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Sample records for abo incompatible caso

  1. ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    Schousboe, Karoline; Titlestad, Kjell; Baudier, Francois;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO-incompatible ......INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO......-incompatible kidney transplantation. We used antigenspecific immunoadsorptions to remove blood group antibodies and anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) to inhibit the antibody production. The aim of introducing the ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH was to increase the rate of living donor kidney...

  2. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

    Khatami S.F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newborn blood type A or B, rising indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two days of life, positive immunohematologic test for newborns and exchange transfusion. Exclusion criteria were: incomplete information, other accompanying diseases that induce hyperbilirubinemia. All newborn infants received phototherapy before and after exchange transfusion. We did not use intravenous immunoglobulin, hemoxygenase inhibitor drugs and blood products before exchange transfusion.Results: Double-volume exchange transfusion via umbilical cord catheter was performed in 96 patients, 19 (20% of whom suffered from ABO incompatibility. Of these 19 newborns, two-thirds (13 were preterm infants. The minimum level of serum bilirubin was 10 mg/dl and the maximum serum bilirubin level was 35 mg/dl. In six patients (32% serum bilirubin levels were >25mg/dl. The most common blood group was type A for newborns. Immunohematologic tests were positive in 84% of the mothers. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease was the fourth and second most common reasons for blood exchange transfusion in preterm and term infants, respectively. Laboratory complications were more common than clinical complications. The etiology of 48% of the alloimmunization and 42% of the hemolytic disease in these newborns was ABO incompatibility.Conclusions: Mothers with blood group O and newborns with blood group A or B with positive immunohematologic tests in first hours of life are at high risk for hemolytic disease

  3. ABO-INCOMPATIBLE PEDIATRIC LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: THE ANALYSIS OF WORLD EXPERIENCE

    I. E. Tsirulnikova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the review we present the world scientific literature data analysis of the results of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation in children and adults. Used previously and modern protocols of pre- and postoperative manage- ment of ABO-incompatible recipients from different transplant centers are described. While adult ABO-incom- patible liver transplantation is still linked with increased risk of immune complications, short and long-term results of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation in children are similar to those of ABO-compatible transplan- tation. We conclude that ABO-incompatible liver transplantation is reasonable in urgent cases for recipients of all age groups and for children without possible ABO-compatible living related donors. 

  4. Our first experiences in applying an original method for removal of ABO-isoagglutinins in ABO-incompatible kidney recipients

    Ignjatović Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Due to improved methods for removal of ABO isoagglutinins and novel immunosuppressive protocols, short and long term outcome in blood group incompatible is similar to blood group compatible kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of our original method for removal of ABO isoagglutinins from the blood in ABO-incompatible kidney allograft recipients. Method. Between 2006 and 2008 twelve patients were transplanted from ABO incompatible living donors. Titers of ABO isoagglutinins were 4-128 (IgG. Immunosuppressive therapy started 14 days before kidney transplantation with rituximab, followed by a triple therapy (prednisone + tacrolimus + mycophenolate mofetil and the first plasma exchange (PE procedure, in which one plasma volume was substituted with albumin and saline on day 7 before transplantation. For selective extracorporeal immunoadsorption, the removed plasma was mixed with donor blood type filtered red blood cells, centrifuged and the supernatant separated and preserved. In the next PE procedure, the removed plasma was replaced with immunoadsorbed plasma, and so on. Titers of ABO agglutinins, renal allograft function and survival were followed-up. Results. The pre-transplant treatment consisting of 1-5 PE procedures and immunosuppressive therapy resulted in target ABO agglutinins titers below 4. During a 10-24 month follow-up three patients had an early acute rejection, one patient acute rejection and hemolytic anemia, two patients surgical complications and one of them lost his graft. In the post-transplant period, the titers of ABO antibodies remained below 4. All the patients had stable kidney allograft function with mean serum creatinine ±SD of 129 ± 45 μmol/l at the end of the study. Conclusion. Our method for removal of ABO antibodies was effective in a limited series of patients and short-term follow-up.

  5. ABO Incompatible Liver Transplantation as a Bridge to Treat HELLP Syndrome

    Brad Butler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The following is a case report of a primiparous woman who developed fulminant liver failure in the setting of HELLP syndrome complicated by hepatic rupture. It is unique in that a timely ABO compatible liver donor was unavailable, necessitating the transplantation of an ABO incompatible organ. Despite aggressive therapy, severe reperfusion injury and humoral rejection dictated retransplantation with an ABO compatible organ on postoperative day 15, resulting in rapid clinical recovery.

  6. Risk factor for ischemic-type biliary lesion after ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    Bang, Jun Bae; Kim, Bong-Wan; Kim, Young Bae; Wang, Hee-Jung; Lee, Hyun Yeong; Sim, Joohyun; Kim, Taegyu; Lee, Kyeong Lok; Hu, Xu-Guang; Mao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the risk factors for ischemic-type biliary lesion (ITBL) after ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). METHODS: Among 141 ALDLTs performed in our hospital between 2008 and 2014, 27 (19%) were ABO-I ALDLT and 114 were ABO-identical/compatible ALDLT. In this study, we extensively analyzed the clinico-pathological data of the 27 ABO-I recipients to determine the risk factors for ITBL after ABO-I ALDLT. All ABO-I ALDLT recipients underwent an identical B-cell depletion protocol with preoperative rituximab, plasma exchange (PE), and operative splenectomy. The median follow-up period after transplantation was 26 mo. The clinical outcomes of the 27 ABO-I ALDLT recipients were compared with those of 114 ABO-identical/compatible ALDLT recipients. RESULTS: ITBL occurred in four recipients (14.8%) between 45 and 112 d after ABO-I ALDLT. The overall survival rates were not different between ABO-I ALDLT and ABO-identical/compatible ALDLT (P = 0.303). Among the ABO-I ALDLT recipients, there was no difference between patients with ITBL and those without ITBL in terms of B-cell and T-cell count, serum isoagglutinin titers, number of PEs, operative time and transfusion, use of graft infusion therapy, or number of remnant B-cell follicles and plasma cells in the spleen. However, the perioperative NK cell counts in the blood of patients with ITBL were significantly higher than those in the patients without ITBL (P 150/μL and postoperative NK cell count > 120/μL were associated with greater relative risks (RR) for development of ITBL (RR = 20 and 14.3, respectively, P transplant recipient’s blood are associated with ITBL after ABO-I ALDLT. Further research is needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of NK cell involvement in the development of ITBL.

  7. ABH-Glycan Microarray Characterizes ABO Subtype Antibodies: Fine Specificity of Immune Tolerance After ABO-Incompatible Transplantation.

    Jeyakanthan, M; Meloncelli, P J; Zou, L; Lowary, T L; Larsen, I; Maier, S; Tao, K; Rusch, J; Chinnock, R; Shaw, N; Burch, M; Beddows, K; Addonizio, L; Zuckerman, W; Pahl, E; Rutledge, J; Kanter, K R; Cairo, C W; Buriak, J M; Ross, D; Rebeyka, I; West, L J

    2016-05-01

    Organ transplantation from ABO blood group-incompatible (ABOi) donors requires accurate detection, effective removal and subsequent surveillance of antidonor antibodies. Because ABH antigen subtypes are expressed differently in various cells and organs, measurement of antibodies specific for the antigen subtypes in the graft is essential. Erythrocyte agglutination, the century-old assay used clinically, does not discriminate subtype-specific ABO antibodies and provides limited information on antibody isotypes. We designed and created an ABO-glycan microarray and demonstrated the precise assessment of both the presence and, importantly, the absence of donor-specific antibodies in an international study of pediatric heart transplant patients. Specific IgM, IgG, and IgA isotype antibodies to nonself ABH subtypes were detected in control participants and recipients of ABO-compatible transplants. Conversely, in children who received ABOi transplants, antibodies specific for A subtype II and/or B subtype II antigens-the only ABH antigen subtypes expressed in heart tissue-were absent, demonstrating the fine specificity of B cell tolerance to donor/graft blood group antigens. In contrast to the hemagglutination assay, the ABO-glycan microarray allows detailed characterization of donor-specific antibodies necessary for effective transplant management, representing a major step forward in precise ABO antibody detection. PMID:26602221

  8. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation with ABO-Incompatible Grafts: A German Single Center Experience

    Armin D. Goralczyk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult living donor liver transplantations (ALDLTs across the ABO blood group barrier have been reported in Asia, North Americas, and Europe, but not yet in Germany. Several strategies have been established to overcome the detrimental effects that are attached with such a disparity between donor and host, but no gold standard has yet emerged. Here, we present the first experiences with three ABO-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantations in Germany applying different immunosuppressive strategies. Four patient-donor couples were considered for ABO-incompatible ALDLT. In these patients, resident ABO blood group antibodies (isoagglutinins were depleted by plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption and replenishment was inhibited by splenectomy and/or B-cell-targeted immunosuppression. Despite different treatments ALDLT could safely be performed in three patients and all patients had good initial graft function without signs for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR. Two patients had long-term graft survival with stable graft function. We thus propose the feasibility of ABO-incompatible ALDLT with these protocols and advocate further expansion of ABO incompatible ALDLT in multicenter trials to improve efficacy and safety.

  9. Late antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation during Gram-negative sepsis

    2014-01-01

    Background The major challenge in ABO-incompatible transplantation is to minimize antibody-mediated rejection. Effective reduction of the anti-ABO blood group antibodies at the time of transplantation has made ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation a growing practice in our hospital and in centers worldwide. ABO antibodies result from contact with A- and B-like antigens in the intestines via nutrients and bacteria. We demonstrate a patient with fulminant antibody-mediated rejection late after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation, whose anti-A antibody titers rose dramatically following Serratia marcescens sepsis. Case presentation A 58-year-old woman underwent an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation for end-stage renal disease secondary to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. It concerned a blood group A1 to O donation. Pre-desensitization titers were 64 for anti-blood group A IgM and 32 for anti-blood group A IgG titers. Desensitization treatment consisted of rituximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids, immunoadsorption and intravenous immunoglobulines. She was readmitted to our hospital 11 weeks after transplantation for S. marcescens urosepsis. Her anti-A IgM titer rose to >5000 and she developed a fulminant antibody-mediated rejection. We hypothesized that the (overwhelming) presence in the blood of S. marcescens stimulated anti-A antibody formation, as S. marcescens might share epitopes with blood group A antigen. Unfortunately we could not demonstrate interaction between blood group A and S. marcescens in incubation experiments. Conclusion Two features of this post-transplant course are remarkably different from other reports of acute rejection in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation: first, the late occurrence 12 weeks after kidney transplantation and second, the very high anti-A IgM titers (>5000), suggesting recent boosting of anti-A antibody formation by S. marcescens. PMID:24517251

  10. Clinico-serologic co-relation in bi-directional ABO incompatible hemopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Sabita Basu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ABO blood group system is of prime significance in red cell transfusion and organ transplantation. However, ABO compatibility is not critical in allogenic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and approximately 40-50% of hemopoietic stem cell transplants are ABO incompatible. This incompatibility may be major, minor or bi-directional. Though there are descriptions of transfusion practice and protocols in ABO incompatible HSCT, there are considerable variations and transfusion support in these patients can be very challenging. Aims: The immunohematologic observations in two cases of bi-directional ABO incompatible HSCT have been described, and clinico-serologic correlation has been attempted. Materials and Methods: In both cases, peripheral blood stem cell harvests were obtained using the Cobe spectra cell separator. Immunohematologic assessments in the donor and recipient were done as a part of pre HSCT evaluation. Both the standard tube technique and column agglutination method (Ortho Biovue Micro Bead System was used. Antibody screen was done by column agglutination method using three cell panel (Surgiscreen cells. Isoagglutinin titration was done by the master dilution method and standard validated techniques were used. Results: The pattern of laboratory findings in the two cases was different and so were the clinical outcomes. Although there was early engraftment in the first case, the second case developed pure red cell aplasia and this was well-reflected in the immunohematologic assessments. Conclusion: Immunohematologic assessment correlated well with the clinical picture and could be used to predict clinical outcome and onset of complications in ABO incompatible HSCT.

  11. Early post-transplant complications following ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    Naciri Bennani, Hamza; Abdulrahman, Zhyiar; Allal, Asma; Sallusto, Federico; Delarche, Antoine; Game, Xavier; Esposito, Laure; Doumerc, Nicolas; Debiol, Bénédicte; Kamar, Nassim; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Living-kidney transplantation is increasing because of the scarcity of kidneys from deceased donors and the increasing numbers of patients on waiting lists for a kidney transplant. Living-kidney transplantation is now associated with increased long-term patient- and allograft-survival rates. Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify, in a cohort of 44 ABO-incompatible (ABOi) live-kidney transplant patients, the main complications that occurred within 6 months post-transplantation, and to compare these findings with those from 44 matched ABO-compatible (ABOc) live-kidney transplant patients who were also from our center. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study assessed post-transplantation complications in 44 ABO-i versus 44 matched ABO-c patients. All patients were comparable at baseline except that ABO-i patients had greater immunological risks. Results: During the 6-month post-transplant period, more ABO-i patients presented with postoperative bleeds, thus requiring significantly more blood transfusions. Bleeds were associated with significantly lower values of fibrinogen, platelets, prothrombin time, and hemoglobin levels. Surgical complications, patient- and graft-survival rates, and kidney-function statuses were similar between both groups at 6 months post-transplantation. Conclusions: We conclude that impairment of hemostatic factors at pre-transplant explained the increased risk of a post-transplant bleed in ABO-i patients. PMID:27047806

  12. Micro gel column technique is fit for detecting mixed fields post ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Li, Min-Fang; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Min

    2015-04-01

    How to choose suitable serologic method for assessment of the actual stages of ABO chimera is more important to establish transfusion strategy for patients post-ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We reported ABO phenotypes of a patient post-ABO minor incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from 1+ weak agglutination by tube method was obviously reaffirmed to mixed fields with 4+ positive reaction by micro gel column card. Hence, blood bank technologists must continually work together with hematologist to establish appropriate transfusion strategy, and micro gel column technique can be more appropriate for detecting mixed fields during the whole period of transplantation. PMID:25578650

  13. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille; Bistrup, Claus

    2010-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated reje...... that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime.......ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody......-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest...

  14. Aplasia pura de serie roja post-trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyeticas ABO incompatible Pure red cell aplasia after ABO incompatible bone marrow transplantation

    E. Bulliorsky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available El trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyéticas (TCPH con incompatibilidad ABO entre el donante y el receptor puede en ocasiones asociarse a trastornos en la progenie eritroide desarrollada a partir de la médula ósea trasplantada, caracterizado por un funcionamiento tardío, inadecuado e incompleto de la misma. En este contexto, la aplasia pura de serie roja es la complicación más severa. Se han intentado tratamientos para la aplasia pura de serie roja post-TCPH con eritropoyetina o plasmaféresis, con relativo éxito. Algunos autores han informado también la utilización de globulina antilinfocitaria, asumiendo que dicha aplasia selectiva de la serie roja en la médula ósea trasplantada es mediada por un mecanismo inmune. En este trabajo se describe un paciente portador de una leucemia aguda en quien se realizó un TCPH alogeneico (ABO incompatible con su donante. Teniendo niveles bajos de aglutininas contra el grupo sanguíneo de la donante, desarrolló una aplasia pura de serie roja post - TCPH. La misma no mejoró con tratamiento con eritropoyetina o con un refuerzo de progenitores hematopoyéticos de sangre periférica de la misma donante (boost, resolviéndose totalmente luego de un tratamiento exitoso con globulina antilinfocitaria de origen equino.ABO incompatibility in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation may be associated with incomplete or delayed erythroid engraftment, being pure red cell aplasia (PRCA the most severe complication in this setting. Attempts for the treatment of PRCA have been made with erythropoietin or with plasmapheresis with relative success, and some authors have reported the reversibility of PRCA with antilymphocyte globulin (ALG or ATG, based on the assumption that PRCA might be immunologically mediated. We report herewith a patient with acute leukemia who developed post - BMT pure red cell aplasia. His sibling donor (sister was HLA identical and ABO incompatible, having low agglutinin

  15. ABO-incompatible kidney transplant recipients have a higher bleeding risk after antigen-specific immunoadsorption.

    de Weerd, Annelies E; van Agteren, Madelon; Leebeek, Frank W; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Weimar, Willem; Betjes, Michiel G H

    2015-01-01

    Pretransplant removal of antiblood group ABO antibodies is the cornerstone of all current ABO-incompatible (ABOi) transplantation programmes. In our protocol, plasmapheresis (PP) is performed with a plasmafilter followed by immunoadsorption (IA) of anti-ABO antibodies. The bleeding complications of this technique are not known. We analysed the data of all 65 consecutive ABOi kidney transplantations between March 2006 and October 2013 and compared these with matched 130 ABO-compatible (ABOc) kidney transplantations. Cases differed from controls in the pre-operative regimen, which included IA-PP and rituximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, prednisone and immunoglobulines. Data on platelet count, blood loss and red blood cell (EC) transfusions during 48 h postoperatively were collected. ABOi patients received EC transfusions more frequently than controls (29% vs. 12%, P = 0.005). Intra-operative blood loss was higher (544 vs. 355 ml, P < 0.005) and they experienced more major bleeding (≥3 EC within 24 h, 15% vs. 2%, P < 0.0005). Platelet count decreased by 28% after the pre-operative IA. In a multivariate model, only the number of pre-operative IAs was associated with the number of ECs given (OR per IA 1.9, P < 0.05). ABOi kidney transplant recipients have a high postoperative bleeding risk, correlating with the number of pre-operative IA sessions performed. PMID:25070762

  16. Different sensitivity of rituximab-treatment to B-cells between ABO-incompatible kidney and liver transplantation.

    Morimoto, Hiroshi; Ide, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yuka; Ishiyama, Kohei; Ohira, Masahiro; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Akita, Tomonori; Tanaka, Junko; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    A desensitization protocol with rituximab is currently widely used for kidney transplantation (KT) and liver transplantation (LT) across the ABO blood group-incompatible (ABO-I) barrier. However, it remains to be elucidated whether rituximab is equally effective for B-cell and T-cell immune responses in both KT and LT recipients. To clarify these effects of rituximab, we enrolled 46 KT and 77 LT recipients in this study. The proportion of peripheral blood B-cells was determined at the perioperative period. T-cell responses to allostimulation were evaluated by a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay. One week after rituximab administration, peripheral B-cells became undetectable in ABO-I KT recipients but remained detectable in some of the ABO-I LT recipients; B-cells were undetectable in both groups by week 2. B-cells remained below the detection limit throughout the first year in the ABO-I KT recipients, whereas they reappeared in the periphery after 6months in the ABO-I LT recipients. There were no significant differences in alloreactive T-cell responses based on MLR analyses between ABO-I and ABO-compatible groups. This study indicates that rituximab has differing B-cell sensitivity between KT and LT recipients and a minimal effect on the alloreactive T-cell responses in KT and LT recipients. PMID:27085793

  17. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility.

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  18. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    Serena Valsami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization.

  19. Economic Impacts of ABO-Incompatible Live Donor Kidney Transplantation: A National Study of Medicare-Insured Recipients.

    Axelrod, D; Segev, D L; Xiao, H; Schnitzler, M A; Brennan, D C; Dharnidharka, V R; Orandi, B J; Naik, A S; Randall, H; Tuttle-Newhall, J E; Lentine, K L

    2016-05-01

    The infrequent use of ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation in the United States may reflect concern about the costs of necessary preconditioning and posttransplant care. Medicare data for 26 500 live donor kidney transplant recipients (2000 to March 2011), including 271 ABOi and 62 A2-incompatible (A2i) recipients, were analyzed to assess the impact of pretransplant, transplant episode and 3-year posttransplant costs. The marginal costs of ABOi and A2i versus ABO-compatible (ABOc) transplants were quantified by multivariate linear regression including adjustment for recipient, donor and transplant factors. Compared with ABOc transplantation, patient survival (93.2% vs. 88.15%, p = 0.0009) and death-censored graft survival (85.4% vs. 76.1%, p spending (marginal costs compared to ABOc - year 1: $25 044; year 2: $10 496; year 3: $7307; p spending are easily justified by avoiding long-term dialysis and its associated morbidity and cost. PMID:26603690

  20. Antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible pediatric living donor liver transplantation for propionic acidemia: A case report.

    Honda, Masaki; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Sakamoto, Rieko; Matsumoto, Shirou; Irie, Tomoaki; Uchida, Koushi; Shimata, Keita; Kawabata, Seiichi; Isono, Kaori; Hayashida, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Endo, Fumio; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2016-09-01

    We herein present the case of a four-yr-old boy with PA who developed AMR after ABO-incompatible LDLT despite undergoing B cell desensitization using rituximab. Although the CD19+ lymphocyte count decreased to 0.1% nine days after the administration of rituximab, he developed a high fever which was accompanied by arthralgia due to a streptococcal infection 13 days after rituximab prophylaxis. After the clearance of the infection, he underwent ABO-incompatible LDLT 36 days after the administration of rituximab. The CD19+ lymphocyte count just prior to LDLT was 1.2%. He developed AMR five days after LDLT, and the antidonor-type IgM and IgG antibody titers increased to 1:1024 and 1:1024, respectively. He was treated by plasma exchange, IVIG, steroid pulse therapy, and rituximab re-administration; however, his liver dysfunction continued. Despite intensive treatment, he died due to complicated abdominal hernia, acute renal failure, and ARDS. This case suggests that a streptococcal infection may induce the activation of innate immune responses; thus, additional desensitization therapy should be considered prior to ABO-incompatible LDLT if B cell reactivation is suspected. PMID:27436684

  1. The frequency of ABO blood group maternal-fetal incompatibility, maternal iso-agglutinins, and immune agglutinins quantitation in Osogbo, Osun State, South-West of Nigeria

    Oseni Bashiru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : ABO incompatibility in maternal-fetal relationship has been shown to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDNB; a survey which is not yet done in this locality. Aim: Frequency of ABO blood group maternal-fetal incompatibility, maternal iso-agglutinins, and immune agglutinins quantitation was carried out in Osogbo, Osun State, South-West of Nigeria. Settings and Designs : A total of 260 subjects comprising 130 postpartum mothers within the age range of 22-35 years having good obstetrics history and normal delivery, with their 130 neonate babies were used for the study. Materials and Methods : ABO cell and serum groupings were carried out on the subjects using standard antisera and cells with appropriate controls. Direct Coomb′s Test was carried out on neonate red cells. Antibody quantitation by double dilution on the maternal serum using red cells containing corresponding antigen to the antibody was determined. A titer, which is the reciprocal of the highest dilution showing agglutination by Indirect Coombs Test, was determined. Another batch of sera was pretreated with 2-mecarptoethanol before determining the titer. Statistical Analysis: The distribution study results obtained were compared in percentages, whereas the antibodies quantitation was expressed as titers using the mode of the titers for compariso-agglutininsn. Results and Conclusions : Thirty-eight percent (50 mothers were ABO incompatible with their babies, whereas 62% (80 mothers were compatible. The distribution of blood groups in the compatible population showed blood group O (45%; A (30%; B (20%; and AB (5%. Mothers O, A, and B carrying incompatible babies had a frequency of 24% each, whereas mothers AB had 28%. Serologist differences occur in maternal ABO antibodies of corresponding incompatible baby ABO antigens. A high incidence of ABO maternal-fetal incompatibility observed without detection of immune agglutinins is indicative of a rare incidence of HDNB due

  2. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome diagnosed four years after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    Kawaguchi, Keiko; Kawanishi, Kunio; Sato, Masayo; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Fujii, Akiko; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Huchinoue, Shouhei; Ohashi, Ryuji; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in allograft kidney transplantation is caused by various factors including rejection, infection, and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a case of a 32 year old woman with aHUS four years after an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from a living relative. The primary cause of end-stage renal disease was unknown; however, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was suspected from her clinical course. She underwent pre-emptive kidney transplantation from her 60 year old mother. The allograft preserved good renal function [serum creatinine (sCr) level 110-130 μmol/L] until a sudden attack of abdominal pain four years after transplant, with acute renal failure (sCr level, 385.3 μmol/L), decreasing platelet count, and hemolytic anemia with schizocytes. On allograft biopsy, there was thrombotic microangiopathy in the glomeruli, with a cellular crescent formation and mesangial IgA and C3 deposition. Microvascular inflammation, such as glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and arteriole endarteritis were also detected. A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) did not decrease and Shiga toxin was not detected. Donor-specific antibodies or autoantibodies, including anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody, were negative. The patient was diagnosed with aHUS and received three sessions of plasmapheresis and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, followed by oral methylprednisolone (0.25-0.5 mg/kg) instead of tacrolimus. She temporarily required hemodialysis (sCr level, 658.3 μmol/L). Thereafter, her sCr level improved to 284.5 μmol/L without dialysis therapy. This case is clinically considered as aHUS after kidney transplantation, associated with various factors, including rejection, glomerulonephritis, and toxicity from drugs such as tacrolimus. PMID:26031589

  3. Antigen-Specific versus Non-Antigen-Specific Immunoadsorption in ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation.

    Gerold Thölking

    Full Text Available ABO-incompatible (ABOi renal transplantation (RTx from living donors is an established procedure to expand the donor pool for patients with end stage renal disease. Immunoadsorption (IA is a standard procedure for the removal of preformed antibodies against the allograft. In this study, antigen-specific and non-antigen-specific IA in ABOi RTx were compared.10 patients underwent antigen-specific IA (Glycosorb group and 13 patients non-antigen-specific IA (Immunosorba group. The effects of both procedures regarding antibody reduction, number of treatments, complications, costs, as well as the allograft function and patient survival were compared between both groups.Although the IgG levels were reduced equally by both procedures (p=0.82, the reduction of the IgM level was more effective in the Glycosorb group (p=0.0172. Patients in both groups required a median number of 6 IA before ABOi RTx. Allograft function at one year after AB0i RTx was similar in both groups (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 66 vs. 64 ml/min/1.73m² respectively, with a death-censored graft survival of 90.0% and 92.3% respectively. Complication rates did not differ between procedures. Due to the reuse of non-antigen-specific Immunosorba columns, costs were considerably lower in this group; however, the use of the Immunosorba-based IA was less time-efficient.Considering upcoming alternatives as simultaneous performance of dialysis and IA or a possible reuse of Glycosorb columns, this might become less relevant in the future.

  4. Aplasia pura de serie roja post-trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyeticas ABO incompatible Pure red cell aplasia after ABO incompatible bone marrow transplantation

    E. Bulliorsky; C. Shanley; G. Stemmelin; J. Ceresetto; O. Rabinovich

    2002-01-01

    El trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyéticas (TCPH) con incompatibilidad ABO entre el donante y el receptor puede en ocasiones asociarse a trastornos en la progenie eritroide desarrollada a partir de la médula ósea trasplantada, caracterizado por un funcionamiento tardío, inadecuado e incompleto de la misma. En este contexto, la aplasia pura de serie roja es la complicación más severa. Se han intentado tratamientos para la aplasia pura de serie roja post-TCPH con eritropoy...

  5. Short-Term Outcomes of ABO-Incompatible Living Donor Kidney Transplantation With Uniform Protocol: Significance of Baseline Anti-ABO Titer.

    Lee, K W; Park, J B; Oh, D K; Na, B G; Choi, J Y; Cho, W T; Lee, S H; Park, H J; Cho, D; Huh, W S; Kim, S J

    2016-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is one of the major causes of poor outcomes in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation (ABOi KT). Studies investigating AMR risk factors found that anti-ABO titer is a major issue. However, the significance of antibody titer has been debated. This retrospective study analyzed AMR risk factors in 59 patients who underwent ABOi KT between August 2010 and January 2015. We also analyzed AMR risk factors in recipients with high anti-ABO baseline titers (≥1:64 on dithiothreitol at 37°C phase or ≥1:256 on antihuman globulin phase). The 2-year patient survival rate was 95.8%, and the 2-year graft survival rate was 94.9%. Nine patients (15.3%) experienced clinical (6 of 59 [10.2%]) or subclinical (3 of 59 [5.1%]) AMR. One patient experienced graft loss from hyperacute rejection. AMR risk factor analysis revealed that baseline antibody titer was associated with incidence of AMR. In patients with high baseline titers, low doses of rituximab (200-mg single-dose), an antibody against CD20, was predictive for AMR. Six patients who received pretransplant intravenous immunoglobulin did not experience AMR even when they had high baseline antibody titers. Our results indicate that a high baseline antibody titer affected the incidence of AMR. ABOi KT candidates with high baseline titers need to undergo an intensified preconditioning protocol, including high-dose rituximab (375 mg/m(2)) and intravenous immunoglobulin. PMID:27234744

  6. Delayed hyperacute rejection in a patient who developed clostridium difficile infection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    Gerald S Lipshutz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerald S Lipshutz1, Elaine F Reed2, Phuong-Chi Pham3, Jeffrey M Miller4, Jennifer S Singer5, Gabriel M Danovitch6, Alan H Wilkinson6, Dean W Wallace7, Suzanne McGuire6, Phuong-Truc Pham8, Phuong-Thu Pham61Department of Surgery, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine-Immunogenetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Nephrology Division, UCLA-Olive View Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Hematology Oncology Division, UCLA-Olive View Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 5Department of Surgery and Urology, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, 6Department of Medicine, Nephrology Division, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 7Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 8Department of Science, Penn State University, Worthington-Scranton, Dunmore, PA, USAAbstract: Over the past decade ABO incompatible transplantation has emerged as an important potential source for increasing living kidney transplantation in selected transplant centers. Early reports suggest that patients who have elevated serum anti-blood group antibody titers (anti-A/B before transplantation and a rebound antibody production after antibody removal may be at high immunological risk. With currently available immune modulation protocols and immunosuppressive therapy, excellent short- and long-term patient and graft survival rates have been achieved even in those with high anti-A/B antibody titers before plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption. Nonetheless, acute infection with an organism possessing surface markers analogous to blood group antigens such as carbohydrate structures on

  7. Aplasia pura de serie roja post-trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyeticas ABO incompatible

    E. Bulliorsky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available El trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyéticas (TCPH con incompatibilidad ABO entre el donante y el receptor puede en ocasiones asociarse a trastornos en la progenie eritroide desarrollada a partir de la médula ósea trasplantada, caracterizado por un funcionamiento tardío, inadecuado e incompleto de la misma. En este contexto, la aplasia pura de serie roja es la complicación más severa. Se han intentado tratamientos para la aplasia pura de serie roja post-TCPH con eritropoyetina o plasmaféresis, con relativo éxito. Algunos autores han informado también la utilización de globulina antilinfocitaria, asumiendo que dicha aplasia selectiva de la serie roja en la médula ósea trasplantada es mediada por un mecanismo inmune. En este trabajo se describe un paciente portador de una leucemia aguda en quien se realizó un TCPH alogeneico (ABO incompatible con su donante. Teniendo niveles bajos de aglutininas contra el grupo sanguíneo de la donante, desarrolló una aplasia pura de serie roja post - TCPH. La misma no mejoró con tratamiento con eritropoyetina o con un refuerzo de progenitores hematopoyéticos de sangre periférica de la misma donante (boost, resolviéndose totalmente luego de un tratamiento exitoso con globulina antilinfocitaria de origen equino.

  8. A case of passenger lymphocyte syndrome following minor ABO incompatible renal transplantation

    Anju Dubey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune hemolysis is one of the adverse effects that can occur following solid organ transplantation. Understanding the clinical settings and the various causes is necessary for prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. One such condition is passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS. This case report describes the case of a 27-year-old male renal allograft recipient of the B-positive blood group who received a kidney from an O-positive donor. Postoperatively, the patient showed declining hemoglobin (Hb level and was transfused with B-group packed RBCs (PRBCs, following which there was steep fall in Hb level. A request for PRBCs was sent to the blood bank and this time cross-match with B-group PRBCs showed incompatibility. The patient′s RBCs were found to be strongly DAT (direct anti-globulin test positive and the eluate showed the presence of anti-B with a titer of 32. Thus, diagnosis of probable PLS was made. The patient was managed with methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis and O-group PRBCs. Gradually his condition improved and was discharged in stable condition.

  9. Liver transplantation with deceased ABO-incompatible donors is life-saving but associated with increased risk of rejection and post-transplant complications.

    Thorsen, Trygve; Dahlgren, Ulrika S; Aandahl, Einar Martin; Grzyb, Krzysztof; Karlsen, Tom H; Boberg, Kirsten M; Rydberg, Lennart; Naper, Christian; Foss, Aksel; Bennet, William

    2015-07-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) liver transplantation (LT) with deceased donor organs is performed occasionally when no ABO-compatible (ABOc) graft is available. From 1996 to 2011, 61 ABOi LTs were performed in Oslo and Gothenburg. Median patient age was 51 years (range 13-75); 33 patients were transplanted on urgent indications, 13 had malignancy-related indications, and eight received ABOi grafts for urgent retransplantations. Median donor age was 55 years (range 10-86). Forty-four patients received standard triple immunosuppression with steroids, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil, and forty-four patients received induction with IL-2 antagonist or anti-CD20 antibody. Median follow-up time was 29 months (range 0-200). The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of patient survival (PS) and graft survival (GS) were 85/71%, 79/57%, 75/55%, and 59/51%, respectively, compared to 90/87%, 84/79%, 79/73%, and 65/60% for all other LT recipients in the same period. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year GS for A2 grafts were 81%, 67%, 62%, and 57%, respectively. In conclusion, ABOi LT performed with non-A2 grafts is associated with inferior graft survival and increased risk of rejection, vascular and biliary complications. ABOi LT with A2 grafts is associated with acceptable graft survival and can be used safely in urgent cases. PMID:25736519

  10. Aplasia pura de serie roja post-trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyeticas ABO incompatible

    E. Bulliorsky; C. Shanley; G. Stemmelin; J. Ceresetto; O. Rabinovich

    2002-01-01

    El trasplante alogeneico de células progenitoras hematopoyéticas (TCPH) con incompatibilidad ABO entre el donante y el receptor puede en ocasiones asociarse a trastornos en la progenie eritroide desarrollada a partir de la médula ósea trasplantada, caracterizado por un funcionamiento tardío, inadecuado e incompleto de la misma. En este contexto, la aplasia pura de serie roja es la complicación más severa. Se han intentado tratamientos para la aplasia pura de serie roja post-TCPH con eritropoy...

  11. Frecuencias de grupos sanguíneos e incompatibilidades ABO y RhD, en La Paz, Baja California Sur, México Blood group ABO and RhD frequencies and incompatibilities in La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Lorenzo del Peón-Hidalgo

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Determinar las frecuencias génicas y de fenotipo, y predecir el riesgo de incompatibilidad y aloinmunización materna en la población de La Paz, Baja California Sur, México. Material y métodos. Estudio descriptivo en el que se evaluaron 1 809 disponentes sanguíneos altruistas que acudieron en 1998 al Hospital General de Zona, del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social en La Paz, Baja California Sur, México, tipificados por aglutinación en tubo. Las frecuencias génicas fueron estimadas asumiendo condiciones de equilibrio, y las incompatibilidades y riesgo de aloinmunización de acuerdo con la literatura. Los datos fueron evaluados estadísticamente mediante ji². Resultados. La población reveló las siguientes frecuencias en porcentaje: O, 58.49; A, 31.40; B, 8.40; AB, 1.71; RhD, 95.36; y RhD negativo, 4.64 y las frecuencias génicas fueron i, 0.7648; I A, 0.1821; I B, 0.0519; D, 0.7845; d, 0.2155, respectivamente. Las incompatibilidades en parejas y maternofetal fueron 0.3023 y 0.1685 para ABO, 0.0442 y 0.0364 para RhD y 0.0134 y 0.0061 para incompatibilidad doble, respectivamente. La probabilidad de aloinmunización materna fue estimada en 0.0309. Conclusiones. En La Paz, los grupos O y RhD son los más abundantes, aunque las frecuencias están entre las más bajas en México, contrario a lo ocurrido para A y RhD negativo. La probabilidad de aloinmunización materna y las incompatibilidades son también elevadas. Los grupos ancestrales blanco, negro e indio interactuaron en la zona noroeste del país, determinando al migrar a Baja California Sur un mestizaje probablemente similar al resto de la zona noroeste.Objective. To determine genic and phenotypic frequencies and predict the risk of incompatibility and maternal alloimmunization in the population of La Paz. Material and Methods. This descriptive study evaluated 1809 voluntary blood donors attending in 1998 the Hospital General de Zona of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social

  12. ABO Uygunsuzluğuna Bağlı Neonatal Hiperbilirubinemi

    Takcı, Şahin; İnce, Deniz Anuk; Hendekçi, Ayşe; Eren, Nagehan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: ABO incompatibility is a common condition occurring in about 15-25% of all maternal/fetal pairs. The features of ABO incompatibility range from asymptomatic through to severe hemolysis with hyperbilirubinemia and anemia. The aim of this study is to assess the clinical course of ABO incompatibility and to evaluate the effect of blood groups on the severity of neonatal jaundice. Material and Methods: Neonates with ABO hemolytic disease of newborn were retrospectively studied. Risk fact...

  13. ABO血型不合肝移植治疗急危重症肝病患者的临床疗效分析%Analysis of the curative effect of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation in the treatment in patients with acute severe liver disease

    沈中阳; 邓永林; 郑虹; 潘澄; 张雅敏; 蒋文涛; 张建军; 高伟; 淮明生

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze and evaluate the clinical effect of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation in the treatment of acute severe liver disease.Methods A retrospective clinical study was conducted.The clinical data of 4 136 patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation in Organ Transplantation Center of Tianjin First Center Hospital from September 1999 to December 2013 were analyzed.The criteria of patients enrolled were as following:model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score ≥ 20,the donor's and recipient's blood types were different,age 18-70 years,and undergone primary non-bypass orthotopic liver transplantation.According to the rate of compliance with the principles of blood transfusion,the cases were divided into two groups:ABO-compatible group (ABO-C group,n =41),ABO-incompatible group (ABO-I group,n =22).The patients in ABO-I group received basiliximab + methylprednisolone for immune induction therapy during operation,basiliximab + tacrolimus + mycophenolate + cortisol as quadruple immunosuppressive regimen after operation.They also received subcutaneous injection of low molecular heparin for anticoagulant therapy after operation,and oral warfarin or aspirin and clopidogrel bisulfate instead after 7 days.They also received routine alprostadil after operation.The remaining treatment was the same as that of ABO-C group.The clinical data,postoperative complications,rejection and survival rates of two groups were statistically analyzed.Results There were no significant differences in gender,age,MELD score,complicated with tumor,quality of donor liver,length of cold preservation of donor liver,duration of operation,and blood loss during operation between ABO-C and ABO-I groups.Number of splenectomy during operation was significantly higher in ABO-I group than that in ABO-C group (5 cases vs.1 case,x2=4.687,P=0.030).The 3-month,6-month,1-year,3-year and 5-year survival rates of ABO-C group were 89.5%,78.3%,72.5%,69.1% and 61.8

  14. Intravenous Immunoglobulin G Treatment in ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn, is it Myth or Real?

    Beken, Serdar; Hirfanoglu, Ibrahim; Turkyilmaz, Canan; Altuntas, Nilgun; Unal, Sezin; Turan, Ozden; Onal, Esra; Ergenekon, Ebru; Koc, Esin; Atalay, Yildiz

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous Immunoglobulin G (IVIG) therapy has been used as a component of the treatment of hemolytic disease of the newborn. There is still no consensus on its use in ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn routinely. The aim of this study is to determine whether administration of IVIG to newborns with ABO incompatibility is necessary. One hundred and seventeen patients with ABO hemolytic disease and positive Coombs test were enrolled into the study. The subjects were healthy except jaundice. ...

  15. Blood ties: ABO is a trans-species polymorphism in primates

    Ségurel, Laure; Thompson, Emma E.; Flutre, Timothée; Lovstad, Jessica; Venkat, Aarti; Margulis, Susan W.; Moyse, Jill; Ross, Steve; Gamble, Kathryn; Sella, Guy; Ober, Carole; Przeworski, Molly

    2012-01-01

    The ABO histo-blood group, the critical determinant of transfusion incompatibility, was the first genetic polymorphism discovered in humans. Remarkably, ABO antigens are also polymorphic in many other primates, with the same two amino acid changes responsible for A and B specificity in all species sequenced to date. Whether this recurrence of A and B antigens is the result of an ancient polymorphism maintained across species or due to numerous, more recent instances of convergent evolution ha...

  16. The ABO blood group is a trans-species polymorphism in primates

    Ségurel, Laure; Thompson, Emma E.; Flutre, Timothée; Lovstad, Jessica; Venkat, Aarti; Margulis, Susan W.; Moyse, Jill; Ross, Steve; Gamble, Kathryn; Sella, Guy; Ober, Carole; Przeworski, Molly

    2012-01-01

    The ABO histo-blood group, the critical determinant of transfusion incompatibility, was the first genetic polymorphism discovered in humans. Remarkably, ABO antigens are also polymorphic in many other primates, with the same two amino acid changes responsible for A and B specificity in all species sequenced to date. Whether this recurrence of A and B antigens is the result of an ancient polymorphism maintained across species or due to numerous, more recent instances of convergent evolution ha...

  17. Incompatible Images

    Sassene, Michel J.; Hertzum, Morten

    is, however, based on a taken-for-granted image of asthmatics as, per se, striving to be symptom-free. This image is incompatible with interviewed asthmatics' day-to-day performances of their asthma, and renders invisible (a) that their asthma performances emphasize an economy of good passages and of...

  18. Role of Subgroup Incompatibility in Newborn Jaundice Requiring Exchange Transfusion

    Annagür, Ali; Altunhan, Hüseyin; Konak, Murat; Koç, Hasan; Örs, Rahmi

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the role of exchange transfusion related complications, treatment, and etiology as well as subgroup incompatibility in patients subject to ET (exchange transfusion) due to newborn jaundice. 82 patients hospitalized due to newborn jaundice and exposed to exchange transfusion between August 2007 and August 2011 were retrospectively studied. Before ET mean total serum bilirubin was 29,2±9,83. The most frequent cause of ET was ABO incompatibility (31%) followed by...

  19. Neonatal BO Incompatibility Is Associated With a Positive Cord Blood Direct Antiglobulin Test in Infants of Black Ethnicity.

    Özgönenel, Bülent; Kukreja, Geetika; O'Malley, Barbara; Bluth, Martin H

    2015-11-01

    ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn occurs almost exclusively in infants of blood group A and B who are born to group O mothers. Positive Direct Antiglobulin Test (DAT) can identify those infants who are at risk of developing the ABO hemolytic disease. Earlier studies have suggested that BO incompatibility is associated with a positive DAT in black infants. In this study we sought to determine whether ABO incompatibility type could be associated with a higher rate of DAT positivity or clinical hemolytic disease. We reviewed the electronic medical records of all ABO-incompatible births over a 2-year period. There were 1537 ABO-incompatible births during the study period. DAT was more commonly positive among BO incompatible (21.5% in BO vs. 14.8% in AO, P=0.001) and black (18.8% in blacks vs. 10.8% in nonblacks, P=0.003) infants. DAT positivity was significantly associated with both severe hyperbilirubinemia (P=0.028) and hemolytic anemia (P<0.001). BO incompatibility was significantly associated with hemolytic anemia, but not severe hyperbilirubinemia, in the infants tested. PMID:26422285

  20. Effect of different proportions of mixed blood exchange transfusion on blood circulation in neonates with ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease%不同比例成分血对新生儿母子ABO血型不合溶血病换血治疗后内环境影响研究

    李军; 黄瑞文; 胡月圆; 肖艾青; 廖镇宇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of different proportions (the O type RBCs vs the AB type plasma)of mixed blood exchange transfusion on blood circulation in neonates with ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease. Methods From Jan. 2009 to Apr. 2010 in Hunan Children's Hospital,forty newborn infants with the disease, treated by exchange transfusion with different proportions of mixed blood (AB type plasma was mixed with 0 type red blood cell), were randomly divided into two groups: 16 patients in treatment group, who used 0 type red blood cells and AB type plasma with the proportion of 3 : 1 ( the 0 type RBCs 300 mL: the AB type plasma 100 mL) during blood transfusion; 24 patients in control group with the proportion of 2: 1. Both of the two groups received the double exchange transfusion in accordance with 150 ~ 180 mL/kg. After exchange, all the patients in controll group received 0 type RBCs transfusion with 15 ~ 20 mlAg (total volume was 60mL), while the other group did not. The other therapies in both of the two groups were the same.The indicators, which included the exchange rate of neonatal serum bilirubin, RBC, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct) , the elctrocyte and gas analysis, were monitored before and after the exchange transfusion. Results The total bilirubin of the two groups were lower after the exchange transfusion, and that the treatment group was even lower(P 0.05), while in the control group the difference was significant (P 0.05). Conclusion The exchange transfusion, using 0 type red blood cells and AB type plasma with the proportion of 3 : 1 inhemolytic disease, can not only decrease the level of bilirubin in blood rapidly but also avoid the anemia.The serum electrolytes and acid-base balance have no signifi-cant differences. It is worth promoting.%目的 探讨不同比例成分血对新生儿母子ABO血型不合溶血病(HDN)换血治疗后内环境的影响.方法 对2009年1月至2010年4月湖南省儿童医院40例HDN达到换血指征的

  1. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  2. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ziman, Mario, E-mail: ziman@savba.sk [RCQI, Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanická 68a, 60200 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  3. ABO blood groups, rhesus factor and pemphigus

    Valikhani Mahin; Kavand Sima; Toosi Siavash; Kavand Golnaz; Ghiasi Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes with significant mortality and morbidity. Genetic factors are known to be involved in pemphigus. Several studies have reproducibly shown significant associations of ABO blood groups with various autoimmune human diseases. Aim: To study the relationship between ABO and Rhesus (D) blood groups and pemphigus in Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: Data on age, sex, ABO and Rhesus blood type and cl...

  4. Incompatibility and Mental Fatigue

    Herzog, Thomas R.; Hayes, Lauren J.; Applin, Rebecca C.; Weatherly, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward prediction from attention restoration theory is that the level of incompatibility in a person's life should be positively correlated with that person's level of mental (or directed attention) fatigue. The authors tested this prediction by developing a new self-report measure of incompatibility in which they attempted to isolate…

  5. Incompatibility breaking quantum channels

    A typical bipartite quantum protocol, such as EPR-steering, relies on two quantum features, entanglement of states and incompatibility of measurements. Noise can delete both of these quantum features. In this work we study the behavior of incompatibility under noisy quantum channels. The starting point for our investigation is the observation that compatible measurements cannot become incompatible by the action of any channel. We focus our attention to channels which completely destroy the incompatibility of various relevant sets of measurements. We call such channels incompatibility breaking, in analogy to the concept of entanglement breaking channels. This notion is relevant especially for the understanding of noise-robustness of the local measurement resources for steering. (paper)

  6. ABO blood groups, rhesus factor and pemphigus

    Valikhani Mahin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes with significant mortality and morbidity. Genetic factors are known to be involved in pemphigus. Several studies have reproducibly shown significant associations of ABO blood groups with various autoimmune human diseases. Aim: To study the relationship between ABO and Rhesus (D blood groups and pemphigus in Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: Data on age, sex, ABO and Rhesus blood type and clinicopathological diagnosis of the patients with pemphigus were collected. A total of 573 patients with pemphigus were assessed for their association with ABO or Rhesus (D blood groups and compared with the normal population in the area. Results: The distribution of ABO and Rhesus blood groups in patients with pemphigus was similar to the normal local population in Iran. No relationship was found between ABO or Rhesus blood groups and the phenotype of pemphigus. Conclusion: It appears that there is no association between ABO or Rhesus (D blood groups and the frequency of pemphigus variants in comparison with normal population in Iran.

  7. PERCENTAGE OF SANGUIN GROUP (ABO, RH

    M.Mirdamadi

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available The ABO and Rh Blood groups of 9753 pregnant women were determined in the Amin Maternity Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, from March 23, 1976 to July 11, 1977. Their ABO blood group frequencies were calculated as follows: 0=38.20%, A=30.67%, B=23.84% and AB=7.26%. Also, 90.02% of the women were Rh positive and the rest, namely, 9.98% were Rh negative.

  8. Enhanced agglutination reaction of ABO subgroups by gold nanoparticle solution: implication for identification of ABO subgroups.

    Ammaranond, P; Sriyarak, J; Saejong, S; Deesin, P; Seereemaspun, A; Rojanathanes, R

    2011-12-01

    Although the ABO blood group is the most significant in blood group system in human, other subgroups system is also important to be concerned in blood banking laboratory. ABO subgroups have weak antigen potency on red blood cell. In some cases, they could not been detected by cell grouping and serum grouping methods. This may lead to misinterpretation of ABO typing which will cause serious problems for transfusion and transplantation. Gold nanoparticle solution can increase the agglutination reaction of ABO typing. Thus far, the investigation of ABO blood group system has been performed using gold nanoparticle solution. Samples were tested comparing between with and without gold nanoparticle solution. After reading the agglutination reaction, supernatants were collected and measured at the optical density at 760 nm by spectrophotometer. The optical density of 2-5% cell suspension and monoclonal antibody was higher than in the tube of 2-5% cell suspension, monoclonal antibody and gold nanoparticle solution. By adding the gold nanoparticle solution, the agglutination reaction was increased ranging from 7.0-37.7% (median 15.0%) for ABO grouping system whereas 12.1-50.9% (median 23.4%) was observed in ABO subgroups. It could decrease the chance of misinterpretation by 33.3%. By using gold nanoparticle solution might be the alternative way for investigation of weak antigen potency on red blood cell. PMID:22416584

  9. ABO blood group and risk of cancer

    Vasan, Senthil K; Hwang, Jinseub; Rostgaard, Klaus;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The associations between ABO blood group and cancer risk have been studied repeatedly, but results have been variable. Consistent associations have only been reported for pancreatic and gastric cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We estimated associations between different ABO blood...... groups and site-specific cancer risk in a large cohort of healthy blood donors from Sweden and Denmark. RESULTS: A total of 1.6 million donors were followed over 27 million person-years (20 million in Sweden and 7 million in Denmark). We observed 119,584 cancer cases. Blood groups A, AB and B were...... associated either with increased or decreased risk of cancer at 13 anatomical sites (p≤0.05), compared to blood group O. Consistent with assessment using a false discovery rate approach, significant associations with ABO blood group were observed for cancer of the pancreas, breast, and upper gastrointestinal...

  10. Plates with Incompatible Prestrain

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lewicka, Marta; Schäffner, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    We study effective elastic behavior of the incompatibly prestrained thin plates, where the prestrain is independent of thickness and uniform through the plate’s thickness h. We model such plates as three-dimensional elastic bodies with a prescribed pointwise stress-free state characterized by a Riemannian metric G, and seek the limiting behavior as h→0. We first establish that when the energy per volume scales as the second power of h, the resulting Γ-limit is a Kirchhoff-type bending theory....

  11. ABO research in the modern era of genomics.

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Blancher, Antoine

    2012-04-01

    Research on ABO has advanced significantly in recent years. A database was established to manage the sequence information of an increasing number of novel alleles. Genome sequencings have identified ABO orthologues and paralogues in various organisms and enhanced the knowledge on the evolution of the ABO and related genes. The most prominent advancements include clarification of the association between ABO and different disease processes. For instance, ABO status affects the infectivity of certain strains of Helicobacter pylori and Noroviruses as well as the sequestration and rosetting of red blood cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Genome-wide association studies have conclusively linked the ABO locus to pancreatic cancer, venous thromboembolism, and myocardial infarction in the presence of coronary atherosclerosis. These findings suggest ABO's important role in determining an individual's susceptibility to such diseases. Furthermore, our understanding of the structures of A and B transferases and their enzymology has been dramatically improved. ABO has also become a research subject in neurobiology and the preparation of artificial/universal blood and became a topic in the pseudoscience of "blood type diets." With such new progress, it has become evident that ABO is a critical player in the modern era of genomic medicine. This article provides the most up-to-date information regarding ABO genomics. PMID:21945157

  12. [Mistyping of ABO grouping by polyagglutination].

    Kato, T; Ishimaru, K; Sekiguchi, S

    1997-09-01

    Polyagglutination is a phenomenon that a sample of patient's red blood cells is agglutinated by most of normal human sera. In patients with bacterial infection or hematological diseases, red cells may become agglutinable due to an exposure of antigens (cryptoantigen) that are usually hidden as submembrane structures of normal red cells. Most of normal sera contain natural antibodies to the corresponding antigens. Polyagglutination can cause apparent discrepancies between ABO antigen and antibody tests with the patient's sample, resulting in mistyping of ABO grouping. In some cases, polyagglutination is observed only by the minor test of cross-matching without showing the discrepancies. Recently polyagglutination has been rarely seen probably because of increasing use of monoclonal antibodies and dispensing minor test for cross-matching. Because no obvious case of adverse reaction by polyagglutination through transfusion is recently reported, clinical significance of polyagglutination seems extremely low. PMID:9301304

  13. [A population-genetics approach to the problem of nonspecific biological resistance of the human body. III. The ABO and rhesus blood group systems of healthy and sick children and their mothers].

    Kurbatova, O L; Botvin'ev, O K; Altukhov, Iu P

    1984-04-01

    ABO and Rhesus blood types have been specified in 2047 diseased newborns, diseased infants and children who died before the age of one, as well as in their mothers. 527 healthy children and their mothers were investigated as a control group. A significant difference in the ABO phenotype frequencies has been revealed between: i) healthy and dead children, ii) mothers of diseased newborns and mothers of healthy children, iii) dead children and their mothers. The significant increase in the incidence of maternal Rhesus-negative phenotype, as compared with the control group, was shown in the groups of diseased newborns, diseased infants and dead children. In the same groups, mothers differ significantly from their children with respect to the frequency of Rhesus phenotypes. The incidence of Rhesus-incompatible mother-child pairs in the groups of diseased newborns, diseased infants and dead children was shown to be two times higher than the respective frequency in the control group and the expected frequency. A certain increase in the frequency of ABO-incompatible pairs was revealed in the groups of diseased newborns and dead children, but the difference, as compared to the control group, did not prove to be statistically significant. A hypothesis was advanced to the effect that the mother-child incompatibility for Rhesus and ABO antigens may result not only in fetal wastage and haemolytic disease of newborns, but also in the decrease of child's resistance to diseases of different origin. PMID:6427064

  14. Plates with Incompatible Prestrain

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lewicka, Marta; Schäffner, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We study effective elastic behavior of the incompatibly prestrained thin plates, where the prestrain is independent of thickness and uniform through the plate's thickness h. We model such plates as three-dimensional elastic bodies with a prescribed pointwise stress-free state characterized by a Riemannian metric G, and seek the limiting behavior as {h to 0}. We first establish that when the energy per volume scales as the second power of h, the resulting {Γ} -limit is a Kirchhoff-type bending theory. We then show the somewhat surprising result that there exist non-immersible metrics G for whom the infimum energy (per volume) scales smaller than h 2. This implies that the minimizing sequence of deformations carries nontrivial residual three-dimensional energy but it has zero bending energy as seen from the limit Kirchhoff theory perspective. Another implication is that other asymptotic scenarios are valid in appropriate smaller scaling regimes of energy. We characterize the metrics G with the above property, showing that the zero bending energy in the Kirchhoff limit occurs if and only if the Riemann curvatures R 1213, R 1223 and R 1212 of G vanish identically. We illustrate our findings with examples; of particular interest is an example where {G_{2 × 2}}, the two-dimensional restriction of G, is flat but the plate still exhibits the energy scaling of the Föppl-von Kármán type. Finally, we apply these results to a model of nematic glass, including a characterization of the condition when the metric is immersible, for {G = Id3 + γ n ⊗ n} given in terms of the inhomogeneous unit director field distribution { n in R^3}.

  15. Naturally occurring anti M complicating ABO grouping.

    Khalid, Safoorah; Dantes, Roelyn; Varghese, Sunu; Al Hakawati, Imadeddin

    2011-01-01

    Anti M is considered a naturally occurring antibody that is usually active at temperatures below 37°C and is thus of no clinical significance. This antibody, if present in an individual, can lead to a discrepancy between forward and reverse ABO grouping and thus creates diagnostic difficulties for blood bank staff. We report a case of a 58-year-old lady who had an unexpected reaction in reverse grouping due to anti M that posed a problem for us in the interpretation of results of her blood group. We also reviewed the literature to find out the significance of such discrepancy in blood grouping. PMID:21393909

  16. Naturally occurring anti M complicating ABO grouping

    Safoorah Khalid; Roelyn Dantes; Sunu Varghese; Imadeddin Al Hakawati

    2011-01-01

    Anti M is considered a naturally occurring antibody that is usually active at temperatures below 37°C and is thus of no clinical significance. This antibody, if present in an individual, can lead to a discrepancy between forward and reverse ABO grouping and thus creates diagnostic difficulties for blood bank staff. We report a case of a 58-year-old lady who had an unexpected reaction in reverse grouping due to anti M that posed a problem for us in the interpretation of results of her blood gr...

  17. Naturally occurring anti M complicating ABO grouping

    Safoorah Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti M is considered a naturally occurring antibody that is usually active at temperatures below 37°C and is thus of no clinical significance. This antibody, if present in an individual, can lead to a discrepancy between forward and reverse ABO grouping and thus creates diagnostic difficulties for blood bank staff. We report a case of a 58-year-old lady who had an unexpected reaction in reverse grouping due to anti M that posed a problem for us in the interpretation of results of her blood group. We also reviewed the literature to find out the significance of such discrepancy in blood grouping.

  18. A Review of ABO3 Perovskite Photocatalysts for Water Splitting

    Zhang Hongjie; Chen Gang; Li Zhonghua; Liu Jiangwen

    2007-01-01

    Photocatalysts with perovskites for hydrogen production from aqueous solution were reviewed. Among the most of metal oxide photocatalysts, the family of ABO3 Perovskite-type oxide shows higher photocatalytie activity, especially alkaline earth titanate and alkali tantalate. Therein, sodium tantalate showed the highest activity for water splitting. The reasons for the high photocatalytic activity of ABO3 perovskties are considered to the diverse and flexible crystal structure. The photocatalytic activity of ABO3 perovskties can be improved by doping other element at A site, B site or O site and loading CO-catalysts such as NiO and Pt. In this paper, the mechanism of photocatalytic water splitting, the structure of ABO3 perovsktie, and Perovskite-type photocatalysts were reviewed.

  19. Significant association between ABO blood group and pancreatic cancer

    Julia; B; Greer; Mark; H; Yazer; Jay; S; Raval; M; Michael; Barmada; Randall; E; Brand; David; C; Whitcomb

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate whether the ABO blood group is related to pancreatic cancer risk in the general population of the United States.METHODS:Using the University of Pittsburgh's clinicalpancreatic cancer registry,the blood donor database from our local blood bank (Central Blood Bank),and the blood product recipient database from the regional transfusion service (Centralized Transfusion Service) in Pittsburgh,Pennsylvania,we identified 274 pancreatic cancer patients with previously determined serological ABO bloo...

  20. ABO blood group and breast cancer incidence and survival

    Gates, Margaret A.; Xu, Mousheng; Chen, Wendy Y.; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Wolpin, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    ABO blood type has been associated with risk and survival for several malignancies; however, data for an association with breast cancer are inconsistent. Our study population consisted of Nurses’ Health Study participants with self-reported serologic blood type and/or ABO genotype. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we examined the association between serologic blood type and incident breast cancer among 67,697 women, including 3,107 cases. In addition, we examined the association wit...

  1. Results of exchange transfusions in newborns without blood group incompatibility

    Servet Yel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hyperbilirubinemia is a common problem ofneonatal period that has high morbidity and mortality.Blood exchange is the most effective and urgent treatmentmodality for very high bilirubin levels that can lead toneurotoxicity called as kernicterus. The aim of this studywas to compare 90 minutes exchange transfusion withthat of 120 minutes.Methods: This study was performed at Dicle UniversityMedical Faculty, Neonatal Unit between July 2007 andJune 2008. A total of 36 term newborn (38 - 42 gestationalweek without blood group incompatibility and withtotal serum bilirubin levels over 25 mg/dl were included.Newborns were randomly assigned in two groups eachof them comprise 18 babies as Group 1 underwent 90minute-exchange and Group 2 120 minute. Effectivenessand complications of exchange transfusion were recorded.Newborns with Rh, ABO or subgroup incompatibilities,prematurity or small for gestational age, septicemia,hypothyroidism, G6PD enzyme deficiency, intrauterineinfections, diabetic mother’s baby, hemolytic disease ormetabolic diseases were excluded.Results: There were no significant differences in thebody weight, gestational age, postnatal age, age of mother,total bilirubin and albumin levels, the number of bloodexchange, hospital stay days and complications betweentwo groups (p>0.05. However, mean phototherapy durationwas significantly shorter in 120 minutes transfusiongroup compared with 90 minutes group (p<0.001.Conclusion: Our results indicated that 90 minutes wassufficient for an effective exchange transfusion in severehyperbilirubinemic newborn infants. However longer exchangetransfusion durations may shorten the duration ofphototherapy.Key words: Indirect hyperbilirubinemia, exchange transfusion,newborns, outcome

  2. Bell inequalities and incompatible measurements

    Morgan, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Bell inequalities are a consequence of measurement incompatibility (not, as generally thought, of nonlocality). In classical terms, this is equivalent to contextuality -- measurement devices do have a significant effect. Contextual models are reasonable in classical physics, which always took the view that we ignore measurement devices whenever possible, but if that isn't good enough then we do have to model measurement devices. It is also argued that quantum theory should only be taken with ...

  3. ABO-Nonidentical Liver Transplantation in the United States.

    Lai, J C; Roberts, J P

    2016-08-01

    Under the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) policy, deceased donor livers may be offered to ABO-nonidentical candidates at each given Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and to blood type B candidates at MELD ≥30. To evaluate ABO-nonidentical liver transplantation (LT) in the United States, we examined all adult LT non-status 1 candidates, recipients and deceased liver donors from 2013 to 2015. There were 34 920 LT candidates (47% type O, 38% type A, 12% type B, 3% type AB) and 10 479 deceased liver donors (47% type O, 38% type A, 12% type B, 3% type AB). ABO-nonidentical LT occurred in 2%, 3%, 20% and 36% of types O, A, B and AB recipients, respectively, which led to a net liver loss of 6% for type O and 2% for type A recipients but a net liver gain of 14% for type B and 55% for type AB recipients. The LT MELD scores of ABO-identical versus -nonidentical recipients were 29 versus 34 for type O, 29 versus 19 for type A, 25 versus 38 for type B, and 22 versus 28 for type AB (p liver supply for candidates with blood types B and AB but decreased supply for type O and A candidates. We urge refinement of UNOS policy surrounding ABO-nonidentical LT. PMID:26932134

  4. ABO Blood Group System and Gastric Cancer: A Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis

    Yingyan Yu; Zhenggang Zhu; Jun Zhang; Min Yan; Bingya Liu; Jianian Zhang; Jun Ji; Zhiwei Wang; Lei Liu

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the association between the ABO blood group system and the risk of gastric cancer or Helicobacter pylori infection. The data for the ABO blood group was collected from 1045 cases of gastric cancer, whereby the patient underwent a gastrectomy in Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai. The information on the ABO blood group from 53,026 healthy blood donors was enrolled as control. We searched the Pubmed database on the relationship between ABO blood groups and gastric cancer risk for m...

  5. [ABO BLOOD GROUPS AS RISK FACTOR IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION

    Gonzáles Flores, Pedro Alejandro; Díaz Ferrer, Javier Omar; Monge Salgado, Eduardo; Watanabe Varas T, Teresa

    2000-01-01

    TITLE: ABO blood groups as risk factor in Helicobacter pylori infection.OBJECTIVE: To asses the relation between ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection. METHODS: The present is a case and control study. A study population of dyspeptic patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was selected. Four biopsies were taken from the antrum and the body of the stomach and blood group was typified. Patients with gastrectomy, gastric cancer, treated for Hp infection in the previous six months or without blood group typification were excluded. The population sample was found using EPIINFO 5.1 program. We called case to every patient with Hp (+) biopsy and control all with Hp (-) biopsy. The risk of the infection was calculated with the OR (Odds ratio) and the study sample was compared with the blood bank control group using the Chi-square test (pblood groups between the study population and the blood bank control. When we compared the ABO blood distribution between patients Hp (+) and Hp (-) we found significant differences for blood group O (p=0.004) and blood group A (p=0.03). Statistical analysis revealed an OR=2,22 for the blood group O and OR=0,5 for the blood group A.CONCLUSIONS: 1) The ABO blood group distribution is different in patients with Hp infection compared with those without Hp infection. 2) Blood group O would be a moderate risk factor for infection by Helicobacter pylori. PMID:12140571

  6. Genetic characterization of the ABO blood group in Neandertals

    Bertranpetit Jaume

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high polymorphism rate in the human ABO blood group gene seems to be related to susceptibility to different pathogens. It has been estimated that all genetic variation underlying the human ABO alleles appeared along the human lineage, after the divergence from the chimpanzee lineage. A paleogenetic analysis of the ABO blood group gene in Neandertals allows us to directly test for the presence of the ABO alleles in these extinct humans. Results We have analysed two male Neandertals that were retrieved under controlled conditions at the El Sidron site in Asturias (Spain and that appeared to be almost free of modern human DNA contamination. We find a human specific diagnostic deletion for blood group O (O01 haplotype in both Neandertal individuals. Conclusion These results suggest that the genetic change responsible for the O blood group in humans predates the human and Neandertal divergence. A potential selective event associated with the emergence of the O allele may have therefore occurred after humans separated from their common ancestor with chimpanzees and before the human-Neandertal population divergence.

  7. On Algebraic properties of ABO-Blood Type Inheritance Pattern

    Casas, J. M.; Ladra, M.; Omirov, B. A.; Turdibaev, R.

    2014-01-01

    We generate an algebra on blood phenotypes with multiplication based on human ABO-blood type inheritance pattern. We assume that during meiosis gametes are not chosen randomly. For this algebra we investigate its algebraic properties. Namely, the lattice of ideals and the associative enveloping algebra are described.

  8. Primate ABO Gene is under Weak Positive Selection

    Eliane Santos EVANOVICH

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABO locus presents three main alleles: A, B and O. A and B encode glycosyltransferases that catalyze the addiction of an N-GalNac and D-galactose to a precursor substance (H substance, producing A and B antigens, while the O allele does not produce a functional protein. The presence of A and B antigens have been associated to resistance against infectious agents which could use them as attachment factors increasing the virulence of some parasitic agents. As these antigens are not restrict to humans, analyses them in others species, for instance non-human primates, may be crucial to understand the relationship between pathogens and ABO phenotypes. Despite of the relevance of this issue, in the last decade few studies have addressed, mainly in New World Monkeys (NWM, natural reservoir of tropical diseases in Amazon Region. In order to understand the evolution of the ABO system in the primates, it has been obtained the partial sequence of the most important exon of ABO gene (exon 7, in platyrrhini families: Atelidae, Pithecidae and Cebidae. Then, it has been compared the sequences obtained those present in the literature, and measured the selective pressure. The present results shown that residues 266 and 268 are also crucial to distinguish A and B phenotypes in the platyrrhines, such as in catarrhines, and the 266 codon is under positive selection, although the most site codons are under action of purifying selection.

  9. Immobilization to prevent enzyme incompatibility with proteases

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme incompatibility is a problem in multi-enzyme processes that involve a non-specific protease, such as Alcalase. An example is the one-pot enzymatic synthesis of peptides catalyzed by a lipase and a protease. The incompatibility between lipase B from Candida antarctica (CalB) and Alcalase was s

  10. Delayed hyperacute rejection in a patient who developed clostridium difficile infection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    Lipshutz, Gerald S.; Reed, Elaine F; Phuong-Chi Pham; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Gerald S Lipshutz1, Elaine F Reed2, Phuong-Chi Pham3, Jeffrey M Miller4, Jennifer S Singer5, Gabriel M Danovitch6, Alan H Wilkinson6, Dean W Wallace7, Suzanne McGuire6, Phuong-Truc Pham8, Phuong-Thu Pham61Department of Surgery, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine-Immunogenetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Nephrology Di...

  11. Robustness of incompatibility for quantum devices

    A robustness measure for incompatibility of quantum devices in the lines of the robustness of entanglement is proposed. The concept of general robustness measures is first introduced in general convex-geometric settings and these ideas are then applied to measure how incompatible a given pair of quantum devices is. The robustness of quantum incompatibility is calculated in three special cases: a pair of Fourier-coupled rank-1 sharp observables, a pair of decodable channels, where decodability means left-invertibility by a channel, and a pair consisting of a rank-1 sharp observable and a decodable channel. (paper)

  12. Ready-made allogeneic ABO-specific serum eye drops

    Harritshøj, Lene Holm; Nielsen, Connie; Ullum, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    severe ocular surface disorders. METHODS: Serum was derived from 450 ml whole-blood donations from regular male blood donors, produced and tested according to good manufacturing practice and legislation regulating blood products in Denmark. Serum was diluted to 20% (v/v) with NaCl 0.9%, filtered, bottled......PURPOSE: To overcome problems and delays of the preparation of autologous serum eye drops, a production line of ABO-specific allogeneic serum eye drops from male blood donors was set up in a blood bank. Feasibility, clinical routine, safety and efficacy were evaluated in a cohort of patients with......, registered and stored at -30°C in the blood bank. Upon request, frozen ABO-identical serum drops in lots of 14 bottles could be provided immediately. Safety and efficacy were evaluated in 34 patients with severe ocular surface disease refractory to conventional medical therapy. Patients were treated six...

  13. Structural Insights into Polymorphic ABO Glycan Binding by Helicobacter pylori.

    Moonens, Kristof; Gideonsson, Pär; Subedi, Suresh; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Romaõ, Ema; Mendez, Melissa; Nordén, Jenny; Fallah, Mahsa; Rakhimova, Lena; Shevtsova, Anna; Lahmann, Martina; Castaldo, Gaetano; Brännström, Kristoffer; Coppens, Fanny; Lo, Alvin W; Ny, Tor; Solnick, Jay V; Vandenbussche, Guy; Oscarson, Stefan; Hammarström, Lennart; Arnqvist, Anna; Berg, Douglas E; Muyldermans, Serge; Borén, Thomas; Remaut, Han

    2016-01-13

    The Helicobacter pylori adhesin BabA binds mucosal ABO/Le(b) blood group (bg) carbohydrates. BabA facilitates bacterial attachment to gastric surfaces, increasing strain virulence and forming a recognized risk factor for peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. High sequence variation causes BabA functional diversity, but the underlying structural-molecular determinants are unknown. We generated X-ray structures of representative BabA isoforms that reveal a polymorphic, three-pronged Le(b) binding site. Two diversity loops, DL1 and DL2, provide adaptive control to binding affinity, notably ABO versus O bg preference. H. pylori strains can switch bg preference with single DL1 amino acid substitutions, and can coexpress functionally divergent BabA isoforms. The anchor point for receptor binding is the embrace of an ABO fucose residue by a disulfide-clasped loop, which is inactivated by reduction. Treatment with the redox-active pharmaceutic N-acetylcysteine lowers gastric mucosal neutrophil infiltration in H. pylori-infected Le(b)-expressing mice, providing perspectives on possible H. pylori eradication therapies. PMID:26764597

  14. Distribution of ABO blood group in children with acute leukemias

    Meliha Sakić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study is the fi rst study about the distribution ABO blood types at children with acute leukemia in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The aim of the study is to point out distribution of blood type groups at children with acute leukemia (ALMethods: The number of children in this study was the following: 145 children with acute leukemia and 27 of children with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML. All of the children were treated at Hemato- Oncology Unitof Pediatric Clinic in Sarajevo, in the period January 2000 until December 2010. Age of children was between 1 month and 15 years.Results: The results showed that different blood types were registered in 93. 1% of children who got ill and treated from acute leukemia for the mentioned period. At 6. 9 % of children, none of the blood types wereregistered. It was noticed that 40.9 % children who have registered blood type O, 37% blood type A,16% blood type B and 6.5% blood type AB had AL, too. It has been observed that children with following bloodtypes had AML: O, 47.8%, A, 47.7% and AB, 30.4%.Conclusion: Signifi cance ABO types distribution was confi rmed for children with ALL, p<0, 05. The analysis of the distribution of ABO types based on gender showed that signifi cance was confi rmed at females with both ALL and AML (p<0.05.

  15. Role of ABO Secretor Status in Mucosal Innate Immunity and H. pylori Infection

    Sara Lindén; Jafar Mahdavi; Cristina Semino-Mora; Cara Olsen; Ingemar Carlstedt; Thomas Borén; Andre Dubois

    2008-01-01

    Author Summary The common ABO blood group antigen system was described in the early 20th century. In addition, it has been known for 60 years that the majority of individuals also express the corresponding ABO antigens (carbohydrate identity tags) in their saliva, tears, milk, and mucus secretions in the digestive tract. To this date, however, the biological function of the ABO blood group antigens has remained an enigma. Here, we show that the great majority of Rhesus monkeys are of blood gr...

  16. Is ABO blood group truly a risk factor for thrombosis and adverse outcomes?

    Zhou, Shan; Welsby, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABO blood type is one of the most readily available laboratory tests, and serves as a vital determinant in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO antigens are expressed not only on red blood cell membranes, determining the compatibility of transfusion, but also on the surface of other human cells, including epithelium, platelet and vascular endothelium, therefore extending the research into other involvements of cardiovascular disease and postoperative outcomes. ABO blood group ...

  17. Prognostic value of ABO blood group in patients with surgically resected colon cancer

    X. Cao; Wen, Z-S; Sun, Y-J; Li, Y.; Zhang, L.; Han, Y-J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies supported a link between the ABO blood type and survival for several types of malignancies. Nonetheless, the relationship between ABO blood type and survival in colon cancer patients has not been rigorously evaluated. The goal of this retrospective analysis was to discern the correlations between ABO blood group and colon cancer survival. Methods: A total of 1555 colon cancer patients that underwent curative-intent surgery between October 1995 and June 2002 were e...

  18. Molecular genotyping of ABO blood groups in some population groups from India

    Sabita Ray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Indian population is characterized by the presence of various castes and tribal groups. Various genetic polymorphisms have been used to differentiate among these groups. Amongst these, the ABO blood group system has been extensively studied. There is no information on molecular genotyping of ABO blood groups from India. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to characterize the common A, B and O alleles by molecular analysis in some Indian population groups. Methods: One hundred samples from the mixed population from Mumbai, 101 samples from the Dhodia tribe and 100 samples from the Parsi community were included in this study. Initially, the samples were phenotyped by standard serologic techniques. PCR followed by single strand conformational polymorphsim (SSCP was used for molecular ABO genotyping. Samples showing atypical SSCP patterns were further analysed by DNA sequencing to characterize rare alleles. Results: Seven common ABO alleles with 19 different genotypes were found in the mixed population. The Dhodias showed 12 different ABO genotypes and the Parsis revealed 15 different ABO genotypes with six common ABO alleles identified in each of them. Two rare alleles were also identified. Interpretation & conclusions: This study reports the distribution of molecular genotypes of ABO alleles among some population groups from India. Considering the extremely heterogeneous nature of the Indian population, in terms of various genotype markers like blood groups, red cell enzymes, etc., many more ABO alleles are likely to be encountered.

  19. Personality traits of aggression-submissiveness and perfectionism associate with ABO blood groups through catecholamine activities.

    Hobgood, Donna K

    2011-08-01

    Personality trait research has shown associations with many genes, prominently those of the catecholamine metabolism such as dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). Because DBH gene is in linkage disequilibrium with ABO gene, there is reason to think that other catecholamine genes using the same substrate as DBH may also have associations with ABO blood groups, and this paper demonstrates how this may be so. Reasons include similarities in hapmap population frequency distributions, similarities in illness risks between ABO blood groups and DBH activities as well as between ABO blood groups and COMT activities and between ABO blood groups and MAOA activities. If ABO blood groups can be demonstrated to associate with all these catecholamine genes, then the catecholamine personality trait research can be applied to ABO blood groups and tested for confirmation. ABO blood typing is widely available and affords ability to test this hypothesis and thus confirm the possible joint association of personality traits of aggression-submissiveness and perfectionism to catecholamine genes and to ABO blood groups. Clinical applications and implications are discussed. PMID:21601990

  20. Prevalence of Phenotypes and Genes of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) Blood Groups in Faisalabad, Pakistan

    Amjad Hameed; Wajahat Hussain; Janbaz Ahmed; Fazli-Rabbi; Javed Anver Qureshi

    2002-01-01

    The frequencies of ABO and Rhesus (D) blood groups and influence of gender were determined on prevalence of these blood groups. Blood group B was found to be the most frequent (38.004%). The frequency of blood group O was 28.755%, for group A 23.260% and for group AB 9.981%. In Rhesus blood grouping system the frequency of Rhesus (D) positive was 89.094%. Gene frequencies with respect to ABO and Rhesus (D) negative were different as for only ABO and ABO along with Rhesus (D) positive. The tre...

  1. 足月新生儿 ABO 溶血病伴高胆红素血症的临床分析%Clinical analysis of neonatal ABO hemolytic disease with hyperbilirubinemia in full-term infants

    韩雪芹; 唐建军; 夏斌

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze characteristics of clinical manifestations,laboratory test results,therapeutic measurements and early prognosis of neonatal ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease (simply as "ABO hemolytic disease")with hyperbilirubinemia in full-term infants,and provid directions of reasonable management of this disease.Methods A total of 331 cases of full-term infants who were confirmed neonatal ABO hemolytic disease with hyperbilirubinemia by laboratory tests,and hospitalized in department of neonatology,West China Second University Hospital,Sichuan University from January 2012 to December 2014 were chosen as study objects.Clinical manifestations,laboratory test results,therapeutic measurements and early prognosis of medical history of these 331 cases were analyzed,retrospectively.The study protocol was approved by the Ethical Review Board of Investigation in Human Being of West China Second University Hospital,Sichuan University.Informed consent was obtained from the parents of each participant.Results The admission mean age was (53.5± 36.2 ) h of these 331 cases of full-term neonatal ABO hemolytic disease with hyperbilirubinemia,48.0%(1 59/331)patients were boys,45.0%(149/331 )patients were born from the first pregnancy,59.2%(1 96/331)patients were cesarean delivery,71.6%(237/331)patients were mixed feeding,the mean jaundice noticed time was (29.7 ± 1 9.4)h after born.The admission mean total serum bilirubin (TSB)was (233.1 ± 90.9)μmol/L,the TSB concentration of 9.4% (31/331 ) patients were>342.0 μmol/L,the highest was 614.7 μmol/L,14.5%(48/331)patients were admitted to hospital with anemia,56.8%(188/331 )patients with type A blood,the rate of eluate positive for anti-A/B test was higher than that of direct antiglobulin test(DAT)(95.5% vs 29.0%),and the difference was statistically significant(χ2 =31 1.076,P =0.000).Mean phototherapy time was (80.1± 20.9)h,8.8%(29/331)patients accepted blood exchange-transfusions and blood transfusions,1 9

  2. The Classroom-Friendly ABO Blood Types Kit: Blood Agglutination Simulation

    Arnold, Savittree Rochanasmita; Kruatong, Tussatrin; Dahsah, Chanyah; Suwanjinda, Duongdearn

    2012-01-01

    The classroom-friendly ABO blood type kit was developed by combining advantages of modelling and a simulation laboratory to teach the topics of ABO blood types and blood transfusion. Teachers can easily simulate the agglutination reaction on a blood type testing plate in the classroom, and show the students how this reaction occurs by using the…

  3. ABO blood group antigens in oral mucosa. What is new?

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    Histo-blood group ABH (O) antigens are major alloantigens in humans. These antigens are widely distributed in human tissues and undergo changes in expression during cellular differentiation and malignant development. The ABH antigens have been characterized as terminal disaccharide determinants...... healing show similarly decreased expression of A/B antigens on migrating epithelial cells. Some studies suggest that the relationship between expression of blood group antigens and cell motility can be explained by different degrees of glycosylation of integrins. Changes in ABO expression in tumours have...

  4. Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Cloud

    Duffy, D.; Schnase, J. L.; McInerney, M.; Webster, W. P.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.; Griffith, P. C.; Hoy, E.; Carroll, M.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of climate change are being revealed at alarming rates in the Arctic and Boreal regions of the planet. NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program has launched a major field campaign to study these effects over the next 5 to 8 years. The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) will challenge scientists to take measurements in the field, study remote observations, and even run models to better understand the impacts of a rapidly changing climate for areas of Alaska and western Canada. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has partnered with the Terrestrial Ecology Program to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud. The cloud combines traditional high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale climate analytics. The ABoVE Science Cloud utilizes (1) virtualized high-speed InfiniBand networks, (2) a combination of high-performance file systems and object storage, and (3) virtual system environments tailored for data intensive, science applications. At the center of the architecture is a large object storage environment, much like a traditional high-performance file system, that supports data proximal processing using technologies like MapReduce on a Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). Surrounding the storage is a cloud of high performance compute resources with many processing cores and large memory coupled to the storage through an InfiniBand network. Virtual systems can be tailored to a specific scientist and provisioned on the compute resources with extremely high-speed network connectivity to the storage and to other virtual systems. In this talk, we will present the architectural components of the science cloud and examples of how it is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign. In our experience, the science cloud approach significantly lowers the barriers and risks to organizations

  5. abo-cross: Hydrogen broadening cross-section calculator

    Barklem, P. S.; Anstee, S. D.; O'Mara, B. J.

    2015-07-01

    Line broadening cross sections for the broadening of spectral lines by collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms have been tabulated by Anstee & O'Mara (1995), Barklem & O'Mara (1997) and Barklem, O'Mara & Ross (1998) for s-p, p-s, p-d, d-p, d-f and f-d transitions. abo-cross, written in Fortran, interpolates in these tabulations to make these data more accessible to the end user. This code can be incorporated into existing spectrum synthesis programs or used it in a stand-alone mode to compute line broadening cross sections for specific transitions.

  6. Protoplasmic Incompatibility in PODOSPORA ANSERINA: a Possible Function for Incompatibility Genes

    Boucherie, Hélian; Bernet, Jean

    1980-01-01

    The suppression of protoplasmic incompatibility resulting from nonallelic gene interactions has been obtained by the coupled effect of mutations in the modA and modB genes (Bernet 1971). Due to their female sterility, modA modB strains provide an experimental tool to determine whether or not the mod and incompatibility loci are involved in a function other than protoplasmic incompatibility. Present results show that modA modB female sterility is a nonautonomous trait since heterokaryotic myce...

  7. Detection of incompatible properties without erasure

    Nisticó, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    In this work we show that in double-slit experiment properties incompatible with Which Slit property can be detected without erasing the knowledge of which slit each particle passes through and without affecting the point of impact on the final screen. A systematic procedure to find these particular properties is provided. A thought experiment which realizes this detection is proposed.

  8. Incompatibilities analysis in the accredited laboratory

    D. Szewieczek

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the presented paper aimed at motivating the necessity of the accreditation of research and standardising laboratories as factors deciding about the competitive advantage of those organisations on the European Union market.Design/methodology/approach used for the research has covered the analyses of results of internal and external audits conducted in one of Polish accredited laboratories and estimation of the incompatibilities occurred.Findings of the carried out research are as follows: number and character of incompatibilities, which are exposed during internal and external audits, reflect size of organisation, where the management system is implemented, phase of implementation as well as the time of functioning.Practical implications refers to any organisation which has quality management system implemented as well as to any accredited laboratory using internal audits as an element of continuous improvement and treating incompatibilities not as something disqualifying the investigated area, but as an supporting element. Originality/value of the presented paper belongs to the methodology comprising the usage of internal audits’ results - proved incompatibilities - as a tool for obtaining and assuring the confidence in the management system.

  9. Prognostic Impact of ABO Blood Group on the Survival in Patients with Ovarian Cancer

    Zhou, Juan; Yang, Li-Chao; He, Zhen-Yu; Li, Fang-Yan; Wu, San-Gang; Sun, Jia-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of ABO blood group on the survival of patients with ovarian cancer remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of the ABO blood group in ovarian cancer patients. Methods: 256 ovarian cancer patients who received a cytoreductive surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The prognostic impact of the ABO blood group with respect to overall survival (OS) was analyzed. Results: The median follow-up time was 57 months and the 5-year OS was 70.1%. T...

  10. Incompatibility boundaries for properties of community partitions

    Browet, Arnaud; Sarlette, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We prove the incompatibility of certain desirable properties of community partition quality functions. Our results generalize the impossibility result of [Kleinberg 2003] by considering sets of weaker properties. In particular, we use an alternative notion to solve the central issue of the consistency property. (The latter means that modifying the graph in a way consistent with a partition should not have counterintuitive effects). Our results clearly show that community partition methods should not be expected to perfectly satisfy all ideally desired properties. We then proceed to show that this incompatibility no longer holds when slightly relaxed versions of the properties are considered, and we provide in fact examples of simple quality functions satisfying these relaxed properties. An experimental study of these quality functions shows a behavior comparable to established methods in some situations, but more debatable results in others. This suggests that defining a notion of good partition in communitie...

  11. DISTRIBUTION OF ABO BLOOD GROUP AND RH(D) FACTOR IN WESTERN RAJASTHAN

    DR. RAJSHREE BEHRA; DR. YOGI RAJ JOSHI

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country with lot of diversity in race, religion & creed. The same diversity has been observed in geographical distribution of blood groups in population within country. The ABO & Rhesus (Rh) blood group system are the most prevalent & important for transfusion of blood & its component, organ transplant, genetic studies & in legal medicine study. This study presents data about the prevalence of ABO & Rhesus (Rh) blood groups amongst blood donors during a period of ten & half ye...

  12. ABO and Rh-D blood group frequency and distribution: a tertiary care hospital experience

    Pandu Rangarao Sanagapati; Sudhir Kumar Vujhini

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to determine the frequency and distribution of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood groups in blood donors of tertiary care hospital-attached blood bank. Methods: This study was conducted among the blood donors of Hyderabad Telangana State (India), who donated blood during the period from July 2013 to December 2014. ABO and Rh blood grouping was performed by forward blood grouping (cell grouping) using test tube agglutination method using antisera A, antisera B...

  13. MOLECULAR ABO PHENOTYPING IN CYNOMOLGUS MACAQUES USING REAL TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR (QPCR)

    Premasuthan, Amritha; Ng, Jillian; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; Houghton, Paul; Farkas, Tibor; Sestak, Karol; Smith, David Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Macaques are commonly used in biomedical research as animal models of human disease. The ABO phenotype of donors and recipients plays an important role in the success of transplantation and stem cell research of both human and macaque tissue. Traditional serological methods for ABO phenotyping can be time consuming, provide ambiguous results and/or require tissue that is unavailable or unsuitable. We developed a novel method to detect the A, B, and AB phenotypes of macaques using real-time qu...

  14. ABO Genotype, ‘Blood-Type’ Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

    Jingzhou Wang; Bibiana García-Bailo; Nielsen, Daiva E.; Ahmed El-Sohemy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 'Blood-Type' diet advises individuals to eat according to their ABO blood group to improve their health and decrease risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. However, the association between blood type-based dietary patterns and health outcomes has not been examined. The objective of this study was to determine the association between 'blood-type' diets and biomarkers of cardiometabolic health and whether an individual's ABO genotype modifies any associations. ...

  15. An integrative evolution theory of histo-blood group ABO and related genes.

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Saitou, Naruya; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Blancher, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The ABO system is one of the most important blood group systems in transfusion/transplantation medicine. However, the evolutionary significance of the ABO gene and its polymorphism remained unknown. We took an integrative approach to gain insights into the significance of the evolutionary process of ABO genes, including those related not only phylogenetically but also functionally. We experimentally created a code table correlating amino acid sequence motifs of the ABO gene-encoded glycosyltransferases with GalNAc (A)/galactose (B) specificity, and assigned A/B specificity to individual ABO genes from various species thus going beyond the simple sequence comparison. Together with genome information and phylogenetic analyses, this assignment revealed early appearance of A and B gene sequences in evolution and potentially non-allelic presence of both gene sequences in some animal species. We argue: Evolution may have suppressed the establishment of two independent, functional A and B genes in most vertebrates and promoted A/B conversion through amino acid substitutions and/or recombination; A/B allelism should have existed in common ancestors of primates; and bacterial ABO genes evolved through horizontal and vertical gene transmission into 2 separate groups encoding glycosyltransferases with distinct sugar specificities. PMID:25307962

  16. The Construal (In)compatibility Effect

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ringberg, Torsten; Mao, Huifang;

    2011-01-01

    This research examines how consumers with a creative mind-set are persuaded by advertising claims construed at different levels (i.e., abstract vs. concrete ad claims). Across four experiments, we show that consumers with a creative mindset are more persuaded by ad claims construed at a level...... incompatible with their mental construal, while ad claims construed at a level compatible with consumers' mental construal are more effective for those who possess a less creative mindset. We document that such differences in persuasion are driven by the fact that consumers with a creative (less creative) mind...

  17. Mechanisms of self-incompatibility and unilateral incompatibility in diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    Eijlander, R.

    1998-01-01

    In chapter 1 an overview is given of the major mechanisms operating in Angiosperms that prevent or limit the degree of inbreeding. The two major systems that function on the basis of interaction between pollen and stigma/style, are the sporophytic and the gametophytic self-incompatibility systems (S

  18. The Incompatibility of Living Systems: Characterizing Growth-Induced Incompatibilities in Expanded Skin.

    Buganza Tepole, Adrian; Gart, Michael; Purnell, Chad A; Gosain, Arun K; Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-05-01

    Skin expansion is a common surgical technique to correct large cutaneous defects. Selecting a successful expansion protocol is solely based on the experience and personal preference of the operating surgeon. Skin expansion could be improved by predictive computational simulations. Towards this goal, we model skin expansion using the continuum framework of finite growth. This approach crucially relies on the concept of incompatible configurations. However, aside from the classical opening angle experiment, our current understanding of growth-induced incompatibilities remains rather vague. Here we visualize and characterize incompatibilities in living systems using skin expansion in a porcine model: We implanted and inflated two expanders, crescent, and spherical, and filled them to 225 cc throughout a period of 21 days. To quantify the residual strains developed during this period, we excised the expanded skin patches and subdivided them into smaller pieces. Skin growth averaged 1.17 times the original area for the spherical and 1.10 for the crescent expander, and displayed significant regional variations. When subdivided into smaller pieces, the grown skin patches retracted heterogeneously and confirmed the existence of incompatibilities. Understanding skin growth through mechanical stretch will allow surgeons to improve-and ultimately personalize-preoperative treatment planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:26416721

  19. Relationship between ABO blood groups and carcinoma of esophagus and cardia in Chaoshan inhabitants of China

    Min Su; Shan-Ming Lu; Dong-Ping Tian; Hu Zhao; Xiao-Yun Li; DeRui Li; Zhi-Chao Zheng

    2001-01-01

    AIM To study the relationship between ABO blood groups and carcinoma of esophagus and cardia in Chaoshan inhebitants of China, which is a unique Littoral high-risk area of esophageal carcinoma in China. The poor communication and transportation in the psst has made Cheoshan a relatively closed area and kept its culture and costure of old China thousend years ago.``METHODS Data on age, sex, ABO blood type and X-rayor psthological diagnose of the pstients with carcinoma of esophagus or cardia were collected from the Tumor Hospital. First Affiliated Hospital, Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College; and the Central Hospital of Shantou and the Central Hospital of Jieyang. A total of 6685 pstients with esophageal carcinoma (EC) and 2 955 patients with cardiac cancer (CC) in Chaoshen district were retrospectively assessed for their association with ABO blood groups.``RESULTS The distribution of ABO blood groups in patients with EC or CC was similar to the norrnal local population in Chaoshen. However, blood group B in male patients with CC and in the pstients with carcinoma in the upper third esophagus was 2.3% and 4.7% higher than the corresponding controls. The relative risk B: O was 1. 1415 (P<0.05)and 1 .2696 (P<0.05), respectively. No relationship was found between ABO blood groups and tumor differentiation.``CONCLTUSION ABO blood group B is associated with the incidence of CC in male individuals and carcinona in the upper third esophagus. The distribution of ABO blood groups varies in the different geographical and ethnic groups. As a result, proper controls are very important for such studies.``

  20. Plasmodial incompatibility in the myxomycetes: a review

    Haskins EF

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Two myxomycete phaneroplasmodia of the same species undergo somatic fusion only if they are phenotypically identical for a complex genetic incompatibility system. This system consists of a three tiered polygenic complex with dominant and recessive alleles. Thus, plasmodia must be phenotypically identical for approximately 16 loci in order to fuse (CC and Cc are phenotypically identical, but different from cc. The first level of the system (having a minimum of seven Fus loci controls membrane fusion, and it apparently prevents fusion unless the two plasmodia have identical membrane or slime sheath components. The second level (having a minimum of six Cz loci produces a rapid lysis of a small mixed region, of the two plasmodia, if membrane fusion has occurred. This lysis is directional in that it targets the recessive phenotype, and it is apparently triggered by some pre-formed substances when they come into contact with a different plasmodium. The third level (having a minimum of three Let loci comes into play if membrane fusion occurs and there is no rapid lysis of the mixed plasmodium. It produces a slow lethal reaction, which targets and degrades the nuclei of the recessive phenotype. This reaction occurs over a period of five to twenty hours and requires the synthesis of new RNA and proteins. Since, this complex system produces a minimum of 65,536 different incompatibility phenotypes, it is highly unlikely that any two phaneroplasmodia will undergo a successful fusion unless they are very closely related. Species with aphaneroplasmoida apparently have a similar system, but species with small protoplasmodia do not appear to undergo any type of plasmodial fusion.

  1. Non-association between anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies and ABO blood group system

    ACF Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii infects humans through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, which elicits humoral immune response with specific antibodies. The expression of the ABO blood group glycoconjugates also occurs in this same system and may influence the human susceptibility of infection by T. gondii. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between ABO blood group phenotypes and the presence of anti-T. gondii antibodies. Data - including age, results of serology tests for T. gondii infection and ABO blood group phenotypes - were assembled from the medical records of 1,006 pregnant women attended in the Base Hospital of the Medical School of São José do Rio Preto, Brazil, between 2001 and 2004. The chi-square test was used to compare the results with the level of significance set at 5%. Of the studied cases, 64.1% (645/1006 and 35.9% (391/1006 presented respectively positive and negative serology tests for anti-T. gondii antibodies. The mean age of those who tested positive was higher than those with negative serology tests (p = 0.0004. The frequencies of ABO blood group phenotypes were similar in those with and without anti-T. gondii antibodies (p = 0.35. In conclusion, the ABO blood group system is not associated with the presence or absence of anti-T. gondii antibodies.

  2. A STUDY OF DISTRIBUTION OF ABO AND RH BLOOD GROUPS SYSTEM AMONG BLOOD DONORS AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Rajesh Kumar; Puja; Vivek Vikram; Amit; Shweeta; Sawke; Shalaka; Nilima

    2015-01-01

    Up till now about 400red cells antigen have been identified. The majority are inherited by Mendelian fashion. The ABO and Rh blood group system was first to be identified and is most important for blood transfusion purposes. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to determine the frequency of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood groups in a ter...

  3. Incompatible insect technique: incompatible males from a Ceratitis capitata genetic sexing strain

    Wolbachia are obligatory intracellular and maternally inherited bacteria that infect and spread through natural arthropod populations by inducing male-killing, feminization, parthenogenesis and, most commonly, unidirectional and bidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). Cytoplasmic incompatibility can be used to control natural populations of insect pests, in a way analogous to the sterile insect technique (SIT), namely through the incompatible insect technique (IIT). For the successful application of the ITT (based on a unidirectional CI approach) against a target species, it is essential that only males are released, as the release of females would lead to fertile matings between the released males and the released females and the establishment of a Wolbachia-carrying field population. In the present study, we describe a Wolbachia-infected line of the VIENNA 8 genetic sexing strain of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedermann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), that carries the selectable marker temperature sensitive lethal (tsl). We show that (1) transferred Wolbachia induce high levels of CI even after the temperature treatment required for the male-only production, and (2) the Wolbachia-infected genetic sexing C. capitata line can be used in cage population suppression experiments analogous to the SIT. We also discuss our results in a comparison between IIT and SIT, investigating whether irradiation and cytoplasmic factors can be combined toward the development of novel strategies for insect pest control. (author)

  4. Frequency of ABO/Rhesus Blood Groups in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Oner, Can; Dogan, Burcu; Telatar, Berrin; Celik Yagan, Canan Fidan; Oguz, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between ABO/Rh blood groups and diabetes mellitus is still controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between ABO/Rhesus blood groups and diabetes in Turkish population. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Istanbul Medeniyet University Göztepe Education and Training Hospital's Diabetes Units. The study group was composed of 421 patients with type-1 diabetes, 484 patients with type-2 diabetes and 432 controls. Blood samples were collected and tested for ABO/Rhesus blood groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 17.0. Asignificant association was found between blood groups and diabetes mellitus. The frequency of AB blood group was significantly higher in type-1 diabetics; and Ablood group was significantly higher in type-2 diabetics. Furthermore, Rh negativity were significantly more frequent in type-2 diabetics. PMID:26787039

  5. Evolution and Molecular Control of Hybrid Incompatibility in Plants

    Chen, Chen; E, Zhiguo; Lin, Hong-Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Postzygotic reproductive isolation (RI) plays an important role in speciation. According to the stage at which it functions and the symptoms it displays, postzygotic RI can be called hybrid inviability, hybrid weakness or necrosis, hybrid sterility, or hybrid breakdown. In this review, we summarized new findings about hybrid incompatibilities in plants, most of which are from studies on Arabidopsis and rice. Recent progress suggests that hybrid incompatibility is a by-product of co-evolution either with “parasitic” selfish elements in the genome or with invasive microbes in the natural environment. We discuss the environmental influences on the expression of hybrid incompatibility and the possible effects of environment-dependent hybrid incompatibility on sympatric speciation. We also discuss the role of domestication on the evolution of hybrid incompatibilities. PMID:27563306

  6. ABO Blood Group Genotyping by Real-time PCR in Kazakh Population

    Pavel Tarlykov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. ABO blood group genotyping is a new technology in hematology that helps prevent adverse transfusion reactions in patients. Identification of antigens on the surface of red blood cells is based on serology; however, genotyping employs a different strategy and is aimed directly at genes that determine the surface proteins. ABO blood group genotyping by real-time PCR has several crucial advantages over other PCR-based techniques, such as high rapidity and reliability of analysis. The purpose of this study was to examine nucleotide substitutions differences by blood types using a PCR-based method on Kazakh blood donors.Methods. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the National Center for Biotechnology. Venous blood samples from 369 healthy Kazakh blood donors, whose blood types had been determined by serological methods, were collected after obtaining informed consent. The phenotypes of the samples included blood group A (n = 99, B (n = 93, O (n = 132, and AB (n = 45. Genomic DNA was extracted using a salting-out method. PCR products of ABO gene were sequenced on an ABI 3730xl DNA analyzer (Applied Biosystems. The resulting nucleotide sequences were compared and aligned against reference sequence NM_020469.2. Real-time PCR analysis was performed on CFX96 Touch™ Real-Time PCR Detection System (BioRad.Results. Direct sequencing of ABO gene in 369 samples revealed that the vast majority of nucleotide substitutions that change the ABO phenotype were limited to exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene at positions 261, 467, 657, 796, 803, 930 and 1,060. However, genotyping of only three of them (261, 796 and 803 resulted in identification of major ABO genotypes in the Kazakh population. As a result, TaqMan probe based real-time PCR assay for the specific detection of genotypes 261, 796 and 803 was developed. The assay did not take into account several other mutations that may affect the determination of blood group, because they have a

  7. Genetic Analysis of ABO and Rh Blood Groups in Backward Caste Population of Uttar Pradesh, India

    Rai, Vandana; Kumar, Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    A series of glycoproteins and glycolipids on red blood cell surface constitute blood group antigens. These are AB, A, B and O in ABO blood group system and Rh in rhesus blood group system. A total of 1065 unrelated Backward Caste (OBC) individuals from Uttar Pradesh were studied for the phenotype and allele frequency distribution of ABO and Rh (D) blood groups. Total 1065 samples analyzed, phenotype B blood type has the highest frequency 36.81% (n=392), followed by O (32.68%; n=348), A (23.66...

  8. Abo and Rh Blood Groups Distribution in Hemophilia and Anti Hiv Positive Individuals

    D.D. FARHUD

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available A group of Iranian patients suffering from Factor VIII deficiency (Hemophilia A and treated with contaminated coagulation factor (imported, became seropositive as determined by ELISA method. Sixty of these individuals, which were available, were studied for ABO distribution. The B blood group in anti HIV pos. individuals (13.33% shows a significant decrease in comparison with the total (1504 of factor VIII hemophilia (21.87%. Statistical analysis of ABO distribution in anti HIV Pos. compared with hemophilia A and the control group showed x2 values of 6.86(0.10 > p>0.05 and 10.21(0.02> P >0.01 respectively.

  9. On microcontinuum field theories: the Eshelby stress tensor and incompatibility conditions

    Lazar, Markus; Maugin, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate linear theories of incompatible micromorphic elasticity, incompatible microstretch elasticity, incompatible micropolar elasticity and the incompatible dilatation theory of elasticity (elasticity with voids). The incompatibility conditions and Bianchi identities are derived and discussed. The Eshelby stress tensor (static energy momentum) is calculated for such inhomogeneous media with microstructure. Its divergence gives the driving forces for dislocations, disclinations, point...

  10. Evolution of Wolbachia cytoplasmic incompatibility types.

    Dobson, Stephen L

    2004-10-01

    The success of obligate endosymbiotic Wolbachia infections in insects is due in part to cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), whereby Wolbachia bacteria manipulate host reproduction to promote their invasion and persistence within insect populations. The observed diversity of CI types raises the question of what the evolutionary pathways are by which a new CI type can evolve from an ancestral type. Prior evolutionary models assume that Wolbachia exists within a host individual as a clonal infection. While endosymbiotic theory predicts a general trend toward clonality, Wolbachia provides an exception in which there is selection to maintain diversity. Here, evolutionary trajectories are discussed that assume that a novel Wolbachia variant will co-exist with the original infection type within a host individual as a superinfection. Relative to prior models, this assumption relaxes requirements and allows additional pathways for the evolution of novel CI types. In addition to describing changes in the Wolbachia infection frequency associated with the hypothesized evolutionary events, the predicted impact of novel CI variants on the host population is also described. This impact, resulting from discordant evolutionary interests of symbiont and host, is discussed as a possible cause of Wolbachia loss from the host population or host population extinction. The latter is also discussed as the basis for an applied strategy for the suppression of insect pest populations. Model predictions are discussed relative to a recently published Wolbachia genome sequence and prior characterization of CI in naturally and artificially infected insects. PMID:15562682

  11. Des loyautés incompatibles

    Daniel Bizeul

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Faire l’expérience directe des phénomènes, en participant aux activités des milieux concernés, représente un des moyens les plus naturels et les plus sûrs pour atteindre la complexité du monde social. C’est aussi un des moyens les plus perturbants pour le chercheur, souvent confronté aux interdits de contact entre des groupes dont les intérêts ou les principes de vie sont antagonistes. Établir des relations étroites avec des militants du Front national, certains d’entre eux « néo-nazis », certains vivant à quelques rues de chez soi, tout en étant « homo », avec pour proches amis des hommes de couleur, de plus entouré de personnes hostiles à ce parti, oblige ainsi à gérer des liens inconciliables. Un risque possible pour le chercheur est alors d’être soumis à des sentiments contradictoires et de mettre du temps pour aboutir à une analyse exempte de toute influence indue.Incompatible loyalties. Moral aspects of an immersion into the French National Front Party.Experiencing directly phenomenon while participating to activities of the concerned circles, represents one of the most natural and safer way to reach the complexity of the society. It is also one of the most disturbing means for the researcher, often confronted to interdicts of contacts between groups which interests or principles of life are antagonists. Creating close relationships with French National Front party activists, some of them “neo-nazis”, some of them living a few streets from your house, while being gay, with colored men as closed friends, surrounded by persons hostile to this party, thus forces to make opposed connections. A possible risk for the researcher can be to be divided between contradictory feelings and spending time finishing an analysis free of unwarranted influence.Lealtades incompatibles. Problemas morales derivados de los contactos con el « Frente nacional »Establecer un contacto directo con fenómenos de diferente

  12. Genetic and epigenetic alterations of the blood group ABO gene in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Gao, Shan; Worm, Jesper; Guldberg, Per;

    2004-01-01

    Loss of histo-blood group A and B antigen expression is a frequent event in oral carcinomas and is associated with decreased activity of glycosyltransferases encoded by the ABO gene. We examined 30 oral squamous cell carcinomas for expression of A and B antigens and glycosyltransferases. We also...

  13. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  14. Association of ABO Blood Group Phenotype and Allele Frequency with Chikungunya Fever

    Rujirojindakul, Pairaya; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Limprasert, Pornprot

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of the ABO blood group phenotype and allele frequency with CHIK fever. Methods. A rural community survey in Southern Thailand was conducted in August and September 2010. A total of 506 villagers were enrolled. Cases were defined as individuals having anti-CHIK IgG by hemagglutination ≥1 : 10. Results. There were 314 cases (62.1%) with CHIK seropositivity. Females were less likely to have positive anti-CHIK IgG with odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) of 0.63 (0.43, 0.93). All samples tested were Rh positive. Distribution of CHIK seropositivity versus seronegativity (P value) in A, B, AB, and O blood groups was 80 versus 46 (0.003), 80 versus 48 (0.005), 24 versus 20 (0.55), and 130 versus 78 (<0.001), respectively. However, chi-square test between ABO and CHIK infection showed no statistical significance (P = 0.76). Comparison of the ABO blood group allele frequency between CHIK seropositivity and seronegativity was not statistically significant. Conclusion. This finding demonstrated no association of the ABO blood group phenotypes and allele frequencies with CHIK infection. PMID:25977691

  15. Clinical use of the ABO-Scoring Index: reliability and subtraction frequency.

    Lieber, William S; Carlson, Sean K; Baumrind, Sheldon; Poulton, Donald R

    2003-10-01

    This study tested the reliability and subtraction frequency of the study model-scoring system of the American Board of Orthodontists (ABO). We used a sample of 36 posttreatment study models that were selected randomly from six different orthodontic offices. Intrajudge and interjudge reliability was calculated using nonparametric statistics (Spearman rank coefficient, Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests). We found differences ranging from 3 to 6 subtraction points (total score) for intrajudge scoring between two sessions. For overall total ABO score, the average correlation was .77. Intrajudge correlation was greatest for occlusal relationships and least for interproximal contacts. Interjudge correlation for ABO score averaged r = .85. Correlation was greatest for buccolingual inclination and least for overjet. The data show that some judges, on average, were much more lenient than others and that this resulted in a range of total scores between 19.7 and 27.5. Most of the deductions were found in the buccal segments and most were related to the second molars. We present these findings in the context of clinicians preparing for the ABO phase III examination and for orthodontists in their ongoing evaluation of clinical results. PMID:14580024

  16. Breaking Gaussian incompatibility on continuous variable quantum systems

    We characterise Gaussian quantum channels that are Gaussian incompatibility breaking, that is, transform every set of Gaussian measurements into a set obtainable from a joint Gaussian observable via Gaussian postprocessing. Such channels represent local noise which renders measurements useless for Gaussian EPR-steering, providing the appropriate generalisation of entanglement breaking channels for this scenario. Understanding the structure of Gaussian incompatibility breaking channels contributes to the resource theory of noisy continuous variable quantum information protocols

  17. Thermodynamic incompatibility and complex formation in pectin/caseinate mixtures

    Rediguieri, Camila F; de Freitas, Osvaldo; Lettinga, Pavlik; Tuinier, Remco

    2007-01-01

    The instability of polysaccharide/protein mixtures occurs because of either thermodynamic incompatibility or complexation. We studied which instability mechanism dominated given the external conditions. Therefore the effect of temperature, pH, and biopolymer concentration on the phase separation of pectin/caseinate mixtures was investigated. At pH > 6, thermodynamic incompatibility with spinodal decomposition was observed in pectin/caseinate mixtures resulting in the formation of water-in-wat...

  18. Breaking Gaussian incompatibility on continuous variable quantum systems

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Kiukas, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.kiukas@aber.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Aberystwyth University, Penglais, Aberystwyth, SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    We characterise Gaussian quantum channels that are Gaussian incompatibility breaking, that is, transform every set of Gaussian measurements into a set obtainable from a joint Gaussian observable via Gaussian postprocessing. Such channels represent local noise which renders measurements useless for Gaussian EPR-steering, providing the appropriate generalisation of entanglement breaking channels for this scenario. Understanding the structure of Gaussian incompatibility breaking channels contributes to the resource theory of noisy continuous variable quantum information protocols.

  19. Noise robustness of the incompatibility of quantum measurements

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Reitzner, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The existence of incompatible measurements is a fundamental phenomenon having no explanation in classical physics. Intuitively, one considers given measurements to be incompatible within a framework of a physical theory, if their simultaneous implementation on a single physical device is prohibited by the theory itself. In the mathematical language of quantum theory, measurements are described by POVMs (positive operator valued measures), and given POVMs are by definition incompatible if they cannot be obtained via coarse-graining from a single common POVM; this notion generalizes noncommutativity of projective measurements. In quantum theory, incompatibility can be regarded as a resource necessary for manifesting phenomena such as Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality violations or Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering which do not have classical explanation. We define operational ways of quantifying this resource via the amount of added classical noise needed to render the measurements compatible, i.e., useless as a resource. In analogy to entanglement measures, we generalize this idea by introducing the concept of incompatibility measure, which is monotone in local operations. In this paper, we restrict our consideration to binary measurements, which are already sufficient to explicitly demonstrate nontrivial features of the theory. In particular, we construct a family of incompatibility monotones operationally quantifying violations of certain scaled versions of the CHSH Bell inequality, prove that they can be computed via a semidefinite program, and show how the noise-based quantities arise as special cases. We also determine maximal violations of the new inequalities, demonstrating how Tsirelson's bound appears as a special case. The resource aspect is further motivated by simple quantum protocols where our incompatibility monotones appear as relevant figures of merit.

  20. Mortality and cancer in relation to ABO blood group phenotypes in the Golestan Cohort Study

    Etemadi, Arash; Kamangar, Farin; Islami, Farhad; Poustchi, Hossein; Pourshams, Akram; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Abnet, Christian C.; Emadi, Ashkan

    2015-01-01

    Background A few studies have shown an association between blood group alleles and vascular disease, including atherosclerosis, which is thought to be due to the higher level of von Willebrand factor in these individuals and the association of blood group locus variants with plasma lipid levels. No large population-based study has explored this association with overall and cause-specific mortality. Methods We aimed to study the association between ABO blood groups and overall and cause-specif...

  1. No Association of Phenotypic ABO Blood Group and Malaria during Pregnancy

    Boel, Machteld E.; Marcus J Rijken; Pimanpanarak, Mupawjay; Keereecharoen, Naw Lily; Proux, Stephane; Nosten, François; McGready, Rose

    2012-01-01

    In a few small studies an association between blood group O and placental malaria has been described. The relationship between blood group and malaria in pregnancy (Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum) was analyzed in 1,468 women from three longitudinal cohort studies in which weekly malaria screening was done systematically during pregnancy. One-third of women (447 of 1,468) had at least one malaria infection in pregnancy. The ABO blood group phenotype was not associated with the spec...

  2. ABO and Rh Blood Type Relationship in Parents with more than One Disabled Child

    Mehrmohammadi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Parental blood variables are one of the most important medical-biological causes of intellectual and physical-movement disabilities. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between parents’ blood variables (ABO and Rh blood type) and their relationship with frequency of intellectual and physical-movement disabilities in Isfahan province. Materials and Methods This was a descriptive-analytical study and 494 samples were selected from mothers with more than one dis...

  3. ABO blood type is associated with endometrial cancer risk in Chinese women

    Xu, Wang-hong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2011-01-01

    ABO blood type has been associated with risk of several malignancies. However, results are not consistent. In this population-based case-control study including 1204 incident endometrial cancer cases and 1212 population controls, we examined the association of self-reported Serologic blood type with endometrial cancer risk using a logistic regression model. Women with endometrial cancer were more likely to have blood type A. Compared to women with blood type O, the adjusted odds ratios for en...

  4. Research study of diversity of Rh and ABO blood groups in 110 psoriatic patients

    Valieghanie M

    1996-01-01

    Psoriasis is an common, chronic, recurrent, inflammatory disease of the skin, characterized by red scaling plaques on the skin surface. The morphology of psoriatic lesions allows classification of the different types of psoriasis that included plaque type, pustular type and Erythrodermic type. I have studied the relationship between distribution of RH and ABO blood groups in 110 psoriatic patients and compared with control normal blood groups. The result of this study was as follow: The rate ...

  5. Breast cancer incidence in Greek women in relation to ABO blood groups and Rh factor

    Stamatakos, Michael; Kontzoglou, Konstantinos; Safioleas, Panagiotis; Safioleas, Constnatinos; Manti, Christina; Safioleas, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Aim To investigate the correlation between breast cancer in Greek women and ABO blood groups. Material-methods In 166 female patients with breast cancer factors such as blood group, histological type, family history, presence or absence of nodal and/or distant metastases were examined. These patients had similar demographic, clinical, surgical, immunohistochemical, laboratory, and follow-up data and this group is representative of general population of women in Greece. Results The ductal type...

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection according to ABO blood group among blood donors in Kosovo

    Bukurije Zhubi; Zana Baruti-Gafurri; Ymer Mekaj; Mimoza Zhubi; Idriz Merovci; Iliriane Bunjaku; Valdete Topciu; Emine Devoli-Disha

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Numerous studies have reported a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among healthy and non-healthy persons in different places. The Aim of the study is to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among Kosovo’s Blood donor associated with ABO/Rhesus blood group.Methods: 671 blood donors are tested for H. pylori antibodies and results are classifi ed by way of donation, age, gender, blood groups and education level. Serum antibodies are analyzed by Enzym...

  7. Heterogeneity and diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in select Saudi Arabian populations.

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Malik, S

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in the Saudi Arabian population, we assembled the phenotypic data of approximately 66,000 subjects from ten representative Saudi populations: Al-Khobar, Riyadh, Tabuk/Madina Al-Munawaara, Jeddah, Abha, South region, Sakaka, Domah, Al-Qurayat, and Sweer. The frequencies of p[A], q[B], and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus were observed to be 0.1688, 0.1242, and 0.7070, respectively, and the frequency of the D allele at the Rh locus was 0.7138. The heterozygosities at the ABO and Rh loci were 0.4563 and 0.4086, respectively, while the combined heterozygosity was 0.4324. Homogeneity tests revealed the population of Abha to be the most heterogeneous while that of Tabuk/Madina was found to be the least heterogeneous. Homogeneity was higher among the Northern populations while Southern populations demonstrated subdivisions and stratification. Gene diversity analyses yielded a total heterozygosity value of 0.4449. The coefficient of gene differentiation was 0.0090. Nei's genetic distance analyses showed that there was close affinity between the populations of Al-Khobar and Riyadh. The largest differences were observed between the populations of Sakaka and Domah. Furthermore, negative correlations were found between p[A] and r[O] alleles, and between q[B] and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus. Clinal analyses revealed that the r[O] allele showed an increasing trend from North-East to South-West, and conversely the q[B] allele exhibited a decreasing trend at these coordinates. These analyses present interesting aspects of the blood group allele distribution across the geography of Saudi Arabia. PMID:26214466

  8. Land Use Effects on Soil Quality Indicators: A Case Study of Abo-Wonsho Southern Ethiopia

    Fantaw Yimer; Melku Dagnachew; Awdenegest Moges

    2013-01-01

    Soil quality assessment is valuable for evaluating agroecosystem sustainability, soil degradation, and identifying sustainable land management practices. This study compared soil quality within culturally protected forest areas and adjacent grassland, grazing land, and farmland in Abo-Wonsho, Southern Ethiopia. A total of 40 soil samples (4 land uses × 5 replications × 2 soil depth layers: 0 to 10 cm and 10 to 20 cm) were collected for analysis. Soil textural fractions (i.e., sand, silt, and ...

  9. Les mélanges de polymères incompatibles Incompatible Polymer Mixtures

    Serpe G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les mélanges de polymères thermoplastiques font actuellement l'objet d'un effort considérable de recherche et de développement. Cette synthèse bibliographique concerne principalement les mélanges mécaniques de polymères incompatibles à l'état fondu. Ceux-ci ont une morphologie hétérogène qui dépend des conditions de mise en oeuvre autant que de la nature des constituants. De plus, pour ce type de matériaux, la nature de l'interface joue un rôle déterminant sur la formation de la morphologie hétérogène et donc sur les propriétés du produit final. D'autre part un problème important réside dans la stabilité des mélanges réalisés. L'ajout d'une faible quantité d'agent tensioactif de type copolymère séquencé, ou greffé, ou la modification chimique des constituants (greffage ou réticulation par exemple permet, dans certains cas d'améliorer très sensiblement les propriétés des mélanges en augmentant l'adhérence entre les phases immiscibles. L'ensemble de ces considérations permettent la réalisation industrielle de nouveaux matériaux polymères aux caractéristiques spécifiques. Thermoplastic polymer mixtures are currently the subject of considerable research and development efforts. This bibliographic synthesis deals mainly with melt blending process of incompatible polymers. These blends have a heterogeneous morphology that depends on the processing conditions as much as on the chemical structure of the componants. Likewise, for these materials the nature of the interface plays a decisive role on the formation of the heterogeneous morphology and hence on the properties on the end product. Furthermore, an important problem is to stabilize the morphology of the blends. Adding a small amount of surfactant of the sequenced of grafted copolymer type or, else, the chemical reaction of the constituents (e. g. grafting or branching during processing are ways in some cases of considerably improving the properties of

  10. Pancreatic cancer risk variant ABO rs505922 in patients with cholangiocarcinoma

    Marcin Krawczyk; Florentina Mihalache; Aksana H(o)blinger; Monica Acalovschi; Frank Lammert; Vincent Zimmer

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate an association between the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and the ABO variant rs505922 (known to increase pancreatic cancer risk) in a large cohort of European individuals with CCA. In total, 180 individuals with CCA and 350 CCA-free controls were included. The ABO variant rs505922 was genotyped using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. Association between this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and CCA was tested in contingency tables. Neither allele distributions nor association tests and regression analysis provided evidence for an increased risk of CCA among carriers of the ABO variant (all P > 0.05). Nevertheless, we documented a deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the entire CCA cohort (P = 0.028) and for patients with intrahepatic (P = 0.037) but not extrahepatic tumor localization (P > 0.05). The association tests did not provide evidence for a prominent role of the investigated SNP in the genetic risk of CCA. However, Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the entire cohort and the intrahepatic CCA subgroup warrants future studies investigating a potential CCA risk modulation by individual blood groups.

  11. ABO blood groups and oral premalignancies: A clinical study in selected Indian population

    S Bhateja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ABO blood group antigens are present on the surface of red blood cells and various epithelial cells. As the majority of human cancers are derived from epithelial cells, changes in blood group antigens constitute an important aspect of human cancers. The aim of the study was to establish clinical usefulness of ABO blood group as a predisposing factor in early diagnosis and management of patients with oral precancerous lesions/conditions. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 50 control and 50 oral precancer (25 leukoplakia and 25 Oral Submucous Fibrosis confirmed by histopathologic examination. All samples were subjected to blood group testing and their prevalence was compared by Z-test using STATA version 8. Results: The "A" blood group was prevalent among the precancerous group. Significant differences on prevalences of blood groups were found (P < 0.05 between control versus leukoplakia and OSMF. Interestingly, 24% gutka chewers who had higher number of grades of dysplasia were falling in "A" blood group. Conclusion: Blood group type should be considered along with other risk factors to understand the individual patient′s risk and further studies in larger samples with inclusion of Rh factor is needed to elucidate the relationship with ABO blood group types.

  12. Distribution of ABO, Rh, MNSs, Kell and Duffy blood-group antigens in population of Vojvodina

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Analysis of erythrocyte blood group antigen polymorphisms and genetic variability in population of Vojvodina was performed by investigating gene and genotype frequencies which determine antigens of ABO, Rh, MNSs, Kell and Duffy blood-group systems. Material and methods We investigated 350 unrelated persons from Vojvodina in regard to appurtenance of ABO, Rh, MNSs, Kell and Duffy blood-group systems. We calculated gene, genotype, phenotype frequencies and proportion significance test. Results and discussion Results of investigation revealed that gene and genotype frequencies of investigated blood-group systems are similar to corresponding data for majority of European populations, while statistically significant differences were established in inhabitants of geographically distant regions. Values of proportion significance test revealed statistically significant differences of genotype frequencies for ABO and MNSs blood-group antigens in populations of: Australian Aborigines, Chinese population, Arabians, Blacks, Eskimos, American Indians (Navaho and Pueblo and population of Papua New Guinea. Statistically significant differences of genotype frequencies were established in inhabitants of narrow geographical areas of Europe such as: Finland, Germany, Sweden, Albania, England and Netherlands. Conclusion Our results point to the fact that erythrocyte blood-groups have different frequencies in some parts of the world, and that there are great differences in frequencies of some blood-groups among inhabitants of various continents and races. Genetical peculiarity of the population of Vojvodina points to the fact that differences in blood-group frequencies are also present among inhabitants of narrow geographical areas.

  13. DISTRIBUTION OF ABO BLOOD GROUP AND RH(D FACTOR IN WESTERN RAJASTHAN

    DR. RAJSHREE BEHRA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available India is a vast country with lot of diversity in race, religion & creed. The same diversity has been observed in geographical distribution of blood groups in population within country. The ABO & Rhesus (Rh blood group system are the most prevalent & important for transfusion of blood & its component, organ transplant, genetic studies & in legal medicine study. This study presents data about the prevalence of ABO & Rhesus (Rh blood groups amongst blood donors during a period of ten & half year (retrospective study from January 2002 to July 2012 conducted at Blood Bank of Mahatma Gandhi Hospital, Jodhpur associated with Dr. S. N. Medical College, Jodhpur (India. During the study period blood groups of 83631 donors were screened by antigen antibody agglutination method using commercially available antiseras which were validated at our Blood Bank. The study revealed that the commonest ABO blood group was B, followed by O, A and AB respectively. Rh negative were 8.25%. [Natl J of Med Res 2013; 3(1.000: 73-75

  14. Genetic Analysis of ABO and Rh Blood Groups in Backward Caste Population of Uttar Pradesh, India

    Vandana RAI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of glycoproteins and glycolipids on red blood cell surface constitute blood group antigens. These are AB, A, B and O in ABO blood group system and Rh in rhesus blood group system. A total of 1065 unrelated Backward Caste (OBC individuals from Uttar Pradesh were studied for the phenotype and allele frequency distribution of ABO and Rh (D blood groups. Total 1065 samples analyzed, phenotype B blood type has the highest frequency 36.81% (n=392, followed by O (32.68%; n=348, A (23.66%; n=252 and AB (6.85%; n=73. The overall phenotypic frequencies of ABO blood groups were B>O>A>AB. The allelic frequencies of O, A, and B alleles were 0.5819, 0.1674 and 0.2506 respectively. Out of total 1065 samples, 1018 (95.59% samples were Rh-positive and 47 (4.41% were Rh-negative. Phenotypic frequency of Rh-negative in Koari, Yadav, Kurmi and Maurya samples were 0.99%, 4%, 1.4% and 7.6% respectively.

  15. Association of ABO and Colton Blood Group Gene Polymorphisms With Hematological Traits Variation.

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Mashayekhi, Amir; Fatahi, Neda; Mahdavi, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-12-01

    Hematological parameters are appraised routinely to determine overall human health and to diagnose and monitor certain diseases. In GWASs, more than 30 loci carrying common deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymorphisms have been identified related to hematological traits. In this study, we investigated the contribution of ABO rs2073823 along with AQP1 rs1049305 and rs10244884 polymorphisms in hematological traits variation in a cohort of Iranian healthy individuals.Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 168 healthy volunteer. Genotyping was performed by ARMS-PCR or PCR-RFLP and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Complete blood analyses were conducted for the participants. Significant association was observed between AQP1 rs1049305 and the hematological traits including hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count (P = 0.012, 0.008, and 0.011, respectively). The AQP1 rs10244884 status was also significantly linked to hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in the study cohort (P = 0.015 and 0.041, respectively). Furthermore, ABO rs2073823 polymorphism was identified as a hemoglobin and hematocrit levels modifier (both with P = 0.004).AQP1 and ABO variants appear to predict hemoglobin and hematocrit levels but not other erythrocyte phenotype parameters including red blood cell counts and red blood cell indices. PMID:26632894

  16. ABO blood groups in relation to breast carcinoma incidence and associated prognostic factors in Moroccan women.

    Zouine, S; Marnissi, F; Otmani, N; Bennani Othmani, M; El Wafi, M; Kojok, K; Zaid, Y; Tahiri Jouti, N; Habti, N

    2016-07-01

    The association between blood groups ABO and different types of diseases was established in several previous studies. Our aim was to seek the possible association between the ABO blood group and breast cancer-associated prognostic factors. The Chi-squared analytic test was used to compare phenotypic ABO distribution among Moroccan blood donors and 442 cases of women suffering from breast carcinoma with archived files in Maternity Ward of University Hospital C.H.U Ibn Rochd between 2008 and 2011. High incidence of breast carcinoma was observed in blood type B patients (p type B was associated with breast carcinomas overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor HER2 (p risk of cancer at age over 70 years (p type A was associated with high risk of cancer among women younger than 35 years old. Blood type A and AB were associated with high incidence of lymph node metastasis (p type and estrogen receptor-positive tumor. Patients with blood group A, B, and AB were more likely to develop aggressive breast carcinoma. Further follow-up studies are necessary to clarify the role of ABH antigens in the progression of breast carcinoma. PMID:27241035

  17. Detention and incompatibility of HIV patients in Italy

    Serena Dell'Isola

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, Law 231/99 and subsequent amendments standardize the conditions allowing or not a HIV positive inmate to remain in jail. Currently such clinical conditions are not automatically associated with the decline of preventive detention and the Court evaluates the incompatibility with detention on the basis of two additional and independent criteria. We have been observing the tendency by jailed HIV-positive patients to manipulate the disease state believing that the rules of incompatibility with the prison system are always applied. The management of HIV positive patients in jail involves significant sanitary and relational efforts, particularly for those suffering AIDS and/or with severe immunodeficiency.

  18. Relation between ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori infection in symptomatic patients

    Jaff MS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Salih Jaff Pathology Department, College of Medicine, Hawler Medical University (formerly Salahuddin University, Erbil, Kurdistan Region, Iraq Abstract: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated higher frequencies of the O blood group and the nonsecretor phenotype of ABH antigens among patients suffering from peptic ulcers. Since Helicobacter pylori has been established as the main etiological factor in this disease, controversies about the associations of the ABO and Lewis blood group phenotypes and secretor and nonsecretor phenotypes in relation to susceptibility towards infection by this bacillus have been presented. The aim of this study was to verify the frequencies of ABO and Rhesus (Rh blood groups in H. pylori seropositive symptomatic patients. The study included (n = 1108 patients with dyspepsia symptoms referred from an outpatient clinic in Erbil city for investigation. Age, sex, and residency were recorded as a routine laboratory framework. Patients underwent SD Bioline (Standard Diagnostics Inc, Kyonggi-do, South Korea and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay serologic tests for H. pylori. ABO blood group phenotypes were determined by a standard hemagglutination test. Results showed that 64.8% of patients (n = 718/1108 were seropositive for H. pylori infection, and (35.2% (n = 390/1108 were seronegative. Of the seropositive patients, 40.8% (n = 293/718 were male and 59.2% (n = 425/718 were female; while of the seronegative patients, 46.7% (n = 182/390 were male and 53.3% (n = 208/390 were female. The mean age for seropositives and seronegatives was (38.0 ± 14.6 years and (37.6 ± 15.7 years respectively. The frequency of the ABO and Rh-positive (Rh+ blood groups among seropositive patients was (A = 32.0%, B = 19.5%, AB = 6.7%, O = 41.8%, and Rh+ = 92.5% and was (A = 32.3%, B = 28.2%, AB = 8.0%, O = 31.5%, and Rh+ = 92.5% in seronegatives. The results of this study suggest that ABO blood groups, age, and gender influence

  19. 26. Relationship between ABO Blood Groups and Carcinoma of Esophagus and Cardia in Chaoshan Littoral of China

    2001-01-01

    Abstract: Background. Chaoshan is the only littoral among the six high-risk areas of esophageal carcinoma (EC) in China and the relatively isolatal society for the inconvenient transport gives an opportunity to study the genetics of carcinoma of esophagus and cardia. Some reports had suggested that ABO blood groups were associated with tumors, but their relation remained controversial. Methods: The data of age, sex, ABO blood type and X-ray or pathological diagnosis of the patients with carcinoma of esophagus or cardia were collected from The tumor hospital, First affiliated hospital, Second affiliated hospital of Shantou University Medical College; the Center hospital of Shantou and the Center hospital of Jieyang. In this study, 6 685 patients with EC and 2 955 patients with cardiac cancer(CC) in Chaoshan district were retrospectively assessed the association with ABO blood groups. Results: The distribution of ABO blood groups in patients with EC or CC was similar to the normal local population in Chaoshan. However, there was 2.3% excess of blood group B in male patients with CC and 4.7% excess in the patients with carcinoma in the upper third esophagus, compared with the corresponding controls. The relative risk B:O was 1.1415 (P<0.05) and 1.2696 (P<0.05), respectively No relationship between ABO blood groups and tumor differentiation was found. Conclusion: ABO blood group B was associated with the incidence of CC in male individuals and carcinoma in the upper third esophagus. The distribution of ABO blood groups varied in the different geographical and ethnic groups, as a result, proper controls were very important for such study.

  20. Variance-based uncertainty relations for incompatible observables

    Chen, Bin; Cao, Ning-Ping; Fei, Shao-Ming; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-06-01

    We formulate uncertainty relations for arbitrary finite number of incompatible observables. Based on the sum of variances of the observables, both Heisenberg-type and Schrödinger-type uncertainty relations are provided. These new lower bounds are stronger in most of the cases than the ones derived from some existing inequalities. Detailed examples are presented.

  1. MIXING OF INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS IN WASTE TANKS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    This document presents onsite radiological, onsite toxicological, and offsite toxicological consequences, risk binning, and control decision results for the mixing of incompatible materials in waste tanks representative accident. Revision 4 updates the analysis to consider bulk chemical additions to single shell tanks (SSTs)

  2. Information complementarity: A new paradigm for decoding quantum incompatibility

    Zhu, Huangjun

    2015-09-01

    The existence of observables that are incompatible or not jointly measurable is a characteristic feature of quantum mechanics, which lies at the root of a number of nonclassical phenomena, such as uncertainty relations, wave—particle dual behavior, Bell-inequality violation, and contextuality. However, no intuitive criterion is available for determining the compatibility of even two (generalized) observables, despite the overarching importance of this problem and intensive efforts of many researchers. Here we introduce an information theoretic paradigm together with an intuitive geometric picture for decoding incompatible observables, starting from two simple ideas: Every observable can only provide limited information and information is monotonic under data processing. By virtue of quantum estimation theory, we introduce a family of universal criteria for detecting incompatible observables and a natural measure of incompatibility, which are applicable to arbitrary number of arbitrary observables. Based on this framework, we derive a family of universal measurement uncertainty relations, provide a simple information theoretic explanation of quantitative wave—particle duality, and offer new perspectives for understanding Bell nonlocality, contextuality, and quantum precision limit.

  3. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study.

    Senthil K Vasan

    Full Text Available Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail.We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models.Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3,615 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 1,842 cases of vascular dementia, and 9,091 cases of unspecified dementia. Overall, our study showed no association between ABO blood group and risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia or unspecified dementia. This was also true when analyses were restricted to donors aged 70 years or older except for a slight, but significantly decreased risk of all dementia combined in subjects with blood group A (IRR, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.98, compared to those with blood group O.Our results provide no evidence that ABO blood group influences the risk of dementia.

  4. ABO and Rh (D group distribution and gene frequency; the first multicentric study in India

    Amit Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The study was undertaken with the objective to provide data on the ABO and Rh(D blood group distribution and gene frequency across India. Materials and Methods: A total of 10,000 healthy blood donors donating in blood banks situated in five different geographical regions of the country (North, South, East and Center were included in the study. ABO and Rh (D grouping was performed on all these samples. Data on the frequency of ABO and Rh(D blood groups was reported in simple numbers and percentages. Results: The study showed that O was the most common blood group (37.12% in the country closely followed by B at 32.26%, followed by A at 22.88% while AB was the least prevalent group at 7.74%. 94.61% of the donor population was Rh positive and the rest were Rh negative. Regional variations were observed in the distribution. Using the maximum likelihood method, the frequencies of the I A , I B and I O alleles were calculated and tested according to the Hardy Weinberg law of Equilibrium. The calculated gene frequencies are 0.1653 for I A (p, 0.2254 for I B (q and 0.6093 for I O (r. In Indian Population, O (r records the highest value followed by B (q and A (p; O > B > A. Conclusion: The study provides information about the relative distribution of various alleles in the Indian population both on a pan-India basis as well as region-wise. This vital information may be helpful in planning for future health challenges, particularly planning with regards to blood transfusion services.

  5. Distribution and clinal trends of the ABO and Rh genes in select Middle Eastern countries.

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Afshan, K; Malik, S

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the ABO and Rh blood group systems is important for blood transfusions and is also pertinent due to their potential association with certain morbidities and susceptibilities to infections. To investigate the diversity and differentiation of the ABO and Rh loci in Middle Eastern populations, data from twelve representative Middle Eastern populations were analyzed. Six populations were in conformity with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at the ABO locus. The pooled heterozygosity at both loci was calculated to be highest in the sample from Jordan and lowest in Bahrain. Heterogeneity was pronounced in the Northern compared to the Southern Middle Eastern populations. Overall, the absolute gene diversity was 0.0046 and gene differentiation was calculated to be 0.0100. Genetic diversity of the studied loci across all populations (HT) was estimated to be 0.4594, while the diversity within the populations (HS) was 0.4548. Nei's genetic distance analyses revealed highest affinities between the populations of Kuwait and Qatar, Oman and Yemen, and between Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. These results were displayed through a UGPMA dendrogram and principal component analyses, which established clustering of certain populations. Clinal trends of the allelic systems were observed by generating contour maps that allow a detailed appreciation of the distributions of alleles across the geography of the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East. Taken together, these analyses are helpful in understanding the differentiation of blood group loci and for designing prospective studies for establishing the associations of these loci with health variables in the populations studied. PMID:26400302

  6. ABO Blood-Typing Using an Antibody Array Technique Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging

    Toemsak Srikhirin; Armote Somboonkaew; Ratthasart Amarit; Boonsong Sutapun; Mongkol Kunakorn; Pimpun Kitpoka; Krisda Sudprasert; Patjaree Peungthum; Nongluck Houngkamhang; Apirom Vongsakulyanon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, readily available antibodies that are used in standard agglutination tests were evaluated for their use in ABO blood typing by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) technique. Five groups of antibodies, including mixed clones of anti-A, anti-B, and anti-AB, and single clones of anti-A and anti-B, were used to construct the five-line detection arrays using a multichannel flow cell in the SPR imager. The red blood cell (RBC) samples were applied to a multichannel flow...

  7. The prevalence of transfusion transmitted infections in ABO blood groups and Rh type system

    Jitendra Singh Nigam; Savitri Singh; Viplesh Kaur; Sumit Giri; Ravi Prakash Kaushal

    2014-01-01

    Screening of blood and blood products is important to reduce the risk of transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs). The transfusion of unscreened or inadequately screened blood and blood products are the major source of TTIs. The aim of this paper is to find out the prevalence of TTIs in ABO blood groups and Rh type system. A total of 4128 blood donors were screened from January 2010 to April 2014. Serological tests were performed for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti hepatitis C viru...

  8. Frequencies of ABO Gene and Rh Blood Groups in Hamadan, Iran

    Hamid Pour-Jafari; Morteza Hashemzadeh Chaleshtari; Mohammad Reza Imani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Determining of gene frequencies of A, Band 0 genes from ABO blood group system and D and d genes from Rhesus system are objectives of the present study.

    <...

  9. Prevalence of hemoglobinopathy, ABO and rhesus blood groups in rural areas of West Bengal, India

    Bikash Mondal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemoglobinopathies are a group of inherited disorders of hemoglobin synthesis. It could be formed a fatal scenario in concern of lacking of actual information. Beside this, ABO and Rh blood grouping are also important matter in transfusion and forensic medicine and to reduce new born hemolytic disease (NHD. Materials and Methods: The spectrum and prevalence of various hemoglobinopathies, ABO and rhesus (Rh blood groups was screened among patients who visited B.S. Medical College and Hospital, Bankura, West Bengal, India. This study was carried out on 958 patients of different ages ranging from child to adults from January to June 2011. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, complete blood count (CBC and hemagglutination technique were performed for the assessment of abnormal hemoglobin variants, ABO and Rh blood groups, respectively. Results: Results from this study had been shown that there was high prevalence of hemoglobinpathies (27.35% where β-thalassemia in heterozygous state occurred more frequent than other hemoglobinopathies. Out of 958 patients, 72.65% were HbAA and 27.35% were hemoglobinopathies individuals where 17.64% β-thalassemia heterozygous, 2.92% β-thalassemia homozygous, 3.86% HbAE, 1.15% HbAS trait, 1.25% HbE-β thalassemia trait and 0.52% HbS-β thalassemia trait were found. No incidence of HbSS, HbSC, HbCC, HbD and other variants of hemoglobinpathies were observed. The gene frequencies with respect to ABO systems had been shown as O > B > A > AB. Blood group O was the highest (35.8% and the least percentage distribution was blood group AB (6.68%. Rhesus positive (Rh+ were 97.7%, while the remaining was 2.3% Rhesus negative (Rh-. The frequencies of A + , B + , AB +, and O + blood groups were 22.44%, 33.61%, 6.58%, and 35.07%, respectively. Conclusions: Remarkable percentages of hemoglobinopathies were prevalent from the present study. An extensive screening of the population is needed to assess the

  10. XPS study of surface absorbed oxygen of ABO3 mixed oxides

    ZHAO Xin; YANG Qiuhua; CUI Jinjin

    2008-01-01

    Perovskite-type complex oxides ABO3 (A=Sr, La;B=Mn, Fe, Co) were prepared by citric acid method. The degradation of water-solubilized dyes was carried out using the mixed oxides as photocatalyst. The surface absorbed oxygen was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that there was a relationship between the photocatalytic activity and the content of the surface absorbed oxygen. The higher the content of the surface absorbed oxygen was, the better the performance of the photocatalyst.

  11. Electron paramagnetic resonance of Cr3+ ions in ABO3 (A = Sc, Lu, In) diamagnetic crystals

    Vorotynov, A. M.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Rudenko, V. V.; Vorotynova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    A magnetic resonance method is applied to the investigation of a number of isostructural diamagnetic compounds ABO3 (A = Sc, Lu, In) with small additions of Cr3+ ions ( S = 3/2) sufficient to observe single-ion spectra. It is shown that the resonance spectra for isolated Cr3+ ions can be described to a good accuracy by the ordinary axial spin Hamiltonian for 3 d ions in octahedral oxygen environment. The parameters of the spin Hamiltonian are determined. It is established that Cr3+ ions in these crystals are characterized by easy-axis-type anisotropy.

  12. Incompatible strategies in international mergers: the failed merger between Telia and Telenor

    Christine Benedichte Meyer; Ellen Altenborg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the problems of incompatible strategies in international mergers. Studying a failed merger between the two state-owned Scandinavian telecom corporations, we examine how the parties' strategies were incompatible. We find that the parties' strategies were incompatible in three distinctive areas, and study how the companies tried to resolve these incompatibilities. Owing to national governance structures established to protect national interests, the parties w...

  13. Understanding the mechanisms of chemical incompatibility ammonium nitrate by molecular modeling

    Cagnina, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Numerous chemical reactants tend to lead to undesired phenomena of incompatibility. In order to prevent the happening of those phenomena, a rapid and accurate identification of the incompatibilities is needed. Until now, experimental studies, which provide insightful, but limited information, were the only possible approach used for the study of incompatibilities. In this work a molecular modeling approach was used in order to complete and improve experimental results of incompatibility proce...

  14. Covalent Fusion of layered Incompatible Gels in Immiscible Solvents

    Biswas, Santidan; Singh, Awaneesh; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Balazs, Anna C.

    We carry out dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to model a two layered stackable gel where the gels are incompatible and are present in immiscible solvent. The bottom layer of the gel is created first and then a solution of new initiators, monomers and cross-linkers is introduced on top of it. These components then undergo polymerization and form the second gel layer. We study all possible combinations of free radical polymerization (FRP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanisms with the two layers of the gel. For example, the bottom layer gel is created via ATRP, whereas the top layer gel follows FRP. Our focus is to do a systematic study of all these combinations and find out the factors responsible for combining two incompatible gels in immiscible solvents.

  15. Cytomechanical properties of papaver pollen tubes are altered after self-incompatibility challenge

    Geitmann, A.; McConnaughey, W.; Lang-Pauluzzi, I.; Franklin-Tong, V.E.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) in Papaver rhoeas triggers a ligand-mediated signal transduction cascade, resulting in the inhibition of incompatible pollen tube growth. Using a cytomechanical approach we have demonstrated that dramatic changes to the mechanical properties of incompatible pollen tubes are

  16. Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose Acetate Succinate: Potential Drug–Excipient Incompatibility

    Dong, Zedong; Choi, Duk Soon

    2008-01-01

    The stability of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMC-AS) and its potential incompatibility with active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) carrying hydroxyl group(s) were investigated in this research. HPMC-AS may undergo hydrolysis under harsh processing conditions with the generation of succinic acid and acetic acid, which can form ester bond(s) with the hydroxyl group(s) in API. In this case, the hot-melt extrusion (HME) product prepared from HPMC-AS and our model compound (...

  17. Incidence of intravenous drug incompatibilities in intensive care units

    Machotka, O.; Maňák, J.; Kuběna, Aleš Antonín; Vlček, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 4 (2015), s. 652-656. ISSN 1213-8118 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : medical error * graph theory * graph coloring * drug administration * drug incompatibilities * applied combinatorics * decision theory * medical * medication safety * intensive care units Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/E/kubena-0437509.pdf

  18. Distyly and heteromorphic self-incompatibility of Hedyotis pulcherrima (Rubiaceae)

    Xinxin Liu; Xiaoqin Wu; Dianxiang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Heterostyly is a genetically controlled floral polymorphism, which includes both distyly and tristyly. We investigated morph ratio, floral and pollen morphology, and self-incompatibility of Hedyotispulcherrima. Overall, the natural population of H. pulcherrima was isoplethic, containing long-styled and short-styled morphs with an equilibrium 1:1 ratio. Long-styled and short-styled morph exhibited a precise reciprocal herkogamy, which was significantly correlated with corolla length. Stigma-lo...

  19. How Incentive-Incompatible Deposit-Insurance Funds Fail

    Kane, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    An incentive-incompatible deposit-insurance fund (IIDIF) is a scheme. Lot guaranteeing deposits at client institutions that deploys defective systems of information collection, client monitoring, and risk management. These defective systems encourage voluntary risk- taking by clients and by managers and politicians responsible for administering the fund. The paper focuses on how principal-agent conflicts and asymmetries in the distribution of information lead to myopic behavior by IIDIF manag...

  20. The different mechanisms of sporophytic self-incompatibility.

    Hiscock, Simon J; Tabah, David A

    2003-01-01

    Flowering plants have evolved a multitude of mechanisms to avoid self-fertilization and promote outbreeding. Self-incompatibility (SI) is by far the most common of these, and is found in ca. 60% of flowering plants. SI is a genetically controlled pollen-pistil recognition system that provides a barrier to fertilization by self and self-related pollen in hermaphrodite (usually co-sexual) flowering plants. Two genetically distinct forms of SI can be recognized: gametophytic SI (GSI) and sporoph...

  1. Comparative genetic organization of incompatibility group P degradative plasmids.

    Burlage, R S; Bemis, L A; Layton, A C; Sayler, G. S.; Larimer, F

    1990-01-01

    Plasmids that encode genes for the degradation of recalcitrant compounds are often examined only for characteristics of the degradative pathways and ignore regions that are necessary for plasmid replication, incompatibility, and conjugation. If these characteristics were known, then the mobility of the catabolic genes between species could be predicted and different catabolic pathways might be combined to alter substrate range. Two catabolic plasmids, pSS50 and pSS60, isolated from chlorobiph...

  2. On the Evolution of Genetic Incompatibility Systems. VI. a Three-Locus Modifier Model for the Origin of Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility

    Uyenoyama, M.K.

    1991-01-01

    Recent genetic analyses have demonstrated that self-incompatibility in flowering plants derives from the coordinated expression of a system of loci. To address the selective mechanisms through which a genetic system of this kind evolves, I present a three-locus model for the origin of gametophytic self-incompatibility. Conventional models assume that a single locus encodes all physiological effects associated with self-incompatibility and that the viability of offspring depends only on whethe...

  3. ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori cagA infection: evidence of an association

    DE Mattos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection appear to be dependent on a host of genetic traits and virulence factors possessed by this microorganism. This paper aimed to investigate the association between the ABO histo-blood groups and H. pylori cagA infections. Genomic DNA samples (n = 110 of gastric biopsies obtained from patients with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcers (n = 25 and chronic active gastritis (n = 85 were analyzed by PCR using specific primers for the cagA gene. Of the samples, 66.4% (n = 73 tested positive and 33.6% (n = 37 negative for the gene. The cagA strain was predominant in peptic ulcers (n = 21; 84.0% compared with chronic active gastritis (n = 52; 61.2% (p = 0.05; OR 3.332; 95% CI: 1.050-10.576. Additionally, the cagA strain was prevalent in the type O blood (48/63; 76.2% compared with other ABO phenotypes (25/47; 53.2% (p = 0.01; OR 2.816; 95% CI: 1.246-6.364. These results suggest that H. pylori cagA infection is associated with the O blood group in Brazilian patients suffering from chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcers.

  4. ABO blood type is associated with endometrial cancer risk in Chinese women

    Wang-Hong Xu; Wei Zheng; Yong-Bing Xiang; Xiao-Ou Shu

    2011-01-01

    ABO blood type has been associated with risk of several malignancies.However,results are not consistent.In this population-based case-control study including 1204 incident endometrial cancer cases and 1212 population controls,we examined the association of self-reported serologic blood type with endometrial cancer risk using a logistic regression model.Women with endometrial cancer were more likely to have blood type A.Compared to women with blood type O,the adjusted odds ratios for endometrial cancer were 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI),0.79-1.28] for type B,1.24 (95% CI,0.90-1.69) for type AB,and 1.50 (95% CI,1.19-1.90) for type A.A significant dose-response relationship was observed for cancer risk and level of antigen A (P for trend =0.0003).The positive association of blood type A with cancer risk was observed regardless of menopausal status,body mass index,oral contraceptive use,or family cancer history.Our results suggest that ABO blood type may be involved in the development of endometrial cancer.

  5. Genetic of the ABO blood system and its link with the immune system A genética do sistema ABO e sua relação com o sistema imune

    Luiz C. de Mattos

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available In the book "Eat Right For Your Type" the author Peter J. D'Adamo writes that the O blood type was the first blood type to appear in humans and affirms that the blood groups are the key to the immune system. Some recent phylogenetic network studies in humans and non-human primates implies that the A gene represents an ancient form of the ABO genes. Relationships between blood groups and infectious and noninfectious diseases and immunodeficiency abnormalities have also been reported in the literature. As D'Adamo's propositions seem to be in opposition with the current knowledge, we present in this paper some comments about the genetics and the evolution of the ABO blood group genes and some links between this blood system and the functioning of the immune system.Peter J. D'Adamo, autor do livro "Eat Right For Your Type", escreve que o grupo O representa o primeiro tipo sangüíneo que surgiu nos humanos e também afirma que os grupos sangüíneos constituem as bases do sistema imune. Recentes estudos filogenéticos realizados em primatas humanos e não humanos estabeleceram que o gene A representa a forma ancestral dos genes que ocupam o locus ABO. Associações entre os grupos sangüíneos ABO, doenças infecciosas, não infecciosas e imunodeficiências também foram relatadas. Diante das proposições do autor, as quais se opõem às informações resultantes de recentes estudos moleculares e filogenéticos, nossa intenção é apresentar algumas reflexões sobre a genética e a evolução dos genes do sistema ABO e as conexões deste sistema com o sistema imune.

  6. Assessing ABO/Rh Blood Group Frequency and Association with Asymptomatic Malaria among Blood Donors Attending Arba Minch Blood Bank, South Ethiopia.

    Alemu, Getaneh; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Determination of the various ABO/Rh blood group distributions and their association with malaria infection has paramount importance in the context of transfusion medicine and malaria control. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2015, to assess ABO/Rh blood groups distribution and their association with asymptomatic malaria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Blood grouping was done using monoclonal antibodies. Thin and thick blood films were examined for Plasmodium parasites. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results. A total of 416 blood donors participated with median age of 22 ± 0.29 (median ± standard error of the mean). Distribution of ABO phenotypes, in decreasing order, was O (175, 42.1%), A (136, 32.7%), B (87, 20.9%), and AB (18, 4.3%). Most of them were Rh+ (386, 92.8%). The overall malaria prevalence was 4.1% (17/416). ABO blood group is significantly associated with malaria infection (P = 0.022). High rate of parasitemia was seen in blood group O donors (6.899, P = 0.003) compared to those with other ABO blood groups. Conclusion. Blood groups O and AB phenotypes are the most and the least ABO blood groups, respectively. There is significant association between ABO blood group and asymptomatic malaria parasitemia. PMID:26925291

  7. Correlation between "ABO" blood group phenotypes and periodontal disease: Prevalence in south Kanara district, Karnataka state, India

    Gurpur Prakash Pai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The correlation between certain systemic diseases and ABO blood group is a well-documented fact. The association between periodontal disease and ABO blood group is not studied in relation to a specific geographic location. Here is a study conducted on a group of patients belonging to South Kanara district of Karnataka state. Materials and Methods: A total of 750 subjects aged between 30and 38 years belonging to South Kanara district were selected on random basis. The study subjects were segregated into healthy/mild gingivitis, moderate/severe gingivitis, and periodontitis group, based on Loe and Silness index and clinical attachment loss as criteria. The study group was further categorized and graded using Ramfjord′s periodontal disease index. Blood samples were collected to identify ABO blood group. Results: Prevalence of blood group O was more in South Kanara district, followed by blood groups B and A, and the least prevalent was AB. The percentage distribution of subjects with blood groups O and AB was more in healthy/mild gingivitis group (group I and moderate/severe gingivitis group (group II, while subjects with blood groups B and A were more in periodontitis group III. There was increased prevalence of subjects with blood groups O and AB with healthy periodontium, while subjects with blood groups B and A showed inclination toward diseased periodontium. Conclusion: There is a correlation existing between periodontal disease and ABO blood group in this geographic location. This association can be due to various blood group antigens acting as receptors for infectious agents associated with periodontal disease. This broad correlation between periodontal disease and ABO blood group also points toward susceptibility ofthe subjects with certain blood groups to periodontal disease.

  8. Is Quantum Mechanics Incompatible with Newton's First Law

    Rabinowitz, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Quantum mechanics (QM) clearly violates Newton's First Law of Motion (NFLM) in the quantum domain for one of the simplest problems, yielding an effect in a force-free region much like the Aharonov-Bohm effect. In addition, there is an incompatibility between the predictions of QM in the classical limit, and that of classical mechanics (CM) with respect to NFLM. A general argument is made that such a disparity may be found commonly for a wide variety of quantum predictions in the classical lim...

  9. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study

    Vasan, Senthil K; Rostgaard, Klaus; Ullum, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined...... the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail. METHODS: We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient...... and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3...

  10. ABO and Rh-D blood group frequency and distribution: a tertiary care hospital experience

    Pandu Rangarao Sanagapati

    2015-08-01

    Results: Out of 1740 blood donors, 1702 (55.6% were male and 38 (44.4% were female. Majority of blood donors were in 21-40 years of age group. The most frequent blood group positions in the descending order are and lsquo;O', and lsquo;A', and lsquo;B' and and lsquo;AB' respectively. One group was and lsquo;Oh' (Bombay Phenotype. Conclusions: and lsquo;O' group is the most frequent position of ABO blood group system followed by and lsquo;A' group. Rh+ is the most frequent group than Rh- in the Rh system. Blood donations by females are very low. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 2058-2061

  11. Frequency of abo blood groups among the diabetes mellitus type 2 patients

    Objective: To study the frequency of ABO blood groups among diabetes mellitus type 2. Results: Comparison of blood groups frequency between the general population and diabetes type 2 patients was carried out in term of percentage. It was noticed that the values were 4.36, 17.15 and 7.34% higher for A, B and AB blood groups respectively in the diabetic patients. On the contrary, the value was 28.94% lower for the blood group O. Conclusion: Present study has supported the hypothesis that diabetes mellitus type 2 and blood groups are interrelated because of the broad genetic immunologic basis in both. It is concluded that the frequency of blood groups B and O is significantly higher and lower respectively in the diabetes mellitus type 2 patients as compared to the general population. (author)

  12. Blood groups polymorphism (ABO, Ss, Rhesus and Duffy) in the Arabic population of Beni Mellal

    The present study deals with anthropogenetic profile of the Arab speaking population of the Beni Mellal region which separates areas inhabited by Mid-Atlas Berbers from those inhabited by Soth-Morroccan Arabs. The study of blood groups ABO, Rhesus, Ss,and Duffy was conducted on 131 individuals. The result shows that this population has the highest frequencies of the FyO allele (0.860) and s allele (0.524) in comparison to all Arab and Berber populations of North Africa and the Middle East. However genetic distances estimated on the basis of these four markers reveal that the population of Beni Mellal and another in the Beni Hlal region are in the same sub-cluster with populations from the Middle East. This may be attributed to the Oriental Arab (Machrek) origin of these two Moroccan Arab populations. (author)

  13. Genetic Characterization of Human Populations: From ABO to a Genetic Map of the British People

    Bodmer, Walter

    2015-01-01

    From 1900, when Landsteiner first described the ABO blood groups, to the present, the methods used to characterize the genetics of human populations have undergone a remarkable development. Concomitantly, our understanding of the history and spread of human populations across the earth has become much more detailed. As has often been said, a better understanding of the genetic relationships among the peoples of the world is one of the best antidotes to racial prejudices. Such an understanding provides us with a fascinating, improved insight into our origins as well as with valuable information about population differences that are of medical relevance. The study of genetic polymorphisms has been essential to the analysis of the relationships between human populations. The evolution of methods used to study human polymorphisms and the resulting contributions to our understanding of human health and history is the subject of this Perspectives. PMID:25657345

  14. Darwin and the origin of interspecific genetic incompatibilities.

    Presgraves, Daven C

    2010-12-01

    Darwin's Origin of Species is often criticized for having little to say about speciation. The complaint focuses in particular on Darwin's supposed failure to explain the evolution of the sterility and inviability of interspecific hybrids. But in his chapter on hybridism, Darwin, working without genetics, got as close to the modern understanding of the evolution of hybrid sterility and inviability as might reasonably be expected. In particular, after surveying what was then known about interspecific crosses and the resulting hybrids, he established two facts that, while now taken for granted, were at the time radical. First, the sterility barriers between species are neither specially endowed by a creator nor directly favored by natural selection but rather evolve as incidental by-products of interspecific divergence. Second, the sterility of species hybrids results when their development is "disturbed by two organizations having been compounded into one." Bateson, Dobzhansky, and Muller later put Mendelian detail to Darwin's inference that the species-specific factors controlling development (i.e., genes) are sometimes incompatible. In this article, I highlight the major developments in our understanding of these interspecific genetic incompatibilities--from Darwin to Muller to modern theory--and review comparative, genetic, and molecular rules that characterize the evolution of hybrid sterility and inviability. PMID:21043780

  15. Proteomics analysis of compatibility and incompatibility in grafted cucumber seedlings.

    Xu, Qing; Guo, Shi-Rong; Li, Lin; An, Ya-Hong; Shu, Sheng; Sun, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Graft compatibility between rootstock and scion is the most important factor influencing the survival of grafted plants. In this study, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) to investigate differences in leaf proteomes of graft-compatible and graft-incompatible cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)/pumpkin (Cucurbita L.) combinations. Cucumber seedlings were used as the scions and two pumpkin cultivars with strongly contrasting grafting compatibilities were used as the rootstocks. Non-grafted and self-grafted cucumber seedlings served as control groups. An average of approximately 500 detectable spots were observed on each 2-DE gel. A total of 50 proteins were differentially expressed in response to self-grafting, compatible-rootstock grafting, and incompatible-rootstock grafting and were all successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The regulation of Calvin cycle, photosynthetic apparatus, glycolytic pathway, energy metabolism, protein biosynthesis and degradation, and reactive oxygen metabolism will probably contribute to intensify the biomass and photosynthetic capacity in graft-compatible combinations. The improved physiological and growth characteristics of compatible-rootstock grafting plants are the result of the higher expressions of proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, and protein metabolism. At the same time, the compatible-rootstock grafting regulation of stress defense, amino acid metabolism, and other metabolic functions also plays important roles in improvement of plant growth. PMID:27070289

  16. Paternity investigation among known false trios: ABO, Rh, MNSs, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, and HLA systems.

    Salaru, N N

    1993-11-01

    This paternity study was performed with trios in which the putative father was not the biological father (NBF), in order to evaluate adjustment of genetic markers employed to disclose non biological fathers for the population, and the biological meaning of likelihood of paternity in casework. All 923 generated trios had ABO, Rh, MNS, Kell and HLA systems tested; 372 of them also had Duffy and Kidd systems tested. The most powerful exclusion system was HLA, followed, in this order, by ABO, Rh, Duffy, MNSs, Kidd, and Kell. Taking into account the Indian/black/white historical miscegenation background in the population, an improvement in the performance of red blood cells as disclosers of non biological fathers could be achieved, if particular additional sera were used. In the group tested with seven different systems, direct exclusions were observed in 90.31%, and they were single system exclusions in 26.61%. In order to avoid the remote possibility of mutation, it is suggested that the number of used systems be increased. Indirect exclusions were verified in 8.87% and only 0.81% of NBF were not excluded at all. In this last group, probabilities of paternity were calculated and two values greater than 95% were obtained. To be able to accomplish the "visum et repertum" duty and to assist the court, the expert should equally emphasize: a) the probability of paternity of the alleged father and the possibility of finding an unexcluded NBF; b) the actual performance of systems used to uncover NBF, together with the probabilities of paternity of those who were not discovered; c) the previous referenced trend of probabilities of paternity of true and of non-biological fathers to cluster in distinct class intervals of likelihood of paternity. PMID:8263491

  17. Determination of natural radioactive elements in Abo Zaabal, Egypt by means of gamma spectroscopy

    Highlights: ► We examined the radioactivity of different type samples from Abo Zaabaal Lake. ► We evaluated the natural nuclide gamma-ray activities and their annual dose rates. ► We evaluated the concentrations of 226Ra and its hazard indices. ► We assessed the absorbed dose in human. ► All results are within normal ranges. - Abstract: The natural nuclide gamma-ray activities and their respective annual effective dose rates, produced by 238U, 232Th, 40K and 226Ra, are determined for 10 different natural samples (soil–plant–water) from Abo Zaabaal Lake. This lake is located very close to the Egyptian reactors. The gamma spectra analysis indicates that the photo-gamma lines represent ten radioactive nuclides 234Th, 239Pu, 228Ac, 226Ra, 212Pb, 214Pb, 208Tl, 212Bi, 214Bi and 40K. These nuclides represent the daughters of the natural radioactive series 238U and 232Th with 40K. The mean activity concentration of 238U was found to be 6.57, 10.16 and 5.44 Bq kg−1 for (soil–plant–water); 8.46, 8.33 and 6.04 Bq kg−1 of 232Th, and 136.3, 216.8 and 119.2 Bq kg−1 of 40K respectively. The mean activity concentrations of 226Ra were obtained which help to evaluate the radiation hazard indices as radium equivalent, internal and external hazard indices. In addition, to assess the radiation risk to a biosystem, the annual effective dose rate, the absorbed dose in human and the absorbed dose outdoor are also evaluated.

  18. Preliminary joint neutron time-of-flight and X-ray crystallographic study of human ABO(H) blood group A glycosyltransferase

    B. Schuman; Fisher, S. Z.; Kovalevsky, A.; Borisova, S. N.; Palcic, M. M.; Coates, L.; Langan, P.; Evans, S V

    2011-01-01

    Collection to 2.5 Å resolution of neutron diffraction data from crystals of the human ABO(H) blood group glycosyltransferase GTA, is presented with the preliminary joint refinement with the corresponding X-ray diffraction data.

  19. Graft Incompatibility Influence on Assimilating Pigments and Soluble Sugars Amount of some Pear (Pyrus sativa) Cultivars

    Gheorghii CIOBOTARI; Maria BRINZA; Aliona MORARIU; Gica GRADINARIU

    2010-01-01

    Graft incompatibility in fruit trees is one of the greatest obstacles in rootstocks and cultivars breeding. The mechanism in which incompatibility is expressed is not yet fully understood and several hypotheses have been advanced in an attempt to explain it. In many cases (pear on quince grafts, apricot on Prunus grafts), incompatibility is manifested by the breaking of the trees at the point of the union particularly when they have been growing for some years. Many reports focus on this prob...

  20. Drug incompatibilities in the adult intensive care unit of a university hospital

    Marsilio, Naiane Roveda; da Silva, Daiandy; Bueno, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to identify the physical and chemical incompatibilities among the drugs administered intravenously to patients admitted to an adult intensive care unit. We also aimed to establish pharmaceutical guidelines for administering incompatible drugs. Methods This cross-sectional, prospective, and quantitative study was conducted from July to September 2015. Drug incompatibilities were identified based on an analysis of the patient prescriptions available in the hospital ...

  1. Frequency of ABO and Rh (D) Blood Groups and Hemoglobin Threshold among Pregnant Women in Family Guidance Association, Mekelle Model Clinic, North Ethiopia.

    Megbaru Alemu; Guesh Abrha; Gessessew Bugssa; Kiros Tedla

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the frequency of ABO and Rh blood group patterns and hemoglobin threshold among pregnant women screened at Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia, North Area Mekelle model clinic. Checklists were prepared to collect data from laboratory registration books of five years to undergo this retrospective study. Those registration books were reviewed for ABO blood group, Rh profiles and hemoglobin threshold of the pregnant women screened during the specified per...

  2. FREQUENCY OF ABO AND RHESUS (D) BLOOD GROUPS IN TRIBAL P OPULATION OF MADHYA PRADESH: A STUDY FROM TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL IN MADHYA PRADESH

    Ajit; Dolly

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ABO and Rh blood groups are most important blood groups in human beings. The frequency of four main blood group systems varies in population throughout the world and even in different parts of country. Objective if this study was to identify distribution o f ABO and Rh blood group system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood samples from 10680 tribals were collected in Jhabua district of Madhya Pradesh during the month of June 2012. Among 10680 tribals, 5670 wer...

  3. Biochemical Models for S-Rnase-Based Self-Incompatibility

    Zhi-Hua Hua; Allison Fields; Teh-hui Kao

    2008-01-01

    S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI) is a genetically determined self/non-self-recognition process employed by many flowering plant species to prevent inbreeding and promote outcrosses.For the Plantaginaceae,Rosa-ceae and Solanaceae,it is now known that S-RNase and S-Iocu F-box(two multiple allelic genes at the S-locus)determine the female and male specificity,respectively,during SI interactions.However,how allelic products of these two genes interact inside pollen tubes to result in specific growth inhibition of self-pollen tubes remains to be investigated.Here,we review all the previously proposed biochemical models and discuss whether their predictions are consistent with all SI phenomena,including competitive jnteraction where SI breaks down in pollen that carries two different pollen 5-alleles.We also discuss these models in Iight of the recent findings of compartmentalization of S-RNases in both incompatible and compatible pollen tubes.Lastly,we summarize the results from our recent biochemical studies of PiSLF(Petunia inflata SLF)and S-RNase.and present a new model for the biochemical mechanism of SI in the Solanaceae.The tenet of this model is that a PiSLF preferentially interacts with its non-self S-RNases in the cytoplasm of a pollen tube to result in the assembly of an E3-like complex,which then mediates ubiquitination and degradation of non-self S-RNases through the ubiquitin-26S proteasome pathway.This model can explain all SI phenomena and,at the same time,has raised new questions for further study.

  4. FREQUENCY AND DISTRIBUTION OF ABO & RH BLOOD GROUP IN BILASPUR DISTRICT OF CHHATTISGARH STATE : A STUDY FROM MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL

    Bhanu Pratap; De, Archana; Watsala; Anil K; De, Shipra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Approximate 30 blood group systems have discovered and more than 400 erythrocytes antigens are identified. Blood group ABO and Rh are most important among all other blood group systems in transfusion service practices. The frequency of four major blood gr oup s namely A, B, O, AB with Rh Positive and Negative varies in different population of the world and differ also in region and race wise. MATER...

  5. PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF ABO AND RHESUS BLOOD GROUPS: A CONCRETE STUDY IN PRAKASAM DISTRICT OF ANDHRA PRADESH

    Bora Prasada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : ABO and Rh System are the major blood Groups widely distributed in the general population irrespective of their race, ethnicity and geographical distribution. The present study is conducted to identify the distribution of these commonest blood groups prevailing in the Prakasam District of Andhra Pradesh in comparison with related studies in India and abroad. About 2404 samples over a period of 4 months from November 2014 to February 2015, grouped for ABO and Rh - D System(s at Blood Bank, RIMS, Ongole, Prakasam district Andhra Pradesh. METHODS : Ongole is the capital of erstwhile Andhra Pradesh; it is very near to the present proposed capital of Andhra Pradesh. The present study was conducted in human male and female subjects comprising of 2404 attendees to the RIMS Medical College Blood Bank of Prakasam D istrict over a period of 4 months. All the standardized Operating Procedures (SOPs and Quality Control measures are taken for blood group determination including Donor Screening Questionnaire. Subjects with severe medical problems like Cardio respiratory, renal, hepatic and gastrointestinal illnesses were excluded from the study. RESULTS : In the present study in Prakasam district, the most common Blood Group in ABO and Rh system was found to be ‘O’ +ve. Next common in descending order were B +ve, A +ve, AB +ve, O - ve, A - ve, B - ve and AB - ve. In Prakasam District, the commonest Rh Blood type is Rh Positive (94.5%, less frequent is Rh negative (5.5%. In South India Rh Positive is 94.6%, Rh negative is 5.4%. In European Population Rh Positive is 85% and Rh negative is 15%. Of the total 60 people affected by diseases, 4 were affected by HIV, 40 by HBSAG and 16 by HCV. CONCLUSION : It is clearly evident that the most common Blood Group in ABO system is ‘O’. Least common Blood Group is AB. In Rh system D Positive is 94.5% in general population.

  6. Sample Acquisition and Analytical Chemistry Challenges to Verifying Compliance to Aviators Breathing Oxygen (ABO) Purity Specification

    Graf, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been developing and testing two different types of oxygen separation systems. One type of oxygen separation system uses pressure swing technology, the other type uses a solid electrolyte electrochemical oxygen separation cell. Both development systems have been subjected to long term testing, and performance testing under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. Testing these two systems revealed that measuring the product purity of oxygen, and determining if an oxygen separation device meets Aviator's Breathing Oxygen (ABO) specifications is a subtle and sometimes difficult analytical chemistry job. Verifying product purity of cryogenically produced oxygen presents a different set of analytical chemistry challenges. This presentation will describe some of the sample acquisition and analytical chemistry challenges presented by verifying oxygen produced by an oxygen separator - and verifying oxygen produced by cryogenic separation processes. The primary contaminant that causes gas samples to fail to meet ABO requirements is water. The maximum amount of water vapor allowed is 7 ppmv. The principal challenge of verifying oxygen produced by an oxygen separator is that it is produced relatively slowly, and at comparatively low temperatures. A short term failure that occurs for just a few minutes in the course of a 1 week run could cause an entire tank to be rejected. Continuous monitoring of oxygen purity and water vapor could identify problems as soon as they occur. Long term oxygen separator tests were instrumented with an oxygen analyzer and with an hygrometer: a GE Moisture Monitor Series 35. This hygrometer uses an aluminum oxide sensor. The user's manual does not report this, but long term exposure to pure oxygen causes the aluminum oxide sensor head to bias dry. Oxygen product that exceeded the 7 ppm specification was improperly accepted, because the sensor had biased. The bias is permanent - exposure to air does not cause the sensor to

  7. Frequencies and ethnic distribution of ABO and Rh(D) blood groups in Mauritania: results of first nationwide study.

    Hamed, C T; Bollahi, M A; Abdelhamid, I; Med Mahmoud, M A; Ba, B; Ghaber, S; Habti, N; Houmeida, A

    2012-04-01

    There is no data available on the ABO/Rh(D) frequencies in the Mauritanian population. We retrospectively analysed records of a 5-year database that contained ABO/Rh phenotype and ethnic origin of 10 116 volunteers giving blood at the national blood transfusion centre to derive the frequencies of ABO/Rh(D) groups in the Mauritanian population. The two race categories in the country and their sub-ethnic groups: the Moors (whites and black) and the black Africans (Pulhars, Soninkes and Wolof) were included in this study. Globally, group O had the highest frequency (49.10%) followed by A (28.28%), B (18.56%) and AB (4.05%). This order more common in North African populations was found in four of the five ethnic groups composing our population. Allele frequencies were, respectively, 70.20%, 17.74% and 12.04% giving the same order of O > A > B. We observed no significant variation in these frequencies between the different ethnic groups. Rhesus study showed that with a percentage of 94.23% Rh(D) positive is by far the most prevalent, while Rh(D) negative is present only in 5.77% of the total population. This frequency distribution supports the mixed-race composition of the Mauritanian population. PMID:22128837

  8. DISTRIBUTION OF CLASSICAL ABO BLOOD GROUPS AMONG TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS : AN ANALYSIS

    Rama Devi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At present Diabetes Mellitus is a global phenomenon with the disease topping the list, comprising of about 32 million cases , India is in the forefront with 30% of the cases . The disease affects multiple organs and is a leading cause of much morbidity and mortality. Since it is a multi - factorial disease a major step would be to identify different associated factors, for an early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The ABO blood groups are often associated with several diseases, with one blood group more often seen with the patients of a particular disease. Our study will help to determine the frequency and distribution of blood groups in correlation with Diabetes Mellitus. MATERIAL & METHODS: This study was conducted in the Gandhi Medical College, Secunderabad, during a two year period. A random study involving every third diabetic patient was chosen and their blood group was determined. A total of 3 00 patients were selected with 150 male and 150 female patients. Another 300 volunteers who were not diabetics were chosen as controls and their blood groups were also determined. A pro - forma was given to both diabetics and controls which included the following variables : 1 . Demographic data 2. Blood grouping 3. Fasting and post prandial blood sugar. Following this, blood groups of both cohorts and controls were determined by antigen antibody agglutination method. Data analysis was do ne after data was entered into excel sheet and double checked for errors using SPSS Software RESULTS: Our a nalysis showed that O group was significantly more among diabetic patients when all patients were compared to control . ² there was a preponderance of blood group O among female diabetics and B among male diabetics. CONCLUSION: ABO blood groups have been determined in 300 diabetic patients and compared with the controls comprising of a series of 300 voluntary blood donors. When the results were analysed on the basis of sex, there was preponderance

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection according to ABO blood group among blood donors in Kosovo

    Bukurije Zhubi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous studies have reported a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among healthy and non-healthy persons in different places. The Aim of the study is to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among Kosovo’s Blood donor associated with ABO/Rhesus blood group.Methods: 671 blood donors are tested for H. pylori antibodies and results are classifi ed by way of donation, age, gender, blood groups and education level. Serum antibodies are analyzed by Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assay test for H. pylori IgG with Biomerieux HPY-VIDAS.Results: The frequency of IgG antibody for H. pylori among healthy blood donors is 56.9%, there is not found any difference between voluntary and non-voluntary blood donors (57.4% respectively 56.3%(OR=1.05; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.43; p=0.8. H pylori IgG antibodies positive are detected in 57.0 % ( 126 of 221 of women, compared with 56.9 % ( 256 of 450 of men(OR=0.99; 95% CI 0.72 to 1.38; p=0.96. Serpositive donors are older than seronegative ones (31.9 years, respectively 29.5 years, p=0.02. Mean value of IgG antibody of H. pylori is 3.61 with no significant difference between males and females (3.72 respectively 3.44; p=0.2. The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection is similar among blood groups: O (57.4%, A (56.2%, B (59.6%, AB (51.4%, RhD positive (56.7% and RhD negative (58.3%.Conclusions: The seropositivity of H. pylori is moderately higher in the non voluntary and familiar blood donors among the total Kosovo blood donors. There is not found a significant relationship between infection with H. pylori and ABO/Rhesus blood group among blood donors.

  10. Streamflow, Infiltration, and Ground-Water Recharge at Abo Arroyo, New Mexico

    Stewart-Deaker, Amy E.; Stonestrom, David A.; Moore, Stephanie J.

    2007-01-01

    Abo Arroyo, an ephemeral tributary to the Rio Grande, rises in the largest upland catchment on the eastern side of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (MRGB). The 30-kilometer reach of channel between the mountain front and its confluence with the Rio Grande is incised into basin-fill sediments and separated from the regional water table by an unsaturated zone that reaches 120 meters thick. The MRGB portion of the arroyo is dry except for brief flows generated by runoff from the upland catchment. Though brief, ephemeral flows provide a substantial fraction of ground-water recharge in the southeastern portion of the MRGB. Previous estimates of average annual recharge from Abo Arroyo range from 1.3 to 21 million cubic meters. The current study examined the timing, location, and amount of channel infiltration using streamflow data and environmental tracers during a four-year period (water years 1997?2000). A streamflow-gaging station (?gage?) was installed in a bedrock-controlled reach near the catchment outlet to provide high-frequency data on runoff entering the basin. Streamflow at the gage, an approximate bound on potential tributary recharge to the basin, ranged from 0.8 to 15 million cubic meters per year. Storm-generated runoff produced about 98 percent of the flow in the wettest year and 80 percent of the flow in the driest year. Nearly all flows that enter the MRGB arise from monsoonal storms in July through October. A newly developed streambed temperature method indicated the presence and duration of ephemeral flows downstream of the gage. During the monsoon season, abrupt downward shifts in streambed temperatures and suppressed diurnal ranges provided generally clear indications of flow. Streambed temperatures during winter showed that snowmelt is also effective in generating channel infiltration. Controlled infiltration experiments in dry arroyo sediments indicated that most ephemeral flow is lost to seepage before reaching the Rio Grande. Streambed temperature

  11. Complex Self-Incompatibility Systems in Ranunculus acris L. and Beta vulgaris L

    Lundqvist, A.; Østerbye, U.; Larsen, K.; Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1973-01-01

    acris, and in Beta vulgaris there are at least four. The observations strongly support the theory of the incompatibility genes being ancient constituents of the breeding systems of the angiosperms. Most probably a complex type of incompatibility control was already present at the presumed common...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix V to Part 264 - Examples of Potentially Incompatible Waste

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples of Potentially Incompatible Waste V Appendix V to Part 264 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 264, App. V Appendix V to Part 264—Examples of Potentially Incompatible Waste...

  13. Within- and between-population variation for Wolbachia-induced reproductive incompatibility in a haplodiploid mite

    F. de Freitas Vala Salvador; A. Weeks; D. Claessen; J.A.J. Breeuwer; M.W. Sabelis

    2002-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is a bacterium that induces cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), the phenomenon in which infected males are reproductively incompatible with uninfected females. CI spreads in a population of hosts because it reduces the fitness of uninfected females relative to infected females. CI

  14. 40 CFR 267.17 - What are the requirements for managing ignitable, reactive, or incompatible wastes?

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for managing ignitable, reactive, or incompatible wastes? 267.17 Section 267.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... requirements for managing ignitable, reactive, or incompatible wastes? (a) You must take precautions to...

  15. A preliminary survey into ways of overcoming self-incompatibility in theobroma cacao L

    Varying concentrations of NAA and GA3 (100-500 mg/l) were applied to the base of self-incompatible cocoa flowers with the view to delaying floral abscission and thus lengthening the time needed for the fusion of self-incompatible male and female gametes. NAA above 300 mg/l slightly delayed floral abscission but this did not help overcome the self-incompatibility whilst none of the GA3 concentrations used either delayed floral abscission or promoted self-compatibility. Similar concentrations of both hormones when applied to the stigma before selfing also did not help to overcome the self-incompatibility. Self-incompatibility was partially overcome by treating compatible pollen with 60Gy of gamma rays and mixing it with self-incompatible pollen. Compatible pollen treated at 60Gy and used alone to pollinate self-incompatible flowers resulted in 100 percent flat, non-viable cocoa beans whilst gamma treated pollen mixed with self-incompatible pollen produced about 30 percent fully formed and viable cocoa beans. This appears to suggest that the irradiated compatible pollen is acting as mentor pollen and promoting selfing. (author)

  16. Supervisee Incompatibility and Its Influence on Triadic Supervision: An Examination of Doctoral Student Supervisors' Perspectives

    Hein, Serge F.; Lawson, Gerard; Rodriguez, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to explore supervisors' experiences of supervisee incompatibility in triadic supervision. In-depth interviews were completed with 9 doctoral student supervisors in a counselor education program, and a whole-text analysis generated 3 categories. Supervisee incompatibility took a wide variety of forms and negatively…

  17. Caso de miasis orbitaria

    Lyane Casas Pérez; Jorge G. Martín Martínez; Aime Noa Barrios

    2009-01-01

    Se presenta un caso de un paciente masculino de ochenta y tres años de edad, de raza blanca con antecedentes de la enfermedad del Parkinson con una miasis orbitaria derecha profunda producida por el gusano barrenador de la mosca Cochlimyia hominivorax. Se realizó un reporte de caso con el objetivo de describir el cuadro médico que presentaba el anciano. Presentó abundantes larvas en una zona necrótica en el párpado superior derecho, con fetidez y ninguna sensación en la zona que permitió real...

  18. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pyloriin school-aged Chinese in Taipei City and relationship between ABO blood groups

    Tzee-Chung Wu; Liang-Kung Chen; Shinn-Jang Hwang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the seropositive rate of antibodies against H. pylori(anti-HP) in Taipei City and to compare the relationship of ABO blood groups and H. pylori infection.METHODS:In 1993, high school students in Shih-Lin District were randomly selected for blood samplings by their registration number at school. In addition, similar procedures were performed on the well-children clinics of Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Besides, randomly selected sera from the adults who took the physical examination were recruited for evaluation. Informed consents were obtained from all the subjects before blood samplings and parents were simultaneously informed for those who were younger than 18-year-old. Blood tests for anti-HP and ABO blood groupings were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Chi square tests were used for the comparisons between seroprevalence of H. pylori and ABO blood groups.RESULTS: Totally, 685 subjects were recruited (260 children aged 1-14 years, 425 high school students aged 15-18 years)were evaluated, and another 88 adult healthy volunteers were studied as well for comparison. The age-specific seropositive rate of anti-HP was 1.3 % at age 1-5 years,7.7 % at age 6-10 years, and 11.5 % at age 11-14 years.The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was abruptly increased in young adolescence: 18.6 % at age 15 years,28.1% at age 16 years, 32.4 % at age 17 years and 41.0%at age 18 years, respectively. In the 425 high school students,ABO blood groupings were performed, which disclosed 48.5 % (206/425) of blood group O, 24 % (102/425) of blood group A, 21.8 % (93/425) of blood group B and 5.6 %(24/425) of blood group AB. In comparison of the subjects with blood group O and the other blood groups, no statistical significance could be identified in the seroprevalence of H. pylori(P=0.99).CONCLUSION: The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection in Taipei City in adults is similar to the developed countries,and the abrupt increase of H. pylori during high

  19. ABO Blood-Typing Using an Antibody Array Technique Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging

    Toemsak Srikhirin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, readily available antibodies that are used in standard agglutination tests were evaluated for their use in ABO blood typing by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging technique. Five groups of antibodies, including mixed clones of anti-A, anti-B, and anti-AB, and single clones of anti-A and anti-B, were used to construct the five-line detection arrays using a multichannel flow cell in the SPR imager. The red blood cell (RBC samples were applied to a multichannel flow cell that was orthogonal to the detection line arrays for blood group typing. We found that the blood samples were correctly grouped in less than 12 min by the SPR imaging technique, and the results were consistent with those of the standard agglutination technique for all 60 samples. We found that mixed clones of antibodies provided 33%–68% greater change in the SPR signal than the single-clone antibodies. Applying the SPR imaging technique using readily available antibodies may reduce the costs of the antibodies, shorten the measurement time, and increase the throughput.

  20. The prevalence of transfusion transmitted infections in ABO blood groups and Rh type system

    Jitendra Singh Nigam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Screening of blood and blood products is important to reduce the risk of transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs. The transfusion of unscreened or inadequately screened blood and blood products are the major source of TTIs. The aim of this paper is to find out the prevalence of TTIs in ABO blood groups and Rh type system. A total of 4128 blood donors were screened from January 2010 to April 2014. Serological tests were performed for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, anti hepatitis C virus (Anti-HCV, anti HIV-1 and 2, venereal disease research laboratory test (VDRL and malaria parasite (MP antigen. In seroreactive donors, HBsAg, Anti-HCV, VDRL, MP antigen and anti HIV were positive in 40 cases, 26 cases, 19 cases, 6 cases and 2 cases, respectively. Highest percentage of HBsAg, Anti HCV, VDRL, MP antigen and anti HIV was observed in blood group A negative (2/50, O negative (1/66, B negative (1/91, AB positive (2/377 blood group respectively. In the present study, the total number of Rh-negative donors is lower when compared to Rh-positive blood donors, but Rh-negative blood donors show higher percentages of seroreactivity for TTIs. Larger scale studies at molecular level are required to improve the knowledge of this aspect.

  1. A STUDY TO FIND CORRELATION BETWEEN DERMATOGLYPHIC PATTERNS AND ABO BLOOD GROUPS

    Usha Verma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dermatoglyphics, the study of fingerprints are constant and individualistic. It has been found useful in forensic medicine and identification purpose. It is useful in medical diagnosis of genetically inherited diseases and in detection of crimes. Objectives: The present study was conducted to correlate between digital dermatoglyphics patterns in ABO, Rh blood groups and to evaluate their significance. Methods: A total of 200 first year MBBS students of Pt. B.D. Sharma PGIMS, Rohtak with known blood groups from age group 17-22 yrs were included in the study. Fingerprints were obtained by Ink method. Parameters studied were arches, whorls, loops. Results: Majority of the subjects (43.5% in the study were of blood group A followed by blood group O, A and AB of whom 94.5% were Rh-positive. The general distribution of pattern of finger print showed high frequency (51.87% of loops followed by whorls and arches. Almost same order was noticed in both Rh-positive and Rh-negative individuals or A, B, AB and O blood groups, except blood group O-ve which showed more whorls. Conclusion: There is an association between distribution of finger print pattern and blood groups.

  2. STUDY OF SEX, AGE AND BLOOD GROUPS (ABO, Rh DISTRIBUTIONS IN THALASSEM IA PATIENTS IN IRAN

    DD Farhud; H Sadighi ; M.R. Mohammad Hassani ; A. Samavat; R. Zakizadeh ; Z. Yazdani

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemias, because of climatic, geographic and ecological conditions, are the most common among the genetically endemic in Iran, especially m provinces adjacent to the Caspian Sea and the Persian Gulf. There are over 14,000 cases of thalassemia major reported in Iran. Data, collected by the Iranian Ministry of Health, and analyzed at the Department of Human Genetics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, showed relative distribution of 3194 patients referring for the iron chelating drug, disferal, in 24 provinces in Iran. 3304 cases were studied for sex and age groups. Higher percentages and sex ratios were observed in each age group and further clarified as the age increased. 3386 cases were considered for ABO and Rh blood groups. Significant high incidence of group 0 (41.228% was followed by groups A (29.090% and B (23.2 13%, and group AB with the lowest (6.467%. A significant low incidence of Rh negative was also observed (6.852%.

  3. Early plasmapheresis and rituximab for acute humoral rejection after ABO-compatible liver transplantation

    Nassim Kamar; Laurence Lavayssière; Fabrice Muscari; Janick Selves; Céline Guilbeau-Frugier; Isabelle Cardeau; Laure Esposito; Olivier Cointault; Marie Béatrice Nogier; Jean Marie Peron; Philippe Otal; Marylise Fort; Lionel Rostaing

    2009-01-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) is uncommon after ABOcompatible liver transplantation. Herein, we report two cases of AHR treated with plasmapheresis and rituximab in two ABO-compatible liver-transplant patients with preformed anti-human leukocyte antigen donor-specific antibodies. Patient 1 experienced a biopsy-proven AHR at day 10 post-transplant. She was treated by steroid pulses, and OKT3. Because of persisting signs of biopsy-proven AHR at day 26, she was treated by plasmapheresis and rituximab. Liver enzyme levels did not improve, and she died on day 41. Patient 2 experienced a biopsy-proven AHR on day 10 post-transplant. She was treated by steroid pulses, plasmapheresis, and rituximab.Liver enzymes returned to within normal range 18 dafter diagnosis. Liver biopsies, at 3 and 9 mo post-transplant,showed complete resolution of AHR. We conclude that plasmapheresis should be started as soon as AHR is diagnosed, and be associated with a B-cell depleting agent. Rituximab may be considered as a first-line therapy.

  4. ABO blood grouping from hard and soft tissues of teeth by modified absorption-elution technique

    B K Ramnarayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teeth have always been known as stable tissue that can be preserved both physically and chemically for long periods of time. Blood group substances have been known to be present in both the hard and soft tissues of the teeth. Objectives: This study aimed at detection of ABO blood group substances from soft and hard tissues of teeth and also to evaluate the reliability of teeth stored for a relatively long period as a source of blood group substances by absorption-elution technique with some modifications. Results: Blood group obtained from the teeth was compared with those obtained from the blood sample. Pulp showed a very large correlation in both fresh and long-standing teeth though it decreased slightly in the latter. Hard tissue showed a large correlation in both the groups indicating that hard tissue is quite reliable to detect blood group and that there is no much difference in the reliability in both the groups. However, combining pulp and hard tissue, correlation is moderate. Correlation of blood grouping with the age, sex, and jaw distribution was carried out. Conclusion: Blood group identification from hard and soft tissues of teeth aids in the identification of an individual.

  5. Genetic incompatibility dampens hybrid fertility more than hybrid viability: yeast as a case study.

    Meibo Xu

    Full Text Available Genetic incompatibility is believed to be the major cause of postzygotic reproductive isolation. Despite huge efforts seeking for speciation-related incompatibilities in the past several decades, a general understanding of how genetic incompatibility evolves in affecting hybrid fitness is not available, primarily due to the fact that the number of known incompatibilities is small. Instead of further mapping specific incompatible genes, in this paper we aimed to know the overall effects of incompatibility on fertility and viability, the two aspects of fitness, by examining 89 gametes produced by yeast S. cerevisiae-S. paradoxus F1 hybrids. Homozygous F2 hybrids formed by autodiploidization of F1 gametes were subject to tests for growth rate and sporulation efficiency. We observed much stronger defects in sporulation than in clonal growth for every single F2 hybrid strain, indicating that genetic incompatibility affects hybrid fertility more than hybrid viability in yeast. We related this finding in part to the fast-evolving nature of meiosis-related genes, and proposed that the generally low expression levels of these genes might be a cause of the observation.

  6. A Method for Prediction of Graft Incompatibility in Sweet Cherry

    S. Filiz GUCLU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out on 1-year old trees of ‘0900 Ziraat’ variety grafted onto ‘Kuş kirazi’, ‘Kara idris’, ‘Sari idris’, ‘MaxMa 14’, ‘MaxMa 60’ and ‘Gisela 5’ in order to determine their compatibility. For this purpose, total peroxidase activity was determined by spectrophotomery assay. Taking ground tissue samples were planned three times as before the grafting (beginning, and then 8 and 12 months after grafting. Total peroxidase activities of rootstocks before grafting varied between 10.80 ΔAg.min. (‘Kuş kirazi’ and 7.83 ΔAg.min. (‘Kara idris’ and were found to be statistically important. The peroxidase activity of ‘0900 Ziraat’ was 11.07ΔAg.min. and the closest value occurred in Prunus avium rootstock. The most different values occurred in rootstocks of ‘Kara idris’ and ‘Gisela 5’. The results showed that peroxidase activity increased in rootstock and graft scion. This increase had higher values in heterogenetic combinations especially in ‘0900 Ziraat’/‘Gisela 5’ and ‘0900 Ziraat’/‘Kara idris’ grafts. Peroxidase activity was decreased at the 12th month for all combinations. The highest value was obtained from ‘0900 Ziraat’/‘MaxMa 14’ combinaion with 29.17 ΔAg.min. while lowest one was ‘0900 Ziraat’/‘Kuş kirazi’ with 17.39. The findings showed that peroxidase activity could be used as a parameter in early determination of graft incompatibility.

  7. Arrow physicians: are economics and medicine philosophically incompatible?

    Tsang, Sandro

    2015-06-01

    Economics is en route to its further expansion in medicine, but many in the medical community remain unconvinced that its impact will be positive. Thus, a philosophical enquiry into the compatibility of economics and medicine is necessary to resolve the disagreements. The fundamental mission of medicine obliges physicians to practise science and compassion to serve the patient's best interests. Conventional (neoclassical) economics assumes that individuals are self-interested and that competitive markets will emerge optimal states. Economics is seemingly incompatible with the emphasis of putting patients' interests first. This idea is refuted by Professor Kenneth Arrow's health economics seminal paper. Arrow emphasizes that medical practice involves agency, knowledge, trust and professionalism, and physician-patient relation critically affects care quality. The term Arrow Physician is used to mean a humanistic carer who has a concern for the patient and acts on the best available evidence with health equity in mind. To make this practice sustainable, implementing appropriate motivations, constitutions and institutions to enable altruistic agency is critical. There is substantial evidence that polycentric governance can encourage building trust and reciprocity, so as to avoid depletion of communal resources. This paper proposes building trusting institutions through granting altruistic physicians adequate autonomy to direct resources based on patients' technical needs. It also summarizes the philosophy bases of medicine and economics. It, therefore, contributes to developing a shared language to facilitate intellectual dialogues, and will encourage trans-disciplinary research into medical practice. This should lead to medicine being reoriented to care for whole persons again. PMID:25850973

  8. Histo-blood group ABO antigen in oral potentially malignant lesions and squamous cell carcinoma--genotypic and phenotypic characterization

    Gao, Shan; Bennett, Erik Paul; Reibel, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    Loss of histo-blood group A/B antigens is frequent in oral cancer. It is unclear whether this alteration is due to loss of the chromosomal region encoding the genes. The aim was to investigate genotypic alterations in the ABO locus in oral potentially malignant lesions and carcinomas. Seventy...... and 3/24 cases with mild and moderate dysplasia by genotyping analysis. O allele loss was found in 10 cases involving all four groups. In patients with heterozygous genotypes, A/B allelic loss by genotyping analysis was always followed by loss of A/B antigen expression by IHC staining. Loss of A...

  9. Against the Quantitative-Qualitative Incompatibility Thesis or Dogmas Die Hard.

    Howe, Kenneth R.

    1988-01-01

    Employs a pragmatic philosophical perspective to argue that there is no incompatibility at either the level of practice or that of epistemology between qualitative and quantitative methods of educational research. (FMW)

  10. Spectrum and Outcome Analysis of Marked Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia with Blood Group Incompatibility

    Yi-Hao Weng

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood group mismatch between a mother and newborn carries a substantialrisk for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and kernicterus. In the current study, weinvestigate the spectrum and outcome of marked neonatal hyperbilirubinemiawith blood group incompatibility.Methods: We retrospectively assessed a cohort of 413 neonates with peak total serumbilirubin (TSB values ≥ 20 mg/dL between 1995 and 2007. Those with agestational age 7%, a hemoglobin value < 13 g/dL and apeak TSB at age < 3 days old than the controls (p < 0.01. Furthermore, kernicterus was more common in neonates with blood group incompatibility(9.8% than in the controls (0.0% (p < 0.01.Conclusions: This survey depicts the clinical profiles of babies with marked neonatalhyperbilirubinemia with blood group incompatibility. Neonates with bloodgroup incompatibility often develop early-onset, hemolysis-mediated hyperbilirubinemia. Our findings show they are at great risk of kernicterus.

  11. Expression of self-incompatibility ribonucleases of Antirrhinum in Escherichia coli

    2000-01-01

    Self-incompatibility is an intraspecific reproductive barrier to prevent self-fertilization in the flowering plants.In many species,self-incompatibility is controlled by a single S locus with multiple alleles.So far,the only gene known in the S locus of the Solanaceae,Scrophulariaceae and Rosaceae encodes a class of ribonucleases,called self-incompatibility ribonucleases (S RNases),which have been shown to mediate stylar expression of self-incompatible reaction.As the first step to investigate their three-dimensional structure,we successfully expressed three biologically active S RNases of Antirrihnum (S2,S4 and S5) in Escherichia coli (E.coli).Their functional expressions caused no detrimental effect on host bacteria growth and provided a basis for a large scale preparation of S RNase proteins.Possible reasons for non-lethality of S RNases on E.coli are discussed.

  12. Linkage disequilibrium between incompatibility locus region genes in the plant Arabidopsis lyrata

    Hagenblad, Jenny; Bechsgaard, Jesper Smærup; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    We have studied diversity in Arabidopsis lyrata of sequences orthologous to the ARK3 gene of A. thaliana. Our main goal was to test for recombination in the S-locus region. In A. thaliana, the single-copy ARK3 gene is closely linked to the non-functional copies of the self-incompatibility loci, and...... the ortholog in A. lyrata (a self-incompatible species) is in the homologous genome region and is known as Aly8. It is thus of interest to test whether Aly8 sequence diversity is elevated due to close linkage to the highly polymorphic incompatibility locus, as is theoretically predicted. However, Aly8...... linked to the incompatibility locus, one being a pseudogene. We determined the phase of multiple haplotypes in families of plants from Icelandic and other populations. Different Aly8 sequence types are associated with different SRK alleles, while haplotypes with the same SRK sequences tend to have the...

  13. Tuberculose ocular: relato de casos

    Costa Daniella Socci da; Silva Rodrigo Tavares Schueler e; Klejnberg Tatina; Japiassu Ricardo; Turchetti Remo; Moraes Jr. Haroldo Vieira de

    2003-01-01

    Os autores relatam dois casos de tuberculose ocular presumida com comprometimento coroidiano. No primeiro caso, um paciente de 43 anos, HIV positivo, com tuberculose pulmonar miliar e tuberculoma cerebral, apresenta um granuloma coroidiano único na região macular do olho esquerdo. No segundo caso, uma paciente de 12 anos, HIV negativa, com tuberculose pulmonar apresenta coroidite multifocal e comprometimento do segmento anterior do olho esquerdo. Ambos os pacientes evoluíram favoravelmente co...

  14. Multilocus PCR Assays Elucidate Vegetative Incompatibility Gene Profiles of Cryphonectria parasitica in the United States

    Short, Dylan P. G.; Double, Mark; Nuss, Donald L.; Stauder, Cameron M.; MACDONALD, WILLIAM; Kasson, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Chestnut blight is a devastating disease of Castanea spp. Mycoviruses that reduce virulence (hypovirulence) of the causative agent, Cryphonectria parasitica, can be used to manage chestnut blight. However, vegetative incompatibility (vic) barriers that restrict anastomosis-mediated virus transmission hamper hypovirulence efficacy. In order to effectively determine the vegetative incompatibility genetic structure of C. parasitica field populations, we have designed PCR primer sets that selecti...

  15. Evolution Controversy: A Phenomenon Prompted by the Incompatibility between Science and Religious Beliefs

    Paz-y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    2015-01-01

    The incompatibility between science and the belief in supernatural causation helps us understand why people do not accept evolution. Belief disrupts, distorts, delays, or stops (3Ds + S) the acceptance of scientific evidence. Here we examine the evolution controversy under three predictions of the incompatibility hypothesis. First, chronological-conflict-and-accommodation, which explains the historical re-emergence of antagonism between evolution and religion when advances in science continue...

  16. Contrasting levels of variability between cytoplasmic genomes and incompatibility types in the mosquito Culex pipiens.

    Guillemaud, T; Pasteur, N; Rousset, F

    1997-02-22

    Reproductive incompatibilities called cytoplasmic incompatibilities are known to affect a large number of arthropod species and are mediated by Wolbachia, a maternally transmitted microorganism. The crossing relationships between strains of potential hosts define their incompatibility types and it is generally assumed that differences between strains of Wolbachia induce different crossing types. Among all the described host species, the mosquito, Culex pipiens, displays the greatest variability of cytoplasmic incompatibility crossing types. We analysed mitochondrial and bacterial DNA variability in Culex pipiens in order to investigate some possible causes of incompatibility crossing type variability. We sequenced fragments of the ftsZ gene, and the A + T-rich control region of the mtDNA. We also sequenced the second subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COII) gene, in Culex pipiens and a closely related species, C. torrentium, in order to verify the usefulness of the A + T-rich region for the present purposes. No variability was found in the Wolbachia ftsZ gene fragment, and very limited variation of the mitochondrial marker whatever the compatibility type or the origin of the host. A low variability was found in the A + T-rich region and comparison of divergence of the A + T-rich region and COII gene between C. pipiens and C. torrentium did not reveal any special constraints affecting this region. In contrast to observations in other host species, variability of incompatibility crossing types is not due to multiple infections by distantly related Wolbachia strains. PMID:9061971

  17. Expression and inheritance of sporophytic self-incompatibility in synthetic allohexaploid Senecio cambrensis (Asteraceae).

    Brennan, Adrian C; Hiscock, Simon J

    2010-04-01

    Allopolyploid speciation is common in plants and is frequently associated with shifts from outcrossing, for example self-incompatibility, to inbreeding (i.e. selfing). Senecio cambrensis is a recently evolved allohexaploid species that formed following hybridization between diploid self-incompatible S. squalidus and tetraploid self-compatible S. vulgaris. Studies of reproduction in wild populations of S. cambrensis have concluded that it is self-compatible. Here, we investigated self-compatibility in synthetic lines of S. cambrensis generated via hybridization and colchicine-induced polyploidization and wild S. cambrensis using controlled crossing experiments. Synthetic F(1)S. cambrensis individuals were all self-compatible but, in F(2) and later generations, self-incompatible individuals were identified at frequencies of 6.7-9.2%. Self-incompatibility was also detected in wild sampled individuals at a frequency of 12.2%. The mechanism and genetics of self-incompatibility were tested in synthetic S. cambrensis and found to be similar to those of its paternal parent S. squalidus (i.e. sporophytic). These results show, for the first time, that functional sporophytic self-incompatibility can be inherited and expressed in allopolyploids as early as the second (F(2)) generation. Wild S. cambrensis should therefore be considered as possessing a mixed mating system with the potential for evolution towards either inbreeding or outcrossing. PMID:19895670

  18. A STUDY OF DISTRIBUTION OF ABO AND RH BLOOD GROUPS SYSTEM AMONG BLOOD DONORS AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Up till now about 400red cells antigen have been identified. The majority are inherited by Mendelian fashion. The ABO and Rh blood group system was first to be identified and is most important for blood transfusion purposes. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to determine the frequency of ABO and Rhesus (Rh blood groups in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective data based study was conducted at blood bank , Chirayu Medical College and Hospital, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India over a period of four years. RESULTS: Study includes a record of 3188 (28.54% voluntary and 7982 (71.46% replacement donors attending blood bank from February 2011 to January 2015. Out of 11170, 10723(95.998% were male and 447(4.002% female donors. The most common blood group was found to be B in 4013 (35.927% donors followed by O in 3462 (30.994% donors , an in 2516 (22.524% donors and AB in 1179 (10.555% donors. Out of these, 10659(95.425% donors were Rh - positive while 511 ( 4.575 % were Rh - negative.

  19. Posttreatment and retention outcomes with and without periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics assessed using ABO objective grading system

    Donald J Ferguson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The posttreatment and retention outcomes following nonextraction orthodontic therapy, with and without corticotomy, were assessed using the American Board of Orthodontists objective grading system (OGS. Purpose: The purpose was to determine if the course of retention was any different following alveolar decortication and augmentation bone grafting, i.e., periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (PAOO. Materials and Methods: Study casts and panoramic radiographs of patients with and without PAOO (28 subjects each were selected on the basis of the following: (1 comprehensive nonextraction orthodontic treatment using straight wire edgewise appliances for Class I crowding, (2 availability of immediate posttreatment records and retention records at least 1 year post de-bracketing, and (3 use of Hawley removable retainers with similar wearing instructions. Results: Independent and paired t-test statistical testing revealed the following: (1 Posttreatment orthodontic outcomes were the same, with or without corticotomy. (2 During retention, 5 of 8 ABO grading criteria improved for the sample without corticotomy, and 6 of 8 ABO grading criteria improved for the group with corticotomy. (3 Retention outcome scores were lower (better for alignment and marginal ridges in the corticotomy-facilitated group. (4 The total score was significantly lower (better for the corticotomy group at retention and the increment of total score change decreased (improved significantly more during retention following corticotomy. Conclusions: The retention phase was more favorable following corticotomy because the amount of OGS total score change demonstrated a significantly improved retention outcome following PAOO therapy.

  20. Screening for neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia and ABO alloimmunization at the time of testing for phenylketonuria and congenital hypothyreosis.

    Meberg, A; Johansen, K B

    1998-12-01

    In a population-based study including 2463 infants, serum bilirubin measurements were added to the neonatal screening programme for phenylketonuria and congenital hypothyreosis. This screening programme detected 11/17 (65%) of infants with serum bilirubin levels >350 micromol 1(-1), of whom 7 (3 per 1000) were readmitted from home (6 treated with phototherapy). A total of 139 infants (5.6%) received phototherapy. Maternal blood type O occurred significantly more often in term infants treated (30/54; 55.6%) compared with preterm infants treated (32/85; 37.6%) and with blood type O occurrence in the total population of mothers (906/2426; 37.3%) (p constellations mother O/infant A or B showed a sensitivity of 64%, specificity 65%, positive predictive value 12% and a negative predictive value of 96% for the requirement of phototherapy for the whole material. Exchange transfusion was not required in any of the infants. No infant developed bilirubin encephalopathy (kemicterus). Adding bilirubin to a neonatal screening programme detects some cases with unexpectedly high bilirubin levels in need of intervention. Routine ABO blood typing of pregnant women, ABO cord blood typing and Coombs' test in infants of mothers with blood type O cannot be recommended because of low positive predictive value for the requirement of intervention (phototherapy) by these tests. PMID:9894828

  1. ABO blood types and cancer risk—A cohort study of 339,432 subjects in Taiwan

    Sun, Wenjie; Wen, Chi-Pang; Lin, Jie; Wen, Christopher; Pu, Xia; Huang, Maosheng; Tsai, Min Kuang; Tsao, Chwen Keng; Wu, Xifeng; Chow, Wong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The associations of laboratory-based ABO phenotypes with cancer risks and mortality have not been systematically determined. Methods The study subjects were 339,432 healthy individuals with laboratory-based blood types from a Taiwan cohort. Results Compared to blood type O, blood type A was significantly associated with an elevated risk of stomach cancer incidence (Hazard Ratio [HR], 1.38 [95% CI, 1.11–1.72]) and mortality (HR, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.02–1.86]) compared with blood type O, after adjusting for age, sex, education, smoking, alcohol drinking, physical activity, and body mass index. Non-O blood types were associated with an elevated risk of pancreatic cancer, with blood type B reaching statistical significance for incidence (HR, 1.59 [95% CI, 1.02–2.48]) and mortality (HR, 1.63 [95% CI, 1.02–2.60]). In contrast, kidney cancer risk was inversely associated with blood type AB (HR, 0.41 [95% CI, 0.18–0.93]) compared to type O. Conclusion Cancer risks vary in people with different ABO blood types, with elevated risks of stomach cancer associated with blood type A and pancreatic cancer associated with non-O blood types (A, B, and AB). PMID:25600007

  2. Relationship between ABO blood groups and malaria with clinical outcome in rural area of South India

    Gayathri B.N.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background A number of studies have shown that susceptibility to several infectious diseases is related to the patient’s blood group. Although the relationship between blood group and susceptibility to malaria has been studied by several researchers, the results have been contradictory. Since malaria has re-emerged as a major problem in India during the past few years, it would be useful to know whether there is any relationship between blood group and infection. Objectives The study will be undertaken to correlate the blood groups and clinical presentations in malaria patients and to understand the differential host susceptibility in malaria. Method Over a period of 4 years malaria positive samples identified by peripheral smear (thin and thick smears will be evaluated in this study. Haemoglobin, total leucocyte count, differential leucocyte count and platelet count of each patient done on an automated cell counter will be retrieved from the data. Blood group was determined by forward and reverse method. The demographic details of the patients and clinical details were obtained from case records of the patients. Malarial species and the severity of clinical course were correlated with blood groups Results A total of 205 patients were included in the study, of which 123 cases were positive for plasmodium falciparum and 78 cases were positive for P. vivax infection and 4 patients had mixed infection. The results of blood groups showed 33 -‘A’ group, 84 -‘B’ group, 70 -‘O’ group and 18 were ‘AB’ group. When the clinical courses between different groups were compared using the following parameters for severe infection- a parasitic load of > 10/1000 RBCs, severe anemia with haemoglobin 101o F and the other organ involvement, it was observed that there was no significant relationship between ABO blood group and malaria in our population, this could be due to various demographic reasons. Conclusions The present study indicate that

  3. Erythrocyte-bound apolipoprotein B in relation to atherosclerosis, serum lipids and ABO blood group.

    Boudewijn Klop

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Erythrocytes carry apolipoprotein B on their membrane, but the determining factors of erythrocyte-bound apolipoprotein B (ery-apoB are unknown. We aimed to explore the determinants of ery-apoB to gain more insight into potential mechanisms. METHODS: Subjects with and without CVD were included (N = 398. Ery-apoB was measured on fresh whole blood samples using flow cytometry. Subjects with ery-apoB levels ≤ 0.20 a.u. were considered deficient. Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT was determined as a measure of (subclinical atherosclerosis. RESULTS: Mean ery-apoB value was 23.2% lower in subjects with increased CIMT (0.80 ± 0.09 mm, N = 140 compared to subjects with a normal CIMT (0.57 ± 0.08 mm, N = 258 (P = 0.007, adjusted P<0.001. CIMT and ery-apoB were inversely correlated (Spearman's r: -0.116, P = 0.021. A total of 55 subjects (13.6% were considered ery-apoB deficient, which was associated with a medical history of CVD (OR: 1.86, 95% CI 1.04-3.33; adjusted OR: 1.55; 95% CI 0.85-2.82. Discontinuation of statins in 54 subjects did not influence ery-apoB values despite a 58.4% increase in serum apolipoprotein B. Subjects with blood group O had significantly higher ery-apoB values (1.56 ± 0.94 a.u. when compared to subjects with blood group A (0.89 ± 1.15 a.u, blood group B (0.73 ± 0.1.12 a.u. or blood group AB (0.69 ± 0.69 a.u. (P-ANOVA = 0.002. CONCLUSION: Absence or very low values of ery-apoB are associated with clinical and subclinical atherosclerosis. While serum apolipoprotein B is not associated with ery-apoB, the ABO blood group seems to be a significant determinant.

  4. Whole genome association mapping by incompatibilities and local perfect phylogenies

    Besenbacher Søren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With current technology, vast amounts of data can be cheaply and efficiently produced in association studies, and to prevent data analysis to become the bottleneck of studies, fast and efficient analysis methods that scale to such data set sizes must be developed. Results We present a fast method for accurate localisation of disease causing variants in high density case-control association mapping experiments with large numbers of cases and controls. The method searches for significant clustering of case chromosomes in the "perfect" phylogenetic tree defined by the largest region around each marker that is compatible with a single phylogenetic tree. This perfect phylogenetic tree is treated as a decision tree for determining disease status, and scored by its accuracy as a decision tree. The rationale for this is that the perfect phylogeny near a disease affecting mutation should provide more information about the affected/unaffected classification than random trees. If regions of compatibility contain few markers, due to e.g. large marker spacing, the algorithm can allow the inclusion of incompatibility markers in order to enlarge the regions prior to estimating their phylogeny. Haplotype data and phased genotype data can be analysed. The power and efficiency of the method is investigated on 1 simulated genotype data under different models of disease determination 2 artificial data sets created from the HapMap ressource, and 3 data sets used for testing of other methods in order to compare with these. Our method has the same accuracy as single marker association (SMA in the simplest case of a single disease causing mutation and a constant recombination rate. However, when it comes to more complex scenarios of mutation heterogeneity and more complex haplotype structure such as found in the HapMap data our method outperforms SMA as well as other fast, data mining approaches such as HapMiner and Haplotype Pattern Mining (HPM

  5. Tres casos de odontomas

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Los odontomas son los tumores odontogénicos más comunes, casi siempre se diagnostican accidentalmente, en exámenes radiográficos; pueden sospecharse al retardar el brote dentario o producir maloclusiones. Se clasifican en odontomas compuestos y complejos, ambos constituidos por estructuras dentales como: esmalte, dentina, cemento y tejido pulpar. Su eliminación quirúrgica y la biopsia es el tratamiento de elección. El propósito de este trabajo es reportar tres casos de pacientes atendidos en el Hospital Pediátrico de Las Tunas, todos remitidos previamente por el ortodoncista. El primero, tipo compuesto, en un escolar de 9 años de edad, masculino, asociado a un 31 retenido; el segundo caso se trata de un gran odontoma complejo en una escolar de 11 años de edad, femenina, que produjo interferencia en el brote del 11 y el tercero compuesto; en un escolar de 10 años, masculino, en la línea media entre 11 y 21, con producción de diastema y brote del 12 por palatino. De ellos uno fue descubierto por un examen radiográfico de rutina y los otros dos sospechados por la maloclusión secundaria; todos se trataron quirúrgicamente. Estos casos demuestran la frecuencia de estos tumores en la cavidad bucal y la importancia de la realización de exámenes clínicos y radiográficos para su detección y tratamiento precoz, así como la importancia de la interrelación entre el ortodoncista y el maxilofacial en la resolución satisfactoria de esta entidad

  6. Mexcode (caso de estudio)

    Gabriel Arturo García Gómez; Holmer José Reyes Sotelo

    2000-01-01

    DESCRIPCION: El caso plantea la reactivación de un proyecto que se presentó en el año 1995 como alternativa para el desarrollo del Centro del Valle y mejora de la Eficiencia en el manejo del Comercio Exterior de la Cuenca Pacífica. El Proyecto se revivió a raíz de la necesidad de la Compañía patrocinadora de mejorar sus Flujos de Caja proyectados y la reciente autorización para su funcionamiento. El proyecto es el popularmente denominado "Puerto Seco" de la ciudad de Guadalajara de Buga, inte...

  7. um estudo de caso

    Costa, Cátia Filipa Pereira da

    2011-01-01

    Dissertação apresentada à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do grau de Mestre em Psicologia Jurídica As situações de abuso sexual de crianças nas quais o perpetrador pertence ao sexo feminino obtiveram ao longo dos últimos anos um acrescido reconhecimento por parte da comunidade científica, evidenciado pelo significativo incremento das investigações no âmbito desta temática consistindo na sua maioria estudos de caso. Um conjunto de particularidades encont...

  8. Tres casos de odontomas

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina; Haideé Tamara Díaz Méndez; Giselle Ávila Chiong

    2015-01-01

    Los odontomas son los tumores odontogénicos más comunes, casi siempre se diagnostican accidentalmente, en exámenes radiográficos; pueden sospecharse al retardar el brote dentario o producir maloclusiones. Se clasifican en odontomas compuestos y complejos, ambos constituidos por estructuras dentales como: esmalte, dentina, cemento y tejido pulpar. Su eliminación quirúrgica y la biopsia es el tratamiento de elección. El propósito de este trabajo es reportar tres casos de pacientes atendidos en ...

  9. Functional divergence caused by ancient positive selection of a Drosophila hybrid incompatibility locus.

    Daniel A Barbash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrid lethality and sterility are a consequence of divergent evolution between species and serve to maintain the discrete identities of species. The evolution of hybrid incompatibilities has been described in widely accepted models by Dobzhansky and Muller where lineage-specific functional divergence is the essential characteristic of hybrid incompatibility genes. Experimentally tractable models are required to identify and test candidate hybrid incompatibility genes. Several Drosophila melanogaster genes involved in hybrid incompatibility have been identified but none has yet been shown to have functionally diverged in accordance with the Dobzhansky-Muller model. By introducing transgenic copies of the X-linked Hybrid male rescue (Hmr gene into D. melanogaster from its sibling species D. simulans and D. mauritiana, we demonstrate that Hmr has functionally diverged to cause F1 hybrid incompatibility between these species. Consistent with the Dobzhansky-Muller model, we find that Hmr has diverged extensively in the D. melanogaster lineage, but we also find extensive divergence in the sibling-species lineage. Together, these findings implicate over 13% of the amino acids encoded by Hmr as candidates for causing hybrid incompatibility. The exceptional level of divergence at Hmr cannot be explained by neutral processes because we use phylogenetic methods and population genetic analyses to show that the elevated amino-acid divergence in both lineages is due to positive selection in the distant past-at least one million generations ago. Our findings suggest that multiple substitutions driven by natural selection may be a general phenomenon required to generate hybrid incompatibility alleles.

  10. Variation at ABO histo-blood group and FUT loci and diffuse and intestinal gastric cancer risk in a European population

    Duell, Eric J; Bonet, Catalina; Muñoz, Xavier;

    2015-01-01

    to GC risk in a European population. The authors conducted an investigation of 32 variants at ABO and FUT1-7 loci and GC risk in a case-control study of 365 cases and 1,284 controls nested within the EPIC cohort (the EPIC-Eurgast study). Four variants (including rs505922) in ABO, and allelic blood group...... A (AO+AA, odds ratio=1.84, 95%CI=1.20-2.80) were associated with diffuse-type GC; however, conditional models with other ABO variants indicated that the associations were largely due to allelic blood group A. One variant in FUT5 was also associated with diffuse-type GC, and four variants (and haplotypes...... the role of ABO and FUT alleles in H. pylori infection and subtype-specific gastric carcinogenesis. What's New? Blood type A indicates a higher risk of gastric cancer, but why? This study examined the relationship between blood group genes and cancer. The authors investigated 32 variants among not only...

  11. Comparison of ABO and Rh-D Blood Group Systems between the Garo Tribal People of Mymensingh and General People of Dhaka City

    Ruhul Amin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The distribution pattern of ABO and Rh-D blood group in our country including the tribal people is not fully established as elaborated and large scale studies have not been carried out on it. Therefore this study was designed to observe the distribution pattern of ABO and Rh-D blood groups among the Garo tribes of Mymensingh and general people of Dhaka city. Objectives: To determine and to compare the distribution pattern of ABO and Rh-D blood groups among the Garo tribal people of Mymensingh and general people of Dhaka city and to compare this distribution between this two groups. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka from July 2008 to June 2009. After proper ethical consideration total 900 Garo people of Mymensingh and 784 general people of Dhaka city were included in this study. The Garo localities and the general people of Dhaka city were selected by systematic random sampling. ABO and Rh-D blood groups were determined by the antigen antibody agglutination test of slide method. Chi square statistical analyses were done to compare the results of ABO blood group systems between the Garo people and general people of Dhaka city. Results: This study revealed that there are significant variations in the distribution of ABO and Rh-D blood groups between the Garo tribal people of Mymensingh and the general people of Dhaka city. In this study it was observed that blood group ‘A’ was apparently predominant in Garo population, while blood group ‘B’ was predominant in general population (p<0.001, blood group ‘AB’ and ‘O’ were almost similar in both groups. Rh typing of the participants reveals that majorities of both groups were Rh positive. Rh negative persons are rare in both populations, but it is extremely rare in the Garo population (0.9%. Conclusion: From the findings of the present study it can be concluded that distribution of ABO

  12. Carlo Caso (1940 - 2007)

    Leonardo Rossi

    Carlo Caso (1940 - 2007) Our friend and colleague Carlo Caso passed away on July 7th, after several months of courageous fight against cancer. Carlo spent most of his scientific career at CERN, taking an active part in the experimental programme of the laboratory. His long and fruitful involvement in particle physics started in the sixties, in the Genoa group led by G. Tomasini. He then made several experiments using the CERN liquid hydrogen bubble chambers -first the 2000HBC and later BEBC- to study various facets of the production and decay of meson and baryon resonances. He later made his own group and joined the NA27 Collaboration to exploit the EHS Spectrometer with a rapid cycling bubble chamber as vertex detector. Amongst their many achievements, they were the first to measure, with excellent precision, the lifetime of the charmed D mesons. At the start of the LEP era, Carlo and his group moved to the DELPHI experiment, participating in the construction and running of the HPC electromagnetic c...

  13. ABO (histo) blood group phenotype development and human reproduction as they relate to ancestral IgM formation: A hypothesis.

    Arend, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a histo (blood) group) ABO phenotype and the exclusion of an autoreactive IgM or isoagglutinin activity arise apparently in identical glycosylation of complementary domains on cell surfaces and plasma proteins. The fundamental O-glycan emptiness of the circulating IgM, which during the neonatal amino acid sequencing of the variable regions is exerting germline-specific O-GalNAc glycan-reactive serine/threonine residues that in the plasma of the adult human blood group O individuals apparently remain associated with the open glycosidic sites on the ABOH convertible red cell surface, must raise suggestions on a transient expression of developmental glycans, which have been "lost" over the course of maturation. In fact, while the mammalian non-somatic, embryogenic stem cell (ESC)- germ cell (GC) transformation is characterized by a transient and genetically as-yet-undefined trans-species-functional O-GalNAc glycan expression, in the C57BL/10 mouse such expression was potentially identified in growth-dependent, blood group A-like GalNAc glycan-bearing, ovarian glycolipids complementary with the syngeneic anti-A reactive IgM, which does not appear in early ovariectomized animals. This non-somatically encoded, polyreactive, ancestral IgM molecule has not undergone clonal selection and does primarily not differentiate between self and non-self and might, due to amino acid hydroxyl groups, highly suggest substrate competition with subsequent O-glycosylations in ongoing ESC-GC transformations and affecting GC maturation. However, the membrane-bound somatic N/O-glycotransferases, which initiate, after formation of the zygote, the complex construction of the human ABO phenotypes in the trans cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, are associated and/or completed with soluble enzyme versions exerting identical specificities in plasma and likely competing vice versa by glycosylation of neonatal IgM amino acids, where they suggest to accomplish the clearance of anti

  14. Genetic evidence that two independent S-loci control RNase-based self-incompatibility in diploid strawberry

    Bošković, Radovan I.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Tobutt, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    The self-incompatibility mechanism that reduces inbreeding in many plants of the Rosaceae is attributed to a multi-allelic S locus which, in the Prunoideae and Maloideae subfamilies, comprises two complementary genes, a stylar-expressed S-RNase and a pollen-expressed SFB. To elucidate incompatibility in the subfamily Rosoideae, stylar-specific RNases and self-(in)compatibility status were analysed in various diploid strawberries, especially Fragaria nubicola and F. viridis, both self-incompat...

  15. Overcoming interspecific incompatibility in the cross Brassica campestris ssp. japonica x Brassica oleracea var. botrytis using irradiated mentor pollen page

    The cross B. campestris ssp. japonica x B. oleracea var. botrytis fails due to incompatibility barrier at the stigma. To realize this cross, irradiated compatible pollen (mentor pollen) was used before the incompatible pollination. The presence of mentor pollen stimulated the incompatible pollen to germinate and effect fertilization and seed set. One hybrid was thus obtained. Most of the seeds were inviable. Of the 5 plants raised one was a hybrid and 4 resembled the female parent. 1 tab., 7 refs

  16. Evaluation of physicochemical incompatibilities during parenteral drug administration in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    Gikic, M; Di Paolo, E R; Pannatier, A; Cotting, J

    2000-06-01

    Patients in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) often receive numerous medications by the parenteral route. Frequently two or more drugs are delivered simultaneously through the same line and the risk of physicochemical incompatibilities is thus important. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify prospectively the combinations of injectable drugs administered in the PICU of our university hospital and 2) to analyze them according to information found in the literature. The data were collected by a pharmacist over a 30-day period and classified in three categories: compatible, incompatible and undocumented. Nineteen patients were included in the study with a median age of 3.2 years. The mean number (+/- SD) of injectable drugs per patient and per day was 6.5 (+/- 2.8), for a total of 26 drugs and 7 solutes. 64 combinations of drugs were observed with 2 (31.3%), 3 (45.3%), 4 (10.9%) or 5 (12.5%) drugs. 81 drug-drug and 94 drug-solute combinations were recorded. Among these, 151 (86.3%) were compatible, 6 (3.4%) incompatible and 18 (10.3%) undocumented. The incompatibilities included furosemide (Lasix), a drug in alkaline solution and Vamina-Glucose, a total parenteral nutrition solution. No clinical consequences resulting from drug incompatibilities were shown in this study. We suggest that in vitro compatibility tests on standard drug combinations, as well as a training program for nurses on drug incompatibility problems would sensitively increase the security of parenteral drug administration. PMID:11028261

  17. Natural variation of heterokaryon incompatibility gene het-c in Podospora anserina reveals diversifying selection.

    Bastiaans, Eric; Debets, Alfons J M; Aanen, Duur K; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Saupe, Sven J; Paoletti, Mathieu

    2014-04-01

    In filamentous fungi, allorecognition takes the form of heterokaryon incompatibility, a cell death reaction triggered when genetically distinct hyphae fuse. Heterokaryon incompatibility is controlled by specific loci termed het-loci. In this article, we analyzed the natural variation in one such fungal allorecognition determinant, the het-c heterokaryon incompatibility locus of the filamentous ascomycete Podospora anserina. The het-c locus determines an allogenic incompatibility reaction together with two unlinked loci termed het-d and het-e. Each het-c allele is incompatible with a specific subset of the het-d and het-e alleles. We analyzed variability at the het-c locus in a population of 110 individuals, and in additional isolates from various localities. We identified a total of 11 het-c alleles, which define 7 distinct incompatibility specificity classes in combination with the known het-d and het-e alleles. We found that the het-c allorecognition gene of P. anserina is under diversifying selection. We find a highly unequal allele distribution of het-c in the population, which contrasts with the more balanced distribution of functional groups of het-c based on their allorecognition function. One explanation for the observed het-c diversity in the population is its function in allorecognition. However, alleles that are most efficient in allorecognition are rare. An alternative and not exclusive explanation for the observed diversity is that het-c is involved in pathogen recognition. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a homolog of het-c is a pathogen effector target, supporting this hypothesis. We hypothesize that the het-c diversity in P. anserina results from both its functions in pathogen-defense, and allorecognition. PMID:24448643

  18. Presence of nucleotide substitutions in the ABO promoter in individuals with phenotypes A3 and B3.

    Isa, K; Yamamuro, Y; Ogasawara, K; Yabe, R; Ogiyama, Y; Ito, S; Takahashi, Y; Kominato, Y; Sano, R; Uchikawa, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the involvement of mutation and deletion of transcription regulatory elements in the Bm , Am , A3 and B3 phenotypes has been reported. In the present study, we carried out genetic analysis of individuals with A3 and B3 using peptide nucleic acid-clamping PCR to exclude amplification of O alleles. Two single-point mutations, -76G>C and -68G>T, were found in the ABO promoter on the A-allele in three A3 individuals and on the B allele in a B3 individual, respectively. Transient transfection of luciferase reporter plasmids carrying the same mutations into K562 cells revealed decreased luciferase activity in comparison with that carrying the wild-type promoter. These observations suggest that the mutations downregulate the promoter activity, leading to reduction in A- or B-antigen expression on red blood cells in individuals with the A3 and B3 phenotypes. PMID:26529276

  19. Distinguishing early-acting inbreeding depression from late-acting ovar-ian self-incompatibility

    Yiqi Hao; Xinfeng Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Reduced seed yields after self-pollination are generally thought to be induced by early-acting in-breeding depression and self-incompatibility. Early-acting inbreeding depression occurs strictly post-zygoti- cally, and leads to the abortion of progeny that are homozygous for deleterious recessive alleles at an early stage of seed maturation. Late-acting ovarian self-incompatibility, on the other hand, may be either pre- or post-zygotic, and usually only one locus is responsible for the reject...

  20. Passenger lymphocyte syndrome in ABO and Rhesus D minor mismatched liver and kidney transplantation: A prospective analysis.

    ElAnsary, Mervat; Hanna, Mariam Onsy F; Saadi, Gamal; ElShazly, Mostafa; Fadel, Fatina I; Ahmed, Hanan AbdElAziz; Aziz, Amr Mostafa; ElSharnouby, Amal; Kandeel, Mona MohiElDin T

    2015-06-01

    The increasing demand for solid organs has necessitated the use of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) D minor mismatched transplants. The passenger lymphocyte syndrome (PLS) occurs when donor lymphocytes produce antibodies that react with host red blood cell (RBC) antigens and result in hemolysis. Our aim was to evaluate prospectively the role of PLS in post transplant anemia and hemolysis in ABO and RhD minor mismatched recipients of liver and kidney grafts and to study the association of PLS with donor lymphocyte microchimerism. We examined 11 liver and 10 kidney recipients at Day +15 for anemia, markers of hemolysis, direct antiglobulin test and eluates, and serum RBC antibodies. Microchimerism was determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes by genotyping of simple sequence length polymorphisms encoding short tandem repeats. Immune hemolytic anemia and anti-recipient RBC antibodies were observed in 2 out of 11 liver (18.2%) and 2 out of 10 kidney (20%) transplants. RBC antibody specificity reflected the donor to recipient transplant, with anti-blood group B antibodies identified in 2 cases of O to B and 1 case of A to AB transplants while anti-D antibodies were detected in 1 case of RhD-negative to RhD-positive transplant. Donor microchimerism was found in only 1 patient. In conclusion, passenger lymphocyte mediated hemolysis is frequent in minor mismatched liver and kidney transplantation. Recognizing PLS as a potential cause of post transplant anemia may allow for early diagnosis and management to decrease the morbidity and mortality in some patients. PMID:25842056

  1. Simultaneous forward and reverse ABO blood group typing using a paper-based device and barcode-like interpretation.

    Songjaroen, Temsiri; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2016-05-19

    A new platform of a paper-based analytical device (PAD) for simultaneous forward and reverse ABO blood group typing has been reported. This platform can overcome the discrepancy results as influenced by the individual haematocrit. The test and the control of non-haemagglutination on each channel were performed in parallel. The PAD was fabricated by printing six parallel channels with wax onto Whatman No. 4 filter paper. An LF1 blood separation membrane was used for the separation of plasma from whole blood for reverse grouping. The blood group was identified by haemagglutination of the corresponding antigen-antibody. For forward grouping, Anti-A, -B and -A,B were treated on the test line of PAD, and inactivated Anti-A, -B and -A,B were immobilized on the control line. For reverse grouping, 30% standard A-cells, B- and O- were added to the test channel after plasma separation, and O-cells were used as a control. Then, 0.9% normal saline (NSS) containing 1% Tween-20 was bi-functionally used for dilution of the blood sample and elution of the non-agglutinated RBCs within the channels. The distance of agglutinated RBCs in each test line was compared with the distance of non-agglutinated RBCs in the parallel control line. The forward and reverse patterns of blood groups A, B, AB and O were a barcode-like chart in which the results can be visually analysed. The PAD has excellent reproducibility when 10 replications of the A, B, AB or O blood groups were performed. The results of both forward and reverse grouping were highly correlated with conventional methods compared with the slide method and tube method, respectively (n = 76). Thus, this ABO typing PAD holds great potential for future applications in blood typing point-of-care testing. PMID:27126791

  2. ABO血型鉴定不一致原因分析及解决方法%ABO Blood Group Identification ;not Consistent Cause Analysis

    万会林

    2013-01-01

    目的:分析ABO血型鉴定不一致原因分析及解决方法方法:应用ABO血型鉴定原理即根据红细胞表面有无A抗原和(或)B抗原,将血型分为A型、B型、AB型及O型4种,可利用红细胞的凝集实验,通过正反定型准确鉴定ABO血型。结果:笔者就几年血型不一致的原因进行分析,并加以分别探讨。结论:正确鉴定ABO血型是输血的关键之一,误输异型血可使受血者发生严重的输血反应,危及病人生命安全。对于ABO血型鉴定不一致的,无法判断的特殊血型标本,可以针对其原因,采取多种方法正确鉴定ABO血型。%objective:To analyse ABO blood group identifica-tion not consistent cause analysis and solution method:the applica-tion of ABO blood group identification principle according to red blood cells that have A surface antigen and (or) B antigens, will be di-vided into A blood type, type B, type AB and type O four, can use of red blood cells agglutinate experiment, through the positive and neg-ative stereotypes accurate identification ABO blood group. Results:the author is not consistent with a few years blood type analysis of the causes, and to study. Conclusion:correctly identify the ABO blood group is one of the keys to a blood transfusion, abnormal blood can make false input by the blood transfusion reactions happen serious, endanger patient safety. For the ABO blood group appraisal does not agree, can't judge blood type specimens of the special, can't judge of the special specimens, can according to the cause and take DuoZhong method correctly identify the ABO blood group.

  3. Inhibiting Self-Pollen: Self-Incompatibility in Papaver Involves Integration of Several Signaling Events

    2007-01-01

    Cellular responses rely on signal perception and integration. A nice example of this is self incompatibility (SI), which is an important mechanism to prevent inbreeding. It prevents self-fertilization by using a highly discriminatory cellular recognition and rejection mechanism. Most S1 systems are genetically specified by the S-locus, which has a pollen and a pistil S-component. A receptor-ligand interaction is used by Papaver rhoeas to control SI. S proteins encoded by the pistil part of the S-locus interact with incompatible pollen to achieve rapid inhibition of tip growth. The incompatible SI interaction triggers a Ca2+ -dependent signaling cascade. A number of SI-specific events are triggered in incompatible pollen, including rapid depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton; phosphorylation of soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (SPPases), Prp26.1; activation of a mitogen activated protein kinase, p56; programmed cell death (PCD) involving a caspase-3-like activlty. These events contribute to prevent self-fertilization. We are attempting to establish the functional signiflcance of these events, and their possible involvement in integrating a coordinated signaling response. Here we describe the identification of these components shown to be involved in SI, together with recent progress in identifying links between some of them. These data constitute the first steps in elucidating how SI signaling is integrated.

  4. 40 CFR Appendix V to Part 265 - Examples of Potentially Incompatible Waste

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples of Potentially Incompatible Waste V Appendix V to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. V Appendix V to Part 265—Examples of...

  5. A co-modelling method for solving incompatibilities during co-design of mechatronic devices

    Ni, Yunyun; Broenink, Jan F.

    2014-01-01

    The design process of mechatronic devices, which involves experts from different disciplines working together, has limited time and resource constraints. These experts normally have their own domain-specific designing methods and tools, which can lead to incompatibilities when one needs to work toge

  6. Male and female roles in crosses of Aspergillus nidulans as revealed by vegetatively incompatible parents

    Bruggeman, I.M.; Debets, A.J.M.; Swart, K.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2003-01-01

    To resolve the role of male and female nuclei and mitochondria in cleistothecium formation in the model organism Aspergillus nidulans, we analysed the genetic constituents of cleistothecia, from crosses between vegetatively compatible and incompatible parents. We used markers that enabled us to dete

  7. How to produce quantum entanglement for ascertaining incompatible properties in double-slit experiments

    Nisticò, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Double-slit experiment very well lends itself in describing the problem of measuring simultaneously incompatible properties. In such a context, we theoretically design an ideal experiment for spin-7/2 particles, able to produce the entanglement which makes possible the detection.

  8. Simultaneous non-disturbing detection of incompatible properties in double-slit experiment

    Nistico', Giuseppe; Sestito, Angela

    2003-01-01

    We exploit the notion of which-slit detector introduced by Englert, Scully and Walther (ESW), to show that two incompatible properties can be detected together for each particle hitting the screen, without disturbing the center-of-mass motion of the particle.

  9. Identification of differentially expressed genes involved in self-incompatibility in Theobroma cacao L.

    Increasing yield, quality and disease resistance are important objectives for cacao breeding programs. However, self-incompatibility (SI) often restricts progress, as crosses between certain cacao germplasm accessions and breeding lines are only partially successful. Various events are involved in t...

  10. Graft Incompatibility Influence on Assimilating Pigments and Soluble Sugars Amount of some Pear (Pyrus sativa Cultivars

    Gheorghii CIOBOTARI

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Graft incompatibility in fruit trees is one of the greatest obstacles in rootstocks and cultivars breeding. The mechanism in which incompatibility is expressed is not yet fully understood and several hypotheses have been advanced in an attempt to explain it. In many cases (pear on quince grafts, apricot on Prunus grafts, incompatibility is manifested by the breaking of the trees at the point of the union particularly when they have been growing for some years. Many reports focus on this problem in order to understand the mechanisms of graft development. These reports refer to both cytological and biochemical responses occurring at an early phase in response to grafting, as well as to the consequences of these events on the future graft response. In this experiment, we tried to highlight how affinity between scion and rootstock can influence the photosynthetic apparatus and carbohydrates synthesis. The results showed that grafting affinity has an influence on total assimilating pigments content. Thus, on the pear cultivars grafted on an incompatible rootstock (cultivars/Cydonia oblonga the total pigments content ratio (reported to the ungrafted rootstock ranged between 0.58 and 0.69. However, the combinations had a ratio ranging between 0.79 and 0.98. Nevertheless, the assimilating pigments ratio reduction had no influence on photosynthetic rate. The soluble sugars amount was close in both variants (cultivars/Cydonia oblonga and cultivars/Pyrus sativa.