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Sample records for abnormalities drug-induced

  1. Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal Arrhythmias.

    Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2016-01-01

    Risk of severe and fatal ventricular arrhythmias, presenting as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), is increased in congenital and acquired forms of long QT syndromes (LQTS). Drug-induced inhibition of K+ currents, IKs, IKr, IK1, and/or Ito, delay repolarization, prolong QT, and increase the risk of TdP. Drug-induced interference with IKr is the most common cause of acquired LQTS/TdP. Multiple drugs bind to KNCH2-hERG-K+ channels affecting IKr, including antiarrythmics, antibiotics, antivirals, azole-antifungals, antimalarials, anticancer, antiemetics, prokinetics, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Azithromycin has been recently added to this list. In addition to direct channel inhibition, some drugs interfere with the traffic of channels from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing mature channel membrane density; e.g., pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol. Other drugs, such as ketoconazole, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, donepezil, tamoxifen, endoxifen, atazanavir, and roxitromycin, induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Although many drugs prolong the QT interval, TdP is a rare event. The following conditions increase the risk of drug-induced TdP: a) Disease states/electrolyte levels (heart failure, structural cardiac disease, bradycardia, hypokalemia); b) Pharmacogenomic variables (presence of congenital LQTS, subclinical ion-channel mutations, history of or having a relative with history of drug-induced long QT/TdP); c) Pharmacodynamic and kinetic factors (high doses, women, elderly, metabolism inhibitors, combining two or more QT prolonging drugs, drugs that prolong the QT and increase QT dispersion, and drugs with multiple actions on ion channels). Because most of these conditions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drug use associated with repolarization abnormalities are strongly recommended. PMID:26926294

  2. Identifying drug-induced repolarization abnormalities from distinct ECG patterns in congenital long QT syndrome: a study of sotalol effects on T-wave morphology

    Graff, Claus; Andersen, Mads P; Xue, Joel Q;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal repolariz......BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal...... typical ECG patterns in LQT2. Blinded to labels, the new morphology measures were tested in a third group of 39 healthy subjects receiving sotalol. Over 3 days the sotalol group received 0, 160 and 320 mg doses, respectively, and a 12-lead Holter ECG was recorded for 22.5 hours each day. Drug...... compared with QTcF, p < 0.001. In subjects receiving sotalol, T-wave morphology reached similarity to LQT2, whereas QTcF did not. CONCLUSION: Distinct ECG patterns in LQT2 carriers effectively quantified repolarization changes induced by sotalol. Further studies are needed to validate whether this measure...

  3. Thrombocytopenia - drug induced

    ... the condition is called drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia. Heparin, a blood thinner, is the most common cause ... bleeding Bleeding when you brush your teeth Easy bruising Pinpoint red spots on the skin ( petechiae )

  4. Drug-induced hepatitis

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  5. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains ...

  6. Drug-induced uveitis

    London, Nikolas JS; Garg, Sunir J; Moorthy, Ramana S; Cunningham, Emmett T

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications have been associated with uveitis. This review highlights both well-established and recently reported systemic, topical, intraocular, and vaccine-associated causes of drug-induced uveitis, and assigns a quantitative score to each medication based upon criteria originally described by Naranjo and associates.

  7. Drug-induced panniculitides.

    Borroni, G; Torti, S; D'Ospina, R M; Pezzini, C

    2014-04-01

    A substantial number of all panniculitides fails to recognize a specific etiology, and that is true also for a relatively frequent type of panniculitis, such as erythema nodosum (EN). Between the recognized causative factors of panniculitides, infectious, physical agents, autoimmune mechanisms and neoplastic disorders are well known. On the contrary, the role of drugs as inducers of panniculitides is marginally considered, and their report limited to anecdotal observations, often without due histopathological support. Since the clinical and histopathological features of drug-induced panniculitides are indistinguishable from those caused by other agents, the causative relationship may be demonstrated by the history of previous drug intake and by clinical improvement after drug discontinuation. We reviewed the currently reported descriptions of drug-induced panniculitis, including a few exemplificative original observations. EN results as the most frequently reported drug-induced panniculitis. Among the causative drugs of EN a variety of medications, with disparate, or even opposite, mechanisms of action are reported, thus limiting the understanding of the pathogenesis. Common causative drugs include oral contraceptives, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiobiotics and leukotriene-modifying agents. Unfortunately, in several cases, the diagnosis of drug-induced EN is done on clinical findings alone. In those cases, the lack of histopathological support does not allow to define a precise clinicopathological correlation on etiologic grounds. Drug-induced lobular and mixed panniculitides, including eosinophilic panniculitis, are even more rarely described. Reported causative agents are glatiramer acetate, interferon beta and heparin (at sites of injections), and systemic steroids, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and BRAF with subcutaneous fat involvement at distance. In view of the recent introduction of new classes of drugs, attention should be paid to disclose their

  8. [Drug-induced dyschromatopsias].

    Perdriel, G; Manent, P J

    1982-01-01

    Drug-induced dyschromatopsias are defined as functional or objective alterations of color sense following drug treatment. Drug induced chromatopsias are characterized by a perception of white surfaces as colored and occur following modifications of normally transparent structures or alterations of the chorioretina or higher centers. Digitalic intoxication is responsible for incorrect perception of yellow or blue; the retinal origin of the disorder is confirmed by electroretinograms and histologic modifications in the photoreceptor synapses. Santonin in doses exceeding 1 cg is associated with various color misperceptions due to injury to a peripheral neuron or problems of rhodopsin formation. Some sulfas and antibiotics may cause misperception of yellow, and the anticonvulsant drug Tridione may cause an almost complete disappearance of some colors. Chromotopsias of central origin due to direct action on cerebral neurons are rare but may follow use of phenacetine or atropine. Drug induced dyschromatopsias are more common and may be the initial symptoms of various kinds of drug intoxication. Various simple and reliable tests enable the practicing clinician to detect such disorders at an early stage. Synthetic antimalarial drugs derived from chloroquine and used in longterm treatment of rheumatism or during antimalarial prophylaxis, indomethacine, and the phenotiazins may cause dyschromatopsias due to retinal intoxication. Oral contraceptives diminish the chromatic perception in 20% of cases according to 1 author, and often cause deficits of blue-yellow perception. Disulfiram, certain antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, nystatin, isoniazide, and other drugs may cause dyschromatopsias due to alterations in the optical fibers. Ethambutol is the most harmful to color perception; its effects are usually but not always reversible on discontinuation of the drug. Systematic tests of color perception should be administered prior to and during treatment with any drug known to

  9. Drug induced lung disease - amiodarone in focus

    Vasić Nada R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 380 medications are known to cause pulmonary toxicity. Selected drugs that are important causes of pulmonary toxicity fall into the following classes: cytotoxic, cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, illicit drugs, miscellaneous. The adverse reactions can involve the pulmonary parenchyma, pleura, the airways, pulmonary vascular system, and mediastinum. Drug-induced lung diseases have no pathognomonic clinical, laboratory, physical, radiographic or histological findings. A drug-induced lung disease is usually considered a diagnosis of exclusion of other diseases. The diagnosis of drug-mediated pulmonary toxicity is usually made based on clinical findings. In general, laboratory analyses do not help in establishing the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography scanning is more sensitive than chest radiography for defining radiographic abnormalities. The treatment of drug-induced lung disease consists of immediate discontinuation of the offending drug and appropriate management of the pulmonary symptoms. Glucocorticoids have been associated with rapid improvement in gas exchange and reversal of radiographic abnormalities. Before starting any medication, patients should be educated about the potential adverse effects of the drug. Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic agent used in the treatment of many types of tachyarrhythmia. Amiodarone-caused pulmonary toxicity is a well-known side effect (complication of this medication. The incidence of amiodarone-induced lung disease is approximately 5-7%.

  10. Drug-induced hepatic injury

    Friis, Henrik; Andreasen, P B

    1992-01-01

    The Danish Committee on Adverse Drug Reactions received 1100 reports of suspected drug-induced hepatic injury during the decade 1978-1987. The causal relationship between drug and hepatic injury was classified as definite in 57 (5.2%) reports, probable in 989 (89.9%) reports, possible in 50 (4.......5%) reports and unclassifiable in four (0.4%) reports. Hepatic injuries accounted for 5.9% of all adverse drug reactions reported, and 14.7% of the lethal adverse drug reactions. A total of 47.2% were classified as acute cytotoxic, 16.2% as acute cholestatic and 26.9% as abnormal hepatic function. In 52 (4.......7%) cases the hepatic injury was lethal; only 14 (1.3%) cases were chronic. Halothane accounted for 25% of the cases. The incidence of halothane-induced hepatic injury is decreasing, and only one lethal case has been reported since 1981. Next to halothane, sulfasalazine was the drug most often suspected...

  11. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000104.htm Drug-induced pulmonary disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... take longer to improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. Possible Complications Complications ...

  12. Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia.

    van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Meyboom, Ronald H B; Egberts, Antoine C G

    2004-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia can have several causes, including the use of certain drugs. The mechanism behind drug-induced thrombocytopenia is either a decrease in platelet production (bone marrow toxicity) or an increased destruction (immune-mediated thrombocytopenia). In addition, pseudothrombocytopenia, an in vitro effect, has to be distinguished from true drug-induced thrombocytopenia. This article reviews literature on drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, with the exception of thrombo-haemorrhagic disorders such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. A literature search in PubMed combined with a check of the reference lists of all the retrieved articles resulted in 108 articles relevant to the subject. The drug classes that are most often associated with drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia are cinchona alkaloid derivatives (quinine, quinidine), sulfonamides, NSAIDs, anticonvulsants, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and diuretics. Several other drugs are occasionally described in case reports of thrombocytopenia; an updated review of these case reports can be found on the internet. A small number of epidemiological studies, differing largely in the methodology used, describe incidences in the magnitude of 10 cases per 1 000 000 inhabitants per year. No clear risk factors could be identified from these studies. The underlying mechanism of drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia is not completely clarified, but at least three different types of antibodies appear to play a role (hapten-dependent antibodies, drug-induced, platelet-reactive auto-antibodies and drug-dependent antibodies). Targets for drug-dependent antibodies are glycoproteins on the cell membrane of the platelets, such as glycoprotein (GP) Ib/IX and GPIIb/IIIa. Diagnosis of drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia may consist of identifying clinical symptoms (bruising, petechiae, bleeding), a careful evaluation of the causal relationship of the suspected

  13. Drug-induced renal disorders.

    Ghane Shahrbaf, Fatemeh; Assadi, Farahnak

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity are more common among infants and young children and in certain clinical situations such as underlying renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Drugs can cause acute renal injury, intrarenal obstruction, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and acid-base and fluid electrolytes disorders. Certain drugs can cause alteration in intraglomerular hemodynamics, inflammatory changes in renal tubular cells, leading to acute kidney injury (AKI), tubulointerstitial disease and renal scarring. Drug-induced nephrotoxicity tends to occur more frequently in patients with intravascular volume depletion, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sepsis. Therefore, early detection of drugs adverse effects is important to prevent progression to end-stage renal disease. Preventive measures requires knowledge of mechanisms of drug-induced nephrotoxicity, understanding patients and drug-related risk factors coupled with therapeutic intervention by correcting risk factors, assessing baseline renal function before initiation of therapy, adjusting the drug dosage and avoiding use of nephrotoxic drug combinations. PMID:26468475

  14. Drug-induced pulmonary injury: CT findings in hemopathic patients

    Objective: To investigate the spiral CT findings in hemopathic patients with drug-induced pulmonary injury. Methods: CT images obtained in 11 patients with drug-induced pulmonary injury were retrospectively analyzed. Six patients had antineoplastic agent-induced pulmonary injury and 5 patients had non-neoplastic agent-induced pulmonary injury (immunosuppressor in 2 patients, antifungal in 2 patients, antineoplastic immunomodulators in 1 patient). CT findings were reviewed by a chest radiologist. Results: All 11 patients had parenchymal abnormalities on MSCT scans, including ground-glass opacities (n=8), consolidation (n=5),interlobular septal thickening (n=3) and focal fibrosis (n=2). The abnormalities were bilateral and asymmetric in all patients. They were mainly in the peripheral lung regions in 6 patients, in the central lung regions in four, and irregularly located in one. The abnormalities involved mainly the lower lung zones in six patients, the upper lung zones in two,and all lung zones homogeneously in three. One patient had fluid in bilateral pleural cavities. Three patients were given the same agent once more after the imaging turned to normal, and they presented with same clinical symptoms and similar but more serious imaging findings. Conclusions: Drug-induced pulmonary injury usually manifests as areas of ground-glass opacity and consolidation, which most commonly involves the peripheral lungs and lower lung zones. Drug-induced pulmonary injury shows reproducible but more serious lesions when the patient is given the same agent once more. (authors)

  15. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy

    Vilholm, Ole Jakob; Christensen, Alex Alban; Zedan, Ahmed;

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by medication, and various descriptions have been applied for this condition. In this MiniReview, the term 'drug-induced peripheral neuropathy' (DIPN) is used with the suggested definition: Damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system caused by a chemical...... substance used in the treatment, cure, prevention or diagnosis of a disease. Optic neuropathy is included in this definition. A distinction between DIPN and other aetiologies of peripheral neuropathy is often quite difficult and thus, the aim of this MiniReview is to discuss the major agents associated with...

  16. Periodic paralysis: An unusual presentation of drug-induced hyperkalemia

    Poonam Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperkalemia is a life-threatening electrolyte abnormality. The most common cause of hyperkalemia includes renal disease and ingestion of medications. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may develop in patients with underlying renal impairment, disturbed cellular uptake of potassium load, excessive ingestion or infusion of potassium-containing substances. We report a case of "drug-induced severe hyperkalemia" presenting as periodic paralysis. A 67-year-old diabetic and hypertensive woman presented to emergency department with the complaint of intermittent episode of inability to walk for the past 5 days. Each episode lasted for 15-20 minutes and was associated with breathlessness and restlessness. There was no family history of periodic paralysis and drug history revealed that the patient was onolmesartan 20 mg per day (for past 2 years, perindopril 4 mg per day (for past 16 months, and torsemide 10 mg/day. On examination patient was found to be conscious, alert, and afebrile. Vitals were normal. Examination of cardiovascular and respiratory system did not reveal any significant finding. Blood report of the patient showed serum K+ level 8.6 mmol/l. All other investigations were within normal limits. A diagnosis of drug-induced hyperkalemia was made. Patient responded well to the symptomatic treatment. To the best of the author′s knowledge, this is the first case report of drug-induced hyperkalemia presenting as periodic paralysis.

  17. [Drug-induced Cognitive Impairment].

    Shinohara, Moeko; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-04-01

    Elderly people are more likely than young people to develop cognitive impairments associated with medication use. One of the reasons for this is that renal and liver functions are often impaired in elderly people. Dementia and delirium (an acute confused state) are known to be associated with drug toxicity. Anticholinergic medications are common causes of both acute and chronic cognitive impairment. Psychoactive drugs, antidepressants and anticonvulsants can cause dementia and delirium. In addition, non-psychoactive drugs such as histamine H2 receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent), and cardiac medications, may cause acute or chronic cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the offending agent are essential for the prevention of drug-induced dementia and delirium. PMID:27056860

  18. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    ... mediastinitis ) Abnormal buildup of fluid in the lungs ( pulmonary edema ) Buildup of fluid between the layers of tissue that line the lungs and chest cavity ( pleural effusion ) Many ... as bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, and methotrexate Illegal drugs

  19. Drug-induced weight gain.

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Apovian, Caroline M

    2005-01-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of many commonly used drugs leading to noncompliance with therapy and to exacerbation of comorbid conditions related to obesity. Improved glycemic control achieved by insulin, insulin secretagogues or thiazolidinedione therapy is generally accompanied by weight gain. It is a problematic side effect of therapy due to the known deleterious effect of weight gain on glucose control, increased blood pressure and worsening lipid profile. Weight gain may be lessened or prevented by adherence to diet and exercise or combination therapy with metformin. Weight gain is also common in psychotropic therapy. The atypical antipsychotic drugs (clozapine, olanzepine, risperidone and quetiapine) are known to cause marked weight gain. Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, mirtazapine and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) also may promote appreciable weight gain that cannot be explained solely by improvement in depressive symptoms. The same phenomenon is observed with mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that promote weight gain include valproate, carbamazepine and gabapentin. Lamotrigine is an AED that is weight-neutral, while topiramate and zonisamide may induce weight loss. PMID:16341287

  20. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. PMID:23972547

  1. Drug-Induced Urinary Calculi

    Matlaga, Brian R; Shah, Ojas D; Assimos, Dean G

    2003-01-01

    Urinary calculi may be induced by a number of medications used to treat a variety of conditions. These medications may lead to metabolic abnormalities that facilitate the formation of stones. Drugs that induce metabolic calculi include loop diuretics; carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; and laxatives, when abused. Correcting the metabolic abnormality may eliminate or dramatically attenuate stone activity. Urinary calculi can also be induced by medications when the drugs crystallize and become the primary component of the stones. In this case, urinary supersaturation of the agent may promote formation of the calculi. Drugs that induce calculi via this process include magnesium trisilicate; ciprofloxacin; sulfa medications; triamterene; indinavir; and ephedrine, alone or in combination with guaifenesin. When this situation occurs, discontinuation of the medication is usually necessary. PMID:16985842

  2. [Drug-induced ventricular tachycardia].

    Fauchier, J P; Fauchier, L; Babuty, D; Breuillac, J C; Cosnay, P; Rouesnel, P

    1993-05-01

    Certain drugs can induce ventricular tachycardia (VT) by creating reentry, ventricular after potentials or exaggerating the slope of phase 4. These may or may not be symptomatic, sustained or non-sustained and have variable ECG appearances: monomorphic or polymorphic, bidirectional, torsades de pointes. They risk degenerating into ventricular flutter of fibrillation and have been held responsible for the increased mortality observed unexpectedly in some long-term treatments. The drugs responsible are mainly those used in cardiology, probably due to predisposing circumstances (cardiomegaly, cardiac failure, previous severe ventricular arrhythmias, therapeutic associations, metabolic abnormalities). These include primarily the antiarrhythmic drugs (IA, IC, sotalol and bepridil), digitalis, sympathomimetics and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. These complications may be toxic or idiosyncratic, in patients with or without cardiac disease, and may also occur with other drugs: vasodilators and anti-anginal drugs (lidoflazine, vincamine, fenoxedil), psychotropic agents (phenothiazine and imipramine), antimitotics, antimalarials (chloroquine) or antibiotics (erythromycin, pentamidine). The prognosis is severe and the treatment is often difficult which makes prevention, helped by repeated surface ECG (or Holter monitoring), very important with careful assessment of patients at risk. PMID:8267504

  3. Anticancer drug-induced kidney disorders.

    Kintzel, P E

    2001-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is an inherent adverse effect of certain anticancer drugs. Renal dysfunction can be categorised as prerenal uraemia, intrinsic damage or postrenal uraemia according to the underlying pathophysiological process. Renal hypoperfusion promulgates prerenal uraemia. Intrinsic renal damage results from prolonged hypoperfusion, exposure to exogenous or endogenous nephrotoxins, renotubular precipitation of xenobiotics or endogenous compounds, renovascular obstruction, glomerular disease, renal microvascular damage or disease, and tubulointerstitial damage or disease. Postrenal uraemia is a consequence of clinically significant urinary tract obstruction. Clinical signs of nephrotoxicity and methods used to assess renal function are discussed. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced renal dysfunction generally include damage to vasculature or structures of the kidneys, haemolytic uraemic syndrome and prerenal perfusion deficits. Patients with cancer are frequently at risk of renal impairment secondary to disease-related and iatrogenic causes. This article reviews the incidence, presentation, prevention and management of anticancer drug-induced renal dysfunction. Dose-related nephrotoxicity subsequent to administration of certain chloroethylnitrosourea compounds (carmustine, semustine and streptozocin) is commonly heralded by increased serum creatinine levels, uraemia and proteinuria. Additional signs of streptozocin-induced nephrotoxicity include hypophosphataemia, hypokalaemia, hypouricaemia, renal tubular acidosis, glucosuria, aceturia and aminoaciduria. Cisplatin and carboplatin cause dose-related renal dysfunction. In addition to increased serum creatinine levels and uraemia, electrolyte abnormalities, such as hypomagnesaemia and hypokalaemia, are commonly reported adverse effects. Rarely, cisplatin has been implicated as the underlying cause of haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Pharmaceutical antidotes to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity include amifostine, sodium

  4. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity in a tertiary care hospital in Rural South India

    Heethal Jaiprakash

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver is the main organ for metabolism of drugs and hepatotoxicity is a potential adverse effect for most drugs. Aims: This study was to study the frequency of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and to find the common drugs causing hepatotoxicity. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital in rural India. It is a study based on case series analysis. All patients with an abnormal liver function report, between July 2006 and July 2007, were included in the study. Results : The study included 411 patients. Among them 141 patients were females and 270 males. The common cause for abnormal liver function was alcoholic liver disease (30.4% followed by drug-induced hepatotoxicity (15.8% and malaria (15.3%. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity was seen in 65 patients. It was common in males (55% compared to females (44%. The mean age of the patients with drug-induced hepatotoxicity was 43±15.9. Antitubercular drugs were the commonly encountered drugs (44% causing hepatotoxicity followed by lipid lowering agents (41%. The others drugs included antiretroviral drugs (6%,steroids (5% and chlorpromazine (2%. Conclusion : A thorough history of drug intake must be taken in all patients presenting with abnormal hepatic function.

  5. Drug-induced hyperthermia in Huntington's disease.

    Gaasbeek, D.; Naarding, P.; Stor, T.; Kremer, H.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    Until now, only three patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and a neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) have been reported in the literature. We describe four cases with advanced stage Huntington's disease who within a period of one year developed drug-induced hyperthermia, either the neuroleptic m

  6. Serious drug-induced liver disease secondary to ezetimibe

    José Castellote; Javier Adza; Rosa Rota; Anna Girbau; Xavier Xiol

    2008-01-01

    Ezetimibe is the first member of a new family of lipidlowering drugs that inhibits uptake of dietary and biliary cholesterol. It was approved by the FDA in 2002for hypercholesterolemia alone or in combination with statins. Its use has been spreading over the last years.Ezetimibe was considered a safe drug. We report a case of a woman who developed a serious hepatocellular drug-induced liver disease after 4 mo therapy with 10 mg daily of ezetimibe. After withdrawal of the drug, the patient recovered slowly. Ezetimibe may produce serious toxic hepatitis and prompt withdrawal is mandatory in case of a significant abnormality in liver testing after beginning or during treatment with ezetimibe.

  7. Drug Induced Hypersensitivity and the HLA Complex

    Munir Pirmohamed; Ana Alfirevic

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions are of major concern and present a burden for national healthcare systems due to their often severe nature, high rate of hospital admissions and high mortality. They manifest with a wide range of symptoms and signs, and can be initiated by a wide range of structurally diverse chemical compounds. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying hypersensitivity reactions are not well understood, but it is thought that they are immune mediated. MHC region on ...

  8. Drug-induced valvulopathy: an update.

    Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2010-10-01

    Drug-induced valvulopathy is a serious liability for certain compound classes in development and for some marketed drugs intended for human use. Reports of valvulopathy led to the withdrawal of fenfluramines (anorexigens) and pergolide (antiparkinson drug) from the United States market in 1997 and 2007, respectively. The mechanism responsible for the pathogenesis of valvulopathy by these drugs is likely a result of an "off-target" effect via activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 2B receptor (5-HT2BR) expressed on heart valve leaflets. Microscopically, the affected valve leaflets showed plaques of proliferative myofibroblasts in an abundant extracellular matrix, composed primarily of glycosaminoglycans. However, the valvular effects caused by fenfluramines and pergolide were not initially predicted from routine preclinical toxicity studies, and to date there are no specific validated animal models or preclinical/toxicologic screens to accurately predict drug-induced valvulopathy. This review covers the structure and function of heart valves and highlights major advances toward understanding the 5-HT2BR-mediated pathogenesis of the lesion and subsequently, development of appropriate animal models using novel techniques/experiments, use of functional screens against 5-HT2BR, and more consistent sampling and pathologic evaluation of valves in preclinical studies that will aid in avoidance of future drug-induced valvulopathy in humans. PMID:20716786

  9. Drug-induced Hepatotoxicity of Anti-tuberculosis Drugs and Their Serum Levels

    Jeong, Ina; Park, Jong-Sun; Cho, Young-Jae; Yoon, Ho Il; Song, Junghan; Lee, Choon-Taek; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between serum anti-tuberculosis (TB) drug levels and the drug-induced hepatotoxicity (DIH) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anti-TB DIH is associated with basal serum drug levels. Serum peak levels of isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP), pyrazinamide (PZA), and ethambutol (EMB) were analyzed in blood samples 2 hr after the administration of anti-TB medication. Anti-TB DIH and mild liver function test abnormality were diagnosed on the basis of...

  10. Drugs Induced Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    Elif ÖNDER

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS is a life threatening mucocutaneous skin disease that mostlydeveloped after using some drug. SJS mostly appear between 2-4th decades. Mucocutaneouslesions were seen between 1-14 days of drug intake. And these lesions spread diffusely all aroundthe body. First treatment choice is the stopping of drug that cause SJS and giving supportingtreatment. After understanding of underlying cytotoxic and immunological mechanism of SJS,new treatment approaches were developed and mortality of disease was reduced. We hereinreport a short review of drug induced SJS and its treatment.

  11. Drug-induced regulation of target expression

    Iskar, Murat; Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    -induced differential expression of drug target mRNA was examined in three cell lines using the Connectivity Map. To overcome various biases in this valuable resource, we have developed a computational normalization and scoring procedure that is applicable to gene expression recording upon heterogeneous drug treatments...... further newly identified drug-induced differential regulation of Lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase, Endoplasmin, DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha and Calmodulin 1. The feedback regulation in these and other targets is likely to be relevant for the success or failure of the molecular intervention....

  12. Quantitative measurement of handwriting in the assessment of drug-induced parkinsonism.

    Caligiuri, Michael P; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Filoteo, J Vincent; Song, David; Lohr, James B

    2006-10-01

    Monitoring drug-induced side effects is especially important for patients who undergo treatment with antipsychotic medications, as these drugs often produce extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) resulting in movement abnormalities similar to parkinsonism. Scientists have developed several objective laboratory tests to measure and research drug-induced movement disorders, but equipment and tests are complex and costly and have not become accepted in large-scale, multi-site clinical trials. The goals of this study were to test whether a simple handwriting measure can discriminate between individuals with psychotropic-induced parkinsonism, Parkinson's disease, and healthy individuals, and to examine some of the psychometric properties of the measure. We examined pen movement kinematics during cursive writing of a standard word in 13 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD), 10 schizophrenia patients with drug-induced parkinsonism (SZ), and 12 normal healthy control participants (NC). Participants were instructed to write the word "hello" in cursive twice, at three vertical height scales. Software was used for data acquisition and analysis of vertical stroke velocities, velocity scaling, and smoothness. There were four important results from this study: (1) both SZ patients with drug-induced EPS and PD participants exhibited impaired movement velocities and velocity scaling; (2) performance on the velocity scaling measure distinguished drug-induced EPS from normal with 90% accuracy; (3) SZ, but not PD participants displayed abnormalities in movement smoothness; and (4) there was a positive correlation between age and magnitude of the velocity scaling deficit in PD participants. This study demonstrates that kinematic analyses of pen movements during handwriting may be useful in detecting and monitoring subtle changes in motor control related to the adverse effects of psychotropic medications. PMID:16647772

  13. Drug-induced lung disease: High-resolution CT and histological findings

    Cleverley, Joanne R.; Screaton, Nicholas J.; Hiorns, Melanie P.; Flint, Julia D.A.; Mueller, Nestor L

    2002-04-01

    AIM: To compare the parenchymal high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) appearances with histological findings in patients with drug-induced lung disease and to determine the prognostic value of HRCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Drug history, HRCT features, histological findings and outcome at 3 months in 20 patients with drug induced-lung disease were reviewed retrospectively. The HRCT images were assessed for the pattern and distribution of abnormalities and classified as most suggestive of interstitial pneumonitis/fibrosis, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), organizing pneumonia (OP) reaction, or a hypersensitivity reaction. RESULTS: On histopathological examination there were eight cases of interstitial pneumonitis/fibrosis, five of DAD, five of OP reactions, one of hypersensitivity reaction and one of pulmonary eosinophilia. The most common abnormalities on HRCT were ground-glass opacities (n = 17), consolidation (n = 14), interlobular septal thickening (n = 15) and centrilobular nodules (n 8). HRCT interpretation and histological diagnosis were concordant in only nine (45%) of 20 patients. The pattern, distribution, and extent of HRCT abnormalities were of limited prognostic value: all eight patients with histological findings of OP, hypersensitivity reaction, or eosinophilic infiltrate improved on follow-up compared to only five of 13 patients with interstitial pneumonitis/fibrosis or DAD. CONCLUSION: In many cases of drug-induced lung injury HRCT is of limited value in determining the histological pattern and prognosis. Cleverly, J.R. et al.

  14. Antipsychotic drug-induced hematologic disorders

    Theocharis Kyziridis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over half a century after the discovery of chlorpromazine and haloperidol, antipsychotic drugs showed a true evolutionary revolution. The knowledge of their adverse effects is of outmost importance as it may contribute to the prevention of unwanted sequelae, to the decrease of the duration and cost of hospitalization, it may improve the quality of life of patients, minimize the problems and maximize the therapeutic gain. Aim: The aim of this review was the presentation of the hematologic side-effects of antipsychotic drugs, and most particularly their frequency and association with the different classes of these drugs, their clinical picture and their pathophysiologic mechanisms. Material-method: This paper is a review of the literature (mainly articles from journals, PubMed, as well as books and monographs of the period 1978-2012. Key-words used included antipsychotics, hematologic adverse effects, drug-induced adverse effects. Results: Antipsychotic-drug induced hematologic side-effects are not particularly highly prevalent, while many of them are found in case reports. For this reason they have not drawn much of attention. These hematologic dyscrasias may concern all the blood cell series as well as the coagulation mechanism. Excluded from this rule is the case of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis, which demands increased clinical vigilance. In fact, agranulocytosis was the reason why the drug was drawn away from circulation approximately 35 years ago. Conclusions: In any case the appearance of a hematologic disorder in a patient receiving antipsychotic medications should prompt careful evaluation.

  15. [Drug-induced impairment of renal function].

    Krüger, B; Benck, U; Singer, T; Krämer, B K

    2012-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) of any origin is a common complication/disease in hospitalized patients, going along with significantly increased mortality and morbidity, as well as hospitalization duration and expenses. Drug-induced AKI is usually seen in patients with concurrent risk factors such as existing kidney disease, dehydration with or without hypotension, older age or diabetes mellitus. In cases with multiple risk factors or therapies the triggering drug is often impossible to define. Hemodynamic alterations, intrinsic tubulointerstitial damages and intrarenal (i. e. tubular) obstructions as a result of drug precipitations are the pathophysiological basis of this disease entity. Clinically the AKI is perceived as the most important problem, due to the development of hyperhydration (including pulmonary edema) and reduced/lacking clearance of toxic metabolites. The prognosis of drug-induced AKI is usually good, especially if the agents are stopped early in the process, but nevertheless some patients experience severe acute AKI requiring dialysis with/without subsequent restoration. Considering and recognizing potential risk factors may help to identify patients at risk and lead to introduction of prophylactic actions. Identification of risk factors and the introduction of prevention strategies should be an integral part of everybody's daily clinical work, especially in intensive care medicine due to the high susceptibility to AKI. PMID:22971974

  16. Biomarkers of drug-induced vascular injury

    In pre-clinical safety studies, drug-induced vascular injury is an issue of concern because there are no obvious diagnostic markers for pre-clinical or clinical monitoring and there is an intellectual gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of this lesion. While vasodilatation and increased shear stress appear to play a role, the exact mechanism(s) of injury to the primary targets, smooth muscle and endothelial cells are unknown. However, evaluation of novel markers for potential clinical monitoring with a mechanistic underpinning would add value in risk assessment and management. This mini review focuses on the progress to identify diagnostic markers of drug-induced vascular injury. Von Willebrand factor (vWF), released upon perturbation of endothelial cells, is transiently increased in plasma prior to morphological evidence of damage in dogs or rats treated with vascular toxicants. Therefore, vWF might be a predictive biomarker of vascular injury. However, vWF is not an appropriate biomarker of lesion progression or severity since levels return to baseline values when there is morphological evidence of injury. A potential mechanistically linked biomarker of vascular injury is caveolin-1. Expression of this protein, localized primarily to smooth muscle and endothelial cells, decreases with the onset of vascular damage. Since vascular injury involves multiple mediators and cell types, evaluation of a panel rather than a single biomarker may be more useful in monitoring early and severe progressive vascular injury

  17. Circulating KL-6 levels in patients with drug induced pneumonitis

    Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Akihito; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Akira; Naka, Tetsuji; Hamada, Hironobu; Abe, Masahiro; Nishimura, Kazutaka; Higaki, Jitsuo; Ikezoe, Junpei; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2003-01-01

    Background: The circulating level of KL-6/MUC1 is a sensitive marker for various interstitial lung diseases. Previous case reports have suggested that KL-6 may also be increased in some patients with drug induced pneumonitis. A study was undertaken to determine whether serum KL-6 could be a marker for particular types of drug induced pneumonitis. Methods: The findings of high resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) chest scans of 30 patients with drug induced pneumonitis were reviewed separate...

  18. Republished: drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-03-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:23417686

  19. Drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:22875739

  20. Pharmacodynamics of drug-induced weight gain.

    Kulkarni, S. K.; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2001-08-01

    Body weight gain during treatment with drugs for any kind of disease may represent improvement of the disease itself. However, sometimes these drug-induced alterations of the body's appetite-regulating mechanisms result in excessive weight gain, thus jeopardizing compliance with prescribed medication. A number of drugs are capable of changing body weight as an adverse consequence of their therapeutic effect. Included in this category are the psychotropic drugs such as antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood stabilizers. Antipsychotics are well-known culprits of weight gain. The low-potency (e.g., chlorpromazine and thioridazine) and atypical agents (e.g., clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone) are most often associated with weight gain. Antidepressants such as tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors are most often associated with significant weight gain. The tertiary tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline is thought to induce the most weight gain. Mood stabilizers such as lithium carbonate, valproic acid and carbamazepine also induce weight gain in a considerable number of patients. Treatment with corticosteroids is associated with dose-dependent body weight gain in many patients and corticosteroid-induced obesity aggravates other corticosteroid-associated health risks. Insulin therapy in diabetic patients usually increases body weight. Finally, sulfonylurea derivatives, antineoplastic agents used for the treatment of breast cancer and several drugs used in migraine prophylaxis may cause body weight gain as well. (c) 2001 Prous Science. All rights reserved. PMID:12743638

  1. Drug-induced immune neutropenia/agranulocytosis.

    Curtis, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant white blood cell in blood and play a critical role in preventing infections as part of the innate immune system. Reduction in neutrophils below an absolute count of 500 cells/pL is termed severe neutropenia or agranulocytosis. Drug-induced immune neutropenia (DIIN) occurs when drug-dependent antibodies form against neutrophil membrane glycoproteins and cause neutrophil destruction. Affected patients have fever, chills, and infections; severe infections left untreated can result in death. Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor can hasten neutrophil recovery. Cumulative data show that severe neutropenia or agranulocytosis associated with exposure to nonchemotherapy drugs ranges from approximately 1.6 to 15.4 cases per million population per year. Drugs most often associated with neutropenia or agranulocytosis include dipyrone, diclofenac, ticlopidine, calcium dobesilate, spironolactone, antithyroid drugs (e.g., propylthiouracil), carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole- trimethoprim, [3-lactam antibiotics, clozapine, levamisole, and vancomycin. Assays used for detection of neutrophil drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) include flow cytometry, monoclonal antibody immobilization of granulocyte antigens, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, granulocyte agglutination, and granulocytotoxicity. However, testing for neutrophil DDAbs is rarely performed owing to its complexity and lack of availability. Mechanisms proposed for DIIN have not been rigorously studied, but those that have been studied include drug- or hapten-induced antibody formation and autoantibody production against drug metabolite or protein adducts covalently attached to neutrophil membrane proteins. This review will address acute, severe neutropenia caused by neutrophil-reactive antibodies induced by nonchemotherapy drugs-DIIN PMID:25247619

  2. Drug induced exfoliative dermatitis: state of the art.

    Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Berti, Alvise; Campochiaro, Corrado; Tombetti, Enrico; Ramirez, Giuseppe Alvise; Nico, Andrea; Di Leo, Elisabetta; Fantini, Paola; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Nettis, Eustachio; Colombo, Giselda

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced exfoliative dermatitis (ED) are a group of rare and severe drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) involving skin and usually occurring from days to several weeks after drug exposure. Erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are the main clinical presentations of drug induced ED. Overall, T cells are the central player of these immune-mediated drug reactions. Here we provide a systematic review on frequency, risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical features and management of patients with drug induced ED. PMID:27551239

  3. Hepatic necrosis associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome

    Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS; also known as drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms [DRESS] is a life-threatening condition first described by Chaikenetal. in 1950. It is characterized by extensive mucocutaneous rash; fever; lymphadenopathy; hepatitis; hematological abnormalities; damage to several organs such as kidney, heart, lungs, and pancreas; and possible reactivation of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 or other herpes virus. Rare and severe cases may present hepatic necrosis, and about 15% of them result in death or liver transplantation. A hallmark of this syndrome is the late onset of symptoms after the drug exposure. The most common culprit drugs are the aromatic anticonvulsants (in almost 30% of the cases and the antibiotics (which in some series represent 20% of the cases. The authors report a case of a 41-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with erythroderma, acute hepatitis, acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure, and was then treated with corticosteroid after the diagnosis of DIHS/DRESS. A specific culprit drug could not confidently be determined due to the presence of multiple drugs used by the patient. The clinical and laboratory outcome was apparently satisfactory, but unexpectedly, on the sixth day of hospitalization, the patient complained of nonspecific malaise, drowsiness, which progressed in a few hours with signs and symptoms of hepatic failure, refractory shock, and death. The autopsy findings showed submassive hepatic necrosis, and the immediate cause of death was attributed to hepatic failure.

  4. Drug-Induced Hyperglycaemia and Diabetes.

    Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Larif, Sofien; Hmouda, Houssem; Ben Salem, Chaker

    2015-12-01

    Drug-induced hyperglycaemia and diabetes is a global issue. It may be a serious problem, as it increases the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications, infections, metabolic coma and even death. Drugs may induce hyperglycaemia through a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in insulin secretion and sensitivity, direct cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cells and increases in glucose production. Antihypertensive drugs are not equally implicated in increasing serum glucose levels. Glycaemic adverse events occur more frequently with thiazide diuretics and with certain beta-blocking agents than with calcium-channel blockers and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system. Lipid-modifying agents may also induce hyperglycaemia, and the diabetogenic effect seems to differ between the different types and daily doses of statins. Nicotinic acid may also alter glycaemic control. Among the anti-infectives, severe life-threatening events have been reported with fluoroquinolones, especially when high doses are used. Protease inhibitors and, to a lesser extent, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have been reported to induce alterations in glucose metabolism. Pentamidine-induced hyperglycaemia seems to be related to direct dysfunction in pancreatic cells. Phenytoin and valproic acid may also induce hyperglycaemia. The mechanisms of second-generation antipsychotic-associated hyperglycaemia, diabetes mellitus and ketoacidosis are complex and are mainly due to insulin resistance. Antidepressant agents with high daily doses seem to be more frequently associated with an increased risk of diabetes. Ketoacidosis may occur in patients receiving beta-adrenergic stimulants, and theophylline may also induce hyperglycaemia. Steroid diabetes is more frequently associated with high doses of glucocorticoids. Some chemotherapeutic agents carry a higher risk of hyperglycaemia, and calcineurin inhibitor-induced hyperglycaemia is mainly due to a decrease in insulin secretion

  5. Drug-induced pancreatitis: A Potentially Serious and Underreported Problem

    Kaufman, Michele B.

    2013-01-01

    There have been many published reports of possible cases of drug-induced pancreatitis. In addition, some disease states and patient characteristics predispose particular populations to the development of this condition. Three case histories are presented.

  6. Drug Induced Hearing Loss: Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve Hearing

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Drug-Induced Hearing Loss Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve ... brain there was a sound. What are ototoxic drugs and why are they important? Ototoxic drugs are ...

  7. Effect of AND#945;-tocopherol on antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity

    Rajiv Nehra

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: and #945;-tocopherol (200 mg/kg bw, oral was found to have hepatoprotective effect against antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity in albino rabbits. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1158-1162

  8. Drug-induced pancreatitis: A Potentially Serious and Underreported Problem.

    Kaufman, Michele B

    2013-06-01

    There have been many published reports of possible cases of drug-induced pancreatitis. In addition, some disease states and patient characteristics predispose particular populations to the development of this condition. Three case histories are presented. PMID:23946630

  9. Drug-Induced Bullous Sweet Syndrome with Multiple Autoimmune Features

    2010-01-01

    Sweet syndrome (SS) (Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis) has been reported in association with autoimmune phenomena including relapsing polychondritis, drug-induced lupus, and the development of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). However, a combination of these autoimmune features has not been reported. Herein, we report a case of drug-induced bullous SS with ocular and mucosal involvement, glomerulonephritis, and multiple autoimmune features including clinical polychondritis w...

  10. Drug-Path: a database for drug-induced pathways.

    Zeng, Hui; Qiu, Chengxiang; Cui, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Some databases for drug-associated pathways have been built and are publicly available. However, the pathways curated in most of these databases are drug-action or drug-metabolism pathways. In recent years, high-throughput technologies such as microarray and RNA-sequencing have produced lots of drug-induced gene expression profiles. Interestingly, drug-induced gene expression profile frequently show distinct patterns, indicating that drugs normally induce the activation or repression of distinct pathways. Therefore, these pathways contribute to study the mechanisms of drugs and drug-repurposing. Here, we present Drug-Path, a database of drug-induced pathways, which was generated by KEGG pathway enrichment analysis for drug-induced upregulated genes and downregulated genes based on drug-induced gene expression datasets in Connectivity Map. Drug-Path provides user-friendly interfaces to retrieve, visualize and download the drug-induced pathway data in the database. In addition, the genes deregulated by a given drug are highlighted in the pathways. All data were organized using SQLite. The web site was implemented using Django, a Python web framework. Finally, we believe that this database will be useful for related researches. PMID:26130661

  11. A rare cause of drug-induced hepatitis in an immunocompromised patient and the role of glutathione

    Viplove Senadhi; Deepika Arora; Manish Arora; Franklin Marsh

    2012-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning on numerous herbal drugs, including many popular products at General Nutrition Centers (GNC), regarding unstudied hepatotoxicity. There have been recent reports of GNC products such as hydroxycut and herbalife, causing drug-induced hepatitis. Herbal medications are over-the-counter products and are not investigated thoroughly by the FDA. Given that the most common outpatient laboratory abnormality is elevated liver transaminases, a s...

  12. Contemporary review of drug-induced pancreatitis: A different perspective

    Whitney; Y; Hung; Odaliz; Abreu; Lanfranco

    2014-01-01

    Although gallstone and alcohol use have been consid-ered the most common causes of acute pancreatitis, hundreds of frequently prescribed medications are as-sociated with this disease state. The true incidence is unknown since there are few population based studies available. The knowledge of drug induced acute pan-creatitis is limited by the availability and the quality of the evidence as the majority of data is extrapolated from case reports. Establishing a definitive causal rela-tionship between a drug and acute pancreatitis poses a challenge to clinicians. Several causative agent classifi-cation systems are often used to identify the suspected agents. They require regular updates since new drug induced acute pancreatitis cases are reported continu-ously. In addition, infrequently prescribed medications and herbal medications are often omitted. Furthermore, identification of drug induced acute pancreatitis with new medications often requires accumulation of post market case reports. The unrealistic expectation for a comprehensive list of medications and the multifacto-rial nature of acute pancreatitis call for a different ap-proach. In this article, we review the potential mecha-nisms of drug induced acute pancreatitis and providethe perspective of deductive reasoning in order to allow clinicians to identify potential drug induced acute pan-creatitis with limited data.

  13. Contemporary review of drug-induced pancreatitis: A different perspective.

    Hung, Whitney Y; Abreu Lanfranco, Odaliz

    2014-11-15

    Although gallstone and alcohol use have been considered the most common causes of acute pancreatitis, hundreds of frequently prescribed medications are associated with this disease state. The true incidence is unknown since there are few population based studies available. The knowledge of drug induced acute pancreatitis is limited by the availability and the quality of the evidence as the majority of data is extrapolated from case reports. Establishing a definitive causal relationship between a drug and acute pancreatitis poses a challenge to clinicians. Several causative agent classification systems are often used to identify the suspected agents. They require regular updates since new drug induced acute pancreatitis cases are reported continuously. In addition, infrequently prescribed medications and herbal medications are often omitted. Furthermore, identification of drug induced acute pancreatitis with new medications often requires accumulation of post market case reports. The unrealistic expectation for a comprehensive list of medications and the multifactorial nature of acute pancreatitis call for a different approach. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms of drug induced acute pancreatitis and provide the perspective of deductive reasoning in order to allow clinicians to identify potential drug induced acute pancreatitis with limited data. PMID:25400984

  14. Phenotype standardization for drug-induced kidney disease.

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick T; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur L; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug-induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug-induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular, and nephrolithiasis, along with the primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease, and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug-induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course, and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry, and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is the first step to recognizing drug-induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  15. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Amy Quynh Trang Pham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics.

  16. Drug-Induced Bullous Sweet Syndrome with Multiple Autoimmune Features

    Jared J. Lund

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet syndrome (SS (Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis has been reported in association with autoimmune phenomena including relapsing polychondritis, drug-induced lupus, and the development of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs. However, a combination of these autoimmune features has not been reported. Herein, we report a case of drug-induced bullous SS with ocular and mucosal involvement, glomerulonephritis, and multiple autoimmune features including clinical polychondritis with antitype II collagen antibodies, ANCAs, antinuclear (HEp-2, and antihistone antibodies in a patient on hydralazine and carbamazepine.

  17. Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Syndromes: Implications for Contemporary Practice.

    Caroff, Stanley N; Campbell, E Cabrina

    2016-09-01

    The development of drugs to treat psychosis is a fascinating nexus for understanding mechanisms underlying disorders of mind and movement. Although the risk of drug-induced extrapyramidal syndromes has been mitigated by the acceptance of less potent dopamine antagonists, expansive marketing and off-label use has increased the number of susceptible people who may be at risk for these neurologic effects. Clinicians need to be familiar with advances in diagnosis and management, which are reviewed herein. A better understanding of drug-induced effects on the motor circuit may improve patient safety, enhance antipsychotic effectiveness, and provide insights into mechanisms underlying antipsychotic activity in parallel brain circuits. PMID:27514296

  18. Anti-TNF-α and hydralazine drug-induced lupus*

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Bernardes Filho, Fred; de Oliveira, Fernanda Brandão; Pockstaller, Mercedes Prates; Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Azulay, David Rubem

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced lupus is a rare drug reaction featuring the same symptoms as idiopathic lupus erythematosus. Recently, with the introduction of new medicines in clinical practice, an increase in the number of illness-triggering implicated drugs has been reported, with special emphasis on anti-TNF-α drugs. In the up-to-date list, almost one hundred medications have been associated with the occurrence of drug-induced lupus. The authors present two case reports of the illness induced respectively by hydralazine and infliximab, addressing the clinical and laboratorial characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26312694

  19. Anti-TNF-α and hydralazine drug-induced lupus.

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Oliveira, Fernanda Brandão de; Pockstaller, Mercedes Prates; Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Azulay, David Rubem

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced lupus is a rare drug reaction featuring the same symptoms as idiopathic lupus erythematosus. Recently, with the introduction of new medicines in clinical practice, an increase in the number of illness-triggering implicated drugs has been reported, with special emphasis on anti-TNF-α drugs. In the up-to-date list, almost one hundred medications have been associated with the occurrence of drug-induced lupus. The authors present two case reports of the illness induced respectively by hydralazine and infliximab, addressing the clinical and laboratorial characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26312694

  20. Inferior phrenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating drug-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Salem, Jean F; Haydar, Ali; Hallal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Inferior phrenic artery (IPA) pseudoaneurysm is an extremely rare complication of chronic pancreatitis with only three cases reported in the literature so far. It is a serious condition that can be life-threatening if not diagnosed promptly. Recent advances in endovascular interventions made angiography with embolisation the modality of choice for diagnosis and treatment. We presented the first report of a case of ruptured IPA pseudoaneurysm complicating a drug-induced acute pancreatitis that was successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolisation. Despite its rarity, rupture of pseudoaneurysm due to drug-induced pancreatitis should be suspected and included in the differential diagnosis when associated with haemodynamic instability. PMID:24385392

  1. A rare cause of drug-induced hepatitis in an immunocompromised patient and the role of glutathione.

    Senadhi, Viplove; Arora, Deepika; Arora, Manish; Marsh, Franklin

    2012-08-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning on numerous herbal drugs, including many popular products at General Nutrition Centers (GNC), regarding unstudied hepatotoxicity. There have been recent reports of GNC products such as hydroxycut and herbalife, causing drug-induced hepatitis. Herbal medications are over-the-counter products and are not investigated thoroughly by the FDA. Given that the most common outpatient laboratory abnormality is elevated liver transaminases, a sign of hepatocellular toxicity; it is not surprising that some of these products end up causing hepatic dysfunction, especially when taken in large volume. There are numerous herbal supplements that are hepatotoxic, however, these medications have a much more significant effect in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients, which is secondary to depleted glutathione. We present a rare case of drug induced hepatitis secondary to herbal medications used to treat HIV and elucidate the role of glutathione depletion in immunocompromised patients. PMID:22993667

  2. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in drug-induced toxicity.

    Foufelle, Fabienne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Drug-induced toxicity is a key issue for public health because some side effects can be severe and life-threatening. These adverse effects can also be a major concern for the pharmaceutical companies since significant toxicity can lead to the interruption of clinical trials, or the withdrawal of the incriminated drugs from the market. Recent studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could be an important event involved in drug liability, in addition to other key mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Indeed, drug-induced ER stress could lead to several deleterious effects within cells and tissues including accumulation of lipids, cell death, cytolysis, and inflammation. After recalling important information regarding drug-induced adverse reactions and ER stress in diverse pathophysiological situations, this review summarizes the main data pertaining to drug-induced ER stress and its potential involvement in different adverse effects. Drugs presented in this review are for instance acetaminophen (APAP), arsenic trioxide and other anticancer drugs, diclofenac, and different antiretroviral compounds. We also included data on tunicamycin (an antibiotic not used in human medicine because of its toxicity) and thapsigargin (a toxic compound of the Mediterranean plant Thapsia garganica) since both molecules are commonly used as prototypical toxins to induce ER stress in cellular and animal models. PMID:26977301

  3. Prolonged drug-induced hypothermia in experimental stroke

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Reith, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    In experimental and human stroke, hypothermia is strongly related to a favorable outcome. Previous attempts to manipulate the core temperature in focal cerebral ischemia have been based on mechanical cooling. The purpose of the study is to establish a model for long-term drug-induced hypothermia in...

  4. Elevated thyroid stimulating hormone in a neonate: Drug induced or disease?

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyshormonogenesis is an uncommon cause of congenital hypothyroidism. The most common abnormality is absent or insufficient thyroid peroxidase enzyme. Maternal intake of antithyroid drug can also lead to elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH in a neonate, albeit the scenario is temporary. We report one such interesting case where a clinically euthyroid neonate borne to a mother on antithyroid drug presents on 12 th day of life with reports of elevated TSH and increased tracer uptake in 99mTc thyroid scan. Disproportionately high TSH in comparison to low maternal antithyroid drug dosage and further elevation of TSH after stopping mother′s antithyroid drugs ruled out maternal antithyroid drug-induced congenital hypothyroidism in the baby. Early institution of therapy in these patients can prevent mental retardation and other features of hypothyroidism.

  5. Quantitative analysis of T-wave morphology increases confidence in drug-induced cardiac repolarization abnormalities

    Graff, Claus; Matz, Jørgen; Christensen, Ellen B.;

    2009-01-01

    determine a combined measure of repolarization morphology (morphology combination score [MCS]), based on asymmetry, flatness, and notching. Replicate measurements were used to determine reliable change and study power for both measures. Lu 35-138 increased the QTc interval with corresponding changes in T...... 93%. As a covariate to the assessment of QT interval liability, MCS offered important additive information to the effect of Lu 35-138 on cardiac repolarization....

  6. Imaging of Drug-induced Complications in the Gastrointestinal System.

    McGettigan, Melissa J; Menias, Christine O; Gao, Zhenqiang J; Mellnick, Vincent M; Hara, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced injury commonly affects the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary systems because of the mechanisms of absorption and metabolism. In pill esophagitis, injury is frequently related to direct contact with the esophageal mucosa, resulting in small superficial ulcers in the mid esophagus. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can lead to gastrointestinal tract ulcers and small bowel mucosal diaphragms (thin weblike strictures). Injury to the pancreatic and hepatobiliary systems can manifest as pancreatitis, acute or chronic hepatitis, cholestasis, or steatosis and steatohepatitis (which may progress to cirrhosis). Various drugs may also insult the hepatic vasculature, resulting in Budd-Chiari and sinusoidal obstructive syndromes. Focal lesions such as hepatic adenomas may develop after use of oral contraceptives or anabolic steroids. Ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can aid in diagnosis of drug-induced injuries and often are necessary to exclude other causes. PMID:26761532

  7. Troponin leak associated with drug-induced methemoglobinemia.

    Cannon, Robert D; Wagner, Michael; Jacoby, Jeanne L

    2014-10-01

    Drug-induced methemoglobinemia is a well-described entity but has not been previously associated with elevated troponins in the absence of cardiac symptoms. We report a case of a patient presenting to the emergency department (ED) with complaints related to an exacerbation of her long-standing cystitis. A low pulse oximetry reading prompted an evaluation, revealing a troponin leak, which peaked at 10 hours. Her methemoglobin level was found to be elevated at 11.4%, but a preexisting anemia apparently prevented the clinical recognition of cyanosis. The methemoglobinemia was determined to be secondary to her ingestion of phenazopyridine and trimethoprim-sulfa methoxizole. Although phenazopyridine and sulfa agents have long been known to cause methemoglobinemia, our patient exhibited an asymptomatic troponin leak that has not been previously reported as a complication of drug-induced methemoglobinemia. Clinicians should be aware of this potential association. PMID:24686024

  8. Student Preferences Regarding Teaching Methods in a Drug-Induced Diseases and Clinical Toxicology Course

    Rivkin, Anastasia; Gim, Suzanna

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To determine which teaching method in a drug-induced diseases and clinical toxicology course was preferred by students and whether their preference correlated with their learning of drug-induced diseases.

  9. An Update on Drug-induced Liver Injury

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2012-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following drugs taken in therapeutic doses. Hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition in drug development, or withdrawal or restricted use after marketing. No age is exempt although adults and the elderly are at increased risk. DILI spans the entire spectrum ranging from asymptomatic elevation in transaminases to severe disease such as acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure. The liver ...

  10. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in drug-induced toxicity

    Foufelle, Fabienne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    International audience Drug-induced toxicity is a key issue for public health because some side effects can be severe and life-threatening. These adverse effects can also be a major concern for the pharmaceutical companies since significant toxicity can lead to the interruption of clinical trials, or the withdrawal of the incriminated drugs from the market. Recent studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could be an important event involved in drug liability, in addition to...

  11. Drug-induced valvular heart disease: an update.

    Andrejak, Michel; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Numerous reports have shown an unquestionable association between fibrotic valve disease and the following drugs: ergot alkaloids (such as methysergide and ergotamine), ergot-derived dopaminergic agonists (such as pergolide and cabergoline) and drugs metabolized into norfenfluramine (such as fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine and benfluorex). This review focuses on different aspects of drug-induced valvular heart disease: historical background; echocardiographic features; different drugs recognized as being responsible for valvular heart disease; and pathophysiology. PMID:23769407

  12. A diagnostic dilemma: drug-induced aseptic meningitis in a 45-year-old HIV-positive man.

    Rowley, D

    2014-03-01

    We describe a case of aseptic meningitis following the administration of moxifloxacin in a 45-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). At presentation he was receiving tuberculosis treatment on a modified regimen following severe hepatotoxicity; this included moxifloxacin, started 8 days previously. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was grossly abnormal. Anti-viral and -bacterial treatments were started. All microbiological tests proved negative and his moxifloxacin was withheld resulting in a complete normalisation of CSF. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a diagnosis of exclusion and presents a serious diagnostic dilemma. The decision to withhold medication cannot be taken lightly.

  13. Antituberculous drug-induced liver injury: current perspective.

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a minor but significant cause of liver injury across all regions. Antituberculosis drug-induced liver injury (TB DILI) is a leading cause of DILI and drug-induced acute liver failure (DIALF) in India and much of the developing world. Single center registries of DILI continue to highlight the high incidence of DILI and DIALF, much of it due to diagnostic errors and inappropriate prescriptions. The clinical spectrum includes asymptomatic elevation in liver tests to acute hepatitis and acute liver failure. TB DILI can occur across all age groups including children with significant morbidity and mortality. Although TB DILI develops more commonly in males, ALF is noted to be commoner in females with a worse prognosis. Contrasting reports on the role of genetic and environmental factors continue to be published. Since DILI is a diagnosis of exclusion, acute viral hepatitis particularly hepatitis E needs to be excluded in such cases. The presence of jaundice, hypoalbuminemia, ascites, encephalopathy and high prothrombin time are poor prognostic markers. Recent reports of the beneficial role of N-acetylcysteine in DIALF and in preventing TB DILI in elderly individuals needs further investigation. Reintroduction of antitubercular therapy must be balanced with the knowledge of adaptation a common occurrence with antituberculosis drugs. Although monitoring and rechallenge practices vary greatly, the importance of early clinical symptoms cannot be underestimated. Simultaneous rechallenge with combination drugs or sequential treatment have similar incidence of DILI, although increasing reports about the role of pyrazinamide in DILI and on rechallenge warrants its careful use. The combined affliction of HIV or chronic hepatitis B or C and tuberculosis poses multiple challenges including the greatly increased risks of DILI. PMID:22332331

  14. In silico modeling to predict drug-induced phospholipidosis

    Choi, Sydney S.; Kim, Jae S.; Valerio, Luis G., E-mail: luis.valerio@fda.hhs.gov; Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2013-06-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the construction and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80–81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ≥ 80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL. - Highlights: • New in silico models for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) are described. • The training set data in the models is derived from the FDA's phospholipidosis database. • We find excellent predictivity values of the models based on external validation. • The models can support drug screening and regulatory decision-making on DIPL.

  15. Role of mitochondria in drug-induced cholestatic injury.

    Kass, George E N; Price, Shirley C

    2008-02-01

    Mitochondria have multiple functions in eukaryotic cells and are organized into dynamic tubular networks that continuously undergo changes through coordinated fusion and fission and migration through the cytosol. Mitochondria integrate cell-signaling networks, especially those involving the intracellular messenger Ca(2+), into the regulation of metabolic pathways. Recently, it has become clear that mitochondria are central to the three main cell death pathways, namely necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death. This article discusses the role of mitochondria in drug-induced cholestatic injury to the liver. The role of mitochondria in the cellular adaptation against the toxic effects of bile acids is discussed also. PMID:18242496

  16. Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia due to moxifloxacin

    Coker, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman with 1 day of oral petechiae, leg ecchymoses and epistaxis was found to have isolated thrombocytopenia. She had recently completed a 10-day course of moxifloxacin for an upper respiratory infection. On further questioning, she had developed thrombocytopenia 2 years earlier after a treatment course with moxifloxacin. After ruling out other causes, drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia due to moxifloxacin was diagnosed. Her platelets returned to normal range 15 days after fin...

  17. Serious drug-induced liver disease secondary to ezetimibe

    Castellote, José; Ariza, Javier; Rota, Rosa; Girbau, Anna; Xiol, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    Ezetimibe is the first member of a new family of lipid-lowering drugs that inhibits uptake of dietary and biliary cholesterol. It was approved by the FDA in 2002 for hypercholesterolemia alone or in combination with statins. Its use has been spreading over the last years. Ezetimibe was considered a safe drug. We report a case of a woman who developed a serious hepatocellular drug-induced liver disease after 4 mo therapy with 10 mg daily of ezetimibe. After withdrawal of the drug, the patient ...

  18. Clinical features, pathogenesis and management of drug-induced seizures.

    Zaccara, G; Muscas, G C; Messori, A

    1990-01-01

    Many classes of pharmacological agents have been implicated in cases of drug-induced seizures. The list includes antidepressant drugs, lithium salts, neuroleptics, antihistamines (H1-receptor antagonists), anticonvulsants, central nervous system stimulants, general and local anaesthetics, antiarrhythmic drugs, narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antimicrobial agents, antifungal agents, antimalarial drugs, antineoplastic drugs, immunosuppressive drugs, radiological contrast agents and vaccines. For each of these classes of drugs, this article offers a revision of the literature and emphasises in particular the frequency of the adverse reaction, its clinical presentation, its presumed epileptogenic mechanism and the therapeutic strategy for the management of drug-induced seizures. An attempt is also made to distinguish seizures induced by standard dosages from those provoked by accidental or self-induced intoxication. For some classes of drugs such as antidepressants, neuroleptics, central nervous system stimulants (e.g. theophylline, cocaine, amphetamines) and beta-lactam antibiotics, seizures are a well recognised adverse reaction, and a large body of literature has been published discussing exhaustively the major aspects of the issue; sufficient data are available also for the other classes of pharmacological agents mentioned above. In contrast, several other drugs [e.g. allopurinol, digoxin, cimetidine, protirelin (thyrotrophin releasing hormone), bromocriptine, domperidone, insulin, fenformin, penicillamine, probenecid, verapamil, methyldopa] have not been studied thoroughly under this aspect, and the only source of information is the occasional case report. This review does not address the issue of seizures induced by drug withdrawal. PMID:2182049

  19. Mitochondrial involvement in drug-induced liver injury.

    Pessayre, Dominique; Mansouri, Abdellah; Berson, Alain; Fromenty, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major mechanism of liver injury. A parent drug or its reactive metabolite can trigger outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization or rupture due to mitochondrial permeability transition. The latter can severely deplete ATP and cause liver cell necrosis, or it can instead lead to apoptosis by releasing cytochrome c, which activates caspases in the cytosol. Necrosis and apoptosis can trigger cytolytic hepatitis resulting in lethal fulminant hepatitis in some patients. Other drugs severely inhibit mitochondrial function and trigger extensive microvesicular steatosis, hypoglycaemia, coma, and death. Milder and more prolonged forms of drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can also cause macrovacuolar steatosis. Although this is a benign liver lesion in the short-term, it can progress to steatohepatitis and then to cirrhosis. Patient susceptibility to drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and liver injury can sometimes be explained by genetic or acquired variations in drug metabolism and/or elimination that increase the concentration of the toxic species (parent drug or metabolite). Susceptibility may also be increased by the presence of another condition, which also impairs mitochondrial function, such as an inborn mitochondrial cytopathy, beta-oxidation defect, certain viral infections, pregnancy, or the obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. Liver injury due to mitochondrial dysfunction can have important consequences for pharmaceutical companies. It has led to the interruption of clinical trials, the recall of several drugs after marketing, or the introduction of severe black box warnings by drug agencies. Pharmaceutical companies should systematically investigate mitochondrial effects during lead selection or preclinical safety studies. PMID:20020267

  20. [Imaging features of drug-induced lung diseases].

    Mellot, F; Scherrer, A

    2005-05-01

    Drug-induced lung diseases are an increasingly frequent cause of morbidity. Over 350 drugs are now recognized as being implicated in drug-induced lung diseases. Early diagnosis is critical. Discontinuing the drug may result in regression of the adverse effect. Diagnosis is based on a history of drug exposure with a temporal relationship between the introduction of the drug and the onset of symptoms, histologic evidence of lung damage and exclusion of other causes of lung injury. Unfortunately there is no specific test available. Histologic and radiologic findings are often non specific and diagnosis can be difficult. Drugs can cause a constellation of distinct patterns of respiratory involvement and all anatomic compartments of the lungs may be involved. The most common patterns are: non specific interstitial pneumonia and fibrosis, pulmonary eosinophilia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, pulmonary edema with or without diffuse alveolar damage, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, pulmonary hemorrhage and vasculitis. It is important to be familiar with their common radiologic appearances. PMID:16106793

  1. Recovering drug-induced apoptosis subnetwork from Connectivity Map data.

    Yu, Jiyang; Putcha, Preeti; Silva, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    The Connectivity Map (CMAP) project profiled human cancer cell lines exposed to a library of anticancer compounds with the goal of connecting cancer with underlying genes and potential treatments. Since the therapeutic goal of most anticancer drugs is to induce tumor-selective apoptosis, it is critical to understand the specific cell death pathways triggered by drugs. This can help to better understand the mechanism of how cancer cells respond to chemical stimulations and improve the treatment of human tumors. In this study, using CMAP microarray data from breast cancer cell line MCF7, we applied a Gaussian Bayesian network modeling approach and identified apoptosis as a major drug-induced cellular-pathway. We then focused on 13 apoptotic genes that showed significant differential expression across all drug-perturbed samples to reconstruct the apoptosis network. In our predicted subnetwork, 9 out of 15 high-confidence interactions were validated in the literature, and our inferred network captured two major cell death pathways by identifying BCL2L11 and PMAIP1 as key interacting players for the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and TAXBP1 and TNFAIP3 for the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. Our inferred apoptosis network also suggested the role of BCL2L11 and TNFAIP3 as "gateway" genes in the drug-induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways. PMID:25883971

  2. Normal lipase drug-induced pancreatitis: a novel finding.

    Shafqet, Muhammad A; Brown, Teresa V; Sharma, Ranita

    2015-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) in the setting of a normal serum amylase has been previously reported in the literature. Serum lipase on the other hand has a negative predictive value approaching 100% and therefore is an excellent test to rule out AP in the emergency department. The occurrence of AP with a normal lipase is extremely rare and has never been reported in the setting of drug-induced pancreatitis. Thiazide diuretics have been implicated as a cause of pancreatic injury via a number of proposed mechanisms. However, all such cases have been in the setting of elevated serum amylase or lipase. We report the first case of radiographically proven hydrochlorothiazide-induced pancreatitis with a normal lipase. PMID:25227976

  3. PTTG1 attenuates drug-induced cellular senescence.

    Yunguang Tong

    Full Text Available As PTTG1 (pituitary tumor transforming gene abundance correlates with adverse outcomes in cancer treatment, we determined mechanisms underlying this observation by assessing the role of PTTG1 in regulating cell response to anti-neoplastic drugs. HCT116 cells devoid of PTTG1 (PTTG1(-/- exhibited enhanced drug sensitivity as assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation in vitro. Apoptosis, mitosis catastrophe or DNA damage were not detected, but features of senescence were observed using low doses of doxorubicin and TSA. The number of drug-induced PTTG1(-/- senescent cells increased ∼4 fold as compared to WT PTTG1-replete cells (p<0.001. p21, an important regulator of cell senescence, was induced ∼3 fold in HCT116 PTTG1(-/- cells upon doxorubicin or Trichostatin A treatment. Binding of Sp1, p53 and p300 to the p21 promoter was enhanced in PTTG1(-/- cells after treatment, suggesting transcriptional regulation of p21. p21 knock down abrogated the observed senescent effects of these drugs, indicating that PTTG1 likely suppresses p21 to regulate drug-induced senescence. PTTG1 also regulated SW620 colon cancer cells response to doxorubicin and TSA mediated by p21. Subcutaneously xenografted PTTG1(-/- HCT116 cells developed smaller tumors and exhibited enhanced responses to doxorubicin. PTTG1(-/- tumor tissue derived from excised tumors exhibited increased doxorubicin-induced senescence. As senescence is a determinant of cell responses to anti-neoplastic treatments, these findings suggest PTTG1 as a tumor cell marker to predict anti-neoplastic treatment outcomes.

  4. An Update on Drug-induced Liver Injury.

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2012-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following drugs taken in therapeutic doses. Hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition in drug development, or withdrawal or restricted use after marketing. No age is exempt although adults and the elderly are at increased risk. DILI spans the entire spectrum ranging from asymptomatic elevation in transaminases to severe disease such as acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure. The liver specific Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method is the most validated and extensively used for determining the likelihood that an implicated drug caused DILI. Asymptomatic elevation in liver tests must be differentiated from adaptation. Drugs producing DILI have a signature pattern although no single pattern is characteristic. Antimicrobial and central nervous system agents including antiepileptic drugs are the leading causes of DILI worldwide. In the absence of a diagnostic test or a biomarker, the diagnosis rests on the evidence of absence of competing causes such as acute viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis and others. Recent studies show that antituberculosis drugs given for active or latent disease are still a major cause of drug-induced liver injury in India and the West respectively. Presence of jaundice signifies a severe disease and entails a worse outcome. The pathogenesis is unclear and is due to a mix of host, drug metabolite and environmental factors. Research has evolved from incriminating candidate genes to genome wide analysis studies. Immediate cessation of the drug is key to prevent or minimize progressive damage. Treatment is largely supportive. N-acetylcysteine is the antidote for paracetamol toxicity. Carnitine has been tried in valproate injury whereas steroids and ursodeoxycholic acid may be used in DILI associated with hypersensitivity or cholestatic features respectively. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, the patterns of

  5. Case Characterization, Clinical Features and Risk Factors in Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    Aida Ortega-Alonso

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI caused by xenobiotics (drugs, herbals and dietary supplements presents with a range of both phenotypes and severity, from acute hepatitis indistinguishable of viral hepatitis to autoimmune syndromes, steatosis or rare chronic vascular syndromes, and from asymptomatic liver test abnormalities to acute liver failure. DILI pathogenesis is complex, depending on the interaction of drug physicochemical properties and host factors. The awareness of risk factors for DILI is arising from the analysis of large databases of DILI cases included in Registries and Consortia networks around the world. These networks are also enabling in-depth phenotyping with the identification of predictors for severe outcome, including acute liver failure and mortality/liver transplantation. Genome wide association studies taking advantage of these large cohorts have identified several alleles from the major histocompatibility complex system indicating a fundamental role of the adaptive immune system in DILI pathogenesis. Correct case definition and characterization is crucial for appropriate phenotyping, which in turn will strengthen sample collection for genotypic and future biomarkers studies.

  6. Drug-induced hepatitis superimposed on the presence of anti-SLA antibody: a case report

    Etxagibel Aitziber

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autoimmune hepatitis is a necroinflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of circulating antibodies, hypergammaglobulinemia, and response to immunosuppression. It has the histological features of chronic hepatitis. The onset is usually insidious, but in some patients the presentation may be acute and occasionally severe. Certain drugs can induce chronic hepatitis mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Different autoantibodies have been associated with this process but they are not detectable after drug withdrawal and clinical resolution. Case presentation We describe a case of drug-induced acute hepatitis associated with antinuclear, antisoluble liver-pancreas and anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies in a 66-year-old woman. Abnormal clinical and biochemical parameters resolved after drug withdrawal, but six months later anti-soluble liver-pancreas antibodies remained positive and liver biopsy showed chronic hepatitis and septal fibrosis. Furthermore, our patient has a HLA genotype associated with autoimmune hepatitis. Conclusion Patient follow-up will disclose whether our patient suffers from an autoimmune disease and if the presence of anti-soluble liver antigens could precede the development of an autoimmune hepatitis, as the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies can precede primary biliary cirrhosis.

  7. 13.5.Toxic and drug-induced liver disease

    1992-01-01

    920133 Measurement of human plasma abnormal prothrombin by biotin-avidin (BA)ELISA in the diagnosis of hepatocellularcarcinoma.HU Dachun (胡大春),et al.DeptChem,Basic Med Sci,Shanhai Med Univ,200032.Chin J Cancer 1991; 10 (4): 283-285.After the removal of fibrinogen and prothrom-bin by bentoite and barium citrate,the abnormal

  8. Congenital Abnormalities

    ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase the risk that a baby will be born with abnormalities (e.g. fetal alcohol spectrum disorders ). Eating raw or uncooked foods during pregnancy can also be dangerous to health of the ...

  9. Drug-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension: a recent outbreak.

    Montani, David; Seferian, Andrei; Savale, Laurent; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterised by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly to appetite suppressant intake drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used, but are considered possible risk factors, for PAH. Dasatinib, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, potentially in part reversible after dasatinib withdrawal. Recently, several studies have raised the issue of potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and a few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility, and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drug-induced PAH. PMID:23997051

  10. Drug-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension: a recent outbreak

    Gérald Simonneau

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a rare disorder characterised by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly to appetite suppressant intake drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used, but are considered possible risk factors, for PAH. Dasatinib, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, potentially in part reversible after dasatinib withdrawal. Recently, several studies have raised the issue of potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and a few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility, and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drug-induced PAH.

  11. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases. Often forgotten

    Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases (DILD) are probably more common than diagnosed. Due to their potential reversibility, increased vigilance towards DILD is appropriate also from the radiologist's point of view, particularly as these diseases regularly exhibit radiological correlates in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lungs. Based on personal experience typical relatively common manifestations of DILD are diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), eosinophilic pneumonia (EP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), organizing pneumonia (OP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). These patterns are presented based on case studies, whereby emphasis is placed on the clinical context. This is to highlight the relevance of interdisciplinary communication and discussion in the diagnostic field of DILD as it is a diagnosis of exclusion or of probability in most cases. Helpful differential diagnostic indications for the presence of DILD, such as an accompanying eosinophilia or increased attenuation of pulmonary consolidations in amiodarone-induced pneumopathy are mentioned and the freely available online database http://www.pneumotox.com is presented. (orig.)

  12. Multiple Targets for Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    Wallace, Kendall B

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is rapidly gaining the interest of researchers and practitioners as a prominent liability in drug discovery and development, accounting for a growing proportion of preclinical drug attrition and post-market withdrawals or black box warnings by the U.S. FDA. To date, the focus of registries of drugs that elicit mitochondrial toxicity has been largely restricted to those that either inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) or uncouple mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less appreciated are the toxicities that are secondary to the drug affecting either the molecular regulation, assembly or incorporation of the ETC into the inner mitochondrial membrane or those that limit substrate availability. The current article describes the complexities of molecular events and biochemical pathways required to sustain mitochondrial fidelity and substrate homeostasis with examples of drugs that interfere which the various pathways. The principal objective of this review is to shed light on the broader scope of drug-induced mitochondrial toxicities and how these secondary targets may account for a large portion of drug failures. PMID:25973981

  13. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome with human herpesvirus-6 reactivation

    Najeeba Riyaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old man, on carbamazepine for the past 3 months, was referred as a case of atypical measles. On examination, he had high-grade fever, generalized itchy rash, cough, vomiting and jaundice. A provisional diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity syndrome to carbamazepine was made with a differential diagnosis of viral exanthema with systemic complications. Laboratory investigations revealed leukocytosis with eosnophilia and elevated liver enzymes. Real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR on throat swab and blood was suggestive of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6. Measles was ruled out by PCR and serology. The diagnosis of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS was confirmed, which could explain all the features manifested by the patient. HHV-6 infects almost all humans by age 2 years. It infects and replicates in CD4 T lymphocytes and establishes latency in human peripheral blood monocytes or macrophages and early bone marrow progenitors. In DIHS, allergic reaction to the causative drug stimulates T cells, which leads to reactivation of the herpesvirus genome. DIHS is treated by withdrawal of the culprit drug and administration of systemic steroids. Our patient responded well to steroids and HHV-6 was negative on repeat real-time multiplex PCR at the end of treatment.

  14. Drug-induced pancreatitis: A rare manifestation of doxycycline administration

    Faisal Inayat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP is rare, but as there are no systematic data on it, the true incidence is not known. Although numerous and varied drugs have been associated with DIP, the clinical evidence on doxycycline-induced pancreatitis is sparse. Case Report: We present the case of a 58-year-old female who presented with complaints of nausea and severe epigastric pain. Her medications included doxycycline which she had been on for only 2 days. Computed tomography of her abdomen showed mild enlargement of body of the pancreas with peripancreatic fatty infiltration, along with lipase level suggestive of acute pancreatitis. In the absence of classical risk factors for acute pancreatitis, a diagnosis of DIP secondary to doxycycline therapy was made. Immediate withdrawal of the drug was accompanied by relief of symptoms and resolution of pancreatitis. Conclusion: This report implicates doxycycline as an etiological factor for acute pancreatitis. Knowledge regarding doxycycline related pancreatitis is of paramount importance in order to diagnose cases early and institute effective treatment in patients who are undergoing therapy with this drug.

  15. Clinical features and 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in drug-induced parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease

    To determine clinical predictors and accuracy of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in the differentiation of drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Several clinical features and 123I-FP-CIT SPECT images in 32 patients with DIP, 25 patients with PD unmasked by antidopaminergic drugs (PDu) and 22 patients with PD without a previous history of antidopaminergic treatment (PDc) were retrospectively evaluated. DIP and PD shared all clinical features except symmetry of parkinsonian signs which was more frequently observed in patients with DIP (46.9%) than in patients with PDu (16.0%, p123I-FP-CIT SPECT images were normal in 29 patients with DIP (90.6%) and abnormal in all patients with PD, and this imaging technique showed high levels of accuracy. DIP and PD are difficult to differentiate based on clinical signs. The precision of clinical diagnosis could be reliably enhanced by 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging. (orig.)

  16. Drug-Induced gingival overgrowth: The genetic dimension

    Noronha Shyam Curtis Charles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, the etiology of drug-induced gingival overgrowth is not entirely understood but is clearly multifactorial. Phenytoin, one of the common drugs implicated in gingival enlargement, is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP2C9 and partly by CYP2C19. The CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes are polymorphically expressed and most of the variants result in decreased metabolism of the respective substrates. Aims: The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of the CYP2C9FNx012 and FNx013 variant genotypes on phenytoin hydroxylation in subjects diagnosed with epilepsy from South India, thus establishing the genetic polymorphisms leading to its defective hydroxylation process. Materials and Methods: Fifteen epileptic subjects, age 9 to 60 years were included in the study. Among the study subjects, 8 were males and 7 were females. Genomic DNA was extracted from patients′ blood using Phenol-chloroform method and genotyping was done for CYP2C9 using customized TaqMan genotyping assays on a real time thermocycler, by allelic discrimination method. The genetic polymorphisms FNx011, FNx012 and FNx013 on CYP2C9 were selected based on their function and respective allele frequencies in Asian subcontinent among the Asian populations. Results: CYP2C9FNx011FNx012 and CYP2C9FNx013/FNx013 were identified with equal frequency in the study population. There were seven subjects with CYP2C9FNx011/FNx012 genotype (heterozygous mutant, one subject with CYP2C9FNx011/FNx011 (wild type and seven study subjects with CYP2C9FNx013/FNx013 (homozygous mutant. Conclusion: The results obtained in the present study will be helpful in the medical prescription purposes of phenytoin, and a more personalized patient approach with its administration can be advocated.

  17. Unusual case of drug-induced cholestasis due to glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate

    Stephen; Ip; Rachel; Jeong; David; F; Schaeffer; Eric; M; Yoshida

    2015-01-01

    Glucosamine(GS) and chondroitin sulfate(CS) are common over-the-counter(OTC) supplements used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. These medications are seemingly safe, but there are increasing reports of hepatotoxicity with these supplements. We reported a unique case of drug-induced cholestasis caused by GS and CS in a combination tablet. The etiology of the jaundice was overlooked despite extensive investigations over a three-month period. Unlike drug-induced hepatocellular injury, drug-induced cholestatic jaundice with GS and CS has only been reported twice before. This case emphasizes the importance of a complete medication history, especially OTC supplements, in the assessment of cholestasis.

  18. ECG-Based Measurements of Drug-induced Repolarization Changes

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer Ahmed

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the abnormal repolarization both in the cellular and the surface ECG along with their relationship. It has been identified that the certain morphological changes of the monophasic action potential are predictor of TdP arrhythmia. Therefore the proporti......The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the abnormal repolarization both in the cellular and the surface ECG along with their relationship. It has been identified that the certain morphological changes of the monophasic action potential are predictor of TdP arrhythmia. Therefore the...... proportional changes of the surface ECG which corresponds to the arrhythmia-triggering MAP morphology is warranted to increase the confidence of determining cardiotoxicity of drugs....

  19. Drug-induced lupus: simvastatin or amiodarone? A case report in elderly

    Mauro Turrin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Reports of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE seen during treatment with amiodarone are rare in the literature. SLE or immunological abnormalities induced by treatment with statins are more frequent. In this issue we report a case of a 81-year-old male who, after a 2-year therapy with amiodarone, developed a clinical and serologic picture of drug-induced SLE (DILE. He was admitted for congestive heart failure in mechanical aortic valve prosthesis, permanent atrial fibrillation (anticoagulation with warfarin, hypercholesterolaemia, and hypothyroidism. Amiodarone was started two years earlier for polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, statin and L-thyroxine the following year. At admission he presented pleuro-pericardical effusion detected by CT-scan (also indicative of interstitial lung involvement and echocardiography. Serological main indicative findings were: elevation of inflammatory markers, ANA (Anti-Nuclear Antibodies titers = 1:320 (indirect immune-fluorescence – IIF – assay on HEp-2, homogeneous/fine speckled pattern, anti-dsDNA titers = 1:80 (IIF on Crithidia luciliae, negative ENA (Extractable Nuclear Antigens and antibodies anti-citrulline, rheumatoid factor = 253 KU/l, normal C3-C4, negative HbsAg and anti-HCV, negative anticardiolipin antibodies IgG and IgM, negative anti-beta2GPI IgG and IgM. Amiodarone was discontinued and methylprednisolone was started, since the patient was severely ill. At discharge, after a month, the patient was better and pleuro-pericardical effusion was reduced. Readmitted few weeks later for bradyarithmia and worsening of dyspnoea, pericardial effusion was further reduced but he died for refractory congestive heart failure and pneumonia. Clinical picture (sierositis, neither skin nor kidney involvement, other typical side effects of amiodarone (hypothyroidism and lung interstitial pathology and serological findings are suggestive of amiodarone-induced SLE.

  20. Involvement of FKHR-Dependent TRADD Expression in Chemotherapeutic Drug-Induced Apoptosis

    Rokudai, Susumu; Fujita, Naoya; Kitahara, Osamu; NAKAMURA, Yusuke; Tsuruo, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs exhibit their cytotoxic effect by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells. Because the serine/threonine kinase Akt is involved in apoptosis suppression, we investigated the relationship between Akt activity and drug sensitivity. We discovered that certain chemotherapeutic drugs induced apoptosis with caspase activation only when Akt was inactivated after drug treatment, while inactivation of Akt was not observed when tumor cells showed resistance to the drug-induced caspase a...

  1. Drug-Induced Liver Toxicity and Prevention by Herbal Antioxidants: An Overview

    Singh, Divya; Cho, William C.; Upadhyay, Ghanshyam

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the center for drug and xenobiotic metabolism, which is influenced most with medication/xenobiotic-mediated toxic activity. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is common and its actual frequency is hard to determine due to underreporting, difficulties in detection or diagnosis, and incomplete observation of exposure. The death rate is high, up to about 10% for drug-induced liver damage. Endorsed medications represented >50% of instances of intense liver failure in a study from the Acute ...

  2. Acute Hepatocellular Drug-Induced Liver Injury From Bupropion and Doxycycline

    Derek M Tang; Koh, Christopher; Twaddell, William S.; von Rosenvinge, Erik C; Han, Hyosun

    2015-01-01

    The management and diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is often challenging, particularly when patients are taking multiple medications. We present a 29-year-old African American man who presented with jaundice and malaise after starting bupropion and doxycycline 2 weeks prior. He was found to have acute hepatocellular drug-induced liver injury with autoimmune features, and made a complete recovery with prednisone. Although bupropion and doxycycline are both known to cause liver tox...

  3. Abnormal chest shadow on CT in immunosuppressed patients

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Nakamura, Hiroshi (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-12-01

    An abnormal chest shadow was observed on CT scans in 25 cases of 23 immunosuppressed patients. Pulmonary disease was pathologically confirmed to be pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PC pneumonia) in four patients, cytomegalovirus pneumonia (CMV pneumonia) in one, bacterial pneumonia in seven, fungal infection in three, miliary tuberculosis in one, leukemic infiltration in two, lymphangitis carcinomatosa in three, drug-induced pneumonitis in three, and ARDS in one. In almost all patients, especially those with infectious diseases such as PC pneumonia, CMV pneumonia, and bacterial pneumonia, the abnormal shadow was wide and visible in the bilateral lung fields. We presumed that such findings as lobular shadow, centrilobular shadow, and mosaic pattern reflected the extension of disease via the respiratory tract, and that those findings are typical of infectious diseases. Because such findings as abnormal linear shadow and swelling of a broncho-vascular bundle were very frequently recognized in patients with lymphangitis carcinomatosa and frequently recognized in those with drug-induced pneumonitis, these diseases may be distinguished from other diseases. An area of slightly increased density was frequently recognized in patients with PC pneumonia, bacterial pneumonia, and drug-induced pneumonitis. Such lesions were pathologically confirmed to be located in the interstitium and/or alveolus. CT was extremely useful in comprehending the character and extension of particular diseases among various diseases. As the number of patients studied was small, the utility of CT in immunosuppressed patients requires further investigation in a larger number of patients. (author).

  4. Drug-induced QT interval prolongation and torsades de pointes: Role of the pharmacist in risk assessment, prevention and management.

    Tisdale, James E

    2016-05-01

    Torsades de pointes (TdP) is a life-threatening arrhythmia associated with prolongation of the corrected QT (QTc) interval on the electrocardiogram. More than 100 drugs available in Canada, including widely used antibiotics, antidepressants, cardiovascular drugs and many others, may cause QTc interval prolongation and TdP. Risk factors for TdP include QTc interval >500 ms, increase in QTc interval ≥60 ms from the pretreatment value, advanced age, female sex, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, bradycardia, treatment with diuretics and elevated plasma concentrations of QTc interval-prolonging drugs due to drug interactions, inadequate dose adjustment of renally eliminated drugs in patients with kidney disease and rapid intravenous administration. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions associated with the highest risk of TdP include antifungal agents, macrolide antibiotics (except azithromycin) and drugs to treat human immunodeficiency virus interacting with amiodarone, disopyramide, dofetilide or pimozide. Other important pharmacokinetic interactions include antidepressants (bupropion, duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine) interacting with flecainide, quinidine or thioridazine. Pharmacists play an important role in minimizing the risk of drug-induced QTc interval prolongation and TdP through knowledge of drugs that are associated with a known or possible risk of TdP, individualized assessment of risk of drug-induced QTc interval prolongation, awareness of drug interactions most likely to result in TdP and attention to dose reduction of renally eliminated QTc interval-prolonging drugs in patients with kidney disease. Treatment of hemodynamically stable TdP consists of discontinuation of the offending drug(s), correction of electrolyte abnormalities and administration of intravenous magnesium sulfate 1 to 2 g. PMID:27212965

  5. Comparison of clinical features between primary and drug-induced sleep-related eating disorder

    Komada Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yoko Komada,1 Yoshikazu Takaesu,2 Kentaro Matsui,3 Masaki Nakamura,3 Shingo Nishida,3 Meri Kanno,3,† Akira Usui,3 Yuichi Inoue1,3 1Department of Somnology, 2Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, 3Japan Somnology Center, Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Tokyo, Japan †Meri Kanno passed away on March 1, 2016 Purpose: The aim of this study was to ascertain the clinical characteristics of drug-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients with primary SRED (without any comorbid sleep disorders and who were not taking any possible causative medications, and ten patients with drug-induced SRED (occurrence of SRED episodes after starting nightly medication of sedative drugs, which completely resolved after dose reduction or discontinuation of the sedatives. Results: All patients with drug-induced SRED took multiple types of sedatives, such as benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine receptor agonists. Clinical features of drug-induced SRED compared with primary SRED were as follows: higher mean age of onset (40 years old in drug-induced SRED vs 26 years old in primary SRED, significantly higher rate of patients who had total amnesia during most of their SRED episodes (75.0% vs 31.8%, significantly lower rate of comorbidity of night eating syndrome (0% vs 63.3%, and significantly lower rate of history of sleepwalking (10.0% vs 46.7%. Increased doses of benzodiazepine receptor agonists may be responsible for drug-induced SRED. Conclusion: The clinical features of drug-induced SRED were different from those of primary SRED, possibly reflecting differences in the underlying mechanisms between these two categories of SREDs. Keywords: nocturnal eating syndrome, night eating, eating disorder, hypnotics, amnesia, sleepwalking, benzodiazepine

  6. Drug-induced lesions of the oesophageal mucosa.

    2015-09-01

    Lesions of the oesophageal mucosa are observed in various situations: most often with gastrooesophageal reflux disease, but also with infections, cancer, contact with a toxic substance, etc. When they are symptomatic, these lesions provoke burning sensations, dysphagia, regurgitation and sometimes dorsal pain. The changes to the oesophageal mucosa may take various forms: inflammation, erosion, ulceration or necrosis. Serious or even fatal complications can develop but are rare; they include oesophageal perforation, stricture and haemorrhage. Some oral drugs damage the oesophageal mucosa through direct contact. The symptoms often develop several hours after ingestion. The pain is of sudden onset. The resulting lesions are solitary or multiple ulcers that vary in depth and usually occur in the upper portion of the oesophagus. Various factors prolong contact between a drug and the oesophageal mucosa, in particular: swallowing the drug with insufficient liquid or just before lying down; capsule forms; and oesophageal abnormalities. The drugs most frequently implicated are tetracyclines, particularly doxycycline, bisphosphonates and various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Many drugs, used in various situations, provoke gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, sometimes causing mucosal lesions in the lower oesophagus: calcium-channel blockers, nitrates, exenatide and liraglutide, drugs with antimuscarinic effects, theophylline, etc. Some drugs affect all mucous membranes in the body, including the oesophageal mucosa, irrespective of their route of administration: cancer drugs, isotretinoin, and nicorandil. PMID:26417631

  7. Hepatocyte-based in vitro model for assessment of drug-induced cholestasis

    Chatterjee, Sagnik, E-mail: Sagnik.Chatterjee@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Richert, Lysiane, E-mail: l.richert@kaly-cell.com [KaLy-Cell, 20A rue du Général Leclerc, 67115 Plobsheim (France); Augustijns, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Augustijns@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Annaert, Pieter, E-mail: Pieter.Annaert@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of drug-induced cholestasis remains a challenge during drug development. We have developed and validated a biorelevant sandwich-cultured hepatocytes- (SCH) based model that can identify compounds causing cholestasis by altering bile acid disposition. Human and rat SCH were exposed (24–48 h) to known cholestatic and/or hepatotoxic compounds, in the presence or in the absence of a concentrated mixture of bile acids (BAs). Urea assay was used to assess (compromised) hepatocyte functionality at the end of the incubations. The cholestatic potential of the compounds was expressed by calculating a drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI), reflecting the relative residual urea formation by hepatocytes co-incubated with BAs and test compound as compared to hepatocytes treated with test compound alone. Compounds with clinical reports of cholestasis, including cyclosporin A, troglitazone, chlorpromazine, bosentan, ticlopidine, ritonavir, and midecamycin showed enhanced toxicity in the presence of BAs (DICI ≤ 0.8) for at least one of the tested concentrations. In contrast, the in vitro toxicity of compounds causing hepatotoxicity by other mechanisms (including diclofenac, valproic acid, amiodarone and acetaminophen), remained unchanged in the presence of BAs. A safety margin (SM) for drug-induced cholestasis was calculated as the ratio of lowest in vitro concentration for which was DICI ≤ 0.8, to the reported mean peak therapeutic plasma concentration. SM values obtained in human SCH correlated well with reported % incidence of clinical drug-induced cholestasis, while no correlation was observed in rat SCH. This in vitro model enables early identification of drug candidates causing cholestasis by disturbed BA handling. - Highlights: • Novel in vitro assay to detect drug-induced cholestasis • Rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) as in vitro models • Cholestatic compounds sensitize SCH to toxic effects of accumulating bile acids • Drug-induced

  8. Acute Hepatocellular Drug-Induced Liver Injury From Bupropion and Doxycycline.

    Tang, Derek M; Koh, Christopher; Twaddell, William S; von Rosenvinge, Erik C; Han, Hyosun

    2015-10-01

    The management and diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is often challenging, particularly when patients are taking multiple medications. We present a 29-year-old African American man who presented with jaundice and malaise after starting bupropion and doxycycline 2 weeks prior. He was found to have acute hepatocellular drug-induced liver injury with autoimmune features, and made a complete recovery with prednisone. Although bupropion and doxycycline are both known to cause liver toxicity, a closer inspection of the signature of liver injury and a review of prior related DILI cases assigns causality more to bupropion than doxycycline. PMID:26504884

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI) in Patients with Pre-Existing Liver Disease.

    Teschke, Rolf; Danan, Gaby

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between drugs and pre-existing liver disease is complex, particularly when increased liver tests (LTs) or new symptoms emerge in patients with pre-existing liver disease during drug therapy. This requires two strategies to assess whether these changes are due to drug-induced liver injury (DILI) as a new event or due to flares of the underlying liver disease. Lacking a valid diagnostic biomarker, DILI is a diagnosis of exclusion and requires causality assessment by RUCAM, the Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method, to establish an individual causality grading of the suspected drug(s). Flares of pre-existing liver disease can reliably be assessed in some hepatotropic virus infections by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and antibody titers at the beginning and in the clinical course to ascertain flares during the natural course of the disease. Unfortunately, flares cannot be verified in many other liver diseases such as alcoholic liver disease, since specific tests are unavailable. However, such a diagnostic approach using RUCAM applied to suspected DILI cases includes clinical and biological markers of pre-existing liver diseases and would determine whether drugs or underlying liver diseases caused the LT abnormalities or the new symptoms. More importantly, a clear diagnosis is essential to ensure effective disease management by drug cessation or specific treatment of the flare up due to the underlying disease. PMID:27091053

  10. Drug-Induced Hypothermia as Beneficial Treatment before and after Cerebral Ischemia

    Johansen, Flemming F; Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Bisgård, Anne Sofie; Bonfils, Peter Kramshøj; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Hypothermia is still unproven as beneficial treatment in human stroke, although in animal models, conditioning the brain with hypothermia has induced tolerance to insults. Here, we delineate the feasibility of drug-induced mild hypothermia in reducing ischemic brain damage when...

  11. Drug-induced liver toxicity and prevention by herbal antioxidants: an overview

    Divya eSingh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is the center for drug and xenobiotic metabolism, which is influenced most with medication/xenobiotic-mediated toxic activity. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is common and its actual frequency is hard to determine due to underreporting, difficulties in detection or diagnosis, and incomplete observation of exposure. The death rate is high, up to about 10% for medication instigated liver danger. Endorsed medications (counting acetaminophen represented >50% of instances of intense liver failure in a study from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group (ALFSG of the patients admitted in 17 US healing facilities. Albeit different studies are accessible uncovering the mechanistic aspects of medication prompted hepatotoxicity, we are in the dilemma about the virtual story. The expanding prevalence and effectiveness of Ayurveda and herbal products in the treatment of various disorders led the investigators to look into their potential in countering drug-induced liver toxicity. Several plant products have been reported to date to mitigate the drug-induced toxicity. The dietary nature and less side reactions of the herbs provide them an extra edge over other candidates of supplementary medication. In this paper, we have discussed on the mechanism involved in drug-induced liver toxicity and the potential of herbal antioxidants as supplementary medication.

  12. Genetic Determinants of Drug-induced Cholestasis and Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    C. Pauli-Magnus; P.J. Meier; B. Stieger

    2010-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and drug-induced cholestasis are two clinically important forms of acquired cholestatic liver disease. The understanding of the underlying mechanisms of acquired cholestasis has recently made considerable progress by the identification of canalicular ATP-binding

  13. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease: mechanisms and best diagnostic approaches

    Matsuno Osamu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD is not uncommon and has many clinical patterns, ranging from benign infiltrates to life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome. There are two mechanisms involved in DILD, which are probably interdependent: one is direct, dose-dependent toxicity and the other is immune-mediated. Cytotoxic lung injury may result from direct injury to pneumocytes or the alveolar capillary endothelium. Drugs can induce all types of immunological reactions described by Gell and Coombs; however, most reactions in immune-mediated DILD may be T cell-mediated. DILD can be difficult to diagnose; diagnosis is often possible by exclusion alone. Identifying the causative drug that induces an allergy or cytotoxicity is essential for preventing secondary reactions. One method to confirm the diagnosis of a drug-induced disease is re-exposure or re-test of the drug. However, clinicians are reluctant to place patients at further risk of illness, particularly in cases with severe drug-induced diseases. Assessment of cell-mediated immunity has recently increased, because verifying the presence or absence of drug-sensitized lymphocytes can aid in confirmation of drug-induced disease. Using peripheral blood samples from drug-allergic patients, the drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST and the leukocyte migration test (LMT can detect the presence of drug-sensitized T cells. However, these tests do not have a definite role in the diagnosis of DILD. This study explores the potential of these new tests and other similar tests in the diagnosis of DILD and provides a review of the relevant literature on this topic.

  14. THE APPLICATION OF HEMATOPOIETIC GROWTH-FACTORS IN DRUG-INDUCED AGRANULOCYTOSIS - A REVIEW OF 70 CASES

    SPRIKKELMAN, A; DEWOLF, JTM; VELLENGA, E

    1994-01-01

    Since 1989, granulocyte-macrophage and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSF, G-CSF) have been increasingly applied in the treatment of drug-induced agranulocytosis. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of GM-CSF and G-CSF in the treatment of drug-induced agranulocytosis, we have studied

  15. 78 FR 5817 - Detecting and Evaluating Drug-Induced Liver Injury; What's Normal, What's Not, and What Should We...

    2013-01-28

    ...: Premarketing Clinical Evaluation'' (74 FR 38035; July 30, 2009). This guidance explained that drug-induced... Normal, What's Not, and What Should We Do About It?; Public Conference; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food... Evaluating Drug-Induced Liver Injury; What's Normal, What's Not, and What Should We Do About It?''...

  16. 76 FR 4918 - Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Are We Ready to Look?; Public Conference; Request for Comments

    2011-01-27

    ... for industry entitled ``Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Premarketing Clinical Evaluation'' (see 74 FR 38035... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Are We Ready to Look?; Public Conference; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  17. 75 FR 14602 - Guidance for Industry on Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Premarketing Clinical Evaluation; Opening of...

    2010-03-26

    ... on Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Premarketing Clinical Evaluation; Opening of Comment Period for Future Revision of Guidance Dated July 2009; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... industry published in the Federal ] Register July 30, 2009, entitled ``Drug-Induced Liver...

  18. Assessing common classification methods for the identification of abnormal repolarization using indicators of T-wave morphology and QT interval

    Shakibfar, Saeed; Graff, Claus; Ehlers, Lars Holger;

    2012-01-01

    Various parameters based on QTc and T-wave morphology have been shown to be useful discriminators for drug induced I(Kr)-blocking. Using different classification methods this study compares the potential of these two features for identifying abnormal repolarization on the ECG. A group of healthy...

  19. Regulation of drug-induced liver injury by signal transduction pathways: critical role of mitochondria

    Han, Derick; Dara, Lily; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Yuan, Liyun; Abbasi, Sadeea Q; Liu, Zhang-Xu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Drugs that cause liver injury often “stress” mitochondria and activate signal transduction pathways important in determining cell survival or death. In most cases, hepatocytes adapt to the drug-induced stress by activating adaptive signaling pathways, such as mitochondrial adaptive responses and erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2), a transcription factor that upregulates antioxidant defenses. Due to adaptation, drugs alone rarely cause liver injury, with acetaminophen being the notable excep...

  20. Drug-induced liver toxicity and prevention by herbal antioxidants: an overview

    Divya eSingh; William eCho; Ghanshyam eUpadhyay

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the center for drug and xenobiotic metabolism, which is influenced most with medication/xenobiotic-mediated toxic activity. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is common and its actual frequency is hard to determine due to underreporting, difficulties in detection or diagnosis, and incomplete observation of exposure. The death rate is high, up to about 10% for medication instigated liver danger. Endorsed medications (counting acetaminophen) represented >50% of instances of intense liver ...

  1. A hidden Markov model to assess drug-induced sleep fragmentation in the telemetered rat

    Diack, C.; Ackaert, O.; Ploeger, B A; van der Graaf, P H; Gurrell, R.; Ivarsson, M.; Fairman, D.

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced sleep fragmentation can cause sleep disturbances either via their intended pharmacological action or as a side effect. Examples of disturbances include excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia and nightmares. Developing drugs without these side effects requires insight into the mechanisms leading to sleep disturbance. The characterization of the circadian sleep pattern by EEG following drug exposure has improved our understanding of these mechanisms and their translatability across...

  2. Antituberculosis Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity in IranianTuberculosis Patients: Role of Isoniazid Metabolic Polymorphism

    Sistanizad, Mohammad; Azizi, Ebrahim; KHALILI, Hosein; Hajiabdolbaghi, Mahboobeh; Gholami, Kheirollah; Mahjub, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association of n-acetyltransferase-2 polymorphisms and anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Iranian pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Acetylating phenotypes was studied in 50 Iranian pulmonary tuberculosis patients using metabolic ratio of plasma acetyl-Isoniazid to Isoniazid. The association between hepatotoxicity and the n-acetyltransferase-2 phenotype was evaluated by using the chi-square (x2) test. The metabolic ratio had a bimodal dis...

  3. Effect of cimetidine and ranitidine on drug induced damage to gastric epithelial cell monolayers in vitro.

    Romano, M.; Razandi, M; Ivey, K J

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the H2 blockers cimetidine and ranitidine on drug induced damage to gastric cell monolayers has been evaluated in conditions independent of systemic factors and their anti-acid properties. Monolayers of mucous cells from a human cell line MKN 28, obtained from a human gastric adenocarcinoma, have been studied. Cell damage has been assessed qualitatively by trypan blue dye exclusion test and quantitatively by 51Cr release assay. Cimetidine and ranitidine significantly protected c...

  4. Drug-Induced Myocardial Infarction Secondary to Coronary Artery Spasm in Teenagers and Young Adults

    Menyar Ayman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no published registry for drug-induced acute myocardial infarction (AMI with subsequent patent coronary angiogram in teenagers. To highlight the mechanism and impact of drug-induced MI with patent coronary arteries among teenagers who have relatively few coronary risk factors in comparison with older patients, we conducted a review of the literature. In this review most of the pertinent published (English and non-English articles through the Medline, Scopus, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and EBSCO Host research databases from 1970 to 2005 have been revised. Teenagers and young adults with AMI and subsequent patent coronary angiogram were included. In those cases drug-induced coronary spasm was highlighted. Among 220 articles (>12000 cases related with AMI with normal coronary angiogram, 50 articles (~100 cases reported the role of drug in AMI secondary to coronary artery spasm (CAS. There is no well-conducted trial for AMI secondary to CAS in young adults but only a series of case reports, and the diagnosis in most of cases was based on the clinical and laboratory findings without provocation. CAS was associated with 12 illicit substances in teenagers (i.e., cocaine, marijuana, alcohol, butane, and amphetamine. Smoking is not only the initiative but also might harbor other illicit substances that increase the risk for CAS. Cocaine-associated AMI is the most frequent in various research papers. CAS was reported with 19 types of medications (i.e., over-the-counter, chemotherapy, antimigraine, and antibiotics without strong relation to age. Despite drug-induced AMI being not a common event, attention to smoking and drugs in teenagers and young adults will have major therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  5. The Role of Bile Salt Export Pump Gene Repression in Drug-Induced Cholestatic Liver Toxicity

    Garzel, Brandy; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E.; Wang, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) is predominantly responsible for the efflux of bile salts, and disruption of BSEP function is often associated with altered hepatic homeostasis of bile acids and cholestatic liver injury. Accumulating evidence suggests that many drugs can cause cholestasis through interaction with hepatic transporters. To date, a relatively strong association between drug-induced cholestasis and attenuated BSEP activity has been proposed. However, whether repression of...

  6. Role of membrane transport in hepatotoxicity and pathogenesis of drug-induced cholestasis

    Stieger, Bruno; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is an important clinical entity, which can be grouped into cholestatic liver injury, hepatocellular liver injury, and mixed liver injury. Cholestatic liver injury is characterized by a reduction in bile flow and the retention within hepatocytes of cholephilic compounds such as bile salts that cause hepatotoxicity. Bile salts are taken up by hepatocytes in a largely sodium-dependent manner and to a lesser extent in a sodium-independent manner. The former process is...

  7. Genetic determinants of drug-induced cholestasis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    Pauli-Magnus, Christiane; Meier, Peter J; Stieger, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and drug-induced cholestasis are two clinically important forms of acquired cholestatic liver disease. The understanding of the underlying mechanisms of acquired cholestasis has recently made considerable progress by the identification of canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as likely targets for these forms of cholestasis. Cholestasis of pregnancy is linked to estrogen and progesterone metabolites. These metabolites have been shown to impa...

  8. Urine - abnormal color

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  9. Assessment of mitochondrial dysfunction-related, drug-induced hepatotoxicity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    Liu, Cong; Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Kousei

    2016-07-01

    Evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in drug-induced liver injury is rapidly accumulating. In contrast to physiological conditions, in which almost all adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in hepatocytes is generated in mitochondria via aerobic respiration, the high glucose content and limited oxygen supply of conventional culture systems force primary hepatocytes to generate most ATP via cytosolic glycolysis. Thus, such anaerobically poised cells are resistant to xenobiotics that impair mitochondrial function, and are not suitable to identify drugs with mitochondrial liabilities. In this study, primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in galactose-based medium, instead of the conventional glucose-based medium, and in hyperoxia to improve the reliance of energy generation on aerobic respiration. Activation of mitochondria was verified by diminished cellular lactate release and increased oxygen consumption. These conditions improved sensitivity to the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. Since oxidative stress is also a general cause of mitochondrial impairment, cells were exposed to test compounds in the presence of transferrin to increase the generation of reactive oxygen species via increased uptake of iron. Finally, 14 compounds with reported mitochondrial liabilities were tested to validate this new drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity assay. Overall, the culture of primary rat hepatocytes in galactose, hyperoxia and transferrin is a useful model for the identification of mitochondrial dysfunction-related drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27095095

  10. Immunoexpression of interleukin-6 in drug-induced gingival overgrowth patients

    Ganesh, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To analyze the role of proinflammatory cytokines in drug-induced gingival enlargement in Indian population. Aim: To evaluate for the presence of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in drug-induced gingival enlargement and to compare it with healthy control in the absence of enlargement. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients selected for the study and divided into control group (10) and study group (25) consisting of phenytoin (10); cyclosporin (10) and nifedipine (5) induced gingival enlargement. Gingival overgrowth index of Seymour was used to assess overgrowth and allot groups. Under LA, incisional biopsy done, tissue sample fixed in 10% formalin and immunohistochemically evaluated for the presence of IL-6 using LAB-SA method, Labeled- Streptavidin-Biotin Method (LAB-SA kit from Zymed- 2nd generation LAB-SA detection system, Zymed Laboratories, CA). The results of immunohistochemistry were statistically analyzed using Kruskaal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney test. Results: The data obtained from immunohistochemistry assessment shows that drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO) samples express more IL-6 than control group and cyclosporin expresses more IL-6 followed by phenytoin and nifedipine. Conclusion: Increased IL-6 expression was noticed in all three DIGO groups in comparison with control group. Among the study group, cyclosporin expressed maximum IL-6 expression followed by phenytoin and nifedipine. PMID:27307657

  11. Immunoexpression of interleukin-6 in drug-induced gingival overgrowth patients

    P R Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To analyze the role of proinflammatory cytokines in drug-induced gingival enlargement in Indian population. Aim: To evaluate for the presence of interleukin-6 (IL-6 in drug-induced gingival enlargement and to compare it with healthy control in the absence of enlargement. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients selected for the study and divided into control group (10 and study group (25 consisting of phenytoin (10; cyclosporin (10 and nifedipine (5 induced gingival enlargement. Gingival overgrowth index of Seymour was used to assess overgrowth and allot groups. Under LA, incisional biopsy done, tissue sample fixed in 10% formalin and immunohistochemically evaluated for the presence of IL-6 using LAB-SA method, Labeled- Streptavidin-Biotin Method (LAB-SA kit from Zymed- 2nd generation LAB-SA detection system, Zymed Laboratories, CA. The results of immunohistochemistry were statistically analyzed using Kruskaal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney test. Results: The data obtained from immunohistochemistry assessment shows that drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO samples express more IL-6 than control group and cyclosporin expresses more IL-6 followed by phenytoin and nifedipine. Conclusion: Increased IL-6 expression was noticed in all three DIGO groups in comparison with control group. Among the study group, cyclosporin expressed maximum IL-6 expression followed by phenytoin and nifedipine.

  12. In silico Prediction of Drug Induced Liver Toxicity Using Substructure Pattern Recognition Method.

    Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Feixiong; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Lee, Philip W; Tang, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and less severe liver injury worldwide. It is also one of the major reasons of drug withdrawal from the market. Thus, DILI has become one of the most important concerns of drugs, and should be predicted in very early stage of drug discovery process. In this study, a comprehensive data set containing 1317 diverse compounds was collected from publications. Then, high accuracy classification models were built using five machine learning methods based on MACCS and FP4 fingerprints after evaluating by substructure pattern recognition method. The best model was built using SVM method together with FP4 fingerprint at the IG value threshold of 0.0005. Its overall predictive accuracies were 79.7 % and 64.5 % for the training and test sets, separately, which yielded overall accuracy of 75.0 % for the external validation dataset, consisting of 88 compounds collected from a benchmark DILI database - the Liver Toxicity Knowledge Base. This model could be used for drug-induced liver toxicity prediction. Moreover, some key substructure patterns correlated with drug-induced liver toxicity were also identified as structural alerts. PMID:27491923

  13. Using Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Levels as a Biomarker for Drug-Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    Sukuroglu, Erkan; Güncü, Güliz N.; Kilinc, Kamer; Caglayan, Feriha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Drug-induced gingival overgrowth has a multifactorial nature and the pathogenesis is still uncertain. It has been suggested that Nitric Oxide (NO) might play a role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth due to the contribution of NO to immune response and matrix degradation. NO levels in biological fluids have been used as a diagnostic biomarker in many diseases. The aim of this study is to determine whether NO levels in plasma, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) can serve as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of drug-induced gingival overgrowth risk. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 patients, receiving cyclosporine A (n = 35), phenytoin (n = 25), nifedipine (n = 26), or diltiazem (n = 18) participated in the study. The amount of gingival overgrowth was evaluated with two indices and was given as percentage. Periodontal clinical parameters including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding time index (GBTI), and probing depth (PD) were also assessed. Saliva, GCF, and plasma samples were obtained from each participants. Nitrite and nitrate levels in saliva, GCF, and plasma were analyzed by Griess reagent. Results: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels in responders were significantly higher than those in non-responders in only phenytoin group (p Nitrite and nitrate levels of gingival crevicular fluid and plasma did not significantly differ between responders and non-responders in all study groups (p > 0.05). Salivary nitrite levels exhibited a significant correlation with PD, GBTI, severity of gingival overgrowth (%GO), and GCF volume (p nitrate levels (p nitrite and nitrate levels in GCF and plasma demonstrated no significant correlation with clinical parameters, GO severity, and GCF volume (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Salivary nitrite and nitrate levels could be used as periodontal disease biomarkers in phenytoin induced gingival overgrowth, and that saliva seems to have a better diagnostic potential than GCF

  14. The characteristics and clinical outcome of drug-induced liver injury in a Chinese hospital: A retrospective cohort study.

    Chen, Sheng-Sen; Yu, Kang-Kang; Huang, Chong; Li, Ning; Zheng, Jian-Ming; Bao, Su-Xia; Chen, Ming-Quan; Zhang, Wen-Hong

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this cohort study was to determine the characteristics and clinical outcome of 287 patients with drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in a Chinese hospital.Between January 2008 and January 2013, individuals who were diagnosed with DILI were selected. The complete medical records of each case were reviewed, and factors for the outcome of patients with DILI were extracted and analyzed using univariate and multivariate analysis.Two hundred eighty-seven cases identified as DILI were included in the study. A total of 105 different drugs were considered to be related to the hepatotoxicity. The main causative group of drugs was Chinese herb (n = 111). Liver failure developed in 9 (3.1%) patients, and 2 died (0.7%). Overall, complete recovery occurred in 92 (32.1%) patients. Univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis identified the digestive symptoms, jaundice, total bilirubin (TBIL), and direct bilirubin (DBIL) as independent factors for the non-recovery of DILI. Then the prediction model, including digestive symptoms, jaundice, TBIL, and DBIL, was built by using binary logistic regression analysis again. Receiver operating characteristic curve validated the strong power (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.907) of prediction model for predicting the DILI non-recovery.DILI is an important cause of liver test abnormalities, and Chinese herb represented the most common drug group. The factors such as digestive symptoms, jaundice, TBIL, and DBIL have effect on DILI outcomes. The prediction model, including digestive symptoms, jaundice, TBIL, and DBIL, established in this study is really an excellent predictive tool for non-recovery of DILI patients. PMID:27559976

  15. In vitro assessment of drug-induced liver steatosis based on human dermal stem cell-derived hepatic cells.

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Branson, Steven; De Boe, Veerle; Sachinidis, Agapios; Rogiers, Vera; De Kock, Joery; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2016-03-01

    Steatosis, also known as fatty liver disease (FLD), is a disorder in which the lipid metabolism of the liver is disturbed, leading to the abnormal retention of lipids in hepatocytes. FLD can be induced by several drugs, and although it is mostly asymptomatic, it can lead to steatohepatitis, which is associated with liver inflammation and damage. Drug-induced liver injury is currently the major cause of postmarketing withdrawal of pharmaceuticals and discontinuation of the development of new chemical entities. Therefore, the potential induction of steatosis must be evaluated during preclinical drug development. However, robust human-relevant in vitro models are lacking. In the present study, we explore the applicability of hepatic cells (hSKP-HPCs) derived from postnatal skin precursors, a stem cell population residing in human dermis, to investigate the steatosis-inducing effects of sodium valproate (Na-VPA). Exposure of hSKP-HPC to sub-cytotoxic concentrations of this reference steatogenic compound showed an increased intracellular accumulation of lipid droplets, and the modulation of key factors involved in lipid metabolism. Using a toxicogenomics approach, we further compared Na-VPA-treated hSKP-HPC and Na-VPA-treated primary human hepatocytes to liver samples from patients suffering from mild and advanced steatosis. Our data show that in hSKP-HPC exposed to Na-VPA and liver samples of patients suffering from mild steatosis, but not in primary human hepatocytes, "liver steatosis" was efficiently identified as a toxicological response. These findings illustrate the potential of hSKP-HPC as a human-relevant in vitro model to identify hepatosteatotic effects of chemical compounds. PMID:25716160

  16. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome due to anticonvulsants in a two-year-old boy.

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Criado, Roberta F J; Vasconcellos, Cidia; Pegas, Jose Roberto P; Cera, Patrícia Calil

    2004-12-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) usually refers to severe cutaneous drug eruption associated with systemic involvement and potentially fatal outcome. We report a 2-year-old Caucasian boy who developed DIHS due to phenytoin and phenobarbital and who showed extensive internal organ involvement. We are alerting that failure to recognize this drug eruption and discontinue the culprit drug may result in increased severity, greater extent of internal organ involvement, and fatal outcome. The recent research about the influence of human herpesvirus 6 co-infection on the pathogenesis of DIHS is also discussed by the authors in this paper. PMID:15801266

  17. ANTIHEPATOTOXIC EFFECT OF BARLERIA MONTANA LEAVES AGAINST ANTI-TB DRUGS INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY

    Jyothi Basini; S. Mohana lakshmi; K.Anitha

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective activity of 95% hydroalcoholic extract of Barleria Montana leaves against anti-TB drugs induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Hepatotoxicity was induced by anti-TB drugs once daily for 35 days and simultaneously 95% hydroalcoholic extract of Barleria Montana (250 & 500 mg/kg p.o.) was administered one hour prior administration of anti-TB drugs. Silymarin was used as standard drug (100 mg/kg p.o.). Results: Elevated levels of...

  18. Pharmaco-epidemiological, clinical and laboratory characteristics of drug-induced liver injury in tuberculosis

    M. V. Koroleva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: improving the efficiency of pharmacotherapy of drug-induced liver injury in tuberculosis by clarifying pharmaco-epidemiological, clinical and laboratory features.Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of primary medical records of 250 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, patients «Volgograd Regional Clinical TB Dispensary № 1». We evaluated the dynamics of biochemical parameters characterizing the development of hepatic cytolytic syndrome, examined the impact of gender and age on the incidence of liver damage, we investigated the relationship of clinical tuberculosis and chemotherapy regimen with the incidence of drug-induced liver injury, examined the clinical manifestations of liver disease.Results: Drug-induced liver injury as a complication of a specific anti-TB treatment was diagnosed in 67 patients (26,8%. In 170 patients (68,0% showed increase in alanine aminotransferase and asparaginaminotrasferazy. Hepatotoxicity significantly more common in patients with disseminated tuberculosis with the collapse of the lung tissue, smear, and a high degree of disease severity. Risk factors for drug liver damage were female gender and age older than 50 years. Women develop liver disease at an earlier date, and displays it harder than men. The earliest and most informative routine biochemical tests, reflecting the state of the liver in the dynamics are ALT and AST. It was found that the mode of the standard anti-TB treatment determines the type of liver injury: the first, 2a and 3rd modes prevails cytolytic hepatocellular type, with 2b mode – combined (mixed type 4th – type of cholestatic liver damage. It was found that repeated, after the development of hepatotoxic reactions, the appointment of anti-TB drugs without gepatoprotektsii in 94% of patients leads to repeated drug-induced liver damage. Cancel specific therapy against the background of cytolytic syndrome promotes the formation of

  19. Characteristics of Mononuclear Extracellular Traps in the Offspring of Female Rats with Drug-Induced Hepatitis.

    Bryukhin, G V; Shopova, A V

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of experimental tetracycline-induced liver injury in mothers on the capacity of macrophages from various compartments to form traps and on activity of extracellular macrophage traps in the offspring. Trap-forming capacity was evaluated by the number of traps. We found reduction in the number and suppression of activity of the macrophage extracellular traps in the offspring of females with experimental liver injury. The findings suggest that mothers with drug-induced liver injury produce physiologically immature offspring with reduced unspecific resistance. PMID:26388577

  20. Evaluation of Protective Effect of Thymoquinone against Anti-tubercular Drug Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    Arvind Chansoria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study was done to see the protective effect of thymoquinone against antitubercular drugs induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Thymoquinone significantly reduced serum urea, serum creatinine and K+ levels in ATT induced renal toxicity. No effect was seen in serum serum Na+ level. Higher dose was found to reduce serum urea to greater extent than 5 mg TQ dose. The nephroprotective effect of thymoquinone was found to be significant. Hence the present study throws light on usefulness of TQ in protection against ATT induced renal injury. This might prove useful for combating the serious renal adverse effects of ATT regimen without eliminating the use of standard first line drugs.

  1. Exploring BSEP Inhibition-Mediated Toxicity with a Mechanistic Model of Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    Woodhead, Jeffrey L; Kyunghee eYang; Siler, Scott Q.; Paul Brent Watkins; Brouwer, Kim L.R.; Barton, Hugh A.; Howell, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) has been linked to incidence of drug-induced liver injury (DILI), presumably by the accumulation of toxic bile acids in the liver. We have previously constructed and validated a model of bile acid disposition within DILIsym®, a mechanistic model of DILI. In this paper, we use DILIsym® to simulate the DILI response of the hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitors bosentan and CP-724,714 and the non-hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitor telmisartan in humans in order to ex...

  2. Exploring BSEP inhibition-mediated toxicity with a mechanistic model of drug-induced liver injury

    Woodhead, Jeffrey L; Yang, Kyunghee; Siler, Scott Q.; Watkins, Paul B.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.; Barton, Hugh A.; Howell, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) has been linked to incidence of drug-induced liver injury (DILI), presumably by the accumulation of toxic bile acids in the liver. We have previously constructed and validated a model of bile acid disposition within DILIsym®, a mechanistic model of DILI. In this paper, we use DILIsym® to simulate the DILI response of the hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitors bosentan and CP-724,714 and the non-hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitor telmisartan in humans in order to ex...

  3. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis: A rare manifestation of an incomplete "dapsone syndrome"

    Anup K Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced acute pancreatitis (AP is under-reported, and a large number of drugs are listed as offenders, but are often overlooked. Knowledge about the possible association of medications in causing AP is important, and needs a high index of suspicion, especially with drugs that have been reported to be the etiology only rarely. Dapsone, a commonly used drug, can cause various hypersensitivity reactions including AP collectively called "dapsone syndrome." Here, we report dapsone-induced AP in a young man. Our case shows certain dissimilarities like associated acute renal failure and acute hemolysis not previously described.

  4. Urine - abnormal color

    The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. ... Abnormal urine color may be caused by infection, disease, medicines, or food you eat. Cloudy or milky urine is a sign ...

  5. Evaluation of the Relative Performance of Drug-Induced Skeletal Muscle Injury Biomarkers in Rats.

    Burch, Peter M; Greg Hall, David; Walker, Elizabeth G; Bracken, William; Giovanelli, Richard; Goldstein, Richard; Higgs, Richard E; King, Nicholas M P; Lane, Pamela; Sauer, John-Michael; Michna, Laura; Muniappa, Nagaraja; Pritt, Michael L; Vlasakova, Katerina; Watson, David E; Wescott, Debra; Zabka, Tanja S; Glaab, Warren E

    2016-03-01

    Novel skeletal muscle (SKM) injury biomarkers that have recently been identified may outperform or add value to the conventional SKM injury biomarkers aspartate transaminase (AST) and creatine kinase (CK). The relative performance of these novel biomarkers of SKM injury including skeletal troponin I (sTnI), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), CK M Isoform (Ckm), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (Fabp3) was assessed in 34 rat studies including both SKM toxicants and compounds with toxicities in tissues other than SKM. sTnI, Myl3, Ckm, and Fabp3 all outperformed CK or AST and/or added value for the diagnosis of drug-induced SKM injury (ie, myocyte degeneration/necrosis). In addition, when used in conjunction with CK and AST, sTnI, Myl3, CKm, and Fabp3 individually and collectively improved diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, as well as diagnostic certainty, for SKM injury and responded in a sensitive manner to low levels of SKM degeneration/necrosis in rats. These findings support the proposal that sTnI, Myl3, Ckm, and Fabp3 are suitable for voluntary use, in conjunction with CK and AST, in regulatory safety studies in rats to monitor drug-induced SKM injury and the potential translational use of these exploratory biomarkers in early clinical trials to ensure patient safety. PMID:26721300

  6. Regulation of drug-induced liver injury by signal transduction pathways: critical role of mitochondria.

    Han, Derick; Dara, Lily; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Yuan, Liyun; Abbasi, Sadeea Q; Liu, Zhang-Xu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Drugs that cause liver injury often 'stress' mitochondria and activate signal transduction pathways important in determining cell survival or death. In most cases, hepatocytes adapt to the drug-induced stress by activating adaptive signaling pathways, such as mitochondrial adaptive responses and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2), a transcription factor that upregulates antioxidant defenses. Owing to adaptation, drugs alone rarely cause liver injury, with acetaminophen (APAP) being the notable exception. Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) usually involves other extrinsic factors, such as the adaptive immune system, that cause 'stressed' hepatocytes to become injured, leading to idiosyncratic DILI, the rare and unpredictable adverse drug reaction in the liver. Hepatocyte injury, due to drug and extrinsic insult, causes a second wave of signaling changes associated with adaptation, cell death, and repair. If the stress and injury reach a critical threshold, then death signaling pathways such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) become dominant and hepatocytes enter a failsafe mode to undergo self-destruction. DILI can be seen as an active process involving recruitment of death signaling pathways that mediate cell death rather than a passive process due to overwhelming biochemical injury. In this review, we highlight the role of signal transduction pathways, which frequently involve mitochondria, in the development of DILI. PMID:23453390

  7. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures.

    Haeseung Lee

    Full Text Available An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity.

  8. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures.

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  9. Monitoring drug induced apoptosis and treatment sensitivity in non-small cell lung carcinoma using dielectrophoresis.

    Taruvai Kalyana Kumar, Rajeshwari; Liu, Shanshan; Minna, John D; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive real time methods for characterizing biomolecular events that contribute towards apoptotic kinetics would be of significant importance in the field of cancer biology. Effective drug-induced apoptosis is an important factor for establishing the relationship between cancer genetics and treatment sensitivity. The objective of this study was to develop a non-invasive technique to characterize cancer cells that are undergoing drug-induced apoptosis. We used dielectrophoresis to determine apoptotic cells as early as 2h post drug treatment as compared to 24h with standard flow cytometry method using non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) adenocarcinoma cell line (HCC1833) as a study model. Our studies have shown significant differences in apoptotic cells by chromatin condensation, formation of apoptotic bodies and exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the extracellular surface when the cells where treated with a potent Bcl-2 family inhibitor drug (ABT-263). Time lapse dielectrophoretic studies were performed over 24h period after exposure to ABT-263 at clinically relevant concentrations. The dielectrophoretic studies were compared to Annexin-V FITC flow assay for the detection of PS in mid-stage apoptosis using flow cytometry. As a result of physical and biochemical changes, inherent dielectric properties of cells undergoing varying stages of apoptosis showed amplified changes in their cytoplasmic and membrane capacitance. In addition, zeta potential of these fixed isolated cells was measured to obtain direct correlation to biomolecular events. PMID:27262539

  10. A Rare Complication of Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole: Drug Induced Aseptic Meningitis.

    Jha, Pinky; Stromich, Jeremiah; Cohen, Mallory; Wainaina, Jane Njeri

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced aseptic meningitis is a rare but challenging diagnosis, most commonly reported with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is a sulfonamide that is widely used in clinical practice for the treatment and prophylaxis of various infections. Drug induced aseptic meningitis, when seen with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, occurs predominantly in patients with some degree of immune compromise and is less commonly seen in immune competent individuals. The patient often exhibits the classic symptoms of meningitis. Early diagnosis is important, since the cessation of the antibiotic leads to rapid clinical improvement. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole induced aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MED-WATCH program. Here we report two cases of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole: an immune competent individual and immune compromised individual, both of which presented with signs of meningitis and a negative infectious workup. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is an uncommon and mysterious adverse reaction to a commonly used antibiotic. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute signs and symptoms of meningitis especially after infectious causes have been ruled out. PMID:27579194

  11. Drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis: a case with elevated urinary cadmium.

    Subat-Dezulović, Mirna; Slavić, Irena; Rozmanić, Vojko; Persić, Mladen; Medjimurec, Branka; Sćukanec-Spoljar, Mira

    2002-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) has many different causes, but is most frequently caused by drugs. We report a 13-year-old vegetarian girl with drug-induced ATIN, confirmed by renal biopsy, and simultaneous occurrence of elevated urinary cadmium. Four weeks prior to admission she had been treated with antibiotics and acetaminophen for respiratory infection, and remaining febrile, was treated with different "home-made" herbal mixtures. She presented with acute non-oliguric renal failure, tubular dysfunction, and sterile pyuria, but without skin rash or edema. Laboratory data showed a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate, normal white blood count with eosinophilia, and a serum creatinine of 245 micromol/l. Urinalysis was remarkable for glycosuria, tubular proteinuria, and elevated beta(2)-microglobulin and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase excretion. Immunoserological tests characteristic of acute glomerulonephritis and systemic diseases were negative. She was treated with steroids and her renal function improved. Follow-up analyses disclosed normal urinary cadmium and enzyme excretion within 6 months. Heavy metal analysis of herbal preparations that she had taken confirmed the presence of cadmium, but within approved concentrations. In conclusion, elevated urinary cadmium in the case of drug-induced ATIN may be assumed to be an accidental finding. However, consumption of different herbs containing cadmium and cadmium-induced nephro-toxicity could be the reason for such serious renal damage. PMID:12042900

  12. Pharmacoepidemiological characterization of drug-induced adverse reaction clusters towards understanding of their mechanisms.

    Mizutani, Sayaka; Noro, Yousuke; Kotera, Masaaki; Goto, Susumu

    2014-06-01

    A big challenge in pharmacology is the understanding of the underlying mechanisms that cause drug-induced adverse reactions (ADRs), which are in some cases similar to each other regardless of different drug indications, and are in other cases different regardless of same drug indications. The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) provides a valuable resource for pharmacoepidemiology, the study of the uses and the effects of drugs in large human population. However, FAERS is a spontaneous reporting system that inevitably contains noise that deviates the application of conventional clustering approaches. By performing a biclustering analysis on the FAERS data we identified 163 biclusters of drug-induced adverse reactions, counting for 691 ADRs and 240 drugs in total, where the number of ADR occurrences are consistently high across the associated drugs. Medically similar ADRs are derived from several distinct indications for use in the majority (145/163=88%) of the biclusters, which enabled us to interpret the underlying mechanisms that lead to similar ADRs. Furthermore, we compared the biclusters that contain same drugs but different ADRs, finding the cases where the populations of the patients were different in terms of age, sex, and body weight. We applied a biclustering approach to catalogue the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions from a large FAERS data set, and demonstrated a systematic way to uncover the cases different drug administrations resulted in similar adverse reactions, and the same drug can cause different reactions dependent on the patients' conditions. PMID:24534381

  13. Compensatory variances of drug-induced hepatitis B virus YMDD mutations.

    Cai, Ying; Wang, Ning; Wu, Xiaomei; Zheng, Kai; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Although the drug-induced mutations of HBV have been ever documented, the evolutionary mechanism is still obscure. To deeply reveal molecular characters of HBV evolution under the special condition, here we made a comprehensive investigation of the molecular variation of the 3432 wild-type sequences and 439 YMDD variants from HBV genotype A, B, C and D, and evaluated the co-variant patterns and the frequency distribution in the different YMDD mutation types and genotypes, by using the naïve Bayes classification algorithm and the complete induction method based on the comparative sequence analysis. The data showed different compensatory changes followed by the rtM204I/V. Although occurrence of the YMDD mutation itself was not related to the HBV genotypes, the subsequence co-variant patterns were related to the YMDD variant types and HBV genotypes. From the hierarchy view, we clarified that historical mutations, drug-induced mutation and compensatory variances, and displayed an inter-conditioned relationship of amino acid variances during multiple evolutionary processes. This study extends the understanding of the polymorphism and fitness of viral protein. PMID:27588233

  14. Biochemical mechanisms in drug-induced liver injury: Certainties and doubts

    Ignazio Grattagliano; Leonilde Bonfrate; Catia V Diogo; Helen H Wang; David QH Wang; Piero Portincasa

    2009-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a significant and still unresolved clinical problem. Limitations to knowledge about the mechanisms of toxicity render incomplete the detection of hepatotoxic potential during preclinical development. Several xenobiotics are lipophilic substances and their transformation into hydrophilic compounds by the cytochrome P-450 system results in production of toxic metabolites. Aging, preexisting liver disease, enzyme induction or inhibition, genetic variances, local O_2 supply and, above all, the intrinsic molecular properties of the drug may affect this process. Necrotic death follows antioxidant consumption and oxidation of intracellular proteins, which determine increased permeability of mitochondrial membranes, loss of potential, decreased ATP synthesis, inhibition of Ca~(2+)-dependent ATPase, reduced capability to sequester Ca~(2+) within mitochondria, and membrane bleb formation. Conversely, activation of nucleases and energetic participation of mitochondria are the main intracellular mechanisms that lead to apoptosis. Non-parenchymal hepatic cells are inducers of hepatocellular injury and targets for damage. Activation of the immune system promotes idiosyncratic reactions that result in hepatic necrosis or cholestasis, in which different HLA genotypes might play a major role. This review focuses on current knowledge of the mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury and recent advances on newly discovered mechanisms of liver damage. Future perspectives including new frontiers for research are discussed.

  15. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (INa) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of INa, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (Emax 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two out of three

  16. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    Cros, C., E-mail: caroline.cros@hotmail.co.uk [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Skinner, M., E-mail: Matthew.Skinner@astrazeneca.com [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Moors, J. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Lainee, P. [Sanofi-Aventis R and D, 371, rue du Pr Joseph Blayac, 34184 Montpellier Cedex 04 (France); Valentin, J.P. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I{sub Na}) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I{sub Na}, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E{sub max} 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two

  17. Dynamically observing the value of the changes of serum sex hormone levels of early pregnancy after drug-induced abortion

    Objective: To observe the value of the changes of serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG), estradiol (E), progesterone (P) Levels of early pregnancy after drug-induced abortion dynamically. Methods: Assessing 55 women proved pregnant by urine or blood HCG retrospecticly, who had terminated their pregnancy by mifepristonr and misoprostol. Meanwhile the serum levels of β-HCG, E, P were monitored dynamically. Results: Among the 55 patients, the levels of β-HCG, E and P had significant decreased (tβ-HCG=4.845, tE=7.655, tP=11.390, PE=9.089, PP=2.910, P<0.05). Conclusion: Detectint the serum hormone's levels after drug-induced abortion by chemiluminescent immunoassay, we can assess indirectly the value of administration of mifepristone and misoprostol, predict the prolonged vaginal bleeding after drug-induced abortion, and the outcome of the treatment, which determine wether need another curestage. (authors)

  18. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  19. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  20. Radiation- and drug-induced DNA repair in mammalian oocytes and embryos

    A review of studies showing ultraviolet- or drug-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in mammalian oocytes and embryos suggests that the female gamete has an excision repair capacity from the earliest stages of oocyte growth. The oocyte's demonstrable excision repair capacity decreases at the time of meiotic maturation for unknown reasons, but the fully mature oocyte maintans a repair capacity, in contrast to the mature sperm, and contributes this to the zygote. Early embryo cells maintain relatively constant levels of excision repair until late fetal stages, when they lose their capacity for excision repair. These apparent changes in excision repair capacity do not have a simple relationship to known differences in radiation sensitivity of germ cells and embryos

  1. Drug-induced Hypothermia by 5HT1A Agonists Provide Neuroprotection in Experimental Stroke

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Hasseldam, Henrik; Nybro Smith, Matthias; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug-induced hypothermia reduces brain damage in animal stroke models and is an undiscovered potential in human stroke treatment. We studied hypothermia induced by the serotonergic agonists S14671 (1-[2-(2-thenoylamino)ethyl]-4[1-(7- methoxynaphtyl)]piperazine) and ipsapirone in a rat...... controls (P < .05). S14671 rats kept normothermic did not show infarct reduction (P > .05). The body temperature after stroke was reduced 1.0-3.0°C compared with controls for 20 hours with S14671 treatment and for 6 hours with ipsapirone treatment. In humans, ipsapirone reduced temperature in average with...... stroke model and in man by literature meta-analysis. METHODS: Rats had 60 minutes of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and then 7 days of survival. Body temperatures were monitored for 22 hours. Thirty minutes after MCAO, 1 group (n = 9) received bolus of S14671 (.75 mg/kg) and continuous infusion...

  2. Modulating sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis: the future for chemotherapy?

    Drug resistance is a fundamental problem in the treatment of most common human cancers. Our understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying death and survival has allowed the development of rational approaches to overcoming drug resistance. The mitogen activated protein kinase family of protein serine/threonine kinases has been implicated in this complex web of signalling, with some members acting to enhance death and other members to prevent it. A recent publication by MacKeigan et al is the first to demonstrate an enhancement of drug-induced cell death by simultaneous blockade of MEK-mediated survival signalling, and offers the potential for targeted adjuvant therapy as a means of overcoming drug resistance

  3. Radiation- and drug-induced DNA repair in mammalian oocytes and embryos

    Pedersen, R A; Brandriff, B

    1979-01-01

    A review of studies showing ultraviolet- or drug-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in mammalian oocytes and embryos suggests that the female gamete has an excision repair capacity from the earliest stages of oocyte growth. The oocyte's demonstrable excision repair capacity decreases at the time of meiotic maturation for unknown reasons, but the fully mature oocyte maintans a repair capacity, in contrast to the mature sperm, and contributes this to the zygote. Early embryo cells maintain relatively constant levels of excision repair until late fetal stages, when they lose their capacity for excision repair. These apparent changes in excision repair capacity do not have a simple relationship to known differences in radiation sensitivity of germ cells and embryos.

  4. Lack of correlation between fecal blood loss and drug-induced gastric mucosal lesions

    Hedenbro, J.L.; Wetterberg, P.; Vallgren, S.; Bergqvist, L.

    1988-05-01

    Increased fecal blood loss was produced in healthy volunteers by the administration of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), naproxen or fenflumizole. Basal as well as drug-induced gastrointestinal blood loss was measured using /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling. Median rise in daily fecal blood loss was 432%. All subjects were endoscoped at the initiation and at the completion of the study. Endoscopic findings were assessed quantitatively by two observers in two different ways. All subjects but three had gastric mucosal lesions at follow-up endoscopy. There was a good correlation between the endoscopic assessments but no statistical correlation between the endoscopic assessment and the increase in fecal blood loss. The data suggest that factors other than gastric mucosal lesions have to be taken into account when investigating NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeding.

  5. Virus reactivation and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    Kano, Yoko; Inaoka, Miyuki; Sakuma, Keiichi; Shiohara, Tetsuo

    2005-04-15

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a severe multi-organ system reaction caused by specific drugs. Many reports have revealed that human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) reactivation contributes to the development of DIHS. In addition, recent articles have shown that reactivation of other herpesviruses such as human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) might be also implicated in the development of DIHS. These observations suggest that not only HHV-6 but also other herpesvirses might reactivate from the latency and play an important role in the appearance of clinical manifestations of DIHS. Several patients with DIHS were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in addition to systemic corticosteroids. The results have been encouraging although virus reactivation could not be suppressed. Although the pathomechanism of IVIG treatment in patients with DIHS remains unknown, the therapeutic effects of IVIG could be dependent, in part, on functional capabilities of anti-virus IgG contained in IVIG. PMID:15767030

  6. Lack of correlation between fecal blood loss and drug-induced gastric mucosal lesions

    Increased fecal blood loss was produced in healthy volunteers by the administration of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), naproxen or fenflumizole. Basal as well as drug-induced gastrointestinal blood loss was measured using 51Cr erythrocyte labeling. Median rise in daily fecal blood loss was 432%. All subjects were endoscoped at the initiation and at the completion of the study. Endoscopic findings were assessed quantitatively by two observers in two different ways. All subjects but three had gastric mucosal lesions at follow-up endoscopy. There was a good correlation between the endoscopic assessments but no statistical correlation between the endoscopic assessment and the increase in fecal blood loss. The data suggest that factors other than gastric mucosal lesions have to be taken into account when investigating NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeding

  7. [A Case of Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia Resulting from Sensitivity to Oxaliplatin].

    Masuda, Taiki; Nagai, Kagami; Sanada, Katsuya

    2015-11-01

    A 67-year-old man was diagnosed with pulmonary metastasis from advanced transverse colon cancer. Thus, a local resection was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was started. Sixteen courses were carried out without problems. However, he complained of chills and chest discomfort 2 hours after beginning the 17th course of chemotherapy. Laboratory data showed remarkable thrombocytopenia, and platelet-associated IgG level was high. After administration of steroids and platelet transfusions, the platelet count improved. Therefore, we diagnosed drug-induced thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to oxaliplatin (L-OHP). Since then, sLV5FU2 therapy was started, and the patient received the whole adjuvant chemotherapy without problems. Thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to L-OHP is a relatively rare side effect. We herein report this case with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26805296

  8. Bilateral macular hemorrhage as a complication of drug-induced anemia: a case report

    Belfort Rubens N

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bilateral macular hemorrhage is a rare ocular finding and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such hemorrhages as a presentation of drug-induced anemia. Case presentation We describe the case of a 14-year-old Caucasian boy who presented with a toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis and was treated with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine. Three months later, he presented with a bilateral macular hemorrhage as a complication of a toxic induced anemia. Conclusion Our patient presented with toxic anemia secondary to the treatment of a very common disease, ocular toxoplasmosis. Prophylactic use of folinic acid could prevent such complications but in many cases, it is not prescribed owing to its cost or is mistakenly substituted with folic acid, which does not present as a valid substitute.

  9. Oxytocinergic regulation of endogenous as well as drug-induced mood.

    Broadbear, J H; Kabel, D; Tracy, L; Mak, P

    2014-04-01

    The interconnections between the serotonin and oxytocin pathways in the brain suggest that changes in oxytocin levels - arising from natural or drug-induced stimuli - lead to measureable changes in mood. In this paper, we review our findings in the context of what is known about the roles of oxytocin and vasopressin in the expression of a range of behaviours. In our first set of studies we investigated whether stimulation of oxytocin and vasopressin receptors, via central or systemic drug administration, would produce behavioural changes indicative of anti-depressant or anxiolytic activity. In our second study we investigated whether oxytocin receptor activation might be implicated in the interoceptive effects experienced with the popular party drug, MDMA ('ecstasy'). Our first study demonstrated that carbetocin, an oxytocin analogue, had anti-depressant actions following systemic and central administration, effects which were blocked by the oxytocin and vasopressin 1A receptor antagonist, atosiban. Carbetocin also had anxiolytic effects in the elevated plus maze. In an evaluation of the complementary nature of oxytocin and vasopressin, we found that systemic administration of desmopressin, a vasopressin analogue, was anxiogenic; its effects blocked by atosiban which on its own produced robust anxiolytic behavioural changes. In our second study, we evaluated MDMA's interoceptive effects using a drug discrimination paradigm. Carbetocin partially substituted for MDMA, while atosiban interfered with MDMA discrimination, suggesting that oxytocin receptor activation contributes to MDMA-related interoceptive cues. The results of these and other clinical and preclinical studies suggest that oxytocin, as well as its closely related counterpart vasopressin, may provide alternative therapeutic targets for the treatment of mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. The possibility that oxytocin release may contribute to the perception of and processes underlying natural

  10. Detection of metabolic activation leading to drug-induced phospholipidosis in rat hepatocyte spheroids.

    Takagi, Masashi; Sanoh, Seigo; Santoh, Masataka; Ejiri, Yoko; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (PLD) is one of the adverse reactions to treatment with cationic amphiphilic drugs. Recently, simple and reliable evaluation methods for PLD have been reported. However, the predictive power of these methods for in vivo PLD induction is insufficient in some cases. To accurately predict PLD, we focused on drug metabolism and used three-dimensional cultures of hepatocytes known as spheroids. Here we used the fluorescent phospholipid dye N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (NBD-PE) to detect PLD induction. After 48 hr exposure to 20 µM amiodarone and amitriptyline, PLD inducers, NBD-PE fluorescence in the spheroids was significantly higher than that in the control. In contrast, 1 mM acetaminophen, as a negative control, did not increase fluorescence. Furthermore, the combination of NBD-PE fluorescence and LysoTracker Red fluorescence and the accumulation of intrinsic phospholipids reflected PLD induction in spheroids. To evaluate metabolic activation, we assessed PLD induction by loratadine. NBD-PE fluorescence intensity was significantly increased by 50 µM loratadine treatment. However, the fluorescence was markedly decreased by co-treatment with 500 µM 1-aminobenzotriazole, a broad cytochrome P450 inhibitor. The formation of desloratadine, a metabolite of loratadine, was observed in spheroids after treatment with loratadine alone. These results showed that metabolic activation is the key factor in PLD induction by treatment with loratadine. We demonstrated that rat primary hepatocyte spheroid culture is a useful model for evaluating drug-induced PLD induction mediated by metabolic activation of the drug using the fluorescence probe technique. PMID:26763403

  11. Update on Advances in Research on Idiosyncratic Drug-Induced Liver Injury.

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major concern for public health, as well as for drug development in the pharmaceutical industry, since it can cause liver failure and lead to drug withdrawal from the market and black box warnings. Thus, it is important to identify biomarkers for early prediction to increase our understanding of mechanisms underlying DILI that will ultimately aid in the exploration of novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or manage DILI. DILI can be subdivided into 'intrinsic' and 'idiosyncratic' categories, although the validity of this classification remains controversial. Idiosyncratic DILI occurs in a minority of susceptible individuals with a prolonged latency, while intrinsic DILI results from drug-induced direct hepatotoxicity over the course of a few days. The rare occurrence of idiosyncratic DILI requires multicenter collaborative investigations and phenotype standardization. Recent progress in research on idiosyncratic DILI is based on key developments in 3 areas: (1) newly developed high-throughput genotyping across the whole genome allowing for the identification of genetic susceptibility markers, (2) new mechanistic concepts on the pathogenesis of DILI revealing a key role of drug-responsive T lymphocytes in the immunological response, and (3) broad multidisciplinary approaches using different platform "-omics" technologies that have identified novel biomarkers for the prediction of DILI. An association of a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele with DILI has been reported for several drugs. HLA-restricted T-cell immune responses have also been investigated using lymphocytes and T-cell clones isolated from patients. A microRNA, miR-122, has been discovered as a promising biomarker for the early prediction of DILI. In this review, we summarize recent advances in research on idiosyncratic DILI with an understanding of the key role of adaptive immune systems. PMID:26540496

  12. Pharmacogenetic testing in idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury: current role in clinical practice.

    Aithal, Guruprasad P

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to the studies that have explored association of genetic variants with other complex traits, those investigating hepatotoxicity have identified risk alleles with substantially higher risk ratios for the susceptibility to drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In addition, a relatively small number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles have overlapping associations with a variety of adverse reactions including DILI, cutaneous hypersensitivity and drug-induced pancreatitis. However, if used as a test prior to prescription to prevent potential adverse reaction, genotyping would have a very high negative predictive value, yet a low positive predictive value based on the low incidence of DILI. One potential consideration is to treat all relevant HLA genotypes as one panel covering different forms of adverse drug reactions, thereby improving the positive predictive value of the panel and widen its application. The majority of HLA alleles associated with DILI have a very high negative predictive value; therefore, they can be used to rule out hepatotoxicity caused by particular drugs. A high negative predictive value of a genetic test can be used to identify the correct agent underlying DILI when the patient had been exposed to two concomitant medications with a potential to cause DILI. Inclusion of genetic tests in the causality assessment of an event, where DILI is suspected, may improve consistency and precision of causality assessment tools. A recent clinical trial used N-acetyltransferase 2 genotyping to determine the appropriate dose of isoniazid in an anti-tuberculosis therapeutic regimen and demonstrated that pharmacogenetic-based clinical algorithms have the potential to improve efficacy of a drug and to reduce DILI. PMID:25809692

  13. Clinical features and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in drug-induced parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease

    Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J.; Escobar-Delgado, Teresa [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla, Seville (Spain); Sanz-Viedma, Salome [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Unidad Diagnostica de Medicina Nuclear, Seville (Spain); Garcia-Solis, David [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Unidad Diagnostica de Medicina Nuclear, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain); Mir, Pablo [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain); Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento. Servicio de Neurologia, Seville (Spain)

    2010-03-15

    To determine clinical predictors and accuracy of {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in the differentiation of drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Several clinical features and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT images in 32 patients with DIP, 25 patients with PD unmasked by antidopaminergic drugs (PDu) and 22 patients with PD without a previous history of antidopaminergic treatment (PDc) were retrospectively evaluated. DIP and PD shared all clinical features except symmetry of parkinsonian signs which was more frequently observed in patients with DIP (46.9%) than in patients with PDu (16.0%, p<0.05) or PDc (4.5%, p<0.01). Qualitatively {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT images were normal in 29 patients with DIP (90.6%) and abnormal in all patients with PD, and this imaging technique showed high levels of accuracy. DIP and PD are difficult to differentiate based on clinical signs. The precision of clinical diagnosis could be reliably enhanced by {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging. (orig.)

  14. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje;

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination...... abnormality independently predicted transition to disability or death [HR (95 % CI) 1.53 (1.01-2.34)]. The hazard increased with increasing number of abnormalities. Among MRI lesions, only ARWMC of severe grade independently predicted disability or death [HR (95 % CI) 2.18 (1.37-3.48)]. In our cohort...

  15. Advantageous use of HepaRG cells for the screening and mechanistic study of drug-induced steatosis.

    Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Jiménez, Nuria; Hervás, David; Jover, Ramiro; Donato, M Teresa

    2016-07-01

    Only a few in vitro assays have been proposed to evaluate the steatotic potential of new drugs. The present study examines the utility of HepaRG cells as a cell-based assay system for screening drug-induced liver steatosis. A high-content screening assay was run to evaluate multiple toxicity-related cell parameters in HepaRG cells exposed to 28 compounds, including drugs reported to cause steatosis through different mechanisms and non-steatotic compounds. Lipid content was the most sensitive parameter for all the steatotic drugs, whereas no effects on lipid levels were produced by non-steatotic compounds. Apart from fat accumulation, increased ROS production and altered mitochondrial membrane potential were also found in the cells exposed to steatotic drugs, which indicates that all these cellular events contributed to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. These findings are of clinical relevance as most effects were observed at drug concentrations under 100-fold of the therapeutic peak plasmatic concentration. HepaRG cells showed increased lipid overaccumulation vs. HepG2 cells, which suggests greater sensitivity to drug-induced steatosis. An altered expression profile of transcription factors and the genes that code key proteins in lipid metabolism was also found in the cells exposed to drugs capable of inducing liver steatosis. Our results generally indicate the value of HepaRG cells for assessing the risk of liver damage associated with steatogenic compounds and for investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in drug-induced steatosis. PMID:27089845

  16. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases. Often forgotten; Medikamenteninduzierte interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen. Haeufig vergessen

    Poschenrieder, F.; Stroszczynski, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Regensburg (Germany); Hamer, O.W. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Regensburg (Germany); Lungenfachklinik Donaustauf, Donaustauf (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases (DILD) are probably more common than diagnosed. Due to their potential reversibility, increased vigilance towards DILD is appropriate also from the radiologist's point of view, particularly as these diseases regularly exhibit radiological correlates in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lungs. Based on personal experience typical relatively common manifestations of DILD are diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), eosinophilic pneumonia (EP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), organizing pneumonia (OP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). These patterns are presented based on case studies, whereby emphasis is placed on the clinical context. This is to highlight the relevance of interdisciplinary communication and discussion in the diagnostic field of DILD as it is a diagnosis of exclusion or of probability in most cases. Helpful differential diagnostic indications for the presence of DILD, such as an accompanying eosinophilia or increased attenuation of pulmonary consolidations in amiodarone-induced pneumopathy are mentioned and the freely available online database http://www.pneumotox.com is presented. (orig.) [German] Medikamenteninduzierte interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen (engl. ''drug-induced interstitial lung diseases'', DILD) sind wahrscheinlich haeufiger, als sie diagnostiziert werden. Aufgrund ihrer potenziellen Reversibilitaet ist eine erhoehte Vigilanz gegenueber DILD auch seitens der Radiologie angebracht, da diese regelmaessig ein radiomorphologisches Korrelat in der hochaufloesenden Computertomographie (''high-resolution CT'', HRCT) der Lunge aufweisen. Typische, nach eigener Erfahrung relativ haeufige Manifestationsformen von DILD sind der diffuse Alveolarschaden (engl. ''diffuse alveolar damage'', DAD), die eosinophile Pneumonie (EP), die Hypersensitivitaetspneumonitis (HP), die organisierende

  17. MicroRNA changes in rat mesentery and serum associated with drug-induced vascular injury

    Thomas, Roberta A., E-mail: Roberta.A.Thomas@gsk.com; Scicchitano, Marshall S.; Mirabile, Rosanna C.; Chau, Nancy T.; Frazier, Kendall S.; Thomas, Heath C.

    2012-08-01

    Regulatory miRNAs play a role in vascular biology and are involved in biochemical and molecular pathways dysregulated during vascular injury. Collection and integration of functional miRNA data into these pathways can provide insight into pathogenesis at the site of injury; the same technologies applied to biofluids may provide diagnostic or surrogate biomarkers. miRNA was analyzed from mesentery and serum from rats given vasculotoxic compounds for 4 days. Fenoldopam, dopamine and midodrine each alter hemodynamics and are associated with histologic evidence of vascular injury, while yohimbine is vasoactive but does not cause histologic evidence of vascular injury in rat. There were 38 and 35 miRNAs altered in a statistically significant manner with a fold change of 2 or greater in mesenteries of fenoldopam- and dopamine-dosed rats, respectively, with 9 of these miRNAs shared. 10 miRNAs were altered in rats given midodrine; 6 were shared with either fenoldopam or dopamine. In situ hybridization demonstrated strong expression and co-localization of miR-134 in affected but not in adjacent unaffected vessels. Mesenteric miRNA expression may provide clarity or avenues of research into mechanisms involved in vascular injury once the functional role of specific miRNAs becomes better characterized. 102 miRNAs were altered in serum from rats with drug-induced vascular injury. 10 miRNAs were commonly altered in serum from dopamine and either fenoldopam or midodrine dosed rats; 18 of these 102 were also altered in mesenteries from rats with drug-induced vascular injury, suggesting their possible utility as peripheral biomarkers. -- Highlights: ► Mesentery and serum were examined from rats given vasoactive compounds for 4 days. ► 72 miRNAs were altered in mesenteries from rats with vascular injury. ► miR-134 was localized to affected but not adjacent unaffected vessels. ► 102 miRNAs were changed in serum from rats with vascular injury. ► 18 miRNAs changed in both

  18. MicroRNA changes in rat mesentery and serum associated with drug-induced vascular injury

    Regulatory miRNAs play a role in vascular biology and are involved in biochemical and molecular pathways dysregulated during vascular injury. Collection and integration of functional miRNA data into these pathways can provide insight into pathogenesis at the site of injury; the same technologies applied to biofluids may provide diagnostic or surrogate biomarkers. miRNA was analyzed from mesentery and serum from rats given vasculotoxic compounds for 4 days. Fenoldopam, dopamine and midodrine each alter hemodynamics and are associated with histologic evidence of vascular injury, while yohimbine is vasoactive but does not cause histologic evidence of vascular injury in rat. There were 38 and 35 miRNAs altered in a statistically significant manner with a fold change of 2 or greater in mesenteries of fenoldopam- and dopamine-dosed rats, respectively, with 9 of these miRNAs shared. 10 miRNAs were altered in rats given midodrine; 6 were shared with either fenoldopam or dopamine. In situ hybridization demonstrated strong expression and co-localization of miR-134 in affected but not in adjacent unaffected vessels. Mesenteric miRNA expression may provide clarity or avenues of research into mechanisms involved in vascular injury once the functional role of specific miRNAs becomes better characterized. 102 miRNAs were altered in serum from rats with drug-induced vascular injury. 10 miRNAs were commonly altered in serum from dopamine and either fenoldopam or midodrine dosed rats; 18 of these 102 were also altered in mesenteries from rats with drug-induced vascular injury, suggesting their possible utility as peripheral biomarkers. -- Highlights: ► Mesentery and serum were examined from rats given vasoactive compounds for 4 days. ► 72 miRNAs were altered in mesenteries from rats with vascular injury. ► miR-134 was localized to affected but not adjacent unaffected vessels. ► 102 miRNAs were changed in serum from rats with vascular injury. ► 18 miRNAs changed in both

  19. CT of pleural abnormalities

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  20. Protective effects of exogenous glutathione and related thiol compounds against drug-induced liver injury.

    Masubuchi, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Junpei; Sadakata, Yuka

    2011-01-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) causes liver injury both in experimental animals and humans. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is clinically used as an antidote for APAP intoxication, and it is thought to act by providing cysteine as a precursor of glutathione, which traps a reactive metabolite of APAP. Other hepatoprotective mechanisms of NAC have also been suggested. Here, we examined the effects of thiol compounds with different abilities to restore hepatic glutathione, on hepatotoxicity of APAP and furosemide in mice. Overnight-fasted male CD-1 mice were given APAP or furosemide intraperitoneally. NAC, cysteine, glutathione, or glutathione-monoethyl ester was administered concomitantly with APAP or furosemide. All thiol compounds used in this study effectively protected mice against APAP-induced liver injury. Only glutathione-monoethyl ester completely prevented APAP-induced early hepatic glutathione depletion. Cysteine also significantly restored hepatic glutathione levels. NAC partially restored glutathione levels. Exogenous glutathione had no effect on hepatic glutathione loss. NAC and glutathione highly stimulated the hepatic expression of cytokines, particularly interleukin-6, which might be involved in the alleviation of APAP hepatotoxicity. Furosemide-induced liver injury, which does not accompany hepatic glutathione depletion, was also attenuated by NAC and exogenous glutathione, supporting their protective mechanisms other than replenishment of glutathione. In conclusion, exogenous thiols could alleviate drug-induced liver injury. NAC and glutathione might exert their effects, at least partially, via mechanisms that are independent of increasing hepatic glutathione, but probably act through cytokine-mediated and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:21372386

  1. Drug induced immune haemolytic anaemia in the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study.

    Garbe, Edeltraut; Andersohn, Frank; Bronder, Elisabeth; Klimpel, Andreas; Thomae, Michael; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Hildebrandt, Martin; Späth-Schwalbe, Ernst; Grüneisen, Andreas; Mayer, Beate; Salama, Abdulgabar; Kurtal, Hanife

    2011-09-01

    Drug-induced immune haemolytic anaemia is a rare but serious condition. This study investigated the possibility of drug aetiology of immune haemolytic anaemia (IHA) in 134 patients with new onset of IHA who were identified in the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study between 2000 and 2009. Single drugs related to IHA in three or more patients and assessed more than once as a certain or probable cause of IHA in a standardized causality assessment included diclofenac, fludarabine, oxaliplatin, ceftriaxone and piperacillin. In a case-control study including all 124 IHA cases developed in outpatient care and 731 controls, significantly increased odds ratios (OR) were observed for beta-lactam antibiotics (OR=8·8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3·2-25·2), cotrimoxazole (OR=6·5; CI 1·1-37·9), ciprofloxacin (OR=6·9, CI 1·3-38·5), fludarabine (OR=22·2; CI: 2·8-454·5) and lorazepam (OR=5·3; CI: 1·2-21·2). Excluding new onset cases with a chronic IHA disease course, an increased risk became also apparent for diclofenac with an OR of 3·1 (CI 1·3-7·0). This is the first case-control study investigating drugs as risk factors for IHA. It corroborates an increased risk for several drugs that have been implicated as a cause of IHA in the standardized causality assessment of individual cases. PMID:21749359

  2. Expression of TNF-α and RANTES in drug-induced human gingival overgrowth

    Subramani Tamilselvan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES is a chemokine that is produced by fibroblasts, lymphoid and epithelial cells of the mucosa in response to various external stimuli. RANTES expression has been demonstrated in a variety of diseases characterized by inflammation, including asthma, transplantation-associated accelerated atherosclerosis, endometriosis and fibrosis. RANTES mRNA is quickly up-regulated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α stimulation. Cyclosporine A (CsA is widely used in organ transplant patients, often causing various side-effects including gingival overgrowth, which is fibrotic in nature. This study was carried out to assess the mRNA expression of TNF-α and RANTES in healthy individual, chronic periodontitis and CsA-induced gingival overgrowth tissues. Materials and Methods : Gingival tissue samples were collected from chronic periodontitis, CsA-induced gingival overgrowth patients and healthy individuals. Total RNA was isolated and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was performed for TNF-α and RANTES expression. Results : The results suggest that CsA-induced gingival overgrowth tissues expressed significantly increased TNF-α and RANTES compared to control and chronic periodontitis. Conclusion : The findings of the present study suggest that CsA can modify the expression of TNF-α and RANTES in drug-induced human gingival overgrowth.

  3. Drug-induced liver injury secondary to testosterone prohormone dietary supplement use.

    Hoedebecke, Kyle; Rerucha, Caitlyn; Maxwell, Kimberly; Butler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Dietary supplementation has become progressively more prevalent, with over half of the American population reporting use of various products. An increased incidence of supplement use has been reported in the military especially within Special Operations Forces (SOF) where training regimens rival those of elite athletes. Federal regulations regarding dietary supplements are minimal, allowing for general advertisement to the public without emphasis on the potentially harmful side effects. Subsequent medical care for these negative effects causes financial burden on the military in addition to the unit?s loss of an Operator and potential mission compromise. This report reviews a case of an Operator diagnosed with drug-induced liver injury secondary to a testosterone prohormone supplement called Post Cycle II. Clinical situations like this emphasize the necessity that SOF Operators and clinicians be aware of the risks and benefits of these minimally studied substances. Providers should also be aware of the Human Performance Resource Center for Health Information and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database supplement safety ratings as well as the Food and Drug Administration?s MedWatch and Natural Medicines WATCH, to which adverse reactions should be reported. PMID:24227554

  4. [Role of ABC efflux transporters in the oral bioavailability and drug-induced intestinal toxicity].

    Yokooji, Tomoharu

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the organ that absorbs nutrients and water from foods and drinks. This organ is often exposed to various harmful xenobiotics, and therefore possesses various detoxification/barrier systems, including metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters. Intestinal epithelial cells express ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and breast cancer resistance protein, in addition to various solute carrier (SLC) influx transporters. These transporters are expressed site- and membrane-specifically in enterocytes, which affects the bioavailability of ingested substrate drugs. Expression and/or function of transporters can be modulated by various compounds, including therapeutic drugs, herbal products, some foods, and by disease states. The modulation of transporters could cause unexpectedly higher or lower blood concentrations, marked inter- and intra-individual variations in pharmacokinetics, and unreliable pharmacological actions in association with toxicities of substrates. Recently, we found that hyperbilirubinemia, which occurs in some disease states, increased intestinal accumulation and toxicity of methotrexate, an MRP substrate, because of the suppression of MRP function by high plasma concentrations of conjugated bilirubin. We also attempted to ameliorate the intestinal toxicity of irinotecan hydrochloride by modulating the hepatic and intestinal functions of MRP2. This review summarizes our findings regarding the role of ABC transporters, especially MRPs, in oral bioavailability and in drug-induced intestinal toxicity. Our approach to treat intestinal toxicity using an MRP2 modulator is also described. PMID:23811769

  5. Drug-induced diseases (DIDs: An experience of a tertiary care teaching hospital from India

    Vishal R Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Drug-induced diseases (DIDs are well known but least studied. Data on DIDs from India are not available. Hence, this retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken using suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR data collected form Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPI to evaluate profile of DIDs over two years, in a tertiary care teaching hospital from north India. Methods: The suspected ADRs in the form of DID were evaluated for drug and disease related variables and were classified in terms of causality. Results: DID rate was 38.80 per cent. Mean duration of developing DIDs was 26.05 ± 9.6 days; 25.16 per cent had more than one co-morbid condition. Geriatric population (53.99% accounted for maximum DIDs followed by adult (37.79% and paediatric (8.21%. Maximum events were probable (93.98% followed by possible (6.04%. All DIDs required intervention. Gastritis (7.43%, diarrhoea (5.92%, anaemia (4.79%, hypotension (2.77%, hepatic dysfunction (2.69%, hypertension (1.51%, myalgia (1.05%, and renal dysfunction (1.01% were some of the DIDs. Anti-tubercular treatment (ATT, anti- retroviral treatment (ART, ceftriaxone injection, steroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antimicrobials and anticancer drugs were found as commonly offending drugs. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that DIDs are a significant health problem in our country, which need more attention.

  6. A hidden Markov model to assess drug-induced sleep fragmentation in the telemetered rat.

    Diack, C; Ackaert, O; Ploeger, B A; van der Graaf, P H; Gurrell, R; Ivarsson, M; Fairman, D

    2011-12-01

    Drug-induced sleep fragmentation can cause sleep disturbances either via their intended pharmacological action or as a side effect. Examples of disturbances include excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia and nightmares. Developing drugs without these side effects requires insight into the mechanisms leading to sleep disturbance. The characterization of the circadian sleep pattern by EEG following drug exposure has improved our understanding of these mechanisms and their translatability across species. The EEG shows frequent transitions between specific sleep states leading to multiple correlated sojourns in these states. We have developed a Markov model to consider the high correlation in the data and quantitatively compared sleep disturbance in telemetered rats induced by methylphenidate, which is known to disturb sleep, and of a new chemical entity (NCE). It was assumed that these drugs could either accelerate or decelerate the transitions between the sleep states. The difference in sleep disturbance of methylphenidate and the NCE were quantitated and different mechanisms of action on rebound sleep were identified. The estimated effect showed that both compounds induce sleep fragmentation with methylphenidate being fivefold more potent compared to the NCE. PMID:21909798

  7. Integrated Analysis of Drug-Induced Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Novel hERG Inhibitors

    Babcock, Joseph J.; Du, Fang; Xu, Kaiping; Wheelan, Sarah J.; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that drugs interact with diverse molecular targets mediating both therapeutic and toxic effects. Prediction of these complex interactions from chemical structures alone remains challenging, as compounds with different structures may possess similar toxicity profiles. In contrast, predictions based on systems-level measurements of drug effect may reveal pharmacologic similarities not evident from structure or known therapeutic indications. Here we utilized drug-induced transcriptional responses in the Connectivity Map (CMap) to discover such similarities among diverse antagonists of the human ether-à-go-go related (hERG) potassium channel, a common target of promiscuous inhibition by small molecules. Analysis of transcriptional profiles generated in three independent cell lines revealed clusters enriched for hERG inhibitors annotated using a database of experimental measurements (hERGcentral) and clinical indications. As a validation, we experimentally identified novel hERG inhibitors among the unannotated drugs in these enriched clusters, suggesting transcriptional responses may serve as predictive surrogates of cardiotoxicity complementing existing functional assays. PMID:23936032

  8. Drug-Induced Dyskinesia, Part 1: Treatment of Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia.

    Vijayakumar, Dhanya; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Dyskinesias encompass a variety of different hyperkinetic phenomenologies, particularly chorea, dystonia, stereotypies, and akathisia. Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is one of the main types of drug-induced dyskinesia, occurring in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who have been treated with levodopa for long time, but this side effect may be encountered even within a few weeks or months after initiation of levodopa therapy. Based on the temporal pattern in relationship to levodopa dosing, LIDs are divided into "peak-dose dyskinesia," "diphasic dyskinesia," and "wearing off" or "off-period" dyskinesia, of which peak-dose dyskinesia is the most common, followed by off-period, and then diphasic dyskinesia. Treatment strategy includes identifying the kind of dyskinesia and tailoring treatment accordingly. Peak-dose dyskinesia is treated mainly by reducing individual doses of levodopa and adding amantadine and dopamine agonists, whereas off-period dystonia often responds to baclofen and botulinum toxin injections. Diphasic dyskinesias, occurring particularly in patients with young-onset PD, are the most difficult to treat. While fractionation of levodopa dosage is the most frequently utilized strategy, many patients require deep brain stimulation to control their troublesome motor fluctuations and LIDs. A variety of emerging (experimental) drugs currently in development promise to provide better control of LIDs and other levodopa-related complications in the near future. PMID:27091215

  9. ANTIHEPATOTOXIC EFFECT OF BARLERIA MONTANA LEAVES AGAINST ANTI-TB DRUGS INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY

    Jyothi Basini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective activity of 95% hydroalcoholic extract of Barleria Montana leaves against anti-TB drugs induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Hepatotoxicity was induced by anti-TB drugs once daily for 35 days and simultaneously 95% hydroalcoholic extract of Barleria Montana (250 & 500 mg/kg p.o. was administered one hour prior administration of anti-TB drugs. Silymarin was used as standard drug (100 mg/kg p.o.. Results: Elevated levels of SGOT, SGPT, ALP, TB & total cholesterol and decreased total HDL following anti-TB drugs administration. Pretreatment of 95% hydroalcoholic extract of Barleria Montana with anti-TB drugs were significantly reduced biochemical markers and increased total HDL. In vivo antioxidant parameters such as SOD, CAT, GSH, GPx and GRx were suppressed in hepatic control animals. Pre treatment of 95% hydroalcoholic extract of Barleria Montana with anti-TB drugs significantly reduced lipid per oxidation and increased antioxidant activities. Conclusion: The result of the present study was indicated that Barleria Montana showed protective effect on liver toxicity induced by anti-TB drugs might be attributed to its antioxidant activity.

  10. Acute liver failure caused by drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome associated with hyperferritinemia

    Masayuki Miyazaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS is a severe reaction usually characterized by fever, rash, and multiorgan failure, occurring 2-6 wk after drug introduction. It is an immune-mediated reaction involving macrophage and T-lymphocyte activation and cytokine release. A 54-year-old woman was diagnosed with rheumatic arthritis and initiated salazosulfapyridine by mouth. About 10 d later, she had a high fever, skin rash and liver dysfunction. She was admitted to hospital and diagnosed with a drug eruption. She was treated with oral prednisolone 30 mg/d; however, she developed high fever again and her blood tests showed acute liver failure and cytopenia associated with hyperferritinemia. She was diagnosed with acute liver failure and hemophagocytosis caused by DIHS. She was transferred to the Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Kyushu University, where she was treated with arterial steroid injection therapy. Following this treatment, her liver function improved and serum ferritin immediately decreased. We hypothesized that an immune-mediated reaction in DIHS may have generated over-activation of macrophages and T-lymphocytes, followed by a cytokine storm that affected various organs. The measurement of serum ferritin might be a useful marker of the severity of DIHS.

  11. A metabolomics cell-based approach for anticipating and investigating drug-induced liver injury.

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Castell, José V; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-01-01

    In preclinical stages of drug development, anticipating potential adverse drug effects such as toxicity is an important issue for both saving resources and preventing public health risks. Current in vitro cytotoxicity tests are restricted by their predictive potential and their ability to provide mechanistic information. This study aimed to develop a metabolomic mass spectrometry-based approach for the detection and classification of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. To this end, the metabolite profiles of human derived hepatic cells (i.e., HepG2) exposed to different well-known hepatotoxic compounds acting through different mechanisms (i.e., oxidative stress, steatosis, phospholipidosis, and controls) were compared by multivariate data analysis, thus allowing us to decipher both common and mechanism-specific altered biochemical pathways. Briefly, oxidative stress damage markers were found in the three mechanisms, mainly showing altered levels of metabolites associated with glutathione and γ-glutamyl cycle. Phospholipidosis was characterized by a decreased lysophospholipids to phospholipids ratio, suggestive of phospholipid degradation inhibition. Whereas, steatosis led to impaired fatty acids β-oxidation and a subsequent increase in triacylglycerides synthesis. The characteristic metabolomic profiles were used to develop a predictive model aimed not only to discriminate between non-toxic and hepatotoxic drugs, but also to propose potential drug toxicity mechanism(s). PMID:27265840

  12. Generation of Pig Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with a Drug-Inducible System

    Zhao Wu; Jijun Chen; Jiangtao Ren; Lei Bao; Jing Liao; Chun Cui; Linjun Rao; Hui Li; Yijun Gu; Huiming Dai; Hui Zhu; Xiaokun Teng; Lu Cheng; Lei Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Domesticated ungulate pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cell lines would be useful for generating precise gene-modified animals. To date, many efforts have been made to establish domesticated ungulate pluripotent ES cells from early embryos without success.Here, we report the generation of porcine-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells using drug-inducible expression of defined factors.We showed that porcine iPS cells expressed alkaline phosphatase, SSEA3, SSEA4, Tra-1-60, Tra-1-81, Oct3/4, Nanog, Sox2, Rex1 and CDH1. Pig iPS cells expressed high levels of telomerase activity and showed normal karyotypes. These cells could differentiate into cell types of all three germ layers in vitro and in teratomas. Our study reveals properties of porcine pluripotent stem cells that may facilitate the eventual establishment of porcine ES cells. Moreover, the porcine iPS cells produced may be directly useful for the generation of precise gene-modified pigs.

  13. Female gender as a susceptibility factor for drug-induced liver injury.

    Amacher, David E

    2014-09-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) can involve all tissues and organs, but liver injuries are considered among the most serious. A number of prospective, multicenter studies have confirmed a higher risk of ADRs in general among female subjects compared to a male cohort. Although drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is infrequently encountered, the preponderance of evidence suggests that women appear to be more susceptible than men to fulminate hepatic/acute liver failure especially in response to some anti-infective drugs and to autoimmune-like hepatitis following exposure to certain other therapeutic drugs. A number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain this sex difference in susceptibility to DILI. Collectively, these hypotheses suggest three basic sex-dependent mechanisms that include differences in various aspects of drug pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics following the administration of certain drugs; specific hormonal effects or interactions with immunomodulating agents or signaling molecules; and differences in the adverse response of the immune system to some drugs, reactive drug metabolites, or drug-protein adducts. At the preclinical drug safety stage, there is a need for more research on hormonal effects on drug PK and for additional research on gender differences in aberrant immune responses that may lead to idiosyncratic DILI in some female patients. Because the detection of rare but serious hepatic ADRs requires the exposure of very large patient populations, pharmacovigilance networks will continue to play a key role in the postmarketing surveillance for their detection and reporting. PMID:24299907

  14. Drug-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Dose Adjustment Recommendations: Agreement Among Four Drug Information Sources.

    Bicalho, Millena Drumond; Soares, Danielly Botelho; Botoni, Fernando Antonio; Reis, Adriano Max Moreira; Martins, Maria Auxiliadora Parreiras

    2015-09-01

    : Hospitalized patients require the use of a variety of drugs, many of which individually or in combination have the potential to cause kidney damage. The use of potentially nephrotoxic drugs is often unavoidable, and the need for dose adjustment should be evaluated. This study is aimed at assessing concordance in information on drug-induced nephrotoxicity and dose adjustment recommendations by comparing four drug information sources (DRUGDEX(®), UpToDate(®), Medscape(®) and the Brazilian Therapeutic Formulary) using the formulary of a Brazilian public hospital. A total of 218 drugs were investigated. The global Fleiss' kappa coefficient was 0.265 for nephrotoxicity (p < 0.001; CI 95%, 0.211-0.319) and 0.346 for recommendations (p < 0.001; CI 95%, 0.292-0.401), indicating fair concordance among the sources. Anti-infectives and anti-hypertensives were the main drugs cited as nephrotoxic by the different sources. There were no clear definitions for qualitative data or quantitative values for dose adjustments among the four information sources. There was no advice for dosing for a large number of the drugs in the international databases. The National Therapeutic Formulary offered imprecise dose adjustment recommendations for many nephrotoxic drugs. Discrepancies among information sources may have a clinical impact on patient care and contribute to drug-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:26371029

  15. Hyperacute drug-induced hepatitis with intravenous amiodarone: case report and review of the literature

    Nasser M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Nasser, Timothy R Larsen, Barryton Waanbah, Ibrahim Sidiqi, Peter A McCullough Providence Hospitals and Medical Centers, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Southfield and Novi, MI, USA Abstract: Amiodarone is a benzofuran class III antiarrhythmic drug used to treat a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. The parenteral formulation is prepared in polysorbate 80 diluent. We report an unusual case of acute elevation of aminotransaminase concentrations after the initiation of intravenous amiodarone. An 88-year-old Caucasian female developed acute hepatitis and renal failure after initiating intravenous amiodarone for atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response in the setting of acutely decompensated heart failure and hepatic congestion. Liver transaminases returned to baseline within 7 days after discontinuing the drug. Researchers hypothesized that this type of injury is related to liver ischemia with possible superimposed direct drug toxicity. The CIOMS/RUCAM scale identifies our patient’s acute hepatitis as a highly probable adverse drug reaction. Future research is needed to understand the mechanisms by which hyperacute drug toxicity occurs in the setting of impaired hepatic perfusion and venous congestion. Keywords: intravenous amiodarone, acute hepatotoxicity, liver transaminases, drug-induced liver toxicity

  16. From Drug-Induced Developmental Neuroapoptosis to Pediatric Anesthetic Neurotoxicity-Where Are We Now?

    Creeley, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    The fetal and neonatal periods are critical and sensitive periods for neurodevelopment, and involve rapid brain growth in addition to natural programmed cell death (i.e., apoptosis) and synaptic pruning. Apoptosis is an important process for neurodevelopment, preventing redundant, faulty, or unused neurons from cluttering the developing brain. However, animal studies have shown massive neuronal cell death by apoptosis can also be caused by exposure to several classes of drugs, namely gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists that are commonly used in pediatric anesthesia. This form of neurotoxic insult could cause a major disruption in brain development with the potential to permanently shape behavior and cognitive ability. Evidence does suggest that psychoactive drugs alter neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity in the animal brain, which, in the human brain, may translate to permanent neurodevelopmental changes associated with long-term intellectual disability. This paper reviews the seminal animal research on drug-induced developmental apoptosis and the subsequent clinical studies that have been conducted thus far. In humans, there is growing evidence that suggests anesthetics have the potential to harm the developing brain, but the long-term outcome is not definitive and causality has not been determined. The consensus is that there is more work to be done using both animal models and human clinical studies. PMID:27537919

  17. Metabolomics approaches for discovering biomarkers of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity

    Hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity are two major reasons that drugs are withdrawn post-market, and hence it is of major concern to both the FDA and pharmaceutical companies. The number of cases of serious adverse effects (SAEs) in marketed drugs has climbed faster than the number of total drug prescriptions issued. In some cases, preclinical animal studies fail to identify the potential toxicity of a new chemical entity (NCE) under development. The current clinical chemistry biomarkers of liver and kidney injury are inadequate in terms of sensitivity and/or specificity, prompting the need to discover new translational specific biomarkers of organ injury. Metabolomics along with genomics and proteomics technologies have the capability of providing translational diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers specific for early stages of liver and kidney injury. Metabolomics has several advantages over the other omics platforms such as ease of sample preparation, data acquisition and use of biofluids collected through minimally invasive procedures in preclinical and clinical studies. The metabolomics platform is reviewed with particular emphasis on applications involving drug-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Analytical platforms for metabolomics, chemometrics for mining metabolomics data and the applications of the metabolomics technologies are covered in detail with emphasis on recent work in the field.

  18. Integrated analysis of drug-induced gene expression profiles predicts novel hERG inhibitors.

    Joseph J Babcock

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that drugs interact with diverse molecular targets mediating both therapeutic and toxic effects. Prediction of these complex interactions from chemical structures alone remains challenging, as compounds with different structures may possess similar toxicity profiles. In contrast, predictions based on systems-level measurements of drug effect may reveal pharmacologic similarities not evident from structure or known therapeutic indications. Here we utilized drug-induced transcriptional responses in the Connectivity Map (CMap to discover such similarities among diverse antagonists of the human ether-à-go-go related (hERG potassium channel, a common target of promiscuous inhibition by small molecules. Analysis of transcriptional profiles generated in three independent cell lines revealed clusters enriched for hERG inhibitors annotated using a database of experimental measurements (hERGcentral and clinical indications. As a validation, we experimentally identified novel hERG inhibitors among the unannotated drugs in these enriched clusters, suggesting transcriptional responses may serve as predictive surrogates of cardiotoxicity complementing existing functional assays.

  19. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    张文娟; 安宇

    2015-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%–70%as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models.

  20. Ultrasonography of splenic abnormalities

    Ming-Jen Chen; Ming-Jer Huang; Wen-Hsiung Chang; Tsang-En Wang; Horng-Yuan Wang; Cheng-Hsin Chu; Shee-Chan Lin; Shou-Chuan Shih

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This report gives a comprehensive overview of ultrasonography of splenic abnormalities. Certain ultrasonic features are also discussed with pathologic correlation.METHODS: We review the typical ultrasonic characteristics of a wide range of splenic lesions, illustrating them with images obtained in our institution from 2000 to 2003.One hundred and three patients (47 men, 56 women),with a mean age of 54 years (range 9-92 years), were found to have an abnormal ultrasonic pattern of spleen.RESULTS: We describe the ultrasonic features of various splenic lesions such as accessory spleen, splenomegaly,cysts, cavernous hemangiomas, lymphomas, abscesses,metastatic tumors, splenic infarctions, hematomas, and rupture, based on traditional gray-scale and color Doppler sonography.CONCLUSION: Ultrasound is a widely available, noninvasive,and useful means of diagnosing splenic abnormalities. A combination of ultrasonic characteristics and clinical data may provide an accurate diagnosis. If the US appearance alone is not enough, US may also be used to guide biopsy of suspicious lesions.

  1. Role of movement in long-term basal ganglia changes: implications for abnormal motor responses

    Nicola eSimola

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal involuntary movements and dyskinesias elicited by drugs that stimulate dopamine receptors in the basal ganglia are a major issue in the management of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Preclinical studies in dopamine-denervated animals have contributed to the modeling of these abnormal movements, but the precise neurochemical and functional mechanisms underlying these untoward effects are still elusive. It has recently been suggested that the performance of movement may itself promote the later emergence of drug-induced motor complications, by favoring the generation of aberrant motor memories in the dopamine-denervated basal ganglia. Our recent results from hemiparkinsonian rats subjected to the priming model of dopaminergic stimulation are in agreement with this and may constitute a useful model to study the early neurochemical events underling dyskinesia. These results demonstrate that early performance of movement is crucial for the manifestation of sensitized rotational behavior, indicative of an abnormal motor response, and neurochemical modifications in selected striatal neurons following a dopaminergic challenge. Building on this evidence, this paper discusses the possible role of movement performance in drug-induced motor complications, with a look at the implications for PD management.

  2. Mechanism of exacerbative effect of progesterone on drug-induced liver injury.

    Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Endo, Shinya; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Miyashita, Taishi; Yano, Azusa; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-03-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern in drug development and clinical drug therapy. However, the underlying mechanism of DILI is little known. It is generally believed that women exhibit worse outcomes from DILI than men. Recently, we found that pretreatment of mice with estradiol attenuated halothane (HAL)-induced liver injury, whereas pretreatment with progesterone exacerbated it in female mice. To investigate the mechanism of sex difference of DILI, we focused on progesterone in this study. We found the exacerbating effect of progesterone in thioacetamide (TA), α-naphthylisothiocyanate, and dicloxacillin-induced liver injury only in female mice. Higher number of myeloperoxidase-positive mononuclear cells infiltrated into the liver and increased levels of Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 and 2 (CXCL1 and CXCL2) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in the liver were observed. Interestingly, CXCL1 was slightly increased by progesterone pretreatment alone. Progesterone pretreatment increased the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in HAL-induced liver injury. Pretreatment with U0126 (ERK inhibitor) significantly suppressed the exacerbating effect of progesterone and the expression of inflammatory mediators. In addition, pretreatment with gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3): inhibitor of Kupffer cells) significantly suppressed the exacerbating effect of progesterone pretreatment and the expression of inflammatory mediators. Moreover, posttreatment of RU486 (progesterone receptor antagonist) 1 h after the HAL or TA administration ameliorated the HAL- or TA-induced liver injury, respectively, in female mice. In conclusion, progesterone exacerbated the immune-mediated hepatotoxic responses in DILI via Kupffer cells and ERK pathway. The inhibition of progesterone receptor and decrease of the immune response may have important therapeutic implications in DILI. PMID:22157104

  3. [Case reports of drug-induced liver injury in a reference hospital of Zulia state, Venezuela].

    Mengual-Moreno, Edgardo; Lizarzábal-García, Maribel; Ruiz-Soler, María; Silva-Suarez, Niniveth; Andrade-Bellido, Raúl; Lucena-González, Maribel; Bessone, Fernando; Hernández, Nelia; Sánchez, Adriana; Medina-Cáliz, Inmaculada

    2015-03-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with varied geographical differences. The aim of this prospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study was to identify and characterize cases of DILI in a hospital of Zulia state, Venezuela. Thirteen patients with a presumptive diagnosis of DILI attended by the Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitario, Zulia state, Venezuela, from December-2012 to December-2013 were studied. Ibuprofen (n = 3; 23.1%), acetaminophen (n = 3; 23.1), isoniazid (n = 2; 15.4%) and Herbalife products (n = 2; 15.4%) were the main drugs involved with DILI. Acetaminophen and ibuprofen showed a mixed pattern of liver injury (n = 3; 23.1%) and isoniazid presented a hepatocellular pattern (n = 2; 15.4%). The CIOMS/RUCAMS allowed the identification of possible (n = 7; 53.9%), probable (n = 4; 30.8%) and highly-probable cases (n = 2; 15.4%) of DILI. Amoxicillin/clavulanate, isoniazid, isotretinoin, methotrexate and Herbalife nutritional products were implicated as highly-probable and probable agents. The highest percentage of DILI corresponded to mild cases that recovered after the discontinuation of the agent involved (n = 9; 69.3%). The consumption of Herbalife botanical products is associated with probable causality and fatality (n = 1; 7.7%). In conclusion, the frequency of DILI cases controlled by the Department of Gastroenterology of the Hospital Universitario of Maracaibo was low, being ibuprofen, acetaminophen, isoniazid and products Herbalife the products most commonly involved. It is recommended to continue with the prospective registration of cases, with an extended follow up monitoring period and to facilitate the incorporation of other hospitals in the Zulia State and Venezuela. PMID:25920181

  4. Chemotherapeutic Drug-Induced ABCG2 Promoter Demethylation as a Novel Mechanism of Acquired Multidrug Resistance

    Eran E. Bram

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available ABCG2 is an efflux transporter conferring multidrug resistance (MDR on cancer cells. However, the initial molecular events leading to its up-regulation in MDR tumor cells are poorly understood. Herein, we explored the impact of drug treatment on the methylation status of the ABCG2 promoter and consequent reactivation of ABCG2 gene expression in parental tumor cell lines and their MDR sublines. We demonstrate that ABCG2 promoter methylation is common in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL lines, also present in primary T-ALL lymphoblast specimens. Furthermore, drug selection with sulfasalazine and topotecan induced a complete demethylation of the ABCG2 promoter in the T-ALL and ovarian carcinoma model cell lines CCRF-CEM and IGROV1, respectively. This resulted in a dramatic induction of ABCG2 messenger RNA levels (235- and 743-fold, respectively and consequent acquisition of an ABCG2-dependent MDR phenotype. Quantitative genomic polymerase chain reaction and ABCG2 promoter-luciferase reporter assay did not reveal ABCG2 gene amplification or differential transcriptional trans-activation, which could account for ABCG2 up-regulation in these MDR cells. Remarkably, mimicking cytotoxic bolus drug treatment through 12- to 24-hour pulse exposure of ABCG2-silenced leukemia cells, to clinically relevant concentrations of the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin and mitoxantrone, resulted in a marked transcriptional up-regulation of ABCG2. Our findings establish that antitumor drug-induced epigenetic reactivation of ABCG2 gene expression in cancer cells is an early molecular event leading to MDR. These findings have important implications for the emergence, clonal selection, and expansion of malignant cells with the MDR phenotype during chemotherapy.

  5. Is periodontal health a predictor of drug-induced gingival overgrowth? A cross-sectional study

    Ruchi Banthia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gingival overgrowth is a common side-effect of amlodipine regimen on the oral cavity. There is controversy regarding the cause and effect relationship of periodontal health and drug induced gingival overgrowth. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate and to assess the relationship between the periodontal health and the onset and severity of gingival overgrowth in hypertensive patients receiving amlodipine. Materials and Methods: A total of 99 known hypertensive patients on amlodipine regimen were included in this study. Probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment loss (CAL were noted on four sites of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. Gingival enlargement scores were assessed for each patient by employing the hyperplastic index. Oral hygiene status was evaluated using the calculus index (CI. Patients were divided into H, E and L groups based on their periodontal status and responders and non-responders based on their hyperplastic index scores. Differences in means of different periodontal variables in different groups were tested for significance by using ANOVA and unpaired Student t-test. Pearson′s correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between different variables. For all analyses, P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: All the periodontal parameters were statistically highly significant (P = 0.00 amongst H, E and L groups and between responders and non-responders. Statistically highly significant Pearson correlation coefficients were found between mean PPD and mean hyperplastic score, mean CAL and mean hyperplastic score and mean calculus and mean hyperplastic score. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated a definite association between periodontal health and development and severity of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth

  6. Drug induced mortality: a multiple cause approach on Italian causes of death Register

    Francesco Grippo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-related mortality is a complex phenomenon that has several health, social and economic effects. In this paper trends of drug-induced mortality in Italy are analysed. Two approaches have been followed: the traditional analysis of the underlying cause of death (UC (data refers to the Istat mortality database from 1980 to 2011, and the multiple cause (MCanalysis, that is the analysis of all conditions reported on the death certificate (data for 2003-2011 period.Methods: Data presented in this paper are based on the Italian mortality register. The selection of Icd codes used for the analysis follows the definition of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction. Using different indicators (crude and standardized rates, ratio multiple to underlying, the results obtained from the two approaches (UC and MC have been compared. Moreover, as a measure of association between drug-related causes and specific conditions on the death certificate, an estimation of the age-standardized relative risk (RR has been used.Results: In the years 2009-2011, the total number of certificates whit mention of drug use was 1,293, 60% higher than the number UC based. The groups of conditions more strongly associated with drug-related causes are the mental and behavioral disorders (especially alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis and fibrosis of liver, AIDS and endocarditis.Conclusions : The analysis based on multiple cause approach shows, for the first time, a more detailed picture of the drug related death; it allows to better describe the mortality profiles and to re-evaluate  the contribution of a specific cause to death.

  7. Exploring BSEP Inhibition-Mediated Toxicity with a Mechanistic Model of Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    Jeffrey L Woodhead

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of the bile salt export pump (BSEP has been linked to incidence of drug-induced liver injury (DILI, presumably by the accumulation of toxic bile acids in the liver. We have previously constructed and validated a model of bile acid disposition within DILIsym®, a mechanistic model of DILI. In this paper, we use DILIsym® to simulate the DILI response of the hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitors bosentan and CP-724,714 and the non-hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitor telmisartan in humans in order to explore whether we can predict that hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitors can cause bile acid accumulation to reach toxic levels. We also simulate bosentan in rats in order to illuminate potential reasons behind the lack of toxicity in rats compared to the toxicity observed in humans. DILIsym® predicts that bosentan, but not telmisartan, will cause mild hepatocellular ATP decline and serum ALT elevation in a simulated population of humans. The difference in hepatotoxic potential between bosentan and telmisartan is consistent with clinical observations. However, DILIsym® underpredicts the incidence of bosentan toxicity. DILIsym® also predicts that bosentan will not cause toxicity in a simulated population of rats, and that the difference between the response to bosentan in rats and in humans is primarily due to the less toxic bile acid pool in rats. Our simulations also suggest a potential synergistic role for bile acid accumulation and mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibition in producing the observed toxicity in CP-724,714, and suggest that CP-724,714 metabolites may also play a role in the observed toxicity. Our work also compares the impact of competitive and noncompetitive BSEP inhibition for CP-724,714 and demonstrates that noncompetitive inhibition leads to much greater bile acid accumulation and potential toxicity. Our research demonstrates the potential for mechanistic modeling to contribute to the understanding of how bile acid transport inhibitors

  8. Biomarkers for metabolic drug activation : towards an integrated risk assessment for drug-induced liver injury (DILI)

    Teppner, Marieke

    2014-01-01

    The term drug-induced liver injury (DILI) describes adverse effects upon therapeutic drug treatment. They are relatively rare, affecting only 1 of 10000 - 1000000 patients, and remain mostly unpredictable. Due to development of severe hepatotoxicity or death, drugs causing DILI display a high risk for patients and have been withdrawn from the market or severely restricted in use. For the pharmaceutical industry late stage attrition due to DILI represents a big burden stretching development ti...

  9. Drug-Induced Acute Myocardial Infarction: Identifying 'Prime Suspects' from Electronic Healthcare Records-Based Surveillance System

    Coloma, Preciosa M; Schuemie, Martijn J; Gianluca Trifirò; Laura Furlong; Erik van Mulligen; Anna Bauer-Mehren; Paul Avillach; Jan Kors; Ferran Sanz; Jordi Mestres; José Luis Oliveira; Scott Boyer; Ernst Ahlberg Helgee; Mariam Molokhia; Justin Matthews

    2013-01-01

    Background: Drug-related adverse events remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality and impose huge burden on healthcare costs. Routinely collected electronic healthcare data give a good snapshot of how drugs are being used in ???real-world??? settings. Objective: To describe a strategy that identifies potentially drug-induced acute myocardial infarction (AMI) from a large international healthcare data network. Methods: Post-marketing safety surveillance was conducted in seven popula...

  10. Identification of a novel and severe pattern of efavirenz drug-induced liver injury in South Africa.

    Sonderup, Mark W; Maughan, Debbie; Gogela, Neliswa; Setshedi, Mashiko; Wainwright, Helen; Meintjes, Graeme; Spearman, Wendy

    2016-06-01

    Efavirenz now forms part of many antiretroviral regimens in low and middle-income countries. Efavirenz-related drug-induced liver injury is not well characterized but is thought to occur less frequently than with nevirapine. We describe our observation of three defined clinicopathological patterns of injury, one of which, submassive necrosis, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A high baseline CD4, younger age and possibly female gender, predicts for the injury. PMID:26959511

  11. Prevention and Treatment of Vaginal Bleeding after Drug-induced Abortion by Yaoliuan Capsule and Its Effects on Menses Recovery

    JIN Zhichun; HUANG Guangying

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore the effect of Yaoliuan capsule in the prevention and treatment of vaginal bleeding after drug-induced abortion and menses recovery after drug-induced abortion, 323 cases of gestation period ≤ 49 days and without contraindication, were divided randomly into study group (168 cases, taking Yaoliuan capsule) and control group (155 cases, taking placebo capsule). The results showed that in the study group, there were 161 cases (95.8 %) of complete abortion, 7 cases (4.2 %) of incomplete abortion; In the control group, there were 146 cases (94.2 %) of complete abortion, 6 cases (3.9 %) of incomplete abortion, 3 cases (1.9 %) of abortion failure. The vaginal bleeding time was 5-25 days (mean 10.8 days) in study group, while that was 6-62 days (mean 19.1 days) in control group. The menstrual cycle was 30.5±5.2 days and 33.8 d±8.6 days respectively in study and control groups. The menstrual period was 6.1±3.5 days and 9.9±5.1 days respectively in study and control groups. Yaoliuan capsule is an effective drug to prevent and treat vaginal bleeding following drug-induced abortion, promote menstruation recovery and prevent pelvic infection.

  12. Polymorphisms in CTLA4 influence incidence of drug-induced liver injury after renal transplantation in Chinese recipients.

    Yifeng Guo

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphisms in cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4 play an influential role in graft rejection and the long-term clinical outcome of organ transplantation. We investigated the association of 5 CTLA4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (rs733618 C/T, rs4553808 A/G, rs5742909 C/T, rs231775 A/G, and rs3087243 G/A with drug-induced liver injury (DILI in Chinese renal transplantation (RT recipients. Each recipient underwent a 24-month follow-up observation for drug-induced liver damage. The CTLA4 SNPs were genotyped in 864 renal transplantation recipients. A significant association was found between the rs231775 genotype and an early onset of DILI in the recipients. Multivariate analyses revealed that a risk factor, recipient rs231775 genotype (p = 0.040, was associated with DILI. Five haplotypes were estimated for 4 SNPs (excluding rs733618; the frequency of haplotype ACGG was significantly higher in the DILI group (68.9% than in the non-DILI group (61.1% (p = 0.041. In conclusion, CTLA4 haplotype ACGG was partially associated with the development of DILI in Chinese kidney transplant recipients. The rs231775 GG genotype may be a risk factor for immunosuppressive drug-induced liver damage.

  13. The Art and Science of Diagnosing and Managing Drug-induced Liver Injury in 2015 and Beyond.

    Lewis, James H

    2015-11-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) remains a leading reason why new compounds are dropped from further study or are the subject of product warnings and regulatory actions. Hy's Law of drug-induced hepatocellular jaundice causing a case-fatality rate or need for transplant of 10% or higher has been validated in several large national registries, including the ongoing, prospective U.S. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network. It serves as the basis for stopping rules in clinical trials and in clinical practice. Because DILI can mimic all known causes of acute and chronic liver disease, establishing causality can be difficult. Histopathologic findings are often nonspecific and rarely, if ever, considered pathognomonic. A daily drug dose >50-100 mg is more likely to be hepatotoxic than does acetaminophen overdose. Although a number of drugs causing idiosyncratic DILI have HLA associations that may allow for pre-prescription testing to prevent hepatotoxicity, the cost and relatively low frequency of injury among affected patients limit the current usefulness of such genome-wide association studies. Alanine aminotransferase monitoring is often recommended but has rarely been shown to be an effective method to prevent serious DILI. Guidelines on the diagnosis and management of DILI have recently been published, although specific therapies remain limited. The LiverTox Web site has been introduced as an interactive online virtual textbook that makes the latest information on more than 650 agents available to clinicians, regulators, and drug developers alike. PMID:26116527

  14. Drug-induced activation of SREBP-controlled lipogenic gene expression in CNS-related cell lines: Marked differences between various antipsychotic drugs

    Vik-Mo Audun O

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiology of schizophrenia is unknown, but neurodevelopmental disturbances, myelin- and oligodendrocyte abnormalities and synaptic dysfunction have been suggested as pathophysiological factors in this severe psychiatric disorder. Cholesterol is an essential component of myelin and has proved important for synapse formation. Recently, we demonstrated that the antipsychotic drugs clozapine and haloperidol stimulate lipogenic gene expression in cultured glioma cells through activation of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP transcription factors. We here compare the action of chlorpromazine, haloperidol, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone on SREBP activation and SREBP-controlled gene expression (ACAT2, HMGCR, HMGCS1, FDPS, SC5DL, DHCR7, LDLR, FASN and SCD1 in four CNS-relevant human cell lines. Results There were marked differences in the ability of the antipsychotic drugs to activate the expression of SREBP target genes, with clozapine and chlorpromazine as the most potent stimulators in a context of therapeutically relevant concentrations. Glial-like cells (GaMg glioma and CCF-STTG1 astrocytoma cell lines displayed more pronounced drug-induced SREBP activation compared to the response in HCN2 human cortical neurons and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, indicating that antipsychotic-induced activation of lipogenesis is most prominent in glial cells. Conclusion Our present data show a marked variation in the ability of different antipsychotics to induce SREBP-controlled transcriptional activation of lipogenesis in cultured human CNS-relevant cells. We propose that this effect could be relevant for the therapeutic efficacy of some antipsychotic drugs.

  15. Evaluation of prognostic markers in severe drug-induced liver disease

    Bo Li; Zhi Wang; Jian-Jiang Fang; Ci-Yi Xu; Wei-Xing Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcome of patients with severe drug-induced liver disease (DILD) associated with jaundice classified as hepatocellular, cholestatic or mixed liver injury and to evaluate the validity of Hy's rule and the most important predictors for outcome.METHODS: The Adverse Drug Reaction Advisory Committee was set up in 1997 in our hospital to identify all suspicions of DILD following a structured prospective report form. Liver damage was divided into hepatocellular, cholestatic, and mixed types according to laboratory and histologic criteria when available. Further evaluation of causality assessment was performed.RESULTS: From January 1997 to December 2004, 265 patients were diagnosed with DILD, and 140 (52.8%) of them were female. Hepatocellular damage was the most common (72.1%), the incidence of death was 9.9% in patients with hepatocellular damage and 9.5% in patients with cholestatic/mixed damage (P < 0.05). There was no difference in age of dead and recovered patients. The proportion of females and males was similar in recovered and dead patients, no difference was observed in duration of treatment between the two groups. The serum total bilirubin (P < 0.001), direct bilirubin (P < 0.001) and aspartate transaminase (AST) (P = 0.013) values were higher in dead patients than in recovered patients. Chinese herbal medicine was the most frequently prescribed, accounting for 24.2% of the whole series. However, antitubercular drugs (3.4%) were found to be the primary etiological factor for fetal DILD. Factors associated with the development of fulminant hepatic failure were hepatic encephalopathy (OR = 43.66, 95% CI = 8.47-224.95, P < 0.0001), ascite (OR = 28.48, 95% CI = 9.26-87.58, P < 0.0001), jaundice (OR = 11.43, 95% CI = 1.52-85.96, P = 0.003), alcohol abuse (OR = 3.83, 95% CI = 1.26-11.67, P = 0.035) and direct bilirubin (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.25-2.58, P = 0.012).CONCLUSION: Death occurs in 9.8% of patients with DILD. Chinese herbal

  16. Evaluation of the usefulness of novel biomarkers for drug-induced acute kidney injury in beagle dogs

    Zhou, Xiaobing [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, A8 Hongda Middle Street, Beijing Economic-Technological Development Area, Beijing 100176 (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730 (China); Ma, Ben; Lin, Zhi; Qu, Zhe; Huo, Yan; Wang, Jufeng [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, A8 Hongda Middle Street, Beijing Economic-Technological Development Area, Beijing 100176 (China); Li, Bo, E-mail: libo@nifdc.org.cn [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, A8 Hongda Middle Street, Beijing Economic-Technological Development Area, Beijing 100176 (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730 (China)

    2014-10-01

    As kidney is a major target organ affected by drug toxicity, early detection of renal injury is critical in preclinical drug development. In past decades, a series of novel biomarkers of drug-induced nephrotoxicity were discovered and verified in rats. However, limited data regarding the performance of novel biomarkers in non-rodent species are publicly available. To increase the applicability of these biomarkers, we evaluated the performance of 4 urinary biomarkers including neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), clusterin, total protein, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), relative to histopathology and traditional clinical chemistry in beagle dogs with acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by gentamicin. The results showed that urinary NGAL and clusterin levels were significantly elevated in dogs on days 1 and 3 after administration of gentamicin, respectively. Gene expression analysis further provided mechanistic evidence to support that NGAL and clusterin are potential biomarkers for the early assessment of drug-induced renal damage. Furthermore, the high area (both AUCs = 1.000) under receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve also indicated that NGAL and clusterin were the most sensitive biomarkers for detection of gentamicin-induced renal proximal tubular toxicity. Our results also suggested that NAG may be used in routine toxicity testing due to its sensitivity and robustness for detection of tissue injury. The present data will provide insights into the preclinical use of these biomarkers for detection of drug-induced AKI in non-rodent species. - Highlights: • Urinary NGAL, clusterin and NAG levels were significantly elevated in canine AKI. • NGAL and clusterin gene expression were increased following treatment with gentamicin. • NGAL and clusterin have high specificity and sensitivity for detection of AKI.

  17. Evaluation of the usefulness of novel biomarkers for drug-induced acute kidney injury in beagle dogs

    As kidney is a major target organ affected by drug toxicity, early detection of renal injury is critical in preclinical drug development. In past decades, a series of novel biomarkers of drug-induced nephrotoxicity were discovered and verified in rats. However, limited data regarding the performance of novel biomarkers in non-rodent species are publicly available. To increase the applicability of these biomarkers, we evaluated the performance of 4 urinary biomarkers including neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), clusterin, total protein, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), relative to histopathology and traditional clinical chemistry in beagle dogs with acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by gentamicin. The results showed that urinary NGAL and clusterin levels were significantly elevated in dogs on days 1 and 3 after administration of gentamicin, respectively. Gene expression analysis further provided mechanistic evidence to support that NGAL and clusterin are potential biomarkers for the early assessment of drug-induced renal damage. Furthermore, the high area (both AUCs = 1.000) under receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve also indicated that NGAL and clusterin were the most sensitive biomarkers for detection of gentamicin-induced renal proximal tubular toxicity. Our results also suggested that NAG may be used in routine toxicity testing due to its sensitivity and robustness for detection of tissue injury. The present data will provide insights into the preclinical use of these biomarkers for detection of drug-induced AKI in non-rodent species. - Highlights: • Urinary NGAL, clusterin and NAG levels were significantly elevated in canine AKI. • NGAL and clusterin gene expression were increased following treatment with gentamicin. • NGAL and clusterin have high specificity and sensitivity for detection of AKI

  18. Antidepressive-drug-induced bodyweight gain is associated with polymorphisms in genes coding for COMT and TPH1

    Secher, Anna; Bukh, Jens; Bock, Camilla; Koefoed, Pernille; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Werge, Thomas; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Mellerup, Erling

    2009-01-01

    examine the association of antidepressive-drug-induced bodyweight gain with polymorphisms in genes within the serotonin or catecholamine systems. Participants (N = 165) were selected from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register from June 2005 through May 2007 as patients with a diagnosis of a...... single depressive episode and who were under antidepressive treatment. Weight gainers were identified based on rating with the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser Side Effect Rating Scale. Polymorphisms in catechol-O-methyltransferase, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH1), serotonin receptor 2C (HTR2C) and...

  19. Drug-Induced Diabetes Mellitus: Evidence for Statins and Other Drugs Affecting Glucose Metabolism.

    Anyanwagu, U; Idris, I; Donnelly, R

    2016-04-01

    Abnormalities of glucose metabolism and glucose tolerance, either because of a reduction in tissue sensitivity to insulin (e.g., in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissues) and/or a reduction in pancreatic insulin secretion, are associated with a number of unwanted health outcomes. Even small increases in circulating glucose levels (often described as dysglycemia or prediabetes) may confer an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease and progression to overt type 2 diabetes. A number of drug therapies, many of them used long term in chronic disease management, have adverse effects on glucose metabolism, diabetes risk, and glycemic control among patients with preexisting diabetes. In this study, we review the evidence, underlying mechanisms, and the clinical significance of drug-related adverse effects on glucose metabolism. PMID:26440603

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using 111In-DTPA ventriculography

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by 111In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (111In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis

  1. Current and future directions in the treatment and prevention of drug-induced liver injury: a systematic review.

    Stine, Jonathan G; Lewis, James H

    2016-04-01

    While the pace of discovery of new agents, mechanisms and risk factors involved in drug-induced liver injury (DILI) remains brisk, advances in the treatment of acute DILI seems slow by comparison. In general, the key to treating suspected DILI is to stop using the drug prior to developing irreversible liver failure. However, predicting when to stop is an inexact science, and commonly used ALT monitoring is an ineffective strategy outside of clinical trials. The only specific antidote for acute DILI remains N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for acetaminophen poisoning, although NAC is proving to be beneficial in some cases of non-acetaminophen DILI in adults. Corticosteroids can be effective for DILI associated with autoimmune or systemic hypersensitivity features. Ursodeoxycholic acid, silymarin and glycyrrhizin have been used to treat DILI for decades, but success remains anecdotal. Bile acid washout regimens using cholestyramine appear to be more evidenced based, in particular for leflunomide toxicity. For drug-induced acute liver failure, the use of liver support systems is still investigational in the United States and emergency liver transplant remains limited by its availability. Primary prevention appears to be the key to avoiding DILI and the need for acute treatment. Pharmacogenomics, including human leukocyte antigen genotyping and the discovery of specific DILI biomarkers offers significant promise for the future. This article describes and summarizes the numerous and diverse treatment and prevention modalities that are currently available to manage DILI. PMID:26633044

  2. Evaluation of drug-induced neurotoxicity based on metabolomics, proteomics and electrical activity measurements in complementary CNS in vitro models.

    Schultz, Luise; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Culot, Maxime; da Costa, Anaelle; Landry, Christophe; Bellwon, Patricia; Kristl, Theresa; Hörmann, Katrin; Ruzek, Silke; Aiche, Stephan; Reinert, Knut; Bielow, Chris; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Huber, Christian G; Schroeder, Olaf H-U; Gramowski-Voss, Alexandra; Weiss, Dieter G; Bal-Price, Anna

    2015-12-25

    The present study was performed in an attempt to develop an in vitro integrated testing strategy (ITS) to evaluate drug-induced neurotoxicity. A number of endpoints were analyzed using two complementary brain cell culture models and an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model after single and repeated exposure treatments with selected drugs that covered the major biological, pharmacological and neuro-toxicological responses. Furthermore, four drugs (diazepam, cyclosporine A, chlorpromazine and amiodarone) were tested more in depth as representatives of different classes of neurotoxicants, inducing toxicity through different pathways of toxicity. The developed in vitro BBB model allowed detection of toxic effects at the level of BBB and evaluation of drug transport through the barrier for predicting free brain concentrations of the studied drugs. The measurement of neuronal electrical activity was found to be a sensitive tool to predict the neuroactivity and neurotoxicity of drugs after acute exposure. The histotypic 3D re-aggregating brain cell cultures, containing all brain cell types, were found to be well suited for OMICs analyses after both acute and long term treatment. The obtained data suggest that an in vitro ITS based on the information obtained from BBB studies and combined with metabolomics, proteomics and neuronal electrical activity measurements performed in stable in vitro neuronal cell culture systems, has high potential to improve current in vitro drug-induced neurotoxicity evaluation. PMID:26026931

  3. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases.

  4. Stabbing headache in an 8-year-old girl: primary or drug induced headache?

    Biedroł, Agnieszka; Kaciłski, Marek; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of stabbing headaches in children requires a thorough diagnostic approach that excludes secondary headaches. The organic background should be taken into consideration when alarming symptoms occur, such as a purely 1-sided location, a change in the character of the headache, or possibly a link to physical activity. The current study describes the case of an 8-year-old girl who suffered short-lasting stabbing headache attacks. The headaches with increasing intensity and frequency started 1 month before her hospitalization and were usually preceded by physical activity (dancing, running). The pain, which was located in the right supraorbital region, lasted 1 second and occurred several times during the day. No associated symptoms were observed. In addition, the girl suffered from allergic rhinitis and was on antiallergic treatment (levocetirizine, fluticasone nasal spray). On admission she was in good general condition, and a pediatric and neurologic examination revealed no abnormalities. Her brain MRI was normal. The initial diagnosis was that the patient was suffering from primary stabbing headaches. However, during a follow-up visit 4 months later, a relationship was observed between the cessation of the headache attacks and the discontinuation of an antihistaminic drug. Six months later, the girl remained headache free. In cases involving differential diagnoses of stabbing headaches, it is important to consider the adverse reactions of the drugs used. PMID:24664098

  5. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  6. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Miyashita, Taishi; Higuchi, Satonori [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsuneyama, Koichi [Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Science for Research, University of Toyama, Sugitani, Toyama 930‐0194 (Japan); Endo, Shinya [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsukui, Tohru [Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Yamane, Hidaka 350‐1241 (Japan); Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Yokoi, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tyokoi@p.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  7. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    ... ency/article/003242.htm Skin - abnormally dark or light To use the sharing features on this page, ... the hands. The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the ...

  8. Consensus statement: Management of drug-induced liver injury in HIV-positive patients treated for TB

    E Jong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury (DILI in HIV/tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients is a common problem in the South African setting, and re-introduction of anti-TB drugs can be challenging for the healthcare worker. Although international guidelines on the re-introduction of TB treatment are available, the definition of DILI is not uniform, management of antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV co-infection is not mentioned, and the guidance on management is not uniform and lacks a practical approach. In this consensus statement, we summarise important aspects of DILI and provide practical guidance for healthcare workers for different patient groups and healthcare settings on the re-introduction of anti-TB drugs and ART in HIV/TB co-infected individuals presenting with DILI.

  9. Biopsy-proven drug-induced tubulointerstitial nephritis in a patient with acute kidney injury and alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis.

    Yoshioka, Wakako; Mori, Takayasu; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Tamura, Teiichi

    2013-01-01

    We report a 49-year-old man with alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated by drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (DI-AIN). Oliguria persisted and became anuric again on day 17 despite improvement of pancreatitis. He presented rash, fever and eosinophilia from day 20. Renal biopsy was performed for dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI), DI-AIN was revealed, and prompt use of corticosteroids fully restored his renal function. This diagnosis might be missed because it is difficult to perform renal biopsy in such a clinical situation. If the patient's general condition allows, renal biopsy should be performed and reversible AKI must be distinguished from many cases of irreversible AKI complicated by SAP. This is the first report of biopsy-proven DI-AIN associated with SAP, suggesting the importance of biopsy for distinguishing DI-AIN in persisting AKI of SAP. PMID:23645698

  10. Drug-induced mild therapeutic hypothermia obtained by administration of a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 agonist

    Fosgerau, Keld; Weber, Uno J; Gotfredsen, Jacob W;

    2010-01-01

    feasibility of using a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist for obtaining drug-induced sustainable mild hypothermia. Methods First, we screened a heterogeneous group of TRPV1 agonists and secondly we tested the hypothermic properties of a selected candidate by dose-response studies......Background  The use of mechanical/physical devices for applying mild therapeutic hypothermia is the only proven neuroprotective treatment for survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest. However, this type of therapy is cumbersome and associated with several side-effects. We investigated the...... was stopped. Finally, in calves the intravenous infusion of DHC was able to maintain mild hypothermia with ΔT > -3°C for more than 12 hours. Conclusions Our data support the hypothesis that infusion of dihydrocapsaicin is a candidate for testing as a primary or adjunct method of inducing and...

  11. Design of the Anti-tuberculosis Drugs induced Adverse Reactions in China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme Study (ADACS

    He Ping

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB patients are receiving the standard anti-TB treatment provided by China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme (CNTS in China every year. Adverse reactions (ADRs induced by anti-TB drugs could both do harm to patients and lead to anti-TB treatment failure. The ADACS aimed to explore ADRs' incidences, prognoses, economical and public health impacts for TB patients and TB control, and build a DNA bank of TB patients. Methods/Design Multiple study designs were adopted. Firstly, a prospective cohort with 4488 sputum smears positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients was established. Patients were followed up for 6-9 months in 52 counties of four regions. Those suspected ADRs should be checked and confirmed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA. Secondly, if the suspected ADR was anti-TB drug induced liver injury (ATLI, a nested case-control study would be performed which comprised choosing a matched control and doing a plus questionnaire inquiry. Thirdly, health economical data of ADRs would be collected to analyze financial burdens brought by ADRs and cost-effectiveness of ADRs' treatments. Fourthly, a drop of intravenous blood for each patient was taken and saved in FTA card for DNA banking and genotyping. Finally, the demographic, clinical, environmental, administrative and genetic data would be merged for the comprehensive analysis. Discussion ADACS will give an overview of anti-TB drugs induced ADRs' incidences, risk factors, treatments, prognoses, and clinical, economical and public health impacts for TB patients applying CNTS regimen in China, and provide suggestions for individualized health care and TB control policy.

  12. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases during rat liver regeneration

    Qian-Ji Ning; Shao-Wei Qin; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the action of the genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases at the gene transcriptional level during liver regeneration (LR) in rats.METHODS: The genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases were obtained by collecting the data from databases and literature, and the gene expression changes in the regenerating liver were checked by the Rat Genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: The initial and total expression numbers of genes occurring in phases of 0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH), 4-6 h after PH (G0/G1 transition),6-66 h after PH (cell proliferation), 66-168 h after PH (cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction) were 21, 3, 9, 2 and 21, 9, 19, 18, respectively. It is illustrated that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initial stage of LR and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity,these genes were classified into 5 types: only upregulated (12 genes), predominantly up-regulated (4genes), only down-regulated (11 genes), predominantly down-regulated (3 genes), and approximately up-/down-regulated (2 genes). The total times of their upand down-expression were 130 and 79, respectively,demonstrating that expression of most of the genes was increased during LR, while a few decreased. The cell physiological and biochemical activities during LR were staggered according to the time relevance and were diverse and complicated in gene expression patterns.CONCLUSION: Drug metabolic capacity in regenerating liver was enhanced. Thirty-two genes play important roles during liver regeneration in rats.

  13. Evaluation of antihepatotoxic potential of Solanum xanthocarpum fruit extract against antitubercular drugs induced hepatopathy in experimental rodents

    Talib Hussain; Ramesh K Gupta; Sweety K; Mohd Sajid Khan; Md Sarfaraj Hussain; Md Arif; Arshad Hussain; Md Faiyazuddin; Chandana Venkateswara Rao

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To assess the hepatoprotective effect of Solanum xanthocarpum (S. xanthocarpum) fruit extract against antitubercular drug-induced liver toxicity in experimental animals. Methods:Ethanolic (50%) fruit extract of S. xanthocarpum (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg bw) was administered daily for 35 days in experimental animals. Liver toxicity was induced by combination of three antitubercular drugs [isoniazid (I) 7.5 mg/kg, rifampicin (R) 10 mg/kg and pyrazinamide (P) 35 mg/kg] given orally as suspension for 35 days in rats. The hepatoprotective activity was assessed using various biochemical parameters like aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatise (ALP), total bilirubin (TBL), albumin (ALB), total protein (TP), lactate dehydroginase (LDH), and serum cholesterol (CHL). Meanwhile, in vivo antioxidant activities as lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were measured in rat liver homogenate. The biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination. Results: The results demonstrated that treatment with S. xanthocarpum significantly (P<0.05-P<0.001) and dose-dependently prevented drug induced increase in serum levels of hepatic enzymes. Furthermore, S. xanthocarpum significantly (up to P<0.001) reduced the LPO in the liver tissue and restored activities of defence antioxidant enzymes GSH, SOD and CAT towards normal levels. Histopathology of the liver tissue showed that S. xanthocarpum attenuated the hepatocellular necrosis and led to reduction in inflammatory cells infiltration. Conclusions:The results of this study strongly indicate the protective effect of S. xanthocarpum against liver injury which may be attributed to its hepatoprotective activity, and thereby scientifically support its traditional use.

  14. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro

    Funk, Juergen; Robbins, Justin B.; Crogan-Grundy, Candace; Presnell, Sharon C.; Singer, Thomas; Roth, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI). This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM). Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level. PMID:27387377

  15. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. - Highlights: ► We used metabolomics to gain insights on drug induced liver injury (DILI) in rats. ► We profiled rats treated with thirteen hepatotoxins at two doses and two time points. ► The toxins decreased the

  16. Late-Onset Drug-Induced Cholestasis in a Living-Related Liver Transplant Donor With Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis.

    Harmancı, Özgür; Ensaroğlu, Fatih; Özçay, Figen; Öcal, Serkan; Korkmaz, Murat; Özdemir, B Handan; Selçuk, Haldun; Moray, Gökhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    We present a rare case of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis within a family. A 34-yearold female became a living-related liver transplant donor for her son, who had the disease. Nine years after the transplant, the mother developed severe intrahepatic cholestasis, for which she was evaluated after using an oral contraceptive drug. She presented with jaundice, pruritus, and increased bilirubin levels, together with elevated gamma glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase levels. A liver biopsy revealed findings consistent with intrahepatic cholestasis. However, despite follow-up management and cessation of the insulting drug, her total bilirubin count continuously increased to 20 mg/dL and was accompanied by intractable pruritus. A total of 9 plasmapheresis sessions were performed, and she was started on a regimen of ursodeoxycholic acid (13 mg/kg/d) and cholestyramine (4 g, 3 times daily). The clinical and laboratory picture dramatically improved following cessation of the oral contraceptive, plasmapheresis sessions, and drug treatment. The patient's cholestasis normalized within 3 months, and she recovered uneventfully. A genetic analysis of the whole family revealed that both parents were heterozygous for the mutation c.124G>A in ABCB11, and the son was homozygous for this mutation. These findings supported varying degrees of bile salt export pump deficiency in the family members. Defective bile salt excretory system function can result in a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis requiring liver transplant to late-onset drug-induced cholestasis. Our findings suggest that, in a heterozygous carrier of a progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis mutation, drug-induced cholestasis is responsive to treatment, after which the clinical picture can normalize within 3 months. PMID:26640927

  17. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-β super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin βE subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin βE in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin βE overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin βE. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin βE subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin βE re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin βE expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin βE as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin βE subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ► Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ► Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ► Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  18. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

    Brüning, Ansgar, E-mail: ansgar.bruening@med.uni-muenchen.de; Matsingou, Christina; Brem, German Johannes; Rahmeh, Martina; Mylonas, Ioannis

    2012-10-15

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-β super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin βE subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin βE in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin βE overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin βE. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin βE subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin βE re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin βE expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin βE as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin βE subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ► Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ► Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ► Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  19. Drug-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Cohort of 328 Patients. A Single-Centre Experience from Australia

    Savio G Barreto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Acute pancreatitis is associated with risk of morbidity and even mortality. Routine prescription drugs have been linked to the causation of acute pancreatitis. Objective To determine the incidence, presentation, course and outcome of drug-induced acute pancreatitis amongst patients admitted to a public hospital. Design/setting A retrospective analysis of patients presenting with acute pancreatitis to the Modbury Hospital, South Australia from January 2006 to April 2011. Main outcome measure Each admission was reviewed within the electronic database for patient details as well as to determine the aetiological factor. In patients with druginduced acute pancreatitis, the WHO Probability Scale was used to evaluate causality relationship. Results Three-hundreds and 28 patients were treated for acute pancreatitis during the study period. Biliary and alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis accounted for 80.8% of cases. Eleven patients (2 male and 9 female patients; median age: 59 years were diagnosed with drug-induced acute pancreatitis. These included 5 cases of codeine-, 2 cases of azathioprine-, and 1 case each of chlorothiazide-, valproic acid-, oestradiol- and rosuvastatin-induced acute pancreatitis. Nine patients had a mild disease while 2 patients had severe acute pancreatitis with a median hospital stay of 4 days. Withdrawal of the drug resulted in cessation of the attacks in all patients over a median follow-up of 24 months. Conclusions Routine prescription drugs, as an aetiological factor, accounted for 3.4% of cases of acute pancreatitis. The disease appeared to be more common in middle-aged women. It is likely that the overall incidence of this entity is under-reported owing to the stringent criteria needed to conclusively determine a causal relationship.

  20. Memetics clarification of abnormal behavior

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Biological medicine is hard to fully and scientifically explain the etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors; while, researches on philosophy and psychology (including memetics) are beneficial to better understand and explain etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors. At present, the theory of philosophy and psychology is to investigate the entity of abnormal behavior based on the views of memetics.METHODS: Abnormal behavior was researched in this study based on three aspects, including instinctive behavior disorder, poorly social-adapted behavior disorder and mental or body disease associated behavior disorder. Most main viewpoints of memetics were derived from "The Meme Machine", which was written by Susan Blackmore. When questions about abnormal behaviors induced by mental and psychological diseases and conduct disorder of teenagers were discussed, some researching achievements which were summarized by authors previously were added in this study, such as aggressive behaviors, pathologically aggressive behaviors, etc.RESULTS: The abnormal behaviors mainly referred to a part of people's substandard behaviors which were not according with the realistic social environment, culture background and the pathologic behaviors resulted from people's various psychological diseases. According to the theory of "meme", it demonstrated that the relevant behavioral obstacles of various psychological diseases, for example, the unusual behavior of schizophrenia, were caused, because the old meme was destroyed thoroughly but the new meme was unable to establish; psychoneurosis and personality disorder were resulted in hard establishment of meme; the behavioral obstacles which were ill-adapted to society, for example, various additional and homosexual behaviors, were because of the selfish replications and imitations of "additional meme" and "homosexual meme"; various instinct behavioral and congenital intelligent obstacles were not significance

  1. Thyroid abnormality in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Prasanna Byna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AUB is a common but complicated clinical presentation and occurs in 15-20% of women between menarche to menopause and significantly affects the women's health. Women with thyroid dysfunction often have menstrual irregularities, infertility and increased morbidity during pregnancy. The objective of present study is to find the correlation between thyroid disorders and AUB in perimenopausal women attending gynecology OPD. Methods: In the present study, fifty five patients with AUB were included and were evaluated for the cause including thyroid abnormality. Thyroid function tests were done in all patients. Results: Among 55 patients, 12 patients were diagnosed as hypothyroidism and 7 as hyperthyroidism, women with AUB 36 (65.4% were euthyroid. Among 19 women with thyroid abnormality, heavy menstrual bleeding was seen in 8 (42% women, 6 (31.57% had polymenorrhagia, 5 (26.31% had oligomenorrhoea. The frequent menstrual abnormality in women with hypothyroidism (12 women was heavy menstrual bleeding in 5 (41.6% women, 3 (25% had oligomennorhoea, 4 (33.3% had polymenorrhagia. Out of 7 women with hyperthyroidism, 2 (28.57% had oligomenorrhoea, 3 (42.8% had heavy menstrual bleeding, 2 (28.57% had polymenorrhagia. In a total of 55 patients with AUB, 11 (20% had structural abnormalities in uterus and ovaries. 5 (9% had adenomyosis, 3 (5.4% had ovarian cysts, 3 (5.4% had fibroids. Conclusions: It is important to screen all women for thyroid abnormality who are presenting with AUB especially with non-structural causes of AUB. Correction of thyroid abnormalities also relieves AUB. This will avoid unnecessary hormonal treatment and surgery. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3250-3253

  2. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test ...

  3. Hepatitis C virus co-infection increases the risk of anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Nino Lomtadze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The country of Georgia has a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB and hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. PURPOSE: To determine whether HCV co-infection increases the risk of incident drug-induced hepatitis among patients on first-line anti-TB drug therapy. METHODS: Prospective cohort study; HCV serology was obtained on all study subjects at the time of TB diagnosis; hepatic enzyme tests (serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] activity were obtained at baseline and monthly during treatment. RESULTS: Among 326 study patients with culture-confirmed TB, 68 (21% were HCV co-infected, 14 (4.3% had chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection (hepatitis B virus surface antigen positive [HBsAg+], and 6 (1.8% were HIV co-infected. Overall, 19% of TB patients developed mild to moderate incident hepatotoxicity. In multi-variable analysis, HCV co-infection (adjusted Hazards Ratio [aHR]=3.2, 95% CI=1.6-6.5 was found to be an independent risk factor for incident anti-TB drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Survival analysis showed that HCV co-infected patients developed hepatitis more quickly compared to HCV seronegative patients with TB. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of HCV co-infection was found among patients with TB in Georgia. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly associated with HCV co-infection but severe drug-induced hepatotoxicity (WHO grade III or IV was rare.

  4. A Case of Sublingual Ranula That Responded Successfully to Localized Injection Treatment with OK-432 after Healing from Drug Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome.

    Yoshizawa, Kunio; Moroi, Akinori; Kawashiri, Shuichi; Ueki, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    A ranula is a mucus retention cyst or pseudocyst caused by leakage of mucus from the sublingual gland and generally occurs in the oral floor. In addition, drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a rare but well-recognized serious adverse effect characterized by fever, skin rashes, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, and hepatosplenomegaly and oral stomatitis. This paper presents the first case of successfully treated sublingual ranula with localized injection of OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome, which has previously been unreported in the literature. We present the case of a 38-year-old Japanese woman with sublingual ranula that responded successfully to localized injection treatment with OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome. She was affected with cutaneous myositis and interstitial lung disease when she was 26 years old. At the age 34 years, she received additional oral treatment of diaminodiphenyl-sulfone due to deterioration of the cutaneous myositis, which resulted in drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) with severe oral stomatitis. Local injection of OK-432 to the ranula may be a very safe and useful treatment method even if the patient has a history of drug allergy and has connective tissue disease such as cutaneous myositis. PMID:27144039

  5. A Case of Sublingual Ranula That Responded Successfully to Localized Injection Treatment with OK-432 after Healing from Drug Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome

    Kunio Yoshizawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A ranula is a mucus retention cyst or pseudocyst caused by leakage of mucus from the sublingual gland and generally occurs in the oral floor. In addition, drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS is a rare but well-recognized serious adverse effect characterized by fever, skin rashes, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, and hepatosplenomegaly and oral stomatitis. This paper presents the first case of successfully treated sublingual ranula with localized injection of OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome, which has previously been unreported in the literature. We present the case of a 38-year-old Japanese woman with sublingual ranula that responded successfully to localized injection treatment with OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome. She was affected with cutaneous myositis and interstitial lung disease when she was 26 years old. At the age 34 years, she received additional oral treatment of diaminodiphenyl-sulfone due to deterioration of the cutaneous myositis, which resulted in drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS with severe oral stomatitis. Local injection of OK-432 to the ranula may be a very safe and useful treatment method even if the patient has a history of drug allergy and has connective tissue disease such as cutaneous myositis.

  6. Neuroimaging abnormalities in Griscelli's disease

    Griscelli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a 7-1/2-month-old white girl who presented with this syndrome, but initially without neurological abnormalities. Initial CT of the brain was normal. Despite haematological remission with chemotherapy, she developed neurological symptoms, progressing to coma. At this time, CT showed areas of coarse calcification in the globi pallidi, left parietal white matter and left brachium pontis. Hypodense areas were present in the genu and posterior limb of the internal capsule on the right side, as well as posterior aspects of both thalami, together with minimal generalised atrophy. MRI revealed areas of increased T2 signal and a focal area of abnormal enhancement in the subcortical white matter. Griscelli's disease should be added to the list of acquired neuroimaging abnormalities in infants. (orig.)

  7. Knee loading for abnormal gait

    Hutchison, J.; Madsen, D.; Norman, T. L.; -Blaha, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a mathematical model for determining knee loads for abnormal gait. Abnormal gait was defined as a person with varus, i.e. “bowleggedness”, or a person who had an external rotation of the femur (or the inability to internally rotate the femur) which caused an indirect varus in the forward positions of gait. Conditions such as these have been observed clinically to result in increased wear on the medial condyle of total knee replacements. This problem was...

  8. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and drug-induced toxicity in a panel of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Pereira, Claudia V.; Oliveira, Paulo J. [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal); Will, Yvonne [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States); Nadanaciva, Sashi, E-mail: sashi.nadanaciva@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been proposed to be involved in idiosyncratic drug reactions. However, current in vitro and in vivo models lack the genetic diversity seen in the human population. Our hypothesis is that different cell strains with distinct mtDNA SNPs may have different mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles and may therefore vary in their response to drug-induced toxicity. Therefore, we used an in vitro system composed of four strains of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with mtDNA polymorphisms. We sequenced mtDNA from embryonic fibroblasts isolated from four mouse strains, C57BL/6J, MOLF/EiJ, CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ, with the latter two being sequenced for the first time. The bioenergetic profile of the four strains of MEFs was investigated at both passages 3 and 10. Our results showed that there were clear differences among the four strains of MEFs at both passages, with CZECHII/EiJ having a lower mitochondrial robustness when compared to C57BL/6J, followed by MOLF/EiJ and PERA/EiJ. Seven drugs known to impair mitochondrial function were tested for their effect on the ATP content of the four strains of MEFs in both glucose- and galactose-containing media. Our results showed that there were strain-dependent differences in the response to some of the drugs. We propose that this model is a useful starting point to study compounds that may cause mitochondrial off-target toxicity in early stages of drug development, thus decreasing the number of experimental animals used. -- Highlights: ► mtDNA SNPs may be linked to individual predisposition to drug-induced toxicity. ► CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ mtDNA was sequenced for the first time in this study. ► Strain-dependent mitochondrial capacity differences were measured. ► Strain-dependent differences in response to mitochondrial toxicants were observed.

  9. Drug-induced acute myocardial infarction: identifying 'prime suspects' from electronic healthcare records-based surveillance system.

    Preciosa M Coloma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug-related adverse events remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality and impose huge burden on healthcare costs. Routinely collected electronic healthcare data give a good snapshot of how drugs are being used in 'real-world' settings. OBJECTIVE: To describe a strategy that identifies potentially drug-induced acute myocardial infarction (AMI from a large international healthcare data network. METHODS: Post-marketing safety surveillance was conducted in seven population-based healthcare databases in three countries (Denmark, Italy, and the Netherlands using anonymised demographic, clinical, and prescription/dispensing data representing 21,171,291 individuals with 154,474,063 person-years of follow-up in the period 1996-2010. Primary care physicians' medical records and administrative claims containing reimbursements for filled prescriptions, laboratory tests, and hospitalisations were evaluated using a three-tier triage system of detection, filtering, and substantiation that generated a list of drugs potentially associated with AMI. Outcome of interest was statistically significant increased risk of AMI during drug exposure that has not been previously described in current literature and is biologically plausible. RESULTS: Overall, 163 drugs were identified to be associated with increased risk of AMI during preliminary screening. Of these, 124 drugs were eliminated after adjustment for possible bias and confounding. With subsequent application of criteria for novelty and biological plausibility, association with AMI remained for nine drugs ('prime suspects': azithromycin; erythromycin; roxithromycin; metoclopramide; cisapride; domperidone; betamethasone; fluconazole; and megestrol acetate. LIMITATIONS: Although global health status, co-morbidities, and time-invariant factors were adjusted for, residual confounding cannot be ruled out. CONCLUSION: A strategy to identify potentially drug-induced AMI from electronic healthcare

  10. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa [Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0818 (Japan); Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C.; Lawton, Kay A.; Milburn, Michael V.; Ryals, John A.; Wulff, Jacob E. [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Guo, Lining, E-mail: lguo@metabolon.com [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. - Highlights: ► We used metabolomics to gain insights on drug induced liver injury (DILI) in rats. ► We profiled rats treated with thirteen hepatotoxins at two doses and two time points. ► The toxins decreased the