat drying of these herbaceous wetlands in this region continues, then two Carex marshes would be replaced gradually by C. angustifolia wet meadow in the near future. This will lead to a reduction in biodiversity and an increase in productivity and carbon budget. Meanwhile, functional traits must be considered, and should be a focus of attention in future studies on the species diversity and ecosystem function in this region. PMID:27097325

  19. Vegetation stands structure and aboveground biomass after the shifting cultivation practices of Karo People in Leuser Ecosystem, North Sumatra

    T. Alief Aththorick; DEDE SETIADI; YOHANES PURWANTO; EDI GUHARDJA

    2012-01-01

    T. ALIEF ATHTHORICK1,2,, DEDE SETIADI3, YOHANES PURWANTO4, EDI GUHARDJA31 Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, North Sumatra University (USU), Medan 20155, North Sumatra, Indonesia. Jl. Bioteknologi No.1 Kampus USU Medan, Tel.: 061-8223564, Fax.: 061-8214290, email: ick TA, Setiadi D, Purwanto Y, Guhardja E. 2012. Vegetation stands structure and aboveground biomass after the shifting cultivation practices of Karo People in Leuser Ec...

  20. Shifting grassland plant community structure drives positive interactive effects of warming and diversity on aboveground net primary productivity.

    Cowles, Jane M; Wragg, Peter D; Wright, Alexandra J; Powers, Jennifer S; Tilman, David

    2016-02-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are increasingly impacted by multiple drivers of environmental change, including climate warming and loss of biodiversity. We show, using a long-term factorial experiment, that plant diversity loss alters the effects of warming on productivity. Aboveground primary productivity was increased by both high plant diversity and warming, and, in concert, warming (≈1.5 °C average above and belowground warming over the growing season) and diversity caused a greater than additive increase in aboveground productivity. The aboveground warming effects increased over time, particularly at higher levels of diversity, perhaps because of warming-induced increases in legume and C4 bunch grass abundances, and facilitative feedbacks of these species on productivity. Moreover, higher plant diversity was associated with the amelioration of warming-induced environmental conditions. This led to cooler temperatures, decreased vapor pressure deficit, and increased surface soil moisture in higher diversity communities. Root biomass (0-30 cm) was likewise consistently greater at higher plant diversity and was greater with warming in monocultures and at intermediate diversity, but at high diversity warming had no detectable effect. This may be because warming increased the abundance of legumes, which have lower root : shoot ratios than the other types of plants. In addition, legumes increase soil nitrogen (N) supply, which could make N less limiting to other species and potentially decrease their investment in roots. The negative warming × diversity interaction on root mass led to an overall negative interactive effect of these two global change factors on the sum of above and belowground biomass, and thus likely on total plant carbon stores. In total, plant diversity increased the effect of warming on aboveground net productivity and moderated the effect on root mass. These divergent effects suggest that warming and changes in plant diversity are likely to have both

  1. Aboveground biomass in Prosopis pallida (Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd.) H. B. K. ecosystems using Landsat 7 ETM+ images

    Padrón, Eva; Navarro Cerrillo, Rafael M.

    2007-01-01

    The significance of field work in remote sensing studies when applied to large areas has often been underestimated. The combination of specific forest inventories for the estimation of aboveground biomass in large dry tropical forest areas with remote sensor data has scarcely been explored to date. In this work, a systematic, stratified forest inventory involving 100 × 100 m square plots in an area of Peruvian Prosopis pallida dry forest, roughly one million hectares in size in th...

  2. Testing the Paradox of Enrichment along a Land Use Gradient in a Multitrophic Aboveground and Belowground Community

    Meyer, K. M.; M. Vos; Mooij, W.M.; Hol, W.H.G.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; van der Putten, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    In the light of ongoing land use changes, it is important to understand how multitrophic communities perform at different land use intensities. The paradox of enrichment predicts that fertilization leads to destabilization and extinction of predatorprey systems. We tested this prediction for a land use intensity gradient from natural to highly fertilized agricultural ecosystems. We included multiple aboveground and belowground trophic levels and land use-dependent searching effici...

  3. QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon

    Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

    2012-04-01

    Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density

  4. Mapping 2002-2012 Aboveground Biomass Carbon from LiDAR and Landsat Time Series across Northern Idaho, USA

    Hudak, A. T.; Fekety, P.; Falkowski, M. J.; Kennedy, R. E.; Crookston, N.; Smith, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The heavy investment by public and private land management entities in commercial off-the-shelf airborne lidar provides an optimum basis for a Carbon Monitoring System due to the known sensitivity of lidar to vegetation canopy structure. The ability to accurately map aboveground carbon pools from lidar and collocated field plot data has been demonstrated in many studies. Our goal is to upscale this biomass information, mapped at 30 m resolution, to the regional level using wall-to-wall, multi-temporal Landsat imagery. We use the LandTrendr approach to transform Landsat time series into annual maps of Brightness, Greenness, and Wetness along with annual change estimates of these same tasseled cap indices. These, along with ancillary layers of canopy height (e.g., GLAS-derived), topography (e.g., insolation), and climate (e.g., mean annual precipitation) are used to predict 2002-2012 aboveground carbon annually across the northern half of Idaho, USA. Ecoregion-specific models are developed to impute aboveground biomass and forest type beneath a forest/non-forest mask. Annual maps are then summarized at the county-level and compared to publically available Forest Inventory and Analysis estimates for Monitoring, Reporting and Verification.

  5. Uncertainties of mapping aboveground forest carbon due to plot locations using national forest inventory plot and remotely sensed data

    Wang, Guangxing; Oyana, Tonny (Dept. of Geography and Environmental Resources, Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (United States)), e-mail: gxwang@siu.edu; Zhang, Maozhen; Ge, Hongli (Dept. of Forest and Environmental Resources, Zhejiang AandF Univ., Zhejiang (China)); Gertner, George Z. (Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)); McRoberts, Ronald E. (Northern Research Station, U.S. Forest Service, St. Paul (United States))

    2011-06-15

    Forest carbon sinks significantly contribute to mitigation of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide. Thus, estimating forest carbon is becoming important to develop policies for mitigating climate change and trading carbon credits. However, a great challenge is how to quantify uncertainties in estimation of forest carbon. This study investigated uncertainties of mapping aboveground forest carbon due to location errors of sample plots for Lin-An County of China. National forest inventory plot data and Landsat TM images were combined using co-simulation algorithm. The findings show that randomly perturbing plot locations within 10 distance intervals statistically did not result in biased population mean predictions of aboveground forest carbon at a significant level of 0.05, but increased root mean square errors of the maps. The perturbations weakened spatial autocorrelation of aboveground forest carbon and its correlation with spectral variables. The perturbed distances of 800 m or less did not obviously change the spatial distribution of predicted values. However, when the perturbed distances were 1600 m or larger, the correlation coefficients of the predicted values from the perturbed locations with those from the true plot locations statistically did not significantly differ from zero at a level of 0.05 and the spatial distributions became random

  6. Remote Sensing Estimates of Grassland Aboveground Biomass Based on MODIS Net Primary Productivity (NPP: A Case Study in the Xilingol Grassland of Northern China

    Fen Zhao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The precise and rapid estimation of grassland biomass is an important scientific issue in grassland ecosystem research. In this study, based on a field survey of 1205 sites together with biomass data of the Xilingol grassland for the years 2005–2012 and the “accumulated” MODIS productivity starting from the beginning of growing season, we built regression models to estimate the aboveground biomass of the Xilingol grassland during the growing season, then further analyzed the overall condition of the grassland and the spatial and temporal distribution of the aboveground biomass. The results are summarized as follows: (1 The unitary linear model based on the field survey data and “accumulated” MODIS productivity data is the optimum model for estimating the aboveground biomass of the Xilingol grassland during the growing period, with the model accuracy reaching 69%; (2 The average aboveground biomass in the Xilingol grassland for the years 2005–2012 was estimated to be 14.35 Tg, and the average aboveground biomass density was estimated to be 71.32 g∙m−2; (3 The overall variation in the aboveground biomass showed a decreasing trend from the eastern meadow grassland to the western desert grassland; (4 There were obvious fluctuations in the aboveground biomass of the Xilingol grassland for the years 2005–2012, ranging from 10.56–17.54 Tg. Additionally, several differences in the interannual changes in aboveground biomass were observed among the various types of grassland. Large variations occurred in the temperate meadow-steppe and the typical grassland; whereas there was little change in the temperate desert-steppe and temperate steppe-desert.

  7. Spatially-Explicit Testing of a General Aboveground Carbon Density Estimation Model in aWestern Amazonian Forest Using Airborne LiDAR

    Patricio Xavier Molina; Asner, Gregory P.; Mercedes Farjas Abadía; Juan Carlos Ojeda Manrique; Luis Alberto Sánchez Diez; Renato Valencia

    2016-01-01

    Mapping aboveground carbon density in tropical forests can support CO2 emissionmonitoring and provide benefits for national resource management. Although LiDAR technology has been shown to be useful for assessing carbon density patterns, the accuracy and generality of calibrations of LiDAR-based aboveground carbon density (ACD) predictions with those obtained from field inventory techniques should be intensified in order to advance tropical forest carbon mapping. Here we present results from...

  8. Study of the behaviour of transuranics and possible chemical homologues in Lake Michigan water and biota

    Concentration factors for Pu, Am and U in Lake Michigan biota are compared to those of a number of stable trace elements that have short residence times in Lake Michigan water. The relative order of uptake for these nuclides in Lake Michigan biota is Am>Pu much>U. Evidence is summarized which suggests that the predominant oxidation state of 239, 240Pu in Lake Michigan water is 4+. Concentrations of 239, 240Pu in net plankton, filterable particulate matter, sediment trap, and benthic floc samples indicate that sorption by biogenic detritus, and settling of this material, can account for the reduced concentration of 239, 240Pu observed in surface waters during summer stratification, but that deposition into the sediments is primarily non-biological. Concentrations of 7Be, 144Ce and 137Cs in sediment trap samples show the effect of spring convective mixing and demonstrate the resuspension of mineral-rich surficial sediments during the summer months. The effect on the concentration of dissolved plutonium in the water column, of varying degrees of resuspension of sedimentary floc, is described using a simple mass-action model. A radiochemical method for the determination of americium and uranium in Lake Michigan environmental samples is also presented. (author)

  9. Selected chlorobornanes, polychlorinated naphthalenes and brominated flame retardants in Bjornoya (Bear Island) freshwater biota

    Levels of selected sparsely investigated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been measured in organisms from two Arctic lakes on Bjornoya (Bear Island). Elevated levels of chlorobornanes (CHBs) (up to 46.7 ng/g wet weight=ww), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (up to 27.2 ng/g ww), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) (up to 1.1 ng/g ww) and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs, only 4 congeners) (up to 62.7 pg/g ww), were measured in biota from Lake Ellasjoen. In Lake Oyangen, located only 5 km north of Ellasjoen, levels of these contaminants were significantly lower. δ15N-values were 7-10%o higher in organisms from Ellasjoen as compared to Oyangen. This is attributed to biological inputs related to seabird activities. The present study illustrates that contaminants such as CHBs, brominated flame retardants and PCNs accumulate in the Ellasjoen food web in a manner similar to PCBs and conventional organochlorine pesticides. Transport mechanisms that control PCB and DDT distributions, i.e. atmospheric long-range transport and biotransport by seabirds, are also relevant for the contaminants investigated in the present study. - Elevate levels of chlorobornanes, polychlorinated naphthalenes and brominated flame retardants have been measured in biota from a Norwegian Arctic lake

  10. Soil cultivation in vineyards alters interactions between soil biota and soil physical and hydrological properties

    Zaller, Johann G.; Buchholz, Jacob; Querner, Pascal; Winter, Silvia; Kratschmer, Sophie; Pachinger, Bärbel; Strauss, Peter; Bauer, Thomas; Stiper, Katrin; Potthoff, Martin; Guernion, Muriel; Scimia, Jennifer; Cluzeau, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Several ecosystem services provided by viticultural landscapes result from interactions between soil organisms and soil parameters. However, to what extent different soil cultivation intensities in vineyards compromise soil organisms and their interactions between soil physical and hydrological properties is not well understood. In this study we examined (i) to what extent different soil management intensities affect the activity and diversity of soil biota (earthworms, Collembola, litter decomposition), and (ii) how soil physical and hydrological properties influence these interactions, or vice versa. Investigating 16 vineyards in Austria, earthworms were assessed by hand sorting, Collembola via pitfall trapping and soil coring, litter decomposition by using the tea bag method. Additionally, soil physical (water infiltration, aggregate stability, porosity, bulk density, soil texture) and chemical (pH, soil carbon content, cation exchange capacity, potassium, phosphorus) parameters were assessed. Results showed complex ecological interactions between soil biota and various soil characteristics altered by management intensity. These investigations are part of the transdisciplinary BiodivERsA project VineDivers and will ultimately lead into management recommendations for various stakeholders.

  11. Perfluorinated compounds in water, sediment, soil and biota from estuarine and coastal areas of Korea

    Soil, sediment, water, and biota collected from the western coast of Korea were analyzed to determine occurrence and sources of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs). PFCs were significantly concentrations of PFCs were measured in some water and biological samples, while concentrations of PFCs in soils and sediments were relatively low. The most widely detected compound was found to be perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), with a maximum concentration in water of 450 ng/L and in fish of 612 ng/g, dw. PFOS concentrations in water and biota were both less than those thought to cause toxicity. However, in both cases concentrations were within a factor of 10 of the toxicity threshold concentration. Concentrations of PFCs were significantly greater downstream than those upstream on the same river, suggesting point sources. Overall, the detection of PFCs at relatively great concentrations in various environmental matrixes from this region of Korea suggests that further studies characterizing PFCs and their potential risk to both humans and wildlife are needed. - Among various environmental media measured, water and biological samples showed relatively high degrees of PFC contamination with the existence of point sources mainly upstream of coastal areas in Korea.

  12. Modelling Growth and Partitioning of Annual Above-Ground Vegetative and Reproductive Biomass of Grapevine

    Meggio, Franco; Vendrame, Nadia; Maniero, Giovanni; Pitacco, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    In the current climate change scenarios, both agriculture and forestry inherently may act as carbon sinks and consequently can play a key role in limiting global warming. An urgent need exists to understand which land uses and land resource types have the greatest potential to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions contributing to global change. A common believe is that agricultural fields cannot be net carbon sinks due to many technical inputs and repeated disturbances of upper soil layers that all contribute to a substantial loss both of the old and newly-synthesized organic matter. Perennial tree crops (vineyards and orchards), however, can behave differently: they grow a permanent woody structure, stand undisturbed in the same field for decades, originate a woody pruning debris, and are often grass-covered. In this context, reliable methods for quantifying and modelling emissions and carbon sequestration are required. Carbon stock changes are calculated by multiplying the difference in oven dry weight of biomass increments and losses with the appropriate carbon fraction. These data are relatively scant, and more information is needed on vineyard management practices and how they impact vineyard C sequestration and GHG emissions in order to generate an accurate vineyard GHG footprint. During the last decades, research efforts have been made for estimating the vineyard carbon budget and its allocation pattern since it is crucial to better understand how grapevines control the distribution of acquired resources in response to variation in environmental growth conditions and agronomic practices. The objective of the present study was to model and compare the dynamics of current year's above-ground biomass among four grapevine varieties. Trials were carried out over three growing seasons in field conditions. The non-linear extra-sums-of-squares method demonstrated to be a feasible way of growth models comparison to statistically assess significant differences among

  13. Allometric models for aboveground biomass of ten tree species in northeast China

    Shuo Cai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available China contains 119 million hectares of natural forest, much of which is secondary forest. An accurate estimation of the biomass of these forests is imperative because many studies conducted in northeast China have only used primary forest and this may have resulted in biased estimates. This study analyzed secondary forest in the area using information from a forest inventory to develop allometric models of the aboveground biomass (AGB. The parameter values of the diameter at breast height (DBH, tree height (H, and crown length (CL were derived from a forest inventory of 2,733 trees in a 3.5 ha plot. The wood-specific gravity (WSG was determined for 109 trees belonging to ten species. A partial sampling method was also used to determine the biomass of branches (including stem, bark and foliage in 120 trees, which substantially easy the field works. The mean AGB was 110,729 kg ha–1. We developed four allometric models from the investigation and evaluated the utility of other 19 published ones for AGB in the ten tree species. Incorporation of full range of variables with WSG-DBH-H-CL, significantly improved the precision of the models. Some of models were chosen that best fitted each tree species with high precision (R2 = 0.939, SEE 0.167. At the latitude level, the estimated AGBof secondary forest was lower than that in mature primary forests, but higher than that in primary broadleaf forest and the average level in other types of forest likewise. 

  14. Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in a Riparian Wetland Following Restoration of Hydrology

    Melissa Koontz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research presents the initial results of the effects of hydrological restoration on forested wetlands in the Mississippi alluvial plain near Memphis, Tennessee. Measurements were carried out in a secondary channel, the Loosahatchie Chute, in which rock dikes were constructed in the 1960s to keep most flow in the main navigation channel. In 2008–2009, the dikes were notched to allow more flow into the secondary channel. Study sites were established based on relative distance downstream of the notched dikes. Additionally, a reference site was established north of the Loosahatchie Chute where the dikes remained unnotched. We compared various components of vegetation composition and productivity at sites in the riparian wetlands for two years. Salix nigra had the highest Importance Value at every site. Species with minor Importance Values were Celtis laevigata, Acer rubrum, and Plantanus occidentalis. Productivity increased more following the introduction of river water in affected sites compared to the reference. Aboveground net primary productivity was highest at the reference site (2926 ± 458.1 g·m−2·year−1, the intact site; however, there were greater increase at the sites in the Loosahatchie Chute, where measurements ranged from 1197.7 ± 160.0 g m−2·year−1·to 2874.2 ± 794.0 g·m−2·year−1. The site furthest from the notching was the most affected. Pulsed inputs into these wetlands may enhance forested wetland productivity. Continued monitoring will quantify impacts of restored channel hydrology along the Mississippi River.

  15. Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in a Riparian Wetland Following Restoration of Hydrology.

    Koontz, Melissa; Lundberg, Christopher; Lane, Robert; Day, John; Pezeshki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This research presents the initial results of the effects of hydrological restoration on forested wetlands in the Mississippi alluvial plain near Memphis, Tennessee. Measurements were carried out in a secondary channel, the Loosahatchie Chute, in which rock dikes were constructed in the 1960s to keep most flow in the main navigation channel. In 2008-2009, the dikes were notched to allow more flow into the secondary channel. Study sites were established based on relative distance downstream of the notched dikes. Additionally, a reference site was established north of the Loosahatchie Chute where the dikes remained unnotched. We compared various components of vegetation composition and productivity at sites in the riparian wetlands for two years. Salix nigra had the highest Importance Value at every site. Species with minor Importance Values were Celtis laevigata, Acer rubrum, and Plantanus occidentalis. Productivity increased more following the introduction of river water in affected sites compared to the reference. Aboveground net primary productivity was highest at the reference site (2926 ± 458.1 g·m(-2)·year(-1)), the intact site; however, there were greater increase at the sites in the Loosahatchie Chute, where measurements ranged from 1197.7 ± 160.0 g m(-2)·year(-1)·to 2874.2 ± 794.0 g·m(-2)·year(-1). The site furthest from the notching was the most affected. Pulsed inputs into these wetlands may enhance forested wetland productivity. Continued monitoring will quantify impacts of restored channel hydrology along the Mississippi River. PMID:26861409

  16. Increasing precipitation event size increases aboveground net primary productivity in a semi-arid grassland.

    Heisler-White, Jana L; Knapp, Alan K; Kelly, Eugene F

    2008-11-01

    Water availability is the primary constraint to aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in many terrestrial biomes, and it is an ecosystem driver that will be strongly altered by future climate change. Global circulation models predict a shift in precipitation patterns to growing season rainfall events that are larger in size but fewer in number. This "repackaging" of rainfall into large events with long intervening dry intervals could be particularly important in semi-arid grasslands because it is in marked contrast to the frequent but small events that have historically defined this ecosystem. We investigated the effect of more extreme rainfall patterns on ANPP via the use of rainout shelters and paired this experimental manipulation with an investigation of long-term data for ANPP and precipitation. Experimental plots (n = 15) received the long-term (30-year) mean growing season precipitation quantity; however, this amount was distributed as 12, six, or four events applied manually according to seasonal patterns for May-September. The long-term mean (1940-2005) number of rain events in this shortgrass steppe was 14 events, with a minimum of nine events in years of average precipitation. Thus, our experimental treatments pushed this system beyond its recent historical range of variability. Plots receiving fewer, but larger rain events had the highest rates of ANPP (184 +/- 38 g m(-2)), compared to plots receiving more frequent rainfall (105 +/- 24 g m(-2)). ANPP in all experimental plots was greater than long-term mean ANPP for this system (97 g m(-2)), which may be explained in part by the more even distribution of applied rain events. Soil moisture data indicated that larger events led to greater soil water content and likely permitted moisture penetration to deeper in the soil profile. These results indicate that semi-arid grasslands are capable of responding immediately and substantially to forecast shifts to more extreme precipitation patterns. PMID

  17. Sensitivity of L-Band SAR Backscatter to Aboveground Biomass of Global Forests

    Yifan Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR backscatter measurements are sensitive to forest aboveground biomass (AGB, and the observations from space can be used for mapping AGB globally. However, the radar sensitivity saturates at higher AGB values depending on the wavelength and geometry of radar measurements, and is influenced by the structure of the forest and environmental conditions. Here, we examine the sensitivity of SAR at the L-band frequency (~25 cm wavelength to AGB in order to examine the performance of future joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Indian Space Research Organisation NASA-ISRO SAR mission in mapping the AGB of global forests. For SAR data, we use the Phased Array L-Band SAR (PALSAR backscatter from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS aggregated at a 100-m spatial resolution; and for AGB data, we use more than three million AGB values derived from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS LiDAR height metrics at about 0.16–0.25 ha footprints across eleven different forest types globally. The results from statistical analysis show that, over all eleven forest types, saturation level of L-band radar at HV polarization on average remains ≥100 Mg·ha−1. Fresh water swamp forests have the lowest saturation with AGB at ~80 Mg·ha−1, while needleleaf forests have the highest saturation at ~250 Mg·ha−1. Swamp forests show a strong backscatter from the vegetation-surface specular reflection due to inundation that requires to be treated separately from those on terra firme. Our results demonstrate that L-Band backscatter relations to AGB can be significantly different depending on forest types and environmental effects, requiring multiple algorithms to map AGB from time series of satellite radar observations globally.

  18. Carbon Sequestration Potential in Aboveground Biomass of Hybrid Eucalyptus Plantation Forest

    Siti Latifah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Forests are a significant part of the global carbon cycle. Forests sequester carbon by conducting photosynthesis, which is the process of converting light energy to chemical energy and storing it in the chemical bonds of sugar. Carbon sequestration through forestry has the potential to play a significant role in ameliorating global environmental problems such as atmospheric accumulation of GHG's and climate change.  The present investigation was carried out to determine carbon sequestration potential of hybrid Eucalyptus. This study was conducted primarily to develop a prediction model of carbon storage capacity for plantation forest of hybrid Eucalyptus in Aek Nauli, Simalungun District, North Sumatera. Models were tested and assessed for statistical validity and accuracy in predicting biomass and carbon, based on determination coefficient (R and correlation coefficient (r, aggregative deviation percentage (AgD, and the average deviation percentage (AvD. The best general model to estimate the biomass of hybrid Eucalyptus was Y = 1351,09x^0,876. e^(0,094.  Results showed that hybrid Eucalyptus had an average above-ground biomass in year 0 (the land without the eucalyptus trees up to year 3 as large as 1.36, 11.56, 43.18, and 63.84 t ha. The carbon content of hybrid Eucalyptus were 0.61, 5.2, 19.43 t^(-1, and 28,73  t^(-1 C ha while the carbon sequestration potential were 2.23, 19.08, 71.31, and 105.43 t^(-1 CO  ha^(-1 respectively.Keywords: biomass, carbon stock, model, hybrid Eucalyptus, plantation forest

  19. Allometric Equations for Estimating Tree Aboveground Biomass in Tropical Dipterocarp Forests of Vietnam

    Bao Huy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are few allometric equations available for dipterocarp forests, despite the fact that this forest type covers extensive areas in tropical Southeast Asia. This study aims to develop a set of equations to estimate tree aboveground biomass (AGB in dipterocarp forests in Vietnam and to validate and compare their predictive performance with allometric equations used for dipterocarps in Indonesia and pantropical areas. Diameter at breast height (DBH, total tree height (H, and wood density (WD were used as input variables of the nonlinear weighted least square models. Akaike information criterion (AIC and residual plots were used to select the best models; while percent bias, root mean square percentage error, and mean absolute percent error were used to compare their performance to published models. For mixed-species, the best equation was AGB = 0.06203 × DBH 2.26430 × H 0.51415 × WD 0.79456 . When applied to a random independent validation dataset, the predicted values from the generic equations and the dipterocarp equations in Indonesia overestimated the AGB for different sites, indicating the need for region-specific equations. At the genus level, the selected equations were AGB = 0.03713 × DBH 2.73813 and AGB = 0.07483 × DBH 2.54496 for two genera, Dipterocarpus and Shorea, respectively, in Vietnam. Compared to the mixed-species equations, the genus-specific equations improved the accuracy of the AGB estimates. Additionally, the genus-specific equations showed no significant differences in predictive performance in different regions (e.g., Indonesia, Vietnam of Southeast Asia.

  20. Dynamics, aboveground biomass and composition on permanent plots, Tambopata National Reserve. Madre de Dios, Peru

    Nadir C. Pallqui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the floristic composition and changes in stored biomass and dynamics over time in 9 permanent plots monitored by RAINFOR (Amazon Forest Inventory Network and located in the lowland Amazon rainforest of the Tambopata National Reserve. Data were acquired in the field using the standardized methodology of RAINFOR. The biomass was estimated using the equation for tropical moist forests of Chave et al. (2005. Biomass dynamics were analyzed, in three separated periods from 2003 to 2011. 64 families, 219 genera and 531 species were recorded. The tree floristic composition is very similar in all plots except for one swamp plot, although but it is also evident that two slightly different forest communities exist in the rest of landscape, apparently related to the age of the ancient river terraces in the area. Mortality and recruitment of individuals averaged 2.12 ± 0.52% and 1.92 ± 0.49%, respectively. The turnover rate is 2.02% per year. Aboveground biomass stored in these forests averages 296.2 ± 33.9 t ha-1. The biomass dynamics show a total net gain of 1.96, 1.69 and –1.23 t ha-1 for period respectively. Prior to the drought of 2010 a change in biomass was found 1.88 t ha-1 yr-1 and post drought was -0.18 t ha-1 yr-1 on average, though the difference is not significant. Demographic analysis suggests a dynamic equilibrium in the plots. The negative balance of biomass observed for the period 2008 – 2011 may be due to the drought of 2010, in which half of the monitored plots experienced negative net biomass change due to mortality of individuals selectively affecting the floristic composition.

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, plant chemistry, and aboveground herbivory on Senecio jacobaea

    Reidinger, Stefan; Eschen, René; Gange, Alan C.; Finch, Paul; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect insect herbivores by changing plant growth and chemistry. However, many factors can influence the symbiotic relationship between plant and fungus, potentially obscuring experimental treatments and ecosystem impacts. In a field experiment, we assessed AMF colonization levels of individual ragwort ( Senecio jacobaea) plants growing in grassland plots that were originally sown with 15 or 4 plant species, or were unsown. We measured the concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), and assessed the presence of aboveground insect herbivores on the sampled plants. Total AMF colonization and colonization by arbuscules was lower in plots sown with 15 species than in plots sown with 4 species and unsown plots. AMF colonization was positively related to the cover of oxeye daisy ( Leucanthemum vulgare) and a positive relationship between colonization by arbuscules and the occurrence of a specialist seed-feeding fly ( Pegohylemyia seneciella) was found. The occurrence of stem-boring, leaf-mining and sap-sucking insects was not affected by AMF colonization. Total PA concentrations were negatively related to colonization levels by vesicles, but did not differ among the sowing treatments. No single factor explained the observed differences in AMF colonization among the sowing treatments or insect herbivore occurrence on S. jacobaea. However, correlations across the treatments suggest that some of the variation was due to the abundance of one plant species, which is known to stimulate AMF colonization of neighbouring plants, while AMF colonization was related to the occurrence of a specialist insect herbivore. Our results thus illustrate that in natural systems, the ecosystem impact of AMF through their influence on the occurrence of specialist insects can be recognised, but they also highlight the confounding effect of neighbouring plant species identity. Hence, our results emphasise the importance of field

  2. Biomassas de partes aéreas em plantas da caatinga Aboveground biomass of caatinga plants

    Grécia Cavalcanti Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available As biomassas de partes aéreas de nove espécies da caatinga foram determinadas e relacionadas com as medidas das plantas, cortando-se 30 plantas de cada espécie e separando-as em caule, galhos, ramos e folhas. As espécies foram divididas em dois grupos: seis espécies com plantas grandes e três com plantas menores. Cada grupo foi separado em classes de diâmetro do caule (DAP. As alturas totais (HT dobraram (3,8 a 8,5 m da classe de menor para a de maior diâmetro (Biomass of aboveground parts of nine caatinga species were determined and related to plant measurements. Thirty plants of each species were collected and separated into stems, branches, twigs and leaves. The species were divided in two groups: six species of large plants and three species of smaller plants. Each group was divided into classes of stem diameter (DBH. Plant height (H doubled (3.8 to 8.5 m from the smallest-diameter class to the largest diameter ( 5 cm diameter, 20% of branches from 1 to 5 cm, 5% of twigs < 1 cm and 5% of leaves. DBH was the single variable that best predicted biomass of parts, in both species groups, according to a power equation (B = a DBH b. H and CPA were also significantly related to biomass for some parts and group, but with R² lower than DBH. Combining DBH and H improved estimation but not enough to justify the extra field effort in determining H. Therefore, plant part biomass can be estimated from measurements of stem diameter, in a non-destructive process.

  3. Quantification of uncertainty in aboveground biomass estimates derived from small-footprint LiDAR data

    Xu, Q.; Greenberg, J. A.; Li, B.; Ramirez, C.; Balamuta, J. J.; Evans, K.; Man, A.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A promising approach to determining aboveground biomass (AGB) in forests comes through the use of individual tree crown delineation (ITCD) techniques applied to small-footprint LiDAR data. These techniques, when combined with allometric equations, can produce per-tree estimates of AGB. At this scale, AGB estimates can be quantified in a manner similar to how ground-based forest inventories are produced. However, these approaches have significant uncertainties that are rarely described in full. Allometric equations are often based on species-specific diameter-at-breast height (DBH) relationships, but neither DBH nor species can be reliably determined using remote sensing analysis. Furthermore, many approaches to ITCD only delineate trees appearing in the upper canopy so subcanopy trees are often missing from the inventories. In this research, we performed a propagation-of-error analysis to determine the spatially varying uncertainties in AGB estimates at the individual plant and stand level for a large collection of LiDAR acquisitions covering a large portion of California. Furthermore, we determined the relative contribution of various aspects of the analysis towards the uncertainty, including errors in the ITCD results, the allometric equations, the taxonomic designation, and the local biophysical environment. Watershed segmentation was used to obtain the preliminary crown segments. Lidar points within the preliminary segments were extracted to form profiling data of the segments, and then mode detection algorithms were applied to identify the tree number and tree heights within each segment. As part of this analysis, we derived novel "remote sensing aware" allometric equations and their uncertainties based on three-dimensional morphological metrics that can be accurately derived from LiDAR data.

  4. The U.S. Department of Energy's graded approach for evaluating radiation doses to non-human biota

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been active in developing requirements, methods, and guidance for protection of non-human biota from the effects of ionizing radiation since the late 1980's. Radiation protection of the environment is an emerging issue that will likely require attention in environmental monitoring programs, and in decisions regarding cleanup and long-term stewardship of radioactively-contaminated sites. The DOE currently has a radiation dose limit for protecting aquatic organisms, and has considered dose limits for terrestrial biota. Practical, cost-effective guidance for implementation of these dose rate guidelines are needed. In response, DOE has developed methods, models, and guidance within a graded approach for evaluating radiation doses to non-human biota. The methodology was developed using an interdisciplinary team approach that included both 'developers' and 'users' through DOE's Biota Dose Assessment Committee (BDAC). The first phase of the graded or multi-tiered approach consists of a general screening methodology that provides limiting concentrations of radionuclides, termed Biota Concentration Guides (BCGs), for use in screening water, sediment, and soil to determine if dose guidelines for non-human biota are exceeded. BCGs were derived for twenty-three target radionuclides. Four organism types (aquatic animals, riparian animals, terrestrial animals, and terrestrial plants) were selected as the basis for methods development. Internal doses were calculated as the product of media concentration, bioaccumulation factor(s), and dose conversion factors. External doses were calculated based on the assumption of immersion of the organism in soil, sediment, or water. Kinetic and allometric techniques were used to fill data gaps in predicting radionuclide concentration factors across a large range of terrestrial and riparian species of animals. The assumptions and default parameters result in conservative BCGs for screening

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on 'effect of radiation on non-human biota'

    Safety assessment and protection for the radiation exposure were so far mainly based on the radiation effects on human health, because it has been generally recognized that, when human beings are protected, other environmental life, at least in the level of species or groups, will be protected from the radiation hazards, even if individuals may be affected. Recently, with increasing concern on environmental protection, a new framework of radiation protection has been proposed, where non-human biota as well as human beings is included. Researches on the environmental radiation protection need a contribution of multi-disciplinary researchers as similar to the other environmental sciences. Especially, a research field on the biological effect of radiation on non-human biota is fundamental and essential. Therefore, we planned the Workshop entitled Effect of Radiation on the Non-human Biota this time. All the 13 papers presented at the entitled meeting are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Plant diversity surpasses plant functional groups and plant productivity as driver of soil biota in the long term.

    Nico Eisenhauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the most significant consequences of contemporary global change is the rapid decline of biodiversity in many ecosystems. Knowledge of the consequences of biodiversity loss in terrestrial ecosystems is largely restricted to single ecosystem functions. Impacts of key plant functional groups on soil biota are considered to be more important than those of plant diversity; however, current knowledge mainly relies on short-term experiments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied changes in the impacts of plant diversity and presence of key functional groups on soil biota by investigating the performance of soil microorganisms and soil fauna two, four and six years after the establishment of model grasslands. The results indicate that temporal changes of plant community effects depend on the trophic affiliation of soil animals: plant diversity effects on decomposers only occurred after six years, changed little in herbivores, but occurred in predators after two years. The results suggest that plant diversity, in terms of species and functional group richness, is the most important plant community property affecting soil biota, exceeding the relevance of plant above- and belowground productivity and the presence of key plant functional groups, i.e. grasses and legumes, with the relevance of the latter decreasing in time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Plant diversity effects on biota are not only due to the presence of key plant functional groups or plant productivity highlighting the importance of diverse and high-quality plant derived resources, and supporting the validity of the singular hypothesis for soil biota. Our results demonstrate that in the long term plant diversity essentially drives the performance of soil biota questioning the paradigm that belowground communities are not affected by plant diversity and reinforcing the importance of biodiversity for ecosystem functioning.

  7. Radionuclide accumulation by aquatic biota exposed to contaminated water in artificial ecosystems before and after its passage through the ground

    This study was designed to investigate the comparative accumulation of radionuclides from contaminated water in artificial ecosystems before and after the water's passage through the ground. Fish, clams, algae, and an emergent vascular plant were experimentally exposed to mixtures of radionuclides in three aqueous streams. Two streams consisted of industrial water discharged directly into a leaching trench, and the same water after it had migrated through the ground for a distance of 260 meters. The third stream was river water, which served as a background or control. Biota exposed to river water in the control stream had very low concentrations of 60Co, less than 3 pCi per gram dry weight (pCi/g DW). Other radionuclides were essentially unmeasurable. Biota exposed to trench water accumulated very high relative concentrations of 60Co. Biota exposed to trench water also had measurable concentrations of 155Eu, 144Ce, 141Ce, 125Sb, 124Sb, 103Ru, 106Ru, 137Cs, 95Zr, 95Nb, 58Co, 54Mn, 59Fe, 65Zn, 90Sr, /sup 239,240/Pu, and 238Pu. Biota exposed to ground water had concentrations of 60Co that ranged between 50 and 1200 pCi/g DW. Fish flesh had the lowest concentration of 60Co and algae the highest. Strontium-90 was measured in the tissues of aquatic biota at concentrations ranging between 360 pCi/g DW in clam flesh to 3400 pCi/g DW in leaves and stems of Veronica. Leaves and fruits of tomato plants rooted in the ground water accumulated 90Sr at concentrations of 160 pCi in fruits and 4200 pCi in leaves. Data indicate that 60Co and 90Sr migrated through the ground along with ground-water flow and were available to all classes of aquatic biota and tomato plants rooted in the water via root uptake, sorption, and food chain transfers. 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Changes to the ocular biota with time in extended- and daily-wear disposable contact lens use.

    Stapleton, F; Willcox, M D; Fleming, C M; Hickson, S; Sweeney, D F; Holden, B A

    1995-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria may play a role in the etiology of certain soft contact lens (SCL)-related diseases. Contact lens (CL) wear may modify the normal ocular biota, providing a more favorable environment for potential pathogens. This study reports temporal changes in ocular biota in daily-wear (DW) and extended-wear (EW) disposable SCL use in experienced and neophyte wearers. Lid margin and bulbar conjunctival biota were sampled prior to CL fitting in 26 previous DW SCL users, 18 previous EW SCL users, and 26 neophytes. Wearers were fitted with an etafilcon A CL in one eye and a polymacon CL in the fellow eye. Lenses were worn on a daily basis by the 26 previous DW SCL wearers and on an EW basis by the remaining 44 subjects. The ocular biota was further sampled after 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of wear. The ocular biota consisted of coagulase-negative staphylococci, Corynebacterium spp., Micrococcus spp., and Propionibacterium spp. Potential pathogens were rarely isolated at baseline. No significant trend of increasing ocular colonization was shown for extended CL wear. Lid and conjunctival colonization increased with DW SCL use (P < 0.001), although this increase occurred for nonpathogenic species only. Fewer potential pathogens were isolated from DW SCL than from EW SCL users (P < 0.05). The lid margin consistently showed greater colonization than the conjunctiva and may be a source of potential pathogens during CL wear. Hydrogel CL wear appears to modify the ocular biota. An increased number of commensal organisms were present in DW SCL use. EW SCL use altered the spectrum of organisms isolated. These alterations may suppress the normal ocular defense mechanisms and may be relevant in the pathogenesis of CL-related disease. PMID:7591092

  9. TOXIC EFFECT OF PESTICIDES ON THE BIOTA OF FRESHWATER RESERVOIRS OF UKRAINE (A REVIEW

    N. Kolesnyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze scientific sources on the studies of toxic and lethal concentrations of pesticides on phytoplankton, zooplankton, zoobenthos and fish in current conditions of Ukraine. Findings. A review of works of a variety of scientists showed that pesticides with different chemical origins have disastrous effects on everyone without the exception of freshwater biota organisms. The article highlights the peculiarities of the toxic effects of pesticides of major chemical groups, which are used or stored in Ukraine. Their toxic and lethal concentrations for the major species of phytoplankton, zooplankton, zoobenthos and ichthyofauna reservoirs are considered. The data on basic features of behavioral reactions of aquatic organisms on poisoning by pesticides are provided. The basic structural and systemic diosrders of homeostasis of the organisms of aquatic biota are described. The effect of pesticides on phytoplankton needs further research, however, is was found that they have common feature as the disturbace of photosynthesis process and accumulation. In turn, this provoques kills in water bodies and poisoning of phytoplanctivorous fish. Zooplanktonic organisms are highly sensitive to pesticides; hence they can be used as an indicator of the state of fresh water. It was found that, pesticides depending on their concentration have different toxic effects on zooplankton organisms. The effect of pesticides on benthic organisms was little investigated. It is known that benthic communities respond to the presence of pesticide by changes in species composition, number of species, abundance and biomass of benthos in general and individual taxonomic groups of benthic invertebrates. The toxicity of pesticides for fish depends on their chemical nature, the form of the preparation, dose, fish species and age, water temperature and the content of oxygen and salts. In particular, juvenile fish are much more sensitive to the chemicals, and an increase in

  10. Examining Spectral Reflectance Saturation in Landsat Imagery and Corresponding Solutions to Improve Forest Aboveground Biomass Estimation

    Panpan Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data saturation problem in Landsat imagery is well recognized and is regarded as an important factor resulting in inaccurate forest aboveground biomass (AGB estimation. However, no study has examined the saturation values for different vegetation types such as coniferous and broadleaf forests. The objective of this study is to estimate the saturation values in Landsat imagery for different vegetation types in a subtropical region and to explore approaches to improving forest AGB estimation. Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery, digital elevation model data, and field measurements in Zhejiang province of Eastern China were used. Correlation analysis and scatterplots were first used to examine specific spectral bands and their relationships with AGB. A spherical model was then used to quantitatively estimate the saturation value of AGB for each vegetation type. A stratification of vegetation types and/or slope aspects was used to determine the potential to improve AGB estimation performance by developing a specific AGB estimation model for each category. Stepwise regression analysis based on Landsat spectral signatures and textures using grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM was used to develop AGB estimation models for different scenarios: non-stratification, stratification based on either vegetation types, slope aspects, or the combination of vegetation types and slope aspects. The results indicate that pine forest and mixed forest have the highest AGB saturation values (159 and 152 Mg/ha, respectively, Chinese fir and broadleaf forest have lower saturation values (143 and 123 Mg/ha, respectively, and bamboo forest and shrub have the lowest saturation values (75 and 55 Mg/ha, respectively. The stratification based on either vegetation types or slope aspects provided smaller root mean squared errors (RMSEs than non-stratification. The AGB estimation models based on stratification of both vegetation types and slope aspects provided the most

  11. Estimating forest aboveground biomass using HJ-1 Satellite CCD and ICESat GLAS waveform data

    2010-01-01

    The ecosystem in northeastern China and the Russian Far East is a hotspot of scientific research into the global carbon balance.Forest aboveground biomass(AGB) is an important component in the land surface carbon cycle.In this study,using forest inventory data and forest distribution data,the AGB was estimated for forest in Daxinganlin in northeastern China by combining charge-coupled device(CCD) data from the Small Satellite for Disaster and Environment Monitoring and Forecast(HJ-1) and Geoscience Laser Altimeter System(GLAS) waveform data from the Ice,Cloud and land Elevation Satellite(ICESat).The forest AGB prediction models were separately developed for different forest types in the research area at GLAS footprint level from GLAS waveform parameters and field survey plot biomass in the Changqing(CQ) Forest Center,which was calculated from forest inventory data.The resulted statistical regression models have a R2=0.68 for conifer and R2=0.71 for broadleaf forests.These models were used to estimate biomass for all GLAS footprints of forest located in the study area.All GLAS footprint biomass coupled with various spectral reflectivity parameters and vegetation indices derived from HJ-1 satellite CCD data were used in multiple regression analyses to establish biomass prediction models(R2=0.55 and R2=0.52 for needle and broadleaf respectively).Then the models were used to produce a forest AGB map for the whole study area using the HJ-1 data.Biomass data obtained from forest inventory data of the Zhuanglin(ZL) Forest Center were used as independent field measurements to validate the AGB estimated from HJ-1 CCD data(R2=0.71).About 80% of biomass samples had an error less than 20 t ha-1,and the mean error of all validation samples is 5.74 t ha-1.The pixel-level biomass map was then stratified into different biomass levels to illustrate the AGB spatial distribution pattern in this area.It was found that HJ-1 wide-swath data and GLAS waveform data can be combined to

  12. Estimating aboveground biomass in the boreal forests of the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    Ji, L.; Wylie, B. K.; Nossov, D.; Peterson, B.; Waldrop, M. P.; McFarland, J.; Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Rover, J. A.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of aboveground biomass (AGB) in Alaska's boreal forests is essential to accurately evaluate terrestrial carbon stocks and dynamics in northern high-latitude ecosystems. However, regional AGB datasets with spatially detailed information (DBH) or basal diameter (BD) for live and dead trees and shrubs (>1 m tall), which were converted to plot-level AGB using allometric equations. We acquired Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images from the Web Enabled Landsat Data (WELD) that provides multi-date composites of top-of-atmosphere reflectance and brightness temperature for Alaska. From the WELD images, we generated a three-year (2008 - 2010) image composite for the Yukon River Basin using a series of compositing criteria including non-saturation, non-cloudiness, maximal normalize difference vegetation index (NDVI), and maximal brightness temperature. Airborne lidar datasets were acquired for two sub-regions in the central basin in 2009, which were converted to vegetation height datasets using the bare-earth digital surface model (DSM) and the first-return DSM. We created a multiple regression model in which the response variable was the field-observed AGB and the predictor variables were Landsat-derived reflectance, brightness temperature, and spectral vegetation indices including NDVI, soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), normalized difference infrared index (NDII), and normalized difference water index (NDWI). Principal component analysis was incorporated in the regression model to remedy the multicollinearity problems caused by high correlations between predictor variables. The model fitted the observed data well with an R-square of 0.62, mean absolute error of 29.1 Mg/ha, and mean bias error of 3.9 Mg/ha. By applying this model to the Landsat mosaic, we generated a 30-m AGB map for the boreal forests in the Yukon River Basin. Validation of the Landsat-derived AGB using the lidar dataset indicated a

  13. Mapping Global Forest Aboveground Biomass with Spaceborne LiDAR, Optical Imagery, and Forest Inventory Data

    Tianyu Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As a large carbon pool, global forest ecosystems are a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Accurate estimations of global forest aboveground biomass (AGB can improve the understanding of global carbon dynamics and help to quantify anthropogenic carbon emissions. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR techniques have been proven that can accurately capture both horizontal and vertical forest structures and increase the accuracy of forest AGB estimation. In this study, we mapped the global forest AGB density at a 1-km resolution through the integration of ground inventory data, optical imagery, Geoscience Laser Altimeter System/Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite data, climate surfaces, and topographic data. Over 4000 ground inventory records were collected from published literatures to train the forest AGB estimation model and validate the resulting global forest AGB product. Our wall-to-wall global forest AGB map showed that the global forest AGB density was 210.09 Mg/ha on average, with a standard deviation of 109.31 Mg/ha. At the continental level, Africa (333.34 ± 63.80 Mg/ha and South America (301.68 ± 67.43 Mg/ha had higher AGB density. The AGB density in Asia, North America and Europe were 172.28 ± 94.75, 166.48 ± 84.97, and 132.97 ± 50.70 Mg/ha, respectively. The wall-to-wall forest AGB map was evaluated at plot level using independent plot measurements. The adjusted coefficient of determination (R2 and root-mean-square error (RMSE between our predicted results and the validation plots were 0.56 and 87.53 Mg/ha, respectively. At the ecological zone level, the R2 and RMSE between our map and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggested values were 0.56 and 101.21 Mg/ha, respectively. Moreover, a comprehensive comparison was also conducted between our forest AGB map and other published regional AGB products. Overall, our forest AGB map showed good agreements with these regional AGB products, but some of the regional

  14. Mapping aboveground woody biomass using forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques.

    Yadav, Bechu K V; Nandy, S

    2015-05-01

    Mapping forest biomass is fundamental for estimating CO₂ emissions, and planning and monitoring of forests and ecosystem productivity. The present study attempted to map aboveground woody biomass (AGWB) integrating forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques, viz., direct radiometric relationships (DRR), k-nearest neighbours (k-NN) and cokriging (CoK) and to evaluate their accuracy. A part of the Timli Forest Range of Kalsi Soil and Water Conservation Division, Uttarakhand, India was selected for the present study. Stratified random sampling was used to collect biophysical data from 36 sample plots of 0.1 ha (31.62 m × 31.62 m) size. Species-specific volumetric equations were used for calculating volume and multiplied by specific gravity to get biomass. Three forest-type density classes, viz. 10-40, 40-70 and >70% of Shorea robusta forest and four non-forest classes were delineated using on-screen visual interpretation of IRS P6 LISS-III data of December 2012. The volume in different strata of forest-type density ranged from 189.84 to 484.36 m(3) ha(-1). The total growing stock of the forest was found to be 2,024,652.88 m(3). The AGWB ranged from 143 to 421 Mgha(-1). Spectral bands and vegetation indices were used as independent variables and biomass as dependent variable for DRR, k-NN and CoK. After validation and comparison, k-NN method of Mahalanobis distance (root mean square error (RMSE) = 42.25 Mgha(-1)) was found to be the best method followed by fuzzy distance and Euclidean distance with RMSE of 44.23 and 45.13 Mgha(-1) respectively. DRR was found to be the least accurate method with RMSE of 67.17 Mgha(-1). The study highlighted the potential of integrating of forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques for forest biomass mapping. PMID:25930205

  15. Investigating Appropriate Sampling Design for Estimating Above-Ground Biomass in Bruneian Lowland Mixed Dipterocarp Forest

    Lee, S.; Lee, D.; Abu Salim, K.; Yun, H. M.; Han, S.; Lee, W. K.; Davies, S. J.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mixed tropical forest structure is highly heterogeneous unlike plantation or mixed temperate forest structure, and therefore, different sampling approaches are required. However, the appropriate sampling design for estimating the above-ground biomass (AGB) in Bruneian lowland mixed dipterocarp forest (MDF) has not yet been fully clarified. The aim of this study was to provide supportive information in sampling design for Bruneian forest carbon inventory. The study site was located at Kuala Belalong lowland MDF, which is part of the Ulu Tembulong National Park, Brunei Darussalam. Six 60 m × 60 m quadrats were established, separated by a distance of approximately 100 m and each was subdivided into quadrats of 10 m × 10 m, at an elevation between 200 and 300 m above sea level. At each plot all free-standing trees with diameter at breast height (dbh) ≥ 1 cm were measured. The AGB for all trees with dbh ≥ 10 cm was estimated by allometric models. In order to analyze changes in the diameter-dependent parameters used for estimating the AGB, different quadrat areas, ranging from 10 m × 10 m to 60 m × 60 m, were used across the study area, starting at the South-West end and moving towards the North-East end. The derived result was as follows: (a) Big trees (dbh ≥ 70 cm) with sparse distribution have remarkable contribution to the total AGB in Bruneian lowland MDF, and therefore, special consideration is required when estimating the AGB of big trees. Stem number of trees with dbh ≥ 70 cm comprised only 2.7% of all trees with dbh ≥ 10 cm, but 38.5% of the total AGB. (b) For estimating the AGB of big trees at the given acceptable limit of precision (p), it is more efficient to use large quadrats than to use small quadrats, because the total sampling area decreases with the former. Our result showed that 239 20 m × 20 m quadrats (9.6 ha in total) were required, while 15 60 m × 60 m quadrats (5.4 ha in total) were required when estimating the AGB of the trees

  16. Defoliation reduces soil biota - and modifies stimulating effects of elevated CO2

    Dam, Marie; Christensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    defoliation on microbial biomass that was not apparently affected by global change. The negative effect of defoliation cascades through to soil nematodes as dependent on CO2 and drought. At ambient CO2, drought and defoliation each reduced nematodes. In contrast, at elevated CO2, a combination of drought and...... defoliation was needed to reduce nematodes. We found positive effects of CO2 on root density and microbial biomass. Defoliation affected soil biota negatively, whereas elevated CO2 stimulated the plant-soil system. This effect seen in June is contrasted by the effects seen in September at the same site. Late...... to experimental climate and atmospheric factors based on prognoses for year 2075 and further exposed to defoliation. By defoliating plants, we were able to study how global change modifies the interactions of the plant-soil system. Shoot production, root biomass, microbial biomass, and nematode...

  17. [A new approach to modeling the diversity dynamics of Phanerozoic marine biota].

    Markov, A V

    2001-01-01

    Modeling of fossil diversity dynamics is usually done with the help of the models borrowed from the population dynamics theory. However there are principal differences between organisms and taxa, reproduction and divergence, mortality and extinction that make this approach doubtful. Another model is presented here, in which absolute origination rate does not depend on diversity, the ability of new genera to sustain unpredictable environmental changes increases three times abruptly at Cambrian/Ordovician, Permian/Triassic and Cretaceous/Tertiary boundaries. In this model the diversity increases due to accumulation of long-lived genera. The computer simulation showed that the model agrees with empirical data by 15 major criteria. The laws of community evolution apparently can explain the general pattern of punctuated equilibrium in the evolution of marine biota. PMID:11871265

  18. Floodplain data: ecosystem characteristics and /sup 137/Cs concentrations in biota and soil. [ORNL

    Van Voris, P.; Dahlman, R.C.

    1976-11-01

    Radiocesium (/sup 137/Cs) distribution was determined in soil, roots, ground vegetation, overstory, litter, mammals, feces, and insects for a floodplain ecosystem contaminated by radioactive wastes from Manhattan Project operations in 1944. The 2-ha research site was located on the ERDA reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in a drained holding pond between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and White Oak Lake. Maximum /sup 137/Cs concentrations in soil occurred near the old retention pond dam (84,400 pCi/g) and at the upper portion of the floodplain boundary (70,500 pCi/g). This bimodal distribution pattern of /sup 137/Cs was evident for all samples collected. Large amounts of data have been collected since the summer of 1974. This report documents the data on ecosystem characteristics and /sup 137/Cs concentrations in biota and soil.

  19. Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota. Final summary report

    Brown, J.; Gjelsvik, R. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Holm, E. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden)); Roos, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Saxen, R.; Outola, I. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland))

    2009-03-15

    The activities of the GAPRAD project are summarised in this report. The background and rationale to GAPRAD are presented and explained. Most notably this relates to a lack of information on naturally occuring radionuclides in terrestrial and aquatic systems that have direct applicability for use in environmental impact assessments. Results from field activities are presented from the Dovrefjell area in Norway (terrestrial study) and selected lake and brackish water systems in Finland. The data mainly concern activity concentrations of Po-210 in environmental media and selected biota allowing concentration ratios to be derived where appropriate. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental work conducted within the project are presented. (au)

  20. Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota. Final summary report

    The activities of the GAPRAD project are summarised in this report. The background and rationale to GAPRAD are presented and explained. Most notably this relates to a lack of information on naturally occuring radionuclides in terrestrial and aquatic systems that have direct applicability for use in environmental impact assessments. Results from field activities are presented from the Dovrefjell area in Norway (terrestrial study) and selected lake and brackish water systems in Finland. The data mainly concern activity concentrations of Po-210 in environmental media and selected biota allowing concentration ratios to be derived where appropriate. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental work conducted within the project are presented. (au)

  1. Pu-239 organ specific dosimetric model applied to non-human biota

    Kaspar, Matthew Jason

    There are few locations throughout the world, like the Maralinga nuclear test site located in south western Australia, where sufficient plutonium contaminate concentration levels exist that they can be utilized for studies of the long-term radionuclide accumulation in non-human biota. The information obtained will be useful for the potential human users of the site while also keeping with international efforts to better understand doses to non-human biota. In particular, this study focuses primarily on a rabbit sample set collected from the population located within the site. Our approach is intended to employ the same dose and dose rate methods selected by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and adapted by the scientific community for similar research questions. These models rely on a series of simplifying assumptions on biota and their geometry; in particular; organisms are treated as spherical and ellipsoidal representations displaying the animal mass and volume. These simplifications assume homogeneity of all animal tissues. In collaborative efforts between Colorado State University and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), we are expanding current knowledge on radionuclide accumulation in specific organs causing organ-specific dose rates, such as Pu-239 accumulating in bone, liver, and lungs. Organ-specific dose models have been developed for humans; however, little has been developed for the dose assessment to biota, in particular rabbits. This study will determine if it is scientifically valid to use standard software, in particular ERICA Tool, as a means to determine organ-specific dosimetry due to Pu-239 accumulation in organs. ERICA Tool is normally applied to whole organisms as a means to determine radiological risk to whole ecosystems. We will focus on the aquatic model within ERICA Tool, as animal organs, like aquatic organisms, can be assumed to lie within an infinite uniform medium. This model would

  2. Floodplain data: ecosystem characteristics and 137Cs concentrations in biota and soil

    Radiocesium (137Cs) distribution was determined in soil, roots, ground vegetation, overstory, litter, mammals, feces, and insects for a floodplain ecosystem contaminated by radioactive wastes from Manhattan Project operations in 1944. The 2-ha research site was located on the ERDA reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in a drained holding pond between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and White Oak Lake. Maximum 137Cs concentrations in soil occurred near the old retention pond dam (84,400 pCi/g) and at the upper portion of the floodplain boundary (70,500 pCi/g). This bimodal distribution pattern of 137Cs was evident for all samples collected. Large amounts of data have been collected since the summer of 1974. This report documents the data on ecosystem characteristics and 137Cs concentrations in biota and soil

  3. Abiotic causes of the great mass extinction of marine biota at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary

    Barash, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    In the interval of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary up to 80% of marine species became extinct. The main hypotheses on the causes of this mass extinction are reviewed. The extinction was triggered by a powerful eruption of basalts in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. In addition, several impact craters have been found. Extraterrestrial factors resulted in two main sequences of events: terrestrial, leading to strong volcanism, and extraterrestrial (impact events). They produced similar effects: emissions of harmful chemical compounds and aerosols. Consequences included the greenhouse effect, darkening of the atmosphere (which prevented photosynthesis), stagnation of the oceans, and anoxia. Biological productivity decreased; food chains collapsed. As a result, all vital processes were disturbed, and a large portion of the biota went extinct.

  4. Sensing of Scent, Fragrance, Smell, and Odor Emissions from Biota Sources

    Ki-Hyun Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available People encounter enormous numbers of chemicals present in the outdoor atmosphere and/or in the various facilities they use daily. Despite such diversity, not many of them have necessarily the potential to draw human’s nasal attraction if their perception thresholds are in general not sufficiently low enough, regardless of abundance. In this sense, many types of scents, musks, fragrances, smells, odors, and pheromones are unique enough to draw a great deal of attention mainly by their presence at or near threshold levels which are far lower than those of common chemicals with poor odorant characteristics. It is known that most of the diverse characters of odor-related ingredients or expressions are commonly produced from various biota sources present in the biosphere, e.g., fauna, flora, bacteria, fruits, flowers, trees, meats, fresh/decaying foods, etc.

  5. Distributions of transuranium nuclides in sediment and biota of the North Atlantic Ocean

    The effects of the interaction of marine sediments with their biotic population on the penetration, redistribution, sediment association and biotic availability of delivered transuranium nuclides are discussed as a function of both sedimentation regimes and in-fauna populations. Data on the penetration and redistribution patterns of fall-out transuranium nuclides in the shallow sediments of Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, are discussed in terms of the known parameters of sedimentation and 'in sediment' biological activity. In this (and most common) type of sedimentation regime, translocation of bioturbationally downmixed transuranium nuclides back toward (and probable loss from) the sediment surface is demonstrated. Various biological and biochemical mechanisms are advanced that may act on these nuclides within sediments. The increased availability to marine biota of sediment transuranium nuclides by these remobilization processes, is indicated by data showing accumulations of these nuclides in marine invertebrates and fish. (author)

  6. Distributions of transuranium nuclides in sediments and biota of the North Atlantic Ocean

    The effects of the interaction of marine sediments with their biotic population on the penetration, redistribution, sediment association and biotic availability of delivered transuranium nuclides are discussed as a function of both sedimentation regimes and in-fauna populations. Data on the penetration and redistribution patterns of fallout transuranium nuclides in the shallow sediments of Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, are discussed in terms of the known parameters of sedimentation and in sediment biological activity. In this (and most common) type of sedimentation regime, translocation of bioturbationally downmixed transuranium nuclides back toward (and probable loss from) the sediment surface is demonstrated. Various biological and biochemical mechanisms are advanced that may act on these nuclides within sediments. The increased availability to marine biota of sediment transuranium nuclides by these remobilization processes is indicated by data showing accumulations of these nuclides in marine invertebrates and fish. Data are included on the distribution of 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Am, 137Cs, and 55Fe in the samples

  7. Assessing impacts of ionizing radiation on non-human biota: the ERICA tool

    There have been significant developments in the last few years concerning methods to explicitly quantify impacts on the environment arising from exposure by ionising radiation. Central to the ERICA integrated approach is the quantification of environmental risk whereby data on environmental transfer and dosimetry are combined to provide a measure of exposure which is compared to exposure levels at which detrimental effects are known to occur. In view of the large data sets underpinning the assessment approach and the potential to introduce errors when performing numerous calculations manually, a supporting computer-based tool (the ERICA Tool) has been developed. The ERICA Tool is a computerised, flexible software system that has a structure based upon the ERICA Integrated Assessment tiered approach to assessing the radiological risk to biota. The user is guided through the assessment process, recording information and decisions as the assessment progresses. The tool allows the necessary calculations to be performed to estimate risks to selected biota. Tier 1 assessments use pre-calculated environmental media concentration limits to estimate risk quotients and require inputs in the form of media concentrations. At Tier 2 dose-rates are calculated but at this stage, the user is allowed to examine and edit most of the parameters used in the calculation. For Tier 3 assessments, the same flexibility as Tier 2 is allowed but assessments may be run probability if the underling parameter probability distribution functions are defined. Results from the tool can be put into context using incorporated data on dose-effects relationships and background dose-rates. (author)

  8. Assessment of radiation impact on biota as a result of hypothetical accidents at small NPP

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Breakthrough in the development of science and technology, caused by the creation of nuclear weapons, allowed expanding the scope of application of the energy of nuclear fission. Nuclear power plants, nuclear power installations for submarines and ships were created. The main factor of the competitiveness of nuclear energy is its success in areas of its industrial, scientific, technical application. Nuclear energy, as well as any other modern sophisticated technology used by people, is associated with a particular risk for the individuals, society and the environment. According to the classification adopted by the IAEA, small reactors are reactors with an equivalent electric power of <300 MW(e) and medium-sized reactors are reactors with an equivalent electric power of 300-700 MW(e). Russia has a unique experience in the creation and operation of reactor systems with lead-bismuth coolant for nuclear-powered submarines. Such is single unit nuclear power station with an experiment industrial power reactor installation with lead-bismuth coolant with an electric capacity of 100 MW (SVBR-100). The launch of the first power unit with the SVBR-100 is going to start up after 2017 in the city of Dimitrovgrad, Russia. After the Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents, the world community makes high demands to operation safety during running of NPPs. Due to this, the analysis of the consequences of non-routine and accidental events is the essential point of rationale for innovative nuclear technologies. In this regard, the evolution of modern radiation protection system considering the radiation protection of not only the population, but also non-human biota, cannot be disregarded. The aim of the current research was the assessment of radiological impact on biota caused by hypothetical accidents at NPP with lead-bismuth cooled small fast reactor SVBR-100. (authors)

  9. Natural Isotope Radium in Marine Biota at Kapar, Klang Coastal Area

    The activities concentration of 226Ra and 228Ra in marine biota at Kapar coastal area nearby Sultan Salahudin Abdul Aziz Shah Power Station (SJSSAAS) had been analyzed. The techniques that had been used to determine the activities concentration of 226Ra dan 228Ra are radiochemistry procedures and liquid scintillation counter (LSC). Results shows that the distribution of radium isotopes depend on the location and during sampling periods. The activities concentration of 226Rai and 228Rai in tissue were ranged 11.82 ± 5.23 Bq/ kg - 17.67 ± 6.81 Bq/ kg and 40.42 ± 16.20 Bq/ kg - 67.86 ± 23.11 Bq/ kg, respectively. The mean activities concentration of radium isotopes in bivalvia such as cockles (anadara granosa) are 61.73 ± 24.15 Bq/ kg (226Raag) and 232.62 ± 119.44 Bq/ kg (228Raag). Meanwhile for green mussles (perna viridis), the mean activities concentration of 226Rapv dan 228Rapv are 38.24 ± 14.19 Bq/ kg dan 99.59 ± 44.91 Bq/ kg, respectively. Concentration Factor (CF) in marine biota is higher than 1 x 104 and it is because of the accumulated radium isotopes is low and has a high affinity for organic matter. The study also shows the effectiveness of dose in radium isotopes were measured to ensure the safety of users and it is still below the limit allowed Malaysia which is 1 mSv / year. (author)

  10. Recent changes in aquatic biota in subarctic Fennoscandia - the role of global and local environmental variables

    Weckström, Jan; Leppänen, Jaakko; Sorvari, Sanna; Kaukolehto, Marjut; Weckström, Kaarina; Korhola, Atte

    2013-04-01

    The Arctic, representing a fifth of the earth's surface, is highly sensitive to the predicted future warming and it has indeed been warming up faster than most other regions. This makes the region critically important and highlights the need to investigate the earliest signals of global warming and its impacts on the arctic and subarctic aquatic ecosystems and their biota. It has been demonstrated that many Arctic freshwater ecosystems have already experienced dramatic and unpreceded regime shifts during the last ca. 150 years, primarily driven by climate warming. However, despite the indisputable impact of climate-related variables on freshwater ecosystems other, especially local-scale catchment related variables (e.g. geology, vegetation, human activities) may override the climate signal and become the primary factor in shaping the structure of aquatic ecosystems. Although many studies have contributed to an improved understanding of limnological and hydrobiological features of Artic and subarctic lakes, much information is still needed especially on the interaction between the biotic and abiotic components, i.e. on factors controlling the food web dynamics in these sensitive aquatic ecosystems. This is of special importance as these lakes are of great value in water storage, flood prevention, and maintenance of biodiversity, in addition to which they are vital resources for settlement patterns, food production, recreation, and tourism. In this study we compare the pre-industrial sediment assemblages of primary producers (diatoms and Pediastrum) and primary consumers (cladoceran and chironomids) with their modern assemblages (a top-bottom approach) from 50 subarctic Fennoscandian lakes. We will evaluate the recent regional pattern of changes in aquatic assemblages, and assess how coherent the lakes' responses are across the subarctic area. Moreover, the impact of global (e.g. climate, precipitation) and local (e.g. lake and its catchment characteristics) scale

  11. Contaminants in fine sediments and their consequences for biota of the Severn Estuary.

    Langston, W J; Pope, N D; Jonas, P J C; Nikitic, C; Field, M D R; Dowell, B; Shillabeer, N; Swarbrick, R H; Brown, A R

    2010-01-01

    When the first MPB special issue was published 25 years ago it was suggested that high body burdens of metals and selected organic pollutants in the Severn Estuary were the result of anthropogenic loadings from a variety of sources. The objective of this synopsis is to illustrate recent trends for contaminants (metals, PAHs, PCBs) in sediments and benthic biota and to consider the evidence for improved environmental quality over the last quarter of a century. Contaminants in sediments and sediment-dwelling fauna such as Hediste(=Nereis)diversicolor are, generally, evenly distributed over the estuary - which is the consequence of extensive re-suspension and redistribution of fine sediment by strong tidal currents. Such dispersal tends to mask the influences of individual discharges and physical characteristics are considered to be the major drivers affecting biodiversity in the Severn Estuary, often overshadowing contaminant concerns. Following the closure of major industries and the introduction of stricter pollution control, many inputs have ceased or been reduced and there are indications that environmental concentrations are now lower. Bioaccumulation of most contaminants has declined accordingly (with the possible exception of Cr). Intuitively, better environmental quality should be linked to ecological improvements. However, due to the dynamic nature of the system (and a lack of biological-effects data) it is difficult to establish direct relationships between inputs, body burdens and biological/ecological consequence. Uniquely, the long-term integrated monitoring program of AstraZeneca (Avonmouth) indicates that recovery of faunal diversity and abundance has occurred in mid-sections of the estuary in recent years implying that contaminants have indeed been a forcing feature for Severn biota. In this context, we highlight contaminant issues and biogeochemical changes which may need to be addressed in connection with the development of proposals for tidal

  12. Assessing impacts of ionizing radiation on non-human biota : The ERICA Tool

    There have been significant developments in the last few years concerning methods to explicitly quantify impacts on the environment arising from exposure by ionising radiation. Central to the ERICA integrated approach is the quantification of environmental risk whereby data on environmental transfer and dosimetry are combined to provide a measure of exposure which is compared to exposure levels at which detrimental effects are known to occur. In view of the large data sets underpinning the assessment approach and the potential to introduce errors when performing numerous calculations manually, a supporting computer-based tool (the ERICA Tool) has been developed. The ERICA Tool is a computerised, flexible software system that has a structure based upon the ERICA Integrated Assessment tiered approach to assessing the radiological risk to biota. The user is guided through the assessment process, recording information and decisions as the assessment progresses. The tool allows the necessary calculations to be performed to estimate risks to selected biota. Tier 1 assessments use pre-calculated environmental media concentration limits to estimate risk quotients and require inputs in the form of media concentrations. At Tier 2 dose-rates are calculated but at this stage, the user is allowed to examine and edit most of the parameters used in the calculation. For Tier 3 assessments, the same flexibility as Tier 2 is allowed but assessments may be run probabilistically if the underling parameter probability distribution functions are defined. Results from the Tool can be put into context using incorporated data on dose-effects relationships and background dose-rates. (author)

  13. Effects of shoreline treatment methods on intertidal biota in Prince William Sound

    Several studies conducted in Prince William Sound during 1989 were directed at assessing short term biological effects of treatment methods considered or employed for treating oil contaminated beaches. The four treatment alternatives evaluated in this paper are: low pressure warm water wash (LP-WW); high pressure hot water wash (HP-HW); the dispersant Corexit 7664; and the beach cleaner Corexit 9580 M2. Effects on the biota were assessed primarily on the basis of changes in the abundance of dominant taxa and the magnitude of selected community attributes (such as percent cover by algae or animals, and number of taxa). Significant reductions in one or more community or population attributes, and increases in the percent of dead mussels were observed in response to all types of treatment but the strongest and most consistent effects were observed following high pressure hot water treatment, which was also accompanied by heavy mortality in rockweed. Generally, the programs were not designed to discriminate among the potential causes of damage. However, available data suggest that neither chemical nor LP-WW treatments caused significant thermal impacts in the intertidal biota. In contrast, temperature appeared to cause significant mortality in the dominant plants and grazing and filter-feeding animals in HP-HW treatment sites. Observations of displacement and mortality for clams and mussels suggest that physical effects may be substantial in some cases. Of the types of treatment examined, dispersant and beach cleaner treatments appeared to be accompanied with the smallest number of significant changes in abundance; however, this conclusion is weak because the LP-WW wash accompanying chemical applications during the tests was sometimes less rigorous than when performed by itself. LP-WW treatment was accompanied by an intermediate level of changes whereas HP-HW treatment was accompanied with the highest percentage of changes, nearly all of which were decreases

  14. Soil water content determination with cosmic-ray neutron sensor: Correcting aboveground hydrogen effects with thermal/fast neutron ratio

    Tian, Zhengchao; Li, Zizhong; Liu, Gang; Li, Baoguo; Ren, Tusheng

    2016-09-01

    The cosmic-ray neutron sensor (CRNS), which estimates field scale soil water content, bridges the gap between point measurement and remote sensing. The accuracy of CRNS measurements, however, is affected by additional hydrogen pools (e.g., vegetation, snow, and rainfall interception). The objectives of this study are to: (i) evaluate the accuracy of CRNS estimates in a farmland system using depth and horizontal weighted point measurements, (ii) introduce a novel method for estimating the amounts of hydrogen from biomass and snow cover in CRNS data, and (iii) propose a simple approach for correcting the influences of aboveground hydrogen pool (expressed as aboveground water equivalent, AWE) on CRNS measurements. A field experiment was conducted in northeast China to compare soil water content results from CRNS to in-situ data with time domain reflectometry (TDR) and neutron probe (NP) in the 0-40 cm soil layers. The biomass water equivalent (BWE) and snow water equivalent (SWE) were observed to have separate linear relationships with the thermal/fast neutron ratio, and the dynamics of BWE and SWE were estimated correctly in the crop seasons and snow-covered seasons, respectively. A simple approach, which considered the AWE, AWE at calibration, and the effective measurement depth of CRNS, was introduced to correct the errors caused by BWE and SWE. After correction, the correlation coefficients between soil water contents determined by CRNS and TDR were 0.79 and 0.77 during the 2014 and 2015 crop seasons, respectively, and CRNS measurements had RMSEs of 0.028, 0.030, and 0.039 m3 m-3 in the 2014 and 2015 crop seasons and the snow-covered seasons, respectively. The experimental results also indicated that the accuracies of CRNS estimated BWE and SWE were affected by the distributions of aboveground hydrogen pools, which were related to the height of the CRNS device above ground surface.

  15. Simulation results of aboveground woody biomass and leaf litterfall for African tropical forest with a global terrestrial model

    De Weirdt, Marjolein; Maignan, Fabienne; Peylin, Philippe; Poulter, Benjamin; Moreau, Inès; Ciais, Philippe; Defourny, Pierre; Steppe, Kathy; Verbeeck, Hans

    2014-05-01

    The response of tropical forest vegetation to global climate change could be central to predictions of future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Tropical forests are believed to annually process approximately six times as much carbon via photosynthesis and respiration as humans emit from fossil fuel use. Of all tropical forests worldwide, the role of African tropical forest is not very well known and both the quantity as well as the dynamics of tropical forest carbon stocks and fluxes are very poorly quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Furthermore, African tropical forest spatial carbon stocks patterns as measured in the field are not as well represented by the global biogeochemical models as they are for temperate forests. In this study, a first simulation for the African tropical forest with the process based global terrestrial ecosystem model ORCHIDEE was done. In this work, ORCHIDEE included deep soils, seasonal leaf litterfall and phosphorus availability mechanisms for tropical evergreen forests included. The ORCHIDEE model run outputs are evaluated against reported field inventories, investigating seasonal variations in leaf litterfall and spatial variation in aboveground woody biomass. A comparison between modeled and measured leaf litterfall was made at a semi-deciduous Equatorial rainforest site in the Republic of Congo at the Biosphere reserve Dimonika south of Gabon. Also, simulated woody aboveground biomass was compared against site-level field inventories and satellite-based estimates based on a combination of MODIS imagery with field inventory data from Uganda, DRC and Cameroon. First comparison results seem promising and show that the radiation driven leaf litterfall model results correspond well with the field inventories and that the mean of the modelled aboveground woody biomass matches the available field inventory observations but there is still a need for more ground data to evaluate the model outcome over a large region like

  16. Aboveground allometric models for freeze-affected black mangroves (Avicennia germinans: equations for a climate sensitive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

    Michael J Osland

    Full Text Available Across the globe, species distributions are changing in response to climate change and land use change. In parts of the southeastern United States, climate change is expected to result in the poleward range expansion of black mangroves (Avicennia germinans at the expense of some salt marsh vegetation. The morphology of A. germinans at its northern range limit is more shrub-like than in tropical climes in part due to the aboveground structural damage and vigorous multi-stem regrowth triggered by extreme winter temperatures. In this study, we developed aboveground allometric equations for freeze-affected black mangroves which can be used to quantify: (1 total aboveground biomass; (2 leaf biomass; (3 stem plus branch biomass; and (4 leaf area. Plant volume (i.e., a combination of crown area and plant height was selected as the optimal predictor of the four response variables. We expect that our simple measurements and equations can be adapted for use in other mangrove ecosystems located in abiotic settings that result in mangrove individuals with dwarf or shrub-like morphologies including oligotrophic and arid environments. Many important ecological functions and services are affected by changes in coastal wetland plant community structure and productivity including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, coastal protection, recreation, fish and avian habitat, and ecosystem response to sea level rise and extreme climatic events. Coastal scientists in the southeastern United States can use the identified allometric equations, in combination with easily obtained and non-destructive plant volume measurements, to better quantify and monitor ecological change within the dynamic, climate sensitive, and highly-productive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

  17. Aboveground allometric models for freeze-affected black mangroves (Avicennia germinans): equations for a climate sensitive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

    Osland, Michael J; Day, Richard H; Larriviere, Jack C; From, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, species distributions are changing in response to climate change and land use change. In parts of the southeastern United States, climate change is expected to result in the poleward range expansion of black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) at the expense of some salt marsh vegetation. The morphology of A. germinans at its northern range limit is more shrub-like than in tropical climes in part due to the aboveground structural damage and vigorous multi-stem regrowth triggered by extreme winter temperatures. In this study, we developed aboveground allometric equations for freeze-affected black mangroves which can be used to quantify: (1) total aboveground biomass; (2) leaf biomass; (3) stem plus branch biomass; and (4) leaf area. Plant volume (i.e., a combination of crown area and plant height) was selected as the optimal predictor of the four response variables. We expect that our simple measurements and equations can be adapted for use in other mangrove ecosystems located in abiotic settings that result in mangrove individuals with dwarf or shrub-like morphologies including oligotrophic and arid environments. Many important ecological functions and services are affected by changes in coastal wetland plant community structure and productivity including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, coastal protection, recreation, fish and avian habitat, and ecosystem response to sea level rise and extreme climatic events. Coastal scientists in the southeastern United States can use the identified allometric equations, in combination with easily obtained and non-destructive plant volume measurements, to better quantify and monitor ecological change within the dynamic, climate sensitive, and highly-productive mangrove-marsh ecotone. PMID:24971938

  18. Aboveground allometric models for freeze-affected black mangroves (Avicennia germinans): equations for a climate sensitive mangrove-marsh ecotone

    Osland, Michael J.; Day, Richard H.; Larriviere, Jack C.; From, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, species distributions are changing in response to climate change and land use change. In parts of the southeastern United States, climate change is expected to result in the poleward range expansion of black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) at the expense of some salt marsh vegetation. The morphology of A. germinans at its northern range limit is more shrub-like than in tropical climes in part due to the aboveground structural damage and vigorous multi-stem regrowth triggered by extreme winter temperatures. In this study, we developed aboveground allometric equations for freeze-affected black mangroves which can be used to quantify: (1) total aboveground biomass; (2) leaf biomass; (3) stem plus branch biomass; and (4) leaf area. Plant volume (i.e., a combination of crown area and plant height) was selected as the optimal predictor of the four response variables. We expect that our simple measurements and equations can be adapted for use in other mangrove ecosystems located in abiotic settings that result in mangrove individuals with dwarf or shrub-like morphologies including oligotrophic and arid environments. Many important ecological functions and services are affected by changes in coastal wetland plant community structure and productivity including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, coastal protection, recreation, fish and avian habitat, and ecosystem response to sea level rise and extreme climatic events. Coastal scientists in the southeastern United States can use the identified allometric equations, in combination with easily obtained and non-destructive plant volume measurements, to better quantify and monitor ecological change within the dynamic, climate sensitive, and highly-productive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

  19. Study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation

    Uncertainty in estimations of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation may arise from a number of sources including values of the model parameters, empirical data, measurement errors and biases in the sampling. The significance of the overall uncertainty of an exposure assessment will depend on how the estimated dose compares with reference doses used for risk characterisation. In this paper, we present the results of a study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota using some of the models and parameters recommended in the FASSET methodology. The study was carried out for semi-natural terrestrial, agricultural and marine ecosystems, and for four radionuclides (137Cs, 239Pu, 129I and 237Np). The parameters of the radionuclide transfer models showed the highest sensitivity and contributed the most to the uncertainty in the predictions of doses to biota. The most important ones were related to the bioavailability and mobility of radionuclides in the environment, for example soil-to-plant transfer factors, the bioaccumulation factors for marine biota and the gut uptake fraction for terrestrial mammals. In contrast, the dose conversion coefficients showed low sensitivity and contributed little to the overall uncertainty. Radiobiological effectiveness contributed to the overall uncertainty of the dose estimations for alpha emitters although to a lesser degree than a number of transfer model parameters

  20. Interactions between above- and belowground biota: importance for small-scale vegetation mosaics in a grassland ecosystem

    Blomqvist, M.M.; Olff, H.; Blaauw, M.B.; Bongers, T.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    Grasslands are often characterised by small-scale mosaics in plant community composition that contribute to their diversity. Although above- and belowground biota can both cause such mosaics, few studies have addressed their interacting effects. We studied multi-trophic interactions between abovegro

  1. Radioactive cesium, cobalt and plutonium in biota, algae and sediments in the nonrestricted areas of the Russian Arctic Seas

    Biota, macroalgae and sediment samples were collected during scientific expeditions organized by the Murmansk Marine Biological Institute (MMBI) during 1993 - 1996 in the Barents, Petshora, Kara, Laptev and White seas and in the Kola Bay. The purpose of the expeditions was to study the levels of radioactive pollution in the Russian arctic seas

  2. Soil biota in Bt-corn: effect on community structure and function in laboratory and field experiments

    Frouz, Jan; Kocourek, F.

    České Budějovice : Institute of Soil Biology ASCR, 2005. s. 24. [Central European Workshop on Soil Zoology /8./. 20.04.2005-22.04.2005, České Budějovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : soil biota * Bt- corn * laboratory and field experiments Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  3. Screes as important landscape structures for xeric and psychrophilic biota conservation and monitoring environmental change in the Czech Republic

    Zacharda, Miloslav; Boucníková, Eva

    Sup.1/2005, č. 24 (2005), s. 28-38. ISSN 1335-342X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : scree * landscape diversity * biota * conservation * global change Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.085, year: 2005

  4. Comparing sediment equilibrium partitioning and passive sampling techniques to estimate benthic biota PCDD/F concentrations in Newark Bay, New Jersey (U.S.A.)

    Sediment and polyethylene sampler-based estimates of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) concentrations in Newark Bay, New Jersey (USA) benthic biota were compared. Biota concentrations based on sediment were estimated using an organic carbon (OC)-water partitioning model and an OC and black carbon (BC)-water dual model. Biota concentrations based on polyethylene were estimated from samplers deployed in the Newark Bay water column and samplers immersed in a sediment/porewater slurry in the laboratory. Porewater samplers provided the best estimates of biota concentrations (within 3.1×), with best results achieved for deposit-feeders (within 1.6×). Polyethylene deployed in deep water also provided good estimates of biota concentrations (within 4×). By contrast, OC-water partitioning overestimated biota concentrations by up to 7×, while OC and BC combined underestimated biota concentrations by up to 13×. We recommend passive samplers such as polyethylene for estimating concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants in field biota given its simplicity and relatively lower uncertainty compared to sediment equilibrium partitioning. -- Highlights: • PE samplers accurately estimate Newark Bay biota PCDD/F concentrations. • A traditional KOC partitioning model overestimated PCDD/F uptake by a factor of 4–7. • A dual KOC and KBC model underestimated biota PCDD/F uptake by a factor of 4–13. • Sediment- and depth-specific KBCs improved predictions of PCDD/F uptake. • Deposit feeder uptake switches from porewater control to ingestion at log KOW 6–7. -- Using polyethylene samplers to measure porewater concentrations is a more efficient approach for estimating site-specific bioavailable organic contaminants than equilibrium partitioning

  5. General Relationships between Abiotic Soil Properties and Soil Biota across Spatial Scales and Different Land-Use Types

    Birkhofer, Klaus; Schöning, Ingo; Alt, Fabian; Herold, Nadine; Klarner, Bernhard; Maraun, Mark; Marhan, Sven; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wubet, Tesfaye; Yurkov, Andrey; Begerow, Dominik; Berner, Doreen; Buscot, François; Daniel, Rolf; Diekötter, Tim; Ehnes, Roswitha B.; Erdmann, Georgia; Fischer, Christiane; Foesel, Bärbel; Groh, Janine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Kandeler, Ellen; Lang, Christa; Lohaus, Gertrud; Meyer, Annabel; Nacke, Heiko; Näther, Astrid; Overmann, Jörg; Polle, Andrea; Pollierer, Melanie M.; Scheu, Stefan; Schloter, Michael; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Schulze, Waltraud; Weinert, Jan; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wolters, Volkmar; Schrumpf, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Very few principles have been unraveled that explain the relationship between soil properties and soil biota across large spatial scales and different land-use types. Here, we seek these general relationships using data from 52 differently managed grassland and forest soils in three study regions spanning a latitudinal gradient in Germany. We hypothesize that, after extraction of variation that is explained by location and land-use type, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in the abundance and diversity of soil biota. If the relationships between predictors and soil organisms were analyzed individually for each predictor group, soil properties explained the highest amount of variation in soil biota abundance and diversity, followed by land-use type and sampling location. After extraction of variation that originated from location or land-use, abiotic soil properties explained significant amounts of variation in fungal, meso- and macrofauna, but not in yeast or bacterial biomass or diversity. Nitrate or nitrogen concentration and fungal biomass were positively related, but nitrate concentration was negatively related to the abundances of Collembola and mites and to the myriapod species richness across a range of forest and grassland soils. The species richness of earthworms was positively correlated with clay content of soils independent of sample location and land-use type. Our study indicates that after accounting for heterogeneity resulting from large scale differences among sampling locations and land-use types, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in fungal and soil fauna abundance or diversity. However, soil biota was also related to processes that act at larger spatial scales and bacteria or soil yeasts only showed weak relationships to soil properties. We therefore argue that more general relationships between soil properties and soil biota can only be derived from future studies that consider

  6. General relationships between abiotic soil properties and soil biota across spatial scales and different land-use types.

    Klaus Birkhofer

    Full Text Available Very few principles have been unraveled that explain the relationship between soil properties and soil biota across large spatial scales and different land-use types. Here, we seek these general relationships using data from 52 differently managed grassland and forest soils in three study regions spanning a latitudinal gradient in Germany. We hypothesize that, after extraction of variation that is explained by location and land-use type, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in the abundance and diversity of soil biota. If the relationships between predictors and soil organisms were analyzed individually for each predictor group, soil properties explained the highest amount of variation in soil biota abundance and diversity, followed by land-use type and sampling location. After extraction of variation that originated from location or land-use, abiotic soil properties explained significant amounts of variation in fungal, meso- and macrofauna, but not in yeast or bacterial biomass or diversity. Nitrate or nitrogen concentration and fungal biomass were positively related, but nitrate concentration was negatively related to the abundances of Collembola and mites and to the myriapod species richness across a range of forest and grassland soils. The species richness of earthworms was positively correlated with clay content of soils independent of sample location and land-use type. Our study indicates that after accounting for heterogeneity resulting from large scale differences among sampling locations and land-use types, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in fungal and soil fauna abundance or diversity. However, soil biota was also related to processes that act at larger spatial scales and bacteria or soil yeasts only showed weak relationships to soil properties. We therefore argue that more general relationships between soil properties and soil biota can only be derived from future

  7. Alternative methods for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. Volume 3. Task 2b: technical requirements for aboveground vault disposal of low-level radioactive waste

    The study reported herein contains the results of Task 2b (Technical Requirements for Aboveground Vault Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste) of a four-task study entitled ''Criteria for Evaluating Engineered Facilities.'' The overall objective of this study is to ensure that the criteria needed to evaluate five alternative low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal methods are available potential license applicants. The above-ground vault disposal alternative is one of several methods that may be proposed for disposal of low-level radioactive waste. In this report, the term aboveground vault refers to an engineered structure with roof, walls and floor enclosing the disposal space. The limited experience and knowledge gained with this method are described and updated in this report. The short term experience does not conclusively demonstrate the capability of this method to satisfy the Part 61 Performance Objectives. A generic description of the features and components and operation of an aboveground vault disposal facility is provided. Features and components that could enhance the long-term performance are described. The applicability of existing criteria developed for near-surface disposal (10 CFR Part 61 Subpart D) to the aboveground vault disposal method, as assessed in Task 1, are reassessed herein. With few exceptions, these criteria were found to be applicable in the reassessment. These conclusions differ slightly from the Task 1 findings. 22 refs., 5 figs

  8. Spectroscopic Determination of Aboveground Biomass in Grasslands Using Spectral Transformations, Support Vector Machine and Partial Least Squares Regression

    Miguel Marabel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aboveground biomass (AGB is one of the strategic biophysical variables of interest in vegetation studies. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the Support Vector Machine (SVM and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR for estimating the AGB of grasslands from field spectrometer data and to find out which data pre-processing approach was the most suitable. The most accurate model to predict the total AGB involved PLSR and the Maximum Band Depth index derived from the continuum removed reflectance in the absorption features between 916–1,120 nm and 1,079–1,297 nm (R2 = 0.939, RMSE = 7.120 g/m2. Regarding the green fraction of the AGB, the Area Over the Minimum index derived from the continuum removed spectra provided the most accurate model overall (R2 = 0.939, RMSE = 3.172 g/m2. Identifying the appropriate absorption features was proved to be crucial to improve the performance of PLSR to estimate the total and green aboveground biomass, by using the indices derived from those spectral regions. Ordinary Least Square Regression could be used as a surrogate for the PLSR approach with the Area Over the Minimum index as the independent variable, although the resulting model would not be as accurate.

  9. [Estimating individual tree aboveground biomass of the mid-subtropical forest using airborne LiDAR technology].

    Liu, Feng; Tan, Chang; Lei, Pi-Feng

    2014-11-01

    Taking Wugang forest farm in Xuefeng Mountain as the research object, using the airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data under leaf-on condition and field data of concomitant plots, this paper assessed the ability of using LiDAR technology to estimate aboveground biomass of the mid-subtropical forest. A semi-automated individual tree LiDAR cloud point segmentation was obtained by using condition random fields and optimization methods. Spatial structure, waveform characteristics and topography were calculated as LiDAR metrics from the segmented objects. Then statistical models between aboveground biomass from field data and these LiDAR metrics were built. The individual tree recognition rates were 93%, 86% and 60% for coniferous, broadleaf and mixed forests, respectively. The adjusted coefficients of determination (R(2)adj) and the root mean squared errors (RMSE) for the three types of forest were 0.83, 0.81 and 0.74, and 28.22, 29.79 and 32.31 t · hm(-2), respectively. The estimation capability of model based on canopy geometric volume, tree percentile height, slope and waveform characteristics was much better than that of traditional regression model based on tree height. Therefore, LiDAR metrics from individual tree could facilitate better performance in biomass estimation. PMID:25898621

  10. Modeling the spatial distribution of above-ground carbon in Mexican coniferous forests using remote sensing and a geostatistical approach

    Galeana-Pizaña, J. Mauricio; López-Caloca, Alejandra; López-Quiroz, Penélope; Silván-Cárdenas, José Luis; Couturier, Stéphane

    2014-08-01

    Forest conservation is considered an option for mitigating the effect of greenhouse gases on global climate, hence monitoring forest carbon pools at global and local levels is important. The present study explores the capability of remote-sensing variables (vegetation indices and textures derived from SPOT-5; backscattering coefficient and interferometric coherence of ALOS PALSAR images) for modeling the spatial distribution of above-ground biomass in the Environmental Conservation Zone of Mexico City. Correlation and spatial autocorrelation coefficients were used to select significant explanatory variables in fir and pine forests. The correlation for interferometric coherence in HV polarization was negative, with correlations coefficients r = -0.83 for the fir and r = -0.75 for the pine forests. Regression-kriging showed the least root mean square error among the spatial interpolation methods used, with 37.75 tC/ha for fir forests and 29.15 tC/ha for pine forests. The results showed that a hybrid geospatial method, based on interferometric coherence data and a regression-kriging interpolator, has good potential for estimating above-ground biomass carbon.

  11. The biomass and aboveground net primary productivity of Schima superba-Castanopsis carlesii forests in east China

    2010-01-01

    The biomass and productivity of Schima superba-Castanopsis carlesii forests in Tiantong,Zhejiang Province,were determined using overlapping quadrants and stem analyses.The total community biomass was(225.3±30.1) t hm-2,of which the aboveground parts accounted for 72.0% and the underground parts accounted for 28.0%.About 87.2% of biomass existed in the tree layer.The resprouting biomass was small,of which over 95.0% occurred in the shrub layer.The productivity of the aboveground parts of the community was(386.8±98.9) g m-2a-1,in which more than 96.0% was present at the tree level.The trunk’s contribution to productivity was the greatest,while that of leaves was the smallest.In China,the community biomass of subtropical evergreen broadleaved forests differs significantly with the age of the forest.The community biomass of the 52-year-old S.superba-C.carlesii forests in this study was lower than the average biomass of subtropical evergreen broadleaved forests in China,and was lower than the biomass of other subtropical evergreen broadleaved forests elsewhere in the world.Moreover,its productivity was lower than the model estimate,indicating that without disturbance,this community has great developmental potential in terms of community biomass and productivity.

  12. Above-ground Woody Biomass Production of Short-rotation Populus Plantations on Agricultural Land in Sweden

    Karacic, Almir; Verwijst, Theo; Weih, Martin [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Short Rotation Forestry

    2003-09-01

    Although poplars are widely grown in short-rotation forestry in many countries, little is known about poplar growth performance in Sweden. In this study, above-ground biomass production was estimated for several hybrid aspen and poplar clones planted at different initial density at five locations across Sweden. Biomass assessments were based on allometric relationships between total above-ground woody dry weight and the diameter at breast height. According to a common harvest practice, tree biomass was partitioned into pulpwood and biomass for energy purposes. The percentage of pulpwood was strongly determined by clone for DBH >10 cm. The mean annual increment ranged from 3.3 /ha/yr for balsam poplar in the north to 9.2 Mg/ha/yr for 9-yr-old 'Boelare' in southern Sweden. At the same age, hybrid aspen reached 7.9 Mg/ha/yr. The results suggest that poplars and hybrid aspen are superior as biomass producers compared with tree species commonly grown on agricultural land at these latitudes. The results are discussed in the light of future wood supply for pulpwood and energy purposes in Sweden.

  13. Stress analysis of a double bottom retrofit of an aboveground storage tank including effects of soil/structure interaction

    Davis, R.C.; Andreani, J.L. [BP Oil Co., Cleveland, OH (United States). Engineering Services

    1995-12-31

    Concern about differential settlement of aboveground atmospheric storage tanks and the effects of the resulting large strains on tank floor integrity has become an important issue in the refining industry, prompting much of the industry to undertake massive programs to retrofit substantial numbers of existing tanks with second floors. This is normally accomplished by cutting a horizontal slot in the tank shell parallel to the existing floor, placing a liner and fill material (such as sand) over the existing floor, installing annular plates through the slot in the shell, and then welding in the remaining floor plate. In this process, the decision whether or not to weld the bottom side of the new floor plate to the shell stub attached to the original floor is a key design consideration which can significantly impact the stress distribution in both the new floor and the existing shell stub. Finite element analysis is used to study operating stresses in a typical double-bottom aboveground atmospheric storage tank on a raised compacted earth pad and gravel ringwall foundation. Results are compared for cases in which the new floor is welded to the existing shell stub and in which the new floor simply rests on the shell stub without further attachment. Effects of soil/structure interaction for a typical granular soil are included in the analysis.

  14. Development of Allometric Equations for Estimating Above-Ground Liana Biomass in Tropical Primary and Secondary Forests, Malaysia

    Patrick Addo-Fordjour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study developed allometric equations for estimating liana stem and total above-ground biomass in primary and secondary forests in the Penang National Park, Penang, Malaysia. Using biomass-diameter-length data of 60 liana individuals representing 15 species, allometric equations were developed for liana stem biomass and total above-ground biomass (TAGB. Three types of allometric equations were developed: models fitted to untransformed, weighted, and log-transformed (log10 data. There was a significant linear relationship between biomass and the predictors (diameter, length, and/or their combinations. The same set of models was developed for primary and secondary forests due to absence of differences in regression line slopes of the forests (ANCOVA: . The coefficients of determination values of the models were high (stem: 0.861 to 0.990; TAGB: 0.900 to 0.992. Generally, log-transformed models showed better fit (Furnival's index, FI 0.5. A comparison of the best TAGB model in this study (based on FI with previously published equations indicated that most of the equations significantly ( overestimated TAGB of lianas. However, a previous equation from Southeast Asia estimated TAGB similar to that of the current equation (. Therefore, regional or intracontinental equations should be preferred to intercontinental equations when estimating liana biomass.

  15. Responses of Soil Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen Deposition and Precipitation Increment Are Closely Linked with Aboveground Community Variation.

    Li, Hui; Xu, Zhuwen; Yang, Shan; Li, Xiaobin; Top, Eva M; Wang, Ruzhen; Zhang, Yuge; Cai, Jiangping; Yao, Fei; Han, Xingguo; Jiang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    It has been predicted that precipitation and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition will increase in northern China; yet, ecosystem responses to the interactive effects of water and N remain largely unknown. In particular, responses of belowground microbial community to projected global change and their potential linkages to aboveground macro-organisms are rarely studied. In this study, we examined the responses of soil bacterial diversity and community composition to increased precipitation and multi-level N deposition in a temperate steppe in Inner Mongolia, China, and explored the diversity linkages between aboveground and belowground communities. It was observed that N addition caused the significant decrease in bacterial alpha-diversity and dramatic changes in community composition. In addition, we documented strong correlations of alpha- and beta-diversity between plant and bacterial communities in response to N addition. It was found that N enriched the so-called copiotrophic bacteria, but reduced the oligotrophic groups, primarily by increasing the soil inorganic N content and carbon availability and decreasing soil pH. We still highlighted that increased precipitation tended to alleviate the effects of N on bacterial diversity and dampen the plant-microbe connections induced by N. The counteractive effects of N addition and increased precipitation imply that even though the ecosystem diversity and function are predicted to be negatively affected by N deposition in the coming decades; the combination with increased precipitation may partially offset this detrimental effect. PMID:26838999

  16. Screening of perfluorinated compounds in water, sediment and biota of the Llobregat River basin (NE Spain)

    Campo, Julian; Perez, Francisca; Pico, Yolanda; Farre, Marinella; Barcelo, Damia; Andreu, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    PFCs present significant thermal and chemical stability being persistent in the environment, where they can bio-accumulate and adversely affect humans and wildlife (Llorca et al., 2012). Human exposure to PFCs is of concern since PFCs tend to be associated with fatty acid binding proteins in the liver or albumin proteins in blood, and have been detected in human serum, urine, saliva, seminal plasma and breast milk (Sundstrom et al., 2011). This study is aimed at the screening of 21 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in environmental samples by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The main objective is to identify target compounds at low levels in water, sediments and biota of the Llobregat River (2010), second longest river in Catalonia and one of Barcelona's major drinking water resources. PFCs were extracted from water samples by Solid Phase Extraction (SPE); from sediment by ultrasonication with acidified methanol followed by an off-line SPE procedure (Picó et al., 2012), and from biota (fish) with alkaline digestion, clean-up by TurboFlow™ on line technology coupled to LC-MS/MS (Llorca et al., 2012). The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of the method were calculated by analysis of spiked river water, sediment, and biota with minimum concentrations of each individual compound at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and 10, respectively. The LODs and LOQs of the method in river water ranged between 0.004 and 0.8 ng L-1 and between 0.01 and 2 ng L-1, respectively. In sediment LODs were 0.013-2.667 ng g-1 dry weight (dw) and LOQs were 0.04-8 ng g-1 dw, meanwhile in biota these were 0.006-0.7 pg μL-1 and 0.02-2.26 pg μL-1, respectively. Recoveries ranged between 65% and 102% for all target compounds. The method was applied to study the spatial distribution of these compounds in the Llobregat River basin. For this, a total of 40 samples were analysed (14 water, 14 sediments, 12 fishes). Of the 21 target

  17. Uptake, turnover and distribution of chlorinated fatty acids in aquatic biota

    Bjoern, Helena

    1999-09-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids (CIFAs) are the major contributors of extractable, organically bound chlorine in fish lipids. A known anthropogenic source of CIFAs is chlorine bleached pulp production. Additional anthropogenic sources may exist, e.g., chlorine-containing discharge from industrial and household waste and they may also occur naturally. CIFAs have a wide geographic distribution. They have, for instance, been identified in fish both from Alaskan and Scandinavian waters. In toxicological studies of CIFAs, the most pronounced effects have been found in reproductive related processes. CIFAs have also been shown to disrupt cell membrane functions. The present study was carried out to further characterise the ecotoxicological properties of CIFAs and their presence in biota. To investigate the biological stability of CIFAs, two experiments were carried out using radiolabelled chlorinated and non-chlorinated fatty acids. In both experiments, CIFAs were taken up from food by fish and assimilated to lipids. From the first experiment it was concluded that the chlorinated fatty acid investigated was turned over in the fish to a lower degree than the non-chlorinated analogue. In the second experiment, the transfer of a chlorinated fatty acid was followed over several trophic levels and the chlorinated fatty acid was transferred to the highest trophic level. In samples with differing loads of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from both fish and marine mammals, high concentrations and diversity of CIFAs were detected. This was also observed in samples with low POP concentration. Chlorohydroxy fatty acids made up a considerable portion of the CIFAs in certain samples, both from limnic fish and marine mammals. CIFAs in fish were found to be bound in complex lipids such as triacylglycerols (storage lipids) and phospholipids, as well as in acyl sterols (membrane lipids). In the marine mammals investigated, high concentrations of CIFAs were mainly bound in phospholipids. If

  18. Investigation of metal toxicity to tropical biota. Recommendations for revision of Australian water quality guidelines

    The specific objectives of this study were to: review available data on the toxicity of metals to aquatic biota in tropical Australia; identify metals considered to be priority toxicants to aquatic biota in tropical Australia; and employ previously developed toxicity testing protocols for two tropical freshwater species to obtain preliminary toxicity data for two priority metals. From the literature review, it was concluded that insufficient metal toxicity data exist for Australian tropical species. Data were absent for a range of metals (eg Ag, As, Al, Cr, Hg, Ni, Sb and Se) listed in the current Australian water quality guidelines. Aluminium, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, U, V and Zn were identified as priority metals of potential ecotoxicological concern in aquatic ecosystems of tropical Australia, largely as a consequence of mining activities, but also from urban impacts. Instead of testing the toxicity of the priority metals for which data do not currently exist (ie Al, Co, Ni and V), it was deemed more important to conduct further experimental work on Cu and U, in the context of elucidating the relatively high variability in the toxic response of these two metals. As a result, Cu and U were selected and toxicity tests conducted using two tropical freshwater species (green hydra (Hydra viridissima) and gudgeon fish (Mogurnda mogurnda)) from the Australian wet/dry tropics using test protocols designed to maximise the greatest sensitivity of metal response in the shortest period of time. Hydra viridissima was about eight times more sensitive to Cu than U, whereas M. mogurnda was about twenty times more sensitive. Once differences between the sublethal and lethal endpoints of the two organisms were corrected by statistical extrapolation, H. viridissima was approximately seven times more sensitive than M. mogurnda to U, but only about three times more sensitive to Cu. Both species were more sensitive to Cu than U. These results are generally consistent with those from

  19. Linking catchment and in-stream processes for an integrated simulation of freshwater biota

    Kiesel, Jens; Hering, Daniel; Jähnig, Sonja; Schmalz, Britta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Natural catchments, streams and aquatic diversity are globally degraded due to the impacts of industrial and urban development, as well as the intensification of agriculture. Degradation occurres at different spatial scales and rehabilitation measures are required in both streams and catchments, to improve conditions for the aquatic biota. Models, applied for planning restoration measures, are mostly targeting individual components of the complex chain linking the abiotic and biotic environment; e.g., models might be used just for predicting hydrological or hydraulic variables. Hereby, the cause-effect chain is compromised, which links drivers, pressures, state and impacts of the riverine system. We describe the design of an integrated, GIS-based model system considering the cause-effect chain from the catchment to the stream and aquatic biota. The models require data on climatic and physical catchment properties, and on the geometry and structure of the streams. This enables the assessment of the impact of global change as well as of more regional and local changes on the stream ecosystem on different scales. The approach is based on the Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-(Response) concept and includes the linkage of one ecohydrologic, two hydraulic and two habitat models: The ecohydrologic model SWAT was used for depicting the discharge regime and ero-sion processes controlled by land use and climate on the catchment scale. The discharge and sediment time series resulting from the hydrologic modelling were used for hydraulic simulations on the reach scale. Water depth, flow velocity, substrate changes and sediment transport were simulated in variable resolutions with the hydraulic models HEC-RAS one-dimensionally and with AdH two-dimensionally. Combined with structural river mapping, the temporally and spatially dynamic results of the hydraulic models were used for describing macroinvertebrate habitats. Two independent simulations were carried out: First, the

  20. Aboveground and belowground responses to nutrient additions and herbivore exclusion in Arctic tundra ecosystems in northern Alaska

    Moore, J. C.; Gough, L.; Simpson, R.; Johnson, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic has experienced significant increased regional warming over the past 30 years. Warming generally increases tundra soil nutrient availability by creating a more favorable environment for plant growth, decomposition and nutrient mineralization. Aboveground there has been a "greening" of the Arctic with increased net primary productivity (NPP), and an increase in woody vegetation. Concurrent with the changes aboveground has been an increase in root growth at lower depths and a loss of soil organic C (40 -100 g C m-2 yr-1). Given that arctic soils contain 14% of the global soil C pool, understanding the mechanisms behind shifts of this magnitude that are changing arctic soils from a net sink to a net source of atmospheric C is critical. We took an integrated multi-trophic level approach to examine how altering soil nutrients and mammalian herbivore activity affects vegetation, soil fauna, and microbial communities as well as soil physical characteristics in moist acidic (MAT) and dry heath (DH) tundra. Our work was conducted at the Arctic LTER site in northern Alaska. We sampled the nutrient (controls and annual N+P additions) and herbivore (controls and exclosures) manipulations established in 1996 after 10 years of treatment. Models that incorporated the biomass estimates from the field were used to characterize the trophic structure of the belowground food web and to estimate carbon flux among soil organisms and C-mineralization rates. Both MAT and DH exhibited significant increases in NPP and root growth and changes in vegetation structure with transitions from a mixed community to deciduous shrubs in MAT and from lichens to grasses and shrubs in DH, with nutrient additions and herbivore exclosures. Belowground responses to the treatments were dependent on ecosystem type, but exposed alterations in trophic structure that included changes in microbial biomass, the establishment of microbivorous enchytreaids, increases in root-feeding nematodes, and

  1. Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations Model of Total Aboveground Biomass in Forest Stands: Site-scale Test of Model

    CHOI, S.; Shi, Y.; Ni, X.; Simard, M.; Myneni, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Sparseness in in-situ observations has precluded the spatially explicit and accurate mapping of forest biomass. The need for large-scale maps has raised various approaches implementing conjugations between forest biomass and geospatial predictors such as climate, forest type, soil property, and topography. Despite the improved modeling techniques (e.g., machine learning and spatial statistics), a common limitation is that biophysical mechanisms governing tree growth are neglected in these black-box type models. The absence of a priori knowledge may lead to false interpretation of modeled results or unexplainable shifts in outputs due to the inconsistent training samples or study sites. Here, we present a gray-box approach combining known biophysical processes and geospatial predictors through parametric optimizations (inversion of reference measures). Total aboveground biomass in forest stands is estimated by incorporating the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) and Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM). Two main premises of this research are: (a) The Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations (ASRL) theory can provide a relationship between tree geometry and local resource availability constrained by environmental conditions; and (b) The zeroth order theory (size-frequency distribution) can expand individual tree allometry into total aboveground biomass at the forest stand level. In addition to the FIA estimates, two reference maps from the National Biomass and Carbon Dataset (NBCD) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) were produced to evaluate the model. This research focuses on a site-scale test of the biomass model to explore the robustness of predictors, and to potentially improve models using additional geospatial predictors such as climatic variables, vegetation indices, soil properties, and lidar-/radar-derived altimetry products (or existing forest canopy height maps). As results, the optimized ASRL estimates satisfactorily

  2. Seeing the Forest through the Trees: Citizen Scientists Provide Critical Data to Refine Aboveground Carbon Estimates in Restored Riparian Forests

    Viers, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Integrating citizen scientists into ecological informatics research can be difficult due to limited opportunities for meaningful engagement given vast data streams. This is particularly true for analysis of remotely sensed data, which are increasingly being used to quantify ecosystem services over space and time, and to understand how land uses deliver differing values to humans and thus inform choices about future human actions. Carbon storage and sequestration are such ecosystem services, and recent environmental policy advances in California (i.e., AB 32) have resulted in a nascent carbon market that is helping fuel the restoration of riparian forests in agricultural landscapes. Methods to inventory and monitor aboveground carbon for market accounting are increasingly relying on hyperspatial remotely sensed data, particularly the use of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technologies, to estimate biomass. Because airborne discrete return LiDAR can inexpensively capture vegetation structural differences at high spatial resolution ( 1000 ha), its use is rapidly increasing, resulting in vast stores of point cloud and derived surface raster data. While established algorithms can quantify forest canopy structure efficiently, the highly complex nature of native riparian forests can result in highly uncertain estimates of biomass due to differences in composition (e.g., species richness, age class) and structure (e.g., stem density). This study presents the comparative results of standing carbon estimates refined with field data collected by citizen scientists at three different sites, each capturing a range of agricultural, remnant forest, and restored forest cover types. These citizen science data resolve uncertainty in composition and structure, and improve allometric scaling models of biomass and thus estimates of aboveground carbon. Results indicate that agricultural land and horticulturally restored riparian forests store similar amounts of aboveground carbon

  3. Character, Age and Ecology of the Hezheng Biota from Northwestern China

    DENG Tao

    2005-01-01

    The Hezheng area of Gansu Province produces the most abundant mammal fossils in China as well as the whole Eurasia, and it also produces other Cenozoic fossils of different animals and plants. Therefore, all of them are named the Hezheng Biota. Mammals are very sensitive to environmental changes, and thus the evolution of mammalian faunas in the Hezheng area reflects the strong uplift of the Tibetan Plateau during the Late Cenozoic, which dramatically affects environmental changes. In the Hezheng area, micromammals are not very rich, but some of them still are important. It is relatively uncommon that three primates are found from the Middle Miocene and the Early Pleistocene deposits. Since the Middle Miocene, carnivores have become important components in the ecosystem of the Hezheng area, and dominated in the Early Pleistocene. The Middle Miocene is a time of high diversity for Proboscidea, characterized by shovel-tusked elephants. Perissodactyls in the Hezheng area are very abundant, especially Late Oligocene and Late Miocene rhinoceroses as well as the Late Miocene and Early Pleistocene horses. From the Middle Miocene, artiodactyls became important components of the mammalian faunas, especially bovids.

  4. Doses to members of the general public and observed effects on biota: Chernobyl Forum update

    Anspaugh, Lynn R. [Division of Radiobiology, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, 729 Arapeen Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)]. E-mail: lanspaugh@aol.com

    2007-07-15

    The Chernobyl Forum was organized by the United Nations to examine the health and environmental effects of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. This paper is concerned with the environmental effects, as determined by Expert Group Environment. The accident resulted in release of a large amount of radioactive materials over a period of 10 days. These materials were deposited throughout Europe with the three more affected countries being Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. More than 5 million persons lived on territories in these countries judged to be contaminated at >37 kBq m{sup -2}. Many countermeasures were employed to mitigate the effects of the accident. The collective effective dose to the residents of the contaminated territories is estimated to be about 55 000 person-Sv. Effects on non-human biota were observed that ranged from minor to lethal; the current increase in the number and diversity of species in the most contaminated area is due to absence of human pressure.

  5. Experimental taphonomy and the anatomy and diversity of the earliest fossil vertebrates (Chengjiang Biota, Cambrian, China)

    Purnell, Mark; Gabbott, Sarah; Murdock, Duncan; Cong, Peiyun

    2016-04-01

    The oldest fossil vertebrates are from the Lower Cambrian Chengjiang biota of China, which contains four genera of fish-like, primitive vertebrates: Haikouichthys, Myllokunmingia, Zhongjianichthys and Zhongxiniscus. These fossils play key roles in calibrating molecular clocks and informing our view of the anatomy of animals close to the origin of vertebrates, potentially including transitional forms between vertebrates and their nearest relatives. Despite the evident importance of these fossils, the degree to which taphonomic processes have affected their anatomical completeness has not been investigated. For example, some or all might have been affected by stemward slippage - the pattern observed in experimental decay of non-biomineralised chordates in which preferential decay of synapomorphies and retention of plesiomorphic characters would cause fossil taxa to erroneously occupy more basal positions than they should. This hypothesis is based on experimental data derived from decay of non-biomineralised chordates under laboratory conditions. We have expanded this analysis to include a broader range of potentially significant environmental variables; we have also compared and combined the results of experiments from several taxa to identify general patterns of chordate decay. Examination of the Chengjiang vertebrates in the light of these results demonstrates that, contrary to some assertions, experimentally derived models of phylogenetic bias are applicable to fossils. Anatomical and phylogenetic interpretations of early vertebrates that do not take taphonomic biases into account risk overestimating diversity and the evolutionary significance of differences between fossil specimens.

  6. The estimation of absorbed dose rates for non-human biota: an extended intercomparison.

    Vives i Batlle, J; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Beresford, N A; Copplestone, D; Horyna, J; Hosseini, A; Johansen, M; Kamboj, S; Keum, D-K; Kurosawa, N; Newsome, L; Olyslaegers, G; Vandenhove, H; Ryufuku, S; Vives Lynch, S; Wood, M D; Yu, C

    2011-05-01

    An exercise to compare 10 approaches for the calculation of unweighted whole-body absorbed dose rates was conducted for 74 radionuclides and five of the ICRP's Reference Animals and Plants, or RAPs (duck, frog, flatfish egg, rat and elongated earthworm), selected for this exercise to cover a range of body sizes, dimensions and exposure scenarios. Results were analysed using a non-parametric method requiring no specific hypotheses about the statistical distribution of data. The obtained unweighted absorbed dose rates for internal exposure compare well between the different approaches, with 70% of the results falling within a range of variation of ±20%. The variation is greater for external exposure, although 90% of the estimates are within an order of magnitude of one another. There are some discernible patterns where specific models over- or under-predicted. These are explained based on the methodological differences including number of daughter products included in the calculation of dose rate for a parent nuclide; source-target geometry; databases for discrete energy and yield of radionuclides; rounding errors in integration algorithms; and intrinsic differences in calculation methods. For certain radionuclides, these factors combine to generate systematic variations between approaches. Overall, the technique chosen to interpret the data enabled methodological differences in dosimetry calculations to be quantified and compared, allowing the identification of common issues between different approaches and providing greater assurance on the fundamental dose conversion coefficient approaches used in available models for assessing radiological effects to biota. PMID:21113609

  7. Sediment distribution coefficients and concentration factors for biota in the marine environment

    In 1985 the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 247 (TRS 247), Sediment Kds and Concentration Factors for Radionuclides in the Marine Environment, which provided sediment distribution coefficients (Kds) and concentration factor (CF) data for marine biological material that could be used in models simulating the dispersion of radioactive waste that had been disposed of in the sea. TRS 247 described an approach for calculating sediment or water Kds using stable element geochemical data developed by J.M. Bewers, even though the use of field derived data was emphasized whenever possible. Over the years, TRS 247 has proved to be a valuable reference for radioecologists, marine modellers and other scientists involved in assessing the impact of radionuclides in the marine environment. In 2000 the IAEA initiated a revision of TRS 247 to take account of the new sets of data obtained since 1985.The outcome of this work is this report, which contains revised sediment Kds for the open ocean and ocean margins and CFs for marine biota. CFs for deep ocean ferromanganese nodules. In addition, this report contains CFs for a limited number of elements for marine mammals not included in TRS 247. This revision was carried out at three IAEA Consultants Meetings held in Monaco and Vienna between April 2000 and December 2002

  8. A STUDY OF RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION OF MARINE BIOTA AFTER THE FUKUSHIMA ACCIDENT

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available 134Cs and 137Cs contents have been studied in 44 samples of the marine biota including four species of brown and red algae (11 samples, four species of invertebrates (8 samples and ten species of fish (25 samples. The samples have been collected in the Northwest Pacific Ocean and in the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan within the framework of the Russian monitoring program that started in 2011 to study environmental consequences of the accident at “Fukushima-1” NPP. In 2011–2012, total activity of both cesium radioisotopes for all the samples analyzed did not exceed 1 Bq kg–1 (wet weight. This value is negligible compared to the safe level of 130 Bq kg–1 (for 137Cs for the fish consumption in Russia. 134Cs, a marker of the Fukushima-derived contamination, has been determined at a level of 0.2–0.4 Bq kg–1 (wet weight for three samples of pacific saury (Cololabis saira collected from areas near Shikotan Island in Sempember 2011 and 2012. The study shows that the Fukushima accident has no considerable impact on radiation conditions in the Kuril-Kamchatka region of the Northwest Pacific Ocean and in the Russian waters of the Sea of Japan.

  9. Composition of the bacterial biota in slime developed in two machines at a Canadian paper mill.

    Disnard, Julie; Beaulieu, Carole; Villemur, Richard

    2011-02-01

    During the process of papermaking by pulp and paper plants, a thick and viscous deposits, termed slime, is quickly formed around the paper machines, which can affect the papermaking process. In this study, we explored the composition of the bacterial biota in slime that developed on shower pipes from 2 machines at a Canadian paper mill. Firstly, the composition was assessed for 12 months by DNA profiling with polymerase chain reaction coupled with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Except for short periods (2-3 months), clustered analyses showed that the bacterial composition of the slime varied substantially over the year, with less than 50% similarity between the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles. Secondly, the screening of 16S rRNA gene libraries derived from 2 slime samples showed that the most abundant bacteria were related to 6 lineages, including Chloroflexi, candidate division OP10, Clostridiales, Bacillales, Burkholderiales, and the genus Deinococcus. Finally, the proportion of 8 bacterial lineages, such as Deinococcus sp., Meiothermus sp., and Chloroflexi, was determined by the Catalyzed Reporter Deposition-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization in 2 slime samples. The results showed a high proportion of Chloroflexi, Tepidimonas spp., and Schlegelella spp. in the slime samples. PMID:21326351

  10. Comparison of Soil Biota Between Organic and Conventional Agroecosystems in Oregon, USA

    WU Shan-Mei; HU Dun-Xiao; E. R. INGHAM

    2005-01-01

    Soil samples at 0-10 cm in depth were collected periodically at paired fields in Corvallis, Oregon, USA to compare differences in soil microbial and faunal populations between organic and conventional agroecosystems. Results showed that the organic soil ecosystem had a significantly higher (P < 0.05) average number or biomass of soil bacteria; densities of flagellates, amoebae of protozoa; some nematodes, such as microbivorous and predaceous nematodes and plant-parasitic nematodes; as well as Collembola. Greater numbers of Rhabditida (such as Rhabditis spp.), were present in the organic soil ecosystem while Panagrolaimus spp. were predominant in the conventional soil ecosystem. The omnivores and predators of Acarina in the Mesostigmata (such as Digamasellidae and Laelapid), and Prostigmata (such as Alicorhaiidae and Rhagidiidae), were also more abundant in the organic soil ecosystem. However, fungivorous Prostigmata (such as Terpnacaridae and Nanorchestidae) and Astigmata (such as Acarida) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the conventional soil ecosystem, which supported the finding that total fungal biomass was greater in the conventional soil ecosystem. Seansonal variations of the population depended mostly on soil moisture condition and food web relationship.The population declined from May to October for both agroecosystems. However, higher diversities and densities of soil biota survived occurred in the organic soil ecosystem in the dry season.

  11. Cernavoda NPP impact study on terrestrial and aquatic biota. Preliminary results

    Recently, the awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against industrial pollutants has been recognized. The concept of sustainable development, requires new and developing international policies for environmental protection. See 'Protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation' IAEA-TECDOC-1091, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. As it is recommended in 'Cernavoda Unit No. 2 NPP Environmental Impact Assessment CES-03702-IAD-006', it is Cernavoda NPP responsibility to conduct an Ecological Risk Assessment study, mainly to assess the impact of nuclear power plant operation on terrestrial and aquatic biota. Long records from normal operation of Cernavoda Unit 1, wind pattern, meteorological conditions, and source terms data were used to evaluate areas of interest for environmental impact, conducting to a circle of 20 km radius around mentioned nuclear objective. The screening campaign established tritium level (because Cernavoda NPP is a CANDU type reactor, and tritium is the most important radioisotope evacuated in the environment) in air, water, soil and vegetation, focusing the interest area on particular ecosystem. Using these primary data it was evaluated which are the monitored ecological receptors and which are the measurement endpoints.This paper presents the Ecological Risk Assessment at Cernavoda NPP technical requirements, and the preliminary results of evaluating criteria for representative ecosystem components at Cernavoda NPP. (authors)

  12. Radiological dose conversion factors for generic non-human biota used for screening potential ecological impacts

    Protection of non-human biota from radionuclides in the environment is an important aspect of many environmental assessments. Biosphere transport models can be used to estimate radionuclide concentrations in plants and animals, and the radiological dose is calculated as the product of concentration and a dose-rate conversion factor (DCF). Here, we calculate and present DCF values for 99 radionuclides that can be used in a generic sense to estimate the dose to a wide variety of plants and animals. DCF values for internally incorporated radionuclides are based on the absorption of all emitted radiations from within the body. DCF values for external exposures include immersion in air, water, soil/sediment and vegetation. We implicitly include the energy from the decay progeny if they have a half-life of less than 1 day, to be consistent with many biosphere transport models. The DCF values can be used for simple screening of potential doses in assessments where a specific target organism cannot be defined. (author)

  13. Screening level dose assessment of aquatic biota downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in southern France

    Aquatic biota in the Rhone River downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in France are exposed to natural sources of radiation and to radioactivity released from the Marcoule complex. A simple conservative screening level model was used to estimate the range of concentrations in aquatic media of both artificial and natural radionuclides and the consequent absorbed dose rates for aquatic organisms. Five categories of aquatic organisms were studied, namely, submerged aquatic plants (phanerogam), non-bottom-feeding fish, bottom-feeding fish, mollusca, and fish-eating birds. The analysis was based on the radionuclide concentrations reported in four consecutive annual radioecological monitoring reports published by French agencies with nuclear regulatory responsibilities. The results of this assessment were used to determine, qualitatively, the magnitude of any potential health impacts on each of the five categories of aquatic organisms studied. The range of dose rate estimates ranged over three orders of magnitude, with maximum dose rates estimated to be in the order of 1 to 10 microGy h-1. These maximum dose rates are a factor 40 or more below the international guideline intended to ensure the protection of aquatic populations, and a factor ten or more below the level which may trigger the need for a more detailed evaluation of potential ecological consequences to the exposed populations

  14. Evolutionary lag times and recent origin of the biota of an ancient desert (Atacama–Sechura)

    Guerrero, Pablo C.; Rosas, Marcelo; Arroyo, Mary T. K.; Wiens, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of regional biotas and organismal responses to anthropogenic climate change both depend on the capacity of organisms to adapt to novel ecological conditions. Here we demonstrate the concept of evolutionary lag time, the time between when a climatic regime or habitat develops in a region and when it is colonized by a given clade. We analyzed the time of colonization of four clades (three plant genera and one lizard genus) into the Atacama–Sechura Desert of South America, one of Earth’s driest and oldest deserts. We reconstructed time-calibrated phylogenies for each clade and analyzed the timing of shifts in climatic distributions and biogeography and compared these estimates to independent geological estimates of the time of origin of these deserts. Chaetanthera and Malesherbia (plants) and Liolaemus (animal) invaded arid regions of the Atacama–Sechura Desert in the last 10 million years, some 20 million years after the initial onset of aridity in the region. There are also major lag times between when these clades colonized the region and when they invaded arid habitats within the region (typically 4–14 million years). Similarly, hyperarid climates developed ∼8 million years ago, but the most diverse plant clade in these habitats (Nolana) only colonized them ∼2 million years ago. Similar evolutionary lag times may occur in other organisms and habitats, but these results are important in suggesting that many lineages may require very long time scales to adapt to modern desertification and climatic change. PMID:23798420

  15. Evolutionary lag times and recent origin of the biota of an ancient desert (Atacama-Sechura).

    Guerrero, Pablo C; Rosas, Marcelo; Arroyo, Mary T K; Wiens, John J

    2013-07-01

    The assembly of regional biotas and organismal responses to anthropogenic climate change both depend on the capacity of organisms to adapt to novel ecological conditions. Here we demonstrate the concept of evolutionary lag time, the time between when a climatic regime or habitat develops in a region and when it is colonized by a given clade. We analyzed the time of colonization of four clades (three plant genera and one lizard genus) into the Atacama-Sechura Desert of South America, one of Earth's driest and oldest deserts. We reconstructed time-calibrated phylogenies for each clade and analyzed the timing of shifts in climatic distributions and biogeography and compared these estimates to independent geological estimates of the time of origin of these deserts. Chaetanthera and Malesherbia (plants) and Liolaemus (animal) invaded arid regions of the Atacama-Sechura Desert in the last 10 million years, some 20 million years after the initial onset of aridity in the region. There are also major lag times between when these clades colonized the region and when they invaded arid habitats within the region (typically 4-14 million years). Similarly, hyperarid climates developed ∼8 million years ago, but the most diverse plant clade in these habitats (Nolana) only colonized them ∼2 million years ago. Similar evolutionary lag times may occur in other organisms and habitats, but these results are important in suggesting that many lineages may require very long time scales to adapt to modern desertification and climatic change. PMID:23798420

  16. Plutonium isotopes in marine sediments and some biota from the Sudanese coast of the Red Sea

    Measurements of 239+240Pu and 238Pu were carried out on marine biota as well as on sediments from the fringing reefs area extending towards north and south (Flamingo Bay) of Port Sudan harbour. The analyses were performed using radiochemical separation and alpha spectrometry. The range of the activity concentrations in marine sediments, in mBq kg-1 dry weight, was found to be from 5.10 to 82.00 for 239+240Pu and from 0.89 to 8.63 for 238Pu. Corresponding activity concentrations of 239+240Pu and 238Pu in sediments from the harbours at Port Sudan and Sawakin were 53-301 and 8.29-28.6 (Port Sudan) and 163-343 and 4.7 (Sawakin), respectively. The higher values for plutonium in marine algae suggest their suitability as an indicator species for monitoring purposes. The results obtained are generally lower than those found by other studies and show that the Red Sea environment is mildly affected by plutonium contamination. Activity ratios of plutonium isotopes confirm that the existence of plutonium in the Red Sea is mainly due to atmospheric global fallout. (authors)

  17. Geological sampling data and benthic biota classification: Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts

    Ackerman, Seth D.; Pappal, Adrienne L.; Huntley, Emily C.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Schwab, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Sea-floor sample collection is an important component of a statewide cooperative mapping effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM). Sediment grab samples, bottom photographs, and video transects were collected within Vineyard Sound and Buzzards Bay in 2010 aboard the research vesselConnecticut. This report contains sample data and related information, including analyses of surficial-sediment grab samples, locations and images of sea-floor photography, survey lines along which sea-floor video was collected, and a classification of benthic biota observed in sea-floor photographs and based on the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS). These sample data and analyses information are used to verify interpretations of geophysical data and are an essential part of geologic maps of the sea floor. These data also provide a valuable inventory of benthic habitat and resources. Geographic information system (GIS) data, maps, and interpretations, produced through the USGS and CZM mapping cooperative, are intended to aid efforts to manage coastal and marine resources and to provide baseline information for research focused on coastal evolution and environmental change.

  18. Proposal of a weight factor for alpha radiation aiming biota radioprotection

    Several proposals based on the environmental radioprotection of calculating the absorbed dose in biota have been suggested. The absorbed dose expresses the deposition of energy per mass unit. The differences in biological effects of the absorbed dose can be quantified by applying a correction factor to the absorbed dose. The correction factor for radiation is easier to establish, because radiations exist in smaller number (alpha, beta, neutrons and photons) and can be set for groups of organisms. This work aims to propose a correction factor for radiation, in order to adequate the concept of absorbed dose currently used to the concept of equivalent dose. A survey of the literature on correction factors proposed for alpha radiation was carried out and, when possible, the biological endpoint was identified, as well as the radionuclide and the biological target. A variation of the weight factor for alpha radiation from 1 to 377 was observed and a number of biological endpoints, biological target and alpha emitter radionuclide were identified. Finally we propose a weight value for alpha radiation of 40, and we propose also the name of correction factor for radiation alpha as being ecological radiation weighting factor (WRE) the name 'equivalent dose for flora and fauna' (HTFF) to name of the new dose. (author)

  19. The role of regional information in the dose rate estimation of biota: from the view point of stakeholder involvement

    A dose evaluation system developed to judge environmental radiation safety was proposed in order to evaluate the effect on environmental flora and fauna. However, it was noted that large differences exist between biota doses based on the regional data and those determined by the dose evaluation system developed. In order to realize successful mutual communication among stakeholders, information needed for environmental radiation protection has been investigated in various kinds of exposure situations, because the Japanese tend to act following the standards set by them to get the most appropriate results in the situations they are faced with. It became clear from the investigation on beliefs about environmental issues that the Japanese are concerned about regional characteristics of natural environments and biota through which they observe variations in their living conditions. Furthermore, the systematic approach for compilation of the regional environmental parameters and data becomes important to accomplish a social agreement on environmental safety. (author)

  20. Assessment of the impact of the Chernobyl Reactor accident on the Biota of Swedeish Streams and Lakes

    The Chernobyl reactor accident resulted in elevated levels of radionuclides in the air space above Sweden, which were then washed into Swedish lakes and streams. Before suspended particles stripped the water column, the concentration of /sp137/Cs in small Swedish lakes was in the order of 10-40 Bq/l. This level of radioactivity should result in a negligible increase in the external exposure rate. However, by August 1986 increased levels of radioactivity were found at all trophic levels of freshwater ecosystems from algae to top carnivore, and from the available data the levels of radioactivity are still increasing. The calculated dose rate for the aquatic biota caused by the two cesium isotopes, /sp134/Cs and /sp137/Cs, is about 25 times higher than natural levels. While acute effectrs of the Chernobyl fallout on freshwater biota are unlikely, the long term ecological effects bear watching

  1. The comparison of Cu, Cr and Fe elements analysis in biota samples using FNAA and AAS method

    Quality control of Fast Neutron Activation Analysis (FNAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) method by comparison test of Cu, Cr, and Fe elements in biota samples has been carried out. The comparison test covered instruments optimizing, homogeneity, method validation, uncertainty measurement, t test and F test for both methods. The results of comparison test were then applied to analyze the biota samples. From the comparison test it was obtained that the validity of both FNAA and AAS methods were between 92.69% and 98.12%. The t test result showed that there was no any differences in the average of elements concentration. The F test for both methods also showed that there was no any differences in the accuracy. (author)

  2. Derivation of transfer parameters for use within the ERICA Tool and the default concentration ratios for terrestrial biota

    An ability to predict radionuclide activity concentrations in biota is a requirement of any method assessing the exposure of biota to ionising radiation. Within the ERICA Tool fresh weight whole-body activity concentrations in organisms are estimated using concentration ratios (the ratio of the activity concentration in the organism to the activity concentration in an environmental media). This paper describes the methodology used to derive the default terrestrial ecosystem concentration ratio database available within the ERICA Tool and provides details of the provenance of each value for terrestrial reference organisms. As the ERICA Tool considers 13 terrestrial reference organisms and the radioisotopes of 31 elements, a total of 403 concentration ratios were required for terrestrial reference organisms. Of these, 129 could be derived from literature review. The approaches taken for selecting the remaining values are described. These included, for example, assuming values for similar reference organisms and/or biogeochemically similar elements, and various simple modelling approaches

  3. Species of Thaumatomastix (Thaumatomastigidae, Protista incertae sedis) from the Arctic sea ice biota (North-East Water Polynya, NE Greenland)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Ikävalko, Johanna

    1997-01-01

    The sea ice biota of polar regions contains numerous heterotrophic flagellates very few of which have been properly identified. The whole mount technique for transmission electron microscopy enables the identification of loricate and scaly forms. A survey of Arctic ice samples (North-East Water Polynya, NE Greenland) revealed the presence of ca. 12 taxa belonging to the phagotrophic genus Thaumatomastix (Protista incertae sedis). Species of Thaumatomastix possess siliceous body scales and one naked and one scale-covered flagellum. The presence in both Arctic samples and sea ice material previously examined from the Antarctic indicates that this genus is most likely ubiquitous in polar sea ice and may be an important component in sea ice biota microbial activities.

  4. The Luoping biota: exceptional preservation, and new evidence on the Triassic recovery from end-Permian mass extinction

    Hu, Shi-xue; Zhang, Qi-yue; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Zhou, Chang-Yong; Lü, Tao; XIE, TAO; Wen, Wen; Huang, Jin-yuan; Benton, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The timing and nature of biotic recovery from the devastating end-Permian mass extinction (252 Ma) are much debated. New studies in South China suggest that complex marine ecosystems did not become re-established until the middle–late Anisian (Middle Triassic), much later than had been proposed by some. The recently discovered exceptionally preserved Luoping biota from the Anisian Stage of the Middle Triassic, Yunnan Province and southwest China shows this final stage of community assembly on...

  5. The Biocontrol Agent Phlebiopsis gigantea: Efficacy and Impacts on the Stump Bacterial Biota and Conifer tree Defences

    Sun, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Phlebiopsis gigantea has been for a long time known as a strong competitor against Heterobasidion annosum and intensively applied as a biological control agent on stump surfaces of Picea abies in Fennoscandia. However, the mechanism underlying its antagonistic activity is still unknown. A primary concern is the possible impact of P. gigantea treatment on resident non-target microbial biota of conifer stumps. Additional risk factor is the potential of P. gigantea to acquire a necrotrophic habi...

  6. Assessment of doses to non-human biota: Review of developments and demonstration assessment for Olkiluoto repository

    Smith, K. [Carol Robinson Enviros Consulting Ltd, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    This report provides a summary of work commissioned by Posiva Oy and undertaken by Enviros Consulting Ltd to support the development of a strategy for the assessment of environmental impacts from ionising radiation associated with the Olkiluoto waste repository, Finland, as part of the development of the Posiva Safety Case Portfolio. This project included a review of the development of international policies and standards related to protection of biota from the effects of ionizing radiation and of biota assessment methodologies, paying particular attention to those that have been applied to waste repository performance assessments. On the basis of this review, recommendations were developed on the most appropriate methodology to apply in order to assess the impact of radioactive releases from the planned spent fuel repository in Olkiluoto. A test-case was developed, in collaboration with staff from Posiva and Facilia AB, and an assessment was performed. The results and experience of which were analysed and summarised to develop recommendations for a future strategy. The test case highlighted some significant data gaps related to the assessment of impacts to both generic biota types and to interest species. In particular, concentration ratios for generic carnivorous mammals and migratory species such as moose that may consume food from multiple ecosystems and dose conversion factors for large burrowing (i.e. hibernating) mammals. However, in general terms, the dose rates predicted for all organism types were several orders of magnitude below those at which population effects would be expected to be observed and those at which effects on the individual may be anticipated. There would therefore be scope for simplifying the approach applied, although there would be value in performing a sensitivity analysis to ensure that the simplification is applied appropriately. There would also be value in ensuring consistency of the developing approach for non-human biota with

  7. Transfer of PCB from sediment to biota: development of a bioaccumulation model in a risk assessment perspective

    Lopes, C; Roy, A.; Persat, H.; Perga, M.E.; Babut, M.

    2011-01-01

    Many chemical, physiological and trophic factors are known to be important in the bioaccumulation processes and trophic transfer of PCB in the biota. Understanding the primary factors influencing PCB contamination of fishes is critical for predicting and assessing risks to upper-trophic levels consumers including humans. We proposed here to (1) identify PCB contamination pathways that could explain between and within species variability in fish concentration levels; and (2) describe PCB trans...

  8. Natural populations of plants and animals as test objects in ecological and genetic assessment of STS biota and population

    Anthropogenic activities result in degradation of natural landscapes and biota impoverishment, disturb historical biocenoses relationships and thus unbalance the ecological system. Rare and few in number plant and animal species vanish and simplify the structure of plant and animal communities. Under unstable landscape conditions and growing impact of stress-inducing anthropogenic factors, populations of living organisms fall into several small isolated sub-populations that impoverishes the gene pool. (author)

  9. Biota: sediment partitioning of aluminium smelter related PAHs and pulp mill related diterpenes by intertidal clams at Kitimat, British Columbia.

    Yunker, Mark B; Lachmuth, Cara L; Cretney, Walter J; Fowler, Brian R; Dangerfield, Neil; White, Linda; Ross, Peter S

    2011-09-01

    The question of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability and its relationship to specific PAH sources with different PAH binding characteristics is an important one, because bioavailability drives PAH accumulation in biota and ultimately the biochemical responses to the PAH contaminants. The industrial harbour at Kitimat (British Columbia, Canada) provides an ideal location to study the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of sediment hydrocarbons to low trophic level biota. Samples of soft shell clams (Mya arenaria) and intertidal sediment collected from multiple sites over six years at various distances from an aluminium smelter and a pulp and paper mill were analysed for 106 PAHs, plant diterpenes and other aromatic fraction hydrocarbons. Interpretation using PAH source ratios and multivariate data analysis reveals six principal hydrocarbon sources: PAHs in coke, pitch and emissions from anode combustion from the aluminium smelter, vascular plant terpenes and aromatised terpenes from the pulp and paper mill, petroleum PAHs from shipping and other anthropogenic activities and PAHs from natural plant detritus. Harbour sediments predominantly contain either pitch or pyrogenic PAHs from the smelter, while clams predominantly contain plant derived PAHs and diterpenes from the adjacent pulp mill. PAHs from the smelter have low bioavailability to clams (Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factors; BSAFs petroleum PAHs and compound specific metabolism, with the importance of petroleum PAHs decreasing with increasing molecular weight. Plant derived compounds exhibit little natural bioaccumulation at reference sites, but unsaturated and aromatised diterpenes released from resins by industrial pulping processes are readily accumulated by the clams (BSAFs >500). Thus while most of the smelter associated PAHs in sediments may not be bioavailable to benthic organisms, the plant terpenes (including retene, totarol, ferruginol, manool, dehydroabietane and other plant

  10. Assessment of doses to non-human biota: Review of developments and demonstration assessment for Olkiluoto repository

    This report provides a summary of work commissioned by Posiva Oy and undertaken by Enviros Consulting Ltd to support the development of a strategy for the assessment of environmental impacts from ionising radiation associated with the Olkiluoto waste repository, Finland, as part of the development of the Posiva Safety Case Portfolio. This project included a review of the development of international policies and standards related to protection of biota from the effects of ionizing radiation and of biota assessment methodologies, paying particular attention to those that have been applied to waste repository performance assessments. On the basis of this review, recommendations were developed on the most appropriate methodology to apply in order to assess the impact of radioactive releases from the planned spent fuel repository in Olkiluoto. A test-case was developed, in collaboration with staff from Posiva and Facilia AB, and an assessment was performed. The results and experience of which were analysed and summarised to develop recommendations for a future strategy. The test case highlighted some significant data gaps related to the assessment of impacts to both generic biota types and to interest species. In particular, concentration ratios for generic carnivorous mammals and migratory species such as moose that may consume food from multiple ecosystems and dose conversion factors for large burrowing (i.e. hibernating) mammals. However, in general terms, the dose rates predicted for all organism types were several orders of magnitude below those at which population effects would be expected to be observed and those at which effects on the individual may be anticipated. There would therefore be scope for simplifying the approach applied, although there would be value in performing a sensitivity analysis to ensure that the simplification is applied appropriately. There would also be value in ensuring consistency of the developing approach for non-human biota with

  11. New approaches for the mass spectrometric determination of trace concentrations and congener group patterns of chlorinated paraffins in biota

    Reth, Margot

    2006-01-01

    The determination of chlorinated paraffins (CPs) in the environment is important, since CPs are persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. However, the analysis of these complex mixtures containing thousands of isomers is also a demanding task. CP analysis and especially the quantification of CPs are far from being well established. In this work, new methodologies were developed for the determination of CPs in biota by low-resolution mass spectrometry (LRMS). The use of expensiv...

  12. Soil development and succession of soil biota in afforested and non-reclaimed sites in post mining landscape - preliminary results

    Frouz, Jan; Pižl, Václav; Tajovský, Karel; Balík, Vladimír; Háněl, Ladislav; Starý, Josef; Lukešová, Alena; Nováková, Alena; Šourková, Monika; Přikryl, I.

    Cagliari: DIGITA Facolta Ingegneria, 2002, s. 621-626. [Symposium on Environmental Issues and Waste Management of Mineral and Energy Production 2002. Cagliari (IT), 07.10.2002-10.10.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/01/1055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : succession * soil biota * post mining landscape Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  13. A first map of tropical Africa's above-ground biomass derived from satellite imagery

    Baccini, A; Laporte, N; Goetz, S J; Sun, M [Woods Hole Research Center, 149 Woods Hole Road, Falmouth, MA 02540 (United States); Dong, H [Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)], E-mail: abaccini@whrc.org

    2008-10-15

    Observations from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) were used in combination with a large data set of field measurements to map woody above-ground biomass (AGB) across tropical Africa. We generated a best-quality cloud-free mosaic of MODIS satellite reflectance observations for the period 2000-2003 and used a regression tree model to predict AGB at 1 km resolution. Results based on a cross-validation approach show that the model explained 82% of the variance in AGB, with a root mean square error of 50.5 Mg ha{sup -1} for a range of biomass between 0 and 454 Mg ha{sup -1}. Analysis of lidar metrics from the Geoscience Laser Altimetry System (GLAS), which are sensitive to vegetation structure, indicate that the model successfully captured the regional distribution of AGB. The results showed a strong positive correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.90) between the GLAS height metrics and predicted AGB.

  14. Dissipation kinetics of alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin residues in aboveground part of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.).

    Słowik-Borowiec, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Dissipation of simultaneously applied insecticides alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin was studied in a minor crop, aboveground part of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.). A validated gas chromatographic method (GC-ECD/NPD) was used to determine insecticide residues. Analytical performances were very satisfactory, with expanded uncertainties not higher than 14% (coverage factor k = 2, confidence level 95%). Dissipation of alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin in white mustard followed first-order kinetics (R(2) between 0.953 and 0.995), with half-lives of 3.1-4.6 and 2.9-3.7 days respectively. Based on the results of this two-year study and the relevant residue regulation, alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin treatments can be considered safe for crop protection, feeding animals and the environment. PMID:27229135

  15. Comparative radiation impact on biota and man in the area affected by the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    Fesenko, S.V. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation) and International Atomic Energy Agency, Agency' s Laboratories, Seibersdorf A-2444 (Austria)]. E-mail: s.fesenko@iaea.org; Alexakhin, R.M. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Geras' kin, S.A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Sanzharova, N.I. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Spirin, Ye.V. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Spiridonov, S.I. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Gontarenko, I.A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Kievskoe shosse, Kaluga region, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteras (Norway)

    2005-07-01

    A methodological approach for a comparative assessment of ionising radiation effects on man and non-human species, based on the use of Radiation Impact Factor (RIF) - ratios of actual exposure doses to biota species and man to critical dose is described. As such doses, radiation safety standards limiting radiation exposure of man and doses at which radiobiological effects in non-human species were not observed after the Chernobyl accident, were employed. For the study area within the 30 km ChNPP zone dose burdens to 10 reference biota groups and the population (with and without evacuation) and the corresponding RIFs were calculated. It has been found that in 1986 (early period after the accident) the emergency radiation standards for man do not guarantee adequate protection of the environment, some species of which could be affected more than man. In 1991 RIFs for man were considerably (by factor of 20.0-1.1 x 10{sup 5}) higher compared with those for selected non-human species. Thus, for the long term after the accident radiation safety standards for man are shown to ensure radiation safety for biota as well.

  16. Comparative radiation impact on biota and man in the area affected by the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    A methodological approach for a comparative assessment of ionising radiation effects on man and non-human species, based on the use of Radiation Impact Factor (RIF) - ratios of actual exposure doses to biota species and man to critical dose is described. As such doses, radiation safety standards limiting radiation exposure of man and doses at which radiobiological effects in non-human species were not observed after the Chernobyl accident, were employed. For the study area within the 30 km ChNPP zone dose burdens to 10 reference biota groups and the population (with and without evacuation) and the corresponding RIFs were calculated. It has been found that in 1986 (early period after the accident) the emergency radiation standards for man do not guarantee adequate protection of the environment, some species of which could be affected more than man. In 1991 RIFs for man were considerably (by factor of 20.0-1.1 x 105) higher compared with those for selected non-human species. Thus, for the long term after the accident radiation safety standards for man are shown to ensure radiation safety for biota as well

  17. Predictive modeling of hazardous waste landfill total above-ground biomass using passive optical and LIDAR remotely sensed data

    Hadley, Brian Christopher

    This dissertation assessed remotely sensed data and geospatial modeling technique(s) to map the spatial distribution of total above-ground biomass present on the surface of the Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) hazardous waste landfill. Ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, regression kriging, and tree-structured regression were employed to model the empirical relationship between in-situ measured Bahia (Paspalum notatum Flugge) and Centipede [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack.] grass biomass against an assortment of explanatory variables extracted from fine spatial resolution passive optical and LIDAR remotely sensed data. Explanatory variables included: (1) discrete channels of visible, near-infrared (NIR), and short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectance, (2) spectral vegetation indices (SVI), (3) spectral mixture analysis (SMA) modeled fractions, (4) narrow-band derivative-based vegetation indices, and (5) LIDAR derived topographic variables (i.e. elevation, slope, and aspect). Results showed that a linear combination of the first- (1DZ_DGVI), second- (2DZ_DGVI), and third-derivative of green vegetation indices (3DZ_DGVI) calculated from hyperspectral data recorded over the 400--960 nm wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum explained the largest percentage of statistical variation (R2 = 0.5184) in the total above-ground biomass measurements. In general, the topographic variables did not correlate well with the MWMF biomass data, accounting for less than five percent of the statistical variation. It was concluded that tree-structured regression represented the optimum geospatial modeling technique due to a combination of model performance and efficiency/flexibility factors.

  18. Analysis of Selenium Concentrations in Biota and Sediment from Stewart Lake and the Middle Green River, 1995-1999: Evaluation of Phase IV Remediation

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report presents the analytical results and analysis of selenium concentrations in biota and sediment samples collected by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  19. EU-wide maps of growing stock and above-ground biomass in forests based on remote sensing and field measurements

    Gallaun, H.; Zanchi, G.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Hengeveld, G.M.; Schardt, M.; Verkerk, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to combine national forest inventory data and remotely sensed data to produce pan-European maps on growing stock and above-ground woody biomass for the two species groups " broadleaves" and " conifers" An automatic up-scaling approach making use of satellite r

  20. Spatially-Explicit Testing of a General Aboveground Carbon Density Estimation Model in a Western Amazonian Forest Using Airborne LiDAR

    Patricio Xavier Molina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mapping aboveground carbon density in tropical forests can support CO2 emission monitoring and provide benefits for national resource management. Although LiDAR technology has been shown to be useful for assessing carbon density patterns, the accuracy and generality of calibrations of LiDAR-based aboveground carbon density (ACD predictions with those obtained from field inventory techniques should be intensified in order to advance tropical forest carbon mapping. Here we present results from the application of a general ACD estimation model applied with small-footprint LiDAR data and field-based estimates of a 50-ha forest plot in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park. Subplots used for calibration and validation of the general LiDAR equation were selected based on analysis of topographic position and spatial distribution of aboveground carbon stocks. The results showed that stratification of plot locations based on topography can improve the calibration and application of ACD estimation using airborne LiDAR (R2 = 0.94, RMSE = 5.81 Mg·C·ha−1, BIAS = 0.59. These results strongly suggest that a general LiDAR-based approach can be used for mapping aboveground carbon stocks in western lowland Amazonian forests.

  1. The variable effects of soil nitrogen availability and insect herbivory on aboveground and belowground plant biomass in an old-field ecosystem

    Blue, Jarrod D.; Souza, Lara; Classen, Aimée T.;

    2011-01-01

    N may not be limiting primary production in this ecosystem. Insects reduced the aboveground biomass of subdominant plant species and decreased coarse root production. We found no statistical interactions between N availability and insect herbivory for any response variable. Overall, the results of 6...

  2. Baseline survey on air, water, soil quality, radioactivity and aquatic biota in and around the project site on new uranium mining site, Tummalapalle, Andhra Pradesh

    In this study four ecological parameters of the environment ie. water, air, soil and biota were monitored at the new uranium mining site of Tummalapalle, Andhra Pradesh. The water quality was assessed by estimating trace metals, natural uranium, physical and chemical parameters. Air quality was assessed through PM10, TSP, PM2.5, SOx and NOx parameters. Soil samples were analysed for trace metals, metal oxides and natural radionuclides. Similarly biota samples were analysed for trace metals and radionuclides

  3. Using macroinvertebrates to identify biota-land cover optima at multiple scales in the Pacific Northwest, USA

    Black, R.W.; Munn, M.D.; Plotnikoff, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Macroinvertebrate assemblages and environmental variables were evaluated at 45 stream sites throughout the Puget Sound Basin, Washington, USA. Environmental variables were measured at 3 spatial scales: reach, local, and whole watershed. Macroinvertebrate distributions were related to environmental variables using canonical correspondence analysis to determine which variables and spatial scales best explained the observed community composition and to identify biota-land cover optima. The calculation of a biota-land cover optimum was a 2-step process. First, an individual taxon's optimum was estimated for a particular land cover by weighting the mean value for that land cover by the abundance of that taxon at all sites. Second, the biota-land cover optimum was determined as the point at which the greatest numbers of taxa, at their calculated optima, appeared for a particular land cover. Sampling reaches were located on streams in watersheds with varying levels of forest, agriculture, and urban/suburban land cover that represented the full range of physical conditions typically found in Puget Sound streams. At the reach scale, taxa composition was correlated with conductivity and mean velocity. At the local and whole-watershed scales, taxa composition was correlated with % forest and agricultural land cover and % forest and bedrock land cover, respectively. For all of the scales, the dominant environmental variables represented an anthropogenic gradient. There was little difference in the amount of variability explained by each spatial scale. At the local-watershed scale, a biota-land cover optimum of ???80 to 90% forest land cover was identified. The total number of taxa at their optima declined rapidly as forest land cover within the local scale declined below 80 to 90%. At the whole-watershed scale, a biota-land cover optimum of 70 to 80% forest land cover was identified. The total number of taxa at their optima declined rapidly as forest land cover within the

  4. Simulation of radioactive cesium transfer in the southern Fukushima coastal biota using a dynamic food chain transfer model

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F NPP) accident occurred on 11 March 2011. The accident introduced 137Cs into the coastal waters which was subsequently transferred to the local coastal biota thereby elevating the concentration of this radionuclide in coastal organisms. In this study, the radioactive cesium levels in coastal biota from the southern Fukushima area were simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model. The simulation derived the possible maximum radioactive cesium levels in organisms, indicating that the maximum 137Cs concentrations in invertebrates, benthic fish and predator fish occurred during late April, late May and late July, respectively in the studied area where the source was mainly the direct leakage of 137Cs effluent from the 1F NPP. The delay of a 137Cs increase in fish was explained by the gradual food chain transfer of 137Cs introduced to the ecosystem from the initial contamination of the seawater. The model also provided the degree of radionuclide depuration in organisms, and it demonstrated the latest start of the decontamination phase in benthic fish. The ecological half-lives, derived both from model simulation and observation, were 1–4 months in invertebrates, and 2–9 months in plankton feeding fish and coastal predator fish from the studied area. In contrast, it was not possible to similarly calculate these parameters in benthic fish because of an unidentified additional radionuclide source which was deduced from the biological compartment model. To adequately reconstruct the in-situ depuration of radiocesium in benthic fish in the natural ecosystem, a contamination source associated with the bottom sediments is necessary. -- Highlights: • Cs-137 in the southern Fukushima coastal biota were simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model. • Simulation derived contamination phase of marine biota was completed until late April to July 2011. • The delay of Cs-137 concentration increase in fish was

  5. RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  6. Radiation Dose Assessment For The Biota Of Terrestrial Ecosystems In The Shoreline Zone Of The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from 90Sr and 137Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  7. Radionuclides in biota collected near a dicalcium phosphate plant, southern Catalonia, Spain

    Industrial waste containing radioactive U-decay series isotopes was released into the Ebro River, Spain, over a period of >20 years from a dicalcium phosphate (DCP) plant. This release raised activities of several natural radionuclides (e.g. 238U, 234U, 230Th, 232Th and 226Ra) in biota taken from the area near the DCP plant. Plants and animals selected for this study included the green algae (Cladophora glomerata), the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and the scavenger catfish (Silurus glanis) because they are all common in the area. Multiple sampling points were chosen for this study: (1) a site in the Riba-Roja Reservoir, above the DCP plant's area of influence, (2) four sites in the area surrounding the DCP plant, close to the town of Flix, and (3) a location in the Ebro Delta Estuary in Fangar Bay. Significant differences in the activities (in Bq kg-1 of dry weight) for the radioisotopes included in this study among samples were attributed to sample location and the species evaluated. For instance, relatively high activities for uranium and radium were obtained in algae collected around the DCP plant, compared to results obtained for algae samples taken from the unimpacted Riba-Roja Reservoir. In contrast, for zebra mussels, enhanced activities were observed for all radionuclides and, in particular, for thorium and radium isotopes within the area of influence. Among catfish samples, activity values from different locations were not significantly different, though slightly higher activities were observed at the sampling point just downstream of the DCP factory. (author)

  8. The effect of native and introduced biofuel crops on the composition of soil biota communities

    Heděnec, Petr; Ustak, Sergej; Novotný, David; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Biofuel crops are an accepted alternative to fossil fuels, but little is known about the ecological impact of their production. The aim of this contribution is to study the effect of native (Salix viminalis and Phalaris arundinacea) and introduced (Helianthus tuberosus, Reynoutria sachalinensis and Silphium perfoliatum) biofuel crop plantations on the soil biota in comparison with cultural meadow vegetation used as control. The study was performed as part of a split plot field experiment of the Crop Research Institute in the city of Chomutov (Czech Republic). The composition of the soil meso- and macrofauna community, composition of the cultivable fraction of the soil fungal community, cellulose decomposition (using litter bags), microbial biomass, basal soil respiration and PLFA composition (incl. F/B ratio) were studied in each site. The C:N ratio and content of polyphenols differed among plant species, but these results could not be considered significant between introduced and native plant species. Abundance of the soil meso- and macrofauna was higher in field sites planted with S. viminalis and P. arundinacea than those planted with S. perfoliatum, H. tuberosus and R. sachalinensis. RDA and Monte Carlo Permutation Test showed that the composition of the faunal community differed significantly between various native and introduced plants. Significantly different basal soil respiration was found in sites planted with various energy crops; however, this difference was not significant between native and introduced species. Microbial biomass carbon and cellulose decomposition did not exhibit any statistical differences among the biofuel crops. The largest statistically significant difference we found was in the content of actinobacterial and bacterial (bacteria, G+ bacteria and G- bacteria) PLFA in sites overgrown by P. arundinacea compared to introduced as well as native biofuel crops. In conclusion, certain parameters significantly differ between various native

  9. Secondary UV radiation from biota as a proof of radiation hormesis and Gurwitsch phenomena

    High (large) and low (small) doses of ionizing radiation consistently induce opposite physiologic effects in biological systems. The effects of low doses cannot be inferred by interpolation between the result from groups exposed to high doses and controls irradiated only by Natural Background Radiation. Stimulation NBR ('bio-positive') effects by low-level doses of ionizing radiation is called radiation hormesis. It is still a controversial idea; however it was found that some biological objects (yeast, sees, animals) after γ-irradiation by low-level doses (10-50 times more NBR) can increase their development. The results of the researches demonstrate that the excitation of living systems by ionizing radiation (high energy, low doses) produces among other hydrogen peroxide which initiates prolonged secondary emission that can influence biota and activate many important processes in biological systems. On the other hand it is well known that after water irradiation by ionizing radiation as the product of radiolysis concentration of hydrogen peroxide has been received. The spectral analysis of this secondary emission confirmed the contribution of the UV component to the total emission. This secondary radiation can play a very important role in the intercellular communication. The influence of hydrogen peroxide on glycine has been examined. I have measured secondary emission from Gly using the Single Photon Counting device SPC. The data obtained made possible at least a partial understanding of the radiation hormesis phenomenon and suggest closer relationship to mitogenetic radiation. I propose deexcitation processes in biomolecules as a common denominator of UV and ionizing radiation interacting with living cells, underlying both radiation hormesis and mitogenetic effect. Based on the above experiments and other authors' reports it is postulated that low-level doses of ionizing radiation through radiolysis products (among others hydrogen peroxide) generate UV

  10. Toxicological impact of cadmium-based quantum dots towards aquatic biota: Effect of natural sunlight exposure.

    Silva, B F; Andreani, T; Gavina, A; Vieira, M N; Pereira, C M; Rocha-Santos, T; Pereira, R

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium-based quantum dots (QDs) are increasingly applied in existent and emerging technologies, especially in biological applications due to their exceptional photophysical and functionalization properties. However, they are very toxic compounds due to the high reactive and toxic cadmium core. The present study aimed to determine the toxicity of three different QDs (CdS 380, CdS 480 and CdSeS/ZnS) before and after the exposure of suspensions to sunlight, in order to assess the effect of environmentally relevant irradiation levels in their toxicity, which will act after their release to the environment. Therefore, a battery of ecotoxicological tests was performed with organisms that cover different functional and trophic levels, such as Vibrio fischeri, Raphidocelis subcapitata, Chlorella vulgaris and Daphnia magna. The results showed that core-shell type QDs showed lower toxic effects to V. fischeri in comparison to core type QDs before sunlight exposure. However, after sunlight exposure, there was a decrease of CdS 380 and CdS 480 QD toxicity to bacterium. Also, after sunlight exposure, an effective decrease of CdSeS/ZnS and CdS 480 toxicity for D. magna and R. subcapitata, and an evident increase in CdS 380 QD toxicity, at least for D. magna, were observed. The results of this study suggest that sunlight exposure has an effect in the aggregation and precipitation reactions of larger QDs, causing the degradation of functional groups and formation of larger bulks which may be less prone to photo-oxidation due to their diminished surface area. The same aggregation behaviour after sunlight exposure was observed for bare QDs. These results further emphasize that the shell of QDs seems to make them less harmful to aquatic biota, both under standard environmental conditions and after the exposure to a relevant abiotic factor like sunlight. PMID:27162069

  11. Diversity of the soil biota in burned areas of southern taiga forests (Tver oblast)

    Gongalsky, K. B.; Zaitsev, A. S.; Korobushkin, D. I.; Saifutdinov, R. A.; Yazrikova, T. E.; Benediktova, A. I.; Gorbunova, A. Yu.; Gorshkova, I. A.; Butenko, K. O.; Kosina, N. V.; Lapygina, E. V.; Kuznetsova, D. M.; Rakhleeva, A. A.; Shakhab, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Relations between soil biota diversity and its contribution to the performance of some ecosystem functions were assessed based on the results obtained in undisturbed and burned spruce forests near the Central Forest Nature Biosphere Reserve (Tver oblast). In August 2014, in two 4-year-old burned areas, abiotic parameters of the soils, indicators of the state of the microbial communities, the number, taxonomic diversity, and the abundance of the main groups of soil invertebrates (testate amoebae, nematodes, enchytraeids, mites, collembolans, and the mesofauna as a whole) were determined. In the soils of the burned areas, higher CO2, CH4, and N2O emissions were observed. The number of bacterial cells remained similar, and the total length of active mycelium was not significantly different. All this implies a certain intensification of biogenic processes promoting the mobilization of carbon and nitrogen after fire. The number of most of the groups of soil animals was lower (not always significantly) in the burned area than that in the soils of the undisturbed forests. The changes in the taxonomic diversity were specific for each taxon studied. Overall, the diversity of invertebrates was related to the litter thickness. However, the high taxonomic diversity of soil fauna did not always correspond to the active functioning of the ecosystem. Thus, for some taxa, a quite close correlation was found, for instance, between the total number of species (of testate amoebae in particular) and the berry crop, as well as between the soil mesofauna population and the dead wood stock. The total diversity of the investigated taxa included in the detrital trophic web was the most reliable indicator of the carbon stock in the burned areas.

  12. Enhancement of tritium concentrations on uptake by marine biota: experience from UK coastal waters

    Concentrations of tritium in sea water and marine biota as reported over the last ∼ 10 years from monitoring programmes carried out by this laboratory under contract to the UK Food Standards Agency are reviewed from three areas: near Cardiff; Sellafield; and Hartlepool. Near Cardiff, enhancement of concentration factors (CFs) above an a priori value of ∼ 1 have already been studied, and attributed to compounds containing organically bound tritium in local radioactive waste discharges. Further data for Cardiff up to 2006 are reported in this note. Up to 2001, CFs increased to values of more than ∼ 7000 in flounders and ∼ 4000 in mussels, but have subsequently reduced; this variability could be due to changes in the organic constitution of compounds discharged. Near Sellafield and Hartlepool, enhancements to the tritium concentration factor are observed but they are relatively small compared with those near Cardiff. Near Sellafield, plaice and mussels appear to have a CF for tritium of ∼ 10; in some cases concentrations of tritium in winkles are below detection limits and positively measured values indicate a CF of ∼ 3. The variation could be due to mechanisms of uptake by the different organisms. Near Hartlepool there were only a few cases where tritium was positively measured. These data give a value of ∼ 5 for the CF in plaice (on the basis of two samples); ∼ 15 in winkles (eight samples); and > 45 in mussels (two samples). Any differences between the behaviours at Sellafield and Hartlepool would need to be confirmed by improved measurements. Possible causes are the organic composition of the effluent and differences in environmental behaviour and uptake by organisms near the two sites. These potential causes need further investigation. It is emphasised that results from tritium analyses are heavily method dependent; thus comparison with results from other programmes needs to take this into account. Further, the results for enhancement of CF will

  13. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  14. Interaction of the reasons for the mass biota extinctions in the Phanerozoic

    Barash, M. S.

    2013-11-01

    The consideration of the conditions during the mass extinctions has shown that a series of factors, including mutually independent tectonic movements, variations in the sea level and climate, volcanism, asteroid impacts, changes in the composition of the atmosphere and hydrosphere, the dimming of the atmosphere by aerosols at volcanism and impact events, etc., had a harmful affect during some periods of time (a hundred thousand years to millions of years). Some of the listed events occurred for a long period of time and could not have caused the abrupt catastrophic death of organisms on a global scale. The examination of the hierarchy of the major events allows us to distinguish the primary terrestrial (volcanism) and cosmic (impact events) reasons for the mass extinctions. The coeval mutually independent events testify to the common external reasons for the higher order beyond the solar system. These events are suggested to be related with the orbital movement of the solar system around the galaxy's center, the intersection of the galactic branches, and the oscillations of the solar system's position relative to the galactic plane. These reasons influence the processes on the Earth, including the internal and external geospheres, and activate the impacts of asteroids and comets. Under their effect, two main subsequences of events are developed: terrestrial, leading to intense volcanism, and cosmic impact events. In both cases, harmful chemical elements and aerosols are vented to the atmosphere, thus resulting in the greenhouse effect, warming, the dimming of the atmosphere, the prevention of photosynthesis, the ocean's stagnation, and anoxia with the following reduction of the bioproductivity, the destruction of the food chains, and the extinction of a significant part of the biota.

  15. Chemical analysis and genotoxicity of high molecular mass PAH in sediment samples and biota

    A normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) method was used to fractionate the organic extracts of prepared from coal tar-contaminated sediments from hamilton Harbor in Ontario and from Sydney Harbor in Nova Scotia into molecular mass classes. Each PAH fraction up to 302 amu was analyzed by GC-MS and fractions containing PAH with molecular masses greater than 302 amu were analyzed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) LC-MS.Each fraction was also subjected to Ames bioassays using a TA100-like strain of Salmonella typhimurium (YG1025 + S9). The 300/302 amu, 326/328 and 350/352 amu PAH fractions accounted for 25% of the total genotoxic response of the extract; these PAH constitute a substantial genotoxic burden. A number of 300, 302, 326, 350, 374 and 400 amu PAH were identified using APCI LC-MS and comparison with authentic standards. The non-polar aromatic extracts of bottom sediments, suspended sediments and zebra mussels from Hamilton Harbor were also examined by GC-MS, APCI LC-MS and genotoxicity bioassays. The profiles of the priority and high mass PAH in these samples were identical showing that all PAH up to and exceeding 400 amu were readily bioavailable to biota such as Zebra mussels. In addition, the pseudo faeces of the Zebra mussels and amphipod detritivores which fed on the pseudo faeces had chemical profiles identical to the Zebra mussels. Since many sport fish prize amphipods as food, this observation demonstrates a pathway for organic contaminants adsorbed to suspended sediments to enter the food chain of non-bottom-feeding fish in areas infested by Zebra mussels

  16. The effect of native and introduced biofuel crops on the composition of soil biota communities

    Frouz, Jan; Hedenec, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Biofuel crops are an accepted alternative to fossil fuels, but little is known about the ecological impact of their production. The aim of this contribution is to study the effect of native (Salix viminalis and Phalaris arundinacea) and introduced (Helianthus tuberosus, Reynoutria sachalinensis and Silphium perfoliatum) biofuel crop plantations on the soil biota in comparison with cultural meadow vegetation used as control. The study was performed as part of a split plot field experiment of the Crop Research Institute in the city of Chomutov (Czech Republic). The composition of the soil meso- and macrofauna community, composition of the cultivable fraction of the soil fungal community, cellulose decomposition (using litter bags), microbial biomass, basal soil respiration and PLFA composition (incl. F/B ratio) were studied in each site. The C:N ratio and content of polyphenols differed among plant species, but these results could not be considered significant between introduced and native plant species. Abundance of the soil meso- and macrofauna was higher in field sites planted with S. viminalis and P. arundinacea than those planted with S. perfoliatum, H. tuberosus and R. sachalinensis. RDA and Monte Carlo Permutation Test showed that the composition of the faunal community differed significantly between various native and introduced plants. Significantly different basal soil respiration was found in sites planted with various energy crops; however, this difference was not significant between native and introduced species. Microbial biomass carbon and cellulose decomposition did not exhibit any statistical differences among the biofuel crops. The largest statistically significant difference we found was in the content of actinobacterial and bacterial (bacteria, G+ bacteria and G- bacteria) PLFA in sites overgrown by P. arundinacea compared to introduced as well as native biofuel crops. In conclusion, certain parameters significantly differ between various native

  17. Above-ground biomass production and allometric relations of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. coppice plantations along a chronosequence in the central highlands of Ethiopia

    Eucalyptus plantations are extensively managed for wood production in the central highlands of Ethiopia. Nevertheless, little is known about their biomass (dry matter) production, partitioning and dynamics over time. Data from 10 different Eucalyptus globulus stands, with a plantation age ranging from 11 to 60 years and with a coppice-shoot age ranging from 1 to 9 years were collected and analyzed. Above-ground tree biomass of 7-10 sampled trees per stand was determined destructively. Dry weights of tree components (Wc; leaves, twigs, branches, stembark, and stemwood) and total above-ground biomass (Wa) were estimated as a function of diameter above stump (D), tree height (H) and a combination of these. The best fits were obtained, using combinations of D and H. When only one explanatory variable was used, D performed better than H. Total above-ground biomass was linearly related to coppice-shoot age. In contrast a negative relation was observed between the above-ground biomass production and total plantation age (number of cutting cycles). Total above-ground biomass increased from 11 t ha-1 at a stand age of 1 year to 153 t ha-1 at 9 years. The highest dry weight was allocated to stemwood and decreased in the following order: stemwood > leaves > stembark > twigs > branches. The equations developed in this study to estimate biomass components can be applied to other Eucalyptus plantations under the assumption that the populations being studied are similar with regard to density and tree size to those for which the relationships were developed

  18. Spatial effects of aboveground biomass on soil ecological parameters and trace gas fluxes in a savannah ecosystem of Mount Kilimanjaro

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The savannah biome is a hotspot for biodiversity and wildlife conservation in Africa and recently got in the focus of research on carbon sequestration. Savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use change, especially around populous areas like the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation in this area consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover, aboveground biomass and root structure. Canopy structure is known to affect microclimate, throughfall and evapotranspiration and thereby controls soil moisture conditions. Consequently, the canopy structure is a major regulator for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4) in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine trends and changes of soil parameters and relate their spatial variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca) in our research area. For each tree, we selected transects with nine sampling points of the same relative distances to the stem. Distances were calculated in relation to the crown radius. At these each sampling point a soil core was taken and separated in 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm depth. We measured soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage, microbial biomass carbon C and N, soil respiration as well as root biomass and -density, soil temperature and soil water content. Each tree was characterized by crown spread, leaf area index and basal area. Preliminary results show that C and N stocks decreased about 50% with depth independently of distance to the tree. Soil water content under the tree crown increased with depth while it decreased under grass cover. Microbial

  19. Spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in terrestrial biota from the Canadian Arctic

    Contaminants in the Canadian Arctic have been studied over the last twelve years under the guidance of the Northern Contaminants Program. This paper summarizes results from that program from 1998 to 2003 with respect to terrestrial animals in the Canadian Arctic. The arctic terrestrial environment has few significant contaminant issues, particularly when compared with freshwater and marine environments. Both current and historical industrial activities in the north may have a continuing effect on biota in the immediate area, but effects tend to be localized. An investigation of arctic ground squirrels at a site in the Northwest Territories that had historically received applications of DDT concluded that DDT in arctic ground squirrels livers was the result of contamination and that this is an indication of the continuing effect of a local point source of DDT. Arsenic concentrations were higher in berries collected from areas around gold mines in the Northwest Territories than from control sites, suggesting that gold mining may significantly affect arsenic levels in berries in the Yellowknives Dene traditional territory. Although moose and caribou from the Canadian Arctic generally carry relatively low contaminant burdens, Yukon moose had high renal selenium concentrations, and moose and some woodland caribou from the same area had high renal cadmium levels, which may put some animals at risk of toxicological effects. Low hepatic copper levels in some caribou herds may indicate a shortage of copper for metabolic demands, particularly for females. Similarities in patterns of temporal fluctuations in renal element concentrations for moose and caribou suggest that environmental factors may be a major cause of fluctuations in renal concentrations of some elements. Concentrations of persistent organochlorines and metals in beaver and muskrat from the Northwest Territories, and carnivores from across the Canadian Arctic were very low and considered normal for terrestrial

  20. High levels of natural radioactivity in biota from deep sea hydrothermal vents

    Hydrothermal vent ecosystems are associated with areas of tectonic activities throughout the deep sea and are thus enriched in natural primitive radionuclides characterizing the magma source i.e. uranium-thorium series. However, the amount of data on radionuclide content in hydrothermal vent biota is very scarce. Here we present data from various archived biological samples collected on several hydrothermal vent site. Samples were collected by manned or unmanned submersibles on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) in 1996 and 2002 and on the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) in 2001. Their concentrations in uranium and thorium isotopes were determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Measurements were performed with a Sector field ICP-MS, the Axiom single collector from VG Elemental (Winsford, Cheshire, UK). 210Po was determined through alpha spectrometry. Results in Table II underline that high levels in uranium isotopes are found in polychaetes from the East Pacific Rise. The highest contents characterize their tubes plus mucus samples. On the contrary, the deep-sea amphipod sample (Orchomenella) collected outside hydrothermal vent areas exhibits the lowest values though direct comparison is difficult due to variability between species. 238U contents in coastal marine organisms are generally in the range 1 to 5 Bq kg-1 dry weight. Comparison between sites (Atlantic vs Pacific) is not obvious since different species have been sampled on MAR and EPR but the highest levels characterize the samples from EPR. Some samples demonstrate 234U/238U ratios very close to the mean value for seawater (1.1 - 1.2) but four present lower ratios (i.e. one sample of Bathymodiolus, Paralvinella, Riftia and Orchomenella). This is certainly to be linked to an uptake of particulate uranium. 210Po contents are very high in polychaetes tubes and mucus and are almost entirely supported by 210Pb. This in agreement with what has been reported by Cherry et al. (1992) for polychaetes (Alvinella and

  1. Monitoring of suspended sediments, sediment conditions and aquatic biota during the functional check of bottom outlets

    Haun, Stefan; Seitz, Lydia; Stockinger, Wolfram; Riedl, Martin; Schletterer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    are affected right after the flushing, however it is shown that the biota (zoobenthos) recovered within a short time period. With the knowledge of this study new management strategies can be developed, e.g. a clear water release in the post-flushing phase can be recommended.

  2. Geochemistry, biota and natural background levels in an arsenic naturally contaminated volcanic aquifer

    Preziosi, Elisabetta; Amalfitano, Stefano; Di Lorenzo, Tiziana; Parrone, Daniele; Rossi, David; Ghergo, Stefano; Lungarini, Silvia; Zoppini, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    The tight links between chemical and ecological status are largely acknowledged as for surface water bodies, while aquifers are still considered as hidden groundwater reservoirs, rather than ecosystems to be preserved. Geochemical and biological interactions play a key role in all subterranean processes, including the dynamics of the fate of anthropogenic contaminants. Studies on groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDE) were mainly focused on karst aquifers so far, but an increased awareness on the importance of water-rock interactions and methodological improvements in microbial ecology are rapidly increasing the level of characterization of groundwater ecosystems in various hydrogeological contexts. Similarly, knowledge about groundwater biodiversity is still limited, especially if porous habitats are concerned. Yet, groundwater and GDEs are populated by a diverse and highly adapted biota, dominated by crustaceans, which provide important ecosystem services and act as biological indicators of chemical and quantitative impact on groundwater resources. In a previous research (Amalfitano et al. 2014), we reported that the microbial community heterogeneity may reflect the lithological and hydrogeological complexity within volcanic and alluvial facies transition in a groundwater body. The quantitative tracking of the microbial community structure allowed disentangling the natural biogeochemical processes evolving within the aquifer flow path. The analyses of groundwater crustaceans assemblages may contribute to shed more light upon the state and dynamics of such ecosystems. In the present research, a comprehensive study of a water table aquifer flowing through a quaternary volcanic district is being performed, including the geochemical (inorganic) composition, the microbial composition, and the analysis of crustacean assemblages . Groundwater samples are periodically collected from private wells and springs under a low anthropic impact. The key issues within the

  3. Paleoecology of an early Holocene faunal and floral assemblage from the Dows Local Biota of north-central Iowa

    Hudak, Curtis M.

    1984-05-01

    The faunas and floras from the Dows Local Biota provide an opportunity to compare Holocene taxa without a cultural bias. The Dows Local Biota is located in a large depression on the back side (north) of the Altamont I Moraine complex within the Des Moines Lobe. The Dows Silt Fauna/Flora ( = DSF; ca. 9380 ± 130 yr B.P.), one horizon of the Dows Local Biota, was collected for plant macrofossils, mollusks, and micromammals. DSF terrestrial gastropods are upland mesic forest dwellers although one species, Strobilops affinis, is characteristic of more xeric forests and may represent open woods. The aquatic gastropods reflect both permanent and periodic waters. DSF micromammals prefer an open, mesic, deciduous forest. The micromammal sympatry is restricted to a small area within the tension zone and deciduous forest belt of west-central Wisconsin. DSF plants are characteristic of upland forests, moist meadowlands or disturbed areas, and aquatic habitats. The DSF plant sympatry is large but restricted to the conifer-hardwood and deciduous forests along the Great Lakes-New England regions. Quantitative climatic data for the combined DSF sympatries suggest that Dows (ca. 9380 yr B.P.) was cooler than at present, and is nearly identical to that achieved by pollen analyses at the Cherokee Sewer-Lake West Okoboji sites (ca. 9000 yr B.P.) in northwest Iowa. Based on common habitat interpretations and sympatries, about 9380 yr B.P. north-central Iowa was cooler and moister than at present and was occupied by an open deciduous forest.

  4. Oil spill in the Rio de la Plata estuary, Argentina: 1. Biogeochemical assessment of waters, sediments, soils and biota

    Aliphatic (ALI) and aromatic (ARO) hydrocarbon concentrations, composition and sources were evaluated in waters, sediments, soils and biota to assess the impact of ∼1000 tons of oil spilled in Rio de la Plata coastal waters. Total ALI levels ranged from 0.4-262 μg/l in waters, 0.01-87 μg/g in sediments, 5-39 μg/g in bivalves, 12-323 μg/g in macrophytes to 948-5187 μg/g in soils. ARO varied from non-detected 10 μg/l, 0.01-1.3 μg/g, 1.0-16 μg/g, 0.5-6.9 μg/g to 22-67 μg/g, respectively. Offshore (1, 5, 15 km) waters and sediments were little affected and contained low background hydrocarbon levels reflecting an effective wind-driven transport of the slick to the coast. Six months after the spill, coastal waters, sediments, soils and biota still presented very high levels exceeding baseline concentrations by 1-3 orders of magnitude. UCM/resolved aliphatic ratio showed a clear trend of increasing decay: coastal waters (3.3)n-C23) and petrogenic/pyrogenic relationship (methylated/unsubstitued PAH) discriminated the samples according to the different degree of impact. The following paper present the results of the study of the progress of hydrocarbon disappearance in sediments and soils 13 and 42 months after the spill. - The Oil spill impact the Rio de la Plata was evaluated by HRGC and multivariate techniques applied to waters, sediments and biota

  5. Partitioning behavior of perfluorinated compounds between sediment and biota in the Pearl River Delta of South China

    Highlights: • PFCs concentrations in different environmental media, including sediment and biota. • PFCs accumulation between biota and sediment. • Human exposure to PFCs pollution via seafood consumption. - Abstract: Surface sediment and biota were collected from 12 sampling sites – seven along the Pearl River Delta and five along the Hong Kong coastline. Perfluorinated compound (PFC) concentrations were detected using a high-performance-liquid-chromatogram–tandem-mass-spectrometry system. Analytical results indicated that the total PFC concentrations were in the range of 0.15–3.11 ng/g dry weight in sediments, while the total PFC concentrations in oyster and mussel samples were between 0.46–1.96 and 0.66–3.43 ng/g wet weight, respectively. The major types of PFCs detected in the sediment samples were perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), with concentrations ranging from low limits of quantification to 0.86 ± 0.12 ng/g dry weight and 1.50 ± 0.26 ng/g dry weight, respectively. In bivalve samples, PFOS was the dominant contaminant with concentrations ranging from 0.25 ± 0.09 to 0.83 ± 0.12 ng/g wet weight in oysters and 0.41 ± 0.14 to 1.47 ± 0.25 ng/g wet weight in mussels. An increase in PFC concentration was found to be correlated with increased human population density in the study areas

  6. Sensitivity test of food chain model of temporal 137Cs distribution in coastal biota in case of short term introduction

    Because of the criticality accident occurred at JCO Co. Ltd. on September 30, 1999 in Tokai, Japan, short term estimation of released radionuclides behavior will be required for decision-making in emergent action. To predict radionuclide concentrations in marine organisms under short term radionuclide introduction to coastal water such as accidental situation, models of nuclide transfer both from seawater and food chain to marine organisms are studied by TATEDA (1994, 1997), TATEDA et al. (1997, 2001). The model was developed for typical Japanese coastal water including benthic food chain and planktonic food chain, with transfer parameter data set, such as uptake rate constant, excretion rate constants, gut transfer rates, food ingestion rates of 137Cs, those collected by many tracer experiment studies. Using the model verified by (calculated equilibrated concentrations)/ (observed concentrations) in biota and (calculated decrease curves of 137Cs concentrations)/(observed curves) in biota under the Chernobyl fallout introduction in Japan, we estimate the period for decontamination time of 137Cs in organisms of marine food chain under several imaginable cases. However, prediction by this model still contains uncertainty because of the variation of transfer parameters used in the model. In this study, we tested the model sensitivity for the different combinations of varied transfer parameters reported, and predicted the temporal and special distribution of 137Cs in biota in the coastal area of future nuclear fuel reprocessing plant site at Rokkasho, Aomori, Japan. The result of sensitivity analyses suggested that the effects of the variation of transfer parameters to the output of model calculations are within a range of 3 - 10 times in temporal 137Cs concentrations in coastal organisms. (author)

  7. Occurrence of persistent organic pollutants in sediments and biota from Portugal versus European incidence: A critical overview.

    Ribeiro, Cláudia; Ribeiro, Ana Rita; Tiritan, Maria Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widespread compounds, such as organohalogenated compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides, which can be found in all types of environmental compartments. Their presence in the aquatic environment is a worldwide problem, with emphasis on sediments which act as depository and consequently as a source of hydrophobic, recalcitrant and harmful compounds. Besides, these pollutants might affect the reproduction and mortality of living organisms, diverging in their potential to bioaccumulate in tissues. The present paper aims to review the occurrence of POPs in sediments and biota from the coastal, estuarine and river areas of Portugal. The list of the studied compounds comprises organohalogenated compounds, PAHs, organometallic compounds, pesticides, sterols, fatty acids and pharmaceutical compounds. The contamination of sediments by various pollutants is presented, such as PAHs up to 7,350 ng g(-1) found in Sado estuary and polychlorinated biphenyls up to 62.2 ng g(-1) in the case of sediments collected in Ria de Aveiro. The occurrence of these persistent toxic substances in sediments demonstrates aquatic contamination from agricultural, industrial and urban discharges and the concern about the potential risks to aquatic organisms, wildlife and humans. In fact, several classes of POPs have also been found in biota, such as polychlorinated biphenyls up to 810.9 ng g(-1) in sentinel fish from the Douro River estuary and pesticides in bivalves from the Sado River estuary. The importance of further systematic research on sediments and biota is here highlighted to compare the contamination of these two reservoirs; to assess their spatial and temporal variation; and to determine other classes of POPs that were not investigated yet (e.g., industrial compounds, estrogens and many classes of pharmaceuticals). PMID:26671606

  8. Review of samples of water, sediment, tailings, and biota at the Little Bonanza mercury mine, San Luis Obispo County, California

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; Goldstein, Daniel N.; Brussee, Brianne E.; May, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The Little Bonanza mercury (Hg) mine, located in San Luis Obispo County, California, is a relatively small mine with, a historical total Hg production of about 1,000 flasks. The mine workings and tailings are located in the headwaters of the previously unnamed west fork of Las Tablas Creek (WF Las Tablas Creek), which flows into the Nacimiento Reservoir. Wasterock and tailings eroded from the Little Bonanza Hg Mine have contributed Hg-enriched mine wastes to the headwaters of WF Las Tablas Creek. The mine is located on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), which requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and other geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at and downstream from the minesite. This report is in response that request, from the lead agency which is mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from the Little Bonanza minesite as a means of reducing Hg transport to WF Las Tablas Creek. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings, wasterock, sediment, water, and biota at the Little Bonanza Mine that was completed on April 6, 2010. Conditions during sampling were dry and no rain had occurred in the watershed for several weeks. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could produce elevated levels of monomethyl mercury (MMeHg) in WF Las Tablas Creek and in biota.

  9. The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on marine biota: Retrospective assessment of the first year and perspectives

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.vives.i.batlle@sckcen.be [Biosphere Impact Studies Unit, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Aono, Tatsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Brown, Justin E.; Hosseini, Ali [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini næringspark 13, 1332 Østerås (Norway); CERAD Centre of Excellence, Grini næringspark 13, 1332 Østerås (Norway); Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, Department for research and expertise in environmental risks, PRP-ENV/SERIS, Cadarache, Building 159, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Sazykina, Tatiana [State Institution Research and Production Association Typhoon, 4 Pobedy Str., Obninsk, Kaluga Region 249038 (Russian Federation); Steenhuisen, Frits [Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Strand, Per [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini næringspark 13, 1332 Østerås (Norway); CERAD Centre of Excellence, Grini næringspark 13, 1332 Østerås (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    An international study under the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was performed to assess radiological impact of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) on the marine environment. This work constitutes the first international assessment of this type, drawing upon methodologies that incorporate the most up-to-date radioecological models and knowledge. To quantify the radiological impact on marine wildlife, a suite of state-of-the-art approaches to assess exposures to Fukushima derived radionuclides of marine biota, including predictive dynamic transfer modelling, was applied to a comprehensive dataset consisting of over 500 sediment, 6000 seawater and 5000 biota data points representative of the geographically relevant area during the first year after the accident. The dataset covers the period from May 2011 to August 2012. The method used to evaluate the ecological impact consists of comparing dose (rates) to which living species of interest are exposed during a defined period to critical effects values arising from the literature. The assessed doses follow a highly variable pattern and generally do not seem to indicate the potential for effects. A possible exception of a transient nature is the relatively contaminated area in the vicinity of the discharge point, where effects on sensitive endpoints in individual plants and animals might have occurred in the weeks directly following the accident. However, impacts on population integrity would have been unlikely due to the short duration and the limited space area of the initially high exposures. Our understanding of the biological impact of radiation on chronically exposed plants and animals continues to evolve, and still needs to be improved through future studies in the FDNPS marine environment. - Highlights: • UNSCEAR assessment of the Fukushima accident impact on the marine environment. • The study covers the period from

  10. The history of Lake Maggiore industrial pollution traced through lake sediment and long term monitoring of the biota

    Aldo MARCHETTO; Guzzella, Licia; Binelli, Andrea; Roberta BETTINETTI; Andrea LAMI; Manca, Marina; Laura MARZIALI; Piscia, Roberta; Volta, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    In Lake Maggiore large watershed (ca. 6,600 sq. km), industrial activities along the XX century led to the discharge into the lake or its tributaries of several pollutants, such as DDT, PCBs and mercury. Other pollutants, such as PAHs and flame retardants (such as PBDEs) are still reaching the lake. Analyses of some of these pollutants in lake biota were performed continuously since 1998 and form a unique time series. We used in parallel lake sediment cores to infer the history of lake contam...

  11. Impact of Ground-Applied Termiticides on the Above-Ground Foraging Behavior of the Formosan Subterranean Termite.

    Henderson, Gregg; Gautam, Bal K; Wang, Cai

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a laboratory study to determine the impact of ground-applied termiticides on the above-ground foraging behavior of Coptotermes formosanus. Two concentrations (1 and 10 ppm) each of three termiticides, viz. fipronil, imidacloprid and chlorantraniliprole, were tested. After one month post-treatment (fipronil 10 ppm was run for 12 days only and all other treatments were run for one month), fipronil had the lowest percentage of survival (3%-4%) at both concentrations. Termite survival ranged from 31% to 40% in the case of imidacloprid treatments and 10 ppm chlorantraniliprole. However, 1 ppm chlorantraniliprole did not cause significant mortality compared to the controls. Foraging on the bottom substrate was evident in all replicates for all chemicals initially. However, a portion of the foraging population avoided the ground treatment toxicants after several days of bottom foraging. Only the slower-acting non-repellents created this repellent barrier, causing avoidance behavior that was most likely due to dead termites and fungus buildup on the treated bottom substrate. Fipronil appeared more toxic and faster acting at the concentrations tested, thus limiting this repellent effect. Suggestions by the pest control industry in Louisiana that some non-repellents can create a repellent barrier stranding live termites above ground are supported by this laboratory study. PMID:27571108

  12. Above-ground biomass estimation of tuberous bulrush ( Bolboschoenus planiculmis) in mudflats using remotely sensed multispectral image

    Kim, Ji Yoon; Im, Ran-Young; Do, Yuno; Kim, Gu-Yeon; Joo, Gea-Jae

    2016-03-01

    We present a multivariate regression approach for mapping the spatial distribution of above-ground biomass (AGB) of B. planiculmis using field data and coincident moderate spatial resolution satellite imagery. A total of 232 ground sample plots were used to estimate the biomass distribution in the Nakdong River estuary. Field data were overlain and correlated with digital values from an atmospherically corrected multispectral image (Landsat 8). The AGB distribution was derived using empirical models trained with field-measured AGB data. The final regression model for AGB estimation was composed using the OLI3, OLI4, and OLI7 spectral bands. The Pearson correlation between the observed and predicted biomass was significant (R = 0.84, p coefficient value: 53.4%) and revealed a negative relationship with the AGB biomass. The total distribution area of B. planiculmis was 1,922,979 m2. Based on the model estimation, the total AGB had a dry weight (DW) of approximately 298.2 tons. The distribution of high biomass stands (> 200 kg DW/900 m2) constituted approximately 23.91% of the total vegetated area. Our findings suggest the expandability of remotely sensed products to understand the distribution pattern of estuarine plant productivity at the landscape level.

  13. Effect of growth regulator Kelpak SL on the formation of aboveground biomass of Festulolium braunii (K. Richt. A. Camus

    Jacek Sosnowski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A study on the cultivation of Festulolium braunii cv. 'Felopa' was carried out using polyurethane rings with a diameter of 36 cm and a height of 40 cm, which were sunk into the ground to a depth of 30 cm and filled with soil material. In this experiment, Kelpak SL was used as a bioregulator. It consists of natural plant hormones such as auxins (11 mg in dm3 and cytokinins (0.03 mg in dm3. The experimental factors were as follows: A1-control; A2 – 20% solution of the growth regulator; A3 – 40% solution; and A4 – 60% solution. The preparation was applied to all three regrowths in the form of spray, at a rate of 3 cm3 ring-1, at the stem elongation stage. The full period of this experiment was in the years 2010–2011. During this time, detailed investigations were carried out on aboveground biomass yield (g DM ring-1, number of shoots (pcs ring-1, leaf blade length (cm, width of the leaf blade base (mm, leaf greenness index (SPAD. The study showed a significant effect of the growth regulator on the formation of Festulolium braunii biomass. However, its highest effectiveness was observed when the 60% solution was applied.

  14. Effect of seven years of experimental drought on the aboveground biomass storage of an eastern Amazonian rainforest

    da Costa, Antonio Carlos Lola; Galbraith, David; Almeida, Samuel; Fisher, Rosie; Phillips, Oliver; Metcalfe, Daniel; Levy, Peter; Portela, Bruno; da Costa, Mauricio; Meir, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    At least one climate model predicts severe reductions of rainfall over Amazonia during this century. Long-term throughfall exclusion (TFE) experiments represent the best available means to investigate the resilience of the Amazon rainforest to such droughts. Results are presented from a 7-year TFE study at Caxiuanã National Forest, eastern Amazonia. We focus on the impacts of the drought on tree mortality, wood production and aboveground carbon storage. Tree mortality in the TFE plot over the experimental period was 2.5% yr-1, compared to 1.25% yr-1 in a nearby Control plot experiencing normal rainfall. Differences in stem mortality between plots were greatest in the largest (> 40 cm dbh) size class (4.1% yr-1 in the TFE and 1.4% yr-1 in the Control). Wood production in the TFE plot was approximately 30% lower than in the Control plot. Together, these changes resulted in a loss of 37.8 ± 2.0 Mg C ha-1 (~ 20%) in the TFE plot (2002-2008), whereas the Control plot was essentially carbon neutral(change of - 0.2 ± 1.0 Mg C ha-1). These results are remarkably consistent with those from another TFE (at Tapajós National Forest), suggesting that Amazonian forests may respond to prolonged drought in a predictable manner.

  15. Influence of soil characteristics on the impedance of aboveground and buried wires in multilayer horizontal soil model environments

    Zhao, H.; Fortin, S.; Dawalibi, F.P. [Safe Engineering Services and Technologies Ltd., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented a newly developed parametric analysis to determine the effects of soil parameters on the longitudinal self and mutual impedances of aboveground and buried conductors. The new and rigorous method does not require the assumption of a pure imaginary current propagation constant and takes into account the presence of a horizontal, multi-layer soil with arbitrary layer thicknesses, resistivities and permeabilities. The study determined the influence of each layer characteristics parameter on the conductor self and mutual impedances as a function of frequency. Detailed computation results were presented for typical stratified earth with different layer parameters. The results showed that there is a significant difference in the earth return impedances compared to the case of homogeneous soils. The analysis showed the influence of each parameter and revealed that layer thickness, resistivity and permeability are significant factors to the longitudinal impedance of conductors located above ground and buried in the soil. The result revealed that the longitudinal impedance of conductors can be affected significantly by the layered structure of the soil, particularly for buried conductors. 11 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs.

  16. Mapping Above-Ground Biomass in a Tropical Forest in Cambodia Using Canopy Textures Derived from Google Earth

    Minerva Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a modelling framework for utilizing very high-resolution (VHR aerial imagery for monitoring stocks of above-ground biomass (AGB in a tropical forest in Southeast Asia. Three different texture-based methods (grey level co-occurrence metric (GLCM, Gabor wavelets and Fourier-based textural ordination (FOTO were used in conjunction with two different machine learning (ML-based regression techniques (support vector regression (SVR and random forest (RF regression. These methods were implemented on both 50-cm resolution Digital Globe data extracted from Google Earth™ (GE and 8-cm commercially obtained VHR imagery. This study further examines the role of forest biophysical parameters, such as ground-measured canopy cover and vertical canopy height, in explaining AGB distribution. Three models were developed using: (i horizontal canopy variables (i.e., canopy cover and texture variables plus vertical canopy height; (ii horizontal variables only; and (iii texture variables only. AGB was variable across the site, ranging from 51.02 Mg/ha to 356.34 Mg/ha. GE-based AGB estimates were comparable to those derived from commercial aerial imagery. The findings demonstrate that novel use of this array of texture-based techniques with GE imagery can help promote the wider use of freely available imagery for low-cost, fine-resolution monitoring of forests parameters at the landscape scale.

  17. Predicting impacts of climate change on the aboveground carbon sequestration rate of a temperate forest in northeastern China.

    Jun Ma

    Full Text Available The aboveground carbon sequestration rate (ACSR reflects the influence of climate change on forest dynamics. To reveal the long-term effects of climate change on forest succession and carbon sequestration, a forest landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS Pro7.0 was used to simulate the ACSR of a temperate forest at the community and species levels in northeastern China based on both current and predicted climatic data. On the community level, the ACSR of mixed Korean pine hardwood forests and mixed larch hardwood forests, fluctuated during the entire simulation, while a large decline of ACSR emerged in interim of simulation in spruce-fir forest and aspen-white birch forests, respectively. On the species level, the ACSR of all conifers declined greatly around 2070s except for Korean pine. The ACSR of dominant hardwoods in the Lesser Khingan Mountains area, such as Manchurian ash, Amur cork, black elm, and ribbed birch fluctuated with broad ranges, respectively. Pioneer species experienced a sharp decline around 2080s, and they would finally disappear in the simulation. The differences of the ACSR among various climates were mainly identified in mixed Korean pine hardwood forests, in all conifers, and in a few hardwoods in the last quarter of simulation. These results indicate that climate warming can influence the ACSR in the Lesser Khingan Mountains area, and the largest impact commonly emerged in the A2 scenario. The ACSR of coniferous species experienced higher impact by climate change than that of deciduous species.

  18. Estimation of aboveground net primary productivity in secondary tropical dry forests using the Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach (CASA) model

    Cao, S.; Sanchez-Azofeifa, GA; Duran, SM; Calvo-Rodriguez, S.

    2016-07-01

    Although tropical dry forests (TDFs) cover roughly 42% of all tropical ecosystems, extensive deforestation and habitat fragmentation pose important limitations for their conservation and restoration worldwide. In order to develop conservation policies for this endangered ecosystem, it is necessary to quantify their provision of ecosystems services such as carbon sequestration and primary production. In this paper we explore the potential of the Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach (CASA) for estimating aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in a secondary TDF located at the Santa Rosa National Park (SRNP), Costa Rica. We calculated ANPP using the CASA model (ANPPCASA) in three successional stages (early, intermediate, and late). Each stage has a stand age of 21 years, 32 years, and 50+ years, respectively, estimated as the age since land abandonment. Our results showed that the ANPPCASA for early, intermediate, and late successional stages were 3.22 Mg C ha‑1 yr‑1, 8.90 Mg C ha‑1 yr‑1, and 7.59 Mg C ha‑1 yr‑1, respectively, which are comparable with rates of carbon uptake in other TDFs. Our results indicate that key variables that influence ANPP in our dry forest site were stand age and precipitation seasonality. Incident photosynthetically active radiation and temperature were not dominant in the ANPPCASA. The results of this study highlight the potential of the use of remote sensing techniques and the importance of incorporating successional stage in accurate regional TDF ANPP estimation.

  19. Estimating aboveground biomass using Landsat TM imagery: A case study of Anatolian Crimean pine forests in Turkey

    A. Günlü

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Forests play an important role in carbon circulation, and the productivity of forest ecosystems can be evaluated by evaluating its biomass. Evaluation of biomass aids the determination and understanding of changes in forest ecosystems. Because of the limitations of ground measurements of biomass, in recent times, satellite images have been broadly applied to estimate aboveground biomass (AGB. The objective of this study is to examine the relationships between AGB and individual band reflectance values and ten Vegetation Indices (VIs obtained from a Landsat TM satellite image for an Anatolian pine forests in northwestern Turkey. Multiple regression analysis is utilized to predict the AGB. The AGB model using TM 1 and TM 2 had an adjusted R2 of 0.465. Another AGB model using Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI and Normalized Difference 57 (ND57 had an adjusted R2 of 0.606. Our results reveal that VIs present better estimation of AGB in Anatolian pine forests as compared to individual band reflectance values.

  20. Interest of a Full-Waveform Flown UV Lidar to Derive Forest Vertical Structures and Aboveground Carbon

    Xiaoxia Shang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Amongst all the methodologies readily available to estimate forest canopy and aboveground carbon (AGC, in-situ plot surveys and airborne laser scanning systems appear to be powerful assets. However, they are limited to relatively local scales. In this work, we have developed a full-waveform UV lidar, named ULICE (Ultraviolet LIdar for Canopy Experiment, as an airborne demonstrator for future space missions, with an eventual aim to retrieve forest properties at the global scale. The advantage of using the UV wavelength for a demonstrator is its low multiple scattering in the canopy. Based on realistic airborne lidar data from the well-documented Fontainebleau forest site (south-east of Paris, France, which is representative of managed deciduous forests in temperate climate zones, we estimate the uncertainties in the retrieval of forest vertical structures and AGC. A complete uncertainty study using Monte Carlo approaches is performed for both the lidar-derived tree top height (TTH and AGC. Our results show a maximum error of 1.2 m (16 tC ha‑1 for the TTH (AGC assessment. Furthermore, the study of leaf effect on AGC estimate for mid-latitude deciduous forests highlights the possibility for using calibration obtained during only one season to retrieve the AGC during the other, by applying winter and summer airborne measurements.

  1. Nitrogen mediates above-ground effects of ozone but not below-ground effects in a rhizomatous sedge

    Jones, M.L.M., E-mail: lj@ceh.ac.u [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, LL57 2UW Wales (United Kingdom); Hodges, G. [AMEC, Earth and Environmental UK Ltd, Unit 1, Trinity Place, Thames St, Weybridge, Surrey KT13 8JB (United Kingdom); Mills, G. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, LL57 2UW Wales (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    Ozone and atmospheric nitrogen are co-occurring pollutants with adverse effects on natural grassland vegetation. Plants of the rhizomatous sedge Carex arenaria were exposed to four ozone regimes representing increasing background concentrations (background-peak): 10-30, 35-55, 60-80 and 85-105 ppb ozone at two nitrogen levels: 12 and 100 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Ozone increased the number and proportion of senesced leaves, but not overall leaf number. There was a clear nitrogen x ozone interaction with high nitrogen reducing proportional senescence in each treatment and increasing the ozone dose (AOT40) at which enhanced senescence occurred. Ozone reduced total biomass due to significant effects on root biomass. There were no interactive effects on shoot:root ratio. Rhizome tissue N content was increased by both nitrogen and ozone. Results suggest that nitrogen mediates above-ground impacts of ozone but not impacts on below-ground resource translocation. This may lead to complex interactive effects between the two pollutants on natural vegetation. - Nitrogen alters threshold of ozone-induced senescence, but not below-ground resource allocation.

  2. Evaluating land use and aboveground biomass dynamics in an oil palm-dominated landscape in Borneo using optical remote sensing

    Singh, Minerva; Malhi, Yadvinder; Bhagwat, Shonil

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this study is to assess the efficacy of using optical remote sensing (RS) in evaluating disparities in forest composition and aboveground biomass (AGB). The research was carried out in the East Sabah region, Malaysia, which constitutes a disturbance gradient ranging from pristine old growth forests to forests that have experienced varying levels of disturbances. Additionally, a significant proportion of the area consists of oil palm plantations. In accordance with local laws, riparian forest (RF) zones have been retained within oil palm plantations and other forest types. The RS imagery was used to assess forest stand structure and AGB. Band reflectance, vegetation indicators, and gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) consistency features were used as predictor variables in regression analysis. Results indicate that the spectral variables were limited in their effectiveness in differentiating between forest types and in calculating biomass. However, GLCM based variables illustrated strong correlations with the forest stand structures as well as with the biomass of the various forest types in the study area. The present study provides new insights into the efficacy of texture examination methods in differentiating between various land-use types (including small, isolated forest zones such as RFs) as well as their AGB stocks.

  3. A dynamic model to estimate the dose rate of marine biota (K-BIOTADYN- M) and its application to the Fukushima accident

    Keum, Dong-Kwon; Jun, In; Kim, Byeong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Yong-ho [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeodaero, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a dynamic compartment model, K-BIOTA-DYN-M, to assess the activity concentration and dose rate of marine biota when the seawater activity varies with time, which is likely for the early phase after an accident. The model consists of seven compartments, phytoplankton, zooplankton, prey fish, benthic fish, crustacean, mollusk, and macro-algae. The phytoplankton compartment is assumed to be instantaneously in equilibrium with the seawater owing to the huge mass of the plankton in sea, and thus the activity of the phytoplankton is estimated using the equilibrium concentration ratio. The other compartments intake the radioactivity from both water and food, and lose the radioactivity by the biological elimination and radioactivity decay. Given the seawater activity, a set of ordinary differential equations representing the activity balance for biota is solved to obtain the time-variant activity concentration of biota, which is subsequently used to calculate the internal dose rate. The key parameters include the water intake rate, the daily feeding rate, the assimilation efficiency of radionuclides from food, the occupancy factor, and so on. The model has been applied to predict the activity concentration and dose rate of marine biota as a result the Fukushima nuclear accident on March 11, 2011. Using the seawater activities measured at three locations near the Fukushima NPPs, the time-variant activity concentration and dose rate during a few months after an accident for the seven model biota have been estimated. The preliminary results showed that the activity concentration of {sup 137}Cs in fish inhabiting the sea close to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP increased up to tenth-thousands of Bq/kg around the peak time of the seawater activity. This level is much higher than the food consumption restriction level for human protection; however, the estimated total dose rates (internal + external) for biota during the entire simulation time were all much less

  4. Using risk quotients and weight-of-evidence analysis to determine risk characterization in an ecological risk assessment of aquatic biota from an east Tennessee stream

    Mercury and other contaminants released from the US DOE Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have contaminated most of the 23 km length of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The risk characterization component of the ecological risk assessment for this EFPC Superfund site consisted of two interrelated approaches. First, risks to several taxa of aquatic biota were characterized by comparing contaminant exposure concentrations (in surface water or biota body burdens) to specific criteria concentrations intended to be protective of the organisms. Second, a weight-of-evidence approach was applied to help identify the causes of the observed ecological responses. Using five criteria various data on biota community structure and/or contaminant concentrations in physical media and biota were incorporated into several propositions which were evaluated against the five criteria. Three types of risk quotients (Q) were 1 ≤ Q ≤ 100 at all six sampling sites on EFPC. The weight-of-evidence analysis generally corroborated the quotient method with respect to location and magnitude of risk to aquatic biota, which were visually presented using Graphical Information System (GIS) techniques. Integrating risk quotients with a rigorous weight-of-evidence analysis provides a powerful tool for defining ecological risk, which in turn, is necessary for setting defensible preliminary remediation goals

  5. Concentration of 129I in aquatic biota collected from a lake adjacent to the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan

    The spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan, has been undergoing final testing since March 2006. During April 2006-October 2008, that spent fuel was cut and chemically processed, the plant discharged 129I into the atmosphere and coastal waters. To study 129I behaviour in brackish Lake Obuchi, which is adjacent to the plant, 129I concentrations in aquatic biota were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry. Owing to 129I discharge from the plant, the 129I concentration in the biota started to rise from the background concentration in 2006 and was high during 2007-08. The 129I concentration has been rapidly decreasing after the fuel cutting and chemically processing were finished. The 129I concentration factors in the biota were higher than those reported by IAEA for marine organisms and similar to those reported for freshwater biota. The estimated annual committed effective dose due to ingestion of foods with the maximum 129I concentration in the biota samples was 2.8 nSv y-1. (authors)

  6. Diversity and community structure of testate amoebae (protista) in tropical montane rain forests of southern Ecuador: altitudinal gradient, aboveground habitats and nutrient limitation.

    Krashevs'ka, Valentyna

    2009-01-01

    The tropical Andes in southern Ecuador constitute a hotspot of plant (especially trees and bryophytes) and animal (especially birds, bats, arctiid and geometrid mothes) diversity. However, data on small animals such as testate amoebae as an important component of the soil and aboveground community are lacking. Variations in density, diversity and community structure of testate amoebae along altitudinal transects in tropical regions are largely unknown. Testate amoebae colonize almost any habi...

  7. Aboveground carbon in Quebec forests: stock quantification at the provincial scale and assessment of temperature, precipitation and edaphic properties effects on the potential stand-level stocking.

    Duchesne, Louis; Houle, Daniel; Ouimet, Rock; Lambert, Marie-Claude; Logan, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems plays an important role in the net balance of greenhouse gases, acting as a carbon sink for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the abiotic environmental factors (including climate) that control carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests and consequently, about their potential response to climate changes. From a set of more than 94,000 forest inventory plots and a large set of spatial data on forest attributes interpreted from aerial photographs, we constructed a fine-resolution map (∼375 m) of the current carbon stock in aboveground live biomass in the 435,000 km(2) of managed forests in Quebec, Canada. Our analysis resulted in an area-weighted average aboveground carbon stock for productive forestland of 37.6 Mg ha(-1), which is lower than commonly reported values for similar environment. Models capable of predicting the influence of mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, and soil physical environment on maximum stand-level aboveground carbon stock (MSAC) were developed. These models were then used to project the future MSAC in response to climate change. Our results indicate that the MSAC was significantly related to both mean annual temperature and precipitation, or to the interaction of these variables, and suggest that Quebec's managed forests MSAC may increase by 20% by 2041-2070 in response to climate change. Along with changes in climate, the natural disturbance regime and forest management practices will nevertheless largely drive future carbon stock at the landscape scale. Overall, our results allow accurate accounting of carbon stock in aboveground live tree biomass of Quebec's forests, and provide a better understanding of possible feedbacks between climate change and carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests. PMID:26966680

  8. Diversity and above-ground biomass patterns of vascular flora induced by flooding in the drawdown area of China's Three Gorges Reservoir.

    Qiang Wang

    Full Text Available Hydrological alternation can dramatically influence riparian environments and shape riparian vegetation zonation. However, it was difficult to predict the status in the drawdown area of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR, because the hydrological regime created by the dam involves both short periods of summer flooding and long-term winter impoundment for half a year. In order to examine the effects of hydrological alternation on plant diversity and biomass in the drawdown area of TGR, twelve sites distributed along the length of the drawdown area of TGR were chosen to explore the lateral pattern of plant diversity and above-ground biomass at the ends of growing seasons in 2009 and 2010. We recorded 175 vascular plant species in 2009 and 127 in 2010, indicating that a significant loss of vascular flora in the drawdown area of TGR resulted from the new hydrological regimes. Cynodon dactylon and Cyperus rotundus had high tolerance to short periods of summer flooding and long-term winter flooding. Almost half of the remnant species were annuals. Species richness, Shannon-Wiener Index and above-ground biomass of vegetation exhibited an increasing pattern along the elevation gradient, being greater at higher elevations subjected to lower submergence stress. Plant diversity, above-ground biomass and species distribution were significantly influenced by the duration of submergence relative to elevation in both summer and previous winter. Several million tonnes of vegetation would be accumulated on the drawdown area of TGR in every summer and some adverse environmental problems may be introduced when it was submerged in winter. We conclude that vascular flora biodiversity in the drawdown area of TGR has dramatically declined after the impoundment to full capacity. The new hydrological condition, characterized by long-term winter flooding and short periods of summer flooding, determined vegetation biodiversity and above-ground biomass patterns along the

  9. Space-related Resource Investments and Gains of Adult Beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Spruce (Picea abies) as a Quantification of Aboveground Competitiveness

    Reiter, Ilja Marco

    2010-01-01

    In a field study, cost-benefit relationships of aboveground resource allocation were analysed in branches of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). The study identified response patterns in allocation of resources under different light conditions in both species. It was postulated that resource investment and gains based on crown volume have the potential to quantitatively describe the plant’s competitive ability (i.e. competitiveness). Three cost-ben...

  10. Short-term abandonment of human disturbances in Zagros Oak forest ecosystems: Effects on secondary succession of soil seed bank and aboveground vegetation

    MEHDI HEYDARI; DAVID POTHIER; MARZBAN FARAMARZI; JAVAD MERZAEI

    2014-01-01

    Heydari M, Pothier D, Faramarzi M, Merzaei J. 2014. Short-term abandonment of human disturbances in Zagros Oak forest ecosystems: Effects on secondary succession of soil seed bank and aboveground vegetation. Biodiversitas 15: 147-161. Zagros Oak forests in the west of Iran have been degraded by anthropogenic activities during many years and to fight against this degradation, several management strategies have been implemented. The principal objectives this study were to identify the character...

  11. Fate of a broad spectrum of perfluorinated compounds in soils and biota from Tierra del Fuego and Antarctica

    In this study, the presence of 18 perfluorinated compounds was investigated in biota and environmental samples from the Antarctica and Tierra de Fuego, which were collected during a sampling campaign carried out along February and March 2010. 61 samples were analysed including fish, superficial soils, guano, algae, dung and tissues of Papua penguin by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The concentrations of PFCs were ranging from 0.10 to 240 ng/g for most of the samples except for penguin dung, which presented levels between 95 and 603 ng/g for perfluorooctane sulfonate, and guano samples from Ushuaia, with concentration levels of 1190–2480 ng/g of perfluorohexanoic acid. PFCs acids presented, in general, the highest levels of concentration and perfluorooctanesulfonate was the most frequently found compound. The present study provides a significant amount of results, which globally supports the previous studies, related to the transport, deposition, biodegradation and bioaccumulation patterns of PFCs. - Highlights: ► 61 samples from the Antarctica and Tierra de Fuego analysed for the presence of 18 perfluorinated compounds. ► Acid compounds presented the highest levels of concentration and perfluorooctane sulfonate was the most frequently found. ► Concentrations in algae much higher than those in soils. ► Data supporting existing models for the transport, deposition, biodegradation and bioaccumulation patterns are presented. - 18 perfluorinated compounds assessed in biota and environmental samples from Tierra del Fuego and the Antarctica. Concentrations related to Compounds properties.

  12. Biomonitoring study of heavy metals in biota and sediments in the South Eastern coast of Mediterranean sea, Egypt.

    Abdallah, Maha A M; Abdallah, Aly M A

    2008-11-01

    Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Co, Zn, Mn and Fe were determined in biota and sediment samples collected from the Eastern Harbour and El-Mex Bay in the Mediterranean Sea, Egypt. The levels of Cu, Co, Zn, Mn and Fe in the macroalgae, Ulva lactuca, Enteromorpha compressa (green algae) and Jania rubens (red algae), recorded high concentrations except for Cd. Moreover, Fe was the most predominant metal in the seaweed. The two species of bivalves, Donax trunculus and Paphia textile, showed different amounts of metals in their tissue. The abundance of heavy metal concentrations in the mussel samples was found in the order Fe> Zn> Mn> Cu> Co> Cd and Fe> Zn> Mn> Cu> Cd> Co, respectively for the two species. The metals concentrations were generally higher compared with the previous studies in mussels from the same area. The levels of metals accumulated in the investigated fish samples, Saurida undosquamis, Siganus rivulatus, Lithognathus mormyrus and Sphyraena sphyraena, were higher than those of Marmara Sea (Turkey), for Co and Cd and lower for Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe. El-Mex Bay having the highest metals concentration in sediments as their order of abundance were Fe> Zn> Mn> Cu> Cd> Co. Nevertheless, a high variability in the metal levels occurs among the studied algae and biota and also between the investigated Harbour. A significant correlations (p < 0.05) were found for each of Zn and Fe in P. textile and of Co in D. trunculus relative to their concentrations in surficial sediments. PMID:18074236

  13. Effects of inter-row management intensity on wild bee, plant and soil biota diversity in vineyards

    Kratschmer, Sophie; Pachinger, Bärbel; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann G.; Buchholz, Jacob; Querner, Pascal; Strauß, Peter; Bauer, Thomas; Stiper, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    Vineyards may provide a range of essential ecosystem services, which interact with a diverse community of above- and belowground organisms. Intensive soil management like frequent tilling has resulted in the degradation of habitat quality with consequences on biodiversity and ecosystem services. This study is part of the European BiodivERsA project "VineDivers - Biodiversity-based ecosystem services in vineyards". We study the effects of different soil management intensities on above- and below-ground biodiversity (plants, insect pollinators, and soil biota), their interactions and the consequences for ecosystem services. We investigated 16 vineyards in Austria assessing the diversity of (1) wild bees using a semi-quantitative transect method, (2) earthworms by hand sorting, (3) Collembola (springtails) via pitfall trapping and soil coring, (4) plants by relevés and (5) litter decomposition (tea bag method). Management intensity differed in tillage frequency from intermediate intensity resulting in temporary vegetation cover to no tillage in permanent vegetation cover systems. First results show opposed relationships between the biodiversity of selected species groups and management intensity. We will discuss possible explanations and evaluate ecological interactions between wild bee, plant and soil biota diversity.

  14. Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2008-10-09

    Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for δ13C and δ15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, δ13C, and δ15N.

  15. Improvements and application of a modified gas chromatography atomic fluorescence spectroscopy method for routine determination of methylmercury in biota samples.

    Gorecki, Jerzy; Díez, Sergi; Macherzynski, Mariusz; Kalisinska, Elżbieta; Golas, Janusz

    2013-10-15

    Improvements to the application of a combined solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to pyrolysis and atomic fluorescence spectrometry method (SPME-GC-AFS) for methylmercury (MeHg) determination in biota samples are presented. Our new method includes improvements in the methodology of determination and the quantification technique. A shaker instead of a stirrer was used, in order to reduce the possibility of sample contamination and to simplify cleaning procedures. Then, optimal rotation frequency and shaking time were settled at 800 rpm and 10 min, respectively. Moreover, the GC-AFS system was equipped with a valve and an argon heater to eliminate the effect of the decrease in analytical signal caused by the moisture released from SPME fiber. For its determination, MeHg was first extracted from biota samples with a 25% KOH solution (3h) and then it was quantified by two methods, a conventional double standard addition method (AC) and a modified matrix-matched calibration (MQ) which is two times faster than the AC method. Both procedures were successfully tested with certified reference materials, and applied for the first time to the determination of MeHg in muscle samples of goosander (Mergus merganser) and liver samples of white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) with values ranging from 1.19 to 3.84 mg/kg dry weight (dw), and from 0.69 to 6.23 mg kg(-1) dw, respectively. PMID:24054647

  16. Assessment of risk to aquatic biota from elevated salinity A case study from the Hunter River, Australia

    Monika Muschal [N.S.W. Department of Infrastructure, Dangar, NSW ( Australia)

    2006-05-15

    An ecological risk assessment was performed on salinity levels of the Hunter River and its tributaries to respond to concerns that high salinity may be damaging aquatic ecosystems. Probabilistic techniques were used to assess likelihood and consequence, and hence the risk to aquatic biota from salinity. Continuous electrical conductivity distributions were used to describe the likelihood that high salinity would occur (exposure dataset) and toxicity values were compiled from the limited literature sources available to describe the consequence of high salinity (effects dataset). The assessment was preliminary in the sense that it modelled risk on the basis of existing data and did not undertake site-specific toxicity testing. Some sections of the Hunter River catchment have geologies that are saline because of their marine origins. Catchment development has increased the liberation rates of salts into surface-waters. Such modifying activities include coal-mining, power generation and land clearing. The aquatic biota of tributaries had a greater risk of impairment from high salinity than that of the Hunter River. High salinities in the tributaries were attributed to the combined factors of naturally saline geologies, increased liberation of salts due to modification of the landscape, and reduced dilution by flushing flows. A salinity guideline trigger value of 1100 mg L{sup -1} was recommended.

  17. LADTAP-2, Organ Doses to Man and Other Biota from Aquatic Environment

    1 - Description of problem or function: LADTAP2 performs environmental dose analyses for releases of liquid effluents from light-water nuclear power plants into surface waters during routine operation. The analyses estimate radiation doses to individuals, population groups, and biota from ingestion (aquatic foods, water, and terrestrial irrigated foods) and external exposure (shoreline, swimming, and boating) pathways. The calculated doses provide information for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) evaluations and for determining compliance with Appendix I of 10 CFR 50 (the 'ALARA' philosophy). The program consists of a hydrologic model chosen to represent mixing in the effluent impoundment system and the receiving surface waters and the exposure pathway models which estimate exposure of selected groups at various water usage locations in the environment. Two types of population doses are calculated. An ALARA analysis is performed based on exposure of people within 50 miles of the site, and a NEPA analysis is performed based on exposure of the entire U.S. population to effluents from the site. A population-dose analysis prepared in the form of a cost-benefit table presents the total-body and thyroid doses from each radionuclide released and the population doses (total-body and thyroid) per curie of each radionuclide released. 2 - Method of solution: The impoundment system is represented by one of four hydrologic models: direct release to the receiving water, linear flow with no mixing (the plug-flow model), linear flow through the impoundment with partial recirculation through the reactor (the partially mixed model), or complete mixing in the impoundment with partial recirculation through the reactor (the completely mixed model). The last three account for radiological decay during transit through the impoundment system. Optional models are available to estimate dilution in nontidal rivers and near-shore lake environments. The consequence calculation part of

  18. Worldwide Laboratory Comparison on the Determination of Trace Elements in IAEA-452 Biota Sample

    educational opportunities, enhanced mutual trust in results and methodology and objective evidence for accreditation purposes The present ILC was designed in order to evaluate the measurement performance of participating laboratories for the analysis of trace elements in biota samples. The test material was distributed to 150 laboratories worldwide and the results from 143 laboratories in 59 countries were received by the end 2009. The data reported by the laboratories, together with the technical and statistical evaluations of the results for each element, are included in this report. The performance of the participant laboratories was assessed through evaluating Z-scores in accordance with ISO 13528 and the International Harmonised Protocol for the Proficiency Testing of Analytical Chemistry Laboratories. On the basis of the outcome from previous ILCs, organised by NAEL for the same population of laboratories, the standard deviation for proficiency assessment (also called target standard deviation) was fixed to 12.5%. Z-scores obtained from this ILC results should assist chemists to make appropriate modifications in their laboratory analytical procedures in order to improve data quality. All results were treated confidentially and each laboratory was identified with a code number for anonymity.

  19. Geosites of Lithuania as an environment for dwelling of specific biota: geo- and biodiversity interactions

    Skridlaite, Grazina; Motiejunaite, Jurga; Jukoniene, Ilona; Prigodina Lukosiene, Ingrida

    2016-04-01

    also in the neighbouring countries. In general, protection of geo-diversity coincides well with protection of narrowly specialized cryptogams, e.g. overgrowing of boulder fields with tall herbs and shrubs also has adversary effect on rock-dwelling lichens. Shading of Devonian outcrops and quarries by trees and shrubs may obscure rocky surfaces and destroy lichens, but favour an establishment of sciophyllous bryophytes. No doubt that cleaning of surfaces of single boulders that are well-known nature monuments prevents an establishment and growth of lichens and bryophytes. However, most of the geological monuments which are subjected to cleaning are situated in localities under strong anthropogenic impact and therefore not suitable for settlement of the rare and protected species. Though conservation conflicts arise even when protecting different species of biota, not to mention conservation of bio- versus geo-diversity, most of the conservation measures for the geoheritage in Lithuania are also suitable for rock-inhabiting lichens and bryophytes. Protection status and measures should be negotiated by bio-and geoscientists, and legislation for bio- and geo-diversity protection should be improved. Khodosovtsev, A., Vondrák, J., Naumovich, A., Kocourková, J., Vondráková, O., Motiejūnaitė, J., 2012. Nova Hedwigia, 95(1-2): 211-220.

  20. Assessment of impact to non-human biota from a generic waste repository in the UK

    The UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (NDA RWMD, formerly Nirex UK Ltd), has played a leading role in establishing knowledge on geological disposal of radioactive waste in the UK. In 2001, a study was commissioned of the potential impact of releases of radio-nuclides from a generic repository on plants and animals). More recently, the NDA commissioned Enviros Consulting to report on developments in policy and in approaches for assessing impacts of radioactivity on non-human biota, that have occurred since the previous study. A trial application of the ERICA assessment tool, to reassess the impact of releases from a generic deep repository using similar source data as used previously (Nirex, 2003), formed part of this work. This paper summarizes the results of the reassessment exercise; key differences between the two assessments are identified and explored. The applicability and capabilities of the ERICA tool to assessments of releases from a waste repository are discussed and priorities for future work are identified. Conclusions: The peak activity concentrations predicted to arise from releases from a generic repository would not lead to a significant increase in environmental risk. Indeed, a substantial proportion of the calculated dose rates are due to natural series radio-nuclides at concentrations that are well below typical background levels. In the previous study, the highest (weighted) absorbed dose rate in an aquatic system was predicted to be around 6.5 micoGy h-1, which is of the same order of magnitude as those predicted in the current study; the significance of the contribution of natural series radionuclides is also common to both studies. However, previously, the authors concluded that it was not possible to undertake a detailed assessment for the terrestrial system, due to the paucity of data on concentration ratios. While the derivation of default concentration factors, as part of the ERICA project, has

  1. Above-ground tree outside forest (TOF) phytomass and carbon estimation in the semiarid region of southern Haryana: A synthesis approach of remote sensing and field data

    Kuldeep Singh; Pritam Chand

    2012-12-01

    Trees outside forest (TOF) play an important role in global carbon cycling, since they are large pools of carbon as well as potential carbon sinks and sources to the atmosphere. In view of the importance of biomass estimates in the global carbon (C) cycle, the present study demonstrates the potential of the standwise tree outside forest inventory data and finer spatial resolution of IRS-P6 LISS-IV satellite data to classify TOF, to estimate above-ground TOF phytomass and the carbon content of TOF in a semiarid region of the southern Haryana, India. The study reports that above-ground TOF phytomass varied from 1.26 tons/ha in the scattered trees in the rural/urban area to 91.5 tons/ha in the dense linear TOF along the canal. The total above-ground TOF phytomass and carbon content was calculated as 367.04 and 174.34 tons/ha, respectively in the study area. The study results conclude that the classification of TOF and estimation of phytomass and carbon content in TOF can be successfully achieved through the combined approach of Remote Sensing and GIS based spatial technique with the supplement of field data. The present approach will help to find out the potential carbon sequestration zone in the semi-arid region of southern Haryana, India.

  2. Developing Aboveground Biomass Equations Both Compatible with Tree Volume Equations and Additive Systems for Single-Trees in Poplar Plantations in Jiangsu Province, China

    Chao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed aboveground biomass equations for poplar plantations in Jiangsu Province, China, both compatible with tree volume equations and additive systems. Biomass equations were fitted with 80 selected and previously harvested sample trees. Additivity property was assured by applying a “controlling directly under total biomass proportion function” approach. Weighted regression was used to correct heteroscedasticity. Parameters were estimated using a nonlinear error-in-variable model. The results indicated that (1, on average, stems constituted the largest proportion (71.5% of total aboveground biomass; (2 the aboveground biomass equations, both compatible with tree volume equations and additive systems, obtained good model fitting and prediction, of which the coefficient of determination ranged from 0.903 to 0.987, and the total relative error and the mean prediction error were less than 2.0% and 10.0%, respectively; (3 adding H and CW into the additive system of biomass equations did not improve model fitting and performance as expected, especially for branches and foliage biomass; and (4 the additive systems of biomass equations presented here provided more reliable and accurate biomass predictions than the independent biomass equations fitted by ordinary least square regression. This system of additive biomass equations will prove to be applicable for estimating biomass of poplar plantations in Jiangsu Province of China.

  3. Fate of polychlorinated biphenyls in a contaminated lake ecosystem: Combining equilibrium passive sampling of sediment and water with total concentration measurements of biota

    Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T.; Figueiredo, Kaisa;

    2015-01-01

    hydrophobic organic chemicals in biota lipids. The authors' aim was to assess the equilibrium status of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a contaminated lake ecosystem and along its discharge course using equilibrium sampling devices for measurements in sediment and water and by also analyzing biota. The...... authors used equilibrium sampling devices (silicone rubber and polyethylene [PE]) to determine freely dissolved concentrations and chemical activities of PCBs in the water column and sediment porewater and calculated for both phases the corresponding equilibrium concentrations and chemical activities in...... model lipids. Overall, the studied ecosystem appeared to be in disequilibrium for the studied phases: sediment, water, and biota. Chemical activities of PCBs were higher in sediment than in water, which implies that the sediment functioned as a partitioning source of PCBs and that net diffusion occurred...

  4. Optimization of the microwave-assisted saponification and extraction of organic pollutants from marine biota using experimental design and artificial neural networks

    Hernandez-Borges, J.; Rodriques-Delgado, M.A.; Garcia-Montelongo, F.J. [Laguna Univ., Tenerife (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Science

    2006-02-15

    Several improvements in sample pretreatment for the determination of organic pollutants (i.e. n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) in marine biota (mussels) are presented. The use of liquid nitrogen and homogenization of the samples are shown to be an alternative to the time consuming liophilization step required for the analysis of biota samples. Microwave-assisted hydrolysis and extraction are combined to isolate organic pollutants (19 n-alkanes and 27 PAHs) from biota matrices. Experimental design (ES) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used to optimize the experimental conditions. NIST-CRM 2978 was used to test the validity of the developed method which shows a good agreement with certified values. (orig.)

  5. Assessing radiation impact at a protected coastal sand dune site: an intercomparison of models for estimating the radiological exposure of non-human biota.

    Wood, Michael D; Beresford, Nicholas A; Barnett, Catherine L; Copplestone, David; Leah, Richard T

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the application of three publicly available biota dose assessment models (the ERICA Tool, R&D128/SP1a and RESRAD-BIOTA) to an assessment of the Drigg coastal sand dunes. Using measured (90)Sr, (99)Tc, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am activity concentrations in sand dune soil, activity concentration and dose rate predictions are made for a range of organisms including amphibians, birds, invertebrates, mammals, reptiles, plants and fungi. Predicted biota activity concentrations are compared to measured data where available. The main source of variability in the model predictions is the transfer parameters used and it is concluded that developing the available transfer databases should be a focus of future research effort. The value of taking an informed user approach to investigate the way in which models may be expected to be applied in practice is highlighted and a strategy for the future development of intercomparison exercises is presented. PMID:19447531

  6. Assessing radiation impact at a protected coastal sand dune site: an intercomparison of models for estimating the radiological exposure of non-human biota

    This paper presents the application of three publicly available biota dose assessment models (the ERICA Tool, R and D128/SP1a and RESRAD-BIOTA) to an assessment of the Drigg coastal sand dunes. Using measured 90Sr, 99Tc, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am activity concentrations in sand dune soil, activity concentration and dose rate predictions are made for a range of organisms including amphibians, birds, invertebrates, mammals, reptiles, plants and fungi. Predicted biota activity concentrations are compared to measured data where available. The main source of variability in the model predictions is the transfer parameters used and it is concluded that developing the available transfer databases should be a focus of future research effort. The value of taking an informed user approach to investigate the way in which models may be expected to be applied in practice is highlighted and a strategy for the future development of intercomparison exercises is presented.

  7. Estimating Forest Aboveground Biomass by Combining Optical and SAR Data: A Case Study in Genhe, Inner Mongolia, China.

    Shao, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Linjing

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of forest aboveground biomass is critical for regional carbon policies and sustainable forest management. Passive optical remote sensing and active microwave remote sensing both play an important role in the monitoring of forest biomass. However, optical spectral reflectance is saturated in relatively dense vegetation areas, and microwave backscattering is significantly influenced by the underlying soil when the vegetation coverage is low. Both of these conditions decrease the estimation accuracy of forest biomass. A new optical and microwave integrated vegetation index (VI) was proposed based on observations from both field experiments and satellite (Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and RADARSAT-2) data. According to the difference in interaction between the multispectral reflectance and microwave backscattering signatures with biomass, the combined VI (COVI) was designed using the weighted optical optimized soil-adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) and microwave horizontally transmitted and vertically received signal (HV) to overcome the disadvantages of both data types. The performance of the COVI was evaluated by comparison with those of the sole optical data, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data, and the simple combination of independent optical and SAR variables. The most accurate performance was obtained by the models based on the COVI and optical and microwave optimal variables excluding OSAVI and HV, in combination with a random forest algorithm and the largest number of reference samples. The results also revealed that the predictive accuracy depended highly on the statistical method and the number of sample units. The validation indicated that this integrated method of determining the new VI is a good synergistic way to combine both optical and microwave information for the accurate estimation of forest biomass. PMID:27338378

  8. Spatial distribution of forest aboveground biomass in China: estimation through combination of spaceborne lidar, optical imagery, and forest inventory data

    Xue, B. L.; Su, Y.; Guo, Q.; Hu, T.; Alvarez, O.; Tao, S.; Fang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The global forest ecosystem, which acts as a large carbon sink, plays an important role in modeling the global carbon balance. An accurate estimation of the total forest carbon stock in the aboveground biomass (AGB) is therefore necessary to improve our understanding of carbon dynamics, especially against the background of global climate change. The forest area of China is among the top five globally. However, because of limitations in forest AGB mapping methods and the availability of ground inventory data, there is still a lack in nationwide wall-to-wall forest AGB estimation map for China. In this study, we collected over 8000 ground inventory data from the literature, and developed an AGB mapping method using a combination of these ground inventory data, Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS)/Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) data, optical imagery, climate surfaces, and topographic data. An uncertainty field model was introduced into the forest AGB mapping model to minimize the influence of plot locality uncertainty. Our nationwide wall-to-wall forest AGB mapping results show that the forest AGB density in China is 120 Mg/ha on average, with a standard deviation of 61 Mg/ha. Evaluation with an independent ground inventory dataset showed that our proposed method can accurately map wall-to-wall forest AGB across a large landscape. The coefficient of determination (R2) and root-mean-square error between our predicted results and the validation dataset were 0.75 and 42.39 Mg/ha, respectively. This new method and the resulting nationwide wall-to-wall AGB map will help to improve the accuracy of carbon dynamic predictions in China.

  9. Above-Ground Dimensions and Acclimation Explain Variation in Drought Mortality of Scots Pine Seedlings from Various Provenances

    Seidel, Hannes; Menzel, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seedling establishment is a critical part of the life cycle, thus seedling survival might be even more important for forest persistence under recent and future climate change. Scots pine forests have been disproportionally more affected by climate change triggered forest-dieback. Nevertheless, some Scots pine provenances might prove resilient to future drought events because of the species’ large distributional range, genetic diversity, and adaptation potential. However, there is a lack of knowledge on provenance-specific survival under severe drought events and on how acclimation alters survival rates in Scots pine seedlings. We therefore conducted two drought-induced mortality experiments with potted Scots pine seedlings in a greenhouse. In the first experiment, 760 three-year-old seedlings from 12 different provenances of the south-western distribution range were subjected to the same treatment followed by the mortality experiment in 2014. In the second experiment, we addressed the question of whether acclimation to re-occurring drought stress events and to elevated temperature might decrease mortality rates. Thus, 139 four-year-old seedlings from France, Germany, and Poland were subjected to different temperature regimes (2012–2014) and drought treatments (2013–2014) before the mortality experiment in 2015. Provenances clearly differed in their hazard of drought-induced mortality, which was only partly related to the climate of their origin. Drought acclimation decreased the hazard of drought-induced mortality. Above-ground dry weight and height were the main determinants for the hazard of mortality, i.e., heavier and taller seedlings were more prone to mortality. Consequently, Scots pine seedlings exhibit a considerable provenance-specific acclimation potential against drought mortality and the selection of suitable provenances might thus facilitate seedling establishment and the persistence of Scots pine forest. PMID:27458477

  10. Sensitivity of Above-Ground Biomass Estimates to Height-Diameter Modelling in Mixed-Species West African Woodlands.

    Valbuena, Rubén; Heiskanen, Janne; Aynekulu, Ermias; Pitkänen, Sari; Packalen, Petteri

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that above-ground biomass (AGB) inventories should include tree height (H), in addition to diameter (D). As H is a difficult variable to measure, H-D models are commonly used to predict H. We tested a number of approaches for H-D modelling, including additive terms which increased the complexity of the model, and observed how differences in tree-level predictions of H propagated to plot-level AGB estimations. We were especially interested in detecting whether the choice of method can lead to bias. The compared approaches listed in the order of increasing complexity were: (B0) AGB estimations from D-only; (B1) involving also H obtained from a fixed-effects H-D model; (B2) involving also species; (B3) including also between-plot variability as random effects; and (B4) involving multilevel nested random effects for grouping plots in clusters. In light of the results, the modelling approach affected the AGB estimation significantly in some cases, although differences were negligible for some of the alternatives. The most important differences were found between including H or not in the AGB estimation. We observed that AGB predictions without H information were very sensitive to the environmental stress parameter (E), which can induce a critical bias. Regarding the H-D modelling, the most relevant effect was found when species was included as an additive term. We presented a two-step methodology, which succeeded in identifying the species for which the general H-D relation was relevant to modify. Based on the results, our final choice was the single-level mixed-effects model (B3), which accounts for the species but also for the plot random effects reflecting site-specific factors such as soil properties and degree of disturbance. PMID:27367857

  11. Aboveground and Belowground Herbivores Synergistically Induce Volatile Organic Sulfur Compound Emissions from Shoots but Not from Roots.

    Danner, Holger; Brown, Phil; Cator, Eric A; Harren, Frans J M; van Dam, Nicole M; Cristescu, Simona M

    2015-07-01

    Studies on aboveground (AG) plant organs have shown that volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions differ between simultaneous attack by herbivores and single herbivore attack. There is growing evidence that interactive effects of simultaneous herbivory also occur across the root-shoot interface. In our study, Brassica rapa roots were infested with root fly larvae (Delia radicum) and the shoots infested with Pieris brassicae, either singly or simultaneously, to study these root-shoot interactions. As an analytical platform, we used Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) to investigate VOCs over a 3 day time period. Our set-up allowed us to monitor root and shoot emissions concurrently on the same plant. Focus was placed on the sulfur-containing compounds; methanethiol, dimethylsulfide (DMS), and dimethyldisulfide (DMDS), because these compounds previously have been shown to be biologically active in the interactions of Brassica plants, herbivores, parasitoids, and predators, yet have received relatively little attention. The shoots of plants simultaneously infested with AG and belowground (BG) herbivores emitted higher levels of sulfur-containing compounds than plants with a single herbivore species present. In contrast, the emission of sulfur VOCs from the plant roots increased as a consequence of root herbivory, independent of the presence of an AG herbivore. The onset of root emissions was more rapid after damage than the onset of shoot emissions. The shoots of double infested plants also emitted higher levels of methanol. Thus, interactive effects of root and shoot herbivores exhibit more strongly in the VOC emissions from the shoots than from the roots, implying the involvement of specific signaling interactions. PMID:26195194

  12. Using LiDAR to Estimate Total Aboveground Biomass of Redwood Stands in the Jackson Demonstration State Forest, Mendocino, California

    Rao, M.; Vuong, H.

    2013-12-01

    The overall objective of this study is to develop a method for estimating total aboveground biomass of redwood stands in Jackson Demonstration State Forest, Mendocino, California using airborne LiDAR data. LiDAR data owing to its vertical and horizontal accuracy are increasingly being used to characterize landscape features including ground surface elevation and canopy height. These LiDAR-derived metrics involving structural signatures at higher precision and accuracy can help better understand ecological processes at various spatial scales. Our study is focused on two major species of the forest: redwood (Sequoia semperirens [D.Don] Engl.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga mensiezii [Mirb.] Franco). Specifically, the objectives included linear regression models fitting tree diameter at breast height (dbh) to LiDAR derived height for each species. From 23 random points on the study area, field measurement (dbh and tree coordinate) were collected for more than 500 trees of Redwood and Douglas-fir over 0.2 ha- plots. The USFS-FUSION application software along with its LiDAR Data Viewer (LDV) were used to to extract Canopy Height Model (CHM) from which tree heights would be derived. Based on the LiDAR derived height and ground based dbh, a linear regression model was developed to predict dbh. The predicted dbh was used to estimate the biomass at the single tree level using Jenkin's formula (Jenkin et al 2003). The linear regression models were able to explain 65% of the variability associated with Redwood's dbh and 80% of that associated with Douglas-fir's dbh.

  13. National-scale estimation of gross forest aboveground carbon loss: a case study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Recent advances in remote sensing enable the mapping and monitoring of carbon stocks without relying on extensive in situ measurements. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is among the countries where national forest inventories (NFI) are either non-existent or out of date. Here we demonstrate a method for estimating national-scale gross forest aboveground carbon (AGC) loss and associated uncertainties using remotely sensed-derived forest cover loss and biomass carbon density data. Lidar data were used as a surrogate for NFI plot measurements to estimate carbon stocks and AGC loss based on forest type and activity data derived using time-series multispectral imagery. Specifically, DRC forest type and loss from the FACET (Forêts d’Afrique Centrale Evaluées par Télédétection) product, created using Landsat data, were related to carbon data derived from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Validation data for FACET forest area loss were created at a 30-m spatial resolution and compared to the 60-m spatial resolution FACET map. We produced two gross AGC loss estimates for the DRC for the last decade (2000–2010): a map-scale estimate (53.3 ± 9.8 Tg C yr−1) accounting for whole-pixel classification errors in the 60-m resolution FACET forest cover change product, and a sub-grid estimate (72.1 ± 12.7 Tg C yr−1) that took into account 60-m cells that experienced partial forest loss. Our sub-grid forest cover and AGC loss estimates, which included smaller-scale forest disturbances, exceed published assessments. Results raise the issue of scale in forest cover change mapping and validation, and subsequent impacts on remotely sensed carbon stock change estimation, particularly for smallholder dominated systems such as the DRC. (letter)

  14. Structure and distribution of glandular and non-glandular trichomes on above-ground organs in Inula helenium L. (Asteraceae

    Aneta Sulborska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Micromorphology and distribution of glandular and non-glandular trichomes on the above-ground organs of Inula helenium L. were investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Two types of biseriate glandular trichomes, i.e. sessile and stalk hairs, and non-glandular trichomes were recorded. Sessile glandular trichomes were found on all examined I. helenium organs (with their highest density on the abaxial surface of leaves and disk florets, and on stems, whereas stalk glandular trichomes were found on leaves and stems. Sessile trichomes were characterised by a slightly lower height (58–103 μm and width (32–35 μm than the stalk trichomes (62–111 μm x 31–36 μm. Glandular hairs were composed of 5–7 (sessile trichomes or 6–9 (stalk trichomes cell tiers. Apical trichome cell tiers exhibited features of secretory cells. Secretion was accumulated in subcuticular space, which expanded and ruptured at the top, and released its content. Histochemical assays showed the presence of lipids and polyphenols, whereas no starch was detected. Non-glandular trichomes were seen on involucral bracts, leaves and stems (more frequently on involucral bracts. Their structure comprised 2–9 cells; basal cells (1–6 were smaller and linearly arranged, while apical cells had a prozenchymatous shape. The apical cell was the longest and sharply pointed. Applied histochemical tests revealed orange-red (presence of lipids and brow colour (presence of polyphenols in the apical cells of the trichomes. This may suggest that beside their protective role, the trichomes may participate in secretion of secondary metabolites.

  15. Risk Assessment of Genetically Engineered Maize Resistant to Diabrotica spp.: Influence on Above-Ground Arthropods in the Czech Republic.

    Svobodová, Zdeňka; Skoková Habuštová, Oxana; Hutchison, William D; Hussein, Hany M; Sehnal, František

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic maize MON88017, expressing the Cry3Bb1 toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt maize), confers resistance to corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp.) and provides tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate. However, prior to commercialization, substantial assessment of potential effects on non-target organisms within agroecosystems is required. The MON88017 event was therefore evaluated under field conditions in Southern Bohemia in 2009-2011, to detect possible impacts on the above-ground arthropod species. The study compared MON88017, its near-isogenic non-Bt hybrid DK315 (treated or not treated with the soil insecticide Dursban 10G) and two non-Bt reference hybrids (KIPOUS and PR38N86). Each hybrid was grown on five 0.5 ha plots distributed in a 14-ha field with a Latin square design. Semiquantitative ELISA was used to verify Cry3Bb1 toxin levels in the Bt maize. The species spectrum of non-target invertebrates changed during seasons and was affected by weather conditions. The thrips Frankliniella occidentalis was the most abundant species in all three successive years. The next most common species were aphids Rhopalosiphum padi and Metopolophium dirhodum. Frequently observed predators included Orius spp. and several species within the Coccinellidae. Throughout the three-year study, analysis of variance indicated some significant differences (Pinsects was similar in maize with the same genetic background, for both Bt (MON88017) and non-Bt (DK315) untreated or insecticide treated. KIPOUS and PR38N86 showed some differences in species abundance relative to the Bt maize and its near-isogenic hybrid. However, the effect of management regime on arthropod community was insignificant and accounted only for a negligible portion of the variability. PMID:26083254

  16. Above-Ground Dimensions and Acclimation Explain Variation in Drought Mortality of Scots Pine Seedlings from Various Provenances.

    Seidel, Hannes; Menzel, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seedling establishment is a critical part of the life cycle, thus seedling survival might be even more important for forest persistence under recent and future climate change. Scots pine forests have been disproportionally more affected by climate change triggered forest-dieback. Nevertheless, some Scots pine provenances might prove resilient to future drought events because of the species' large distributional range, genetic diversity, and adaptation potential. However, there is a lack of knowledge on provenance-specific survival under severe drought events and on how acclimation alters survival rates in Scots pine seedlings. We therefore conducted two drought-induced mortality experiments with potted Scots pine seedlings in a greenhouse. In the first experiment, 760 three-year-old seedlings from 12 different provenances of the south-western distribution range were subjected to the same treatment followed by the mortality experiment in 2014. In the second experiment, we addressed the question of whether acclimation to re-occurring drought stress events and to elevated temperature might decrease mortality rates. Thus, 139 four-year-old seedlings from France, Germany, and Poland were subjected to different temperature regimes (2012-2014) and drought treatments (2013-2014) before the mortality experiment in 2015. Provenances clearly differed in their hazard of drought-induced mortality, which was only partly related to the climate of their origin. Drought acclimation decreased the hazard of drought-induced mortality. Above-ground dry weight and height were the main determinants for the hazard of mortality, i.e., heavier and taller seedlings were more prone to mortality. Consequently, Scots pine seedlings exhibit a considerable provenance-specific acclimation potential against drought mortality and the selection of suitable provenances might thus facilitate seedling establishment and the persistence of Scots pine forest. PMID:27458477

  17. Detection of large above-ground biomass variability in lowland forest ecosystems by airborne LiDAR

    J. Jubanski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of tropical forest above-ground biomass (AGB over large areas as input for Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+ projects and climate change models is challenging. This is the first study which attempts to estimate AGB and its variability across large areas of tropical lowland forests in Central Kalimantan (Indonesia through correlating airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR to forest inventory data. Two LiDAR height metrics were analysed, and regression models could be improved through the use of LiDAR point densities as input (R2 = 0.88; n = 52. Surveying with a LiDAR point density per square metre of about 4 resulted in the best cost / benefit ratio. We estimated AGB for 600 km of LiDAR tracks and showed that there exists a considerable variability of up to 140% within the same forest type due to varying environmental conditions. Impact from logging operations and the associated AGB losses dating back more than 10 yr could be assessed by LiDAR but not by multispectral satellite imagery. Comparison with a Landsat classification for a 1 million ha study area where AGB values were based on site-specific field inventory data, regional literature estimates, and default values by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC showed an overestimation of 43%, 102%, and 137%, respectively. The results show that AGB overestimation may lead to wrong greenhouse gas (GHG emission estimates due to deforestation in climate models. For REDD+ projects this leads to inaccurate carbon stock estimates and consequently to significantly wrong REDD+ based compensation payments.

  18. Aboveground and belowground biomass allocation in native Prosopis caldenia Burkart secondaries woodlands in the semi-arid Argentinean pampas

    The woodlands in the south-west of the Argentinean pampas are dominated by Prosopis Caldenia Burkart (calden). The current deforestation rate of this woodlands is 0.82% per year. Different compensation initiatives have begun that recognize the role of forests as environmental service providers. The financial incentives they offer make it necessary to quantify the amount of carbon stored in the forest biomass. A model for estimating calden biomass was developed. Thirty-eight trees were selected, felled and divided into sections. An equation system was fitted using joint generalized regression to ensure the additivity property. A weighted regression was used to avoid heteroscedasticity. In these woodlands fire is the main disturbance and it can modify tree allometry, due this all models included the area of the base of the stem and tree height as independent variables since it indirectly collects this variability. Total biomass and the stem fraction had the highest R2Adj. values (0.75), while branches with a diameter less than 7 cm had the lowest (0.58). Tree biomass was also analyzed by partitioning into the basic fractions of stem, crown, roots, and the root/shoot ratio. Biomass allocation was greatest in the crown fraction and the mean root/shoot ratio was 0.58. The carbon stock of the caldenales considering only calden tree biomass is 20.2 Mg ha−1. While the overall carbon balance of the region is negative (deforestation and biomass burning, the remnant forested area has increased their calden density and in an indirect way his carbon sequestration capacity could also be increased. - Highlights: • A model for estimating aboveground and belowground Prosopis caldenia biomass was developed. • Biomass allocation into the tree and the root/shoot ratio were analyzed. • The equation systems presented had made it possible to more accurately estimate the biomass stored in calden woodlands

  19. Risk Assessment of Genetically Engineered Maize Resistant to Diabrotica spp.: Influence on Above-Ground Arthropods in the Czech Republic.

    Zdeňka Svobodová

    Full Text Available Transgenic maize MON88017, expressing the Cry3Bb1 toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt maize, confers resistance to corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp. and provides tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate. However, prior to commercialization, substantial assessment of potential effects on non-target organisms within agroecosystems is required. The MON88017 event was therefore evaluated under field conditions in Southern Bohemia in 2009-2011, to detect possible impacts on the above-ground arthropod species. The study compared MON88017, its near-isogenic non-Bt hybrid DK315 (treated or not treated with the soil insecticide Dursban 10G and two non-Bt reference hybrids (KIPOUS and PR38N86. Each hybrid was grown on five 0.5 ha plots distributed in a 14-ha field with a Latin square design. Semiquantitative ELISA was used to verify Cry3Bb1 toxin levels in the Bt maize. The species spectrum of non-target invertebrates changed during seasons and was affected by weather conditions. The thrips Frankliniella occidentalis was the most abundant species in all three successive years. The next most common species were aphids Rhopalosiphum padi and Metopolophium dirhodum. Frequently observed predators included Orius spp. and several species within the Coccinellidae. Throughout the three-year study, analysis of variance indicated some significant differences (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that the abundance and diversity of plant dwelling insects was similar in maize with the same genetic background, for both Bt (MON88017 and non-Bt (DK315 untreated or insecticide treated. KIPOUS and PR38N86 showed some differences in species abundance relative to the Bt maize and its near-isogenic hybrid. However, the effect of management regime on arthropod community was insignificant and accounted only for a negligible portion of the variability.

  20. Lasting effects of climate disturbance on perennial grassland above-ground biomass production under two cutting frequencies.

    Zwicke, Marine; Alessio, Giorgio A; Thiery, Lionel; Falcimagne, Robert; Baumont, René; Rossignol, Nicolas; Soussana, Jean-François; Picon-Cochard, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    Climate extremes can ultimately reshape grassland services such as forage production and change plant functional type composition. This 3-year field research studied resistance to dehydration and recovery after rehydration of plant community and plant functional types in an upland perennial grassland subjected to climate and cutting frequency (Cut+, Cut-) disturbances by measuring green tissue percentage and above-ground biomass production (ANPP). In year 1, a climate disturbance gradient was applied by co-manipulating temperature and precipitation. Four treatments were considered: control and warming-drought climatic treatment, with or without extreme summer event. In year 2, control and warming-drought treatments were maintained without extreme. In year 3, all treatments received ambient climatic conditions. We found that the grassland community was very sensitive to dehydration during the summer extreme: aerial senescence reached 80% when cumulated climatic water balance fell to -156 mm and biomass declined by 78% at the end of summer. In autumn, canopy greenness and biomass totally recovered in control but not in the warming-drought treatment. However ANPP decreased under both climatic treatments, but the effect was stronger on Cut+ (-24%) than Cut- (-15%). This decline was not compensated by the presence of three functional types because they were negatively affected by the climatic treatments, suggesting an absence of buffering effect on grassland production. In the following 2 years, lasting effects of climate disturbance on ANPP were observable. The unexpected stressful conditions of year 3 induced a decline in grassland production in the Cut+ control treatment. The fact that this treatment cumulated higher (45%) N export over the 3 years suggests that N plays a key role in ANPP stability. As ANPP in this mesic perennial grassland did not show engineering resilience, long-term experimental manipulation is needed. Infrequent mowing appears more

  1. Testing the generality of above-ground biomass allometry across plant functional types at the continent scale.

    Paul, Keryn I; Roxburgh, Stephen H; Chave, Jerome; England, Jacqueline R; Zerihun, Ayalsew; Specht, Alison; Lewis, Tom; Bennett, Lauren T; Baker, Thomas G; Adams, Mark A; Huxtable, Dan; Montagu, Kelvin D; Falster, Daniel S; Feller, Mike; Sochacki, Stan; Ritson, Peter; Bastin, Gary; Bartle, John; Wildy, Dan; Hobbs, Trevor; Larmour, John; Waterworth, Rob; Stewart, Hugh T L; Jonson, Justin; Forrester, David I; Applegate, Grahame; Mendham, Daniel; Bradford, Matt; O'Grady, Anthony; Green, Daryl; Sudmeyer, Rob; Rance, Stan J; Turner, John; Barton, Craig; Wenk, Elizabeth H; Grove, Tim; Attiwill, Peter M; Pinkard, Elizabeth; Butler, Don; Brooksbank, Kim; Spencer, Beren; Snowdon, Peter; O'Brien, Nick; Battaglia, Michael; Cameron, David M; Hamilton, Steve; McAuthur, Geoff; Sinclair, Jenny

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground-based estimation of the carbon stored in terrestrial ecosystems is critical to quantifying the global carbon budget. Allometric models provide cost-effective methods for biomass prediction. But do such models vary with ecoregion or plant functional type? We compiled 15 054 measurements of individual tree or shrub biomass from across Australia to examine the generality of allometric models for above-ground biomass prediction. This provided a robust case study because Australia includes ecoregions ranging from arid shrublands to tropical rainforests, and has a rich history of biomass research, particularly in planted forests. Regardless of ecoregion, for five broad categories of plant functional type (shrubs; multistemmed trees; trees of the genus Eucalyptus and closely related genera; other trees of high wood density; and other trees of low wood density), relationships between biomass and stem diameter were generic. Simple power-law models explained 84-95% of the variation in biomass, with little improvement in model performance when other plant variables (height, bole wood density), or site characteristics (climate, age, management) were included. Predictions of stand-based biomass from allometric models of varying levels of generalization (species-specific, plant functional type) were validated using whole-plot harvest data from 17 contrasting stands (range: 9-356 Mg ha(-1) ). Losses in efficiency of prediction were plant functional types. Development of new species-specific models is only warranted when gains in accuracy of stand-based predictions are relatively high (e.g. high-value monocultures). PMID:26683241

  2. Evaluation of Radiometric and Atmospheric Correction Algorithms for Aboveground Forest Biomass Estimation Using Landsat 5 TM Data

    Pablito M. López-Serrano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation is affected by absorption and emission phenomena during its downward trajectory from the Sun to the Earth’s surface and during the upward trajectory detected by satellite sensors. This leads to distortion of the ground radiometric properties (reflectance recorded by satellite images, used in this study to estimate aboveground forest biomass (AGB. Atmospherically-corrected remote sensing data can be used to estimate AGB on a global scale and with moderate effort. The objective of this study was to evaluate four atmospheric correction algorithms (for surface reflectance, ATCOR2 (Atmospheric Correction for Flat Terrain, COST (Cosine of the Sun Zenith Angle, FLAASH (Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes and 6S (Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar, and one radiometric correction algorithm (for reflectance at the sensor ToA (Apparent Reflectance at the Top of Atmosphere to estimate AGB in temperate forest in the northeast of the state of Durango, Mexico. The AGB was estimated from Landsat 5 TM imagery and ancillary information from a digital elevation model (DEM using the non-parametric multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS technique. Field reference data for the model training were collected by systematic sampling of 99 permanent forest growth and soil research sites (SPIFyS established during the winter of 2011. The following predictor variables were identified in the MARS model: Band 7, Band 5, slope (β, Wetness Index (WI, NDVI and MSAVI2. After cross-validation, 6S was found to be the optimal model for estimating AGB (R2 = 0.71 and RMSE = 33.5 Mg·ha−1; 37.61% of the average stand biomass. We conclude that atmospheric and radiometric correction of satellite images can be used along with non-parametric techniques to estimate AGB with acceptable accuracy.

  3. Accumulation of transuranic elements in the aquatic biota of the Belarusian sector of contaminated area near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant - Accumulation of transuranic elements in aquatic biota of Belarusian sector of contaminated area of Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    Golubev, Alexander; Mironov, Vladislav [International Sakharov Environmental University. Box 220070, 23 Dolgobrodskaya Street, Minsk, 220070 (Belarus)

    2014-07-01

    The evolution of nuclear contamination of Belarus territory after Chernobyl accident includes the four stages: 1. Iodine-neptunium stage, caused mainly by short-lived radionuclides {sup 131}I, {sup 239}Np and others with a half-life period of several weeks; II. Intermediate stage, caused by radionuclides with a half-life period of a year ({sup 144}Ce, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 134}Cs, etc.); III. Strontium-cesium stage, caused by {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs with a half-life period of about 30 years; IV. Plutonium-americium, caused by long-lived α-emitting radionuclides {sup 241}Am (period of half-life of 432 years) and {sup 239+240}Pu, having high radio and chemo-toxicity. According to forecasts, activity of {sup 241}Am to 2050 year will increase by 2.5 times and it will be the most important dose-related factor for the aquatic biota within the Chernobyl accident zone. In 2002 - 2008 years we have studied the accumulation of trans-uranic elements (TUE, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239+240}Pu) in basic components of water body ecosystems within the Chernobyl zone - non-flowing Perstok Lake, weak-flowing Borschevka flooding and small Braginka River. Among investigated components are water, bottom sediments, submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum submersum, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae, Lemna minor, Nuphar lutea, Stratiotes aloides), emergent macrophytes (Typha spp.), shellfish and fish. In the soil cover in the vicinity of the Perstok Lake activity of {sup 241}Am at present is equivalent to 300 - 600 Bq.kg{sup -1}, that is the basic source of its income to the lake. Radionuclides mobility in the water environment is higher than in the soil, that facilitates the rapid incorporation of {sup 241}Am to the trophic nets of water bodies and its removal by near-water animals in the terrestrial biotopes, including outside Chernobyl zone. Thus, the activity of {sup 241}Am in bottom sediments in the Perstok Lake and Borschevka flooding in 2008 year reach respectively 324 and 131 Bq.kg{sup -1}, and the

  4. Towards a universal sampling protocol for soil biotas in the humid tropics Em direção a um protocolo universal de amostragem de biotas do solo nos trópicos úmidos

    David Edward Bignell

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the methods for the inventory of below-ground biotas in the humid tropics, to document the (hypothesized loss of soil biodiversity associated with deforestation and agricultural intensification at forest margins. The biotas were grouped into eight categories, each of which corresponded to a major functional group considered important or essential to soil function. An accurate inventory of soil organisms can assist in ecosystem management and help sustain agricultural production. The advantages and disadvantages of transect-based and grid-based sampling methods are discussed, illustrated by published protocols ranging from the original "TSBF transect", through versions developed for the alternatives to Slash-and-Burn Project (ASB to the final schemes (with variants adopted by the Conservation and Sustainable Management of Below-ground Biodiversity Project (CSM-BGBD. Consideration is given to the place and importance of replication in below-ground biological sampling and it is argued that the new sampling protocols are inclusive, i.e. designed to sample all eight biotic groups in the same field exercise; spatially scaled, i.e. provide biodiversity data at site, locality, landscape and regional levels, and link the data to land use and land cover; and statistically robust, as shown by a partial randomization of plot locations for sampling.Este trabalho faz uma revisão dos métodos de inventariado da biota edáfica nos trópicos úmidos para documentar a (hipotética perda de biodiversidade do solo associada ao desmatamento e à intensificação agrícola nas margens de florestas. A biota foi agrupada em oito categorias, cada uma correspondente a um grande grupo funcional considerado importante ou essencial para a função do solo. Um inventário cuidadoso dos organismos do solo pode auxiliar a gestão de ecossistemas e a sustentabilidade da produção agrícola. As vantagens e desvantagens de métodos de amostragem baseados em

  5. Accumulation of transuranic elements in the aquatic biota of the Belarusian sector of contaminated area near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant - Accumulation of transuranic elements in aquatic biota of Belarusian sector of contaminated area of Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    The evolution of nuclear contamination of Belarus territory after Chernobyl accident includes the four stages: 1. Iodine-neptunium stage, caused mainly by short-lived radionuclides 131I, 239Np and others with a half-life period of several weeks; II. Intermediate stage, caused by radionuclides with a half-life period of a year (144Ce, 106Ru, 134Cs, etc.); III. Strontium-cesium stage, caused by 90Sr and 137Cs with a half-life period of about 30 years; IV. Plutonium-americium, caused by long-lived α-emitting radionuclides 241Am (period of half-life of 432 years) and 239+240Pu, having high radio and chemo-toxicity. According to forecasts, activity of 241Am to 2050 year will increase by 2.5 times and it will be the most important dose-related factor for the aquatic biota within the Chernobyl accident zone. In 2002 - 2008 years we have studied the accumulation of trans-uranic elements (TUE, 241Am, 239+240Pu) in basic components of water body ecosystems within the Chernobyl zone - non-flowing Perstok Lake, weak-flowing Borschevka flooding and small Braginka River. Among investigated components are water, bottom sediments, submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum submersum, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae, Lemna minor, Nuphar lutea, Stratiotes aloides), emergent macrophytes (Typha spp.), shellfish and fish. In the soil cover in the vicinity of the Perstok Lake activity of 241Am at present is equivalent to 300 - 600 Bq.kg-1, that is the basic source of its income to the lake. Radionuclides mobility in the water environment is higher than in the soil, that facilitates the rapid incorporation of 241Am to the trophic nets of water bodies and its removal by near-water animals in the terrestrial biotopes, including outside Chernobyl zone. Thus, the activity of 241Am in bottom sediments in the Perstok Lake and Borschevka flooding in 2008 year reach respectively 324 and 131 Bq.kg-1, and the activity of 241Am in macrophytes of the Perstok Lake at the same year was 1,0 - 3,7 Bq.kg-1. In

  6. Guanling Biota: A Marker of Triassic Biotic Recovery from the end-Permian Extinction in the Ancient Guizhou Sea

    JIANG Dayong; Ryosuke MOTANI; LI Chun; HAO Weicheng; SUN Yuanlin; SUN Zuoyu; Lars SCHMITZ

    2005-01-01

    After a slow recovery from the end-Permian extinction during the Early Triassic and rapid radiation in the Middle Triassic, evolution of organisms reached a new peak phase in the Late Triassic. The Guanling Biota from the Wayao Member (conodont Paragondolella polygnathiformis Zone), Falang Formation, Xinpu, Guanling County, Guizhou Province, southwestern China corresponds to this peak that marks the full recovery from the end-Permian extinction of marine ecosystems. The biota is of high diversity, containing well preserved and completely articulated skeletons of vertebrates comprising marine reptiles, fishes, and invertebrates including crinoids, ammonites, bivalves, and other fossils,and is one of the best examples of marine ecosystem records in life history. The fossil marine reptiles and crinoids are most significant in this biota, especially the marine reptiles, which provide an important link between the Triassic Pacific and Tethys, and between Triassic basal forms and the Jurassic-Cretaceous marine top predators. The most remarkable fossils are the large completely articulated ichthyosaur skeletons up to and more than 10 m, and the first recorded thalattosaurs and placodonts in China. Following our review, of the 17 named reptilian taxa the eight listed here are considered to be valid: three ichthyosaurs (Qianichthyosaurus zhoui Li, 1999; Guizhouichthyosaurus tangae Cao and Luo in Yin et al.,2000, Guanlingsaurus liangae Yin in Yin et al., 2000), three thalattosaurs (Anshunsaurus huangguoshuensis Liu, 1999,Xinpusaurus suni Yin in Yin et al., 2000, Xinpusaurus kohi Jiang et al., 2004), and two placodonts (Sinocyamodus xinpuensis Li, 2000, Psephochelys polyosteoderma Li and Rieppel, 2002). Mixosaurus guanlingensis Cao in Yin et al.,2000 might be a junior synonym of Qianichthyosaurus zhoui Li, 1999, and Cymbospondylus asiaticus Li and You, 2002and Panjiangsaurus epicharis Chen and Cheng, 2003 might be junior synonyms of Guizhouichthyosaurus tangae Cao and Luo in

  7. Polonium-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial, freshwater and brackish environments Results from the NKS project GAPRAD (Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota)

    Gjelsvik, R.; Brown, J.; Holm, E.; Roos, P.; Saxen, R.; Outola, I.

    2012-01-15

    The background and rationale to filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for biota are presented. Concentrations of Po-210 and Pb-210 are reported for biota sampled in Dovrefjell, Norway and selected lake and brackish ecosystems in Finland. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental studies are recounted. (Author)

  8. Polonium-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial, freshwater and brackish environments Results from the NKS project GAPRAD (Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota)

    The background and rationale to filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for biota are presented. Concentrations of Po-210 and Pb-210 are reported for biota sampled in Dovrefjell, Norway and selected lake and brackish ecosystems in Finland. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental studies are recounted. (Author)

  9. Highest PBDE levels (max 63 ppm) yet found in biota measured in seabird eggs from San Francisco Bay

    She, J.; Holden, A.; Tanner, M.; Sharp, M.; Hooper, K. [Department of Toxic Substances Control, Berkeley, CA (United States). Hazardous Materials Lab.; Adelsbach, T. [Environmental Contaminants Division, Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    High levels of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) have been found in humans and wildlife from the San Francisco Bay Area, with levels in women among the highest in the world, and levels in piscivorous seabird eggs at the ppm level. Seabirds are useful for monitoring and assessing ecosystem health at various times and places because they occupy a high trophic level in the marine food web, are long-lived, and are generally localized near their breeding and non-breeding sites. In collaboration with the US Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS), we are carrying out a three-year investigation of dioxin, PCB and PBDE levels in eggs from fish-eating seabirds. Year 1 (2002) PBDE measurements from 73 bird eggs were reported at Dioxin2003. Year 2 (2003) PBDE measurements from 45 samples are presented in this report. The highest PBDE level measured in eggs was 63 ppm, lipid, which is the highest PBDE level, yet reported in biota.

  10. Changes in environmental conditions as the cause of the marine biota Great Mass Extinction at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary

    Barash, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    In the interval of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, 80% of the marine species became extinct. Four main hypotheses about the causes of this mass extinction are considered: volcanism, climatic oscillations, sea level variations accompanied by anoxia, and asteroid impact events. The extinction was triggered by an extensive flooding of basalts in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. Furthermore, a number of meteoritic craters have been found. Under the effect of cosmic causes, two main sequences of events developed on the Earth: terrestrial ones, leading to intensive volcanism, and cosmic ones (asteroid impacts). Their aftermaths, however, were similar in terms of the chemical compounds and aerosols released. As a consequence, the greenhouse effect, dimming of the atmosphere (impeding photosynthesis), ocean stagnation, and anoxia emerged. Then, biological productivity decreased and food chains were destroyed. Thus, the entire ecosystem was disturbed and a considerable part of the biota became extinct.

  11. Toxicity of 35 trace elements in coal to freshwater biota: a data base with automated retrieval capabilities. [313 references

    Cushman, R. M.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Strand, R. H.; Anderson, R. M.

    1977-06-01

    Data are tabulated on the toxicity to freshwater biota of 35 trace elements with the potential for release to the environment from coal conversion effluents. The entire data base is presented on a microfiche appended to the document, in the interest of portability and accessibility. The data were gathered from a variety of research papers, compendia, and reviews. Details of water chemistry and test conditions are presented when available from the documents consulted. The data base may be used by referring directly to the tabulated data as they appear on the microfiche, or, with appropriate computer facilities, by manipulation (sorting, subsetting, or merging) of the data to meet the particular needs of the investigator. The data may be used as they appear in the data base, or the data base may be used to index the cited original papers.

  12. Contribution to the lichen biota of the Stawy Milickie nature reserve and its adjacent area (Lower Silesia, southwestern Poland

    Edyta Kaźmierska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of lichenological investigations conducted in the eastern part of the Stawy Milickie nature reserve and its buffer zone (Barycz Valley, southwestern Poland. The study area is a famous waterfowl refuge, consisting of several fishpond complexes, together with adjacent forests, meadows, and villages. In total 72 lichen taxa were recorded, growing on bark and branches of trees and shrubs, stumps, wood, soil, and anthropogenic rock substrates (mortar, concrete, bricks, etc.. Six species, namely Evernia prunastri, Flavoparmelia caperata, Hypogymnia tubulosa, Parmelina tiliacea, Physconia distorta, and Pleurosticta acetabulum, are threatened in Poland. As represented by single young thalli, they indicate the recent improvement of environmental conditions. The lichen biota of the study area is typical for the lowland regions of western and southwestern Poland.

  13. Diversity and distribution of fauna of the Nasese Shore, Suva, Fiji Islands with reference to existing threats to the biota

    Dissanayake Mudiyanselage Suratissa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Faunal diversity and distribution in the Nasese Shore, Suva, Fiji Islands were studied April–August 2014. The belt transect method was employed to study the species richness and abundance of the fauna. Opportunistic observations were performed to supplement the species richness of the selected habitat types: sandy, rocky and muddy (SRM; Habitat 1; mangrove and sandy (MNS; Habitat 2; muddy and sandy (MS; Habitat 3; and rocky and coral (RC; Habitat 4. Sampling was performed during high and low tide. Faunal density was highest in the RC substrate. The density of mud skippers was significantly higher in the MNS habitat than in the other habitats. This findings could well indicate the environmental pollution levels of this habitat. The Shanon–Weiner Index indicated that the RC habitat possesses the highest diversity, whereas the MS habitat possesses the lowest diversity. In addition, major threats to the biota existed.

  14. Efectos de la biota edáfica en las interacciones planta-insecto a nivel foliar

    E. de la Peña

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de la inmensa diversidad de especies que habitan en el suelo y de la importancia funcional que tiene la biota edáfica tanto a nivel de comunidad como de ecosistema, la teoría ecológica ha tenido tradicionalmente sólo en cuenta las interacciones que ocurren en la parte aérea de las plantas. Recientemente esta situación ha cambiado y durante los últimos diez años se han publicado numerosos estudios que destacan la importancia que tienen las interacciones bióticas entre plantas y organismos edáficos sobre diferentes procesos que se dan enla parte aérea. Estos estudios han demostrado que las interacciones que se dan entre las raíces y los herbívoros edáficos, los hongos mutualistas y la flora microbiana, tienen efecto no sólo en el crecimiento de las plantas sino también en niveles tróficos superiores como son los herbívoros foliares, parasitoides, hiperparasitoides y polinizadores. En este artículo se hace una breve revisión de los mecanismos fundamentales que median la relación entre la biota edáfica y las interacciones bióticas de la parte aérea. Por último, se proponen abordajes complementarios como son la utilización de modelos espaciales y el estudio de estas interacciones desde una perspectiva evolutiva.

  15. Making sense of ocean biota: How evolution and biodiversity of land organisms differ from that of the plankton

    Victor Smetacek

    2012-09-01

    The oceans cover 70% of the planet’s surface, and their planktonic inhabitants generate about half the global primary production, thereby playing a key role in modulating planetary climate via the carbon cycle. The ocean biota have been under scientific scrutiny for well over a century, and yet our understanding of the processes driving natural selection in the pelagic environment – the open water inhabited by drifting plankton and free-swimming nekton – is still quite vague. Because of the fundamental differences in the physical environment, pelagic ecosystems function differently from the familiar terrestrial ecosystems of which we are a part. Natural selection creates biodiversity but understanding how this quality control of randommutations operates in the oceans − which traits are selected for under what circumstances and by which environmental factors, whether bottom-up or top-down − is currently a major challenge. Rapid advances in genomics are providing information, particularly in the prokaryotic realm, pertaining not only to the biodiversity inventory but also functional groups. This essay is dedicated to the poorly understood tribes of planktonic protists (unicellular eukaryotes) that feed the ocean’s animals and continue to run the elemental cycles of our planet. It is an attempt at developing a conceptually coherent framework to understand the course of evolution by natural selection in the plankton and contrast it with the better-known terrestrial realm. I argue that organism interactions, in particular co-evolution between predators and prey (the arms race), play a central role in driving evolution in the pelagic realm. Understanding the evolutionary forces shaping ocean biota is a prerequisite for harnessing plankton for human purposes and also for protecting the oceanic ecosystems currently under severe stress from anthropogenic pressures.

  16. Making sense of ocean biota: how evolution and biodiversity of land organisms differ from that of the plankton.

    Smetacek, Victor

    2012-09-01

    The oceans cover 70% of the planet's surface, and their planktonic inhabitants generate about half the global primary production, thereby playing a key role in modulating planetary climate via the carbon cycle. The ocean biota have been under scientific scrutiny for well over a century, and yet our understanding of the processes driving natural selection in the pelagic environment - the open water inhabited by drifting plankton and free-swimming nekton - is still quite vague. Because of the fundamental differences in the physical environment, pelagic ecosystems function differently from the familiar terrestrial ecosystems of which we are a part. Natural selection creates biodiversity but understanding how this quality control of random mutations operates in the oceans - which traits are selected for under what circumstances and by which environmental factors, whether bottom-up or top-down - is currently a major challenge. Rapid advances in genomics are providing information, particularly in the prokaryotic realm, pertaining not only to the biodiversity inventory but also functional groups. This essay is dedicated to the poorly understood tribes of planktonic protists (unicellular eukaryotes) that feed the ocean's animals and continue to run the elemental cycles of our planet. It is an attempt at developing a conceptually coherent framework to understand the course of evolution by natural selection in the plankton and contrast it with the better-known terrestrial realm. I argue that organism interactions, in particular co-evolution between predators and prey (the arms race), play a central role in driving evolution in the pelagic realm. Understanding the evolutionary forces shaping ocean biota is a prerequisite for harnessing plankton for human purposes and also for protecting the oceanic ecosystems currently under severe stress from anthropogenic pressures. PMID:22922185

  17. The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on marine biota: retrospective assessment of the first year and perspectives.

    Vives I Batlle, Jordi; Aono, Tatsuo; Brown, Justin E; Hosseini, Ali; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Sazykina, Tatiana; Steenhuisen, Frits; Strand, Per

    2014-07-15

    An international study under the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was performed to assess radiological impact of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) on the marine environment. This work constitutes the first international assessment of this type, drawing upon methodologies that incorporate the most up-to-date radioecological models and knowledge. To quantify the radiological impact on marine wildlife, a suite of state-of-the-art approaches to assess exposures to Fukushima derived radionuclides of marine biota, including predictive dynamic transfer modelling, was applied to a comprehensive dataset consisting of over 500 sediment, 6000 seawater and 5000 biota data points representative of the geographically relevant area during the first year after the accident. The dataset covers the period from May 2011 to August 2012. The method used to evaluate the ecological impact consists of comparing dose (rates) to which living species of interest are exposed during a defined period to critical effects values arising from the literature. The assessed doses follow a highly variable pattern and generally do not seem to indicate the potential for effects. A possible exception of a transient nature is the relatively contaminated area in the vicinity of the discharge point, where effects on sensitive endpoints in individual plants and animals might have occurred in the weeks directly following the accident. However, impacts on population integrity would have been unlikely due to the short duration and the limited space area of the initially high exposures. Our understanding of the biological impact of radiation on chronically exposed plants and animals continues to evolve, and still needs to be improved through future studies in the FDNPS marine environment. PMID:24784739

  18. Effect of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on a soil-biota system: Role of earthworms and ryegrass.

    Feng, Mingbao; He, Qun; Shi, Jiaqi; Qin, Li; Zhang, Xuesheng; Sun, Ping; Wang, Zunyao

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the toxic effect of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), an important brominated fire retardant, on soil was evaluated by amending with different concentrations (0 mg/kg, 1 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg dry wt) for 40 d. The activities of 3 soil enzymes (urease, catalase, and alkaline phosphatase) were measured as the principal assessment endpoints. Meanwhile, the effects of natural environmental factors, such as light conditions and soil biota, on BDE-209 intoxication were studied. For the latter, 30 earthworms (Metaphire guillelmi) with fully matured clitella or ryegrass (Lolium perenne) with fully matured leaves were exposed in soil amended with BDE-209. The activities of the soil enzymes were adversely affected by BDE-209, especially for the high-concentration treatments, with greater adverse effects in the dark than in the light. The presence of earthworms reduced toxicity to BDE-209, whereas ryegrass did not. The calculated integrated biomarker response index, which provides a general indicator of the health status of test species by combining different biomarker signals, further validated these findings. Moreover, the antioxidant status (oxidant-antioxidant balance) of these 2 biota was assessed. Results indicated that BDE-209 significantly affected the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and enhanced the levels of malondialdehyde in both species. The present study may facilitate a better understanding of the toxicity of BDE-209 toward the soil environment. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1349-1357. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26448514

  19. E.D.E.N.: a tool for the estimation of dose coefficient equivalents for non-human biota

    Current studies within the field of Environmental Risk Assessments associated with the presence of radionuclides in ecosystems tend to implement the usual approach developed for chemicals, that includes four steps: (1) pollutants inventory in the sources of exposure, (2) effect analysis, (3) exposure analysis and (4) risk calculation. In the case of ionising radiation, the third stage involves radiological dose calculation. For humans, this kind of calculation is internationally codified by the ICRP, that provides both models and associated dose coefficients. For non-human biota, this task is a new field of investigations and no international consensus exists at the present time. We thus propose a computer tool to evaluate the dose rate by which the energy produced by ionising radiations is deposited in representative organisms of non-human biota. This energy depends on several parameters, describing the geometry of the relative position of the ionising source and the target, in association with the main properties of the latter. Concerning the source, the radiation type (alpha, beta or gamma) should be taken into account as well as the energy emissions of the concerned nuclides. The target-organism is described by its geometry (assimilated to an ellipsoid characterised by its three axes), its chemical composition and its lifestyle (exposure pathways, dietary habits, behaviour). E.D.E.N. (Elementary Dose Evaluation for Natural environment) is the operational code that we are developing to evaluate the Dose Per Unit of Concentration (expressed in Gy.time-1 / Bq.mass-1 or Bq.volume-1) due to internal and external exposures of any non-human organism to any radionuclide. A user-friendly interface is provided to build the exposure scenario of interest, characterising the target and the sources involved. Several cases are presented to illustrate the possibilities of E.D.E.N. (author)

  20. Simulation of radioactive cesium transfer in the southern Fukushima coastal biota using a dynamic food chain transfer model.

    Tateda, Yutaka; Tsumune, Daisuke; Tsubono, Takaki

    2013-10-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F NPP) accident occurred on 11 March 2011. The accident introduced (137)Cs into the coastal waters which was subsequently transferred to the local coastal biota thereby elevating the concentration of this radionuclide in coastal organisms. In this study, the radioactive cesium levels in coastal biota from the southern Fukushima area were simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model. The simulation derived the possible maximum radioactive cesium levels in organisms, indicating that the maximum (137)Cs concentrations in invertebrates, benthic fish and predator fish occurred during late April, late May and late July, respectively in the studied area where the source was mainly the direct leakage of (137)Cs effluent from the 1F NPP. The delay of a (137)Cs increase in fish was explained by the gradual food chain transfer of (137)Cs introduced to the ecosystem from the initial contamination of the seawater. The model also provided the degree of radionuclide depuration in organisms, and it demonstrated the latest start of the decontamination phase in benthic fish. The ecological half-lives, derived both from model simulation and observation, were 1-4 months in invertebrates, and 2-9 months in plankton feeding fish and coastal predator fish from the studied area. In contrast, it was not possible to similarly calculate these parameters in benthic fish because of an unidentified additional radionuclide source which was deduced from the biological compartment model. To adequately reconstruct the in-situ depuration of radiocesium in benthic fish in the natural ecosystem, a contamination source associated with the bottom sediments is necessary. PMID:23639689