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Sample records for abo-incompatible kidney transplantation

  1. ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    Schousboe, Karoline; Titlestad, Kjell; Baudier, Francois;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO-incompatible ......INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO......-incompatible kidney transplantation. We used antigenspecific immunoadsorptions to remove blood group antibodies and anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) to inhibit the antibody production. The aim of introducing the ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH was to increase the rate of living donor kidney...

  2. Late antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation during Gram-negative sepsis

    2014-01-01

    Background The major challenge in ABO-incompatible transplantation is to minimize antibody-mediated rejection. Effective reduction of the anti-ABO blood group antibodies at the time of transplantation has made ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation a growing practice in our hospital and in centers worldwide. ABO antibodies result from contact with A- and B-like antigens in the intestines via nutrients and bacteria. We demonstrate a patient with fulminant antibody-mediated rejection late after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation, whose anti-A antibody titers rose dramatically following Serratia marcescens sepsis. Case presentation A 58-year-old woman underwent an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation for end-stage renal disease secondary to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. It concerned a blood group A1 to O donation. Pre-desensitization titers were 64 for anti-blood group A IgM and 32 for anti-blood group A IgG titers. Desensitization treatment consisted of rituximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids, immunoadsorption and intravenous immunoglobulines. She was readmitted to our hospital 11 weeks after transplantation for S. marcescens urosepsis. Her anti-A IgM titer rose to >5000 and she developed a fulminant antibody-mediated rejection. We hypothesized that the (overwhelming) presence in the blood of S. marcescens stimulated anti-A antibody formation, as S. marcescens might share epitopes with blood group A antigen. Unfortunately we could not demonstrate interaction between blood group A and S. marcescens in incubation experiments. Conclusion Two features of this post-transplant course are remarkably different from other reports of acute rejection in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation: first, the late occurrence 12 weeks after kidney transplantation and second, the very high anti-A IgM titers (>5000), suggesting recent boosting of anti-A antibody formation by S. marcescens. PMID:24517251

  3. Early post-transplant complications following ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    Naciri Bennani, Hamza; Abdulrahman, Zhyiar; Allal, Asma; Sallusto, Federico; Delarche, Antoine; Game, Xavier; Esposito, Laure; Doumerc, Nicolas; Debiol, Bénédicte; Kamar, Nassim; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Living-kidney transplantation is increasing because of the scarcity of kidneys from deceased donors and the increasing numbers of patients on waiting lists for a kidney transplant. Living-kidney transplantation is now associated with increased long-term patient- and allograft-survival rates. Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify, in a cohort of 44 ABO-incompatible (ABOi) live-kidney transplant patients, the main complications that occurred within 6 months post-transplantation, and to compare these findings with those from 44 matched ABO-compatible (ABOc) live-kidney transplant patients who were also from our center. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study assessed post-transplantation complications in 44 ABO-i versus 44 matched ABO-c patients. All patients were comparable at baseline except that ABO-i patients had greater immunological risks. Results: During the 6-month post-transplant period, more ABO-i patients presented with postoperative bleeds, thus requiring significantly more blood transfusions. Bleeds were associated with significantly lower values of fibrinogen, platelets, prothrombin time, and hemoglobin levels. Surgical complications, patient- and graft-survival rates, and kidney-function statuses were similar between both groups at 6 months post-transplantation. Conclusions: We conclude that impairment of hemostatic factors at pre-transplant explained the increased risk of a post-transplant bleed in ABO-i patients. PMID:27047806

  4. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille; Bistrup, Claus

    2010-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated reje...... that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime.......ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody......-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest...

  5. ABO-incompatible kidney transplant recipients have a higher bleeding risk after antigen-specific immunoadsorption.

    de Weerd, Annelies E; van Agteren, Madelon; Leebeek, Frank W; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Weimar, Willem; Betjes, Michiel G H

    2015-01-01

    Pretransplant removal of antiblood group ABO antibodies is the cornerstone of all current ABO-incompatible (ABOi) transplantation programmes. In our protocol, plasmapheresis (PP) is performed with a plasmafilter followed by immunoadsorption (IA) of anti-ABO antibodies. The bleeding complications of this technique are not known. We analysed the data of all 65 consecutive ABOi kidney transplantations between March 2006 and October 2013 and compared these with matched 130 ABO-compatible (ABOc) kidney transplantations. Cases differed from controls in the pre-operative regimen, which included IA-PP and rituximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, prednisone and immunoglobulines. Data on platelet count, blood loss and red blood cell (EC) transfusions during 48 h postoperatively were collected. ABOi patients received EC transfusions more frequently than controls (29% vs. 12%, P = 0.005). Intra-operative blood loss was higher (544 vs. 355 ml, P < 0.005) and they experienced more major bleeding (≥3 EC within 24 h, 15% vs. 2%, P < 0.0005). Platelet count decreased by 28% after the pre-operative IA. In a multivariate model, only the number of pre-operative IAs was associated with the number of ECs given (OR per IA 1.9, P < 0.05). ABOi kidney transplant recipients have a high postoperative bleeding risk, correlating with the number of pre-operative IA sessions performed. PMID:25070762

  6. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome diagnosed four years after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    Kawaguchi, Keiko; Kawanishi, Kunio; Sato, Masayo; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Fujii, Akiko; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Huchinoue, Shouhei; Ohashi, Ryuji; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in allograft kidney transplantation is caused by various factors including rejection, infection, and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a case of a 32 year old woman with aHUS four years after an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from a living relative. The primary cause of end-stage renal disease was unknown; however, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was suspected from her clinical course. She underwent pre-emptive kidney transplantation from her 60 year old mother. The allograft preserved good renal function [serum creatinine (sCr) level 110-130 μmol/L] until a sudden attack of abdominal pain four years after transplant, with acute renal failure (sCr level, 385.3 μmol/L), decreasing platelet count, and hemolytic anemia with schizocytes. On allograft biopsy, there was thrombotic microangiopathy in the glomeruli, with a cellular crescent formation and mesangial IgA and C3 deposition. Microvascular inflammation, such as glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and arteriole endarteritis were also detected. A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) did not decrease and Shiga toxin was not detected. Donor-specific antibodies or autoantibodies, including anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody, were negative. The patient was diagnosed with aHUS and received three sessions of plasmapheresis and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, followed by oral methylprednisolone (0.25-0.5 mg/kg) instead of tacrolimus. She temporarily required hemodialysis (sCr level, 658.3 μmol/L). Thereafter, her sCr level improved to 284.5 μmol/L without dialysis therapy. This case is clinically considered as aHUS after kidney transplantation, associated with various factors, including rejection, glomerulonephritis, and toxicity from drugs such as tacrolimus. PMID:26031589

  7. Economic Impacts of ABO-Incompatible Live Donor Kidney Transplantation: A National Study of Medicare-Insured Recipients.

    Axelrod, D; Segev, D L; Xiao, H; Schnitzler, M A; Brennan, D C; Dharnidharka, V R; Orandi, B J; Naik, A S; Randall, H; Tuttle-Newhall, J E; Lentine, K L

    2016-05-01

    The infrequent use of ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation in the United States may reflect concern about the costs of necessary preconditioning and posttransplant care. Medicare data for 26 500 live donor kidney transplant recipients (2000 to March 2011), including 271 ABOi and 62 A2-incompatible (A2i) recipients, were analyzed to assess the impact of pretransplant, transplant episode and 3-year posttransplant costs. The marginal costs of ABOi and A2i versus ABO-compatible (ABOc) transplants were quantified by multivariate linear regression including adjustment for recipient, donor and transplant factors. Compared with ABOc transplantation, patient survival (93.2% vs. 88.15%, p = 0.0009) and death-censored graft survival (85.4% vs. 76.1%, p spending (marginal costs compared to ABOc - year 1: $25 044; year 2: $10 496; year 3: $7307; p spending are easily justified by avoiding long-term dialysis and its associated morbidity and cost. PMID:26603690

  8. Delayed hyperacute rejection in a patient who developed clostridium difficile infection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    Gerald S Lipshutz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerald S Lipshutz1, Elaine F Reed2, Phuong-Chi Pham3, Jeffrey M Miller4, Jennifer S Singer5, Gabriel M Danovitch6, Alan H Wilkinson6, Dean W Wallace7, Suzanne McGuire6, Phuong-Truc Pham8, Phuong-Thu Pham61Department of Surgery, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine-Immunogenetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Nephrology Division, UCLA-Olive View Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Hematology Oncology Division, UCLA-Olive View Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 5Department of Surgery and Urology, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, 6Department of Medicine, Nephrology Division, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 7Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 8Department of Science, Penn State University, Worthington-Scranton, Dunmore, PA, USAAbstract: Over the past decade ABO incompatible transplantation has emerged as an important potential source for increasing living kidney transplantation in selected transplant centers. Early reports suggest that patients who have elevated serum anti-blood group antibody titers (anti-A/B before transplantation and a rebound antibody production after antibody removal may be at high immunological risk. With currently available immune modulation protocols and immunosuppressive therapy, excellent short- and long-term patient and graft survival rates have been achieved even in those with high anti-A/B antibody titers before plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption. Nonetheless, acute infection with an organism possessing surface markers analogous to blood group antigens such as carbohydrate structures on

  9. Delayed hyperacute rejection in a patient who developed clostridium difficile infection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    Lipshutz, Gerald S.; Reed, Elaine F; Phuong-Chi Pham; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Gerald S Lipshutz1, Elaine F Reed2, Phuong-Chi Pham3, Jeffrey M Miller4, Jennifer S Singer5, Gabriel M Danovitch6, Alan H Wilkinson6, Dean W Wallace7, Suzanne McGuire6, Phuong-Truc Pham8, Phuong-Thu Pham61Department of Surgery, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine-Immunogenetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Nephrology Di...

  10. Different sensitivity of rituximab-treatment to B-cells between ABO-incompatible kidney and liver transplantation.

    Morimoto, Hiroshi; Ide, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yuka; Ishiyama, Kohei; Ohira, Masahiro; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Akita, Tomonori; Tanaka, Junko; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    A desensitization protocol with rituximab is currently widely used for kidney transplantation (KT) and liver transplantation (LT) across the ABO blood group-incompatible (ABO-I) barrier. However, it remains to be elucidated whether rituximab is equally effective for B-cell and T-cell immune responses in both KT and LT recipients. To clarify these effects of rituximab, we enrolled 46 KT and 77 LT recipients in this study. The proportion of peripheral blood B-cells was determined at the perioperative period. T-cell responses to allostimulation were evaluated by a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay. One week after rituximab administration, peripheral B-cells became undetectable in ABO-I KT recipients but remained detectable in some of the ABO-I LT recipients; B-cells were undetectable in both groups by week 2. B-cells remained below the detection limit throughout the first year in the ABO-I KT recipients, whereas they reappeared in the periphery after 6months in the ABO-I LT recipients. There were no significant differences in alloreactive T-cell responses based on MLR analyses between ABO-I and ABO-compatible groups. This study indicates that rituximab has differing B-cell sensitivity between KT and LT recipients and a minimal effect on the alloreactive T-cell responses in KT and LT recipients. PMID:27085793

  11. Short-Term Outcomes of ABO-Incompatible Living Donor Kidney Transplantation With Uniform Protocol: Significance of Baseline Anti-ABO Titer.

    Lee, K W; Park, J B; Oh, D K; Na, B G; Choi, J Y; Cho, W T; Lee, S H; Park, H J; Cho, D; Huh, W S; Kim, S J

    2016-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is one of the major causes of poor outcomes in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation (ABOi KT). Studies investigating AMR risk factors found that anti-ABO titer is a major issue. However, the significance of antibody titer has been debated. This retrospective study analyzed AMR risk factors in 59 patients who underwent ABOi KT between August 2010 and January 2015. We also analyzed AMR risk factors in recipients with high anti-ABO baseline titers (≥1:64 on dithiothreitol at 37°C phase or ≥1:256 on antihuman globulin phase). The 2-year patient survival rate was 95.8%, and the 2-year graft survival rate was 94.9%. Nine patients (15.3%) experienced clinical (6 of 59 [10.2%]) or subclinical (3 of 59 [5.1%]) AMR. One patient experienced graft loss from hyperacute rejection. AMR risk factor analysis revealed that baseline antibody titer was associated with incidence of AMR. In patients with high baseline titers, low doses of rituximab (200-mg single-dose), an antibody against CD20, was predictive for AMR. Six patients who received pretransplant intravenous immunoglobulin did not experience AMR even when they had high baseline antibody titers. Our results indicate that a high baseline antibody titer affected the incidence of AMR. ABOi KT candidates with high baseline titers need to undergo an intensified preconditioning protocol, including high-dose rituximab (375 mg/m(2)) and intravenous immunoglobulin. PMID:27234744

  12. ABO-INCOMPATIBLE PEDIATRIC LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: THE ANALYSIS OF WORLD EXPERIENCE

    I. E. Tsirulnikova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the review we present the world scientific literature data analysis of the results of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation in children and adults. Used previously and modern protocols of pre- and postoperative manage- ment of ABO-incompatible recipients from different transplant centers are described. While adult ABO-incom- patible liver transplantation is still linked with increased risk of immune complications, short and long-term results of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation in children are similar to those of ABO-compatible transplan- tation. We conclude that ABO-incompatible liver transplantation is reasonable in urgent cases for recipients of all age groups and for children without possible ABO-compatible living related donors. 

  13. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation with ABO-Incompatible Grafts: A German Single Center Experience

    Armin D. Goralczyk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult living donor liver transplantations (ALDLTs across the ABO blood group barrier have been reported in Asia, North Americas, and Europe, but not yet in Germany. Several strategies have been established to overcome the detrimental effects that are attached with such a disparity between donor and host, but no gold standard has yet emerged. Here, we present the first experiences with three ABO-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantations in Germany applying different immunosuppressive strategies. Four patient-donor couples were considered for ABO-incompatible ALDLT. In these patients, resident ABO blood group antibodies (isoagglutinins were depleted by plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption and replenishment was inhibited by splenectomy and/or B-cell-targeted immunosuppression. Despite different treatments ALDLT could safely be performed in three patients and all patients had good initial graft function without signs for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR. Two patients had long-term graft survival with stable graft function. We thus propose the feasibility of ABO-incompatible ALDLT with these protocols and advocate further expansion of ABO incompatible ALDLT in multicenter trials to improve efficacy and safety.

  14. ABO Incompatible Liver Transplantation as a Bridge to Treat HELLP Syndrome

    Brad Butler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The following is a case report of a primiparous woman who developed fulminant liver failure in the setting of HELLP syndrome complicated by hepatic rupture. It is unique in that a timely ABO compatible liver donor was unavailable, necessitating the transplantation of an ABO incompatible organ. Despite aggressive therapy, severe reperfusion injury and humoral rejection dictated retransplantation with an ABO compatible organ on postoperative day 15, resulting in rapid clinical recovery.

  15. Clinico-serologic co-relation in bi-directional ABO incompatible hemopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Sabita Basu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ABO blood group system is of prime significance in red cell transfusion and organ transplantation. However, ABO compatibility is not critical in allogenic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and approximately 40-50% of hemopoietic stem cell transplants are ABO incompatible. This incompatibility may be major, minor or bi-directional. Though there are descriptions of transfusion practice and protocols in ABO incompatible HSCT, there are considerable variations and transfusion support in these patients can be very challenging. Aims: The immunohematologic observations in two cases of bi-directional ABO incompatible HSCT have been described, and clinico-serologic correlation has been attempted. Materials and Methods: In both cases, peripheral blood stem cell harvests were obtained using the Cobe spectra cell separator. Immunohematologic assessments in the donor and recipient were done as a part of pre HSCT evaluation. Both the standard tube technique and column agglutination method (Ortho Biovue Micro Bead System was used. Antibody screen was done by column agglutination method using three cell panel (Surgiscreen cells. Isoagglutinin titration was done by the master dilution method and standard validated techniques were used. Results: The pattern of laboratory findings in the two cases was different and so were the clinical outcomes. Although there was early engraftment in the first case, the second case developed pure red cell aplasia and this was well-reflected in the immunohematologic assessments. Conclusion: Immunohematologic assessment correlated well with the clinical picture and could be used to predict clinical outcome and onset of complications in ABO incompatible HSCT.

  16. Our first experiences in applying an original method for removal of ABO-isoagglutinins in ABO-incompatible kidney recipients

    Ignjatović Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Due to improved methods for removal of ABO isoagglutinins and novel immunosuppressive protocols, short and long term outcome in blood group incompatible is similar to blood group compatible kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of our original method for removal of ABO isoagglutinins from the blood in ABO-incompatible kidney allograft recipients. Method. Between 2006 and 2008 twelve patients were transplanted from ABO incompatible living donors. Titers of ABO isoagglutinins were 4-128 (IgG. Immunosuppressive therapy started 14 days before kidney transplantation with rituximab, followed by a triple therapy (prednisone + tacrolimus + mycophenolate mofetil and the first plasma exchange (PE procedure, in which one plasma volume was substituted with albumin and saline on day 7 before transplantation. For selective extracorporeal immunoadsorption, the removed plasma was mixed with donor blood type filtered red blood cells, centrifuged and the supernatant separated and preserved. In the next PE procedure, the removed plasma was replaced with immunoadsorbed plasma, and so on. Titers of ABO agglutinins, renal allograft function and survival were followed-up. Results. The pre-transplant treatment consisting of 1-5 PE procedures and immunosuppressive therapy resulted in target ABO agglutinins titers below 4. During a 10-24 month follow-up three patients had an early acute rejection, one patient acute rejection and hemolytic anemia, two patients surgical complications and one of them lost his graft. In the post-transplant period, the titers of ABO antibodies remained below 4. All the patients had stable kidney allograft function with mean serum creatinine ±SD of 129 ± 45 μmol/l at the end of the study. Conclusion. Our method for removal of ABO antibodies was effective in a limited series of patients and short-term follow-up.

  17. Aplasia pura de serie roja post-trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyeticas ABO incompatible Pure red cell aplasia after ABO incompatible bone marrow transplantation

    E. Bulliorsky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available El trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyéticas (TCPH con incompatibilidad ABO entre el donante y el receptor puede en ocasiones asociarse a trastornos en la progenie eritroide desarrollada a partir de la médula ósea trasplantada, caracterizado por un funcionamiento tardío, inadecuado e incompleto de la misma. En este contexto, la aplasia pura de serie roja es la complicación más severa. Se han intentado tratamientos para la aplasia pura de serie roja post-TCPH con eritropoyetina o plasmaféresis, con relativo éxito. Algunos autores han informado también la utilización de globulina antilinfocitaria, asumiendo que dicha aplasia selectiva de la serie roja en la médula ósea trasplantada es mediada por un mecanismo inmune. En este trabajo se describe un paciente portador de una leucemia aguda en quien se realizó un TCPH alogeneico (ABO incompatible con su donante. Teniendo niveles bajos de aglutininas contra el grupo sanguíneo de la donante, desarrolló una aplasia pura de serie roja post - TCPH. La misma no mejoró con tratamiento con eritropoyetina o con un refuerzo de progenitores hematopoyéticos de sangre periférica de la misma donante (boost, resolviéndose totalmente luego de un tratamiento exitoso con globulina antilinfocitaria de origen equino.ABO incompatibility in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation may be associated with incomplete or delayed erythroid engraftment, being pure red cell aplasia (PRCA the most severe complication in this setting. Attempts for the treatment of PRCA have been made with erythropoietin or with plasmapheresis with relative success, and some authors have reported the reversibility of PRCA with antilymphocyte globulin (ALG or ATG, based on the assumption that PRCA might be immunologically mediated. We report herewith a patient with acute leukemia who developed post - BMT pure red cell aplasia. His sibling donor (sister was HLA identical and ABO incompatible, having low agglutinin

  18. Risk factor for ischemic-type biliary lesion after ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    Bang, Jun Bae; Kim, Bong-Wan; Kim, Young Bae; Wang, Hee-Jung; Lee, Hyun Yeong; Sim, Joohyun; Kim, Taegyu; Lee, Kyeong Lok; Hu, Xu-Guang; Mao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the risk factors for ischemic-type biliary lesion (ITBL) after ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). METHODS: Among 141 ALDLTs performed in our hospital between 2008 and 2014, 27 (19%) were ABO-I ALDLT and 114 were ABO-identical/compatible ALDLT. In this study, we extensively analyzed the clinico-pathological data of the 27 ABO-I recipients to determine the risk factors for ITBL after ABO-I ALDLT. All ABO-I ALDLT recipients underwent an identical B-cell depletion protocol with preoperative rituximab, plasma exchange (PE), and operative splenectomy. The median follow-up period after transplantation was 26 mo. The clinical outcomes of the 27 ABO-I ALDLT recipients were compared with those of 114 ABO-identical/compatible ALDLT recipients. RESULTS: ITBL occurred in four recipients (14.8%) between 45 and 112 d after ABO-I ALDLT. The overall survival rates were not different between ABO-I ALDLT and ABO-identical/compatible ALDLT (P = 0.303). Among the ABO-I ALDLT recipients, there was no difference between patients with ITBL and those without ITBL in terms of B-cell and T-cell count, serum isoagglutinin titers, number of PEs, operative time and transfusion, use of graft infusion therapy, or number of remnant B-cell follicles and plasma cells in the spleen. However, the perioperative NK cell counts in the blood of patients with ITBL were significantly higher than those in the patients without ITBL (P 150/μL and postoperative NK cell count > 120/μL were associated with greater relative risks (RR) for development of ITBL (RR = 20 and 14.3, respectively, P transplant recipient’s blood are associated with ITBL after ABO-I ALDLT. Further research is needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of NK cell involvement in the development of ITBL.

  19. Micro gel column technique is fit for detecting mixed fields post ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Li, Min-Fang; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Min

    2015-04-01

    How to choose suitable serologic method for assessment of the actual stages of ABO chimera is more important to establish transfusion strategy for patients post-ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We reported ABO phenotypes of a patient post-ABO minor incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from 1+ weak agglutination by tube method was obviously reaffirmed to mixed fields with 4+ positive reaction by micro gel column card. Hence, blood bank technologists must continually work together with hematologist to establish appropriate transfusion strategy, and micro gel column technique can be more appropriate for detecting mixed fields during the whole period of transplantation. PMID:25578650

  20. Antigen-Specific versus Non-Antigen-Specific Immunoadsorption in ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation.

    Gerold Thölking

    Full Text Available ABO-incompatible (ABOi renal transplantation (RTx from living donors is an established procedure to expand the donor pool for patients with end stage renal disease. Immunoadsorption (IA is a standard procedure for the removal of preformed antibodies against the allograft. In this study, antigen-specific and non-antigen-specific IA in ABOi RTx were compared.10 patients underwent antigen-specific IA (Glycosorb group and 13 patients non-antigen-specific IA (Immunosorba group. The effects of both procedures regarding antibody reduction, number of treatments, complications, costs, as well as the allograft function and patient survival were compared between both groups.Although the IgG levels were reduced equally by both procedures (p=0.82, the reduction of the IgM level was more effective in the Glycosorb group (p=0.0172. Patients in both groups required a median number of 6 IA before ABOi RTx. Allograft function at one year after AB0i RTx was similar in both groups (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 66 vs. 64 ml/min/1.73m² respectively, with a death-censored graft survival of 90.0% and 92.3% respectively. Complication rates did not differ between procedures. Due to the reuse of non-antigen-specific Immunosorba columns, costs were considerably lower in this group; however, the use of the Immunosorba-based IA was less time-efficient.Considering upcoming alternatives as simultaneous performance of dialysis and IA or a possible reuse of Glycosorb columns, this might become less relevant in the future.

  1. A case of passenger lymphocyte syndrome following minor ABO incompatible renal transplantation

    Anju Dubey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune hemolysis is one of the adverse effects that can occur following solid organ transplantation. Understanding the clinical settings and the various causes is necessary for prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. One such condition is passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS. This case report describes the case of a 27-year-old male renal allograft recipient of the B-positive blood group who received a kidney from an O-positive donor. Postoperatively, the patient showed declining hemoglobin (Hb level and was transfused with B-group packed RBCs (PRBCs, following which there was steep fall in Hb level. A request for PRBCs was sent to the blood bank and this time cross-match with B-group PRBCs showed incompatibility. The patient′s RBCs were found to be strongly DAT (direct anti-globulin test positive and the eluate showed the presence of anti-B with a titer of 32. Thus, diagnosis of probable PLS was made. The patient was managed with methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis and O-group PRBCs. Gradually his condition improved and was discharged in stable condition.

  2. Antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible pediatric living donor liver transplantation for propionic acidemia: A case report.

    Honda, Masaki; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Sakamoto, Rieko; Matsumoto, Shirou; Irie, Tomoaki; Uchida, Koushi; Shimata, Keita; Kawabata, Seiichi; Isono, Kaori; Hayashida, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Endo, Fumio; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2016-09-01

    We herein present the case of a four-yr-old boy with PA who developed AMR after ABO-incompatible LDLT despite undergoing B cell desensitization using rituximab. Although the CD19+ lymphocyte count decreased to 0.1% nine days after the administration of rituximab, he developed a high fever which was accompanied by arthralgia due to a streptococcal infection 13 days after rituximab prophylaxis. After the clearance of the infection, he underwent ABO-incompatible LDLT 36 days after the administration of rituximab. The CD19+ lymphocyte count just prior to LDLT was 1.2%. He developed AMR five days after LDLT, and the antidonor-type IgM and IgG antibody titers increased to 1:1024 and 1:1024, respectively. He was treated by plasma exchange, IVIG, steroid pulse therapy, and rituximab re-administration; however, his liver dysfunction continued. Despite intensive treatment, he died due to complicated abdominal hernia, acute renal failure, and ARDS. This case suggests that a streptococcal infection may induce the activation of innate immune responses; thus, additional desensitization therapy should be considered prior to ABO-incompatible LDLT if B cell reactivation is suspected. PMID:27436684

  3. Liver transplantation with deceased ABO-incompatible donors is life-saving but associated with increased risk of rejection and post-transplant complications.

    Thorsen, Trygve; Dahlgren, Ulrika S; Aandahl, Einar Martin; Grzyb, Krzysztof; Karlsen, Tom H; Boberg, Kirsten M; Rydberg, Lennart; Naper, Christian; Foss, Aksel; Bennet, William

    2015-07-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) liver transplantation (LT) with deceased donor organs is performed occasionally when no ABO-compatible (ABOc) graft is available. From 1996 to 2011, 61 ABOi LTs were performed in Oslo and Gothenburg. Median patient age was 51 years (range 13-75); 33 patients were transplanted on urgent indications, 13 had malignancy-related indications, and eight received ABOi grafts for urgent retransplantations. Median donor age was 55 years (range 10-86). Forty-four patients received standard triple immunosuppression with steroids, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil, and forty-four patients received induction with IL-2 antagonist or anti-CD20 antibody. Median follow-up time was 29 months (range 0-200). The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of patient survival (PS) and graft survival (GS) were 85/71%, 79/57%, 75/55%, and 59/51%, respectively, compared to 90/87%, 84/79%, 79/73%, and 65/60% for all other LT recipients in the same period. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year GS for A2 grafts were 81%, 67%, 62%, and 57%, respectively. In conclusion, ABOi LT performed with non-A2 grafts is associated with inferior graft survival and increased risk of rejection, vascular and biliary complications. ABOi LT with A2 grafts is associated with acceptable graft survival and can be used safely in urgent cases. PMID:25736519

  4. ABH-Glycan Microarray Characterizes ABO Subtype Antibodies: Fine Specificity of Immune Tolerance After ABO-Incompatible Transplantation.

    Jeyakanthan, M; Meloncelli, P J; Zou, L; Lowary, T L; Larsen, I; Maier, S; Tao, K; Rusch, J; Chinnock, R; Shaw, N; Burch, M; Beddows, K; Addonizio, L; Zuckerman, W; Pahl, E; Rutledge, J; Kanter, K R; Cairo, C W; Buriak, J M; Ross, D; Rebeyka, I; West, L J

    2016-05-01

    Organ transplantation from ABO blood group-incompatible (ABOi) donors requires accurate detection, effective removal and subsequent surveillance of antidonor antibodies. Because ABH antigen subtypes are expressed differently in various cells and organs, measurement of antibodies specific for the antigen subtypes in the graft is essential. Erythrocyte agglutination, the century-old assay used clinically, does not discriminate subtype-specific ABO antibodies and provides limited information on antibody isotypes. We designed and created an ABO-glycan microarray and demonstrated the precise assessment of both the presence and, importantly, the absence of donor-specific antibodies in an international study of pediatric heart transplant patients. Specific IgM, IgG, and IgA isotype antibodies to nonself ABH subtypes were detected in control participants and recipients of ABO-compatible transplants. Conversely, in children who received ABOi transplants, antibodies specific for A subtype II and/or B subtype II antigens-the only ABH antigen subtypes expressed in heart tissue-were absent, demonstrating the fine specificity of B cell tolerance to donor/graft blood group antigens. In contrast to the hemagglutination assay, the ABO-glycan microarray allows detailed characterization of donor-specific antibodies necessary for effective transplant management, representing a major step forward in precise ABO antibody detection. PMID:26602221

  5. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after AB0-incomptible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Kofoed-Nielsen, Pernille Bundgaard; Bistrup, Claus

    2009-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated reje...... that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime.......ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody......-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest...

  6. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

    Khatami S.F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newborn blood type A or B, rising indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two days of life, positive immunohematologic test for newborns and exchange transfusion. Exclusion criteria were: incomplete information, other accompanying diseases that induce hyperbilirubinemia. All newborn infants received phototherapy before and after exchange transfusion. We did not use intravenous immunoglobulin, hemoxygenase inhibitor drugs and blood products before exchange transfusion.Results: Double-volume exchange transfusion via umbilical cord catheter was performed in 96 patients, 19 (20% of whom suffered from ABO incompatibility. Of these 19 newborns, two-thirds (13 were preterm infants. The minimum level of serum bilirubin was 10 mg/dl and the maximum serum bilirubin level was 35 mg/dl. In six patients (32% serum bilirubin levels were >25mg/dl. The most common blood group was type A for newborns. Immunohematologic tests were positive in 84% of the mothers. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease was the fourth and second most common reasons for blood exchange transfusion in preterm and term infants, respectively. Laboratory complications were more common than clinical complications. The etiology of 48% of the alloimmunization and 42% of the hemolytic disease in these newborns was ABO incompatibility.Conclusions: Mothers with blood group O and newborns with blood group A or B with positive immunohematologic tests in first hours of life are at high risk for hemolytic disease

  7. Kidney Transplant

    ... You are here Home » Kidney Transplant Click to watch a video on this topic Click to watch a video on Hemodialysis When kidneys fail, there ... 05/2016 - 10:00am Philadelphia, PA Kidney Camp Sun, 07/17/2016 - 6:00pm Ingleside, IL Register ...

  8. ABO血型不合肝移植治疗急危重症肝病患者的临床疗效分析%Analysis of the curative effect of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation in the treatment in patients with acute severe liver disease

    沈中阳; 邓永林; 郑虹; 潘澄; 张雅敏; 蒋文涛; 张建军; 高伟; 淮明生

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze and evaluate the clinical effect of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation in the treatment of acute severe liver disease.Methods A retrospective clinical study was conducted.The clinical data of 4 136 patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation in Organ Transplantation Center of Tianjin First Center Hospital from September 1999 to December 2013 were analyzed.The criteria of patients enrolled were as following:model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score ≥ 20,the donor's and recipient's blood types were different,age 18-70 years,and undergone primary non-bypass orthotopic liver transplantation.According to the rate of compliance with the principles of blood transfusion,the cases were divided into two groups:ABO-compatible group (ABO-C group,n =41),ABO-incompatible group (ABO-I group,n =22).The patients in ABO-I group received basiliximab + methylprednisolone for immune induction therapy during operation,basiliximab + tacrolimus + mycophenolate + cortisol as quadruple immunosuppressive regimen after operation.They also received subcutaneous injection of low molecular heparin for anticoagulant therapy after operation,and oral warfarin or aspirin and clopidogrel bisulfate instead after 7 days.They also received routine alprostadil after operation.The remaining treatment was the same as that of ABO-C group.The clinical data,postoperative complications,rejection and survival rates of two groups were statistically analyzed.Results There were no significant differences in gender,age,MELD score,complicated with tumor,quality of donor liver,length of cold preservation of donor liver,duration of operation,and blood loss during operation between ABO-C and ABO-I groups.Number of splenectomy during operation was significantly higher in ABO-I group than that in ABO-C group (5 cases vs.1 case,x2=4.687,P=0.030).The 3-month,6-month,1-year,3-year and 5-year survival rates of ABO-C group were 89.5%,78.3%,72.5%,69.1% and 61.8

  9. A Risk Index for Living Donor Kidney Transplantation.

    Massie, A B; Leanza, J; Fahmy, L M; Chow, E K H; Desai, N M; Luo, X; King, E A; Bowring, M G; Segev, D L

    2016-07-01

    Choosing between multiple living kidney donors, or evaluating offers in kidney paired donation, can be challenging because no metric currently exists for living donor quality. Furthermore, some deceased donor (DD) kidneys can result in better outcomes than some living donor kidneys, yet there is no way to compare them on the same scale. To better inform clinical decision-making, we created a living kidney donor profile index (LKDPI) on the same scale as the DD KDPI, using Cox regression and adjusting for recipient characteristics. Donor age over 50 (hazard ratio [HR] per 10 years = 1.15 1.241.33 ), elevated BMI (HR per 10 units = 1.01 1.091.16 ), African-American race (HR = 1.15 1.251.37 ), cigarette use (HR = 1.09 1.161.23 ), as well as ABO incompatibility (HR = 1.03 1.271.58 ), HLA B (HR = 1.03 1.081.14 ) mismatches, and DR (HR = 1.04 1.091.15 ) mismatches were associated with greater risk of graft loss after living donor transplantation (all p DD kidney), and 4.4% of donors had LKDPI > 50 (more risk than the median DD kidney). The LKDPI is a useful tool for comparing living donor kidneys to each other and to deceased donor kidneys. PMID:26752290

  10. Rituximab: An emerging therapeutic agent for kidney transplantation

    Joseph Kahwaji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Kahwaji, Chris Tong, Stanley C Jordan, Ashley A VoComprehensive Transplant Center, Transplant immunology Laboratory, HLA Laboratory, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Rituximab (anti-CD20, anti-B-cell is now emerging as an important drug for modification of B-cell and antibody responses in solid-organ transplant recipients. Its uses are varied and range from facilitating desensitization and ABO blood group-incompatible transplantation to the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD, and recurrent glomerular diseases in the renal allograft. Despite these uses, prospective randomized trials are lacking. Only case reports exist in regards to its use in de novo and recurrent diseases in the renal allograft. Recent reports suggests that the addition of rituximab to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG may have significant benefits for desensitization and treatment of AMR and chronic rejection. Current dosing recommendations are based on data from United States Food and Drug Administration-approved indications for treatment of B-cell lymphomas and rheumatoid arthritis. From the initial reported experience in solid organ transplant recipients, the drug is well tolerated and not associated with increased infectious risks. However, close monitoring for viral infections is recommended with rituximab use. The occurrence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML has been reported with rituximab use. However, this is rare and not reported in the renal transplant population. Here we will review current information regarding the effectiveness of rituximab as an agent for desensitization of highly human leukocyte antigen-sensitized and ABO-incompatible transplant recipients and its use in treatment of AMR. In addition, the post-transplant use of rituximab for treatment of PTLD and for recurrent and de novo glomerulonephritis in the allograft will be discussed. In

  11. Kidney transplant - series (image)

    ... functions that both kidneys perform in healthy people. Kidney transplant recipients are required to take immunosuppressive medications for the rest of the lives, to prevent immune rejection of the transplanted organ.

  12. Kidney transplant

    ... Heart tests such as an EKG, echocardiogram, or cardiac catheterization Tests to look for early cancer You will also want to consider one or more transplant centers to determine which is best for you. ...

  13. [Promoting Living Kidney Transplantation].

    Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best approach for treating patients with end stage renal disease, offering patients the best chance of returning to normal health. While the techniques used in kidney transplantation surgery are mature and highly successful, there is a severe shortage of donor organs. Statistics show a serious imbalance between organ donations and patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation. Moreover, evidence from empirical studies has shown a better transplantation outcome for patients who receive living donor transplantation than for those who receive organs from cadavers. Although using relatives as donors offers an effective way to reduce the problem of organ shortage, this strategy faces many challenges and many other factors affect the promotion of living donor transplantation. This article elaborates how cultural and psychological factors, kidney transplantation awareness, and ethics and laws impact upon living kidney donations and then proposes coping strategies for promoting living kidney transplantation. PMID:27026555

  14. Kidney transplant - series (image)

    ... Donor kidneys are obtained from either brain-dead organ donors, or from living relatives or friends of the ... the lower right quadrant of the abdomen. The donor kidney is transplanted into the right lower pelvis of the recipient.

  15. Analysis of donor selection for living related kidney transplantation and their postoperative outcome

    Ležaić Višnja

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of cadaveric organs for transplantation resulted in increased number of living related kidney donors examinations and consequent transplantations in our Department. Donor procedure, selection, drop-outs and final results for living related donors (LRD were retrospectively analyzed in this paper. Between 1987 and 1994 202 potential LRD were examined. Most of them were females (59% and about 30% were older than 60 years. The family relation between LRD and recipients were: parents (95%, siblings (3%, grandmother grandfather (1.5% and uncle (0.5%. Potential LRD were informed on risks advantages and procedure of living donor transplantation. After primary information 26% of potential LRD gave up further examinations. Following immunological and clinical evaluations 48% of LRD actually donated a kidney. The other 26% were excluded during the selection procedure. High immunological risks including ABO incompatibility, HLA mismatches and positive cross match test were the reasons for drop outs of 35 potential LRD (17%. Five more donors were excluded for medical reasons: one because of low creatinine clearance and four because of neoplasms, discovered during examination (kidney, laryngeal, lung. Fourteen transplantation were not realized due to different recipient reasons: 5 of them had clinical contraindications, two died and in 7 cadaveric kidney transplantations were performed. Mild hypertension, coronary disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 were presented in 5 LRD accepted for transplantation. Five more had to be operated before donation (abdominal or urological operation. Early complications after donor nephrectomy were acute renal failure, stress ulcus, pleuropneumonia in three and thromboflebitis in two donors. In conclusion, although kidney transplantation from LRD is highly successful careful examination during selection procedure is indispensable.

  16. Pediatric Kidney Transplantation 2011

    N. K. Kanzelmeyer; Lehner, F; Pape, L.

    2011-01-01

    As recently as 50 years ago, children suffering from renal insuffiency were dying due to a lack of adequate treatment. Nowadays providing different kinds a dialysis modalities, e. g. peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis, as well as kidney transplantation have nearly become routine therapeutic options in children. Today, dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation can even be performed in infants.Patient survival of 20 years and near-normal mental and physical development is observed in more ...

  17. Kidney Transplantation in Iran

    Behzad Einollahi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kidney transplantation in patients with end stage renal diseaseis preferred to dialysis because transplantation provides a betterquality of life and improved survival. However, the gapbetween the supply and demand for a renal allograft is wideningand the waiting time is increasing. Iranian protocol, a controlledtransplant program supported by the government forliving unrelated donors, was initiated for solving the problemof organ shortage. Although this system might experiencechallenges, clearly it has advantages over other organ procurementsystems primarily that thousands in need do not diewhile waiting for a compatible donor.In the present review I discuss the history of renal transplantationin Iran, "Iranian model" protocol, the situation ofIran’s kidney transplantation from either living or deceaseddonors compared with the Middle East countries, and our experiencesof unrelated renal transplantation.

  18. Everolimus in kidney transplantation

    Cooper JE

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available James E Cooper¹, Uwe Christians², Alexander C Wiseman¹¹Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Transplant Center, ²iC42 Integrated Solutions in Systems Biology for Clinical Research and Development, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USAAbstract: Everolimus is a novel target of rapamycin (mTOR-I analog that has recently been approved in combination with cyclosporine A and steroids for use in the prevention of organ rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Compared with rapamycin, everolimus is characterized by a shorter half-life and improved bioavailability. Prior to US Food and Drug Administration approval, a number of Phase II and III clinical trials were undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of everolimus in combination with calcineurin inhibitors for preventing acute rejection and promoting allograft survival in kidney transplant recipients. In this report, we review the pharmacokinetic properties of everolimus, the clinical efficacy studies that led to its approval for use in kidney transplantation, as well as reported data on patient safety and tolerability associated with its use.Keywords: mTOR inhibitors, kidney transplantation, everolimus

  19. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... little different about kidney transplants compared to, say, heart transplants or liver transplants is it’s not necessary to ... our time. “Are doctors using manmade kidneys for transplant?” That ... artificial heart and ventricular assist device that have been successful. ...

  20. Aplasia pura de serie roja post-trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyeticas ABO incompatible Pure red cell aplasia after ABO incompatible bone marrow transplantation

    E. Bulliorsky; C. Shanley; G. Stemmelin; J. Ceresetto; O. Rabinovich

    2002-01-01

    El trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyéticas (TCPH) con incompatibilidad ABO entre el donante y el receptor puede en ocasiones asociarse a trastornos en la progenie eritroide desarrollada a partir de la médula ósea trasplantada, caracterizado por un funcionamiento tardío, inadecuado e incompleto de la misma. En este contexto, la aplasia pura de serie roja es la complicación más severa. Se han intentado tratamientos para la aplasia pura de serie roja post-TCPH con eritropoy...

  1. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... Can someone receive a transplant before going into kidney failure?” Absolutely. That’s call a “preemptive transplant.” There are ... donor cleared, and to get everybody together before kidney failure actually occurs. But we do do preemptive transplants ...

  2. Everolimus in kidney transplantation

    Cooper JE; Christians U; Wiseman AC

    2011-01-01

    James E Cooper¹, Uwe Christians², Alexander C Wiseman¹¹Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Transplant Center, ²iC42 Integrated Solutions in Systems Biology for Clinical Research and Development, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USAAbstract: Everolimus is a novel target of rapamycin (mTOR)-I analog that has recently been approved in combination with cyclosporine A and steroids for use in the prevention of organ rejection in kidney...

  3. Trasplante renal Kidney transplant

    P. Martín

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available El trasplante renal es la terapia de elección para la mayoría de las causas de insuficiencia renal crónica terminal porque mejora la calidad de vida y la supervivencia frente a la diálisis. El trasplante renal de donante vivo es una excelente alternativa para el paciente joven en situación de prediálisis porque ofrece mejores resultados. El tratamiento inmunosupresor debe ser individualizado buscando la sinergia inmunosupresora y el mejor perfil de seguridad, y debe adaptarse a las diferentes etapas del trasplante renal. En el seguimiento del trasplante renal hay que tener muy en cuenta los factores de riesgo cardiovascular y los tumores puesto que la muerte del paciente con injerto funcionante es la segunda causa de pérdida del injerto tras el primer año del trasplante. La función alterada del injerto es un factor de mortalidad cardiovascular independiente que requerirá seguimiento y control de todas sus complicaciones para retrasar la entrada en diálisis.The kidney transplant is the therapy of choice for the majority of the causes of chronic terminal kidney insufficiency, because it improves the quality of life and survival in comparison with dialysis. A kidney transplant from a live donor is an excellent alternative for the young patient in a state of pre-dialysis because it offers the best results. Immunosuppressive treatment must be individualised, seeking immunosuppressive synergy and the best safety profile, and must be adapted to the different stages of the kidney transplant. In the follow-up to the kidney transplant, cardiovascular risk factors and tumours must be especially taken into account, given that the death of the patient with a working graft is the second cause of loss of the graft following the first year of the transplant. The altered function of the graft is a factor of independent cardiovascular mortality that will require follow-up and the control of all its complications to postpone the entrance in dialysis.

  4. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... 800 kidneys have been transplanted, and 441 of these have been living donor transplants, and that will ... John Hopkins, and we have done hundreds of these since then. The procedure is beneficial to patients ...

  5. Pediatric kidney transplantation: a review

    Sharma A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Amit Sharma, Rajesh Ramanathan, Marc Posner, Robert A Fisher Hume-Lee Transplant Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: Pediatric kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for children with end-stage renal disease. The most common indications for transplantation in children are renal developmental anomalies, obstructive uropathy, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Living donor kidney transplants are often performed pre-emptively and offer excellent graft function. Policy changes in deceased-donor kidney allocation have increased the proportion of such transplants in pediatric recipients. Adequate pretransplant workup along with evaluation of urologic abnormalities is imperative in achieving good outcomes. Overall, patient and graft outcomes after kidney transplantation have improved, with five-year deceased donor and living donor graft survivals of 78.8% and 84.3%, respectively. Improvements in induction and maintenance immunosuppression have contributed to the gradual improvement in outcomes. Unique challenges in pediatric recipients include increased graft thrombosis, adverse growth, and abnormal development relating to immunosuppression, increased rejection due to nonadherence, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and post-transplant malignancy. This review focuses on the current practices and outcomes in pediatric kidney transplantation in North America. We discuss the indications for transplantation, the evaluation process, some key surgical and immunologic considerations, and the common risk factors for graft dysfunction. Keywords: pediatric kidney transplantation, end-stage renal disease, dialysis, organ donors, immunosuppression

  6. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... Norfolk General was started in 1972. Since that time, over 1,800 kidneys have been transplanted, and ... that came in. They would come in three times a week, so basically you become their family. ...

  7. Cancer rates after kidney transplantation

    Sodemann, Ulrik; Bistrup, Claus; Marckmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated a 3-5-fold increased cancer risk in kidney allograft recipients compared with the general population. Our aim was to estimate cancer frequencies among kidney allograft recipients who were transplanted in 1997-2000 and who were immunosuppressed according to a more...

  8. Features and ethical considerations associated with living kidney and liver transplantations in South Korea.

    Kim, J H

    2014-12-01

    When the Organ Transplantation Act came into effect in 2000 in South Korea, living organ donations were legalized and the Korean Network for Organ Sharing (KONOS) had a duty to approve the application of donation. The number of living organ donors has increased and the waiting time of recipients has been steady or decreased. The Organ Transplantation Act mainly focuses on the informed consent process of donations, so unrelated directed donations are permitted unless there is a suspicion of organ trafficking. But the annual reports show that directed donations of unrelated and related donors may have an ethical concern about organ sales. The donations of family members show another ethical concern. The numbers of ABO-incompatible transplantations have steadily increased since 2008, and lineal descendants, including minors, comprised 61% of living liver donors in 2012. Addressing the unethical practices without inhibiting living organ donations is the current task in South Korea. Private agencies have actively operated the living organ donations programs. The web-based computerized organ exchange program has been cooperatively run by hospital-based organizations. The strict legal regulations that could decrease living organ donations are hard to adopt. In the current situation, the functions of the official system need to be more developed. A national organ exchange program run by KONOS could be an option which could reduce ABO-incompatible transplantations and relieve the ethical concern of organ sales in unrelated directed donations. PMID:25498104

  9. VASCULAR COMPLICATIONS AFTER KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: evaluation of the incidence and the pattern of vessel complications, efficacy of the prophylactic anticoagulation therapy after kidney transplantation. Materials and methods. From March 2007 till January 2013 421 patients: 230 men (54,6% and 191 women (45,4%; mean age 43,07 ± 11,62 undergone 429 kidney transplantations in the department of pancreas and kidney transplantation of the Scientific-Research Institute of Emergency Care named after N.V. Sklifosovsky. In order to evaluate the condition and the function of the kidney transplant ultrasound investigation (daily andacquisition(weekly wereused. In cases of kidney dysfunction and assumption of vessel complications we used computerized tomography. Besides, we used daily analysis of biochemical and clinical parameters of blood and urine. Results. The most common vessel complication was the thrombosis of the microvasculature of the kidney transplant due to acute humoral and combined rejection resistant to antirejection therapy (n = 9; 2,1%; in 4 cases there was a breakage of the transplant due to the acute rejection and the urgent transplantatectomy in an effort to save the patient; thrombosis of the transplantat artery occurred in 1 case (0,23%; we observed 2 cases (0,46% of the artery stenosis and 2 cases (0,46% of venous thrombosis. Conclusion. Summary frequency of vessel complications in our clinic, including thrombosis due to rejection, was 3,49%. It fully corresponds with data obtained from the global medical community. The incidence of great vessel thrombosis was less than 1% which indicates the adequate prophylactic anticoagulation therapy. For the benefit of early diacrisis of complications Doppler sonography is needed. In case of assumption of vessel complications urgent acquisition, computerized tomography and/ or angiography are to be held. 

  10. Dual kidney transplantation: case report.

    Vidas, Zeljko; Kocman, Branislav; Knotek, Mladen; Skegro, Dinko

    2010-06-01

    Chronic shortage of kidney transplants worldwide has led to the use of organs from so called marginal or borderline donors, now termed "expanded-criteria donors". There has been an emerging practice of dual kidney transplantation (DKT) to compensate for sub optimal nephron mass of such kidneys. We performed DKT in "Merkur" University Hospital in August 2005. The donor was a 72-year old female with a history of long-term hypertension, aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery, cerebrovascular insult (CVI), and with normal creatinine values and kidney function at the time of explantation. Initial biopsy of donor kidneys revealed acute tubular damage, with connective changes in 22% and 11% of glomeruli in the left and the right kidney, respectively. The recipient was a 60-year old male diagnosed with the IgA nephropathy on the last biopsy in 1999, and on dialysis since November 2003. Postoperative course was uneventful without any surgical complications. A triple immunosuppressive protocol was used. On follow-up ultrasonography 4 years posttransplantation both kidneys appeared of normal size and parenchymal pattern and with no signs of dilatation of the canal system, and color Doppler examination demonstrated normal flow in both kidneys. In conclusion, the use of DKT ie. donors by the expanded-criteria will continue to increase, and further studies of the results will, with no doubt, support this method. PMID:20698157

  11. Renal Cell Carcinoma in Transplanted Kidney

    M. Naroienejad; Salouti, R

    2005-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are prescribed routinely to kidney transplant recipients to prevent rejection. These medications are associated wi th an increased risk of secondary malignancies,including renal cell carcinoma in the transplanted kidney itself. We present a case of renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney.

  12. Aplasia pura de serie roja post-trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyeticas ABO incompatible

    E. Bulliorsky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available El trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyéticas (TCPH con incompatibilidad ABO entre el donante y el receptor puede en ocasiones asociarse a trastornos en la progenie eritroide desarrollada a partir de la médula ósea trasplantada, caracterizado por un funcionamiento tardío, inadecuado e incompleto de la misma. En este contexto, la aplasia pura de serie roja es la complicación más severa. Se han intentado tratamientos para la aplasia pura de serie roja post-TCPH con eritropoyetina o plasmaféresis, con relativo éxito. Algunos autores han informado también la utilización de globulina antilinfocitaria, asumiendo que dicha aplasia selectiva de la serie roja en la médula ósea trasplantada es mediada por un mecanismo inmune. En este trabajo se describe un paciente portador de una leucemia aguda en quien se realizó un TCPH alogeneico (ABO incompatible con su donante. Teniendo niveles bajos de aglutininas contra el grupo sanguíneo de la donante, desarrolló una aplasia pura de serie roja post - TCPH. La misma no mejoró con tratamiento con eritropoyetina o con un refuerzo de progenitores hematopoyéticos de sangre periférica de la misma donante (boost, resolviéndose totalmente luego de un tratamiento exitoso con globulina antilinfocitaria de origen equino.

  13. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis ar...

  14. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... of work for a little while and my child is grown and I don’t have to ... possible to transplant an adult kidney to a child?” Certainly. Our team here works with children’s hospital ...

  15. Kidney-Pancreas Transplant

    ... day or so in the intensive care unit (ICU) for close watching to make sure both kidney ... worker at your center for information about the rehabilitation services provided through your state's Department of Vocational ...

  16. CKD-MBD after kidney transplantation

    Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Bacchetta, Justine

    2011-01-01

    Successful kidney transplantation corrects many of the metabolic abnormalities associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, skeletal and cardiovascular morbidity remain prevalent in pediatric kidney transplant recipients and current recommendations from the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group suggest that bone disease—including turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth, and strength—as well as cardiovascular disease be evaluated in all patients with ...

  17. Gender Disparity in Kidney Transplantation

    Naghibi Orode

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender discrimination in benefiting from medical treatment is a worldwide pro-blem. Kidney transplantation, as the ideal treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, is not an exception. Considering the unique kidney donation patterns and different family styles in the Middle East, studying this problem in Iran seemed justifiable and necessary. In addition to comparing the numbers of female and male recipients, which has been done in other similar studies, considering the critical effect of waiting time on the outcome, we assessed and compared the waiting times also. The data of age, gender, nationality, donor type and waiting time before transplantation of 1426 (61.85% male, 38.14% female recipients who underwent transplantation in Imam Reza Hospital in the northeast of Iran from 1990 to 2003, was analyzed. Recipients were categorised into three groups based on donation patterns: those receiving kidney from live unrelated, live related and cadaver donors. The number of patients in each group was 1057 (61.96% male, 38.03% female, 232 (67.24% male, 32.75% female and 137 (51.82% male, 48.17% female respectively. The mean overall waiting time was 708 days. Comparing waiting time of male and female recipients in each of these groups did not show significant difference. In all categories of donors, females were less likely than males to be recipients. Furthermore, waiting time for females was longer than males when receiving kidney from sisters and children. For spousal donations, males were recipients more frequently than females although female recipients in this group waited less than their male counterparts to receive the kidney. Generally, our results are in accordance with results of similar researches. In all three mentioned groups, males com-prised the majority while the waiting time does not show significant difference between genders. We suggest some reasons for this phenomenon, of which the two main ones are: fewer females

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography in Kidney Transplantation

    Andrews, Peter M.; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Yu

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with both high mortality rates and an enormous economic burden [1]. The preferred treatment option for ESRD that can extend patients' lives and improve their quality of life is kidney transplantation. However, organ shortages continue to pose a major problem in kidney transplantation. Most kidneys for transplantation come from heart-beating cadavers. Although non-heart-beating cadavers represent a potentially large pool of donor kidneys, these kidneys are not often used due to the unknown extent of damage to the renal tubules (i.e., acute tubular necrosis or "ATN") induced by ischemia (i.e., lack of blood flow). Also, ischemic insult suffered by kidneys awaiting transplantation frequently causes ATN that leads to varying degrees of delayed graft function (DGF) after transplantation. Finally, ATN represents a significant risk for eventual graft and patient survival [2, 3] and can be difficult to discern from rejection. In present clinical practice, there is no reliable real-time test to determine the viability of donor kidneys and whether or not donor kidneys might exhibit ATN. Therefore, there is a critical need for an objective and reliable real-time test to predict ATN to use these organs safely and utilize the donor pool optimally. In this review, we provided preliminary data indicating that OCT can be used to predict the post-transplant function of kidneys used in transplantation.

  19. Kidney regeneration and repair after transplantation

    M. Franquesa (Marcella); M. Flaquer (Maria); J.M. Cruzado; J. Grinyo (Josep)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: To briefly show which are the mechanisms and cell types involved in kidney regeneration and describe some of the therapies currently under study in regenerative medicine for kidney transplantation. RECENT FINDINGS: The kidney contains cell progenitors that under specif

  20. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... you can see the left kidney here and right kidney here. And we generally use the left ... that the vein to the kidney of the right kidney. Here is another CT angiogram image, and ...

  1. Late Kidney Dysfunction in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Josephson, Michelle A.

    2013-01-01

    Late kidney transplant dysfunction may be a harbinger of graft failure. For many years, calcineurin inhibitor toxicity was felt to be the main cause for graft dysfunction with fibrosis and transplant loss. Recently this idea has come into question. With the observation that peritubular capillary C4d staining in kidney allografts may indicate antibody-mediated injury in conjunction with biopsy study findings, an appreciation for antibody-mediated rejection as a major cause of late graft dysfun...

  2. Comparison of Minimal Skin Incision Technique in Living Kidney Transplantation and Conventional Kidney Transplantation

    Sang-Dong Kim; Ji-Il Kim; In-Sung Moon; Sun-Cheol Park

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, the most common incision for kidney transplantation (KT) is an inverted J-shaped incision known as the “hockey-stick.” However, demands for minimally invasive surgery in KT are increasing as in other various fields of surgery. Hence, we evaluated whether there is difference between minimal skin incision technique in kidney transplantation (MIKT) and conventional KT (CKT) . Methods: Between June 2006 and March 2013, a total of 452 living kidney transplant patients were...

  3. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    Phelan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  4. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    Phelan, Paul J

    2011-08-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  5. Native kidney reincarnation following a failed transplant

    Full text: A 51-year-old woman with end stage renal failure secondary to Haemolytic Uraemic syndrome underwent a cadaveric renal transplant. A routine post transplant DTPA scan was performed which demonstrated satisfactory renal transplant perfusion and function. Incidental note was made of tracer uptake in the pelvis in the mid-line, which was suspected to be a uterine fibroid. This was confirmed on ultrasonography and at surgery. One week post transplantation the patient became acutely unwell and at laparotomy a perforated diverticular abscess was drained. Intraoperatively the transplant kidney was examined and the surgeon thought there was a area of infarction. This was confirmed on biopsy. As the patient's creatinine was rising a repeat DTPA study was performed. Perfusion and function of the transplant kidney was virtually absent while Doppler studies showed no flow. The patient however continued to produce urine and the creatinine was stable. Subsequently a mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG) 3 study was performed which again confirmed absent perfusion and function by the the transplanted kidney as well as the previous noted uterine fibroid. The native kidneys however demonstrated good perfusion and function. The patient's renal function remained stable and she did not require dialysis. A necrotic infarcted transplant kidney was removed uneventfully. This case illustrates the importance of imaging the native kidneys as well as the transplant kidney when there are puzzling clinical features. The presumed cause of the recovery of native renal function was the immunosuppression given for the transplant. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  6. Dual kidney transplantation with organs from extended criteria cadaveric donors.

    D'Arcy, Frank T

    2009-10-01

    The critical shortage of kidneys available for transplantation has led to alternate strategies to expand the pool. Transplantation of the 2 kidneys into a single recipient using organs suboptimal for single kidney transplantation was suggested. We assessed results in 24 grafts allocated for dual kidney transplantation vs those in a control group of 44 designated for single kidney transplantation. Each group underwent pretransplant biopsy and recipients were age matched.

  7. The Global Role of Kidney Transplantation

    Guillermo Garcia Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available World Kidney Day on March 8 th 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  8. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... painful, we have really excellent visualization of the anatomy of the kidney and organs around the kidney. ... which gives us an excellent view of the anatomy of the kidneys, including the blood vessels. And ...

  9. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... kidneys. There is plenty of room for the new kidney. We actually put it down in part ... to both remove their kidneys and put a new one in, so that’s not necessary. We now ...

  10. Plasma adiponectin before and after kidney transplantation

    Idorn, Thomas; Hornum, Mads; Bjerre, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    The role of plasma adiponectin (ADPN) in patients with impaired kidney function and following kidney transplantation (Tx) is debated. We aimed to: (i) determine whether pretransplant ADPN level is an independent risk factor for deterioration of glucose tolerance including development of new...

  11. Sex and the single transplanted kidney.

    Noel, Sanjeev; Desai, Niraj M; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A; Rabb, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Substantial ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) to the transplanted kidney occurs in 30% to 50% of transplantation patients who receive the organ from a deceased donor. IRI usually manifests as delayed graft function (DGF) and, in severe cases, results in primary nonfunction. Previous studies, primarily experimental, have demonstrated sex-specific susceptibility to IRI in kidney and other organs. In this issue of the JCI, Aufhauser Jr., Wang, and colleagues further demonstrate the importance of donor and recipient sex in IRI and elucidate the role of estrogen receptors in a murine model. Furthermore, analysis of data from 46,691 renal transplant patients in the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database revealed that sex affects DGF outcomes in humans. Manipulation of sex-driven molecular pathways offers a fertile opportunity to increase the number of organs available for transplantation and to reduce IRI in kidney and, likely, other organs. PMID:27088804

  12. Kidney Transplantation From Donors with Hepatitis B.

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Ardita, Vincenzo; Corona, Daniela; Giaquinta, Alessia; Ekser, Burcin; Sinagra, Nunziata; Zerbo, Domenico; Patanè, Marco; Gozzo, Cecilia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    The growing demand for organ donors to supply the increasing number of patients on kidney waiting lists has led most transplant centers to develop protocols that allow safe use of organs from donors with special clinical situations previously regarded as contraindications. Deceased donors with previous hepatitis B may be a safe resource to increase the donor pool even if there is still controversy among transplantation centers regarding the use of hepatitis B surface antigen-positive donors for renal transplantation. However, when allocated to serology-matched recipients, kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis B may result in excellent short-term outcome. Many concerns may arise in the long-term outcome, and studies must address the evaluation of the progression of liver disease and the rate of reactivation of liver disease in the recipients. Accurate selection and matching of both donor and recipient and correct post-transplant management are needed to achieve satisfactory long-term outcomes. PMID:27123988

  13. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... I’d like to celebrate here the two real stars of our webcast today, Anna and Sarah, ... There was one, what we would consider a real transplant, the first successful transplant was performed almost ...

  14. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... problems such as diabetes, which in turn can cause kidney disease, but also because of risks perioperatively ... the diseased kidneys really don’t tend to cause any problem. They actually get smaller and smaller ...

  15. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... prior to putting the patient on the immunosuppressive medicines to take care of their new kidney. But ... Absolutely. All of our patients take three immunosuppressive drugs to keep them from rejecting the kidney. Even ...

  16. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... here and right kidney here. And we generally use the left kidney because the vein for the ... of the renal vein. We’re going to use this ligature device, again, to basically heat this ...

  17. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... hospitals in the America for patients with kidney disease, and only one other hospital in the State ... as diabetes, which in turn can cause kidney disease, but also because of risks perioperatively such as ...

  18. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... Absolutely. All of our patients take three immunosuppressive drugs to keep them from rejecting the kidney. Even ... the recipient that the recipient could have fewer drugs to take to keep from rejecting the kidney. ...

  19. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... of non-steroidal medications like ibuprofen, which can affect kidney function. And then about four weeks after ... for you? “How does having only one kidney affect a patient’s life? Is kidney function still normal?” ...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the transplanted kidneys

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new noninvasive means for evaluating pathological changes of kidney transplants. Thirty kidney transplants were examined by MRI study, comparing with 12 donor kidneys as control. Imaging of well functioning grafts using inversion recovery (IR) method displayed a clear figure of corticomedullary differentiation (CMD). Kidneys under acute rejection, chronic rejection, and ciclosporin nephrotoxicity displayed poor CMD. CMD of Kidneys under ATN was poor on IR imaging, but clear on T1 weightened imaging. T1 values of kidney grafts were obtained as the mean value of T1 relaxation time of three areas including upper pole, lower pole, and the middle of the cortex. T1 value of the grafts under chronic rejection was similar to that of well functioning grafts. The value increased in case of acute rejection, ATN, and ciclosporin nephrotoxicity and decreased as the graft function was getting better. Imaging and the estimation of T1 value of kidney transplants of MRI were effective for evaluating graft function but of no use for differentiation of causes of graft deterioration. (author)

  1. Subtraction nephrotomography during urography of transplanted kidneys

    Hypocycloid tomography with photographic subtraction was applied during the early nephrographic phase of urography in 48 transplanted kidneys. The quality of demarcation between cortex and medulla in the subtracted nephrotomogram was evaluated and categorized into 4 groups: Excellent, good, poor, and absent demarcation. The renal function determined by 24-h endogenous creatinine clearance did not correlate with the quality of demarcation. Among 30 cases with excellent or good demarcation only one patient experienced rejection within 8 days after the urography. In 18 cases with poor or absent demarcation 9 had an episode of rejection. Absence of demarcation was only observed in this group of patients. Segmental renal infarcts were demonstrated occasionally on the subtracted early nephrotomogram. Thus, tomographic demonstration of the initial distribution of contrast medium in a transplanted kidney may prove to be of value in the diagnosis both of rejection of transplanted kidneys and renal infarcts. (orig.)

  2. Protein-Based Urine Test Predicts Kidney Transplant Outcomes

    ... News Releases News Release Thursday, August 22, 2013 Protein-based urine test predicts kidney transplant outcomes NIH- ... supporting development of noninvasive tests. Levels of a protein in the urine of kidney transplant recipients can ...

  3. Metabolic Syndrome after Kidney Transplantation - Are You at Risk?

    ... Sign up for our FREE magazine, Kidney Living Organ Donation & Transplantation Be an Organ Donor Living Donation Donor ... Giving Primary menu Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate Search Search Header ...

  4. MR surface coil imaging of kidney transplant

    MR appearance of the kidney transplant is evaluated on a series of 80 examinations performed on a supraconductive unit operating at 0.5 T. Normal function kidneys displayed a clearly delineated corticomedullary differentiation (CMD); the ratio between the thickness of cortex and medulla didn't exceed 0.6. The same appearance was observed in non complicated acute tubular necrosis. Complete loss of CMD was the major finding in acute rejection (74% of the cases), but it was not specific as it was also observed in chronic rejection and in acute glomerulonephritis. Cortex thickening was helpful for the detection of rejected transplants with visible CMD. The sensitivity of MR in the detection of acute rejection was 94%. Specificity of MR findings for acute rejection depended on the transplant age: it varied from 100% for examinations performed during the first 3 months after transplantation, to less than 50% for examinations of the second year

  5. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... what we would consider a real transplant, the first successful transplant was performed almost 54 years ago now at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston. Dr. Joseph Murray was awarded the Nobel Prize for that pioneering work. And we’ve had ...

  6. Biopsy of the Transplanted Kidney

    Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the current state-of-the-art technique of percutaneous transplant renal biopsy. A brief overview of the history of transplant renal biopsy is given. The indications and contraindications are discussed, including pre- and postprocedure patient management. The technique of the procedure and the devices that are available in the market are described.

  7. Recurrence of Lupus Nephritis after Kidney Transplantation

    Contreras, Gabriel; Mattiazzi, Adela; Guerra, Giselle; Ortega, Luis M.; Tozman, Elaine C.; Li, Hua; Tamariz, Leonardo; Carvalho, Cristiane; Kupin, Warren; Ladino, Marco; Leclercq, Baudouin; Jaraba, Isabel; Carvalho, Decio; Carles, Efrain; Roth, David

    2010-01-01

    The frequency and outcome of recurrent lupus nephritis (RLN) among recipients of a kidney allograft vary among single-center reports. From the United Network for Organ Sharing files, we estimated the period prevalence and predictors of RLN in recipients who received a transplant between 1987 and 2006 and assessed the effects of RLN on allograft failure and recipients' survival. Among 6850 recipients of a kidney allograft with systemic lupus erythematosus, 167 recipients had RLN, 1770 experien...

  8. AB32. Sexuality after kidney transplantation

    Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for persons with ESRD, and in general, KTx recipients have increased survival rates and enjoy overall better QOL than those on dialysis However, one thing of QOL that does not seem to improve post-transplant is sexuality. In fact, one study found that sexuality was the only aspect of QOL that did not improve after transplantation. Roughly, 50% of males and at least the same percent of females. Sexuality is important to QOL and is ...

  9. Plasma adiponectin before and after kidney transplantation

    Idorn, Thomas; Hornum, Mads; Bjerre, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    The role of plasma adiponectin (ADPN) in patients with impaired kidney function and following kidney transplantation (Tx) is debated. We aimed to: (i) determine whether pretransplant ADPN level is an independent risk factor for deterioration of glucose tolerance including development of new......-onset diabetes mellitus after Tx, (ii) describe which parameters that influence the ADPN concentration before and after Tx. Fifty-seven nondiabetic kidney allograft recipients and 40 nondiabetic uraemic patients were included. The Tx group was examined at baseline and 3 and 12 months after Tx. The uraemic...

  10. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... it is being said, and feel like you explain it but you’re not really sure you ... they are still interested in a transplant, we explain what our position is. A few programs in ...

  11. Calciphylaxis following kidney transplantation: a case report

    Hanvesakul Rajesh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Calciphylaxis occurring after kidney transplantation is rare and rarely reported. It results in chronic non-healing wounds and is associated with a poor prognosis and is often fatal. We present a case of proximal lower limb calciphylaxis that occurred early after kidney transplantation. The patient had no classic associated risk factors. He had previously had a total parathyroidectomy but had normal serum calcium-phosphate product and parathyroid hormone levels. The clinical outcome of this case was favorable and highlights some fundamental issues relating to management. Case presentation A 70-year-old British Caucasian man with end-stage renal failure secondary to IgA nephropathy presented six months post kidney transplantation with cutaneous calciphylaxis lesions involving the medial aspect of the thigh bilaterally. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of rapid onset cutaneous calciphylaxis occurring soon after kidney transplantation that was associated with a favorable outcome. Cutaneous calciphylaxis lesions should be promptly managed with meticulous wound care, antimicrobial therapy and the correction of calcium-phosphate product where indicated.

  12. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... ever be a donor?” No. The recipient, by definition, had end-stage kidney disease and certainly can’ ... And you had that PCA pump for pain control to where you push the button to help ...

  13. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... choose one donor over another? There are several factors go into that. If somebody’s fortunate enough to have more than one person who is willing to donate them a kidney, ...

  14. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... to three days until they can eat solid foods. A few images of the procedure show this ... if they were, let’s say, to develop a cancer in one of their kidneys, and certainly that ...

  15. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... medical condition, such as HIV positive status or diabetes or cancer or mental illness or severe obesity ... long-term risks for health problems such as diabetes, which in turn can cause kidney disease, but ...

  16. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... to do the surgery if we ran into something like that, which has happened on two occasions ... year survival of the kidney. At five years, something like 55 or 60 percent, depending on what ...

  17. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... need dialysis after the operation?” One of the advantages of living donation is that these kidneys essentially ... were removed from the donor. One of the advantages of living donor is that time is from ...

  18. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... the spleen and the colon fall into that space, and the patient doesn’t really notice that. ... the liver and the colon would fill the space where the kidney was located. 7 And this ...

  19. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... make it so that a person who has antibodies against another person, that recipient can be treated with treatments that will bind up their antibodies and allow them to accept a kidney from ...

  20. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... re quite secure. They have been tested in animal models and have shown to have high, what ... them a kidney, first we will do compatibility testing, see who is the best match in terms ...

  1. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... donor meets with a social worker and a psychologist, and there are also some basic medical tests ... steroidal medications like ibuprofen, which can affect kidney function. And then about four weeks after surgery, I’ ...

  2. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... monofilament suture like fishing line. We wear magnifying lenses while we sew it in, and here you ... and you can see the ureter, which the tube that drains the urine down from the kidney ...

  3. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... iliac vein of the recipient actually has the big clamp on it, and you can see the ... kilos in size, just so that they’re big enough to accommodate the kidney. I know there’s -- ...

  4. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... the 50 best hospitals in the America for patients with kidney disease, and only one other hospital ... these since then. The procedure is beneficial to patients because the incisions are less painful, we have ...

  5. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... of a machine, have a better quality of life. It ended up not happening until 2001. It ... Since I’ve become a kidney donor, my life really hasn’t changed. My health is just ...

  6. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... day as well. It takes about four to five hours to remove the kidney in terms of ... does occasionally happen, but it is less than five percent of the time, whereas with the deceased ...

  7. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... such as HIV positive status or diabetes or cancer or mental illness or severe obesity are some ... if they were, let’s say, to develop a cancer in one of their kidneys, and certainly that ...

  8. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... vasodilator or a tissue -- or a fluid that increases blood flow through the arteries to keep them ... a little line on the kidneys just to help me maintain the orientation when I put them ...

  9. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... a kidney is safe. It has an excellent safety record both here and nationwide. To ensure that, ... ve had a lot of talk about the safety for the living donors. The donor for that ...

  10. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... prior to putting the patient on the immunosuppressive medicines to take care of their new kidney. But ... days, I think. And then they gave you medicine through the IV after that. Right. So the ...

  11. OCULAR PATHOLOGY IN PATIENTS AFTER KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    L. K. Moshetova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural changes in eyes are present in all patients with chronic kidney disease. A study to detect ocular patho- logy in patients with end-stage chronic renal failure after kidney transplantation in the early and late postopera- tive period compared with patients receiving replacement therapy with hemodialysis. Revealed that in the early post-transplant period in recipients of kidneyas in patients on hemodialysis, continued angioretinopatiya, 40% of patients had «dry eye syndrome». In the delayed post-transplant period, patients showed significant impro- vement in the retina and retinal vessels, the improvement of spatial-temporal parameters of visual perception. However, a decrease of visual acuity on the background of the development of posterior subcapsular cataract caused by prolonged corticosteroid, and an increased incidence of viral and bacterial conjunctivitis. 

  12. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... Sentara. In the ‘80s, I worked in a dialysis unit in Arkansas. I was a dialysis tech, and I got to know the people ... But do patients who receive a transplant need dialysis after the operation?” One of the advantages of ...

  13. Gazing into a crystal ball to predict kidney transplant outcome

    Schröppel, Bernd; Heeger, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the optimal therapy for end-stage kidney disease but requires lifelong immunosuppression. Despite improvements in immunosuppression regimens that have reduced rates of acute transplant rejection, long-term allograft survival remains suboptimal. More than 50% of transplanted kidneys from deceased donors fail within 10 years. In order to improve long-term outcomes, physicians need to better understand mechanisms underlying transplant rejection and tolerance in humans. ...

  14. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... to begin to feel like your kidney was working normally? Well, it’s funny, even right after the surgery, I was still -- I mean I was still in pain and recovering, but it’s funny, I already could ...

  15. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... for a little while and my child is grown and I don’t have to take care of her so much, I would donate my kidney to help somebody get off of a machine, have a better quality of life. It ended up not happening until 2001. It was 20 years ...

  16. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... patient doesn’t really notice that. On the right side it would be the liver and the colon would fill the space where the kidney was located. 7 And this question I’ll give you to ...

  17. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... of the kidney, they are admitted the same day as the surgery, and the recipient’s admitted that day as well. It takes about four to five ... Patients are generally in the hospital about three days. Occasionally they’re ready to go home in ...

  18. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... kidney, I would say if that’s where you heart is at, because it’s a wonderful feeling to ... to do. Make sure that it’s in your heart to do that, and then just do it. ...

  19. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Full Text Available ... an adult kidney to a child?” Certainly. Our team here works with children’s hospital the King’s Daughters with their ... members of the team. We have a great team here at Norfolk General, particularly Amy who works so hard with the living donors, but really ...

  20. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:26202137

  1. Mineral and bone disorder after kidney transplantation.

    Taweesedt, Pahnwat T; Disthabanchong, Sinee

    2015-12-24

    After successful kidney transplantation, accumulated waste products and electrolytes are excreted and regulatory hormones return to normal levels. Despite the improvement in mineral metabolites and mineral regulating hormones after kidney transplantation, abnormal bone and mineral metabolism continues to present in most patients. During the first 3 mo, fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and parathyroid hormone levels decrease rapidly in association with an increase in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D production. Renal phosphate excretion resumes and serum calcium, if elevated before, returns toward normal levels. FGF-23 excess during the first 3-12 mo results in exaggerated renal phosphate loss and hypophosphatemia occurs in some patients. After 1 year, FGF-23 and serum phosphate return to normal levels but persistent hyperparathyroidism remains in some patients. The progression of vascular calcification also attenuates. High dose corticosteroid and persistent hyperparathyroidism are the most important factors influencing abnormal bone and mineral metabolism in long-term kidney transplant (KT) recipients. Bone loss occurs at a highest rate during the first 6-12 mo after transplantation. Measurement of bone mineral density is recommended in patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate > 30 mL/min. The use of active vitamin D with or without bisphosphonate is effective in preventing early post-transplant bone loss. Steroid withdrawal regimen is also beneficial in preservation of bone mass in long-term. Calcimimetic is an alternative therapy to parathyroidectomy in KT recipients with persistent hyperparathyroidism. If parathyroidectomy is required, subtotal to near total parathyroidectomy is recommended. Performing parathyroidectomy during the waiting period prior to transplantation is also preferred in patients with severe hyperparathyroidism associated with hypercalcemia. PMID:26722650

  2. Immunosuppressive treatment for kidney transplantation.

    Zivčić-Ćosić, S; Trobonjača, Z; Rački, S

    2011-01-01

    Immunosuppressive treatment minimizes unwanted immune reactivity, but it also leads to complications such as metabolic disorders, cardiovascular diseases and malignant tumours. In this paper we summarise the recent developments in action mechanisms of available immunosuppressive drugs and their usage for renal transplantation. These drugs act at various levels of lymphocytic activation and proliferation, and they may have additive or synergic effects when combined. In the majority of patients, the immunosuppressive protocol includes a calcineurin inhibitor (tacrolimus or cyclosporin), an antimetabolite (mycophenolate mofetil or mycophenolic acid) and a corticosteroid. Most patients also receive induction with monoclonal or polyclonal antilymphocytic antibodies. These immunosuppressive drugs allow a one-year survival of renal allografts in over 90% of cases and an incidence of acute rejection episodes below 15%. In most cases, acute cell-mediated rejection can be reversed with pulse doses of methylprednisolone; less often antilymphocytic antibodies must be applied. Acute humoral rejection can be suppressed with high doses of intravenous immunoglobulines or low doses of cytomegalovirus hyperimmune globuline, in combination with plasmapheresis, to obtain a satisfactory reduction of anti-donor antibodies. This treatment also allows renal transplantation for sensitised recipients, or transplantation against a positive cross match or AB0 incompatibility. Less often, immunoadsorption, alemtuzumab, rituximab or splenectomy are applied. New immunosuppressive drugs and protocols are currently under investigation. Immunosuppressive agents and methods targeting the induction of immune tolerance to the donor organ are especially promising. PMID:22286615

  3. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  4. Update on laparoscopic/robotic kidney transplant: a literature review

    He B

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulang He,1,2 Jeffrey M Hamdorf2 1Liver and Kidney Transplant Unit, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia; 2School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia Aims: The aim of this paper was to review the current status of laparoscopic/robotic kidney transplant and evaluate its feasibility and safety in comparison with conventional standard "open" kidney transplant. Methods: An electronic search of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane library database was performed to identify the papers between January 1980 and June 2013 that reported on laparoscopic/robotic kidney transplantation. The terms "laparoscopic kidney/renal transplant" and "robotic kidney/renal transplant (transplantation" were used. Cross-referencing was also used to find the further publications. Only English language reports were selected and accepted for descriptive analysis. Results: A total of 17 papers and abstracts were retrieved. There were two case-control studies of small volume. High-level evidence comparing the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic/robotic kidney transplant with conventional open kidney transplant was not available at the time of this review. Conclusion: The limited published data have suggested that laparoscopic/robotic kidney transplant may offer the advantages of less pain, better cosmesis, possible shorter hospital stay, and fewer wound complications, without compromising graft function. Accordingly, some immunosuppressive agents, such as sirolimus, might be able to be commenced earlier, after laparoscopic/robotic kidney transplant. The techniques are various at this early stage. A uniformed operative technique may be established in the near future. With refinement of laparoscopic devices, this technique may be widely employed. Further studies will be needed to demonstrate the advantages of laparoscopic/robotic kidney transplant over the conventional open kidney transplant. Keywords: laparoscopic surgery, robotic

  5. Vitamin D status in kidney transplant patients

    Ewers, Bettina; Gasbjerg, Ane; Moelgaard, Christian;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency has been found in the general population and in patients with chronic kidney disease. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to examine vitamin D status and determinants and metabolic correlates of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in a population of adult Danish...... kidney transplant patients. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of 173 adult kidney transplant patients with a mean (+/-SD) age of 53.4 +/- 11.7 y and a median graft age of 7.4 y (interquartile range: 3.3-12.7 y). Serum concentrations of intact parathyroid hormone (S-PTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D [S-25....... Low S-25(OH)D concentrations were associated with 1) increased S-PTH concentrations (P = 0.0002), independently of S-1,25(OH)(2)D concentrations, and 2) decreased S-1,25(OH)(2)D concentrations (P = 0.002), independently of graft function. CONCLUSIONS: Hypovitaminosis D is common among Danish kidney...

  6. Kidney Transplantation in Patients With Alport Syndrome

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of kidney transplantation in patients with Alport syndrome. Materials and Methods: A total of 15 patients with Alport syndrome underwent kidney transplantation and the result of their transplantation was compared with the results in patients without Alport Syndrome. Rejection episodes and the presence of antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM nephritis were assessed in these patients. Results: Fifteen patients with Alport syndrome were compared with a control group including 212 kidney allograft recipients. One patient with Alport syndrome (6.7% and 30 controls (14.2% experienced delayed graft function. Renal artery thrombosis was reported in 1 patient (6.7% with Alport syndrome and 10 (4.7% in the control group, which led to nephrectomy in all cases. Acute rejection was confirmed in 2 patients (13.3% by kidney biopsy and classic treatment yielded relative response. However, they lost their grafts 35 and 44 months after the transplantation. On pathologic examination, no specific finding of anti-GBM nephritis was found. In the control group, 43 cases of acute rejection (20.3% were reported and 12 patients (5.7% returned to dialysis. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year

  7. Recurrence of primary hyperoxaluria: An avoidable catastrophe following kidney transplant

    Madiwale C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare autosomal recessive disease due to deficiency of an oxalate-metabolizing liver enzyme, which results in nephrolithiasis and renal failure. Concomitant liver and kidney transplant is recommended as isolated kidney transplant is inevitably complicated by recurrence of the disease. We present a 25-year-old man with end-stage nephrolithiatic renal disease who underwent bilateral nephrectomy, followed by kidney transplantation. There was progressive worsening of kidney function two weeks post transplant. Review of nephrectomy and transplant kidney biopsy showed abundant calcium oxalate crystals and further workup revealed hyperoxaluria, which was previously unsuspected. Later he developed fever, breathlessness, hemiparesis and died 10 weeks after transplant. Autopsy revealed multi-organ deposits of oxalate crystals as well as widespread zygomycosis. This case emphasizes the need for careful pre-transplant evaluation of patients with renal calculus disease in order to exclude primary hyperoxaluria.

  8. The everyday of people waiting for kidney transplantation

    Micheli Rezende Ferreira Cruz; Anna Maria de Oliveira Salimena; Ivis Emília de Oliveira Souza; Maria Carmen Simões Cardoso de Melo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to understand the everyday of people experiencing the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Methods: this is a qualitative research, based on Heideggerian phenomenology. 14 deponents participated in hemodialysis and registered on the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Phenomenological interview with the research question: How is the experience awaiting the kidney transplant? Color marking technique for analyzing demarcating lines that show similarity, of these, emerged the...

  9. The perception of sleep quality in kidney transplant patients during the first year of transplantation

    Dnyelle Souza Silva; Elisangela dos Santos Prado Andrade; Rosilene Motta Elias; Elias David-Neto; William Carlos Nahas; Manuel Carlos Martins de Castro; Maria Cristina Ribeiro de Castro

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Poor sleep quality is one of the factors that adversely affects patient quality of life after kidney transplantation, and sleep disorders represent a significant cardiovascular risk factor. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of changes in sleep quality and their outcomes in kidney transplant recipients and analyze the variables affecting sleep quality in the first years after renal transplantation. METHODS: Kidney transplant recipients were evaluated at t...

  10. Progress in pancreas transplantation and combined pancreas-kidney transplantation

    Chang-Sheng Ming; Zhong-Hua Klaus Chen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreas transplantation (PT) has proved effective but it is associated with a high risk of surgical complications and technical failure. Duct management and venous drainage are identiifed as major issues. Improvements in immunosuppression and prophylaxis greatly have contributed to surgical progress. DATA SOURCES: A literature search of the PubMed database (1996-2005) was conducted and research articles on PT reviewed. RESULTS: More than 23 000 PTs have been performed throughout the world. The majority (83%) were performed in combination with kidney transplantation [simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK)]. Pancreas graft survival rates at one year were 85% for 2001-2003 SPK cases, 79% for pancreas after kidney transplantation (PAK) cases, and 76% for pancreas transplantation alone (PTA) cases. For the 1999-2003 cases, enteric drainage was done in 79% of the SPK cases and bladder drainage in 21%. Patient survival rates, pancreas and kidney graft survival rates, and pancreas graft immunological failure rates did not differ signiifcantly in enteric versus bladder drainage cases. All the available data fail to demonstrate a deifnitive advantage of portal drainage over systemic drainage. From 1993 to 2002, the use of rabbit antithymocyte globulin increased from 0 to 37%;the use of daclizumab increased from 0 to 16%;and the use of basiliximab increased from 0 to 25%. In 1993, 98%of SPK recipients received cyclosporine;but this was decreased to 9% in 2002. Tacrolimus (FK506) usage has increased from 0 (1993) to 87%(2002) of SPK recipients. Sirolimus (SIR) usage has increased from 0 (1993) to 18%(2002) of SPK recipients. CONCLUSIONS: PT remains an effective therapy for treatment of type Ⅰ diabetes mellitus. Enteric drainage is currently predominant in SPK, but bladder drainage is still largely used. Portal drainage is as safe as systemic drainage, but there is still no convincing evidence about whether it is immunologically or metabolically

  11. [Kidney transplant from living donors in children?].

    Ginevri, Fabrizio; Dello Strologo, Luca; Guzzo, Isabella; Belingheri, Mirco; Ghio, Luciana

    2011-01-01

    A living-donor kidney transplant offers a child at the terminal stages of renal disease better functional recovery and quality of life than an organ from a deceased donor. Before starting the procedure for a living-donor transplant, however, it is necessary to establish if it is really safe. There are diseases, such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, atypical HUS and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with dense deposits, for which living donation is not recommended given the high incidence of recurrence of the disease but also the frequent loss of the graft. Regarding the selection of the donor, an increased risk of acute rejection has been reported for donors older than 60-65 years and a worsening of the renal outcome if the donor's weight is equal to or less than the recipient's. Finally, it is necessary to take into consideration that complications may arise in the donor both in the perioperative period and in the long term. In conclusion, kidney transplant from a living donor is a natural choice within the pediatric setting. The parents, usually young and highly motivated to donate, are the ideal donors. However, although the risks associated with donation are minimal, they are not totally absent, and consequently it is mandatory to follow standardized procedures according to the guidelines issued by the Centro Nazionale Trapianti. PMID:21341241

  12. Bilateral native nephrectomy for refractory hypertension in kidney transplant and kidney pancreas transplant patients

    Mark J. Lerman

    2015-01-01

    We found laparoscopic bilateral native nephrectomy to be beneficial in renal and simultaneous kidney pancreas transplant patients with severe and refractory hypertension. Our patients with better baseline renal allograft function at time of nephrectomy received the most benefit. No decrease in allograft function could be attributed to acute rejection.

  13. Issues in solid-organ transplantation in children: translational research from bench to bedside

    Steven E. Lipshultz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we identify important challenges facing physicians responsible for renal and cardiac transplantation in children based on a review of the contemporary medical literature. Regarding pediatric renal transplantation, we discuss the challenge of antibody-mediated rejection, focusing on both acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection. We review new diagnostic approaches to antibody-mediated rejection, such as panel-reactive antibodies, donor-specific cross-matching, antibody assays, risk assessment and diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection, the pathology of antibody-mediated rejection, the issue of ABO incompatibility in renal transplantation, new therapies for antibody-mediated rejection, inhibiting of residual antibodies, the suppression or depletion of B-cells, genetic approaches to treating acute antibody-mediated rejection, and identifying future translational research directions in kidney transplantation in children. Regarding pediatric cardiac transplantation, we discuss the mechanisms of cardiac transplant rejection, including the role of endomyocardial biopsy in detecting graft rejection and the role of biomarkers in detecting cardiac graft rejection, including biomarkers of inflammation, cardiomyocyte injury, or stress. We review cardiac allograft vasculopathy. We also address the role of genetic analyses, including genome-wide association studies, gene expression profiling using entities such as AlloMap®, and adenosine triphosphate release as a measure of immune function using the Cylex® ImmuKnow™ cell function assay. Finally, we identify future translational research directions in heart transplantation in children.

  14. Transfusion medicine and solid organ transplant – Update and review of some current issues

    R S Sarkar; Philip, J.; Yadav, Pramod

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion medicine holds a place of prime importance in organ transplant surgeries. There is a huge demand of organs worldwide with long waiting periods before the organ is available for transplant. Currently the dependency on ABO and HLA matching has decreased considerably with the use of modern immunosuppressant drugs and transplant techniques. The greatest advance in clinical implementation of ABO-incompatible transplants came about through desensitization and isoagglutinin elimination t...

  15. Immunologic monitoring in kidney transplant recipients

    Townamchai, Natavudh; Safa, Kassem; Chandraker, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Transplant biopsy has always been the gold standard for assessing the immune response to a kidney allograft (Chandraker A: Diagnostic techniques in the work-up of renal allograft dysfunction—an update. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens 8:723–728, 1999). A biopsy is not without risk and is unable to predict rejection and is only diagnostic once rejection has already occurred. However, in the past two decades, we have seen an expansion in assays that can potentially put an end to the “drug level” era...

  16. [Renal transplantation without maintenance immunosuppression. Identical twins and kidney transplantation following a successful bone marrow graft].

    Hadi, Riad Abdel; Thomé, Gustavo Gomes; Ribeiro, Adriana Reginato; Manfro, Roberto Ceratti

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation without maintenance immunosuppression has been sporadically reported in the literature. The cases include non-adherent patients who discontinued their immunosuppressive medications, transplantation between identical twins, kidney transplantation after a successful bone marrow graft from the same donor and simultaneous bone marrow and kidney transplantation for the treatment of multiple myeloma with associated renal failure. There are also ongoing clinical trials designed to induce donor specific transplant tolerance with infusion of hematopoietic cells from the same kidney donor. Here we describe two cases of renal transplantation without immunosuppression as examples of situations described above. PMID:26154652

  17. Oxidative stress in kidney transplantation: causes, consequences, and potential treatment.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major mediator of adverse outcomes throughout the course of transplantation. Transplanted kidneys are prone to oxidative stress-mediated injury by pre-transplant and post-transplant conditions that cause reperfusion injury or imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants. Besides adversely affecting the allograft, oxidative stress and its constant companion, inflammation, cause cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and other disorders in transplant recipients...

  18. OUTCOME OF SECOND PANCREAS TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUS SIMULTANEOUS KIDNEY AND PANCREAS TRANSPLANTATION COMPARED TO PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUS KIDNEY ALONE TRANSPLANTATION

    Hekmat, R.; S. Gareh; E. Morelon; N. Lefrancois L. Badet

    2007-01-01

    "nThere had been few if any study for second pancreas transplant outcome and consequences in patients with simultaneous kidney pancreas transplant after failure of the first pancreas allograft. The aim of this study was to compare the patient and graft survival and clinical outcomes and complication of the second pancreas transplant in patients with simultaneous kidney pancreas, compared with pancreas after kidney transplantation in patients with no history of previous failed pancreas gr...

  19. Recipient Criteria Predictive of Graft Failure in Kidney Transplantation.

    Molmenti, Ernesto P; Alex, Asha; Rosen, Lisa; Alexander, Mohini; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Yang, Jingyan; Siskind, Eric; Alex, Leesha; Sameyah, Emil; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Ali, Nicole; Basu, Amit; Sachdeva, Mala; Agorastos, Stergiani; Rajendran, Prejith; Krishnan, Prathik; Ramadas, Poornima; Amodu, Leo; Cagliani, Joaquin; Rehman, Sameer; Kressel, Adam; Sethna, Christine B; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C; Radtke, Arnold; Sgourakis, George; Schwarz, Richard; Fishbane, Steven; Bellucci, Alessandro; Coppa, Gene; Rilo, Horacio; Molmenti, Christine L

    2016-03-01

    Several classifications systems have been developed to predict outcomes of kidney transplantation based on donor variables. This study aims to identify kidney transplant recipient variables that would predict graft outcome irrespective of donor characteristics. All U.S. kidney transplant recipients between October 25,1999 and January 1, 2007 were reviewed. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model time until graft failure. Death-censored and nondeath-censored graft survival models were generated for recipients of live and deceased donor organs. Recipient age, gender, body mass index (BMI), presence of cardiac risk factors, peripheral vascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, cerebrovascular disease, history of malignancy, hepatitis B core antibody, hepatitis C infection, dialysis status, panel-reactive antibodies (PRA), geographic region, educational level, and prior kidney transplant were evaluated in all kidney transplant recipients. Among the 88,284 adult transplant recipients the following groups had increased risk of graft failure: younger and older recipients, increasing PRA (hazard ratio [HR],1.03-1.06], increasing BMI (HR, 1.04-1.62), previous kidney transplant (HR, 1.17-1.26), dialysis at the time of transplantation (HR, 1.39-1.51), hepatitis C infection (HR, 1.41-1.63), and educational level (HR, 1.05-1.42). Predictive criteria based on recipient characteristics could guide organ allocation, risk stratification, and patient expectations in planning kidney transplantation. PMID:26900309

  20. Long-term management of the kidney transplant recipient.

    Schaefer, Heidi M

    2012-01-01

    Due to the successes of kidney transplantation, patients with allografts are enjoying long-term survival. In addition to care of the allograft with lifelong administration of immunosuppressive medications, common medical conditions must be recognized and managed appropriately. With constraints on the transplant centers and patient considerations of finance and geography, it is recognized that community providers will play an ever increasing role in the care of the kidney transplant recipient. Guidelines for understanding and managing some of the more important common general medical problems, including care as it relates to cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, transplant-related issues, and general health maintenance, are reviewed in this article. PMID:22269883

  1. Historical perspectives in kidney transplantation: an updated review.

    Shrestha, Badri; Haylor, John; Raftery, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The present state of success in kidney transplantation, including its benefits to patients with end-stage renal failure, was achieved through relentless research, both in experimental animal models and human volunteers. Kidney transplantation has evolved during the past century thanks to various milestones in surgical techniques, immunology, immunosuppressive drugs, expansion of donor sources, organ preservation, transplant against immunological barriers (ABO blood group-incompatible and positive crossmatch transplants), and research on induction of tolerance, xenotransplants, and stem cell technology. Despite significant improvements in graft and patient survival, several issues still must be addressed to reduce the growing number of patients with kidney failure waiting to receive organs. This article provides an up-to-date review of the milestones in the history of kidney transplantation and highlights strategies to resolve current problems faced by patients and the transplant community. PMID:25758803

  2. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Kidney after Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation

    Pascual, Julio; Samaniego, Milagros D.; Torrealba, José R.; Odorico, Jon S.; Djamali, Arjang; Becker, Yolanda T.; Voss, Barbara; Leverson, Glen E.; Knechtle, Stuart J.; Sollinger, Hans W.; Pirsch, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence, risk factors, and outcome of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of the kidney after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation are unknown. In 136 simultaneous pancreas-kidney recipients who were followed for an average of 3.1 yr, 21 episodes of AMR of the kidney allograft were identified. Eight episodes occurred early (≤90 d) after transplantation, and 13 occurred later. Histologic evidence of concomitant acute cellular rejection was noted in 12 cases; the other nine had evi...

  3. AB32. Sexuality after kidney transplantation

    Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for persons with ESRD, and in general, KTx recipients have increased survival rates and enjoy overall better QOL than those on dialysis However, one thing of QOL that does not seem to improve post-transplant is sexuality. In fact, one study found that sexuality was the only aspect of QOL that did not improve after transplantation. Roughly, 50% of males and at least the same percent of females. Sexuality is important to QOL and is considered a basic human right and an important component of general health by WHO. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life. Encompassing Related causes, difficulties with sexuality and sexual functioning are most likely a result of both psychological and physiological factors, side effects of required medications, weight gain, hirsutism, and loss of sexually attractive following KTx, post-transplant complications and/or comorbid conditions. Hypertension and depression require medications. Almost all transplant recipients have or will eventually develop one or more comorbid conditions (diabetes) or experience side effects from treatments (pretransplant dialysis) or medications that can have a negative effect on their sexuality or sexual functioning Publications The first studies that examined sexuality among persons with ESRD were done in the 1970s. Retrospectively compare their sexual functioning levels. One of the largest of these early studies, conducted by Levy, was a nationwide survey of 519 persons belonging to the National Association of Patients on Hemodialysis and Transplantation. Three sexual functioning questions. There are 48% of men and 26% of women reported the development of or worsening of a sexual dysfunction as their ESRD progressed. And 35% of males and 25% of females reported a worsening of sexual function at the start of HD. 59% of all male HD patients and 43% of all male KTx recipients considered themselves to be partially or totally

  4. A retrospective analysis of dermatological lesions in kidney transplant patients

    Castello, Michela; Gregorini, Marilena; Rampino, Teresa; Bosio, Francesca; Bedino, Giulia; Piotti, Giovanni; Soccio, Grazia; Esposito, Pasquale; Klersy, Catherine; Abelli, Massimo; Borroni, Giovanni; Canton, Antonio Dal

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Kidney transplantation is the best option for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) failure. Prolonged use of immunosuppressive drugs often causes opportunistic infections and malignancies of skin and mucosae, but due to lack of a careful dermatological screening in several transplantation centers the diagnosis and the treatment of dermatological lesions in kidney transplant patients are underestimated. In addition after the introduction of interleukin (IL)-2 -...

  5. Low predictive value of positive transplant perfusion fluid cultures for diagnosing postoperative infections in kidney and kidney-pancreas transplantation.

    Cotter, Meaghan P

    2012-12-01

    Infection following transplantation is a cause of morbidity and mortality. Perfusion fluid (PF) used to preserve organs between recovery and transplantation represents a medium suitable for the growth of microbes. We evaluated the relevance of positive growth from PF sampled before the implantation of kidney or kidney-pancreas (KP) allografts.

  6. Development of Self-Management Scale for Kidney Transplant Recipients, Including Management of Post-Transplantation Chronic Kidney Disease

    Kosaka, Shiho; Tanaka, Makoto; Sakai, Tomoko; Tomikawa, Shinji; Yoshida, Kazunari; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Kazuma, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    An evaluation scale is indispensable for the promotion of continuing, effective postkidney transplantation self-management behaviors. We aimed to develop and validate a new self-management scale for kidney transplant recipients to improve their long-term outcomes and prevent the recurrence of CKD complications. Two hundred and thirty-nine Japanese patients who had undergone kidney transplantation were recruited from three hospitals. The scale’s validity and reliability were evaluated using ex...

  7. Comparison of Minimal Skin Incision Technique in Living Kidney Transplantation and Conventional Kidney Transplantation

    Kim, Sang-Dong; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Sun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, the most common incision for kidney transplantation (KT) is an inverted J-shaped incision known as the “hockey-stick.” However, demands for minimally invasive surgery in KT are increasing as in other various fields of surgery. Hence, we evaluated whether there is difference between minimal skin incision technique in kidney transplantation (MIKT) and conventional KT (CKT). Methods: Between June 2006 and March 2013, a total of 452 living kidney transplant patients were enrolled. The MIKT group included 17 young unmarried women whose body mass index was 0.05). The 5-year graft survival was 92.3% and 85.7% in MIKT and CKT groups, respectively (P = 0.786). Conclusions: Our results indicated that MIKT showed more favorable cosmetic results, and there were no statistical differences in various postoperative factors including graft function, survival, and complications compared with CKT. Hence, we suggested that MIKT is an appropriate method for selected patients in living KT. PMID:27064035

  8. Challenging immunosuppression treatment in lung transplant recipients with kidney failure.

    Högerle, Benjamin A; Kohli, Neeraj; Habibi-Parker, Kirsty; Lyster, Haifa; Reed, Anna; Carby, Martin; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Weymann, Alexander; Simon, André R; Sabashnikov, Anton; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Soresi, Simona

    2016-03-01

    Kidney failure after lung transplantation is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Calcineurin inhibitors are immunosuppressants which play a major role in terms of postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. We report our preliminary experience with the anti-interleukin-2 monoclonal antibody Basiliximab utilized as a "calcineurin inhibitor-free window" in the setting of early postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. Between 2012 and 2015 nine lung transplant patients who developed kidney failure for more than 14 days were included. Basiliximab was administrated in three doses (Day 0, 4, and 20) whilst Tacrolimus was discontinued or reduced to maintain a serum level between 2 and 4 ng/mL. Baseline glomerular filtration rate pre transplant was normal for all patients. Seven patients completely recovered from kidney failure (67%, mean eGFR pre and post Basiliximab: 42.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 69 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and were switched back on Tacrolimus. Only one of these patients still needs ongoing renal replacement therapy. Two patients showed no recovery from kidney failure and did not survive. Basiliximab might be a safe and feasible therapeutical option in patients which are affected by calcineurin inhibitor-related kidney failure in the early post lung transplant period. Further studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary results. PMID:26892232

  9. The interaction of the international society concerning kidney transplants--a consideration of diseased kidney transplants in Japan and transplant tourism over the world.

    Kokubo, Asako

    2009-04-01

    In November 2006 in Japan, it was detected that there were 41 cases that diseased kidneys were harvested from patients and then were transplanted to other renal failure patients. This "Diseased kidney transplant" was prohibited in Japan since 2007 because of a lot of problems. On the other hand, in Japan, although there are about 12,000 patients on a waiting list for a transplant, only 10% of those get a transplant. Recently it appears that some patients have gone overseas for kidney transplants (transplant tourism). Concerning the background of transplant tourism, the issues are three points following. First, globalization caused recipients to go abroad easier and faster. Second, transnational law is difficult to institutionalize. Third, there is economical gap in not only international but also domestic. We should discuss again diseased kidney transplant in not only professionals but also in Japanese civilized society. PMID:19261518

  10. [BK virus infections in kidney transplantation].

    Lanot, Antoine; Bouvier, Nicolas; Chatelet, Valérie; Dina, Julia; Béchade, Clémence; Ficheux, Maxence; Henri, Patrick; Lobbedez, Thierry; Hurault de Ligny, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    BK virus is near ubiquitous, with a seroprevalence of around 80% in the general population. Subsequent to an asymptomatic primary infection, BK virus then remains dormant in healthy subjects. Reactivation occurs in immunocompromised people. BKv is pathogenic mainly among patients who have received a kidney transplant, in whom the virus can cause specific tubulo-interstitial nephritis and even result in graft failure among approximately 20 to 30% of nephritic cases. Since the mid 90s, incidence has increased with the use of new powerful immunosuppressor treatments. The cornerstone of BK virus infection or BK virus-associated nephropathy treatment is a decrease of the immunosuppressive regimen, which must then be offset with the risk of rejection. The use of several adjuvant therapies has been submitted (fluoroquinolones, leflunomide, intravenous immunoglobulins, cidofovir), with no sufficient proof enabling the recommendation of first-line prescription. The high frequency of this infection and its potential harmfulness argue for the use of prevention strategies, at least among patients presenting risk factors. Retransplantation is safe after a first kidney allograft loss caused by BK-virus nephropathy, on condition that a screening for viremia is frequently conducted. PMID:26827190

  11. The everyday of people waiting for kidney transplantation

    Micheli Rezende Ferreira Cruz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the everyday of people experiencing the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Methods: this is a qualitative research, based on Heideggerian phenomenology. 14 deponents participated in hemodialysis and registered on the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Phenomenological interview with the research question: How is the experience awaiting the kidney transplant? Color marking technique for analyzing demarcating lines that show similarity, of these, emerged the essential structures that enabled the units of meaning. Results: changing lifestyles, imposing a routine and rigidity of treatment signaling everyday stress and exhaustion of hemodialysis being. Emerging from the modes of gossip, curiosity, and bureaucracy, unfolding-inauthentic and impersonal regarding their care. Conclusion: hemodialysis dependence and awaiting kidney transplantation transfer care for family/professional caregivers. To understand the everyday marked by impositions and restrictions, the reflection about how professional health interaction/being-care becomes important.

  12. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Experience in Japan.

    Ishihara, Hiroki; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Unagami, Kohei; Hirai, Toshihito; Toki, Daisuke; Omoto, Kazuya; Okumi, Masayoshi; Imai, Yoichi; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation; however, few large studies have been performed in Asian institutions. We review our single-center experience with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder patients in Japan. We retrospectively evaluated patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation between January 1985 and December 2013. The patients were divided into early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder ( 10 years after transplantation; therefore, long-term monitoring of patients is needed. PMID:26948427

  13. Health-related quality of life outcomes after kidney transplantation

    Mitterbauer Christa; Fiebiger Wolfgang; Oberbauer Rainer

    2004-01-01

    Abstract With the improvements in short and long term graft and patient survival after renal transplantation over the last two decades Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) is becoming an important additional outcome parameter. Global and disease specific instruments are available to evaluate objective and subjective QOL. Among the most popular global tools is the SF-36, examples of disease specific instruments are the Kidney Transplant Questionnaire (KTQ), the Kidney Disease Questionnaire (K...

  14. SIMULTANEOUS PANCREAS-KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION: EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS

    M.Sh. Khubutia; A. V. Pinchuk; I.V. Dmitriev; K.E. Lazareva; A. G. Balkarov; R. V. Storozhev; N.V. Shmarina

    2014-01-01

    Aim: evaluation of the incidence of early postoperative complications after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation.Materials and methods. The analysis of early postoperative complications after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation is presented in the paper, the most rational diagnostic algorithms, non-surgical and surgical complications’ treatment; the outcomes of the SPKT are reported.Results. 15,6% of patients experienced surgical complications, 12,5% – immunological complicat...

  15. Acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation

    Hamida Fethi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute rejection episodes (AREs are a major determinant of renal allograft survival. The incorporation of new immunosuppressive agents explains, at least partially, the improvement seen in the results of transplantation in recent years. The objectives of this study are to analyze the incidence and severity of AREs, their risk factors and their influence on graft and patient survival. We retrospectively studied 280 kidney transplants performed in adults at the Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, between 1986 and 2004. The diagnosis of ARE was based on clinical data and response to treatment. Allograft biopsies were performed in ten cases. The treatment of AREs consisted of pulse methylprednisolone and anti-thymocyte globulin. There were 186 males (66.4% and 94 females (33.6%, and their mean age was 31 ± 8.9 years. Overall, the 280 study patients experienced a total of 113 AREs. Of them, 85 had only one ARE, 28 had two to three and none had more than three AREs. A total of 68 AREs were completely re-versible, 42 were partially reversible while three could not be reversed with treatment. The mean inci-dence of AREs was 40.4%. The incidence was > 45% between 1986 and 1997, decreased to 20.5% between 1998 and 2000 and to 9% between 2001 and 2004. Graft survival rates in patients with and without AREs were respectively 91% and 93% at three years, 82% and 90% at five years and 73% and 83% at 10 years. We found a decrease in the incidence of AREs in recent years in our study patients, and this was related to the introduction of sensitized cross-match and the newer immunosuppressive agents, particularly MMF. Additionally, AREs had a deleterious impact on late graft survival in our study population.

  16. Post-transplant small cell carcinoma arising in the native kidney of renal transplant recipient

    Tang, Wenhao; Ma, Lulin; Hou, Xiaofei; Yan, Longtao; Upadhyay, Amit Mani

    2009-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) originating from kidney is extremely rare. To date, there has been no reported case of primary SCC of renal transplant recipients' (RTRs)' own kidney. Here, we report the first case of primary SCC of RTRs' own kidney. Resection of bilateral native kidneys, possessing whole length of ureters and small cuffs of bladder along with a neoplasm located in her right kidney, was performed on a 68-year-old female patient, five years after renal transplantation. The immuno-hi...

  17. Comparison of Minimal Skin Incision Technique in Living Kidney Transplantation and Conventional Kidney Transplantation

    Sang-Dong Kim; Ji-II Kim; In-Sung Moon; Sun-Cheol Park

    2016-01-01

    Background:Recently,the most common incision for kidney transplantation (KT) is an inverted J-shaped incision known as the "hockey-stick." However,demands for minimally invasive surgery in KT are increasing as in other various fields of surgery.Hence,we evaluated whether there is difference between minimal skin incision technique in kidney transplantation (MIKT) and conventional KT (CKT).Methods:Between June 2006 and March 2013,a total of 452 living kidney transplant patients were enrolled.The MIKT group included 17 young unmarried women whose body mass index was <25 kg/m2 and had no anatomic variation.The CKT group included 435 patients.The MIKT operation technique restricted to the 10 cm-sized skin incision in the lower right abdomen from laterally below the anterior superior iliac spine to the midline just above the pubis was performed.We compared the baseline clinical characteristics and postoperative results between two groups.For proper comparison,propensity score matching was implemented.Results:There was no difference in graft function,survival,and postoperative complication rate between MIKT and CKT groups (all P > 0.05).The 5-year graft survival was 92.3% and 85.7% in MIKT and CKT groups,respectively (P =0.786).Conclusions:Our results indicated that MIKT showed more favorable cosmetic results,and there were no statistical differences in various postoperative factors including graft function,survival,and complications compared with CKT.Hence,we suggested that MIKT is an appropriate method for selected patients in living KT.

  18. Urinary Expression of Kidney Injury Markers in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Szeto, Cheuk-Chun; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Lai, Ka-Bik; Lai, Fernand Mac-Moune; Chow, Kai-Ming; Wang, Gang; Luk, Cathy Choi-Wan; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: The outcome of renal transplantation after an episode of acute rejection is difficult to predict, even with an allograft biopsy. We examined whether urinary expression of specific biomarker mRNA could be used as a noninvasive prognostic marker in kidney transplant recipients.

  19. Renal allograft transplant recipient with ruptured hydatid native kidney

    Riyaz Ahmad Bhat; Imtiyaz Wani; Imran Khan; Muzaffar Wani

    2014-01-01

    Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. Ruptured renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a ruptured native hy...

  20. Ethical issues in kidney transplantation – reflections from Nigeria

    Fadare, Joseph; Salako, Babatunde

    2010-01-01

    Joseph Olusesan Fadare1, Babatunde L Salako21Department of Medicine, Kogi State Specialist Hospital, Lokoja; 2Department of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NigeriaAbstract: Organ transplantation has become a life-saving procedure for many disease conditions hitherto considered incurable. Kidney transplantation, now the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease, is the commonest solid organ transplantation carried out in the world at the moment and it is the only solid organ tran...

  1. Warts in a cohort of Danish kidney transplanted patients

    Zachariae, Claus; Sand, Carsten; Hansen, Jesper Melchior; Sørensen, Søren Schwartz; Koch, Karen; Villumsen, John; Axelsen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    There are no published clinical studies evaluating the impact of warts on quality of life after transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of self-reported skin warts and skin cancer and their impact on quality of life in kidney transplanted patients, as measured with the...... cutaneous cancer. A total of 285 (52%) patients replied that they had warts, and these increased with time since last transplantation, with a p-value...

  2. Organ preservation and viability in kidney and liver transplantation

    Maathuis, Marcus Hubertus Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Organ preservation for transplantation. The easy way or best method? Kidney and liver transplantations are routinely performed nowadays to treat end stage organ diseases. However, the increasing gap between demand and supply, has necessitated the transplantation community to expand donor criteria and accept donor organs which sustained more damage. Organ preservation should maintain organ viability after an organ has been disconnected from the circulation in the donor. At this moment static c...

  3. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection

    Shuo-Chun Weng; Kuo-Hsiung Shu; Ming-Ju Wu; Mei-Chin Wen; Shie-Liang Hsieh; Nien-Jung Chen; Der-Cherng Tarng

    2015-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft...

  4. The risk factors for diabetes mellitus after kidney transplantation

    Razeghi Effat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM is an adverse complication of kidney transplantation, associated with decreased graft and patient survival. We investigated the risk factors for PTDM and their relation to graft rejection in our kidney transplant recipients. We prospectively included 109 consecutive first kidney transplant recipients transplanted at the Sina Hospital in Tehran from June 2003 to May 2004. Patients were excluded if they had diabetes at the time of transplantation either as the cause of kidney failure or as a comorbidity. PTDM was defined by fasting blood sugar ≥126 mg/dL or random blood sugar ≥200 mg/dL on two occasions and the need for insulin therapy and/or oral hypoglycemic drugs for at least two weeks. Thirty non-diabetic transplant recipients were diagnosed as having PTDM during the six month follow-up period after transplantation. Sixty non-PTDM controls, matched for age, sex and immuno-suppressive regimen, and transplanted as closely as possible to the PTDM cases, were randomly selected. The risk factors for PTDM were investigated in these 90 transplant recipients. Age older than 50 years (P = 0.04, history of hypertension (P = 0.02, polycystic kidney disease (P = 0.015, duration on dialysis more than one year (P < 0.0001, family history of diabetes mellitus (P < 0.0001, mean daily dose of prednisolone ≥15 mg/day (P < 0.0001 and cyclosporine ≥240 mg/day (P < 0.0001 were all more in the PTDM group. Also, the mean serum triglycerides was higher (P = 0.019 and there was an increased risk of graft rejection (P < 0.0001 in the PTDM group.

  5. The risk factors for diabetes mellitus after kidney transplantation

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is an adverse complication of kidney transplantation, associated with decreased graft and patient survival. We investigated the risk factors for PTDM and their relation to graft rejection in our kidney transplant recipients. We prospectively included 109 consecutive first kidney transplant recipients transplanted at the Sina Hospital in Tehran from June 2003 to May 2004. Patients were excluded if they had diabetes at the time of transplantation either as the cause of kidney failure or as a comorbidity. PTDM was defined by fasting blood sugar =126 mg/dL or random blood sugar =200 mg/dL on two occasions and the need for insulin therapy and/or oral hypoglycemic drugs for at least two weeks. Thirty non-diabetic transplant recipients were diagnosed as having PTDM during the six month followup period after transplantation. Sixty non-PTDM controls, matched for age, sex and immun suppressive regimen, and transplanted as closely as possible to the PTDM cases, were randomly selected. The risk factors for PTDM were investigated in these 90 transplant recipients. Age older than 50 years (P = 0.04), history of hypertension (P = 0.02), polycystic kidney disease (P = 0.015), duration on dialysis more than one year (P < 0.0001), family history of diabetes mellitus (P < 0.0001), mean daily dose of prednisolone =15 mg/day (P < 0.0001) and cyclosporine =240 mg/day (P < 0.0001) were all more in the PTDM group. Also, the mean serum triglycerides was higher (P = 0.019) and there was an increased risk of graft rejection (P < 0.0001) in the PTDM group (Author).

  6. Post-kidney transplant large bowel lymphoproliferative disorder

    Neeraj Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a serious complication of organ transplantation. The gastrointestinal (GI tract is a common site involved, but non-specific signs and symptoms often delay the diagnosis. We report a case of EBV-associated GI-PTLD in a 68-year-old kidney transplant patient who received the kidney ten months earlier. He presented with chronic diarrhea and developed massive pneumo-peritoneum secondary to multiple colonic perforations.

  7. Renal allograft transplant recipient with ruptured hydatid native kidney.

    Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Wani, Imtiyaz; Khan, Imran; Wani, Muzaffar

    2014-07-01

    Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. Ruptured renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition. PMID:25125908

  8. Renal allograft transplant recipient with ruptured hydatid native kidney

    Riyaz Ahmad Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. Ruptured renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition.

  9. When Your Child Needs a Kidney Transplant

    ... One example is polycystic kidney disease, in which normal kidney tissue is replaced by fluid-filled sacs. Glomerular ... kidney will be needed. In some cases, donor kidneys come from a close relative ... whose organs are similar in size to the child's. If a living donor can' ...

  10. The role of commercial non-related living kidney transplants.

    Friedlaender, Michael M

    2003-01-01

    The motivation for dialysis patients to seek early, even pre-emptive, kidney transplantation from living donors is discussed. In most countries both the waiting time and the numbers of patients awaiting kidney transplantation are increasing. Local geopolitics in Jerusalem have produced a unique window to observe present transplant practices which include widespread international marketing of kidneys from paid living donors. These have been subject of media admonitions and total rejection by professional organizations. In a modern world, traditional medical paternalism to both donors and patients should be balanced by rights for individual autonomy. Since patients, donors and medical professionals are already participating in illicit organ trading, is it not time for us to seriously consider the ethical and logistic implications of legalizing financial remuneration for kidney donation? PMID:14733294

  11. Transplantation of infant kidneys - the surgical technique en bloc and transplant position variation: A case report

    Popović Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Due to the ever-present lack of kidney transplant grafts, more and more organs obtained from the so-called “marginal donors” group are accepted, which can provide suboptimal effect of transplantation, depending on their characteristics and/or implantation techniques. Case report. We presented a case with successful variation of kidney position with modified approach of kidney transplantation from an infant to an adult female patient with normal postoperative recovery. Urethral anastomosis was performed without antireflux procedure and this has not led to the development of reflux disease at an early stage. Conclusion. The position of a pair of kidneys proved to be satisfactory despite the growth of the kidney to the expected size and relatively small pelvis. There were no problems with venous stasis and kidney function from the very beginning was good.

  12. End-Stage Renal Disease after Liver Transplantation in Patients with Pre-Transplant Chronic Kidney Disease

    Bahirwani, Ranjeeta; Forde, Kimberly A.; Mu, Yifei; Lin, Fred; Reese, Peter; Goldberg, David; Abt, Peter; Reddy, K. Rajender; Levine, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction prior to liver transplantation has a marked impact on post-transplant kidney outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess post-transplant renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receiving orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) alone.

  13. Different techniques of vessel reconstruction during kidney transplantation

    Tomić Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Multiple renal arteries (MRAs represent a surgical challenge by the difficulty in performing anastomoses, bleeding and stenosis. MRAs should be preserved and special attention should be paid to accessory polar arteries. All renal arteries (RAs must be reconstructed and prepared for safe anastomosis. The paper decribed the different techniques of vessel reconstruction during kidney transplantation including important steps within recovery of organs, preparation and implantation. Methods. In a 16-year period (1996-2012 of kidney transplantation in the Military Medical Academy, Belgrade, a total of 310 living donors and 44 human cadaver kidney transplantations were performed, of which 28 (8% kidneys had two or more RAs. Results. All the transplanted kidneys had immediate function. We repaired 20 cases of donor kidneys with 2 arteries, 4 cases with three RAs, one case with 4 RAs, one case with 4 RAs and renal vein reconstruction, one case with 3 arteries and additional polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE graft reconstruction, one case with transected renal artery and reconstruction with 5 cm long deceased donor external iliac artery. There were no major complications and graft failure. At a minimum of 1-year follow-up, all the patients showed normal renal function. Conclusion. Donor kidney transplantation on a contralateral side and “end-to-end” anastomosis of the renal artery to the internal iliac artery (IIA is our standard procedure with satisfactory results. Renal artery reconstruction and anastomosis with IIA is a safe and highly efficient procedure and kidneys with MRAs are not contraindicated for transplantation. A surgical team should be fully competent to remove cadaveric abdominal organs to avoid accidental injuries of organs vessels.

  14. Ethical issues in kidney transplantation – reflections from Nigeria

    Joseph Olusesan Fadare

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Olusesan Fadare1, Babatunde L Salako21Department of Medicine, Kogi State Specialist Hospital, Lokoja; 2Department of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NigeriaAbstract: Organ transplantation has become a life-saving procedure for many disease conditions hitherto considered incurable. Kidney transplantation, now the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease, is the commonest solid organ transplantation carried out in the world at the moment and it is the only solid organ transplantation done in Nigeria. This procedure, in addition to prolonging lives, also provides better quality of life and is evaluated as cost-effective, because it makes more resources available to other sectors of the economy. Organ transplantation in general and kidney transplantation in particular are fraught with ethical issues and dilemmas worldwide. Some of the ethical issues arising in the setting of developing countries like Nigeria may differ from those in countries where this procedure is established. Informed consent of the donor and the recipient is a major requirement for both organ donation and transplantation. Regarding donation, the ethical issues may differ depending on the type of organ donation, ie, whether it is living-related, living-unrelated, cadaveric, or from brain-dead individuals. Commodification of organs is identified as an ethical dilemma, and arguments for and against this practice are put forward here. Confidentiality of donor information, fairness and equity in donor selection, and access to kidney transplantation when needed are also discussed. Finally, the issue of safety of organ harvesting for the donor and of the transplantation process itself, and the possible long-term consequences for both parties are investigated.Keywords: kidney transplantation, ethical issues, developing countries, Nigeria

  15. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis. PMID:27095641

  16. Acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation

    Obesity in nontransplant patients has been associated with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and proteinuria. To determine whether renal transplant recipients with an elevated BMI have worse long term graft survival, we prospectively studied 92 patients transplanted between April 1999 and July 2000. Weight (Wt) and height of the patients were recorded prior to transplantation and two weeks, one, two and three years post transplantation. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr) and blood pressure were checked monthly, while triglyceride, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were obtained 3 monthly for 3 years post transplantation. Graft dysfunction was defined as serum Cr> 1.8 mg/dL. While BMI and Wt of the patients before transplantation did not show any significant correlation with chronic renal allograft dysfunction (CRAD), patients with higher Wt and BMI two weeks after transplantation showed an increased risk of developing CRAD during the three year post transplant independent of other risk factors (P< 0.05). Patients with greater Wt loss in the first two weeks post transplantation showed a decreased risk of developing CRAD in the following 3 years (P< 0.001). Our study suggests that high Wt and BMI are significantly associated with worse graft survival 3 years post renal transplantation. (author)

  17. A case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome diagnosed after kidney transplantation.

    Park, Yoo Min; Kim, Da Rae; Park, Ji Yoon; Kim, Seul Ki; Kim, Se Yun; Kim, Jin Sug; Lee, Yu Ho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Moon, Ju-Young; Lee, Sang-Ho; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Lee, Tae-Won

    2015-12-01

    We report the first case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS) diagnosed after kidney transplantation in Korea. RHS is a disease caused by latent varicella-zoster characterized to involve geniculate ganglion of the seventh cranial nerve. Patients who have undergone kidney transplantation can be easily affected by viral infections because of their immune-compromised status. A 35-year-old man with hypertensive end-stage renal disease underwent kidney transplantation. Two months after surgery, the recipient was diagnosed with RHS and treated with antivirals and steroids. However, after using the antiviral agents for the recommended duration, facial paralysis occurred as a new presentation and he required further treatment. Otalgia and periauricular vesicles improved, but the facial palsy remained. PMID:26779429

  18. Acute kidney transplant failure following transurethral bladder polyp fulguration.

    Collins, Bradley H.; Marroquin, Carlos E.; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E.; Kuo, Paul C.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Butterly, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction and anastomotic leak represent the most common urologic complications of kidney transplantation. Delay in diagnosis or treatment can lead to allograft loss. Obstruction of the ureter occurs in 2% of kidney transplant recipients. Although the majority of cases are immediate technical complications of the operation, subsequent manipulation of the genitourinary system can result in iatrogenic ureteral injury. We report the case of a long-term kidney transplant recipient who developed obstructive uropathy and acute renal failure requiring dialysis after undergoing cystoscopy and bladder polyp fulguration. The etiology was inadvertent thermal injury of the ureteroneocystostomy incurred during the procedure. After attempted percutaneous management, definitive open repair resulted in a return of allograft function to baseline. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15779509

  19. Use of Kidneys with Small Renal Tumors for Transplantation.

    Lugo-Baruqui, Alejandro; Guerra, Giselle; Arocha, Adriana; Burke, George W; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Population of patients with end-stage renal disease increases every day. There is a vast difference in the number of patients on the waiting list for a kidney transplant, and the number of donors and the gap increases every year. The use of more marginal organs can increase the donor pool. These organs include the kidneys with small renal cell carcinomas (RCTC). There has been a number of reports in the literature about the use of these grafts for renal transplant after tumor excision and reconstruction. These grafts have been reported to be used with good renal function outcomes without an increased risk for malignancy recurrences. We present the collection of evidence for the use of kidneys with RCC for transplantation, technique used for surgical resection, and reconstruction as well as insights on the recommendations for the use of these grafts. PMID:26695405

  20. Renal denervation of the native kidneys for drug-resistant hypertension after kidney transplantation.

    Dobrowolski, Linn C; Bemelman, Frederike J; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; van den Born, Bert-Jan H; Reekers, Jim A; Krediet, C T Paul

    2015-02-01

    There is a strong rationale for renal denervation (RDN) of the native kidneys in kidney transplant recipients with treatment-resistant hypertension. We present a patient with a stable graft function, who underwent RDN for posttransplant therapy-resistant hypertension (24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) 143/89 mmHg, while compliantly using five different antihypertensive agents). After RDN, BP measurements and orthostatic complaints required withdrawal of two antihypertensive agents and halving a third. At 6 months, ABPM was 134/84 mmHg and allograft function remained unchanged. This case calls for designing well-designed prospective studies on RDN in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:25713714

  1. Transplant Trajectory and Relational Experience Within Living Kidney Dyads.

    Ummel, Deborah; Achille, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Living kidney donation is considered common practice across most Westernized countries. While extensive research has documented the experience of living donors, few studies have addressed the perspective of recipients, and even fewer have examined the experience of donor and recipient as an interactive dyad. In this study, our aim was to examine the reciprocal influence between donors and recipients across the transplantation process. We recruited a homogeneous sample of 10 donors and recipients, who were interviewed individually. Data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The presentation of results follows the stages of the transplantation process: the disease experience, the experience of offering and accepting a kidney, the screening period, the surgery, and the post-transplantation period. Results are discussed within the framework of Mauss's gift exchange theory, social roles, and altruism. This comprehensive description of the dyadic experience provides a way to frame and understand psychosocial aspects and relational implications of living renal transplantation. PMID:25700284

  2. Functional genomics in renal transplantation and chronic kidney disease

    For the past decade, the development of genomic technology has revolutionized modern biological research. Functional genomic analyses enable biologists to study genetic events on a genome wide scale. Examples of applications are gene discovery, biomarker determination, disease classification, and drug target identification. Global expression profiles performed with microarrays enable a better understanding of molecular signature of human disease, including acute and chronic kidney disease. About 10 % of the population in western industrialized nations suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Treatment of end stage renal disease, the final stage of CKD is performed by either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation. The preferred treatment is renal transplantation, because of the higher quality of life. But the pathophysiology of the disease on a molecular level is not well enough understood and early biomarkers for acute and chronic kidney disease are missing. In my studies I focused on genomics of allograft biopsies, prevention of delayed graft function after renal transplantation, anemia after renal transplantation, biocompatibility of hemodialysis membranes and peritoneal dialysis fluids and cardiovascular diseases and bone disorders in CKD patients. Gene expression profiles, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction networks were used to elucidate the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of the disease or phenomena, identifying early biomarkers or predictors of disease state and potentially drug targets. In summery my PhD thesis represents the application of functional genomic analyses in chronic kidney disease and renal transplantation. The results provide a deeper view into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of kidney disease. Nevertheless, future multicenter collaborative studies, meta-analyses of existing data, incorporation of functional genomics into large-scale prospective clinical trials are needed and will give biomedical

  3. Segmental Renal Ischemia following Transplantation of Horseshoe Kidney as Separate Allografts

    J. T. Foster

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Horseshoe kidney is a congenital anomaly that presents unique challenges for the transplant surgeon. The mere presence of horseshoe kidney should not preclude consideration for transplantation. Case Report. A 33-year-old women suffering from end-stage renal disease underwent deceased donor renal transplant with a divided horseshoe kidney. We present a postoperative complication and the technical strategy for transplant salvage. The patient currently has excellent graft function. Discussion. Horseshoe kidneys do present challenges for successful transplantation. Though case reports of successful transplantation are increasing, we present a technical complication and successful transplant salvage strategy. Technical descriptions in the literature of successful back-table preparation strategies should help more transplant surgeons to begin to utilize this resource. Conclusion. This study concludes that horseshoe kidneys can be successfully used for transplantation and provides a technical strategy to salvage the transplant after a unique complication associated with these donor kidneys.

  4. Management and prevention of post-transplant malignancies in kidney transplant recipients

    Stallone, Giovanni; Infante, Barbara; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The central issue in organ transplantation remains suppression of allograft rejection. Thus, the development of immunosuppressive drugs has been the key to successful allograft function. The increased immunosuppressive efficiency obtained in the last two decades in kidney transplantation dramatically reduced the incidence of acute rejection. However, the inevitable trade-off was an increased rate of post-transplant infections and malignancies. Since the incidence of cancer in immunosuppressed...

  5. FREQUENCY OF KIDNEY REJECTION IN DIABETIC PATIENTS UNDERGOING SIMULTANEOUS KIDNEY AND PANCREATIC ISLET CELL TRANSPLANTATION1,2

    Carroll, P B; Ricordi, C.; Shapiro, R.; Rilo, H.R.; Fontes, P.; Scantlebury, V.; Irish, W.; Tzakis, A.G.; Starzl, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    An increased frequency of kidney rejection has been reported in diabetic patients who have simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation compared with patients who have a kidney transplant alone. Kidney graft outcome is similar in the two groups. The mechanism for increased kidney graft rejection with a simultaneous pancreas graft is not clear. It is ascribed to the immunogenicity of the exocrine pancreas that initiates migration of activated cells from the peripheral blood that are entrap...

  6. Dendritic Cells and Innate Immunity in Kidney Transplantation

    Zhuang, Quan; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes emerging concepts related to the roles of dendritic cells and innate immunity in organ transplant rejection. First, it highlights the primary role that recipient, rather than donor, dendritic cells have in rejection and reviews their origin and function in the transplanted kidney. Second, it introduces the novel concept that recognition of allogeneic non-self by host monocytes (referred to here as innate allorecognition) is necessary for initiating rejection by ...

  7. Type 4 renal tubular acidosis in a kidney transplant recipient.

    Kulkarni, Manjunath

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old diabetic patient who presented with muscle weakness 2 weeks after kidney transplantation. Her immunosuppressive regimen included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids. She was found to have hyperkalemia and normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Tacrolimus levels were in therapeutic range. All other drugs such as beta blockers and trimethoprim - sulfamethoxazole were stopped. She did not respond to routine antikalemic measures. Further evaluation revealed type 4 renal tubular acidosis. Serum potassium levels returned to normal after starting sodium bicarbonate and fludrocortisone therapy. Though hyperkalemia is common in kidney transplant recipients, determining exact cause can guide specific treatment. PMID:27105603

  8. New Onset Diabetes Mellitus after Kidney Transplantation in Denmark

    Hornum, Mette; Jørgensen, Kaj Anker; Hansen, Jesper Melchior;

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: This study aimed to investigate the development of new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) in a prospective study of 97 nondiabetic uremic patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Included were 57 kidney recipients (Tx group, age 39 13 years) and 40 uremic...... patients remaining on the waiting list for kidney transplantation (uremic controls, age 47 11 years). All were examined at baseline before possible transplantation and after 12 months. The prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes, insulin sensitivity index (ISI), and insulin secretion index (Isecr) were...

  9. Successful reuse of a transplanted kidney: 3-year follow-up.

    Celik, Ali; Saglam, Funda; Cavdar, Caner; Sifil, Aykut; Gungor, Ozkan; Bora, Seymen; Gulay, Huseyin; Camsari, Taner

    2007-07-01

    The number of new transplantations has not kept pace with the ever-growing number of patients waiting for a kidney transplant, and there has been a growing shortage of deceased donor kidneys. Previously transplanted organs have been used to increase the donor pool. There is very little data about the reuse of a transplanted kidney. We report a case of successful reuse of a kidney graft after the death of the first recipient with a 3-year follow-up. PMID:17591534

  10. Therapeutic role of sirolimus in non-transplant kidney disease.

    Rangan, Gopala K; Nguyen, Tina; Mainra, Rahul; Succar, Lena; Schwensen, Kristina G; Burgess, Jane S; Ho, Kok On

    2009-08-01

    Sirolimus is a member of a novel class of immunosuppressant drug that potently suppresses T cell proliferation and expansion by inhibition of the Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (TORC1) protein kinase. Sirolimus also has anti-proliferative effects on intrinsic cells of the kidney, and increasing evidence suggests that it may have a therapeutic role in non-transplant renal diseases. In the normal kidney, sirolimus is considered to be non-nephrotoxic. In the diseased kidney, sirolimus may be beneficial or detrimental, depending on the type of renal injury. In polycystic kidney disease, TORC1 activation mediates renal tubular epithelial cell (TEC) proliferation and cyst growth in animals, and Phase III clinical trials are underway to determine the effect of sirolimus in attenuating disease progression in humans. In contrast, in acute kidney injury, sirolimus transiently impairs proximal TEC regeneration and delays renal recovery. In animal models of lupus nephritis and diabetic kidney disease, sirolimus prevents disease progression. However, the efficacy of sirolimus in human glomerulonephritis as well as in diabetic chronic kidney disease remains unclear, as it paradoxically exacerbates renal dysfunction when the baseline glomerular filtration rate is low ( 300 mg/day). This may, in part, be due to inhibition of compensatory glomerular capillary repair through the suppression of endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenic growth factor production by podocytes. Therefore, at present, polycystic kidney disease is the most promising therapeutic application for sirolimus in non-transplant renal diseases, and further studies are needed to clarify its role in other situations. PMID:19374918

  11. Two cases of combined liver-kidney transplantation

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To report the clinical experiences of srmultaneous hepatorenal transplantation. Methods We performed simultaneous hepatorenal transplantation in one patient with liver cirrhosis of hepatitis B and uremia of chronic nephritis on February 1,1999 and one patient with liver cirrhosis of hepatitis B complicated by hepatorenal syndrome on March 12, 1999.The donors were heart arrest cases. Rapid multiple organ harvesting techniques and UW solution infusion in situ were used. Liver and kidney transplantation were orthotopic and ordinary methods, respectively. Immunosuppressive drugs consisted of cyclosporine, Cellcept, ALG and sortstso steroids. Lamividine was used os day 50 and day 40 postoparation, respectively. Results Both transplanted organs rapidly achieved normal function postoperation and the patients recovered well but suffered mild kidney rejection day 110 postopemtion in No 1 patient. In No 2 patient, acute renal function failure, mental symptoms, muscle spasm,cerebral artery thrombosis, inhalation poeumonia and chronic liver graft rejection ensured sequentially but were controlled.The patients have survived for more than nine and eight months, respectively, with normal life quality. Conclusions Combined hepatorenal transplant is a radical treatment method for liver and kidney function failure and requires more comprehensive techniques than isolated single organ transplantation.Preventing the recurrence of hepatitis B by oral lamividine may be a kdy to long-term survival.

  12. Increased Early Rejection Rate after Conversion from Tacrolimus in Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation

    Barone GW; Ketel BL; Abul-Ezz SR; Lightfoot ML

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT: A successful immunosuppression regimen for combined kidney and pancreas transplants is tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. However, not all patients tolerate these immunosuppressants especially tacrolimus. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of cyclosporine as a rescue agent for tacrolimus toxicity in combined kidney and pancreas transplants. DESIGN: Retrospective. SETTING: Single center. PATIENTS: Thirty-five combined kidney and pancreas transplants were performed bet...

  13. Red Kidney: Kidney Transplant From a Deceased Donor Who Received Massive Blood Transfusion During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Bell, Richard; Hanif, Faisal; Prasad, Padmini; Ahmad, Niaz

    2016-06-01

    Here, we present a case of a deceased-donor kidney transplant. The brain-dead donor had received a massive blood transfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, which lead to hemolysis, hemoglobinuria, acute kidney injury, and renal replacement therapy. The kidney appeared red after in situ flush. Postoperatively, the recipient developed delayed graft function. Protocol biopsy during the postoperative period revealed the widespread deposition of heme pigment in the renal tubules. Massive blood transfusion and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery are associated with hemolysis and heme pigment deposition in the renal tubules, which subsequently lead to acute kidney injury. Kidneys from such donors appear red and, while this does not preclude transplant, are likely to develop delayed graft function. PMID:26030717

  14. The perception of sleep quality in kidney transplant patients during the first year of transplantation

    Dnyelle Souza Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Poor sleep quality is one of the factors that adversely affects patient quality of life after kidney transplantation, and sleep disorders represent a significant cardiovascular risk factor. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of changes in sleep quality and their outcomes in kidney transplant recipients and analyze the variables affecting sleep quality in the first years after renal transplantation. METHODS: Kidney transplant recipients were evaluated at two time points after a successful transplantation: between three and six months (Phase 1 and between 12 and 15 months (Phase 2. The following tools were used for assessment: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the quality of life questionnaire Short-Form-36; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale; the Karnofsky scale; and assessments of social and demographic data. The prevalence of poor sleep was 36.7% in Phase 1 and 38.3% in Phase 2 of the study. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between patients with and without changes in sleep quality between the two phases. We found no changes in sleep patterns throughout the study. Both the physical and mental health scores worsened from Phase 1 to Phase 2. CONCLUSION: Sleep quality in kidney transplant recipients did not change during the first year after a successful renal transplantation.

  15. Polyomavirus JC Urinary Shedding in Kidney and Liver Transplant Recipients Associated With Reduced Creatinine Clearance

    Kusne, Shimon; Vilchez, Regis A.; Zanwar, Preeti; Quiroz, Jorge; Mazur, Marek J.; Heilman, Raymond L.; Mulligan, David; Butel, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Polyomavirus reactivation can cause significant morbidity in solid organ transplant recipients, particularly BK virus (BKV) in kidney transplant patients. Less is known about dynamics of John Cunningham virus (JCV) in nonkidney organ transplant patients.

  16. Effect of recipient age on the outcome of kidney transplantation.

    Abou-Jaoude, Maroun M; Khoury, Mansour; Nawfal, Naji; Shaheen, Joseph; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of recipient age (RA) on kidney transplantation outcome in 107 transplant patients, with a follow-up of 1 year. Patients were divided in 3 groups: Group A (RA60 years; 16 patients). The rate and severity of acute rejection, infection rate and type, delayed graft function, hospital stay, creatinine levels (3, 6, 12 months), incidence at 1 year of post-transplant hypertension, cholesterol and triglycerides blood levels, and the rate of post-transplant surgical complications, and 1-year graft and patient survival were comparable between the 3 groups. However, creatinine blood level at 1 month and the 1-year fasting blood sugar were significantly higher in Group B. The RA does not seem to be of a significant predictive value, good selection and pre-transplant patient workout are important factors for a better outcome. PMID:18817871

  17. A suspected case of plasma cell-rich acute renal transplant rejection associated with de novo donor-specific antibody.

    Yoshikawa, Mikiko; Kitamura, Ken; Ishimura, Takeshi; Hara, Shigeo; Fujisawa, Masato; Nishi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    A kidney transplant case with de novo donor-specific antibody showed monoclonal plasma cell infiltration into the graft with ABO incompatibility. Three years after transplantation, the patient's graft function suddenly deteriorated. Interstitial edema and the predominant infiltration of inflammatory plasma cells with kappa chain monoclonality were observed in biopsy specimens. The in situ hybridization of Epstein-Barr virus was negative and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder was not evident from radiological examinations. On laboratory examination, the patient had de novo donor-specific antibody for HLA-DQ. We suspected plasma cell-rich acute rejection for which methylprednisolone pulse therapy, plasma exchange, rituximab, and 15-deoxyspergualin were given. In the ensuing biopsy, the degree of plasma cell infiltration was similar to the first biopsy; however, kappa chain monoclonality relatively weakened. Owing to resistance to these treatments, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (0.5 g/kg/day) was added. The serum creatinine level gradually declined to 3.1 mg/dL; however, it increased up to 3.6 mg/dL again. In the final biopsy, the infiltrated plasma cells disappeared but severe interstitial fibrosis developed. This case showed difficulty in the diagnosis and treatment of plasma cell-rich acute rejection. A detailed consideration of this case may be helpful in understanding the clinical features and pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:26031590

  18. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation

    ... transplant medicines? Through patient-assistance programs, prescription drug companies give discounts to people who can show they cannot afford ... financial help. Through patient-assistance programs, prescription drug companies give discounts to people who can show they cannot afford ...

  19. Improving kidney and live donation rates in Asia: living donation.

    Rizvi, S A H; Naqvi, S A A; Hashmi, A; Akhtar, F; Hussain, M; Ahmed, E; Zafar, M N; Abbas, Z; Jawad, F; Sultan, S; Hasan, S M

    2004-09-01

    Organ transplantation started with organs donated by living subjects. Increasing demands brought cadaveric organ donation. The brain-death law, mandatory for this procedure, is prevalent in all countries involved in organ transplantation except Pakistan. Spain is the leading country in cadaveric organ donation (32.5 pmp). Despite the sources of living and cadaveric organs, both heart-beating and non-heart-beating, the gap between the demand and supply has widened. An example is the United States, where the numbers of patients on the waiting list for kidney transplantation have risen from 30,000 in 1988 to more than 116,000 in 2001. This has caused a resurgence in living donors all over the world. These can be related, unrelated, spousal, marginal, or ABO-incompatible donors. Family apprehensions, medical care costs, and nonexistent social security can be barriers to this form of organ donation. Unrelated organ donation can open the doors to commercialism. To make this process more successful, transplantation should be made reachable by all sectors of the population. This is possible when transplantation is taken to the public sector institutions and financed jointly by the government and community. To increase living organ donation especially in Asian countries, which face barriers of low literacy rates, ignorance, and cultural and religious beliefs, more efforts are needed. Public awareness and education play an important role. Appreciation and supporting the donors is necessary and justified. It is a noble act and should be recognized by offering job security, health insurance, and free education for the donor's children. PMID:15518688

  20. Kidney transplantation: is there any place for refugees?

    Einollahi, B; Noorbala, M H; Kardavani, B; Moghani-Lankarani, M; Assari, S; Simforosh, N; Bagheri, N

    2007-05-01

    There are more than 8 million refugees worldwide with the Middle East bearing the brunt. Socioeconomic factors are the major obstacles that refugees encounter when seeking health care in the host country. It, therefore, comes as no surprise that refugees are denied equal opportunities for one of the most sophisticated and expensive medical procedures in the world, kidney transplantation. With respect to transplantation, refugees are caught between a rock and a hard place: as recipients they have to single-handedly clear many hurdles on the arduous road to renal transplantation and as donors they are left unprotected against human organ trafficking. It should be the moral responsibility of the host country to provide this population with a support network. The ways and means of establishing this network should be defined locally; nevertheless, enabling refugees to receive a transplant is the most basic step, which should be followed by the provision of financial support and follow-up facilities in a concerted effort to ensure the continued function of the invaluable graft. It is also necessary that refugees be protected from being an organ reservoir on the black market. There are no precise regional or international data available on kidney transplantation in refugees; among the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation countries, only Iran, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, and Turkey have thus far provided data on their respective kidney transplantation regulations and models. Other countries in the region should follow suit and design models tailored to the local needs and conditions. What could, indubitably, be of enormous benefit in the long term is the establishment of an international committee on transplantation in refugees. PMID:17524843

  1. Sexual dysfunction after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation

    Jürgensen, J S; Ulrich, C; Hörstrup, J H;

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) is the treatment of choice for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) because it improves survival, is cost-effective, and can mitigate secondary complications of diabetes. Patient-reported outcomes such as...

  2. DCD kidney transplantation: results and measures to improve outcome.

    Hoogland, E.R.; Snoeijs, M.G.; Heurn, L.W.E. van

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the present review is to describe the current kidney preservation techniques for donors after cardiac death and to give insight in new developments that may reduce warm ischemia times and therefore improve graft function after transplantation. RECENT FINDINGS: There

  3. Cost-Related Immunosuppressive Medication Nonadherence Among Kidney Transplant Recipients

    Evans, Roger W.; Applegate, William H.; Briscoe, David M.; Cohen, David J.; Rorick, Christopher C.; Murphy, Barbara T.; Madsen, Joren C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Immunosuppressive medications are essential in preventing kidney transplant rejection. Continuous insurance coverage for outpatient immunosuppressive medications remains a major issue. The objective of this study was to establish the prevalence and consequences of cost-related immunosuppressive medication nonadherence.

  4. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation

    ... back on the waiting list for another kidney. Side Effects of Immunosuppressants Immunosuppressants can weaken your immune system, ... patients, over long periods of time, this diminished immunity can increase the risk of developing cancer. Some ...

  5. Health-related quality of life outcomes after kidney transplantation

    Mitterbauer Christa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the improvements in short and long term graft and patient survival after renal transplantation over the last two decades Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL is becoming an important additional outcome parameter. Global and disease specific instruments are available to evaluate objective and subjective QOL. Among the most popular global tools is the SF-36, examples of disease specific instruments are the Kidney Transplant Questionnaire (KTQ, the Kidney Disease Questionnaire (KDQ and the Kidney Disease-Quality of Life (KDQOL. It is generally accepted that HRQL improves dramatically after successful renal transplantation compared to patients maintained on dialysis treatment but listed for a transplant. It is less clear however which immunosuppressive regimen confers the best QOL. Only few studies compared the different regimens in terms of QOL outcomes. Although limited in number, these studies seem to favour non-cyclosporine based protocols. The main differences that could be observed between patients on cyclosporine versus tacrolimus or sirolimus therapy concern the domains of appearance and fatigue. This may be explained by two common adverse effects occurring under cyclosporine therapy, gingival hyperplasia and hair growth. Another more frequently occurring side effect under calcineurin inhibitor therapy is tremor, which may favour CNI free protocols. This hypothesis, however, has not been formally evaluated in a randomised trial using HRQL measurements. In summary HRQL is becoming more of an issue after renal transplantation. Whether a specific immunosuppressive protocol is superior to others in terms of HRQL remains to be determined.

  6. Black markets, transplant kidneys and interpersonal coercion

    Taylor, J S

    2006-01-01

    One of the most common arguments against legalising markets in human kidneys is that this would result in the widespread misuse that is present in the black market becoming more prevalent. In particular, it is argued that if such markets were to be legalised, this would lead to an increase in the number of people being coerced into selling their kidneys. Moreover, such coercion would occur even if markets in kidneys were regulated, for those subject to such coercion would not be able to avail themselves of the legal protections that regulation would afford them. Despite the initial plausibility of this argument, there are three reasons to reject it. Firstly, the advantages of legalising markets in human kidneys would probably outweigh its possible disadvantages. Secondly, if it is believed that no such coercion can ever be tolerated, markets in only those human kidneys that fail to do away with coercion should be condemned. Finally, if coercion is genuinely opposed, then legalising kidney markets should be supported rather than opposed, for more people would be coerced (ie, into not selling) were such markets to be prohibited. PMID:17145908

  7. Spanish validation of the "Kidney Transplant Questionnaire": a useful instrument for assessing health related quality of life in kidney transplant patients

    Valdés Covadonga; Ortega Teresa; Ortega Francisco; Rebollo Pablo; García-Mendoza Mónica; Gómez Ernesto

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background There is a growing interest in the evaluation of Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) among patients undergoing Renal Replacement Therapy. In Spain, no specific questionnaire exists for kidney transplant patients. Here we present the Spanish validation of the first specific HRQoL assessment tool: the kidney transplant questionnaire (KTQ). Methods Prospective study of 31 patients on transplant waiting list who received the first kidney. Patients were evaluated before tran...

  8. Kidney transplantation: Ethical challenges in the Arab world

    Hassan Chamsi-Pasha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide gap between organ supply and demand, which results in a very long waiting time for kidney transplantation and an increasing number of deaths of the patients while on the waiting list. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding organ donation, allocation and use of living donors through exploitation of the poor for the benefit of the wealthy. Success in the implementation of kidney transplantation programs in a country depends on various factors including the economic situation, religious approval, public views, medical expertise and existing legislation. The public attitude toward donation is pivotal in all transplantation programs; increasing the awareness of the leaders of religion is vital in this regard.

  9. Kidney transplantation: ethical challenges in the Arab world.

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed Ali

    2014-05-01

    There is a wide gap between organ supply and demand, which results in a very long waiting time for kidney transplantation and an increasing number of deaths of the patients while on the waiting list. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding organ donation, allocation and use of living donors through exploitation of the poor for the benefit of the wealthy. Success in the implementation of kidney transplantation programs in a country depends on various factors including the economic situation, religious approval, public views, medical expertise and existing legislation. The public attitude toward donation is pivotal in all transplantation programs; increasing the awareness of the leaders of religion is vital in this regard. PMID:24821144

  10. Kidney transplantation in older patients: benefits and risks.

    Rao, Venkateswara K

    2002-01-01

    The proportion of older patients accepted for dialysis is increasing every year both in the US and abroad. Of the two treatment modalities for end-stage renal disease, i.e. dialysis and transplantation, the latter offers more freedom and is associated with better clinical outcome. Most elderly patients seem to have excellent functional rehabilitation after a kidney transplant. However, in view of the wide gap between the availability of cadaver organs and the people in need, giving the precious organ to the elderly who have a shorter expected lifespan may present an ethical problem. Therefore, it has become increasingly important to offer the kidney to only those who have no significant comorbid conditions or other high risk factors, so as to improve the odds of success after renal transplantation. PMID:11950375

  11. Radiology of kidney transplants; Radiodiagnostik der Transplantatniere

    Schenk, J.P.; Hansmann, J.; Hallscheidt, P.; Weingard, K.; Leutloff, C.U.; Duex, M.; Richter, G.M.; Kaufmann, G.W. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiodiagnostik; Wiesel, M. [Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Urologische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1999-05-01

    Diagnostic imaging after renal transplantation is of high importance in the differential diagnosis of peri- and postoperative complications. Sonography with color duplex imaging is the method of choice in the diagnosis of acute transplant rejection. MRI is an additional method in the diagnosis of transplant dysfunktion especially in diagnosis of perirenal fluid collections. MR angiography and MR urography are noninvasive diagnostic modalities with the potential to replace angiography and pyelography. Angiography, complemented by carbon dioxide angiography, still is the gold standard in the diagnosis of transplant artery stenosis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die bildgebende Diagnostik nach Nierentransplantation hat einen hohen Stellenwert in der Differentialdiagnostik peri- und postoperativer Komplikationen. Die Sonographie mit Doppler- und Farbduplexsonographie ist die Methode der ersten Wahl in der Diagnostik der akuten Transplantatabstossung. Die MRT kann als zusaetzliche Methode in der Diagnostik der akuten Transplantatdysfunktion und insbesondere bei unklarer perirenaler Fluessigkeitsansammlung nach Transplantation eingesetzt werden. MR-Angiographie und MR-Urographie sind ergaenzende nichtinvasive Methoden, welche die Angiographie (DSA) und Pyelographie zunehmend ersetzen koennen. Die Angiographie, ergaenzt durch die CO{sub 2}-Angiographie, ist weiterhin der Goldstandard in der Diagnostik von Transplantatarterienstenosen. (orig.)

  12. INTERLEUKIN-6 PROFILE IN EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD AFTER KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    A. V. Vatazin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the profile of IL-6 in the early postoperative period after kidney transplantation and the factors that affect concentration of this cytokine. Methods and results. 28 kidney recipients were included in the study. It has been found that in most patients after surgery IL-6 was released, and the absence of such a reaction was a poor prognostic sign. Rate of increasing of the concentration and form of its curve within the first postoperative day depended on the length of preservation, warm ischemia time, type of donor, and differed in recipients with normal and delayed initial graft function. Conclusion. Further study of the role of circulating factors in kidney transplantation would improve patient outcomes. 

  13. Predicting and preventing readmissions in kidney transplant recipients.

    Covert, Kelly L; Fleming, James N; Staino, Carmelina; Casale, Jillian P; Boyle, Kimberly M; Pilch, Nicole A; Meadows, Holly B; Mardis, Caitlin R; McGillicuddy, John W; Nadig, Satish; Bratton, Charles F; Chavin, Kenneth D; Baliga, Prabhakar K; Taber, David J

    2016-07-01

    A lack of research exploring post-transplant process optimization to reduce readmissions and increasing readmission rates at our center from 2009 to 2013 led to this study, aimed at assessing the effect of patient and process factors on 30-d readmission rates after kidney transplantation. This was a retrospective case-control study in adult kidney transplant recipients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were utilized to assess patient and process determinants of 30-d readmissions. 384 patients were included; 30-d readmissions were significantly associated with graft loss and death (p = 0.001). Diabetes (p = 0.049), pharmacist identification of poor understanding or adherence, and prolonged time on hemodialysis prior to transplant were associated with an increased risk of 30-d readmissions. After controlling for risk factors, readmission rates were only independently predicted by pharmacist identification of patient lack of understanding or adherence regarding post-transplant medications and dialysis exposure for more than three yr (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.10-4.71, p = 0.026 and OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.22, 3.70, respectively), both of which were significantly modified by history of diabetes. Thirty-d readmissions are attributable to both patient and process-level factors. These data suggest that a lack of post-transplant medication knowledge in high-risk patients drives early hospital readmission. PMID:27101090

  14. Radionuclide assessment of renal function in the transplanted kidney

    The ability of radionuclide renal function to detect rejection and to presume the prognosis of the transplanted kidney was evaluated in 70 patients. Effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), excretory index (EI) and perfusion index (PI) were examined by I-123 OIH and Tc-99 m DTPA. Numbers of the study in various status were as follows; 51 studies in good function, 43 in acute rejection and 18 in chronic rejection. Significant reduction in ERPF and EI and increase of PI were observed in the acute rejection (p<0.01). In the chronic rejection, there was a progressive decrease of ERPF (p<0.01). The patients were divided into two groups: group A; 46 patients with good function more than 9 months after transplantation and group B; 20 patients of whom recurrence of hemodialysis or nephectomy was done. In living transplantation, ERPF of group B at the first week after transplantation was remarkably lower than group A (p<0.05). In cadaveric transplantation, ERPF of group B at the sixth week was lower than that of group B (p<0.05). This study indicates that serial measurements of renal function by radionuclide methods may provide the state of rejection and prognosis of the transplanted kidney. (author)

  15. [Kidney transplantation and infection in childhood].

    Ranchin, Bruno; Hees, Laure; Stamm, Didier; Bertholet-Thomas, Aurélia; Billaud, Geneviève; Lina, Gérard; Cochat, Pierre; Gillet, Yves

    2011-12-01

    Infectious risk is more important in the transplanted child than in adult because children are less often immunised against pathogens ant more exposed than adults to numerous infectious agents (virus but also bacteria including pneumococcus). The application of the standard immunisation schedule must be a permanent concern of transplantation (Tx) teams. Some vaccines that are not planned in the standard immunization schedule are particularly advised for the child and his family circle, as well as for caregivers. Immunisation response must be evaluated by a serological follow-up before Tx, in particular during the pre-Tx diagnostic work-up, then regularly after Tx. The more frequent absence of immunisation against Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) in children explains the increased frequency of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder at the pediatric age. PMID:22118791

  16. Should we perform kidney transplants on foreign nationals?

    Fortin, Marie-Chantal; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2014-12-01

    In Canada, there are currently no guidelines at either the federal or provincial level regarding the provision of kidney transplantation services to foreign nationals (FN). Renal transplant centres have, in the past, agreed to put refugee claimants and other FNs on the renal transplant waiting list, in part, because these patients (refugee claimants) had health insurance through the Interim Federal Health Programme to cover the costs of medication and hospital care. However, severe cuts recently made to this programme have forced clinicians to question whether they should continue with transplants for FNs, for financial and ethical reasons. This paper first examines different national policies (eg, in Canada, USA, France and the UK) to map the diversity of approaches regarding transplantation for FNs, and then works through different considerations commonly used to support or oppose the provision of organs to these patients: (1) the organ shortage; (2) the free-rider problem; (3) the risk of becoming a transplant destination; (4) the impact on organ donation rates; (5) physicians' duties; (6) economic concerns; (7) vulnerability. Using a Canadian case as a focus, and generalising through a review of various national policies, we analyse the arguments for and against transplantation for FNs with a view to bringing clarity to what is a sensitive political and clinical management issue. Our aim is to help transplant centres, clinicians and ethicists reflect on the merits of possible options, and the rationales behind them. PMID:24277941

  17. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    ROMAO, Elen A.; BOLELLA, Valdes R.; NARDIN, Maria Estela P.; HABIB-SIMAO, Maria Lucia; FURTADO, João Marcelo; MOYSES-NETO, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  18. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    Romao, Elen A; Bolella, Valdes R; Nardin, Maria Estela P; Habib-Simao, Maria Lucia; Furtado, João Marcelo; Moyses-Neto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  19. Surface coil imaging of the kidney transplant

    Seventy-five MR imaging examinations were performed on 51 patients who had received renal allografts. Studies were performed using a 1.5-T superconductive unit operating at 0.5 T, in spin-echo mode with varying pulsing factors. Surface coils were systematically used for signal detection. After qualitative analysis of the MR imaging appearances of the kidneys, results were correlated with the patients' clinical conditions and with pathological studies. T-1 weighted images were the most sensitive in revealing corticomedullary differentiation (CMD). All normally functioning kidneys had the same typical appearance, with excellent CMD. Acute tubular necrosis with good prognosis had a similar appearance. On average, CMD was altered during acute rejection episodes, but it remained preserved in 31% of cases. In such cases, the cortex thickness and the kidney's behavior during multiecho sequences were valuable factors that improved accurate discrimination of acute rejection

  20. Twenty-year survivors of kidney transplantation.

    Traynor, C

    2012-12-01

    There have been few studies of patients with renal allografts functioning for more than 20 years. We sought to identify clinical factors associated with ultra long-term (>20 year) renal allograft survival and to describe the clinical features of these patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the Irish Renal Transplant Database and included 1174 transplants in 1002 patients. There were 255 (21.74%) patients with graft function for 20 years or more. Multivariate analysis identified recipient age (HR 1.01, CI 1.01-1.02), gender (male HR 1.25, CI 1.08-1.45), acute rejection (HR 1.26, CI 1.09-1.45) and transplant type (living related donor vs. deceased donor) (HR 0.52, CI 0.40-0.66) as significantly associated with long-term graft loss. Median serum creatinine was 115 μmol\\/L. The 5-year graft survival in 20-year survivors was 74.7%. The mean age at death was 62.7 years (±10.6). The most common causes of death were cardiovascular disease and malignancy. The two major causes of graft loss were death (with function) and interstitial fibrosis\\/tubular atrophy. Comorbidities included skin cancer (36.1%), coronary heart disease (17.3%) and other malignancies (14.5%). This study identifies factors associated with long-term allograft survival and a high rate of morbidity and early mortality in long-term transplant recipients.

  1. Normal Non-Functioning Kidney Transplant

    Al-Marwani Abdulhakeem

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe form of HCV infection complicated by early liver failure was reported after solid organ transplantation and described as fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis (FCH. We highlight the need for early detection and possible treatment in this rare but often fatal complication of HCV infection.

  2. Combined heart and kidney transplantation: what is the appropriate surgical sequence?

    Ruzza, Andrea; Czer, Lawrence S. C.; Trento, Alfredo; Esmailian, Fardad

    2013-01-01

    Combined heart and kidney transplantation is increasing in frequency but there are no guidelines to establish the indications, contraindications and sequence for this surgical procedure. We report our single-centre experience on 30 consecutive patients who underwent combined heart and kidney transplant in comparison with heart transplant alone. Patients had similar preoperative characteristics in both groups. Combined heart and kidney transplant is associated with the same long-term survival ...

  3. Can deceased donor with recurrent primary brain tumor donate kidneys for transplantation?

    Kumar, Suresh; Modi, Pranjal R; Pal, Bipin C; Modi, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from deceased donors is in its infancy in India. Cadaver organ donation was accepted legally in 1994 by the "Human Organs Transplantation Act." Marginal donors are now accepted by many centers for kidney transplantation. We report a case of procurement of both kidneys from a young deceased donor having recurrent primary brain tumor, transplanted into two adult recipients with successful outcome. PMID:26941500

  4. The Critically Ill Kidney Transplant Recipient: A Narrative Review.

    Canet, Emmanuel; Zafrani, Lara; Azoulay, Élie

    2016-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplantation performed worldwide. Up to 6% of kidney transplant recipients experience a life-threatening complication that requires ICU admission, chiefly in the late posttransplantation period (≥ 6 months). Acute respiratory failure and septic shock are the main reasons for ICU admission. Cardiac pulmonary edema, bacterial pneumonia, acute graft pyelonephritis, and bloodstream infections account for the vast majority of diagnoses in the ICU. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia is the most common opportunistic infection, and one-half of the patients so infected require mechanical ventilation. The incidence of cytomegalovirus visceral infections in the era of preemptive therapy has dramatically decreased. Drug-related neutropenia, sirolimus-related pneumonitis, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome are among the most common immunosuppression-associated toxic effects. Importantly, the impact of critical illness on graft function is worrisome. Throughout the ICU stay, acute kidney injury is common, and about 40% of the recipients require renal replacement therapy. One-half of the patients are discharged alive and free from dialysis. Hospital mortality can reach 30% and correlates with acute illness severity and reason for ICU admission. Transplant characteristics are not predictors of short-term survival. Graft survival depends on pre-ICU graft function, disease severity, and renal toxicity of ICU investigations and treatments. PMID:26836919

  5. Fasting ramadan in kidney transplant patients is safe

    Boobes Yousef

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Muslims with renal transplant often ask their doctors whether fasting Ramadan is safe. Scanty studies have addressed this question. This prospective study was undertaken to identify any clinical or biological changes with Muslim fasting. 22 kidney transplant patients with stable kidney functions, who were transplanted for more than one year, and voluntarily chose to fast during Ramadan in 1425 H (October-November 2004, were studied. Total of 22 subjects (10 men and 12 women with a mean age of 47 ± 11.6 years were studied. Full clinical and biological assessment was done before during and after the month of Ramadan fasting. Medications were taken in two divided doses at sunset (time of breaking the fast and pre dawn (before the fast. None of the patients experienced any undue fatigue, or symptoms. Body weight, blood pressure, kidney function tests, blood sugar, lipid profile, and cyclosporine levels remained stable. In conclusion it is safe for renal transplant recipients of more than one year and having stable graft function to fast during the month of Ramadan; however caution is advised for moderate to severe impaired renal function.

  6. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  7. Update on the Current Status of Kidney Transplantation for Chronic Kidney Disease in Animals.

    Aronson, Lillian R

    2016-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is a novel treatment option for cats suffering from chronic renal failure or acute irreversible renal injury. Improvement in quality of life as well as survival times of cats that have undergone transplantation has helped the technique to gain acceptance as a viable treatment option for this fatal disease. This article reviews information regarding the optimal time for intervention, congenital and acquired conditions that have been successfully treated with transplantation, recipient and donor screening, immunosuppressive therapy, recent advances in anesthetic and surgical management, postoperative monitoring and long-term management, and troubleshooting perioperative and long-term complications. PMID:27593577

  8. Expanded Criteria Donor Kidney Transplantation: Comparative Outcome Evaluation Between Single Versus Double Kidney Transplantation at 8 Years: A Single Center Experience.

    De Paolis, P; Colonnelli, R; Favarò, A; Salem, F; Vignally, P; Carriero, C; Iappelli, M; Di Giulio, S

    2016-03-01

    Transplantation of kidneys retrieved from expanded criteria donors is one of the options to expand the pool of available grafts, shorten the waiting time and increase the number of kidney transplant recipients. This study was a retrospective assessment of 99 patients who underwent renal transplantation during the period 2007-2015 with kidneys harvested from expanded criteria donors (ECD) as defined by the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) following routine biopsy of all kidneys obtained by Karpinsky Score. They formed two groups: SKT (67 recipients that received a single kidney) and DKT (32 patients that received dual kidney transplant). An analysis of differences of two groups between graft and patient survival and graft function were performed after 8 years of observation. We observed between two groups the following statistical differences: Donor age (P < .001), basal high risk of recipients (P < .05), wait time before transplant (P < .05), recipient age (P < .001) delayed graft function (P < .005) while we observe similar values of donor renal function, outcome in graft and patient survival and graft function in recipients. The transplantation of kidneys obtained from expanded criteria donor, allows increase in the number of kidney transplants and in the respect of values of biopsy score and the donor renal function, showed in single or dual kidney transplantation with similar graft and patient survival. PMID:27109948

  9. Impact of Hepatitis C Virus Infection on Kidney Transplantation

    Yasser Soliman

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection increases morbimortality in renal transplantation. Hepatitis C virus positive kidney transplant candidates who remain on the waiting list show a greater risk of mortality than those who are transplanted. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of HCV infection on patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Eighty two patients with end stage renal disease underwent kidney transplantation were included in this study. The patients were classified into group I including 46 HCV negative patients (HCV- and group II including 36 HCV antibody and HCV-RNA positive patients (HCV+. The immunosuppressive protocols were similar in both groups. All recipients were followed up for 3years.Results: There were statistically insignificant differences (P>0.05 between both groups as regard age, gender and donor type (living related or unrelated. Hemodialysis duration before transplantation was highly significant (P0.05; 2 grafts (4.3% lost in HCV- group and 3 (8.3% in HCV+ group with also insignificant difference (P>0.05. Five recipients (10.9% in group I experienced delayed graft function compared to 2 (5.6% recipients in group II with statistically insignificant difference. There was a significantly (P< 0.05 more number of acute rejection episodes among HCV+ patients (11=30.6% than HCV- patients (5=10.9%.New onset diabetes mellitus occurred more among HCV+ (19.4% than HCV- (8.7% recipients, however the difference was insignificant. There was a significant (P<0.05 higher incidence of cytomegalovirus disease among HCV+ (11.1% than HCV- (2.2% recipients. Conclusion: This study suggested that HCV positivity does not significantly affect patient and graft survival despite the significant increased incidence of acute rejection episodes and cytomegalovirus disease. Lastly, all measures should be taken to prevent HCV transmission in dialysis population.

  10. Cholelithiasis in patients on the kidney transplant waiting list

    André Thiago Scandiuzzi Brito

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of cholecystopathy in chronic renal patients awaiting kidney transplants. INTRODUCTION: The prevalence and management of cholelithiasis in renal transplant patients is not well established. METHODS: A total of 342 chronic renal failure patients on the waiting list for a kidney transplant were studied. Patients were evaluated for the presence of cholelithiasis and related symptoms, previous cholecystectomies and other abdominal surgeries, time on dialysis, and general data (gender, age, number of pregnancies, and body mass index. RESULTS: Cholelithiasis was found in 41 out of 342 patients (12%. Twelve of these patients, all symptomatic, had previously undergone cholecystectomies. Five out of 29 patients who had not undergone surgery were symptomatic. Overall, 17 patients (41.5% were symptomatic. Their mean age was 54 (range 32-74 years old; 61% were female, and their mean body mass index was 25.4. Nineteen (76% out of 25 women had previously been pregnant, with an average of 3.6 pregnancies per woman. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of cholelithiasis was similar to that reported in the literature for the general population. However, the high frequency of symptomatic patients points toward an indication of routine pre-transplant cholecystectomy to avoid serious post-transplant complications.

  11. The outcome of commercial kidney transplant tourism in Pakistan.

    Ivanovski, Ninoslav; Masin, Jelka; Rambabova-Busljetic, Irena; Pusevski, Vlado; Dohcev, Saso; Ivanovski, Ognen; Popov, Zivko

    2011-01-01

    The lack of cadaver organs for transplantation motivates some Balkan patients to go to developing countries to buy a kidney. We have followed 36 patients who received kidney transplants in Lahore and Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The patients had not been cleared for transplantation with a standard pre-transplant work-up: 80% were hepatitis-C virus (HCV) or HBsAg positive. During follow-up, seven patients died. Sixteen patients experienced wound infections with post-operative hernias, and three patients developed peri-renal hematomas. Six abscesses and four lymphoceles occurred, and four urinary fistulas were surgically treated. Nephrectomy was performed in three patients because of renal artery thrombosis. Nine patients developed active hepatitis C, and four patients manifested cytomegalovirus disease. Three patients developed steroid diabetes, and three patients experienced acute myocardial infarction. Nine patients had one or more rejection episodes. Urinary tract infection with Pseudomonas or Escherichia occurred frequently. The one-yr patient and graft survival rates were 80% and 68%, respectively. Paid unregulated renal transplantation is not recommended for both ethical reasons and because of an association with excessive morbidity and mortality. PMID:20626425

  12. Living Donor Kidney Versus Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplant in Type I Diabetics: An Analysis of the OPTN/UNOS Database

    Young, Brian Y.; Gill, Jagbir; Huang, Edmund; Takemoto, Steven K.; Anastasi, Bishoy; Shah, Tariq; Bunnapradist, Suphamai

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Transplant options for type I diabetics with end-stage renal disease include simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPKT), living donor kidney (LDKT), and deceased donor kidney transplant (DDKT). It is unclear whether SPKT offers a survival benefit over LDKT in the current era of transplantation. The authors compared outcomes of kidney transplant recipients with type I diabetes using data from the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network/United Network for Organ Sharing.

  13. [Early human transplants: 60th anniversary of the first successful kidney transplants].

    Gentili, Marc E

    2015-11-01

    First kidney transplant attempts begin with the 20th century: improving vascular sutures, understanding the phenomena of rejection or tolerance, then progress in HLA groups enable early success in the second half of the century. Definition of brain death, use of corticosteroids, radiotherapy and prime immunosuppressors promote the development of transplants. Discover of cyclosporine in the 1980s, and legislative developments augur a new era. Many advances are arising: use of stem cells from the donor, enhancement of Maastricht 3 donor or living donation. Finally organ transplantation remains an immense human adventure, but also scientific and ethic. PMID:26206772

  14. Kidney transplantation in an adult patient with VACTERL association.

    Cimen, Sertac; Nantais, Jordan; Guler, Sanem; Lawen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb birth defects (VACTERL) association is a rare, non-random constellation of congenital abnormalities among which urinary tract anomalies can be included. In the presence of these anomalies, patients are suspected to have a higher rate of renal failure than average. We report a case of a 22-year-old woman with VACTERL association and consequent end stage renal failure. A live-related kidney transplant was carried out successfully and the postoperative course was uncomplicated. The patient had immediate graft function. Risk factors that may complicate kidney transplant surgery in this patient population as well as considerations relevant to peritransplant management are discussed. PMID:26106170

  15. Comprehensive evaluation of renal function in the transplanted kidney

    By means of a comprehensive renal function test based on the analysis of orthoiodohippurate kinetics carried out 223 times in 86 renal transplant patients, we have been able to separate clearly five clinical entities: normally functioning transplanted kidneys, acute tubular necrosis, cell-mediated rejection, humoral (chronic) rejection, and postrenal obstruction. Accurate prediction of the fate of the rejecting kidney can be made while still subclinical as much as a week before manifestations by other techniques are evident. Data on 22 donors studied 44 times are also presented. The comprehensive test consists of measurements of effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), sequential scintigraphy, calculations of excretory index (EI) (percent dose actually found in bladder and voided urine as a fraction of the percent dose expected at a given time after injection at the patient's specific ERPF), and residual urine volume. Formulas and regression equations for the calculation of ERPF, EI, residual urine, etc., are presented

  16. Prospective study of urinary tract infection surveillance after kidney transplantation

    Rivera-Sanchez Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI remains one of the main complications after kidney transplantation and it has serious consequences. Methods Fifty-two patients with kidney transplantation were evaluated for UTI at 3-145 days (mean 40.0 days after surgery.. Forty-two received a graft from a live donor and 10 from a deceased donor. There were 22 female and 30 male patients, aged 11-47 years. Microscopic examinations, leukocyte esterase stick, and urinary culture were performed every third day and weekly after hospitalization. A positive culture was consider when patients presented bacterial counts up to 105 counts. Results UTI developed in 19/52 (37% patients at 3-75 days (mean 19.5 days after transplantation. Recurrent infection was observed in 7/52 (13.4% patients at days 17-65. UTI was more frequent in patients who received deceased grafts compared with live grafts (7/10, 70% vs. 12/42, 28%; p vs. 8/22, 36.35%; p Escherichia coli (31.5%, Candida albicans (21.0% and Enterococcus spp. (10.5%, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Morganella morganii, Enterobacter cloacae and Micrococcus spp. Secondary infections were produced by (7/19, 36.8%. Enterococcus spp. (57%, E. coli (28% and Micrococcus spp. (14.2%. Antibiotic resistance was 22% for ciprofloxacin and 33% for ampicillin. Therapeutic alternatives were aztreonam, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, netilmicin and fosfomycin. Conclusions Surveillance of UTI for the first 3 months is a good option for improving quality of life of kidney transplantation patients and the exit of graft function especially for female patients and those receiving deceased grafts. Antibiograms provided a good therapeutic alternative to patients who presented with UTIs after receiving a kidney allograft.

  17. Noninvasive methods to assess the risk of kidney transplant rejection

    Cravedi, Paolo; Mannon, Roslyn B.

    2009-01-01

    In current clinical practice, immune reactivity of kidney transplant recipients is estimated by monitoring the levels of immunosuppressive drugs, and by functional and/or histological evaluation of the allograft. The availability of assays that could directly quantify the extent of the recipient’s immune response towards the allograft would help clinicians to customize the prescription of immunosuppressive drugs to individual patients. Importantly, these assays might provide a more in-depth u...

  18. Health Literacy and Medication Adherence in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    Demian, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Poorer health literacy, defined as patients’ ability to access, process, and understand health-based information in order to make medically related decisions, is linked to adverse self-care and disease management outcomes in a variety of medical populations. We investigated the relationship between health literacy, other aspects of cognition, and medication adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients (N= 96). Our results indicated that poorer health literacy, as assessed by a novel meas...

  19. Recent Developments in Kidney Transplantation – A Critical Assessment

    Womer, Karl L.; Kaplan, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Rapid advances have been made in decreasing acute rejection rates and improving short-term graft survival in kidney transplant recipients. Whether these advances ultimately will lead to a commensurate improvement in long-term survival is not yet known. In recent years, greater attention has been placed on defining the precise etiology of graft loss, determining how far and with what agents we can minimize immunosuppression, and delineating the nature of both T cell-mediated as well as antibod...

  20. Ethical considerations on kidney transplantation from living donors.

    Bruzzone, P; Pretagostini, R; Poli, L; Rossi, M; Berloco, P B

    2005-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from living donors is widely performed all over the world. Living nephrectomy for transplantation has no direct advantage for the donor other than increased self-esteem, but at least remains an extremely safe procedure, with a worldwide overall mortality rate of 0.03%. This theoretical risk to the donor seems to be justified by the socioeconomic advantages and increased quality of life of the recipient, especially in selected cases, such as pediatric patients, when living donor kidney transplantation can be performed in a preuremic phase, avoiding the psychological and physical stress of dialysis, which in children is not well tolerated and cannot prevent retarded growth. According to the Ethical Council of the Transplantation Society, commercialism must be prevented, not only for ethical but also medical reasons. The risks are too high not only for the donors, but also for the recipients, as a consequence of poor donor screening and evaluation with consequent transmission of human immunodeficiency virus or other infectious agents, as well as inappropriate medical and surgical management of donors and also of recipients, who are often discharged too early. Most public or private insurance companies are considering kidney donation a safe procedure without long-term impairment and, therefore, do not increase the premium, whereas recipient insurance of course should cover hospital fees for the donors. "Rewarded gifting" or other financial incentives to compensate for the inconvenience and loss of income related to the donation are not advisable, at least in our opinion. Our center does not perform anonymous living organ donation or "cross-over" transplantation. PMID:16182701

  1. Surveillance biopsies after paediatric kidney transplantation: A review.

    Rose, Edward M; Kennedy, Sean E; Mackie, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective means of treating children with end-stage kidney disease, and yet, there continues to be a limited "life span" of transplanted kidneys in paediatric recipients. Early graft monitoring, using the surveillance biopsy, has the potential to extend renal allograft survival in paediatric recipients. The surveillance biopsy provides important and timely information about acute and chronic graft pathology, particularly SCR and calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity, which can subsequently guide management decisions and improve long-term graft survival. The ostensible value of the surveillance biopsy is furthered by the limitations of conventional renal functional studies. However, there is still much debate surrounding the surveillance biopsy in paediatric recipients, particularly in regard to its overall utility, safety and timing. This review discusses the current literature regarding the utility, safety, and potential predictive value of surveillance biopsies for guiding post-transplant management in paediatric renal allograft recipients, as well as the viability of other potentially newer non-invasive strategies for renal allograft monitoring. PMID:27306873

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy in kidney transplantation.

    Chen, Cheng; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage renal disease, but its implementation is limited by organ shortage and immune rejection. Side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs, such as nephrotoxicity, opportunistic infection, and tumorigenic potential, influence long-term graft outcomes. In recent years, continued research and subsequent discoveries concerning the properties and potential utilization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have aroused considerable interest and expectations. Biological characteristics of MSCs, including multi-lineage differentiation, homing potential, paracrine effect and immunomodulation, have opened new horizons for applications in kidney transplantation. However, many studies have shown that the biological activity of MSCs depends on internal inflammatory conditions, and the safety and efficacy of the clinical application of MSCs remain controversial. This review summarizes the findings of a large number of studies and aims to provide an objective viewpoint based on a comprehensive analysis of the presently established benefits and obstacles of implementing MSC-based therapy in kidney transplantation, and to promote its clinical translation. PMID:26852923

  3. Diagnostics and therapy of lymphoceles after kidney transplantation.

    Hamza, A; Fischer, K; Koch, E; Wicht, A; Zacharias, M; Loertzer, H; Fornara, P

    2006-04-01

    Lymphocele incidence after kidney transplantation is as high as 18%. We retrospectively studied the therapy of 42 lymphoceles that occurred in our clinic between 1990 and 2005, focusing on possible predisposing factors for their formation and the results of several therapy variants: conservative, operative, percutaneous puncture, and laparoscopic or open marsupialization. There was no connection between lymphocele formation and the following parameters: the extent to which the iliac vessels had been prepared, the materials used for the preparation, or whether clips or ligatures were applied. Lymphoceles may originate either from the lymphatic system of the recipient or the transplanted kidney. The most sensible measures to prevent their occurrence therefore seems to be to restrict the transplant bed to the smallest permissible level with careful ligature of the lymphatic vessels in the area of the kidney hilus. Treatment for lymphoceles should start with minimally invasive measures. We use the following algorithm in our clinic: puncture to differentiate between urinoma/lymphocele and to test for bacterial infection, sclerotization (200 mg doxycyclin), and finally marsupialization if persistent. The choice of operative technique depends on the location. This algorithm resulted in a relapse rate of 9.5% during the postoperative observation period of up to 15 years. PMID:16647449

  4. Microsporidia Infection in a Mexican Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Oscar Xavier Hernández-Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms of the microsporidia group are obligated intracellular protozoa that belong to the phylum Microspora; currently they are considered to be related or belong to the fungi reign. It is considered an opportunistic infection in humans, and 14 species belonging to 8 different genera have been described. Immunocompromized patients such as those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, also HIV serum-negative asymptomatic patients, with poor hygienic conditions, and recipients of bone marrow or solid organ transplantation are susceptible to develop deinfection. Sixty transplanted patients with renal microsporidia infection have been reported worldwide. The aim of this paper is to inform about the 2nd case of kidney transplant and microsporidia infection documented in Mexico.

  5. Cognitive Changes in Chronic Kidney Disease and After Transplantation.

    Van Sandwijk, Marit S; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Caan, Matthan W A; De Sonneville, Leo M J; Van Gool, Willem A; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is very common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is strongly associated with increased mortality. This review article will discuss the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in CKD, as well as the effect of dialysis and transplantation on cognitive function. In CKD, uremic toxins, hyperparathyroidism and Klotho deficiency lead to chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular calcifications. This results in an increased burden of cerebrovascular disease in CKD patients, who consistently have more white matter hyperintensities, microbleeds, microinfarctions and cerebral atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Hemodialysis, although beneficial in terms of uremic toxin clearance, also contributes to cognitive decline by causing rapid fluid and osmotic shifts. Decreasing the dialysate temperature and increasing total dialysis time limits these shifts and helps maintain cognitive function in hemodialysis patients. For many patients, kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment modality, because it reverses the underlying mechanisms causing cognitive impairment in CKD. These positive effects have to be balanced against the possible neurotoxicity of infections and immunosuppressive medications, especially glucocorticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. A limited number of studies have addressed the overall effect of transplantation on cognitive function. These have mostly found an improvement after transplantation, but have a limited applicability to daily practice because they have only included relatively young patients. PMID:26479287

  6. Three-year post-transplant medicare payments in kidney transplant recipients: Associations with pre-transplant comorbidities

    Gerardo Machnicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the influence of pre-transplant comorbidities on post-transplant expenditures. We estimated the associations between pre-transplant comorbidities and post-transplant Medicare costs, using several comorbidity classification systems. We included recipients of first-kidney deceased donor transplants from 1995 through 2002 for whom Medicare was the primary payer for at least one year pre-transplant (N = 25,175. We examined pre-transplant comorbidities as classified by International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM codes from Medicare claims with the Clinical Cla-ssifications Software (CCS and Charlson and Elixhauser algorithms. Post-transplant costs were calcu-lated from payments on Medicare claims. We developed models considering Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN variables plus: 1 CCS categories, 2 Charlson, 3 Elixhauser, 4 num-ber of Charlson and 5 number of Elixhauser comorbidities, independently. We applied a novel regression methodology to account for censoring. Costs were estimated at individual and population levels. The comorbidities with the largest impact on mean Medicare payments included cardiovascular disease, ma-lignancies, cerebrovascular disease, mental conditions and functional limitations. Skin ulcers and infec-tions, rheumatic and other connective tissue disease and liver disease also contributed to payments and have not been considered or described previously. A positive graded relationship was found between costs and the number of pre-transplant comorbidities. In conclusion, we showed that expansion beyond the usually considered pre-transplant comorbidities with inclusion of CCS and Charlson or Elixhauser comorbidities increased the knowledge about comorbidities related to augmented Medicare payments. Our expanded methodology can be used by others to assess more accurately the financial implications of renal transplantation to Medicare and individual transplant centers.

  7. Many Kidney Transplant Patients Land in ER Within 2 Years: Study

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157959.html Many Kidney Transplant Patients Land in ER Within 2 Years: Study Findings show need to coordinate care after organ transplant, researcher says To use the sharing features on ...

  8. An Association between BK Virus Replication in Bone Marrow and Cytopenia in Kidney-Transplant Recipients

    Emilie Pambrun; Catherine Mengelle; Geneviève Fillola; Patrick Laharrague; Laure Esposito; Isabelle Cardeau-Desangles; Arnaud Del Bello; Jacques Izopet; Lionel Rostaing; Nassim Kamar

    2014-01-01

    The human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is associated with severe complications, such as ureteric stenosis and polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN), which often occur in kidney-transplant patients. However, it is unknown if BKV can replicate within bone marrow. The aim of this study was to search for BKV replication within the bone marrow of kidney-transplant patients presenting with a hematological disorder. Seventy-two kidney-transplant patients underwent bone-marrow aspiration for cytopenia....

  9. Kidney transplantation in infantile myofibromatosis and fibromuscular dysplasia: a case report

    Frezin, Julie; Fusaro, Fabio; REDING, Raymond; Godefroid, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report what we believe to be the first case of a child affected by two rare vascular diseases complicated by kidney failure and successfully treated by kidney transplantation. Case presentation A 3-year-old Caucasian girl with fibromuscular dysplasia and infantile myofibromatosis presented with arterial hypertension and renal failure. She received a deceased donor kidney transplantation distal to an iliac graft. The technical peculiarities of this transplantation are described...

  10. Bilateral native nephrectomy for refractory hypertension in kidney transplant and kidney pancreas transplant patients

    Lerman, Mark J.; Sandra Hinton; Ronald Aronoff

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is common in renal transplant patients and sometimes very difficult to control. Refractory hypertension can adversely affect renal graft and patient survival. Many antihypertensive medications are not well tolerated or can have important drug interactions with immunosuppressive medications. These drugs can cause significant side effects including fluid depletion, azotemia, electrolyte imbalance, and anemia. Bilateral native nephrectomy in renal transplant patients has been report...