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Sample records for abnormal tdp-43 immunoreactivity

  1. Staging TDP-43 pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    Josephs, Keith A; Murray, Melissa E; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Parisi, Joseph E; Petrucelli, Leonard; Jack, Clifford R; Petersen, Ronald C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2014-03-01

    TDP-43 immunoreactivity occurs in 19-57 % of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases. Two patterns of TDP-43 deposition in AD have been described involving hippocampus (limbic) or hippocampus and neocortex (diffuse), although focal amygdala involvement has been observed. In 195 AD cases with TDP-43, we investigated regional TDP-43 immunoreactivity with the aim of developing a TDP-43 in AD staging scheme. TDP-43 immunoreactivity was assessed in amygdala, entorhinal cortex, subiculum, hippocampal dentate gyrus, occipitotemporal, inferior temporal and frontal cortices, and basal ganglia. Clinical, neuroimaging, genetic and pathological characteristics were assessed across stages. Five stages were identified: stage I showed scant-sparse TDP-43 in the amygdala only (17 %); stage II showed moderate-frequent amygdala TDP-43 with spread into entorhinal and subiculum (25 %); stage III showed further spread into dentate gyrus and occipitotemporal cortex (31 %); stage IV showed further spread into inferior temporal cortex (20 %); and stage V showed involvement of frontal cortex and basal ganglia (7 %). Cognition and medial temporal volumes differed across all stages and progression across stages correlated with worsening cognition and medial temporal volume loss. Compared to 147 AD patients without TDP-43, only the Boston Naming Test showed abnormalities in stage I. The findings demonstrate that TDP-43 deposition in AD progresses in a stereotypic manner that can be divided into five distinct topographic stages which are supported by correlations with clinical and neuroimaging features. Given these findings, we recommend sequential regional TDP-43 screening in AD beginning with the amygdala. PMID:24240737

  2. Staging TDP-43 pathology in Alzheimer’s disease

    Josephs, Keith A.; Murray, Melissa E; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Parisi, Joseph E.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Jack, Clifford R., Jr.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Dickson, Dennis W

    2013-01-01

    TDP-43 immunoreactivity occurs in 19–57% of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cases. Two patterns of TDP-43 deposition in AD have been described involving hippocampus (Limbic) or hippocampus and neocortex (Diffuse), although focal amygdala involvement has been observed. In 195 AD cases with TDP-43, we investigated regional TDP-43 immunoreactivity with the aim of developing a TDP-43 in AD staging scheme. TDP-43 immunoreactivity was assessed in amygdala, entorhinal cortex, subiculum, hippocampal dentate...

  3. Traumatic brain injury causes frontotemporal dementia and TDP-43 proteolysis.

    Wang, H-K; Lee, Y-C; Huang, C-Y; Liliang, P-C; Lu, K; Chen, H-J; Li, Y-C; Tsai, K-J

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for dementia. Recently, TBI has also been suggested as a risk factor for frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and plasma immunoreactivity to the TAR-DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been observed in both patients with acute TBI and long-term survivors of this condition. We used a population-based study to estimate and compare the risk of FTD in individuals with and without TBI. Furthermore, we used a rat model of TBI to show that increased TDP-43 proteolysis following TBI produces FTD-like impairments, including abnormal limb-clasping, and impaired performances in the Morris water maze. We recruited 24,585 patients who received ambulatory or hospital care for TBI and 122,925 patients without TBI for this study. Each individual was investigated for 4years to evaluate FTD development, and data were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression. In the TBI rat model, behavior and TDP-43 inclusions were assessed following intracranial administration of a caspase-3 inhibitor or vehicle. FTD was more likely to occur in the TBI group than in the group without TBI (adjusted hazard ratio, 4.43; 95% confidence interval, 3.85-5.10; P<0.001). Rats developed behavioral impairments similar to those in patients with FTD after TBI. Further, the behavioral impairments were likely associated with TDP-43 short fragment mislocalization and accumulation. Our findings suggest that in humans, TBI is associated with a greater occurrence of FTD. Moreover, clinical FTD manifestations may be associated with TDP-43 proteolysis, since impaired behaviors in TBI rats were reminiscent of those in humans with FTD. PMID:25982564

  4. Expression of mutant TDP-43 induces neuronal dysfunction in transgenic mice

    Dickson Dennis W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal distribution, modification and aggregation of transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 are the hallmarks of multiple neurodegenerative diseases, especially frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Researchers have identified 44 mutations in the TARDBP gene that encode TDP-43 as causative for cases of sporadic and familial ALS http://www.molgen.ua.ac.be/FTDMutations/. Certain mutant forms of TDP-43, such as M337V, are associated with increased low molecular weight (LMW fragments compared to wild-type (WT TDP-43 and cause neuronal apoptosis and developmental delay in chick embryos. Such findings support a direct link between altered TDP-43 function and neurodegeneration. Results To explore the pathogenic properties of the M337V mutation, we generated and characterized two mouse lines expressing human TDP-43 (hTDP-43M337V carrying this mutation. hTDP-43M337V was expressed primarily in the nuclei of neurons in the brain and spinal cord, and intranuclear and cytoplasmic phosphorylated TDP-43 aggregates were frequently detected. The levels of TDP-43 LMW products of ~25 kDa and ~35 kDa species were also increased in the transgenic mice. Moreover, overexpression of hTDP-43M337V dramatically down regulated the levels of mouse TDP-43 (mTDP-43 protein and RNA, indicating TDP-43 levels are tightly controlled in mammalian systems. TDP-43M337V mice displayed reactive gliosis, widespread ubiquitination, chromatolysis, gait abnormalities, and early lethality. Abnormal cytoplasmic mitochondrial aggregates and abnormal phosphorylated tau were also detected in the mice. Conclusion Our novel TDP-43M337V mouse model indicates that overexpression of hTDP-43M337V alone is toxic in vivo. Because overexpression of hTDP-43 in wild-type TDP-43 and TDP-43M337V mouse models produces similar phenotypes, the mechanisms causing pathogenesis in the mutant model remain unknown. However, our results suggest that overexpression of the hTDP-43M337V can cause neuronal dysfunction due to its effect on a number of cell organelles and proteins, such as mitochondria and TDP-43, that are critical for neuronal activity. The mutant model will serve as a valuable tool in the development of future studies designed to uncover pathways associated with TDP-43 neurotoxicity and the precise roles TDP-43 RNA targets play in neurodegeneration.

  5. Phosphorylation of TAR DNA-binding Protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) by Truncated Casein Kinase 1δ Triggers Mislocalization and Accumulation of TDP-43.

    Nonaka, Takashi; Suzuki, Genjiro; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Kametani, Fuyuki; Hirai, Shinobu; Okado, Haruo; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Saitoe, Minoru; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Masai, Hisao; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-03-11

    Intracellular aggregates of phosphorylated TDP-43 are a major component of ubiquitin-positive inclusions in the brains of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration and ALS and are considered a pathological hallmark. Here, to gain insight into the mechanism of intracellular TDP-43 accumulation, we examined the relationship between phosphorylation and aggregation of TDP-43. We found that expression of a hyperactive form of casein kinase 1 δ (CK1δ1-317, a C-terminally truncated form) promotes mislocalization and cytoplasmic accumulation of phosphorylated TDP-43 (ubiquitin- and p62-positive) in cultured neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Insoluble phosphorylated TDP-43 prepared from cells co-expressing TDP-43 and CK1δ1-317 functioned as seeds for TDP-43 aggregation in cultured cells, indicating that CK1δ1-317-induced aggregated TDP-43 has prion-like properties. A striking toxicity and alterations of TDP-43 were also observed in yeast expressing TDP-43 and CK1δ1-317. Therefore, abnormal activation of CK1δ causes phosphorylation of TDP-43, leading to the formation of cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregates, which, in turn, may trigger neurodegeneration. PMID:26769969

  6. Cytoplasmic Inclusions of TDP-43 in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Potential Role for Caspases

    Rohn, Troy T.

    2009-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) proteinopathies are classified based upon the extent of modified TDP-43 inclusions and include a growing number of neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin immunoreactive, tau negative inclusions (FTLD-U) and FTLD with motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND). In addition, TDP-43 inclusions have also been identified in a number of other neurodegenerative diso...

  7. A Drosophila model for TDP-43 proteinopathy

    Li, Yan; Ray, Payal; Rao, Elizabeth J; Shi, Chen; Guo, Weirui; Chen, Xiaoping; Woodruff, Elvin A.; Fushimi, Kazuo; Wu, Jane Y.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropathology involving TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43) has been identified in a wide spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases collectively named as TDP-43 proteinopathy, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD). To test whether increased expression of wide-type human TDP-43 (hTDP-43) may cause neurotoxicity in vivo, we generated transgenic flies expressing hTDP-43 in various neuronal subpopulations. Expression in the fly eyes of the full-lengt...

  8. Altered distributions of Gemini of coiled bodies and mitochondria in motor neurons of TDP-43 transgenic mice

    Shan, Xiu; Chiang, Po-Min; Price, Donald L.; Wong, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43), a DNA/RNA-binding protein involved in RNA transcription and splicing, has been associated with the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS. However, the function of TDP-43 in motor neurons remains undefined. Here we use both gain- and loss-of-function approaches to determine roles of TDP-43 in motor neurons. Mice expressing human TDP-43 in neurons exhibited growth retardation and premature death that are characterized by abnormal intra...

  9. ALS/FTLD-linked TDP-43 regulates neurite morphology and cell survival in differentiated neurons

    Tar-DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been characterized as a major component of protein aggregates in brains with neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, physiological roles of TDP-43 and early cellular pathogenic effects caused by disease associated mutations in differentiated neurons are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the physiological roles of TDP-43 and the effects of missense mutations associated with diseases in differentiated cortical neurons. The reduction of TDP-43 by siRNA increased abnormal neurites and decreased cell viability. ALS/FTLD-associated missense mutant proteins (A315T, Q331K, and M337V) were partially mislocalized to the cytosol and neurites when compared to wild-type and showed abnormal neurites similar to those observed in cases of loss of TDP-43. Interestingly, cytosolic expression of wild-type TDP-43 with mutated nuclear localization signals also induced abnormal neurtie morphology and reduction of cell viability. However, there was no significant difference in the effects of cytosolic expression in neuronal morphology and cell toxicity between wild-type and missense mutant proteins. Thus, our results suggest that mislocalization of missense mutant TDP-43 may contribute to loss of TDP-43 function and affect neuronal morphology, probably via dominant negative action before severe neurodegeneration in differentiated cortical neurons. Highlights: • The function of nuclear TDP-43 in neurite morphology in mature neurons. • Partial mislocalization of TDP-43 missense mutants into cytosol from nucleus. • Abnormal neurite morphology caused by missense mutants of TDP-43. • The effect of cytosolic expression of TDP-43 in neurite morphology and in cell survival

  10. ALS/FTLD-linked TDP-43 regulates neurite morphology and cell survival in differentiated neurons

    Han, Jeong-Ho; Yu, Tae-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Jun, Mi-Hee; Ban, Byung-Kwan [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Nanotechnology, Hannam University, Dajeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Deok-Jin [Department of Applied Biology, College of Ecology and Environment, Kyungpook National University, 386, Gajang-dong, Sangju-si, Kyungbuk 742-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin-A, E-mail: leeja@hnu.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Nanotechnology, Hannam University, Dajeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    Tar-DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been characterized as a major component of protein aggregates in brains with neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, physiological roles of TDP-43 and early cellular pathogenic effects caused by disease associated mutations in differentiated neurons are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the physiological roles of TDP-43 and the effects of missense mutations associated with diseases in differentiated cortical neurons. The reduction of TDP-43 by siRNA increased abnormal neurites and decreased cell viability. ALS/FTLD-associated missense mutant proteins (A315T, Q331K, and M337V) were partially mislocalized to the cytosol and neurites when compared to wild-type and showed abnormal neurites similar to those observed in cases of loss of TDP-43. Interestingly, cytosolic expression of wild-type TDP-43 with mutated nuclear localization signals also induced abnormal neurtie morphology and reduction of cell viability. However, there was no significant difference in the effects of cytosolic expression in neuronal morphology and cell toxicity between wild-type and missense mutant proteins. Thus, our results suggest that mislocalization of missense mutant TDP-43 may contribute to loss of TDP-43 function and affect neuronal morphology, probably via dominant negative action before severe neurodegeneration in differentiated cortical neurons. Highlights: • The function of nuclear TDP-43 in neurite morphology in mature neurons. • Partial mislocalization of TDP-43 missense mutants into cytosol from nucleus. • Abnormal neurite morphology caused by missense mutants of TDP-43. • The effect of cytosolic expression of TDP-43 in neurite morphology and in cell survival.

  11. Accumulation of TAR DNA Binding Protein-43 (TDP-43) in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer Disease

    Tremblay, Cyntia; St-Amour, Isabelle; Schneider, Julie; Bennett, David A.; Calon, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43) plays a central role in the neuropathology of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but the relationship between TDP-43 abnormalities and Alzheimer disease (AD) remains unclear. To determine whether TDP-43 can serve as a neuropathological marker of AD, we performed biochemical characterization and quantification of TDP-43 in homogenates from parietal neocortex of subjects with a clinical diagnosis of no cognitive impairment (NCI, n = 12), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 12), or AD (n = 12). Immunoblots revealed increased detergent-insoluble TDP-43 in the cortex of 0/12, 3/12 and 6/12 individuals with NCI, MCI or AD, respectively. Detergent-insoluble TDP-43 was positively correlated with the accumulation of soluble A?42, amyloid plaques and paired helical filament tau. In contrast, phospho-TDP-43 was decreased in the cytosolic fraction and detergent-soluble membrane/nuclear fraction from AD patients and correlated with antemortem cognitive function. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that the frequencies of individuals with TPD-43 or phospo-TDP-43 cytoplasmic inclusions were higher in AD than in NCI, with MCI at an intermediate level. These data indicate that abnormalities of TDP-43 occur in an important subset of MCI and AD patients and that they correlate with the clinical and neuropathological features of AD. PMID:21865887

  12. Mass spectrometric analysis of accumulated TDP-43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis brains.

    Kametani, Fuyuki; Obi, Tomokazu; Shishido, Takeo; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Murayama, Shigeo; Saito, Yuko; Yoshida, Mari; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    TDP-43 is the major disease-associated protein involved in the pathogenesis and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions linked to TDP-43 pathology (FTLD-TDP). Abnormal phosphorylation, truncation and cytoplasmic mis-localization are known to be the characteristics for the aggregated forms of TDP-43, and gain of toxic abnormal TDP-43 or loss of function of physiological TDP-43 have been suggested as the cause of neurodegeneration. However, most of the post-translational modifications or truncation sites in the abnormal TDP-43 in brains of patients remain to be identified by protein chemical analysis. In this study, we carried out a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of Sarkosyl-insoluble pathological TDP-43 from brains of ALS patients and identified several novel phosphorylation sites, deamidation sites, and cleavage sites. Almost all modifications were localized in the Gly-rich C-terminal half. Most of the cleavage sites identified in this study are novel and are located in N-terminal half, suggesting that these sites may be more accessible to proteolytic enzymes. The data obtained in this study provide a foundation for the molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 aggregation and ALS pathogenesis. PMID:26980269

  13. Molecular Neuropathology of TDP-43 Proteinopathies

    Manuela Neumann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of TDP-43 as the major component of the pathologic inclusions in most forms of sporadic and familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS resolved a long-standing enigma concerning the nature of the ubiquitinated disease protein under these conditions. Anti-TDP-43 immunohistochemistry and the recent development of novel tools, such as phosphorylation-specific TDP-43 antibodies, have increased our knowledge about the spectrum of pathological changes associated with FTLD-U and ALS and moreover, facilitated the neuropathological routine diagnosis of these conditions. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding on the molecular neuropathology and pathobiology of TDP-43 in FTLD and ALS.

  14. Rethinking ALS: the FUS about TDP-43

    Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Cleveland, Don W.

    2009-01-01

    Mutation in TDP-43, a DNA/RNA binding protein, causes an inherited form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Combination of its mislocalization in most incidences of sporadic ALS (as well as other neurodegenerative disorders) with discovery of ALS-causing mutations in FUS/TLS, another DNA/RNA binding protein, has initiated a paradigm shift in understanding ALS pathogenesis. TDP-43 and FUS/TLS have striking structural and functional similarities, implicating alterations in RNA processing as...

  15. LAMINAR DISTRIBUTION OF THE PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN SPORADIC FRONTOTEMPORAL LOBAR DEGENERATION WITH TDP-43 PROTEINOPATHY: A QUANTITATIVE STUDY USING POLYNOMIAL CURVE FITTING

    Armstrong, Richard A.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Mackenzie, Ian R. A.; Hedreen, John; Cairns, Nigel J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Previous data suggest heterogeneity in laminar distribution of the pathology in the molecular disorder frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with transactive response (TAR) DNA-binding protein of 43kDa (TDP-43) proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP). To study this heterogeneity, we quantified the changes in density across the cortical laminae of neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI), glial inclusions (GI), neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NII), dystrophic neurites (DN), surviving neurons, abnormally enlarged neurons (EN), and vacuoles in regions of the frontal and temporal lobe. Methods Changes in density of histological features across cortical gyri were studied in ten sporadic cases of FTLD-TDP using quantitative methods and polynomial curve-fitting. Results Our data suggest that laminar neuropathology in sporadic FTLD-TDP is highly variable. Most commonly, NCI, DN, and vacuolation were abundant in the upper laminae and GI, NII, EN, and glial cell nuclei in the lower laminae. TDP-43-immunoreactive inclusions affected more of the cortical profile in longer duration cases, their distribution varied with disease subtype, but was unrelated to Braak tangle score. Different TDP-43-immunoreactive inclusions were not spatially correlated. Conclusions Laminar distribution of pathological features in ten sporadic cases of FTLD-TDL is heterogeneous and may be accounted for, in part, by disease subtype and disease duration. In addition, the feed-forward and feed-back cortico-cortical connections may be compromised in FTLD-TDP. PMID:22804696

  16. TDP-43 deposition in prospectively followed, cognitively normal elderly individuals: correlation with argyrophilic grains but not other concomitant pathologies.

    Arnold, Stacy J; Dugger, Brittany N; Beach, Thomas G

    2013-07-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been heavily researched in recent years due to its involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Several studies have also sought to investigate the frequency of TDP-43 deposition in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, but there has been relatively little work focused on the prevalence, distribution and histopathological associations of abnormal TDP-43 deposits in the brains of cognitively normal elderly subjects. We screened thick, free-floating coronal sections of mesial temporal lobe from 110 prospectively followed and autopsied cognitively normal subjects (age range 71-100 years) using an immunohistochemical method for phosphorylated TDP-43. We found a 36.4 % prevalence of pathologic TDP-43, mostly in the form of neurites while perikaryal cytoplasmic neuronal inclusions were uncommon and intranuclear inclusions were rare. With respect to other concomitant pathologies commonly found in elderly individuals, cases with TDP-43 had a greater prevalence of argyrophilic grains (ARG) (40 vs. 18.6 %) and overall ARG density (moderate vs. sparse). There were no additional associations with other concomitant pathologies, including cerebral white matter rarefaction, incidental Lewy bodies, neurofibrillary tangles or amyloid plaques. These results indicate deposition of TDP-43 occurs in a substantial subset of cognitively normal elderly subjects and is more common in those with ARG, supporting some previous studies linking pathological TDP-43 deposition with ARG and other pathological tau protein deposits. PMID:23604587

  17. Kinase Inhibitor Screening Identifies Cyclin-Dependent Kinases and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 as Potential Modulators of TDP-43 Cytosolic Accumulation during Cell Stress

    Moujalled, Diane; James, Janine L.; Parker, Sarah J; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Duncan, Clare; Meyerowitz, Jodi; NONAKA, TAKASHI; Hasegawa, Masato; Kanninen, Katja M; Grubman, Alexandra; Liddell, Jeffrey R.; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal processing of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been identified as a major factor in neuronal degeneration during amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). It is unclear how changes to TDP-43, including nuclear to cytosolic translocation and subsequent accumulation, are controlled in these diseases. TDP-43 is a member of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) RNA binding protein family and is known to associate with cytosolic RNA stre...

  18. TDP-43 is a component of ubiquitin-positive tau-negative inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Ubiquitin-positive tau-negative neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites are common pathological features in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with or without symptoms of motor neuron disease and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Using biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses, we have identified a TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43), a nuclear factor that functions in regulating transcription and alternative splicing, as a component of these structures in FTLD. Furthermore, skein-like inclusions, neuronal intranuclear inclusions, and glial inclusions in the spinal cord of ALS patients are also positive for TDP-43. Dephosphorylation treatment of the sarkosyl insoluble fraction has shown that abnormal phosphorylation takes place in accumulated TDP-43. The common occurrence of intracellular accumulations of TDP-43 supports the hypothesis that these disorders represent a clinicopathological entity of a single disease, and suggests that they can be newly classified as a proteinopathy of TDP-43

  19. Does a loss of TDP-43 function cause neurodegeneration?

    Xu Zuo-Shang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2006, TAR-DNA binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43 was discovered to be in the intracellular aggregates in the degenerating cells in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD, two fatal neurodegenerative diseases [1,2]. ALS causes motor neuron degeneration leading to paralysis [3,4]. FTLD causes neuronal degeneration in the frontal and temporal cortices leading to personality changes and a loss of executive function [5]. The discovery triggered a flurry of research activity that led to the discovery of TDP-43 mutations in ALS patients and the widespread presence of TDP-43 aggregates in numerous neurodegenerative diseases. A key question regarding the role of TDP-43 is whether it causes neurotoxicity by a gain of function or a loss of function. The gain-of-function hypothesis has received much attention primarily based on the striking neurodegenerative phenotypes in numerous TDP-43-overexpression models. In this review, I will draw attention to the loss-of-function hypothesis, which postulates that mutant TDP-43 causes neurodegeneration by a loss of function, and in addition, by exerting a dominant-negative effect on the wild-type TDP-43 allele. Furthermore, I will discuss how a loss of function can cause neurodegeneration in patients where TDP-43 is not mutated, review the literature in model systems to discuss how the current data support the loss-of-function mechanism and highlight some key questions for testing this hypothesis in the future.

  20. A molecular mechanism realizing sequence-specific recognition of nucleic acids by TDP-43.

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yoh; Fukuoka, Mami; Nagasawa, Kenichi; Nakagome, Kenta; Shimizu, Hideaki; Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Akiyama, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein containing two consecutive RNA recognition motifs (RRM1 and RRM2) in tandem. Functional abnormality of TDP-43 has been proposed to cause neurodegeneration, but it remains obscure how the physiological functions of this protein are regulated. Here, we show distinct roles of RRM1 and RRM2 in the sequence-specific substrate recognition of TDP-43. RRM1 was found to bind a wide spectrum of ssDNA sequences, while no binding was observed between RRM2 and ssDNA. When two RRMs are fused in tandem as in native TDP-43, the fused construct almost exclusively binds ssDNA with a TG-repeat sequence. In contrast, such sequence-specificity was not observed in a simple mixture of RRM1 and RRM2. We thus propose that the spatial arrangement of multiple RRMs in DNA/RNA binding proteins provides steric effects on the substrate-binding site and thereby controls the specificity of its substrate nucleotide sequences. PMID:26838063

  1. Neurocognitive speed associates with frontotemporal lobar degeneration TDP-43 subtypes

    Pamela M. Dean; Smith, Glenn E; Parisi, Joseph E.; Dickson, Dennis W; Petersen, Ronald C.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is pathologically heterogeneous with TAR DNA binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43) proteinopathy the most common substrate. Previous work has identified atrophy patterns across TDP-43 subtypes with Type A showing greater frontotemporal and parietal atrophy, Type C predominantly anterior temporal, and Type B predominantly posterior frontal. Despite neuroanatomical correlates of involvement, neuropsychological findings have been inconsistent. The current study...

  2. Knockdown of transactive response DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) downregulates histone deacetylase 6

    Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Voigt, Aaron; Weber, Stephanie S.; Van den Haute, Chris; Waldenmaier, Andrea; Görner, Karin; Walter, Michael; Anderson, Marlene L; Kern, Jeannine V; Rasse, Tobias M; Schmidt, Thorsten; Springer, Wolfdieter; Kirchner, Roland; BONIN, MICHAEL; Neumann, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    TDP-43 is an RNA/DNA-binding protein implicated in transcriptional repression and mRNA processing. Inclusions of TDP-43 are hallmarks of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Besides aggregation of TDP-43, loss of nuclear localization is observed in disease. To identify relevant targets of TDP-43, we performed expression profiling. Thereby, histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) downregulation was discovered on TDP-43 silencing and confirmed at the mRNA and protein level in human ...

  3. An ALS-mutant TDP-43 neurotoxic peptide adopts an anti-parallel β-structure and induces TDP-43 redistribution.

    Zhu, Li; Xu, Meng; Yang, Mengxue; Yang, Yanlian; Li, Yang; Deng, Jianwen; Ruan, Linhao; Liu, Jianghong; Du, Sidan; Liu, Xuehui; Feng, Wei; Fushimi, Kazuo; Bigio, Eileen H; Mesulam, Marsel; Wang, Chen; Wu, Jane Y

    2014-12-20

    TDP-43 proteinopathies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that had been considered distinct from classical amyloid diseases. Here, we provide evidence for the structural similarity between TDP-43 peptides and other amyloid proteins. Atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy examination of peptides spanning a previously defined amyloidogenic fragment revealed a minimal core region that forms amyloid fibrils similar to the TDP-43 fibrils detected in FTLD-TDP brain tissues. An ALS-mutant A315E amyloidogenic TDP-43 peptide is capable of cross-seeding other TDP-43 peptides and an amyloid-β peptide. Sequential Nuclear Overhauser Effects and double-quantum-filtered correlation spectroscopy in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the A315E-mutant TDP-43 peptide indicate that it adopts an anti-parallel β conformation. When added to cell cultures, the amyloidogenic TDP-43 peptides induce TDP-43 redistribution from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Neuronal cultures in compartmentalized microfluidic-chambers demonstrate that the TDP-43 peptides can be taken up by axons and induce axonotoxicity and neuronal death, thus recapitulating key neuropathological features of TDP-43 proteinopathies. Importantly, a single amino acid change in the amyloidogenic TDP-43 peptide that disrupts fibril formation also eliminates neurotoxicity, supporting that amyloidogenesis is critical for TDP-43 neurotoxicity. PMID:25113748

  4. Neurocognitive speed associates with frontotemporal lobar degeneration TDP-43 subtypes.

    Dean, Pamela M; Smith, Glenn E; Parisi, Joseph E; Dickson, Dennis W; Petersen, Ronald C; Josephs, Keith A

    2013-12-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is pathologically heterogeneous with the TAR DNA binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43) proteinopathy the most common substrate. Previous work has identified atrophy patterns across TDP-43 subtypes with Type A showing greater frontotemporal and parietal atrophy, Type C predominantly anterior temporal, and Type B predominantly posterior frontal. Despite neuroanatomical correlates of involvement, neuropsychological findings have been inconsistent. The current study utilized broader neurocognitive domains based on aggregated neuropsychological measures to distinguish between subtypes. We hypothesized that patterns of neurocognitive domain impairments would predict FTLD-TDP subtype. Fifty-one patients, aged 38-87, were identified post mortem with pathologically confirmed FTLD with TDP-43. Participants were classified into subtypes A, B, or C. Patients had completed neuropsychological assessments as part of their clinical evaluation. Six cognitive domains were created: Language; Cognitive Speed; Memory; Learning; Visuoperception; and Fluency. Binary logistic regression was conducted. All but three patients could be classified as FTLD-TDP Types A, B, or C: 26 as Type A; nine as Type B; and 13 as Type C. Cognitive Speed scores were associated with Types A and C (p Test differentiated Types A and C. Worse Boston Naming Test and Logical Memory (Immediate) (p < 0.05) scores also increased the likelihood of Type C phenotype. Findings suggest Cognitive Speed associates with TDP-43 subtypes. Type C also demonstrated language-specific involvement. Differences between TDP-43 subtypes further supports the notion of differences in pathophysiology or topography across these types. PMID:24012243

  5. Updated TDP-43 in Alzheimer's disease staging scheme.

    Josephs, Keith A; Murray, Melissa E; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D; Petrucelli, Leonard; Liesinger, Amanda M; Petersen, Ronald C; Parisi, Joseph E; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we update the TDP-43 in Alzheimer's disease staging scheme by assessing the topography of TDP-43 in 193 cases of Alzheimer's disease, in 14 different brain regions (eight previously described plus six newly reported) and use conditional probability to model the spread of TDP-43 across the 14 brain regions. We show that in addition to the eight original regions we previously reported [amygdala, entorhinal cortex, subiculum, dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, occipitotemporal cortex, inferior temporal cortex, middle frontal cortex and basal ganglia (putamen/globus pallidum)] that TDP-43 is also deposited in the insular cortex, ventral striatum, basal forebrain, substantia nigra, midbrain tectum, and the inferior olive of the medulla oblongata, in Alzheimer's disease. The conditional probability analysis produced six significantly different stages (P amygdala (stage 1), then moves to entorhinal cortex and subiculum (stage 2); to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and occipitotemporal cortex (stage 3); insular cortex, ventral striatum, basal forebrain and inferior temporal cortex (stage 4); substantia nigra, inferior olive and midbrain tectum (stage 5); and finally to basal ganglia and middle frontal cortex (stage 6). This updated staging scheme is superior to our previous staging scheme, classifying 100 % of the cases (versus 94 % in the old scheme), based on criteria provided, and shows clinical significance with some regions and with increasing stage. We discuss the relevance of the updated staging scheme, as well as its impact on the prion-like hypothesis of protein spread in neurodegenerative disease. We also address the issue of whether frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 could be the primary pathology in stage 6. PMID:26810071

  6. Inter-domain interactions of TDP-43 as decoded by NMR.

    Wei, Yuanyuan; Lim, Liangzhong; Wang, Lu; Song, Jianxing

    2016-04-29

    TDP-43 inclusions have been found in ∼97% ALS as well as an increasing spectrum of other neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. TDP-43 contains an ubiquitin-like fold, two RRMs and a prion-like domain, but whether they interact with each other remains unknown due to being intrinsically aggregation-prone. Nevertheless, this knowledge is pivotal to understanding physiological functions and pathological roles of TDP-43. Here as facilitated by our previous discovery which allowed NMR characterization of TDP-43 and its five dissected fragments, we successfully decoded that TDP-43 does have dynamic inter-domain interactions, which are coordinated by the intrinsically-disordered prion-like domain. Thus, TDP-43 appears to undergo conformational exchanges between "closed" and "open" states which are needed for its functions. Our study thus offers a mechanism by which cellular processes might control TDP-43 physiology and proteinopathy by mediating its inter-domain interactions. PMID:27040765

  7. Lack of association between TDP-43 pathology and tau mis-splicing in Alzheimer's disease.

    Niblock, Michael; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Spickett, Carl; Jones, Rebecca; Shaw, Christopher E; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    A proportion of Alzheimer's disease cases displays inclusions of the RNA-binding protein, TDP-43. Considering the pathogenic role of tau mis-splicing, we compared tau isoform expression between Alzheimer's disease cases with or without TDP-43 inclusions. The average ratio of tau isoforms containing or lacking exon 10 (4R/3R ratio) or the total level of tau mRNA was not significantly different between cases with or without TDP-43 pathology in any of the brain regions examined. Although TDP-43 functions may be affected, TDP-43 does not critically regulate expression or splicing of tau in Alzheimer's disease suggesting that TDP-43 contributes to Alzheimer's disease through mechanisms independent of tau. PMID:26507309

  8. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    Highlights: ► The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). ► The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. ► The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. ► The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  9. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    Chang, Chung-ke [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tzong-Huah [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Biochemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chu-Ya [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Liao, Yu-heng [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tai-huang, E-mail: bmthh@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse, E-mail: jthuang@chem.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  10. TDP-43 loss of function increases TFEB activity and blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    Xia, Qin; Wang, Hongfeng; Hao, Zongbing; Fu, Cheng; Hu, Qingsong; Gao, Feng; Ren, Haigang; Chen, Dong; Han, Junhai; Ying, Zheng; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-18

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by selective loss of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord. TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) was identified as a major component of disease pathogenesis in ALS, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and other neurodegenerative disease. Despite the fact that TDP-43 is a multi-functional protein involved in RNA processing and a large number of TDP-43 RNA targets have been discovered, the initial toxic effect and the pathogenic mechanism underlying TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration remain elusive. In this study, we found that loss of TDP-43 strongly induced a nuclear translocation of TFEB, the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy, through targeting the mTORC1 key component raptor. This regulation in turn enhanced global gene expressions in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) and increased autophagosomal and lysosomal biogenesis. However, loss of TDP-43 also impaired the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes through dynactin 1 downregulation, leading to accumulation of immature autophagic vesicles and overwhelmed ALP function. Importantly, inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rapamycin treatment aggravated the neurodegenerative phenotype in a TDP-43-depleted Drosophila model, whereas activation of mTORC1 signaling by PA treatment ameliorated the neurodegenerative phenotype. Taken together, our data indicate that impaired mTORC1 signaling and influenced ALP may contribute to TDP-43-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:26702100

  11. Pharmacological reduction of ER stress protects against TDP-43 neuronal toxicity in vivo.

    Vaccaro, Alexandra; Patten, Shunmoogum A; Aggad, Dina; Julien, Carl; Maios, Claudia; Kabashi, Edor; Drapeau, Pierre; Parker, J Alex

    2013-07-01

    C. elegans and D. rerio expressing mutant TAR DNA Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) are powerful in vivo animal models for the genetics and pharmacology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Using these small-animal models of ALS, we previously identified methylene blue (MB) as a potent suppressor of TDP-43 toxicity. Consequently here we investigated how MB might exert its neuroprotective properties and found that it acts through reduction of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. We tested other compounds known to be active in the ER unfolded protein response in worms and zebrafish expressing mutant human TDP-43 (mTDP-43). We identified three compounds: salubrinal, guanabenz and a new structurally related compound phenazine, which also reduced paralysis, neurodegeneration and oxidative stress in our mTDP-43 models. Using C. elegans genetics, we showed that all four compounds act as potent suppressors of mTDP-43 toxicity through reduction of the ER stress response. Interestingly, these compounds operate through different branches of the ER unfolded protein pathway to achieve a common neuroprotective action. Our results indicate that protein-folding homeostasis in the ER is an important target for therapeutic development in ALS and other TDP-43-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23567652

  12. TDP-43 knockdown impairs neurite outgrowth dependent on its target histone deacetylase 6

    Weber Stephanie S

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trans-activation response element (TAR DNA binding protein of 43kDa (TDP-43 is causally related to the neurodegenerative diseases frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis being the hallmark protein in the disease-characteristic neuropathological lesions and via genetic linkage. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 is an established target of the RNA-binding protein TDP-43. HDAC6 is an unusual cytosolic deacetylase enzyme, central for a variety of pivotal cellular functions including aggregating protein turnover, microtubular dynamics and filopodia formation. All these functions are important in the context of neurodegenerative proteinopathies involving TDP-43. We have previously shown in a human embryonic kidney cell line that TDP-43 knockdown significantly impairs the removal of a toxic, aggregating polyQ ataxin-3 fusion protein in an HDAC6-dependent manner. Here we investigated the influence of TDP-43 and its target HDAC6 on neurite outgrowth. Results Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with stably silenced TDP-43 showed a significant reduction of neurite outgrowth induced by retinoic acid and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Re-transfection with TDP-43 as well as HDAC6 rescued retinoic acid-induced neurite outgrowth. In addition, we show that silencing of HDAC6 alone is sufficient to reduce neurite outgrowth of in vitro differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusions TDP-43 deficiency leads to impairment of neurite growth in an HDAC6-dependent manner, thereby contributing to neurodegenerative events in TDP-43 diseases.

  13. Maple Syrup Decreases TDP-43 Proteotoxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

    Aaron, Catherine; Beaudry, Gabrielle; Parker, J Alex; Therrien, Martine

    2016-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease causing death of the motor neurons. Proteotoxicity caused by TDP-43 protein is an important aspect of ALS pathogenesis, with TDP-43 being the main constituent of the aggregates found in patients. We have previously tested the effect of different sugars on the proteotoxicity caused by the expression of mutant TDP-43 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we tested maple syrup, a natural compound containing many active molecules including sugars and phenols, for neuroprotective activity. Maple syrup decreased several age-dependent phenotypes caused by the expression of TDP-43(A315T) in C. elegans motor neurons and requires the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 to be effective. PMID:27071850

  14. TDP-43, an ALS Linked Protein, Regulates Fat Deposition and Glucose Homeostasis

    Stallings, Nancy R.; Puttaparthi, Krishna; Dowling, Katherine J.; Luther, Christina M.; Burns, Dennis K.; Davis, Kathryn; Elliott, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of proteins which determine fat and lean body mass composition is critical to better understanding and treating human obesity. TDP-43 is a well-conserved RNA-binding protein known to regulate alternative splicing and recently implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 knockout mice show early embryonic lethality, post-natal conditional knockout mice show weight loss, fat depletion, and rapid death, suggesting an important role for TD...

  15. TDP-43 knockdown impairs neurite outgrowth dependent on its target histone deacetylase 6

    Weber Stephanie S; Schurr Christine; Fiesel Fabienne C; Kahle Philipp J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Trans-activation response element (TAR) DNA binding protein of 43kDa (TDP-43) is causally related to the neurodegenerative diseases frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis being the hallmark protein in the disease-characteristic neuropathological lesions and via genetic linkage. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an established target of the RNA-binding protein TDP-43. HDAC6 is an unusual cytosolic deacetylase enzyme, central for a variety of pivotal cellul...

  16. Depletion of TDP-43 affects Drosophila motoneurons terminal synapsis and locomotive behavior.

    Feiguin, Fabian; Godena, Vinay K; Romano, Giulia; D'Ambrogio, Andrea; Klima, Raffaella; Baralle, Francisco E

    2009-05-19

    Pathological modifications in the highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein TDP-43 were recently associated to neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a late-onset disorder that affects predominantly motoneurons [Neumann, M. et al. (2006) Ubiquitinated TDP-43 in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Science 314, 130-133, Sreedharan, J. et al. (2008) TDP-43 mutations in familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Science 319, 1668-1672, Kabashi, E. et al. (2008) TARDBP mutations in individuals with sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Nat. Genet. 40, 572-574]. However, the function of TDP-43 in vivo is unknown and a possible direct role in neurodegeneration remains speculative. Here, we report that flies lacking Drosophila TDP-43 appeared externally normal but presented deficient locomotive behaviors, reduced life span and anatomical defects at the neuromuscular junctions. These phenotypes were rescued by expression of the human protein in a restricted group of neurons including motoneurons. Our results demonstrate the role of this protein in vivo and suggest an alternative explanation to ALS pathogenesis that may be more due to the lack of TDP 43 function than to the toxicity of the aggregates. PMID:19379745

  17. Methylene blue protects against TDP-43 and FUS neuronal toxicity in C. elegans and D. rerio.

    Vaccaro, Alexandra; Patten, Shunmoogum A; Ciura, Sorana; Maios, Claudia; Therrien, Martine; Drapeau, Pierre; Kabashi, Edor; Parker, J Alex

    2012-01-01

    The DNA/RNA-binding proteins TDP-43 and FUS are found in protein aggregates in a growing number of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and related dementia, but little is known about the neurotoxic mechanisms. We have generated Caenorhabditis elegans and zebrafish animal models expressing mutant human TDP-43 (A315T or G348C) or FUS (S57Δ or R521H) that reflect certain aspects of ALS including motor neuron degeneration, axonal deficits, and progressive paralysis. To explore the potential of our humanized transgenic C. elegans and zebrafish in identifying chemical suppressors of mutant TDP-43 and FUS neuronal toxicity, we tested three compounds with potential neuroprotective properties: lithium chloride, methylene blue and riluzole. We identified methylene blue as a potent suppressor of TDP-43 and FUS toxicity in both our models. Our results indicate that methylene blue can rescue toxic phenotypes associated with mutant TDP-43 and FUS including neuronal dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:22848727

  18. PPAR gamma activation is neuroprotective in a Drosophila model of ALS based on TDP-43

    Joardar, Archi; Menzl, Judith; Podolsky, Taylor C.; Manzo, Ernesto; Estes, Patricia S.; Ashford, Sarah; Zarnescu, Daniela C.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neuromuscular disease for which there is no cure. We have previously developed a Drosophila model of ALS based on TDP-43 that recapitulates several aspects of disease pathophysiology. Using this model, we designed a drug screening strategy based on the pupal lethality phenotype induced by TDP-43 when expressed in motor neurons. In screening 1200 FDA-approved compounds, we identified the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone as neuroprotective in Drosophila. Here, we show that pioglitazone can rescue TDP-43-dependent locomotor dysfunction in motor neurons and glia but not in muscles. Testing additional models of ALS, we find that pioglitazone is also neuroprotective when FUS, but not SOD1, is expressed in motor neurons. Interestingly, survival analyses of TDP or FUS models show no increase in lifespan, which is consistent with recent clinical trials. Using a pharmacogenetic approach, we show that the predicted Drosophila PPARγ homologs, E75 and E78, are in vivo targets of pioglitazone. Finally, using a global metabolomic approach, we identify a set of metabolites that pioglitazone can restore in the context of TDP-43 expression in motor neurons. Taken together, our data provide evidence that modulating PPARγ activity, although not effective at improving lifespan, provides a molecular target for mitigating locomotor dysfunction in TDP-43 and FUS but not SOD1 models of ALS in Drosophila. Furthermore, our data also identify several ‘biomarkers’ of the disease that may be useful in developing therapeutics and in future clinical trials. PMID:25432537

  19. HO-1 induction in motor cortex and intestinal dysfunction in TDP-43 A315T transgenic mice.

    Guo, Yansu; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Kunxi; An, Ting; Shi, Pengxiao; Li, Zhongyao; Duan, Weisong; Li, Chunyan

    2012-06-15

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been found to be related to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). TDP-43 A315T transgenic mice develop degeneration of specific motor neurons, and accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins has been observed in the pyramidal cells of motor cortex of these mice. In this study, we found stress-responsive HO-1 induction and no autophagic alteration in motor cortex of TDP-43 A315T transgenic mice. Glial activation, especially astrocytic proliferation, occurred in cortical layer 5 and sub-meningeal region. Interestingly, we noticed that progressively thinned colon, swollen small intestine and reduced food intake, rather than severe muscle weakness, contributed to the death of TDP-43 A315T transgenic mice. Increased TDP-43 accumulation in the myenteric nerve plexus and increased thickness of muscular layer of colon were related to the intestinal dysfunction. PMID:22578468

  20. On the development of markers for pathological TDP-43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia.

    Geser, F

    2011-12-01

    Pathological 43-kDa transactive response sequence DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) has been recognized as the major disease protein in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin positive, tau and α-synuclein negative inclusions (FTLD-U) and the transitional forms between these multisystem conditions. In order to develop TDP-43 into a successful ALS biomarker, the natural history of TDP-43 pathology needs to be characterized and the underlying pathophysiology established. Here we propose a spatial and temporal "two-axes" model of central nervous system vulnerability for TDP-43 linked degeneration and review recent studies on potential biomarkers related to pathological TDP-43 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood, and skeletal muscle. The model includes the following two arms: Firstly, a "motor neuron disease" or "spinal cord\\/brainstem to motor cortex" axis (with degeneration possibly ascending from the lower motor neurons to the upper motor neurons); and secondly, a "dementia" or "corticoid\\/allocortex to neocortex" axis (with a probable spread of TDP-43 linked degeneration from the mediotemporal lobe to wider mesocortical and neocortical brain areas). At the cellular level, there is a gradual disappearance of normal TDP-43 in the nucleus in combination with the formation of pathological aggregates in the cell body and cellular processes, which can also be used to identify the stage of the disease process. Moreover, TDP-43 lesions in subpial\\/subependymal or perivascular localizations have been noted, and this might account for increased CSF and blood TDP-43 levels through mechanisms that remain to be elucidated.

  1. Distinct TDP-43 pathology in ALS patients with ataxin 2 intermediate-length polyQ expansions

    Hart, Michael P.; Brettschneider, Johannes; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration of motor neurons, resulting in paralysis and death. A pathological hallmark of the degenerating motor neurons in most ALS patients is the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions containing the protein TDP-43. The morphology and type of TDP-43 pathological inclusions is variable and can range from large round Lewy body-like inclusions to filamentous skein-like inclusions. The cl...

  2. Semi-Automated Digital Image Analysis of Pick's Disease and TDP-43 Proteinopathy.

    Irwin, David J; Byrne, Matthew D; McMillan, Corey T; Cooper, Felicia; Arnold, Steven E; Lee, Edward B; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Xie, Sharon X; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowski, John Q

    2016-01-01

    Digital image analysis of histology sections provides reliable, high-throughput methods for neuropathological studies but data is scant in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), which has an added challenge of study due to morphologically diverse pathologies. Here, we describe a novel method of semi-automated digital image analysis in FTLD subtypes including: Pick's disease (PiD, n=11) with tau-positive intracellular inclusions and neuropil threads, and TDP-43 pathology type C (FTLD-TDPC, n=10), defined by TDP-43-positive aggregates predominantly in large dystrophic neurites. To do this, we examined three FTLD-associated cortical regions: mid-frontal gyrus (MFG), superior temporal gyrus (STG) and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) by immunohistochemistry. We used a color deconvolution process to isolate signal from the chromogen and applied both object detection and intensity thresholding algorithms to quantify pathological burden. We found object-detection algorithms had good agreement with gold-standard manual quantification of tau- and TDP-43-positive inclusions. Our sampling method was reliable across three separate investigators and we obtained similar results in a pilot analysis using open-source software. Regional comparisons using these algorithms finds differences in regional anatomic disease burden between PiD and FTLD-TDP not detected using traditional ordinal scale data, suggesting digital image analysis is a powerful tool for clinicopathological studies in morphologically diverse FTLD syndromes. PMID:26538548

  3. Globular Glial Mixed Four Repeat Tau and TDP-43 Proteinopathy with Motor Neuron Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    Takeuchi, Ryoko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Tada, Mari; Tanaka, Hidetomo; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shiga, Atsushi; Miura, Takeshi; Aoki, Kenju; Aikawa, Akane; Ishizawa, Shin; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be accompanied by frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report a case of glial mixed tau and TDP-43 proteinopathies in a Japanese patient diagnosed clinically as having ALS-D. Autopsy revealed loss of lower motor neurons and degeneration of the pyramidal tracts in the spinal cord and brain stem. The brain showed frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the most severe neuronal loss and gliosis being evident in the precentral gyrus. Although less severe, such changes were also observed in other brain regions, including the basal ganglia and substantia nigra. AT8 immunostaining revealed that predominant occurrence of astrocytic tau lesions termed globular astrocytic inclusions (GAIs) was a feature of the affected regions. These GAIs were Gallyas-Braak negative. Neuronal and oligodendrocytic tau lesions were comparatively scarce. pS409/410 immunostaining also revealed similar neuronal and glial TDP-43 lesions. Interestingly, occasional co-localization of tau and TDP-43 was evident in the GAIs. Immunoblot analyses revealed band patterns characteristic of a 4-repeat (4R) tauopathy, corticobasal degeneration and a TDP-43 proteinopathy, ALS/FTLD-TDP?Type?B. No mutations were found in the MAPT or TDP-43 genes. We consider that this patient harbored a distinct, sporadic globular glial mixed 4R tau and TDP-43 proteinopathy associated with motor neuron disease and FTD. PMID:25787090

  4. An optimized InCell Western screening technique identifies hexachlorophene as a novel potent TDP43 targeting drug.

    Narayan, Malathi; Peralta, Diego A; Gibson, Chelsea; Zitnyar, Ashley; Jinwal, Umesh K

    2015-08-10

    TAR DNA binding protein (TDP43) is a DNA- and RNA-binding protein that is implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders termed as "TDP43 proteinopathies" including Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal lobe dementia (FTLD). We have developed an InCell Western (ICW) technique for screening TDP targeting drugs in 96 well plates. We tested 281 compounds and identified a novel compound hexachlorophene (referred to as B10) that showed potent reduction in TDP43 levels. The effect of B10 on TDP protein level was validated in two different cellular models: endogenous TDP43 expressing N9 microglial cells and TDP43-over-expressing HEK293 and HeLa cells. We also analyzed effect of B10 on various pathological forms of TDP such as the C25 cleaved fragment that localizes to the cytosol, insoluble high molecular weight species, and ALS-linked mutants. Our data suggest that B10 effectively reduces all forms of TDP. Overall, our data suggest that B10 could serve as a potential drug molecule for the treatment of AD, ALS and other TDP43 proteinopathies. PMID:25987361

  5. TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) regulates stress granule dynamics via differential regulation of G3BP and TIA-1.

    McDonald, Karli K; Aulas, Anaïs; Destroismaisons, Laurie; Pickles, Sarah; Beleac, Evghenia; Camu, William; Rouleau, Guy A; Vande Velde, Christine

    2011-04-01

    TAR deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a multifunctional protein with roles in transcription, pre-messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) splicing, mRNA stability and transport. TDP-43 interacts with other heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP A2, via its C-terminus and several hnRNP family members are involved in the cellular stress response. This relationship led us to investigate the role of TDP-43 in cellular stress. Our results demonstrate that TDP-43 and hnRNP A2 are localized to stress granules (SGs), following oxidative stress, heat shock and exposure to thapsigargin. TDP-43 contributes to both the assembly and maintenance of SGs in response to oxidative stress and differentially regulates key SGs components, including TIA-1 and G3BP. The controlled aggregation of TIA-1 is disrupted in the absence of TDP-43 resulting in slowed SG formation. In addition, TDP-43 regulates the levels of G3BP mRNA, a SG nucleating factor. The disease-associated mutation TDP-43(R361S) is a loss-of-function mutation with regards to SG formation and confers alterations in levels of G3BP and TIA-1. In contrast, a second mutation TDP-43(D169G) does not impact this pathway. Thus, mutations in TDP-43 are mechanistically divergent. Finally, the cellular function of TDP-43 extends beyond splicing and places TDP-43 as a participant of the central cellular response to stress and an active player in RNA storage. PMID:21257637

  6. Gain and loss of function of ALS-related mutations of TARDBP (TDP-43) cause motor deficits in vivo.

    Kabashi, Edor; Lin, Li; Tradewell, Miranda L; Dion, Patrick A; Bercier, Valérie; Bourgouin, Patrick; Rochefort, Daniel; Bel Hadj, Samar; Durham, Heather D; Vande Velde, Christine; Rouleau, Guy A; Drapeau, Pierre

    2010-02-15

    TDP-43 has been found in inclusion bodies of multiple neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the TDP-43 encoding gene, TARDBP, have been subsequently reported in sporadic and familial ALS patients. In order to investigate the pathogenic nature of these mutants, the effects of three consistently reported TARDBP mutations (A315T, G348C and A382T) were tested in cell lines, primary cultured motor neurons and living zebrafish embryos. Each of the three mutants and wild-type (WT) human TDP-43 localized to nuclei when expressed in COS1 and Neuro2A cells by transient transfection. However, when expressed in motor neurons from dissociated spinal cord cultures these mutant TARDBP alleles, but less so for WT TARDBP, were neurotoxic, concomitant with perinuclear localization and aggregation of TDP-43. Finally, overexpression of mutant, but less so of WT, human TARDBP caused a motor phenotype in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos consisting of shorter motor neuronal axons, premature and excessive branching as well as swimming deficits. Interestingly, knock-down of zebrafisfh tardbp led to a similar phenotype, which was rescued by co-expressing WT but not mutant human TARDBP. Together these approaches showed that TARDBP mutations cause motor neuron defects and toxicity, suggesting that both a toxic gain of function as well as a novel loss of function may be involved in the molecular mechanism by which mutant TDP-43 contributes to disease pathogenesis. PMID:19959528

  7. Gain-of-function profilin 1 mutations linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cause seed-dependent intracellular TDP-43 aggregation.

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Nonaka, Takashi; Suzuki, Genjiro; Kametani, Fuyuki; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-04-01

    Profilin 1 (PFN1) is an actin monomer-binding protein essential for regulating cytoskeletal dynamics in all cell types. Recently, mutations in the PFN1 gene have been identified as a cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The co-aggregation of PFN1 bearing mutations that cause ALS with TDP-43 (a key molecule in both sporadic and some familial forms of ALS), together with the classical TDP-43 pathology detected in post-mortem tissues of patients with autosomal dominant PFN1 mutation, imply that gain-of-toxic-function of PFN1 mutants is associated with the onset of ALS. However, it remains unknown how PFN1 mutants cause ALS. We found mutant PFN1 that causes ALS formed cytoplasmic aggregates positive for ubiquitin and p62, and these aggregates sequestered endogenous TDP-43. In cells harboring PFN1 aggregates, formation of aggresome-like structures was inhibited in the presence of proteasome inhibitor, and conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II was suppressed in the presence of lysosome inhibitor. Further, insoluble TDP-43 was increased in both cases. Co-expression of ALS-linked mutant PFN1 and TDP-43 increased insoluble and phosphorylated TDP-43 levels. The C-terminal region of TDP-43, essential for aggregation of TDP-43, was also indispensable for the interaction with PFN1. Interestingly, insoluble fractions prepared from cells expressing ALS-linked mutant PFN1 functioned as a seed to induce accumulation and phosphorylation of TDP-43, indicating that TDP-43 accumulated in the presence of the PFN1 mutants is converted to prion-like species. These findings provide new insight into the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in ALS, suggesting that gain-of-toxic-function PFN1 gene mutation leads to conformational change of TDP-43. PMID:26908597

  8. TDP-43 Proteinopathies: A New Player in Neurodegenerative Diseases with Defective Protein Folding

    Suna Lahut

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The proteome is the sum of all proteins inside a cell, and proteostasis (protein homeostasis is the stable condition of the proteome. Proteostasis is essential for the cellular and organismal health. Stress, aging and the chronic expression of misfolded proteins challenge the proteostasis machinery and the vitality of the cell. There is increasing evidence that the accumulation of damaged proteins not only has direct consequences on the efficiency and fidelity of cellular processes but, when not corrected, that they initiate a cascade of dysfunction, which in humans is associated with a plethora of diseases of protein conformation, referred to as proteinopathies. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, Parkinson’s Disease (PD, Huntington’s Disease (HD, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, cancer and diabetes, whose frequencies have drastically increased in countries with aging populations, are all consequences of misfolded proteins. This paper focuses on TDP-43, which excelled as a key protein in neurodegenerative processes because of its association with different diseases, especially with ALS and Frontotemporal Lobar Dementia (FTLD, the two best studied examples of TDP-43 proteinopathies.

  9. Two mutations G335D and Q343R within the amyloidogenic core region of TDP-43 influence its aggregation and inclusion formation.

    Jiang, Lei-Lei; Zhao, Jian; Yin, Xiao-Fang; He, Wen-Tian; Yang, Hui; Che, Mei-Xia; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA binding protein associated with TDP-43 proteinopathies. Many mutations have been identified in the flexible C-terminal region, which is implicated in the disease pathology. We investigated four point mutations in the amyloidogenic core region (residues 311-360) of TDP-43 by biochemical and spectroscopic methods. We found that the G335D mutation enhances the aggregation and inclusion formation of TDP-43 and this mutant in TDP-35 (the C-terminal fragment of 35 kDa) exaggerates the antagonist effect on RNA processing by endogenous TDP-43; whereas Q343R gives an opposite effect. As a comparison, M337V and Q331K have very little impact on the aggregation and inclusion formation of TDP-43 or TDP-35. NMR structural analysis showed that the G335D mutant in the core region forms a loop linker between the two α-helices and promotes α-to-β transition, but Q343R loses the second helix and consequently the structural transformation. Thus, the propensity of structural transformation in the amyloidogenic core of TDP-43 determines its aggregation and inclusion formation. This study may provide a molecular mechanism of the TDP-43 proteinopathies caused by genetic mutations. PMID:27030292

  10. Structural analysis of disease-related TDP-43 D169G mutation: linking enhanced stability and caspase cleavage efficiency to protein accumulation.

    Chiang, Chien-Hao; Grauffel, Cédric; Wu, Lien-Szu; Kuo, Pan-Hsien; Doudeva, Lyudmila G; Lim, Carmay; Shen, Che-Kun James; Yuan, Hanna S

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 forms intracellular inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 mutations have been identified in ALS patients, how these mutations are linked to ALS remains unclear. Here we examined the biophysical properties of six ALS-linked TDP-43 mutants and found that one of the mutants, D169G, had higher thermal stability than wild-type TDP-43 and that it was cleaved by caspase 3 more efficiently, producing increased levels of the C-terminal 35?kD fragments (TDP-35) in vitro and in neuroblastoma cells. The crystal structure of the TDP-43 RRM1 domain containing the D169G mutation in complex with DNA along with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the D169G mutation induces a local conformational change in a ? turn and increases the hydrophobic interactions in the RRM1 core, thus enhancing the thermal stability of the RRM1 domain. Our results provide the first crystal structure of TDP-43 containing a disease-linked D169G mutation and a disease-related mechanism showing that D169G mutant is more susceptible to proteolytic cleavage by caspase 3 into the pathogenic C-terminal 35-kD fragments due to its increased stability in the RRM1 domain. Modulation of TDP-43 stability and caspase cleavage efficiency could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration. PMID:26883171

  11. Short-term suppression of A315T mutant human TDP-43 expression improves functional deficits in a novel inducible transgenic mouse model of FTLD-TDP and ALS.

    Ke, Yazi D; van Hummel, Annika; Stevens, Claire H; Gladbach, Amadeus; Ippati, Stefania; Bi, Mian; Lee, Wei S; Krüger, Sarah; van der Hoven, Julia; Volkerling, Alexander; Bongers, Andre; Halliday, Glenda; Haass, Nikolas K; Kiernan, Matthew; Delerue, Fabien; Ittner, Lars M

    2015-11-01

    The nuclear transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) undergoes relocalization to the cytoplasm with formation of cytoplasmic deposits in neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Pathogenic mutations in the TDP-43-encoding TARDBP gene in familial ALS as well as non-mutant human TDP-43 have been utilized to model FTD/ALS in cell culture and animals, including mice. Here, we report novel A315T mutant TDP-43 transgenic mice, iTDP-43(A315T), with controlled neuronal over-expression. Constitutive expression of human TDP-43(A315T) resulted in pronounced early-onset and progressive neurodegeneration, which was associated with compromised motor performance, spatial memory and disinhibition. Muscle atrophy resulted in reduced grip strength. Cortical degeneration presented with pronounced astrocyte activation. Using differential protein extraction from iTDP-43(A315T) brains, we found cytoplasmic localization, fragmentation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination and insolubility of TDP-43. Surprisingly, suppression of human TDP-43(A315T) expression in mice with overt neurodegeneration for only 1 week was sufficient to significantly improve motor and behavioral deficits, and reduce astrogliosis. Our data suggest that functional deficits in iTDP-43(A315T) mice are at least in part a direct and transient effect of the presence of TDP-43(A315T). Furthermore, it illustrates the compensatory capacity of compromised neurons once transgenic TDP-43 is removed, with implications for future treatments. PMID:26437864

  12. High TDP43 expression is required for TRIM16-induced inhibition of cancer cell growth and correlated with good prognosis of neuroblastoma and breast cancer patients.

    Kim, Patrick Y; Tan, Owen; Liu, Bing; Trahair, Toby; Liu, Tao; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D; Marshall, Glenn M; Cheung, Belamy B

    2016-05-01

    Tripartite Motif-containing protein 16 (TRIM16) is a member of a large family of tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins, that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple cancers. However, the mechanism by which TRIM16 acts as a tumour suppressor is currently unknown. We used the versatile yeast two-hybrid assay on a cDNA library from human testes, which has relative high TRIM16 expression, to identify potential TRIM16-binding proteins. We identified transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP43) as a novel TRIM16 binding protein. Co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that TDP43 bound TRIM16 in neuroblastoma and breast cancer cells. Enforced over-expression of TRIM16 increased the protein half-life of TDP43, through the inhibition of the proteosomal degradation pathway. High levels of TRIM16 and TDP43 are associated with good prognosis in both human neuroblastoma and breast cancer tissues. Importantly, we found TDP43 expression was required for TRIM16-induced inhibition of neuroblastoma and breast cancer cell growth and the repressive effect of TRIM16 on cell cycle regulatory proteins, E2F1 and pRb. Taken together, our data suggest that TRIM16 and TDP43 are both good prognosis indicators; also we showed that TRIM16 inhibits cancer cell viability by a novel mechanism involving interaction and stabilisation of TDP43 with consequent effects on E2F1 and pRb proteins. PMID:26902425

  13. Pathological tau deposition in Motor Neurone Disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with TDP-43 proteinopathy.

    Behrouzi, Roya; Liu, Xiawei; Wu, Dongyue; Robinson, Andrew C; Tanaguchi-Watanabe, Sayuri; Rollinson, Sara; Shi, Jing; Tian, Jinzhou; Hamdalla, Hisham H M; Ealing, John; Richardson, Anna; Jones, Matthew; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Davidson, Yvonne S; Strong, Michael J; Hasegawa, Masato; Snowden, Julie S; Mann, David M A

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that patients with motor neurone disease (MND) and those with MND combined with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) (ie FTD + MND) or with FTD alone might exist on a continuum based on commonalities of neuropathology and/or genetic risk. Moreover, it has been reported that both a neuronal and a glial cell tauopathy can accompany the TDP-43 proteinopathy in patients with motor neurone disease (MND) with cognitive changes, and that the tauopathy may be fundamental to disease pathogenesis and clinical phenotype. In the present study, we sought to substantiate these latter findings, and test this concept of a pathological continuum, in a consecutive series of 41 patients with MND, 16 with FTD + MND and 23 with FTD without MND. Paraffin sections of frontal, entorhinal, temporal and occipital cortex and hippocampus were immunostained for tau pathology using anti-tau antibodies, AT8, pThr(175) and pThr(217), and for amyloid β protein (Aβ) using 4G8 antibody. Twenty four (59 %) patients with MND, 7 (44 %) patients with FTD + MND and 10 (43 %) patients with FTD showed 'significant' tau pathology (ie more than just an isolated neurofibrillary tangle or a few neuropil threads in one or more brain regions examined). In most instances, this bore the histological characteristics of an Alzheimer's disease process involving entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, temporal cortex, frontal cortex and occipital cortex in decreasing frequency, accompanied by a deposition of Aβ up to Thal phase 3, though 2 patients with MND, and 1 with FTD did show tau pathology beyond Braak stage III. Four other patients with MND showed novel neuronal tau pathology, within the frontal cortex alone, specifically detected by pThr(175) antibody, which was characterised by a fine granular or more clumped aggregation of tau without neurofibrillary tangles or neuropil threads. However, none of these 4 patients had clinically evident cognitive disorder, and this type of tau pathology was not seen in any of the FTD + MND or FTD patients. Finally, two patients, one with MND and one with FTD, showed a tau pathology consistent with Argyrophilic Grain Disease (AGD). Western blotting and use of 3- and 4-repeat tau antibodies confirmed the histological interpretation of Alzheimer's disease type pathology in all instances except for those patients with accompanying AGD where a banding pattern on western blot, and immunohistochemistry, confirmed 4-repeat tauopathy. In all 3 patient groups, amyloid pathology was more likely to be present in patients dying after 65 years of age, and in the presence of APOE ε4 allele. We conclude that tau pathological changes are equally common amongst patients with MND, FTD + MND and FTD though, in most instances, these are limited in extent. In patients with MND, when cognitive impairment is present this is most likely due to an accompanying/evolving (coincidental) Alzheimer's disease process or, as in a single case, Dementia with Lewy bodies, within the cerebral cortex rather than as a result of TDP-43 proteinopathy. Conversely, in FTD and FTD + MND dementia is more likely to be associated with TDP-43 proteinopathy than tau. Hence, present study shows no progression in severity of (tau) pathology from MND through FTD + MND to FTD, and does not support the concept of these conditions forming a continuum of clinical or pathological change. PMID:27036121

  14. ?-N-methylamino-L-alanine induces changes in both GSK3 and TDP-43 in human neuroblastoma.

    Muñoz-Saez, Emma; de Munck, Estefanía; Arahuetes, Rosa M; Solas, M Teresa; Martínez, Ana M; Miguel, Begoña G

    2013-01-01

    ?-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid produced by most cyanobacteria, which are extensively distributed in different environments all over the world. L-BMAA has been linked to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. This work aims to analyze the toxicological action of L-BMAA related to alterations observed in different neurodegenerative illness as Alzheimer disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our results demonstrate that neuroblastoma cells treated with L-BMAA show an increase in glycogen synthase kinase 3 ? (GSk3?) and induce accumulation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) truncated forms (C-terminal fragments), phosphorylated  and high molecular weight forms of TDP-43, that appears frequently in some neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23665941

  15. TDP-43 pathology in a case of hereditary spastic paraplegia with a NIPA1/SPG6 mutation.

    Martinez-Lage, Maria; Molina-Porcel, Laura; Falcone, Dana; McCluskey, Leo; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2012-08-01

    Mutations in NIPA1 (non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome) have been described as a cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) known as SPG6 (spastic paraplegia-6). We present the first neuropathological description of a patient with a NIPA1 mutation, and clinical phenotype of complicated HSP with motor neuron disease-like syndrome and cognitive decline. Postmortem examination revealed degeneration of lateral corticospinal tracts and dorsal columns with motor neuron loss. TDP-43 immunostaining showed widespread spinal cord and cerebral skein-like and round neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions. We ruled out NIPA1 mutations in 419 additional cases of motor neuron disease. These findings suggest that hereditary spastic paraplegia due to NIPA1 mutations could represent a TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:22302102

  16. FUS pathology defines the majority of tau- and TDP-43-negative frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    Urwin, Hazel; Josephs, Keith A; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Mackenzie, Ian R; Neumann, Manuela; Authier, Astrid; Seelaar, Harro; Van Swieten, John C; Brown, Jeremy M; Johannsen, Peter; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Holm, Ida E; Dickson, Dennis W; Rademakers, Rosa; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald C; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; White, Charles L; Weiner, Myron F; Geser, Felix; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Trojanowski, John Q; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W; van der Zee, Julie; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Bigio, Eileen H; Deng, Han-Xiang; Halliday, Glenda M; Kril, Jillian J; Munoz, David G; Mann, David M; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M; Doodeman, Valerie; Adamson, Gary; Ghazi-Noori, Shabnam; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Holton, Janice L; Revesz, Tamas; Rossor, Martin N; Collinge, John; Mead, Simon; Isaacs, Adrian M

    2010-01-01

    % (34/37) had fused in sarcoma (FUS) protein pathology, indicating that FTLD-FUS is an important FTLD subtype. This FTLD-FUS collection specifically focussed on aFTLD-U cases, one of three recently defined subtypes of FTLD-FUS. The aFTLD-U subtype of FTLD-FUS is characterised clinically by behavioural...... variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and has a particularly young age of onset with a mean of 41 years. Further, this subtype had a high prevalence of psychotic symptoms (36% of cases) and low prevalence of motor symptoms (3% of cases). We did not find FUS mutations in any aFTLD-U case. To date, the...... only subtype of cases reported to have ubiquitin-positive but tau-, TDP-43- and FUS-negative pathology, termed FTLD-UPS, is the result of charged multivesicular body protein 2B gene (CHMP2B) mutation. We identified three FTLD-UPS cases, which are negative for CHMP2B mutation, suggesting that the full...

  17. Rab1-dependent ER-Golgi transport dysfunction is a common pathogenic mechanism in SOD1, TDP-43 and FUS-associated ALS.

    Soo, Kai Y; Halloran, Mark; Sundaramoorthy, Vinod; Parakh, Sonam; Toth, Reka P; Southam, Katherine A; McLean, Catriona A; Lock, Peter; King, Anna; Farg, Manal A; Atkin, Julie D

    2015-11-01

    Several diverse proteins are linked genetically/pathologically to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) including SOD1, TDP-43 and FUS. Using a variety of cellular and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that ALS-associated mutant TDP-43, FUS and SOD1 inhibit protein transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus in neuronal cells. ER-Golgi transport was also inhibited in embryonic cortical and motor neurons obtained from a widely used animal model (SOD1(G93A) mice), validating this mechanism as an early event in disease. Each protein inhibited transport by distinct mechanisms, but each process was dependent on Rab1. Mutant TDP-43 and mutant FUS both inhibited the incorporation of secretory protein cargo into COPII vesicles as they bud from the ER, and inhibited transport from ER to the ER-Golgi intermediate (ERGIC) compartment. TDP-43 was detected on the cytoplasmic face of the ER membrane, whereas FUS was present within the ER, suggesting that transport is inhibited from the cytoplasm by mutant TDP-43, and from the ER by mutant FUS. In contrast, mutant SOD1 destabilised microtubules and inhibited transport from the ERGIC compartment to Golgi, but not from ER to ERGIC. Rab1 performs multiple roles in ER-Golgi transport, and over-expression of Rab1 restored ER-Golgi transport, and prevented ER stress, mSOD1 inclusion formation and induction of apoptosis, in cells expressing mutant TDP-43, FUS or SOD1. Rab1 also co-localised extensively with mutant TDP-43, FUS and SOD1 in neuronal cells, and Rab1 formed inclusions in motor neurons of spinal cords from sporadic ALS patients, which were positive for ubiquitinated TDP-43, implying that Rab1 is misfolded and dysfunctional in sporadic disease. These results demonstrate that ALS-mutant forms of TDP-43, FUS, and SOD1 all perturb protein transport in the early secretory pathway, between ER and Golgi compartments. These data also imply that restoring Rab1-mediated ER-Golgi transport is a novel therapeutic target in ALS. PMID:26298469

  18. ALS-Causing Mutations Significantly Perturb the Self-Assembly and Interaction with Nucleic Acid of the Intrinsically Disordered Prion-Like Domain of TDP-43

    Lim, Liangzhong; Wei, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yimei; Song, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    TAR-DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) C-terminus encodes a prion-like domain widely presented in RNA-binding proteins, which functions to form dynamic oligomers and also, amazingly, hosts most amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-causing mutations. Here, as facilitated by our previous discovery, by circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have successfully determined conformations, dynamics, and self-associations of the full-length prion-like domains of the wild type and three ALS-causing mutants (A315E, Q331K, and M337V) in both aqueous solutions and membrane environments. The study decodes the following: (1) The TDP-43 prion-like domain is intrinsically disordered only with some nascent secondary structures in aqueous solutions, but owns the capacity to assemble into dynamic oligomers rich in ?-sheet structures. By contrast, despite having highly similar conformations, three mutants gained the ability to form amyloid oligomers. The wild type and three mutants all formed amyloid fibrils after incubation as imaged by electron microscopy. (2) The interaction with nucleic acid enhances the self-assembly for the wild type but triggers quick aggregation for three mutants. (3) A membrane-interacting subdomain has been identified over residues Met311-Gln343 indispensable for TDP-43 neurotoxicity, which transforms into a well-folded ?-loop-helix structure in membrane environments. Furthermore, despite having very similar membrane-embedded conformations, three mutants will undergo further self-association in the membrane environment. Our study implies that the TDP-43 prion-like domain appears to have an energy landscape, which allows the assembly of the wild-type sequence into dynamic oligomers only under very limited condition sets, and ALS-causing point mutations are sufficient to remodel it to more favor the amyloid formation or irreversible aggregation, thus supporting the emerging view that the pathologic aggregation may occur via the exaggeration of functionally important assemblies. Furthermore, the coupled capacity of TDP-43 in aggregation and membrane interaction may critically account for its high neurotoxicity, and therefore its decoupling may represent a promising therapeutic strategy to treat TDP-43 causing neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26735904

  19. ALS-Associated Ataxin 2 PolyQ Expansions Enhance Stress-Induced Caspase 3 Activation and Increase TDP-43 Pathological Modifications

    Hart, Michael P.; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of motor neurons. The degenerating motor neurons of ALS patients are characterized by the accumulation of cytoplasmic inclusions containing phosphorylated and truncated forms of the RNA-binding protein TDP-43. Ataxin 2 intermediate-length polyglutamine (polyQ) expansions were recently identified as a risk factor for ALS; however, the mechanism by which they contribute to disease is unknown. Here,...

  20. ER-mitochondria associations are regulated by the VAPB-PTPIP51 interaction and are disrupted by ALS/FTD-associated TDP-43

    Stoica, Radu; de Vos, Kurt J.; Paillusson, Sébastien; Mueller, Sarah; Sancho, Rosa M.; Lau, Kwok-Fai; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Lin, Wen-Lang; Xu, Ya-Fei; Lewis, Jada; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Mitchell, Jacqueline C.; Shaw, Christopher E.; Miller, Christopher C. J.

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) form tight structural associations and these facilitate a number of cellular functions. However, the mechanisms by which regions of the ER become tethered to mitochondria are not properly known. Understanding these mechanisms is not just important for comprehending fundamental physiological processes but also for understanding pathogenic processes in some disease states. In particular, disruption to ER-mitochondria associations is linked to some neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show that the ER-resident protein VAPB interacts with the mitochondrial protein tyrosine phosphatase-interacting protein-51 (PTPIP51) to regulate ER-mitochondria associations. Moreover, we demonstrate that TDP-43, a protein pathologically linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal dementia perturbs ER-mitochondria interactions and that this is associated with disruption to the VAPB-PTPIP51 interaction and cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Finally, we show that overexpression of TDP-43 leads to activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and that GSK-3β regulates the VAPB-PTPIP51 interaction. Our results describe a new pathogenic mechanism for TDP-43.

  1. The rate of rise of corticotrophin releasing factor and endogenous digoxin-like immunoreactivity in normal and abnormal pregnancy.

    Wolfe, C D; Petruckevitch, A; Quartero, R; Carabelli, P; Poston, L; Kerkez, S; Campbell, E; Lowry, P J; Linton, E A

    1990-09-01

    Maternal plasma concentrations of corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) and endogenous digoxin-like immunoreactivity (EDLI) were estimated in 80 normal and 88 abnormal pregnancies which were sampled sequentially from 24 weeks gestation to delivery. A slope was fitted for each woman's antenatal EDLI and CRF values, both of which rose significantly during gestation, and the mean of the slopes for the normal and abnormal groups for each value compared. There was no evidence of significant mean differences between groups for EDLI but there was evidence of a significant mean difference for CRF (P less than 0.05). After adjustment for other variables which may affect pregnancy outcome, the slopes for CRF were found not to be significantly related to outcome. PMID:2242370

  2. Oligogenic inheritance of optineurin (OPTN) and C9ORF72 mutations in ALS highlights localisation of OPTN in the TDP-43-negative inclusions of C9ORF72-ALS.

    Bury, Joanna J; Highley, J Robin; Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; Goodall, Emily F; Higginbottom, Adrian; McDermott, Christopher J; Ince, Paul G; Shaw, Pamela J; Kirby, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by motor neurone loss resulting in muscle weakness, spasticity and ultimately death. 5-10% are caused by inherited mutations, most commonly C9ORF72, SOD1, TARDBP and FUS. Rarer genetic causes of ALS include mutation of optineurin (mt OPTN). Furthermore, optineurin protein has been localized to the ubiquitylated aggregates in several neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS. This study: (i) investigated the frequency of mt OPTN in ALS patients in England; (ii) characterized the clinical and neuropathological features of ALS associated with a mt OPTN; and (iii) investigated optineurin neuropathology in C9ORF72-related ALS (C9ORF72-ALS). We identified a heterozygous p.E322K missense mutation in exon 10 of OPTN in one familial ALS patient who additionally had a C9ORF72 mutation. This patient had bulbar, limb and respiratory disease without cognitive problems. Neuropathology revealed motor neurone loss, trans-activation response DNA protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive neuronal and glial cytoplasmic inclusions together with TDP-43-negative neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in extra motor regions that are characteristic of C9ORF72-ALS. We have demonstrated that both TDP-43-positive and negative inclusion types had positive staining for optineurin by immunohistochemistry. We went on to show that optineurin was present in TDP-43-negative cytoplasmic extra motor inclusions in C9ORF72-ALS cases that do not carry mt OPTN. We conclude that: (i) OPTN mutations are associated with ALS; (ii) optineurin protein is present in a subset of the extramotor inclusions of C9ORF72-ALS; (iii) It is not uncommon for multiple ALS-causing mutations to occur in the same patient; and (iv) studies of optineurin are likely to provide useful dataregarding the pathophysiology of ALS and neurodegeneration. PMID:26303227

  3. Altered microRNA expression in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology caused by progranulin mutations

    Kocerha Jannet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that can be triggered through genetic or sporadic mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have become a major therapeutic focus as their pervasive expression and powerful regulatory roles in disease pathogenesis become increasingly apparent. Here we examine the role of miRNAs in FTLD patients with TAR DNA-binding protein 43 pathology (FTLD-TDP caused by genetic mutations in the progranulin (PGRN gene. Results Using miRNA array profiling, we identified the 20 miRNAs that showed greatest evidence (unadjusted P PGRN mutations when compared to 32 FTLD-TDP patients with no apparent genetic abnormalities. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analyses provided technical validation of the differential expression for 9 of the 20 miRNAs in frontal cortex. Additional qRT-PCR analyses showed that 5 out of 9 miRNAs (miR-922, miR-516a-3p, miR-571, miR-548b-5p, and miR-548c-5p were also significantly dysregulated (unadjusted P PGRN mutation carriers, consistent with a systemic reduction in PGRN levels. We developed a list of gene targets for the 5 candidate miRNAs and found 18 genes dysregulated in a reported FTLD mRNA study to exhibit anti-correlated miRNA-mRNA patterns in affected cortex and cerebellar tissue. Among the targets is brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 3, which was recently identified as an important player in synapse biology. Conclusions Our study suggests that miRNAs may contribute to the pathogenesis of FTLD-TDP caused by PGRN mutations and provides new insight into potential future therapeutic options.

  4. FTLD-TDP with motor neuron disease, visuospatial impairment and a progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome: broadening the clinical phenotype of TDP-43 proteinopathies. A report of three cases

    Holmerová Iva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin and TDP-43 positive neuronal inclusions represents a novel entity (FTLD-TDP that may be associated with motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND; involvement of extrapyramidal and other systems has also been reported. Case presentation We present three cases with similar clinical symptoms, including Parkinsonism, supranuclear gaze palsy, visuospatial impairment and a behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, associated with either clinically possible or definite MND. Neuropathological examination revealed hallmarks of FTLD-TDP with major involvement of subcortical and, in particular, mesencephalic structures. These cases differed in onset and progression of clinical manifestations as well as distribution of histopathological changes in the brain and spinal cord. Two cases were sporadic, whereas the third case had a pathological variation in the progranulin gene 102 delC. Conclusions Association of a "progressive supranuclear palsy-like" syndrome with marked visuospatial impairment, motor neuron disease and early behavioral disturbances may represent a clinically distinct phenotype of FTLD-TDP. Our observations further support the concept that TDP-43 proteinopathies represent a spectrum of disorders, where preferential localization of pathogenetic inclusions and neuronal cell loss defines clinical phenotypes ranging from frontotemporal dementia with or without motor neuron disease, to corticobasal syndrome and to a progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome.

  5. Immunoreactive trypsin in Shwachman's syndrome.

    Dossetor, J F; Spratt, H C; Rolles, C J; Seem, C P; Heeley, A F

    1989-01-01

    We studied two infants with Shwachman's syndrome in whom the immunoreactive trypsin concentration was found to be abnormally low. Experience with several hundred assays for immunoreactive trypsin has not shown this low concentration. This finding is probably specific for pancreatic acinar deficiency at this age and strongly suggests Shwachman's syndrome.

  6. Phosphorylated Smad2/3 immunoreactivity in sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its mouse model.

    Nakamura, Masataka; Ito, Hidefumi; Wate, Reika; Nakano, Satoshi; Hirano, Asao; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2008-03-01

    Phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3), the central mediators of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling, were recently identified in tau-positive inclusions in certain neurodegenerative disorders. To clarify whether the localization of pSmad2/3 is altered in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we immunohistochemically examined spinal cords from sporadic ALS (SALS), from familial ALS (FALS) patients with the A4V mutation in their Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene, and from G93A mutant SOD1 transgenic (mSOD1 Tg) mice. In control spinal cords, pSmad2/3 immunoreactivity was observed exclusively in neuronal and glial nuclei. In SALS and FALS patients the nuclei showed increased immunoreactivity for pSmad2/3. Noticeably, round hyaline inclusions (RHIs) and skein-like inclusions of SALS patients were immunoreactive for pSmad2/3. Double immunofluorescence staining for pSmad2/3 and transactive response-DNA-binding protein (TDP)-43 revealed co-localization of these proteins within RHIs. In contrast, Bunina bodies in SALS and Lewy body-like hyaline inclusions (LBHIs) in FALS were devoid of labeling for pSmad2/3. Similarly, in the mSOD1 Tg mice pSmad2/3 immunoreactivity was increased in the nuclei, while LBHIs were not labeled. These findings suggest increased TGF-beta-Smad signaling in SALS, FALS, and mSOD1 Tg mice, as well as impaired TGF-beta signal transduction in RHI-bearing neurons of SALS patients, presumably at the step of pSmad2/3 translocation into the nucleus. The pathomechanisms, including the process of inclusion development, appears to be different between SALS and mSOD1-related FALS or Tg mice. PMID:18210139

  7. Accumulation of transactive response DNA binding protein 43 in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease.

    Tremblay, Cyntia; St-Amour, Isabelle; Schneider, Julie; Bennett, David A; Calon, Frédéric

    2011-09-01

    Transactive response DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) plays a central role in the neuropathology of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but the relationship between TDP-43 abnormalities and Alzheimer disease (AD) remains unclear. To determine whether TDP-43 can serve as a neuropathologic marker of AD, we performed biochemical characterization and quantification of TDP-43 in homogenates from parietal neocortex of subjects with aclinical diagnosis of no cognitive impairment (NCI, n = 12), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 12), or AD (n = 12). Immunoblots revealed increased detergent-insoluble TDP-43 in the cortex of 0, 3, and 6 of the 12 individuals with NCI, MCI, or AD, respectively. Detergent-insoluble TDP-43 was positively correlated with the accumulation of soluble A?42, amyloid plaques, and paired helical filamenttau. In contrast, phospho-TDP-43 was decreased in the cytosolic fraction and detergent-soluble membrane/nuclear fraction from AD patients and correlated with antemortem cognitive function.Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that the frequencies of individuals with TDP-43 or phospho-TDP-43 cytoplasmic inclusions were higher in AD than in NCI, with MCI at an intermediate level. These data indicate that abnormalities of TDP-43 occur in an important subset of MCI and AD patients and that they correlate with the clinical and neuropathologic features of AD. PMID:21865887

  8. Clinical value of serum immunoreactive trypsin concentration

    Ruddell, W S J

    1982-01-01

    The clinical value of estimation of serum concentrations of immunoreactive trypsin was evaluated by studying 46 healthy controls, 23 controls in hospital, 44 patients with chronic pancreatic disease, and 184 patients with non-pancreatic conditions in which pancreatic disease commonly enters into the differential diagnosis. Serum trypsin concentration had a log normal distribution in the controls, and the calculated normal range was considerably wider than that previously reported. The concent...

  9. Human lymphocyte production of immunoreactive thyrotropin.

    Smith, E M; Phan, M.; Kruger, T E; Coppenhaver, D H; Blalock, J E

    1983-01-01

    Interferon-alpha inducers were previously shown to cause human lymphocyte production of a corticotropin (ACTH)-like peptide. Thyrotropin (TSH) was not produced under these conditions. In contrast, this report shows that a T-cell mitogen (staphylococcal enterotoxin A), which does not induce the ACTH-like peptide, caused human lymphocyte production of an immunoreactive (ir) TSH. Lymphocyte synthesis of the ir TSH was first detectable at 24 hr, peaked at 48 hr, and thereafter declined. NaDodSO4/...

  10. Effects of Static Magnetic Field on Growth of Leptospire, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola: Immunoreactivity and Cell Division

    Triampo, W; Triampo, D; Wong-Ekkabut, J; Tang, I M; Triampo, Wannapong; Doungchawee, Galayanee; Triampo, Darapond; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the exposure of the bacterium, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola to a constant magnetic field with magnetic flux density from a permanent ferrite magnet = 140 mT were studied. Changes in Leptospira cells after their exposure to the field were determined on the basis of changes in their growth behavior and agglutination immunoreactivity with a homologous antiserum using darkfield microscopy together with visual imaging. The data showed that the exposed Leptospira cells have lower densities and lower agglutination immunoreactivity than the unexposed control group. Interestingly, some of the exposed Leptospira cells showed abnormal morphologies such as large lengths. We discussed some of the possible reasons for these observations.

  11. Congenital Abnormalities

    ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase the risk that a baby will be born with abnormalities (e.g. fetal alcohol spectrum disorders ). Eating raw or uncooked foods during pregnancy can also be dangerous to health of the ...

  12. Immunoreactive somatomedin A in human serum

    A RIA has been developed for somatomedin A (SM-A) utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies. This assay, measuring SM-A, the insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2, and somatomedin C, allows determination in serum samples. In comparison with a serum standard, the mean serum levels in patients with acromegaly or GH deficiency and healthy subjects were 8.7 +- 0.7 (n=25), 0.24 +- 0.02 (n=25), and 1.15 +- 0.11 U/ml, respectively. The correlation coefficient between immunoreactive SM-A and SM-A by radioreceptor assay was highly significant (r=0.93), although the potency ratio of SM-A between the two groups of patients was higher in the RIA than in the radioreceptor assay. Gel chromatography revealed that SM-A in acromegalic serum is bound to a carrier protein which is absent in patients with GH deficiency. After gel chromatography at low pH, 90% of applied immunoreactive SM-A was recovered in the low molecular weight fraction and consisted mainly of neutral polypeptides

  13. A comparative study of leucokinin-immunoreactive neurons in insects.

    Chen, Y; Veenstra, J A; Davis, N T; Hagedorn, H H

    1994-04-01

    Antisera were raised against leucokinin IV, a member of the leucokinin peptide family. Immunohistochemical localization of leucokinin immunoreactivity in the brain of the cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea revealed neurosecretory cells in the pars intercerebralis and pars lateralis, several bilateral pairs of interneurons in the protocerebrum, and a group of interneurons in the optic lobe. Several immunoreactive interneurons were found in the thoracic ganglia, while the abdominal ganglia contained prominent immunoreactive neurosecretory cells, which projected to the lateral cardiac nerve. The presence of leucokinins in the abdominal nerve cord was confirmed by HPLC combined with ELISA. Leucokinin-immunoreactive neurosecretory cells were also found in the pars intercerebralis of the cricket Acheta domesticus and the mosquito Aedes aegypti, but not in the locust Schistocerca americana or the honey bee Apis mellifera. However, all these species have leucokinin-immunoreactive neurosecretory cells in the abdominal ganglia. The neurohemal organs innervated by abdominal leucokinin-immunoreactive cells were different in each species. PMID:7910521

  14. Immunoreactivity assay for ?-particle emitting monoclonal antibody constructs

    Clinical trials using ?-particle radiolabeled antibodies require a rapid and reproducible assay of the immunoreactivity of drugs. While live cell assays are typically used to determine the immunoreactive drug fraction, a fixed cell assay may replace the traditional live cell assay and offer the advantages of rapidity, easy availability and consistency for qualifying drugs for preclinical or clinical studies. We have identified optimal cell fixation and immunoreactivity assay conditions and have validated them by performing the fixed-cell assay in clinical trials

  15. Non-human primate model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with cytoplasmic mislocalization of TDP-43

    Uchida, Azusa; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Tajiri, Mio; Ohkubo, Takuya; Ono, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Kanai, Kazuaki; Hirai, Takashi; Sano, Tatsuhiko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Kobayashi, Masaki; Yamamoto, Mariko; Yokota, Shigefumi; Kubodera, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motoneuron loss. Redistribution of transactive response deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein 43 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and the presence of cystatin C-positive Bunina bodies are considered pathological hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but their significance has not been fully elucidated. Since all reported rodent transgenic models using wild-type transactive response deoxyribo...

  16. Mixed tau and TDP-43 pathology in a patient with unclassifiable primary progressive aphasia.

    Flanagan, Eoin P; Duffy, Joseph R; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Dickson, Dennis W; Josephs, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Classifying primary progressive aphasia (PPA) into variants that may predict the underlying pathology is important. However, some PPA patients cannot be classified. A 78-year-old woman had unclassifiable PPA characterized by anomia, dysarthria, and apraxia of speech without agrammatism. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed left mesial temporal atrophy and 18-flourodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography showed left anterior temporal and posterior frontal (premotor) hypometabolism. Autopsy revealed a mixed tauopathy (argyrophilic grain disease) and transactive response-DNA-binding-protein-43 proteinopathy. Dual pathologies may explain the difficulty classifying some PPA patients and recognizing this will be important as new imaging techniques (particularly tau-positron emission tomography) are introduced and patients begin enrollment in clinical trials targeting the underlying proteinopathy. PMID:25929342

  17. Regional distribution of immunoreactive endothelin in rats

    Yoshimi, H.; Hirata, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Kawano, Y.; Emori, T.; Kuramochi, M.; Omae, T.; Marumo, F. (National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute and Hospital, Osaka (Japan))

    1989-07-01

    By use of a specific radioimmunoassay for endothelin (ET), the regional distribution of ET-like immunoreactivity (LI) was studied in rats. The antiserum used cross-reacted equally with synthetic porcine and rat ET. Significant amounts of ET-LI are detectable not only in aorta, but also in kidney, lung, heart, liver and central nervous system. Gel chromatography of the tissue extracts revealed size heterogeneity of ET-LI; one major component eluting close to, but slightly larger than standard rat ET and the other minor component with a larger molecular weight. These data indicate that ET-LI is widely distributed throughout the various rat tissues, suggesting its possible involvement in a variety of organ functions.

  18. Immunoreactive trypsin and neonatalscreening for cystic fibrosis

    Immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) was measured in dried blood spots from 160.822 five-day-old babies as a part of a regionwide neonatal screening program for cystic fibrosis. A second test was performed for 492 babies in whom blood IRT levels were found greater than 900 μg/l; retesting revealed persistent elevation in 55. Sweat testing confirmed cystic fibrosis in 43 babies, but results were normal in 12. During the course of this study, a total of 51 cystic fibrosis babies were identified: 43 by newborn screening, 6 because they had meconium ileus; so, early diagnosis was achieved in 49 cases out of 51. Two newborn babies did not have elevated IRT and they were missed by the screening test. Our results confirm that elevated blood IRT is characteristic of newborn babies with cystic fibrosis and show that this test has an excellent specificity (99.7%) and a good sensitivity (95%) when used as a neonatal screening test

  19. Immunoreactivity for interleukin 3 and 5 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor of intestinal mucosa in bronchial asthma

    1995-01-01

    T lymphocytes and eosinophils are important components of the inflammatory cell infiltrate in bronchial mucosa in asthma. Because activated lymphocytes migrate through the thoracic duct and the general circulation to remote glandular and mucosal sites, we initiated this study to evaluate pathological abnormalities and immunoreactivity for interleukin (IL) 3, IL-5, and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) of intestinal mucosa in bronchial asthma. 15 asthmatic patients, 8 n...

  20. FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of Hydra

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Dockray, G J; Schot, L P

    1982-01-01

    FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity has been localized in different parts of the hydra nervous system. Immunoreactivity occurs in nerve perikarya and processes in the ectoderm of the lower peduncle region near the basal disk, in the ectoderm of the hypostome and in the ectoderm of the tentacles. The...

  1. Abnormal Head Position

    ... ocular causes of an abnormal head position include cerebral palsy, bony abnormalities, occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any treatments for abnormal head postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures ...

  2. Localization in the gastrointestinal tract of immunoreactive prosomatostatin

    Holst, J J; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    of ileal mucosa. The latter showed that the antisera were capable of identifying components containing N-terminal as well as C-terminal parts of prosomatostatin. Endocrine cells were identified with all antisera in most parts of the gastrointestinal tract, and varicose nerve fibres were observed in...... all parts of the small intestine but not in the stomach and the colon. The colon contained very few immunoreactive structures. Immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were found in the submucous plexus of the small intestine. All immunoreactive endocrine cells in the stomach and the duodenum and all...... immunoreactive nerves were stained by all 5 antisera whereas the small intestinal endocrine cells did not stain for the most N-terminal region of prosomatostatin. The results suggest that all gastrointestinal somatostatin is derived from the same precursor molecule, which, however, in the small intestinal...

  3. In vitro digestibility and immunoreactivity of bovine milk proteins.

    Do, Andrew B; Williams, Kristina; Toomer, Ondulla T

    2016-01-01

    Current models of digestibility solely utilize pepsin stability to assess the safety of allergenic food proteins. However, in vivo complete protein digestion requires acid denaturation and pepsin, trypsin, and/or chymotrypsin cleavage. This study aimed to identify the immunoreactivity and allergenicity of stable bovine milk proteins, using an improved digestibility model to simulate physiological gastric and intestinal conditions in vitro. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis were used to determine protein stability and immunoreactivity, respectively. Immunoreactivity of bovine milk proteins, ?-lactoglobulin (?-LG) and casein (CN) was greatly diminished with gastric simulation (0-60 min), but some proteins were stable and immunoreactive with simulated intestinal digestive conditions (0-60 min). This study demonstrates the need for improved digestibility models for more accurate assessment of the behavior of food allergens in vivo. PMID:26213013

  4. Immunoreactive determinants of CA 125 in women with endometriosis.

    Mojiminiyi, O A; Bramwell, M. E.; Kennedy, S. H.; Shepstone, B. J.; Humm, S M; Barlow, D H

    1989-01-01

    Among 10 patients with endometriosis CA 125 was increased (greater than 35 U/ml) in endometriotic cyst fluid in all the patients, but only two had increased serum concentrations. Gel electrophoresis of serum, endometriotic cyst fluid, and endometriotic tissue resolved the CA 125 immunoreactive fragments from the three sources into bands of similar electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions showed immunoreactive fragments of apparent masses of 55,000...

  5. Effect of electroconvulsive therapy on serum myelin basic protein immunoreactivity.

    Hoyle, N. R.; Pratt, R T; Thomas, D G

    1984-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay that can detect brain damage in cases of head injury and stroke was applied to blood samples from 13 patients before and after they received multiple treatments with electroconvulsive therapy for psychiatric disorder. None of the patients showed a significant increase in serum myelin basic protein immunoreactivity. As increased serum myelin basic protein immunoreactivity may reflect myelin damage it is apparent that in these patients electroconvulsive therapy did ...

  6. Mechanism of action of cysteamine in depleting prolactin immunoreactivity

    The thiol reagent cysteamine (CSH) depletes anterior pituitary cells of immunoreactive PRL both in vivo and in vitro. The authors examined the hypothesis that CSH affects either the solubility or immunoreactivity of PRL through a mechanism involving thiol-disulfide exchange. Adult female rats were treated with either CSH (300 mg/kg, sc) or an equimolar dose of ethanolamine as a control. Anterior pituitary glands were extracted in 0.1 M sodium borate buffer, pH 9.0. Treatment of pituitary extracts with beta-mercaptoethanol (BME) destroys the immunoreactivity of PRL. However, extraction in the presence of reduced glutathione or CSH of pituitaries of rats treated with CSH restores immunoreactive PRL to control levels. Extracts were also subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). On gels of pituitary extracts of CSH-treated rats, the band that comigrates with purified PRL is diminished compared to that in ethanolamine-treated controls. However, extraction of the pituitaries in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing buffer followed by chemical reduction with BME restores the PRL band. Therefore, CSH acts on PRL through a thiol-related mechanism to yield a product that is poorly soluble in aqueous buffer at pH 9 and is poorly immunoreactive. Dispersed anterior pituitary cells in tissue culture were incubated with L-[35S]methionine to radiolabel newly synthesized peptides. PAGE followed by autoradiography confirmed the above results obtained in vivo

  7. Effect of pulsed light on structure and immunoreactivity of gluten.

    Panozzo, Agnese; Manzocco, Lara; Lippe, Giovanna; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The effect of pulsed light (from 1.75 to 26.25Jcm(-2)) on selected properties of wheat gluten powder and aqueous suspension (absorbance, particle size and microstructure, free sulfhydryl content, protein fractions, protein electrophoretic mobility and immunoreactivity) was investigated. Gluten photoreactivity was strongly affected by hydration. While minor photo-induced structure modifications were observed in gluten powder, pulsed light induced the development of browning and promoted partial depolymerisation of hydrated gluten proteins by disulphide exchange. These changes were associated with a significant decrease in immunoreactivity, suggesting that pulsed light could be exploited to efficiently modify structure and thus functionality of gluten. PMID:26471567

  8. Immunoreactivity of 125I-papain labelled by different methods

    Three different methods of papain iodination (with chloramine-T, lactoperoxidase and conjugation with Bolton-Hunter reagent) have been compared. The highest yield of 125I-papain could be obtained using lactoperoxidase which enabled to achieve the highest immunoreactivity. 125I-papain, labelled this way, is suitable for the radioimmunoassay of papain. (author)

  9. Bombesin-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of hydra

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Dockray, G J; Yanaihara, N

    1981-01-01

    With immunocytochemical methods, nerve cells have been detected in Hydra attenuata containing bombesin-like immunoreactivity. These nerve cells are located in ectoderm of all body regions of the animal and are especially abundant in basal disk and tentacles. Radioimmunoassay of extracts of hydra ...

  10. Neurotensin-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of hydra

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Carraway, R E; Rökaeus, A; Sundler, F

    1981-01-01

    Neurotensin-like immunoreactivity is found in nerve fibers present in all body regions of hydra. The nerve fibers are especially numerous in the ectoderm at the bases of the tentacles and in the ectoderm at a site just above the foot. Radioimmunoassays of acetic-acid extracts of hydra, using vari...

  11. Localization of neuropeptide-immunoreactive neurons in the human retina.

    Li, H B; Lam, D M

    1990-07-01

    Light microscopic immunocytochemistry was utilized to localize populations of neurons in the human retina immunoreactive for the following neuroactive peptides: substance P (SP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM) and LANT-6-(H-Lys-Asn-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu-OH), a hexapeptide which is identical to the C-terminal half of neurotensin except for the amino acid substitutions Lys/Arg and Asn/Arg. The majority of SP immunoreactive cells were amacrine cells whose pear-shaped or oval cell bodies (about 8 microns in diameter) were situated in the proximal parts of the inner nuclear layer. A small number of SP-stained somas (about 10-15 microns in diameter) were located in the ganglion cell layer and were designated as those of displaced amacrine cells. The SP-immunoreactive processes were distributed in sublamina 1, 3 and 5 with the most dense plexus being found in sublamina 3 of the inner layer. VIP-positive cell bodies (8-9 microns) were oval or pear-shaped and were situated in the innermost cell rows of inner nuclear layer. The majority of fine VIP-immunoreactive processes extended to sublamina 3 with only a few branches distributing in sublamina 1 of the inner plexiform layer. The SOM-stained cell bodies (10-11 microns) were round and were situated in the innermost cell rows of inner nuclear layer. SOM-positive processes were observed in sublamina 1 and 2 of the inner plexiform layer. The LANT-6 immunoreactive cell bodies (12-22 microns) were either oval-, round- or pyriform-shaped and were situated in ganglion cell layer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1699634

  12. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems in the arms or legs (limbs). ... The term skeletal limb abnormalities is most often used to describe defects in the legs or arms that are due to ...

  13. γ2-MSH immunoreactivity in the human heart

    In patients undergoing aorto-coronary by-pass surgery, we found a 26% arterial-venous difference of immunoreactive γ2-melanocytostimulating hormone (MSH), a proopiomelanocortin (POMC) derived peptide known to possess profound hemodynamic effects. These results prompted an investigation of the presence of γ2-MSH in the human heart. Using a two-step extraction procedure, regions of human hearts were examined by sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays to determine their γ2-MSH content. Mean (± SEM) concentrations of 0.14 ± 0.023 pmol/g and 0.12 ± 0.017 were found in right atrium and right ventricle, respectively. High performance liquid chromatography indicated that 80-90 % of the total immunoreactivity eluted in a single sharp peak in a position identical to that of synthetic γ2-MSH

  14. gamma. sub 2 -MSH immunoreactivity in the human heart

    Ekman, R.; Bjartell, A.; Lisander, J.; Edvinsson, L. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden))

    1989-01-01

    In patients undergoing aorto-coronary by-pass surgery, we found a 26% arterial-venous difference of immunoreactive {gamma}{sub 2}-melanocytostimulating hormone (MSH), a proopiomelanocortin (POMC) derived peptide known to possess profound hemodynamic effects. These results prompted an investigation of the presence of {gamma}{sub 2}-MSH in the human heart. Using a two-step extraction procedure, regions of human hearts were examined by sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays to determine their {gamma}{sub 2}-MSH content. Mean ({plus minus} SEM) concentrations of 0.14 {plus minus} 0.023 pmol/g and 0.12 {plus minus} 0.017 were found in right atrium and right ventricle, respectively. High performance liquid chromatography indicated that 80-90 % of the total immunoreactivity eluted in a single sharp peak in a position identical to that of synthetic {gamma}{sub 2}-MSH.

  15. Octopamine Immunoreactivity in the Fruit Fly Drosophila melanogaster

    MONASTIRIOTI, MARIA; GORCZYCA, MICHAEL; Rapus, Jürgen; ECKERT, MANFRED; White, Kalpana; BUDNIK, VIVIAN

    1995-01-01

    Octopamine has been proposed as a neurotransmitter/modulator/hormone serving a variety of physiological functions in invertebrates. We have initiated a study of octopamine in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which provides an excellent system for genetic and molecular analysis of neuroactive molecules. As a first step, the distribution of octopamine immunoreactivity was studied by means of an octopamine-specific antiserum. We focused on the central nervous system (CNS) and on the innerv...

  16. Kinetics of Antibody Response to Ehrlichia canis Immunoreactive Proteins

    McBride, Jere W.; Corstvet, Richard E.; Gaunt, Steven D.; Boudreaux, Charles; Guedry, Thaya; Walker, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Immunoreactive proteins of Ehrlichia canis and Ehrlichia chaffeensis that have been characterized include a family of 28-kDa major outer membrane proteins (p28) and two large antigenically divergent surface glycoprotein orthologs. We previously demonstrated that recombinant E. canis p28 and the 140- and 200-kDa glycoproteins gp140 and gp200, respectively, react strongly with serum antibodies from suspect canine ehrlichiosis cases that were positive for E. canis by immunofluorescent antibody t...

  17. Tooth - abnormal shape

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence of ...

  18. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Urine - abnormal color

    The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. ... Abnormal urine color may be caused by infection, disease, medicines, or food you eat. Cloudy or milky urine is a sign ...

  20. GABAergic parvalbumin-immunoreactive large calyciform presynaptic complexes in the reticular nucleus of the rat thalamus.

    Csillik, Bertalan; Mihály, András; Krisztin-Péva, Beata; Chadaide, Zoltán; Samsam, Mohtasham; Knyihár-Csillik, Elizabeth; Fenyo, Robert

    2005-07-01

    In the reticular thalamic nucleus of the rat, nearly all neurons are parvalbumin-immunoreactive. We found that in addition, though superficially similar to large parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons, also numerous peculiar parvalbumin-immunoreactive complexes are present in the reticular thalamic nucleus which are not identical with parvalbumin-immunoreactive perikarya, as shown by nuclear variation curves. Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical studies revealed that these parvalbumin-immunoreactive complexes are brought about by parvalbumin-immunoreactive calyciform terminals which establish synapses with large, parvalbumin-immunonegative dendritic profiles. Transection of thalamo-reticular connections did not cause any alteration of calyciform terminals in the reticular thalamic nucleus. Nuclear counterstaining revealed that parvalbumin-immunoreactive calyciform terminals originated from local parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneuronal perikarya, which, depending of the length of the "neck" protruding from the perikaryon, establish somato-dendritic, axo-dendritic or dendro-dendritic synapses. Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical investigations prove that the parvalbumin-immunoreactive calyciform complexes contain also GABA, that are likely to be inhibitory. In accordance with literature data, our results suggest that parvalbumin-immunoreactive GABAergic calyciform terminals in the reticular thalamic nucleus may be instrumental in intrinsic cell-to-cell communications and, as such, may be involved in synchronisation of thalamo-cortical oscillations, in the production of sleep spindles and in attentional processes. PMID:15913953

  1. Enzyme immunoassay of immunoreactive trypsin in serum and blood spots

    An enzyme immunoassay method for the assay of serum immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) is described. The method is a two site binding assay carried out on microtitre plates as the solid phase. Wells were coated with affinity purified anti-human trypsin and bioinylated anti-trypsin and avidin-β-galactosidase were used as the second antibody and detection system respectively. The assay was sensitive enough to determine IRT concentrations in either serum or dried blood spots. A good correlation was obtained when the method was compared with the Hoechst radioimmunoassay method. (Author)

  2. Neurotensin-like immunoreactivity after intestinal resection in the rat

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1987-01-01

    Neurotensin is a tridecapeptide located mainly in the distal small intestine. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the neurotensin response after proximal small intestinal resection in the rat. After resection, the median plasma concentration of neurotensin like...... intragastric instillation of amino acids or glucose. The tissue concentration of NTLI increased significantly in the jejunum and ileum after proximal small intestinal resection, while the number of immunoreactive neurotensin cells was unchanged. This study shows that the adaptive responses in the distal small...... intestine after proximal small intestinal resection also involve the neurotensin producing cells....

  3. Immunoreactivity examination of patients with testicular tumours treated with radiotherapy

    Stefanits, K.; Kuhn, E.; Csere, T.

    1985-02-01

    Results of the immunoreactivity study of 72 patients receiving radiotherapy are presented. Tuberculin and DNCB (2,4 dinitrochlorobenzol) reactivity tests were performed before, during and 3 years after the radiation therapy and at the time when metastases appeared. The number of positive reactions decreased slightly in both tuberculin and DNCB groups, though not significantly. Metastatic patients showed a significant decrease of reactivity against DNCB as compared with the results obtained before the treatment. In 5,6% of patients herpes zoster was registered. No other infections occured. It was found that immunosuppression caused by the radiation treatment does not influence the later fate of patients with testicular tumours. 41 refs.

  4. Inducible nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in healthy rat pancreas.

    Nurullah Keklikoglu

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is produced by NO synthase (NOS) isoforms: neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS). It is believed that, while nNOS and eNOS are effective in regulation of normal physiological processes, iNOS is expressed at an increasing rate especially in inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of iNOS immunoreactivity (iNOS-IR) and, to compare the iNOS-IR in islet of Langerhans cells (LC), acinar cells (AC), centroacinar cell...

  5. Menin immunoreactivity in secretory granules of human pancreatic islet cells.

    Debelenko, Larisa V; Agarwal, Sunita; Du, Qiang; Yan, Wusheng; Erickson, Heidi S; Abu-Asab, Mones; Raffeld, Mark A; Libutti, Steven K; Marx, Stephen J; Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The protein product of the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type I (MEN1) gene is thought to be involved in predominantly nuclear functions; however, immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis data on cellular localization are conflicting. To further investigate menin expression, we analyzed human pancreas (an MEN1 target organ) using IHC analyses and 6 antibodies raised against full-length menin or its peptides. In 10 normal pancreas specimens, 2 independently raised antibodies showed unexpected cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in peripheral cells in each islet examined (over 100 total across all 10 patients). The staining exhibited a distinct punctate pattern and subsequent immunoelectron microscopy indicated the target antigen was in secretory granules. Exocrine pancreas and pancreatic stroma were not immunoreactive. In MEN1 patients, unaffected islets stained similar to those in normal samples but with a more peripheral location of positive cells, whereas hyperplastic islets and tumorlets showed increased and diffuse cytoplasmic staining, respectively. Endocrine tumors from MEN1 patients were negative for menin, consistent with a 2-hit loss of a tumor suppressor gene. Secretory granule localization of menin in a subset of islet cells suggests a function of the protein unique to a target organ of familial endocrine neoplasia, although the IHC data must be interpreted with some caution because of the possibility of antibody cross-reaction. The identity, cellular trafficking, and role of this putative secretory granule-form of menin warrant additional investigation. PMID:25153502

  6. Immunoreactivity, sensory and physicochemical properties of fermented soy protein isolate.

    Meinlschmidt, Pia; Ueberham, Elke; Lehmann, Jörg; Schweiggert-Weisz, Ute; Eisner, P

    2016-08-15

    The effect of induced liquid state fermentation (Bacillus subtilis, Rhizopus oryzae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus helveticus) on the immunoreactivity, physicochemical and sensory properties of soy protein isolate (SPI) was studied. L. helveticus revealed the most abundant reduction in terms of immunoreactivity within soluble protein fractions, up to 100%, which could be measured by in vitro sandwich ELISA using mouse monoclonal anti-Glym5 antibodies (mAbs). Almost no binding was found in western blot analysis using mouse monoclonal mAbs and sera from soy sensitive individuals. Fermentation increased water- and oil-binding capacity as well as protein solubility at pH 4.0. Foaming activity was nearly doubled compared to non-fermented SPI. A decreased emulsifying capacity, foaming density, and quantity of soluble proteins at pH 7.0 were observed. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed decreased bitter and beany off-flavors of fermented samples compared to non-fermented SPI. Consequently, fermentation might be a promising method to produce tasty low-allergen food ingredients with good physicochemical properties. PMID:27006235

  7. Presence and distribution of serotonin immunoreactivity in the cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    L Gallus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the presence and distribution of serotonin in the cyprid of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite were investigated by immunohistochemical methods. Serotonin-like immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies were detected in the central nervous system only. Various clusters of immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies are distributed in the brain (protocerebrum, deutocerebrum, optical lobes, and at least, four pairs of neuronal cell bodies were detected in the centrally positioned neuropil of the posterior ganglion. Rich plexuses of immunoreactive nerve fibers in the neuropil area were also observed. Furthermore, bundles of strongly immunoreactive nerve fibers surrounding the gut wall were localized, and immunoreactive nerve terminals in the antennules and compound eyes were observed. These data demonstrate the presence of a serotonin-like immunoreactive substance in the barnacle cyprids; furthermore, its immunolocalization in the cephalic nerve terminals allows us to postulate the involvement of this bioactive molecule in substrate recognition during the settlement process.

  8. Radioimmunological determination and characterization of cathodal trypsin-like immunoreactivity in normal human plasma

    A radioimmunological method for determination of human cathodal trypsin-like immunoreactivity is described. DFP-treated human cathodal trypsin is used as standard and tracer. Freshly drawn normal human plasma contains about 25μg/l of cathodal trypsin-like immunoreactivity measured as DFP-treated cathodal trypsin. The normally circulating cathodal trypsin-like immunoreactivity is shown to consist mainly of cathodal trypsinogen. (Auth.)

  9. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  10. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  11. Abnormal sound detection device

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  12. The effect of repeated stress on KCC2 and NKCC1 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of female mice

    Takao Tsukahara

    2016-03-01

    The data were obtained from the hippocampus of female mice using single-plane confocal microscopy images. The mean fluorescence intensity of the perisomatic area of neurons, defined as raw fluorescence intensity (RFI was calculated. Repeated stress (RS resulted in a decrease in perisomatic area of immunoreactive (IR-KCC2 and an increase of the IR-NKCC1. In addition, RS decreased perisomatic IR-pKCC2ser940, corresponding to that of KCC2. The data in this article support the results of a previous study [1] and provide the details of immunohistological methods. Interpretation of the data in this article can be found in “Repeated stress-induced expression pattern alterations of the hippocampal chloride transporters KCC2 and NKCC1 associated with behavioral abnormalities in female mice” by Tsukahara et al. [1].

  13. Prostaglandin H synthase immunoreactivity in human gut. An immunohistochemical study

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J; Qvortrup, Klaus

    1991-01-01

    longitudinal and circular muscle layers. Endothelial cells in capillaries and larger vessels showed a positive reaction. In addition, unidentified cells in subserosa, at the level of Auerbach's plexus and in the submucosa were stained. We concluded that the smooth muscle cells of the human gut has a rather......Prostaglandins exhibit a variety of actions on intestinal smooth muscle depending upon the type, dose and muscle layer studied. As the cellular origin of prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase has not been established with certainty in the human gut wall, we studied the localization of PGH synthase in the...... human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon by immunohistochemistry. PGH synthase immunoreactivity appeared to be similar in all segments of the intestine. Most smooth muscle cells seemed to contain PGH synthase; however, the reaction in the lamina muscularis mucosae was much stronger than in the...

  14. Digoxin-like immunoreactivity in human body fluids

    The clinical and chemical characteristics of a solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) for routine digoxin determination has been studied with the aim to confirm our previous observation of the presence of digoxin-like immunoreactive substance (DLIS) in serum (plasma) and urine of normal subjects not under digoxin treatment. The sensitivity of the assay was 2.1±0.6 pg/tube and the reproducibility, tested with two different urine pools in terms of digoxin-equivalents (d.e.), was 12.5% (285.6±35.7 pg/ml d.e., n=19) and 20.6% (123.8±25.5 pg/ml d.e., n=19), respectively. The mean DLIS concentration in the blood of 32 normal subjects was 15.6±8.0 pg/ml d.e. (range 0-60 pg/ml d.e.). The mean DLIS concentration in urine of 37 normal subjects (overnight collection) was 160.0±52.3 pg/ml d.e. (range 70-350 pg/ml d.e.), while the mean 24-hour DLIS excretion of 10 normal subjects was 97.3±39.7 ng d.e. Two urine pools were extracted with organic solvents. Good recoveries (80-100%) were obtained with methanol, while poor recoveries were obtained with methylene chloride, hexane and petroleum ether. The present study indicates that DLIS is not a large charged molecule, neither salt, nor fatty acid, which are considered the most frequent non-specific interferences in RIA systems. Urine samples may be more useful for pathophysiological studies on digoxin-like immunoreactivity in human body fluids, because of their higher DLIS concentrations (4-10 times the concetration in blood)

  15. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity is common in the enteric nervous system in teleosts.

    Olsson, Catharina

    2016-05-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamines and TH immunoreactivity is indicative of cells synthesising either adrenaline/noradrenaline or dopamine. In this study, the distribution of TH immunoreactivity was examined in two distantly related teleost species, zebrafish (Danio rerio) and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). In both species, TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and varicose nerve fibres were common in the myenteric plexus of the intestine. However, no TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were seen in the sculpin stomach. The TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies seemed to constitute a larger proportion of the total enteric population in shorthorn sculpin (50 ± 5 %, n = 3067 cells) compared with zebrafish (14 ± 2 %, n = 10,163 cells). In contrast, in sculpin, the TH-immunoreactive cells were smaller than the average enteric nerve cell bodies, whereas in zebrafish, the relationship was the opposite. In developing zebrafish larvae, TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were common (approx. 75 % of the total population) at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf), but decreased in numbers between 3 and 7 dpf. In conclusion, in contrast to previous studies, TH-immunoreactive intrinsic neurons are common in the fish gut. Their role and function need to be further characterized in order to understand the potential importance of this enteric subpopulation in controlling various gut functions. PMID:26572541

  16. CT of pleural abnormalities

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  17. Chronic 835-MHz radiofrequency exposure to mice hippocampus alters the distribution of calbindin and GFAP immunoreactivity.

    Maskey, Dhiraj; Pradhan, Jonu; Aryal, Bijay; Lee, Chang-Min; Choi, In-Young; Park, Ki-Sup; Kim, Seok Bae; Kim, Hyung Gun; Kim, Myeung Ju

    2010-07-30

    Exponential interindividual handling in wireless communication system has raised possible doubts in the biological aspects of radiofrequency (RF) exposure on human brain owing to its close proximity to the mobile phone. In the nervous system, calcium (Ca(2+)) plays a critical role in releasing neurotransmitters, generating action potential and membrane integrity. Alterations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration trigger aberrant synaptic action or cause neuronal apoptosis, which may exert an influence on the cellular pathology for learning and memory in the hippocampus. Calcium binding proteins like calbindin D28-K (CB) is responsible for the maintaining and controlling Ca(2+) homeostasis. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of RF exposure on rat hippocampus at 835 MHz with low energy (specific absorption rate: SAR=1.6 W/kg) for 3 months by using both CB and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) specific antibodies by immunohistochemical method. Decrease in CB immunoreactivity (IR) was noted in exposed (E1.6) group with loss of interneurons and pyramidal cells in CA1 area and loss of granule cells. Also, an overall increase in GFAP IR was observed in the hippocampus of E1.6. By TUNEL assay, apoptotic cells were detected in the CA1, CA3 areas and dentate gyrus of hippocampus, which reflects that chronic RF exposure may affect the cell viability. In addition, the increase of GFAP IR due to RF exposure could be well suited with the feature of reactive astrocytosis, which is an abnormal increase in the number of astrocytes due to the loss of nearby neurons. Chronic RF exposure to the rat brain suggested that the decrease of CB IR accompanying apoptosis and increase of GFAP IR might be morphological parameters in the hippocampus damages. PMID:20546709

  18. Inducible nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in healthy rat pancreas.

    Nurullah Keklikoglu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is produced by NO synthase (NOS isoforms: neuronal NOS (nNOS, endothelial NOS (eNOS and inducible NOS (iNOS. It is believed that, while nNOS and eNOS are effective in regulation of normal physiological processes, iNOS is expressed at an increasing rate especially in inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of iNOS immunoreactivity (iNOS-IR and, to compare the iNOS-IR in islet of Langerhans cells (LC, acinar cells (AC, centroacinar cells (CC and ductal cells (DC by immunohistochemical (IHC method in healthy rat pancreata. This study revealed the presence of iNOS-IR in all cell types except AC. Statistical analysis revealed a highly significant difference (p<0.001 with respect to iNOS-IR in comparison of all cell types. However, binary comparison of cell types revealed no significant differences between LC and DC (p=0.136, significant differences LC and CC, CC and DC (p=0.001 and 0.022, respectively and a highly significant differences LC and AC, AC and DC (P<0.001. The results of this study indicate that iNOS-IR is present in almost all LC. Thus, especially in reseach related to diabetes, it should not be disregarded that iNOS may be constitutively present in pancreatic islets.

  19. Clinical applications of measurement of serum immunoreactive levels of erythropoietin

    The purification of erythropoietin (Ep) in 1977 enabled investigators to more clearly define the role of this hormone in erythropoiesis in man. Radioimmunoassays were rapidly developed. Undoubtedly differences between levels of immunoreactive and biologically active Ep will be found but the resolution of these discrepancies will expand our understanding of the erythron. Recently others described a monoclonal antibody against Ep. Because of this breakthrough, large quantities of pure hormone should soon be available to a larger number of investigators than currently have access to it. The major clinical use of this hormone will probably be in the treatment of the anemia of chronic renal disease. In the relatively few years since the radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed, measurements of the levels of this hormone have been made in several disease states as well as in normal man. Most of the findings to date confirm the predictions that have been made over the years based on studies done using the rather crude bioassay for Ep. In the present study the authors shall review and expand on what is known about subjects with chronic lung and renal disease

  20. Serum immunoreactive erythropoietin in HIV-infected patients

    Serum immunoreactive erythropoietin (SIE) and hemoglobin levels were measured in 152 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Anemia was present in 18% of asymptomatic patients who tested positive for the human immunodeficiency virus, 50% of patients with a condition related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and 75% of patients with AIDS. The mean SIE level for untreated AIDS patients was greater than for patients who tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus or patients with an AIDS-related condition but not outside the normal range for SIE, and the incremental increase in SIE level for a given decline in hemoglobin level was much less in AIDS patients than in patients with uncomplicated iron deficiency anemia. Forty-two patients were treated with zidovudine, and the hemoglobin level fell 10 g/L or more in 48%. The data indicate that SIE level is inappropriately low in anemic AIDS patients. The ability of these patients to produce erythropoietin is intact and can be expressed with zidovudine therapy. However, even very high levels of SIE fail to stimulate erythropoiesis adequately

  1. Serum immunoreactive erythropoietin in HIV-infected patients

    Spivak, J.L.; Barnes, D.C.; Fuchs, E.; Quinn, T.C. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-06-02

    Serum immunoreactive erythropoietin (SIE) and hemoglobin levels were measured in 152 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Anemia was present in 18% of asymptomatic patients who tested positive for the human immunodeficiency virus, 50% of patients with a condition related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and 75% of patients with AIDS. The mean SIE level for untreated AIDS patients was greater than for patients who tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus or patients with an AIDS-related condition but not outside the normal range for SIE, and the incremental increase in SIE level for a given decline in hemoglobin level was much less in AIDS patients than in patients with uncomplicated iron deficiency anemia. Forty-two patients were treated with zidovudine, and the hemoglobin level fell 10 g/L or more in 48%. The data indicate that SIE level is inappropriately low in anemic AIDS patients. The ability of these patients to produce erythropoietin is intact and can be expressed with zidovudine therapy. However, even very high levels of SIE fail to stimulate erythropoiesis adequately.

  2. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Olsen, Jørn

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  3. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje; Pracucci, Giovanni; Chabriat, Hugues; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Fazekas, Franz; Ferro, José M; Blahak, Christian; Langhorne, Peter; O'Brien, John; Schmidt, Reinhold; Visser, Marieke C; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Waldemar, Gunhild; Wallin, Anders; Scheltens, Philip; Inzitari, Domenico; Pantoni, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological...... 74.1 ± 5.0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any...

  4. Correlation between ocular Demodex infestation and serum immunoreactivity to bacillus proteins

    Jian-Jing Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate correlation between ocular Demodex infestation and serum immunoreactivity.METHODS:Demodex counting of 68 inpatients was performed based on eight lashes sampling. Serum immunoreactivity to two 62-kDa and 83-kDa proteins derived from B oleronius was determined by Western blot analysis.RESULTS: These 68 patients without facialrosacea or blepharitis were age matched(P=0.888and gender matched(P=0.595regarding serum immunoreactivity or ocular Demodex infestation. According to the eyelash, creep mite infection was divided into positive and negative groups, age-matched(P=0.590and sex-matched(P=0.329. There was no significant correlation between serum immunoreactivity and Demodex infestation(P=0.925. There were 27 patients with positive serum immunoreactivity in 38 patients with Demodex infestation(71%, and there were 21 patients in 30 patients without Demodex infestation(70%. There was no significant correlation between serum immunoreactivity and Demodex counting(P=0.758. CONCLUSION: It is unnecessary to perform serum analysis when Demodex can be found in asymptomatic individuals. But treatment of reducing lashes Demodex infestation is necessary when patient with blepharitis was detected Demodex in eye lashes and positive serum immunoreactivity.

  5. Small skeletal abnormalities

    To date, the skeletal imaging capabilities of digital radiography with storage phosphors have been poorly investigated, and the diagnostic accuracy ofthis technique has not been thoroughly assessed. To evaluate the performance of storage phosphor digital radiography we compared 66 conventional and 66 digital radiographs of small abnormalities of the extremities (fractures, erosions, calcifications). Conventional images were obtained with a low-speed screen-film system while digital ones were acquired with high resolution (5lp/mm max) phosphors and laser-printed on a 8'x10' film. Two experienced radiologist defined the gold standard (389 abnormalities) and four radiologist scored the findings (1,556 observations) on a five-point discrete scale. ROC analysis indicated film and storage radiography to be equally effective in the overall detection of abnormalities. No difference was found in the individual performances of the four readers in the site subclasses (wrist, hand) and in the specific detection of fractures and erosions. Digital radiography proved to be superior to conventional radiography in the detection of calcifications in all sites and particularly in the wrist (p<0.05). Storage phosphor radiography may replace conventional radiography of the extremities without causing any significant decrease in diagnostic accuracy

  6. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  7. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old. PMID:25316335

  8. What neurons hide behind calretinin immunoreactivity in the human gut?

    Beuscher, Nicholas; Jabari, Samir; Strehl, Johanna; Neuhuber, Winfried; Brehmer, Axel

    2014-04-01

    Calretinin (CALR) is often used as an immunohistochemical marker for the histopathological diagnosis of human intestinal neuropathies. However, little is known about its distribution pattern with respect to specific human enteric neuron types. Prior studies revealed CALR in both myenteric and submucosal neurons, most of which colabel with choline acetyl transferase (ChAT). Here, we specified the chemical code of CALR-positive neurons in small and large intestinal wholemounts in a series of 28 patients. Besides other markers, we evaluated the labeling pattern of CALR in combination with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). In colonic submucosa, CALR and VIP were almost completely colocalized in about three-quarters of all submucosal neurons. In the small intestinal submucosa, both the colocalization rate of CALR and VIP as well as the proportion of these neurons were lower (about one-third). In the myenteric plexus of both small intestine and colon, CALR amounted to 11 and 10 %, respectively, whereas VIP to 5 and 4 % of the whole neuron population, respectively. Colocalization of both markers was found in only 2 and 3 % of myenteric neurons, respectively. In section specimens, nerve fibers coreactive for CALR and VIP were found in the mucosa but not in the muscle coat. Summarizing the present and earlier results, CALR was found in at least one submucosal and two myenteric neuron populations. Submucosal CALR+/VIP+/ChAT± neurons innervate mucosal structures. Furthermore, CALR immunoreactivity in the myenteric plexus was observed in morphological type II (supposed primary afferent) and spiny type I (supposed inter- or motor-) neurons. PMID:24203089

  9. Plasma immunoreactive neuropeptide Y in congestive heart failure at rest and during exercise

    Madsen, B K; Husum, D; Videbaek, R; Stokholm, K H; Saelsen, L; Christensen, N J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study described here was to study plasma immunoreactive Neuropeptide Y (NPY) at rest and during exercise in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and in healthy subjects. Thirty-five patients, mean age 64 years, with CHF in optimal treatment and with a mean ejection...... capacity. In patients with congestive heart failure mean plasma immunoreactive NPY at rest was 10.3 pmol l-1 and was not significantly different from the control group. No differences between patients with slight and severe CHF were found and there was no correlation between plasma immunoreactive NPY and...... left ventricular ejection fraction. Mean maximal exercise time was on average 6.3 min. Only three patients exercised more than 10 min. At maximal exercise mean plasma immunoreactive NPY was 10.6 pmol l-1 the same as at rest. Plasma noradrenaline was increased in CHF patients compared to healthy...

  10. The expression of β3-adrenoceptor and muscarinic type 3 receptor immuno-reactivity in the major pelvic ganglion of the rat.

    Eastham, J; Stephenson, C; Korstanje, K; Gillespie, J I

    2015-07-01

    Bladder afferent outflow, linked to sensation, plays a critical role in bladder pathology: abnormal outflow results in altered sensation, leading to increased voiding frequency, urge and often incontinence. β3-adrenoceptor agonists have been suggested to be beneficial in treating these symptoms. However, the absence of a significant sympathetic innervation of the detrusor and only a modest relaxation of bladder muscle by β3 agonists has questioned the therapeutic site of action of β3 agonists in the bladder. The present study was done to explore the possibility that β3-adrenoceptors might be located in the pelvic plexus. Using the rat, where the pelvic plexus is located primarily within a single ganglion, the major pelvic ganglion (MPG), immuno-histochemical approaches were used to identify structures expressing β3-adrenoceptor immuno-reactivity (β3AR-IR). The only structures found to express β3AR-IR were small-diameter tyrosine hydroxylase and vesicular mono-amine transporter immuno-reactive (TH-IR and vmat-IR) neurones. These neurones, found in clusters or singly on the periphery of the ganglion, or dispersed in smaller clumps throughout the MPG, are similar to the small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells described previously. Not all small cells expressed β3AR-IR. A population of the small cells were also immuno-reactive to the type 3 muscarinic receptor (M3R-IR) and the P2X3 purinergic receptor (P2X3-IR). Clumps of small cells were associated with calcitonin gene-related peptide immuno-reactive (CGRP-IR) nerve fibres (putative sensory fibres) and a small number were contacted by putative cholinergic nerves expressing immuno-reactivity to vesicular acetylcholine transporter (vacht-IR). These observations are consistent with the idea that small cells are interneurons and one of the components making up complex neural circuits within the MPG. The precise physiological role of these neural elements in the MPG is unknown. However, as one therapeutic action of β3-adrenoceptor agonists is to modulate sensation, it is possible that these neural circuits may be involved in the regulation of afferent outflow and sensation. PMID:25920933

  11. Levels of immunoreactive inhibin-like material in urine during the menstrual cycle

    Using a specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay, the authors determined levels of inhibinlike material in the urine of eight healthy women with normal menstrual cycle length of 28 +- 4 days. The results revealed a cyclic variation in urinary immunoreactive inhibin levels during the menstrual cycles, with a sharp rise in levels three to four days prior to luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) peaks. These levels of immunoreactive inhibin may thus serve as a parameter to detect impending LH surge. (author)

  12. Diurnal variation of ?-endorphin like immunoreactivity in rat brain, pituitary gland, and plasma

    ?-endorphin like immunoreactivity was measured in the brain, pituitary gland and plasma of rats at 2 A.M, 8 A.M, 2 P.M and 8 P.M. Values were higher in the brain and pituitary gland at 8 P.M and in the plasma at 8 A.M and 2 P.M. The findings suggest a circadian rhythm in the production and release of ?-endorphin immunoreactive material. (Author)

  13. Expression of c-Fos immunoreactivity in transmitter-characterized neurons after stress.

    Ceccatelli, S; Villar, M J; Goldstein, M; HÖKFELT, T.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular injection of the mitosis inhibitor colchicine and of immobilization stress, subcutaneous injection of capsaicin, and intraperitoneal injection of hypertonic salt solution on expression of c-Fos-like immunoreactivity was studied in the rat brain with immunohistochemistry. All the procedures induced c-Fos immunoreactivity in parvocellular neurons of the paraventricular nucleus, and many of these neurons also contained corticotropin-releasing factor immunore...

  14. Humoral immunoreactivity to gliadin and to tissue transglutaminase is present in some patients with multiple myeloma

    Matkovic Suzana

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple myeloma (MM is a clonal B-cell disorder with many immunological disturbances. The aim of this work was to assess whether some of food antigens contribute to the imbalance of immune response by screening the sera of MM patients for their immunoreactivity to food constituent gliadin, to tissue transglutaminase-2 (tTG-2 and to Ro/SSA antigen. Sera from 61 patients with MM in various stages of disease, before, or after some cycles of conventional therapy were analyzed by commercial Binding Site ELISA tests. The control group consisted of 50 healthy volunteers. Statistical analysis of data obtained was performed by Mann Whitney Test. Results The higher serum IgA immunoreactivity to gliadin was found in 14/56 patients and in one of control people. The enhanced serum IgG immunoreactivity to gliadin was found in only two of tested patients and in two controls. The enhanced IgA immunoreactivity to tTG-2 was found in 10/49 patients' sera, while 4/45 patients had higher serum IgG immunoreactivity. The enhanced serum IgG immunoreactivity to RoSSÀ antigen was found in 9/47 analyzed MM patients' sera. Statistical analysis of data obtained revealed that only the levels of anti-tTG-2 IgA immunoreactivity in patients with MM were significantly higher than these obtained in healthy controls (P Conclusion Data obtained showed the existence of the enhanced serum immunoreactivity to gliadin, tTG-2 and Ro/SSA antigens in some patients with MM. These at least partially could contribute to the immunological imbalance frequently found in this disease.

  15. CD34 immunoreactivity and interstitial cells of Cajal in the human and mouse gastrointestinal tract

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J; De Laet, M H; Vanderhaeghen, J J; Schiffmann, S N

    2000-01-01

    Immunoreactivity for the tyrosine kinase receptor Kit (Kit-ir) is an established marker for the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) of the gut. Recently, the presence of CD34 immunoreactivity (CD34-ir) has been reported in Kit-ir ICC around the myenteric plexus in human small intestine. Conversely,...... ontogeny and function of CD34-ir cells in the gut, as well as the origin of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, remain unclear....

  16. Calretinin immunoreactivity in the developing olfactory system of the rainbow trout

    Porteros Herrero, Ángel; Arévalo Arévalo, Rosario; Weruaga, Eduardo; Crespo, Carlos; Briñón, Jesús G.; Alonso Peña, José-Ramón; Aijón Noguera, José

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of calretinin immunoreactivity in the developing olfactory system of the rainbow trout was studied by using an indirect immunocytochemical method. Calretinin immunoreactivity was firstly detected at 150 day-degrees in the olfactory placode, where labeled primordial cells were observed. At 250 day-degrees, precursor cells of the olfactory receptor neurons located in the olfactory pit were calretininimmunoreactive. At 300 day-degrees, recognizable olfactory receptor ne...

  17. Glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is present in oligodendroglia of various regions of the central nervous system

    D'Amelio, F.; Eng, L. F.; Gibbs, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were identified in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord. They were mostly confined to the gray matter, particularly close to neurons and processes. The white matter showed few immunoreactive oligodendroglia. It was suggested that some type of oligodendrocytes, specially those in perineuronal location, might fulfill a functional role more akin to astrocytes than to the normally myelinating oligodendroglia.

  18. Minicolumnar abnormalities in autism.

    Casanova, Manuel F; van Kooten, Imke A J; Switala, Andrew E; van Engeland, Herman; Heinsen, Helmut; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Hof, Patrick R; Trippe, Juan; Stone, Janet; Schmitz, Christoph

    2006-09-01

    Autism is characterized by qualitative abnormalities in behavior and higher order cognitive functions. Minicolumnar irregularities observed in autism provide a neurologically sound localization to observed clinical and anatomical abnormalities. This study corroborates the initial reports of a minicolumnopathy in autism within an independent sample. The patient population consisted of six age-matched pairs of patients (DSM-IV-TR and ADI-R diagnosed) and controls. Digital micrographs were taken from cortical areas S1, 4, 9, and 17. The image analysis produced estimates of minicolumnar width (CW), mean interneuronal distance, variability in CW (V (CW)), cross section of Nissl-stained somata, boundary length of stained somata per unit area, and the planar convexity. On average CW was 27.2 microm in controls and 25.7 microm in autistic patients (P = 0.0234). Mean neuron and nucleolar cross sections were found to be smaller in autistic cases compared to controls, while neuron density in autism exceeded the comparison group by 23%. Analysis of inter- and intracluster distances of a Delaunay triangulation suggests that the increased cell density is the result of a greater number of minicolumns, otherwise the number of cells per minicolumns appears normal. A reduction in both somatic and nucleolar cross sections could reflect a bias towards shorter connecting fibers, which favors local computation at the expense of inter-areal and callosal connectivity. PMID:16819561

  19. Immunoreactivity of calcium binding protein secretagogin in the human hippocampus is restricted to pyramidal neurons.

    Attems, Johannes; Quass, Magdalena; Gartner, Wolfgang; Nabokikh, Anastasiya; Wagner, Ludwig; Steurer, Stefan; Arbes, Stefanie; Lintner, Felix; Jellinger, Kurt

    2007-03-01

    Disturbed calcium homeostasis plays a crucial role in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the aging process. We evaluated immunoreactivity of secretagogin, a recently cloned calcium binding protein, in hippocampus and adjacent entorhinal cortex of 30 neuropathologically examined post mortem brains (m:f=12:18; mean age, 79.8+/-15.1 years). The study group consisted of 15 cases fulfilling the criteria for high probability of AD according to the NIA-Reagan Institute Criteria and 15 cases with no to medium probability. Sections were incubated with secretagogin-specific antibodies and the number of immunoreactive neurons as well as staining intensities in both neurons and neuropil were assessed. Both cellular and neuropil immunoreactivity were restricted to subiculum and Ammons horn. Cellular immunoreactivity was further restricted to pyramidal neurons and showed a hierarchical distribution: the mean percentage of immunoreactive neurons was highest in sector CA3 (64.41%), followed by CA2 (44.09%), CA4 (34.38%), CA1 (10.9%), and the subiculum (2.92%; P0.05), while it did not differ significantly between groups with different degrees of AD pathology. The pattern of secretagogin immunoreactivity resembles that of calcium sensor proteins as it is restricted to a subset of neurons and therefore secretagogin could serve highly specialized tasks in neuronal calcium signalling. PMID:17116382

  20. Somatostatin-28- and somatostatin-14-like immunoreactivities in the rat pituitary gland.

    Mesguich, P; Benoit, R; Dubois, P M; Morel, G

    1988-05-01

    Endogenous SS14- as well as SS28-like immunoreactive materials were detected in both male and female rats by radioimmunoassay and by immunocytochemistry on ultrathin frozen sections. The content of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity was 0.39 +/- 0.08 pg per mg adenohypophysis. Immunoreactivity was localized by immunocytochemistry in three pituitary cell types: somatotrophs, lactotrophs and thyrotrophs, but not in corticotrophs and gonadotrophs. In these three pituitary cell types the SS28- and the SS14-like immunoreactive materials were localized in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. In the cytoplasm the immunoreactivity was seen in the cytoplasmic matrix and in the secretory granules. In the nucleus it was present mainly in the euchromatin close to the heterochromatin. In somatotrophs and lactotrophs, SS14- and SS28-like immunoreactive materials have been detected at the plasma membrane level. These results suggest that (1) endogenous SS14 and SS28 are present in adenohypophysis in somatotrophs, lactotrophs and thyrotrophs, and (2) the two peptides act on both the cytoplasmic components and the nucleus. PMID:2898294

  1. Evidence for the presence of immunoreactive inhibin in extragonadal tissues of ovariectomized ewes.

    Peeters, R; Vanmontfort, D; Van Isterdael, J; Verhoeven, G; Rombauts, L; Decuypere, E

    1997-08-01

    Six ewes were ovariectomized to determine the immediate and long-term effects of removal of ovaries on the immunoreactive concentrations of FSH, LH and inhibin. Three months after ovariectomy, ewes were slaughtered and tissue samples of brain, pituitary, spleen, liver, perirenal fat, lung, kidney, adrenals and uterus were collected to determine the immunoreactive inhibin content. Both gonadotrophins, FSH and LH, increased significantly after ovariectomy. The increase of FSH, however, was more pronounced and remarkably faster than the changes of LH after ovariectomy. Immunoreactive concentrations of inhibin decreased sharply as early as 15 min after ovariectomy and subsequently decreased more gradually until 2 weeks after surgery. From this moment on, the level stabilized at 56% of the initial value. In control ewes, a considerable amount of immunoreactive inhibin is found in tissue samples of ovary, lung, kidney, pituitary and spleen. After ovariectomy, the level of immunoreactive inhibin decreased in spleen and lung samples while an important increase of immunoreactive inhibin is found in adrenals and pituitary. These results demonstrate a differential regulation of LH and FSH after ovariectomy and support an involvement of inhibin only in the immediate changes of FSH after ovariectomy in sheep. They further suggest that the adrenals and the pituitary may be extragonadal sources of inhibin. To explore the eventual contribution of the adrenals to circulating inhibin, dexamethasone (1.4 mg/ewe) and ACTH (200 IU/ewe) were in a following experiment injected intravenously in control and ovariectomized ewes. The lack of any effect of dexamethasone or ACTH on the plasma concentration of immunoreactive inhibin indicate that adrenal inhibin probably does not contribute to circulating inhibin. PMID:9452878

  2. Urocortin-like immunoreactivity in the primary lymphoid organs of the duck (Anas platyrhynchos

    A. De Luca

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Urocortin (UCN is a 40 aminoacid peptide which belongs to corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF family. This family of peptides stimulates the secretion of proopiomelanocortin (POMC-derived peptides, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, b-endorphin and melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH in the pituitary gland. In the present study, using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, the distribution of UCN in the primary lymphoid organs of the duck was investigated at different ages. In the cloacal burse and thymus, Western blot demonstrated the presence of a peptide having a molecular weight compatible with that of the mammalian UCN. In the cloacal burse, immunoreactivity was located in the medullary epithelial cells and in the follicular associated and cortico-medullary epithelium. In the thymus, immunoreactivity was located in single epithelial cells. Double labelling immunofluorescence studies showed that UCN immunoreactivity completely colocalised with cytokeratin immunoreactivity in both the thymus and cloacal burse. Statistically significant differences in the percentage of UCN immunoreactivity were observed between different age periods in the cloacal burse. The results suggest that, in birds, urocortin has an important role in regulating the function of the immune system.

  3. Pretreatment P53 immunoreactivity does not infer radioresistance in prostate cancer patients

    Purpose: To test, in a clinical context, the hypothesis that p53 aberrations, assessed by immunoreactivity, are related to radioresistance as suggested by several experimental studies. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients with prostate cancer who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate or biopsy prior to definitive external beam therapy were retrospectively identified. The endpoint in the study was cancer specific survival. The nuclear accumulation of the aberrant p53 protein was evaluated by immunohistochemistry with the pantropic, monoclonal Ab-6 anti-p53 antibody (clone DO-1) on pretreatment biopsies. Immunoreactivity was related to stage, grade, and cancer-specific survival. Results: There was a correlation between p53 immunoreactivity and low tumor stage (p < 0.001), but no relation between p53 status and grade was found. Moreover, no significant difference was found in cancer-specific survival between the p53 positive tumors (109 months) and the p53 negative tumors (99 months). Conclusions: No disadvantage regarding survival was seen for patients with p53 immunoreactive tumors, implicating that p53 immunoreactivity does not infer radioresistance in prostate cancer. This suggests that the p53 inactivation may be a less important determinant of tumor response to radiotherapy in some human cancers than in the previously studied experimental situations. Thus, other mechanisms may be more important in determining outcome after radiation. However, the series is small and data should be interpreted with caution

  4. Urotensin II-immunoreactive neurons in the caudal neurosecretory system of freshwater and seawater fish.

    Owada, K; Kawata, M; Akaji, K; Takagi, A; Moriga, M; Kobayashi, H

    1985-01-01

    Antiserum generated against synthetic urotensin II of the goby, Gillichthys mirabilis, was used to localize urotensin II in the caudal neurosecretory system in six species of freshwater teleosts: Cyprinus carpio, Carassius auratus, Oreochromis mossambicus, Oreochromis niloticus, Salmo gairdneri and Plecoglossus altivelis, and six species of seawater teleosts: Acanthogobius flavimanus, Pagrus major, Parapristipoma trilineatum, Trachurus japonicus, Seriola dumerili and Seriola quinqueradiata. In the carp, urotensin II-immunoreactive perikarya were classified into three groups according to their size and shape. Small cells were located in the spinal cord dorsal to the urophysis, medium-sized cells immediately anterior to the urophysis, and large cells anterior to the medium-sized cells. In each group, a small number of nonreactive cells was found. Urotensin II-immunoreactive nerve fibers extended toward the urophysis and terminated around the blood vessels. Other species of teleosts showed a similar immunoreaction to that observed in the carp. The immunoreaction of the urophysis was stronger in seawater fish than freshwater fish. Urotensin II-immunoreactive elements could not be detected in the brains of the carp, goldfish and goby. PMID:3884162

  5. Substance P immunoreactivity in the lumbar spinal cord of the turtle Trachemys dorbigni following peripheral nerve injury

    W.A. Partata; A.M.R. Krepsky; L.L. Xavier; Marques, M.; Achaval, M

    2003-01-01

    Immunoreactive substance P was investigated in turtle lumbar spinal cord after sciatic nerve transection. In control animals immunoreactive fibers were densest in synaptic field Ia, where the longest axons invaded synaptic field III. Positive neuronal bodies were identified in the lateral column of the dorsal horn and substance P immunoreactive varicosities were observed in the ventral horn, in close relationship with presumed motoneurons. Other varicosities appeared in the lateral and anteri...

  6. Somatostatin-28(1-12)-like immunoreactivity is reduced in Alzheimer's disease cerebral cortex.

    Beal, M F; Benoit, R; Mazurek, M F; Bird, E D; Martin, J B

    1986-03-19

    A deficiency in somatostatin is the most consistently described neurochemical alteration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) attributable to intrinsic cortical neurons. Somatostatin-28 (SOM-28), an N-terminal-extended form of somatostatin, can be cleaved to form somatostatin-28(1-12)(SOM-28(1-12) ) and somatostatin-14 (SOM-14). We have measured concentrations of SOM-28(1-12)-like immunoreactivity in 8 cortical regions from 12 patients with AD and 13 controls. Significant reductions (P less than 0.001) were found in all cortical regions examined with the largest decrease in temporal lobe. Reductions were significantly correlated with decreases in somatostatin-14-like immunoreactivity in the same regions. The similar reductions of two prosomatostatin-derived peptides in AD cerebral cortex supports the contention that decreased somatostatin immunoreactivity in AD is caused by a degeneration of somatostatin cortical neurons and terminals. PMID:2870772

  7. So-called interplexiform cells immunoreactive to tyrosine hydroxylase or somatostatin in rat retina.

    Negishi, K; Kato, S; Teranishi, T; Kiyama, H; Katayama, Y; Tohyama, M

    1985-10-28

    The morphology of so-called interplexiform (IP) cells immunoreactive to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or somatostatin (SOM) in the rat retina was described in comparison with those in the carp retina. In frozen cross-sections of the rat retina, many processes of TH-like immunoreactive cells were found to extend toward the outer plexiform layer (OPL), forming a thin layer of network fibers. A few of them further extended into the photoreceptor cell layer; such fibers were never found in the carp retina. Some processes of SOM-like immunoreactive cells in the rat retina were found to travel across the inner nuclear layer and appeared to poorly develop a network at the OPL. In the carp retina, on the other hand, only one exceptional cross-section contained such an ascending process. PMID:2864980

  8. Effects of heat and high-pressure treatments on the solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins.

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jieqiong; Sheng, Wei; Wang, Shuo; Fu, Tong-Jen

    2016-05-15

    The effects of dry and moist heat, autoclave sterilization and high-pressure treatment on the biochemical characteristics and immunological properties of almond proteins were investigated. Changes in the solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins extracted from treated almond flour were evaluated using a total protein assay, indirect competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IC-ELISA), and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Almond proteins were stable during dry-heat treatment at temperatures below 250°C. Dry heat at 400°C, boiling, autoclave sterilization and high-pressure treatment in the presence of water at ⩾500MPa greatly reduced the solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins. SDS-PAGE revealed that the protein profiles of almond flour samples treated under these conditions also changed significantly. The synergistic effects of heat, pressure and the presence of water contributed to significant changes in solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins. PMID:26776044

  9. Orthopaedic abnormalities in primary myopathies.

    Finsterer, Josef; Strobl, Walter

    2011-10-01

    Orthopaedic abnormalities are frequently recognised in patients with myopathy but are hardly systematically reviewed with regard to type of myopathy, type of orthopaedic problem, and orthopaedic management. This review aims to summarize recent findings and current knowledge about orthopaedic abnormalities in these patients, their frequency, and possible therapeutic interventions. A MEDLINE search for the combination of specific terms was carried out and appropriate articles were reviewed for the type of myopathy, types of orthopaedic abnormalities, frequency of orthopaedic abnormalities, and possible therapeutic interventions. Orthopaedic abnormalities in myopathies can be most simply classified according to the anatomical location into those of: the spine, including dropped head, camptocormia, scoliosis, hyperlordosis, hyperkyphosis, or rigid spine; the thorax, including pectus excavatum (cobbler's chest), anterior/posterior flattening, or pectus carinatum (pigeon's chest); the limb girdles, including scapular winging and pelvic deformities; and the extremities, including contractures, hyperlaxity of joints, and hand or foot deformities. These orthopaedic abnormalities can be most frequently found in arthrogryposis, muscular dystrophies, congenital myopathies, myofibrillar myopathies, and myotonic dystrophies. Occasionally, they also occur in metabolic myopathies or other types of myopathy. Most of the orthopaedic abnormalities are sufficiently accessible to conservative or surgical orthopaedic treatment. Orthopaedic abnormalities have major implications in the management and outcome of myopathy patients; they should be closely monitored and treated on time. PMID:22187829

  10. Morphometric characteristics of Neuropeptide Y immunoreactive neurons of human cortical amygdaloid nucleus

    Mališ Miloš

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cortical amygdaloid nucleus belongs to the corticomedial part of the amygdaloid complex. In this nucleus there are neurons that produce neuropetide Y. This peptide has important roles in sleeping, learning, memory, gastrointestinal regulation, anxiety, epilepsy, alcoholism and depression. Material and methods We investigated morphometric characteristics (numbers of primary dendrites, longer and shorter diameters of cell bodies and maximal radius of dendritic arborization of NPY immunoreactive neurons of human cortical amygdaloid nucleus on 6 male adult human brains, aged 46 to 77 years, by immunohistochemical avidin-biotin technique. Results Our investigation has shown that in this nucleus there is a moderate number of NPY immunoreactive neurons. 67% of found neurons were nonpyramidal, while 33% were pyramidal. Among the nonpyramidal neurons the dominant groups were multipolar neurons (41% - of which 25% were multipolar irregular, and 16% multipolar oval. Among the pyramidal neurons the dominant groups were the neurons with triangular shape of cell body (21%. All found NPY immunoreactive neurons (pyramidal and nonpyramidal altogether had intervals of values of numbers of primary dendrites 2 to 6, longer diameters of cell bodies 13 to 38 µm, shorter diameters of cell bodies 9 to 20 µm and maximal radius of dendritic arborization 50 to 340 µm. More than a half of investigated neurons (57% had 3 primary dendrites. Discussion and conclusion The other researchers did not find such percentage of pyramidal immunoreactive neurons in this amygdaloid nucleus. If we compare our results with the results of the ather researchers we can conclude that all pyramidal NPY immunoreactive neurons found in this human amygdaloid nucleus belong to the class I of neurons, and that all nonpyramidal NPY immunoreactive neurons belong to the class II of neurons described by other researchers. We suppose that all found pyramidal neurons were projectional.

  11. Changes in small intestinal chromogranin A-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance.

    Mazzawi, Tarek; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2016-05-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for enteroendocrine cells in the gut, and CgA-immunoreactive cell densities are abnormal in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The majority of patients with IBS report that their symptoms develop after consuming certain foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary guidance on the total enteroendocrine cell densities in the small intestine, as detected by CgA. A total of 14 patients with IBS underwent a gastroscopy with duodenal biopsies and 11 of them also underwent a colonoscopy, with biopsy samples obtained from the ileum. Fourteen control subjects were also included. Each patient received 3 sessions of dietary guidance. Gastroscopies and colonoscopies were performed on both the controls and patients with IBS (at baseline and at 3-9 months after receiving guidance). Biopsy samples obtained from the duodenum and ileum were immunostained for CgA using the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method and were quantified using computerized image analysis. The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the duodenum (mean ± SEM values) in the control subjects was 235.9±31.9 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 36.9±9.8 and 103.7±16.9 cells/mm2 before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007). The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the ileum in the control subjects was 47.4±8.3 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 48.4±8.1 and 17.9±4.4 cells/mm2, before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.0006). These data indicate that changes in CgA-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with IBS after receiving dietary guidance may reflect a change in the densities of the small intestinal enteroendocrine cells, which may contribute to an improvement in the IBS symptoms. PMID:26987104

  12. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity in brain and pituitary of the hagfish Eptatretus burgeri (Cyclostomata)

    Jirikowski, G; Erhart, G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Triepel, J; Patzner, R A

    1984-01-01

    Paraffin sections of brain and pituitary of the hagfish Eptatretus burgeri were immunostained with an antiserum to FMRF-amide. Immunoreactivity was visible in a large number of neurons in the posterior part of the ventromedial hypothalamus and in long neuronal processes extending cranially from the...... hypothalamus to the olfactory system and caudally to the medulla oblongata. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity was also found in cells of the adenohypophysis. These observations suggest that the hagfish possesses a brain FMRF-amide-like transmitter system and pituitary cells containing FMRF-amide-like material...

  13. Evaluation of the immunoreactive fraction of an anti-tumour monoclonal antibody.

    Mantovani, L; Ménard, S.; Mezzanzanica, D.; Miotti, S.; Pupa, S. M.; Colnaghi, M. I.

    1990-01-01

    Over a period of approximately 1 year, the immunoreactivity of the anti-ovary carcinoma MAb MOv18 was evaluated after radiolabelling with 125I on two different ovarian carcinoma cell lines, OvCa432 and IGROV1. A high variability of the immunoreactive values was observed by analysing different preparations of radiolabelled MOv18 (from 12 to 21% on OvCa432 and from 22 to 56% on IGROV1) and by using the same radiolabelled preparation (12% on OvCa432 and 51% on IGROV1). Since the variability coul...

  14. FMRFamide immunoreactivity is generally occurring in the nervous systems of coelenterates

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1983-01-01

    Abundant FMRFamide immunoreactivity has been found in the nervous systems of all hydrozoan, anthozoan, scyphozoan and ctenophoran species that were looked upon. This general and abundant occurrence shows that FMRFamide-like material must play a crucial role in the functioning of primitive nervous...

  15. Gastrin/CCK-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of coelenterates

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Sundler, F; Rehfeld, J F

    1980-01-01

    Using immunocytochemistry, gastrin/CCK-like immunoreactivity is found in sensory nerve cells in the ectoderm of the mouth region of hydra and in nerve cells in the endoderm of all body regions of the sea anemone tealia. These results are corroborated by radioimmunoassay: One hydra contains at lea...

  16. Enkephalin- and somatostatin-like immunoreactivities in human adrenal medulla and pheochromocytoma.

    Lundberg, J M; Hamberger, B; Schultzberg, M; Hökfelt, T; Granberg, P O; Efendi?, S; Terenius, L; Goldstein, M; Luft, R

    1979-01-01

    By using the Coons indirect immunofluorescence technique, enkephalin-like immunoreactivity with a granular localization was observed in human adrenal medullary gland cells and pheochromocytomas. In two of the tumors and in a few adrenal gland cells, a somatostatin-like peptide could also be identified. Catecholamine cell types were visualized on adjacent sections with antisera to the synthesizing enzymes dopamine-beta-hydroxylase [DBH; dopamine beta-monooxygenase; 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine, ascorbate: oxygen oxidoreductase (beta-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.17.1] and phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PNMT; noradrenalin N-methyltransferase; S-adenosyl-L-methionine:phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, EC 2.1.1.28). In the normal adrenal medulla more DBH- than PNMT-immunoreactive gland cells were observed. In the adrenal pheochromocytoma both DBH- and PNMT-positive cells were seen, whereas the two extra-adrenal tumors contained only DBH. These findings correlated well with plasma catecholamine measurements. Finally, enkephalin immunoreactive fibers and somatostatin immunoreactive cells were observed in a sympathetic ganglion extirpated together with one of the tumors. Images PMID:386355

  17. VIP-like immunoreactivity in the intestinal tract of fish with different feeding habits.

    Andreozzi, G; de Girolamo, P; Affatato, C; Antonucci, R; Russo, P; Gargiulo, G

    1997-01-01

    We studied the distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactive (VIP-ir) cells and fibres in the intestine of three fish species with different feeding habits: the silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), the goldfish (Carassius auratus), and the pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus). Each species was divided into two groups: (1) fish fed once a day up until sacrifice and (2) fish fed once a day and then fasted three days before sacrifice. Immunoreactive endocrine cells and fibres were present in all three fish species. The immunoreactive cells were distributed along the entire intestinal mucosa of the carp and goldfish but were found only in the anterior intestine of the sunfish. The immunoreactive fibres were present along the entire intestinal wall, in the myenteric plexus, in the circular muscular layer, and in the connective tissue of the mucosa in all three fish species. No differences were found between the cells and fibres of normally-fed animals and the cells and fibres of fasted animals. The authors hypothesize that the different distributions of VIP-ir cells and fibres are related to the different contents of hard and indigestible matter of the fish food. PMID:9174846

  18. Tau immunoreactivity detected in human plasma, but no obvious increase in dementia

    Ingelson, M; Blomberg, M; Benedikz, Eirikur; Wahlund, L O; Karlsson, E; Vanmechelen, E; Lannfelt, L

    1999-01-01

    dementia (n = 16) and from healthy controls (n = 15). By using an ELISA with monoclonal tau antibodies, tau immunoreactivity was detected in approximately 20% of the subjects. However, no difference between the disease and control groups was seen. After gel filtration of tau immunopositive plasma, the peak...

  19. Monoclonal antibody to the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Relationship between the immunoreactive and DNA-binding domain

    The region of the glucocorticoid receptor that reacted with a monoclonal antibody (BUGR-1) was identified. In order to identify the immunoreactive region, the rat liver glucocorticoid receptor was subjected to limited proteolysis; immunoreactive fragments were identified by Western blotting. The monoclonal antibody reacted with both the undigested Mr approximately 97,000 receptor subunit and a Mr approximately 45,000 fragment containing the steroid-binding and DNA-binding domains. Digestion by trypsin also produced two steroid-binding fragments of Mr approximately 27,000 and 31,000 which did not react with the antibody and an immunoreactive Mr approximately 16,000 fragment. This Mr approximately 16,000 fragment was shown to bind to DNA-cellulose, indicating that it contained a DNA-binding domain of the receptor. The undigested receptor must have steroid associated with it to undergo activation to a DNA-binding form. However, the Mr approximately 16,000 immunoreactive fragment binds to DNA-cellulose even if it is obtained by digestion of the steroid-free holoreceptor which does not itself bind to DNA

  20. Optoelectrofluidic enhanced immunoreaction based on optically-induced dynamic AC electroosmosis.

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-03-23

    We report a novel optoelectrofluidic immunoreaction system based on electroosmotic flow for enhancing antibody-analyte binding efficiency on a surface-based sensing system. Two conventional indium tin oxide glass slides are assembled to provide a reaction chamber for a tiny volume of sample droplet (∼5 μL), in which the top layer is employed as an antibody-immobilized substrate and the bottom layer acts as a photoconductive layer of an optoelectrofluidic device. Under the application of an AC voltage, an illuminated light pattern on the photoconductive layer causes strong counter-rotating vortices to transport analytes from the bulk solution to the vicinity of the assay spot on the glass substrate. This configuration overcomes the slow immunoreaction problem of a diffusion-based sensing system, resulting in the enhancement of binding efficiency via an optoelectrofluidic method. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of optically-induced dynamic AC electroosmotic flow on optoelectrofluidic enhancement for surface-based immunoreaction with a mathematical simulation study and real experiments using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG. As a result, dynamic light patterns provided better immunoreaction efficiency than static light patterns due to effective mass transport of the target analyte, resulting in an achievement of 2.18-fold enhancement under a growing circular light pattern compared to the passive mode. PMID:26926571

  1. Ultrastructural evidence for endogenous somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the pituitary gland.

    Morel, G; Mesguich, P; Dubois, M P; Dubois, P M

    1983-01-01

    The tetradecapeptide, somatostatin (SRIF), is a potent inhibitor on pituitary hormone release, by a direct effect. The immunocytological method was used with the aim of localizing SRIF at the cellular and subcellular levels. Rat pituitaries were fixed and frozen. Ultrathin sections obtained by cryoultramicrotomy, were incubated with anti-SRIF serum. The antigen-antibody reaction was detected by 4-chloro-1-naphthol. SRIF immunoreactivity was observed in somatotrophs, thyreotrophs and prolactin cells, but not in corticotrophs or gonadotrophs. Im immunoreactive cells, SRIF was found in the cytoplasmic matrix, in the secretory granules and in the nucleus distributed primarily in the euchromatin, in the vicinity of the heterochromatin regions. SRIF immunoreactivity was also observed at the plasma membrane. No immunoreactivity was observed when nonimmune serum or anti-SRIF serum incubated with SRIF was used. No modification was observed when anti-SRIF serum incubated with gonadoliberin, thyroliberin or vasopressin was used. These data (1) provide immunocytological evidence for the presence of somatostatin in pituitary gland, and (2) indicate the presence of SRIF peptide in the somatotrophs, thyreotrophs and prolactin cells. PMID:6135171

  2. Leydig cells in the lingual epithelium of the axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, are immunoreactive for serotonin.

    Toyoshima, K; Shimamura, A

    1992-01-01

    The Leydig cells in the lingual epithelium of the axolotl were investigated by immunohistochemistry using serotonin antiserum. Serotonin-immunoreactivity was found in their secretory granules. The physiological role of serotonin in the Leydig cell, a type of exocrine cell, is unknown.

  3. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    ... The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the degree of ... with an SPF of 30 or higher. Abnormally dark skin may continue even after treatment. Experts recommend ...

  4. TMI abnormal waste project plan

    This report discusses plans for the TMI Abnormal Waste Project, which is part of the EPICOR and Waste Research and Disposition Program and funded by the US Department of Energy. The sequence proposed for disposition of Three Mile Island (TMI) abnormal wastes includes: (a) packaging at TMI, (b) shipment to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), (c) storage at INEL for up to 30 years, (d) processing for disposal, and (e) final disposal. Some wastes may be disposable immediately and would be processed and disposed without storage. Potentially, 930 ft3 of cartridge filters, Submerged Demineralizer System filters, sludges, ion-exchange resins, and miscellaneous plant equipment may be classified as abnormal waste. Some wastes may be deleted and others added as cleanup progresses at TMI. The first waste classified as abnormal is Makeup and Purification Demineralizer resin. This report outlines storage plans, procedures, project management, costs, and schedules for placement of those resins

  5. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may exist in multiple different molecular forms and that molecular pattern variations derived from altered post-transcriptional processing may underlay Rett syndrome physiophatology. PMID:27064487

  6. Ultrastructural evidence for endogenous growth hormone-releasing factor-like immunoreactivity in the monkey pituitary gland.

    Morel, G; Mesguich, P; Dubois, M P; Dubois, P M

    1984-02-01

    Growth hormone-releasing factor-like immunoreactivity was visualized in monkey pituitary gland by immunocytochemistry on ultrathin sections obtained by cryoultramicrotomy. Antibodies were raised against synthetic human pancreas growth hormone-releasing factor (1-40). Growth hormone-releasing factor-like immunoreactivity was observed in somatotropes (identified by immunocytochemistry) only. The other pituitary cell types were not immunoreactive. In somatotropes, immunoreactivity was observed at the plasma membrane but only very scarcely, in the cytoplasm (cytoplasmic matrix and secretory granules) and in the nucleus. These results (1) provide immunocytological evidence for the presence of growth hormone-releasing factor or of an immunoreactive fragment of its molecule in the pituitary; (2) indicate the presence of this peptide in one particular pituitary cell type; and (3) provide cytological evidence for direct participation of growth hormone-releasing factor in the regulation of the somatotropic function. PMID:6425708

  7. Oxaliplatin-induced loss of phosphorylated heavy neurofilament subunit neuronal immunoreactivity in rat DRG tissue

    Connor Bronwen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxaliplatin and related chemotherapeutic drugs cause painful chronic peripheral neuropathies in cancer patients. We investigated changes in neuronal size profiles and neurofilament immunoreactivity in L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG tissue of adult female Wistar rats after multiple-dose treatment with oxaliplatin, cisplatin, carboplatin or paclitaxel. Results After treatment with oxaliplatin, phosphorylated neurofilament heavy subunit (pNF-H immunoreactivity was reduced in neuronal cell bodies, but unchanged in nerve fibres, of the L5 DRG. Morphometric analysis confirmed significant changes in the number (-75%; P P P = 0.82, NF-M (-1%, P = 0.96 or NF-H (0%; P = 0.93 after oxaliplatin treatment, although the sizes of parvalbumin (-29%, P = 0.047, NF-M (-11%, P = 0.038 and NF-H (-28%; P = 0.0033 immunoreactive neurons were reduced. In an independent comparison of different chemotherapeutic agents, the number of pNF-H-immunoreactive neurons was significantly altered by oxaliplatin (-77.2%; P P = 0.03 but not by carboplatin or paclitaxel, and their mean cell body area was significantly changed by oxaliplatin (-31.1%; P = 0.008 but not by cisplatin, carboplatin or paclitaxel. Conclusion This study has demonstrated a specific pattern of loss of pNF-H immunoreactivity in rat DRG tissue that corresponds with the relative neurotoxicity of oxaliplatin, cisplatin and carboplatin. Loss of pNF-H may be mechanistically linked to oxaliplatin-induced neuronal atrophy, and serves as a readily measureable endpoint of its neurotoxicity in the rat model.

  8. Correlation of in vivo neuroimaging abnormalities with postmortem human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis and dendritic loss

    Archibald, Sarah L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Ellis, Ronald J.; McCutchan, Allen; Heaton, Robert K.; Grant, Igor; Mallory, Margaret; Miller, Aida; Jernigan, Terry Lynne

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the absence of significant opportunistic infection, the most common alterations on neuroimaging in the brains of patients with AIDS include enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces, white-matter loss, volume loss in striatal structures, and white-matter signal abnormalities. Although pr...... immunoreactivity. CONCLUSIONS: White-matter and cortical damage resulting from HIV disease are closely related. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging may be a valuable adjunct in the assessment of patients at risk for developing HIV encephalitis......BACKGROUND: In the absence of significant opportunistic infection, the most common alterations on neuroimaging in the brains of patients with AIDS include enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces, white-matter loss, volume loss in striatal structures, and white-matter signal abnormalities. Although...... data from autopsies. RESULTS: The HIV-seropositive subjects demonstrated cerebrospinal fluid increases relative to seronegative controls. These increases were associated with a significant decrease in the volumes of cerebral and cerebellar white matter, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, and, to a lesser...

  9. Thyroid abnormality in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Prasanna Byna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AUB is a common but complicated clinical presentation and occurs in 15-20% of women between menarche to menopause and significantly affects the women's health. Women with thyroid dysfunction often have menstrual irregularities, infertility and increased morbidity during pregnancy. The objective of present study is to find the correlation between thyroid disorders and AUB in perimenopausal women attending gynecology OPD. Methods: In the present study, fifty five patients with AUB were included and were evaluated for the cause including thyroid abnormality. Thyroid function tests were done in all patients. Results: Among 55 patients, 12 patients were diagnosed as hypothyroidism and 7 as hyperthyroidism, women with AUB 36 (65.4% were euthyroid. Among 19 women with thyroid abnormality, heavy menstrual bleeding was seen in 8 (42% women, 6 (31.57% had polymenorrhagia, 5 (26.31% had oligomenorrhoea. The frequent menstrual abnormality in women with hypothyroidism (12 women was heavy menstrual bleeding in 5 (41.6% women, 3 (25% had oligomennorhoea, 4 (33.3% had polymenorrhagia. Out of 7 women with hyperthyroidism, 2 (28.57% had oligomenorrhoea, 3 (42.8% had heavy menstrual bleeding, 2 (28.57% had polymenorrhagia. In a total of 55 patients with AUB, 11 (20% had structural abnormalities in uterus and ovaries. 5 (9% had adenomyosis, 3 (5.4% had ovarian cysts, 3 (5.4% had fibroids. Conclusions: It is important to screen all women for thyroid abnormality who are presenting with AUB especially with non-structural causes of AUB. Correction of thyroid abnormalities also relieves AUB. This will avoid unnecessary hormonal treatment and surgery. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3250-3253

  10. SPERM ABNORMALITIES AND ITS TREATMENT

    Prajapati Parimal M.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The term sperm is derived from the Greek word sperma means "seed" and it refers to the male reproductive cells. In the types of sexual reproduction known as anisogamy and oogamy, there is a marked difference in the size of the gametes with the smaller one being termed the "male" or sperm cell. A uniflagellar sperm cell that is motile is referred to as a spermatozoon, whereas a non-motile sperm cell is referred to as a spermatium. Sperm cells cannot divide and have a limited life span, but after fusion with egg cells during fertilization, a new organism begins developing, starting as a totipotent zygote. Sperm morphology the size and shape of sperm is checked as part of a standard semen analysis for male infertility. Many different types of sperm abnormalities occur. A common classification scheme is based on the location of the abnormalities. Those that are located in the sperm head are classified as primary. Abnormalities associated with neck, midpiece or tail are classified as secondary abnormalities. Included in the secondary abnormalities is the presence of cytoplasmic droplets.

  11. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test ...

  12. Sporadic Corticobasal Syndrome due to FTLD-TDP

    Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Sidhu, Manu; Laluz, Victor; Racine, Caroline; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Creighton, Kelly; Karydas, Anna; Rademakers, Rosa; Huang, Eric J.; Bruce L. Miller; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Seeley, William W.

    2009-01-01

    Sporadic corticobasal syndrome (CBS) has been associated with diverse pathological substrates, but frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 immunoreactive inclusions (FTLD-TDP) has only been linked to CBS among progranulin mutation carriers. We report the clinical, neuropsychological, imaging, genetic, and neuropathological features of GS, a patient with sporadic corticobasal syndrome. Genetic testing revealed no mutations in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) or progranulin (...

  13. A longitudinal study of maternal digoxin-like immunoreactive substances in normotensive pregnancy and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    Kerkez, S A; Poston, L; Wolfe, C D; Quartero, H W; Carabelli, P; Petruckevitch, A; Hilton, P J

    1990-03-01

    The serum of women in the third trimester of pregnancy demonstrates cross-reactivity with some commercially available antibodies to digoxin. A number of studies have suggested that levels of this digoxin-like immunoreactive substance(s) are further increased in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension, and some have proposed that the digoxin-like immunoreactive substance could be useful as a predictor of pregnancy-induced hypertension. We measured digoxin-like immunoreactive substance levels every 2 weeks throughout the third trimester in 170 women; of these, 20 developed hypertension. Digoxin-like immunoreactive substance levels rose with gestational age. A graph of the slope of digoxin-like immunoreactive substance plotted against gestational age was fitted for the results obtained from each woman. There was no significant difference in the mean rate of increase of digoxin-like immunoreactive substance level per week between pregnancy-induced hypertension and normotensive pregnancy, nor was there any difference between these two groups at any gestational age studied. These results suggest that measuring digoxin-like immunoreactive substance levels is not useful as a predictor of pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:2316589

  14. Responses of plasma cyclic AMP, serum immunoreactive insulin, C-peptide immunoreactivity and blood sugar levels to glucagon in patients with liver diseases.

    Shimamura,Junnosuke

    1985-10-01

    Full Text Available Levels of plasma cyclic AMP, serum immunoreactive insulin (IRI, serum c-peptide immunoreactivity (CPR and blood sugar (BS were determined 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after a glucagon injection (0.01 mg per kg body weight in normal controls, patients with acute hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. Plasma cyclic AMP responses to glucagon in liver disease patients varied widely in peak value, and only in patients with fulminant hepatitis and decompensated liver cirrhosis with poor prognosis was the response suppressed. The peak response of BS was found significantly later in liver cirrhosis patients than in normal controls. IRI and CPR responses to glucagon were lower in acute hepatitis patients than in normal controls and liver cirrhosis patients. IRI levels and their sum were also lower in acute hepatitis patients, although CPR levels were not significantly different. Thus, the ratio of the sum of CPR from 0 to 60 min to that of IRI was significantly higher in acute hepatitis, indicating impaired pancreatic secretion of insulin to glucagon stimulation as well as increased uptake of insulin by the liver in acute hepatitis.

  15. Neuroimaging abnormalities in Griscelli's disease

    Griscelli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a 7-1/2-month-old white girl who presented with this syndrome, but initially without neurological abnormalities. Initial CT of the brain was normal. Despite haematological remission with chemotherapy, she developed neurological symptoms, progressing to coma. At this time, CT showed areas of coarse calcification in the globi pallidi, left parietal white matter and left brachium pontis. Hypodense areas were present in the genu and posterior limb of the internal capsule on the right side, as well as posterior aspects of both thalami, together with minimal generalised atrophy. MRI revealed areas of increased T2 signal and a focal area of abnormal enhancement in the subcortical white matter. Griscelli's disease should be added to the list of acquired neuroimaging abnormalities in infants. (orig.)

  16. Different pattern of haemagglutinin immunoreactivity of equine influenza virus strains isolated in Poland

    Kwaśnik Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The immunoreactivity of haemagglutinin (HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus was compared among the strains isolated in Poland, using H3 monoclonal antibody. A stronger signal in immunoblot reaction was observed for A/equi/Pulawy/2008 HA polypeptides compared to A/equi/Pulawy/2006, despite the fact that both strains are phylogenetically closely related and belong to Florida clade 2 of American lineage. The strongest signal, observed in the case of A/equi/Pulawy/2008, seemed to be connected with the presence of G135, I213, E379, and/or V530 instead of R135, M213, G379, and I530 present in A/equi/Pulawy/2006 HA sequence. This implies that point mutations within amino acid sequences of HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus may change their immunoreactivity even when they are not located within five basic antigenic sites.

  17. Ablation of prion protein immunoreactivity by heating in saturated calcium hydroxide

    Holtzapple Mark T

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prions, the infectious agents that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, are relatively resistant to destruction by physical, enzymatic, and chemical treatments. Hydrolysis in boiling saturated calcium hydroxide (limewater utilizes inexpensive chemicals to digest protein components of offal. The purpose of this work was to determine if incubating brain material from scrapie-infected sheep in near-boiling saturated calcium hydroxide solution (Ca(OH2 would abolish immunoreactivity of the infectious prion (PrPSc as determined by western blot. Findings After incubating for as few as 10 minutes in saturated calcium hydroxide at 99°C, immunoreactivity of protease resistant bands by western blot analysis is completely lost. Conclusion Boiling in limewater may offer an alternative for disposal of carcasses and enable alternative uses for rendered products from potentially infected carcasses.

  18. GABAergic Neurons Immunoreactive for Calcium Binding Proteins are Reduced in the Prefrontal Cortex in Major Depression

    Rajkowska, Grazyna; O'Dwyer, Gillian; Teleki, Zsofia; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier

    2006-01-01

    Post-mortem morphometric studies report reductions in the average density and size of cortical neurons in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (ORB) in major depressive disorder (MDD). The contribution of specific neuronal phenotypes to this general pathology in depression is still unclear. Post-mortem sections from the dlPFC and ORB regions of 14 subjects with MDD and 11 controls were immunostained to visualize calbindin-immunoreactive (CB-IR) and parvalbumin-i...

  19. Increases in Doublecortin Immunoreactivity in the Dentate Gyrus following Extinction of Heroin-Seeking Behavior

    M. Foster Olive; Lacrosse, Amber L.; Megan P. Hicks; Kelly C. Wischerath

    2012-01-01

    Adult-generated neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus play a role in various forms of learning and memory. However, adult born neurons in the DG, while still at an immature stage, exhibit unique electrophysiological properties and are also functionally implicated in learning and memory processes. We investigated the effects of extinction of drug-seeking behavior on the formation of immature neurons in the DG as assessed by quantification of doublecortin (DCX) immunoreactivity. ...

  20. The effect of conjugation of monoclonal antibody with electronegatively charged polymers on immunoreactivity

    Tumor cells in culture will take protein molecules such as albumin and ferritin and the intracellular transport of these proteins can be enhancement by basic polyamino acids and amino-dextrans. A similar enhancement may occur with the antitumor monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The purpose of this study is to synthesize In-111 labeled MAb conjugated with electronegatively charged polymers and evaluate whether these polymers retain their immunoreactivity

  1. Aromatase Immunoreactivity Is Increased in Mammographically Dense Regions of the Breast

    Vachon, Celine M.; Sasano, Hironobu; Ghosh, Karthik; Brandt, Kathleen R; Watson, David A.; Reynolds, Carol; Lingle, Wilma L.; Goss, Paul E.; Li, Rong; Aiyar, Sarah E.; Scott, Christopher G.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Santen, Richard J.; Ingle, James N.

    2010-01-01

    Mammographic breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. Unfortunately, the biologic basis underlying this association is unknown. This study compared aromatase expression or immunoreactivity (IR) in core biopsies from mammographically dense versus non-dense regions of the breast to examine whether estrogen synthesis in the breast is associated with mammographic breast density (MBD) and one possible mechanism through which it may influence breast cancer. Eligible pa...

  2. Dietary-induced increase in lactase activity and in immunoreactive lactase in adult rat jejunum.

    Goda, T; Bustamante, S; Thornburg, W; Koldovský, O

    1984-07-01

    Adult rats that had been fed on a low-starch high-fat diet for 7 days were force-fed with either the same diet or isoenergetic diets containing 40% of energy as either sucrose or lactose. Within 12h, the increase in jejunal lactase activity in sucrose- and lactose-fed rats was accompanied by a corresponding increase in immunoreactive lactase protein. PMID:6431971

  3. Nerve growth factor receptor immunoreactivity in the new world monkey (Cebus apella) and human cerebellum.

    Mufson, E J; Higgins, G A; Kordower, J H

    1991-06-22

    The present study used the NGFR-5 monoclonal antibody raised against human nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) to determine the extent of NGFR immunoreactivity within the embryonic and young adult Cebus apella cerebellum as well as the human cerebellum. Immunohistochemically processed tissue revealed NGFR expressing Purkinje cell somata, axons, and dendrites, the latter being observed within the molecular layer of both adult species. Within all regions of the cerebellum we observed both darkly and lightly immunostained Purkinje cells. The proximal axons of these cells, which were visualized for short distances within the granular cell layer, appeared to contain bulbous aggregates of reaction product. In sagittal sections, the full extent of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree was observed in the more lightly stained portions of the cerebellum. In situ hybridization experiments revealed NGFR mRNA within Purkinje cells in a pattern similar to that seen with immunohistochemistry. The distribution of NGFR immunoreactivity within the cerebellum exhibits a general topographic organization with the heaviest and most consistent staining occurring within the archi- and neocerebellum and weaker staining within the paleocerebellum. In fetal Cebus monkey cerebellum obtained at gestational day 50 and 70, NGFR immunoreactivity was observed as a band composed of developing Purkinje cell neurites. These profiles were seen in the paleo- and neocerebellum, but not the archicerebellum. The present investigation is the first demonstration of NGFR immunoreactive profiles in the adult monkey and human cerebellum. These findings suggest that nerve growth factor may influence locomotor and vestibular behaviors that are mediated by cerebellar circuity. The precise mode of action for the NGF/NGFR system within the cerebellum remains to be determined. PMID:1650799

  4. Preparation and post-labelling immunoreactivity of anti-human lung cancer monoclonal antibodies

    Anti-human lung cancer monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were prepared using hybridoma technology. Two McAbs, 2E3 and 6D1, were radioiodinated with Iodogen method and the post-labelling immunoreactivity was evaluated with in vitro cell binding assay. The binding ratios of McAb 2E3 and 6D1 with lung cancer cells were 31.99% and 35.81% respectively. Two important parameters of radioiodinated McAbs, affinity constant and immunoreactive fraction, were calculated. The affinity constants of McAb 2E3 and 6D1 were 4.95 x 109L/mol and 4.23 x 109L/mol respectively and immunoreactive fractions 0.52 and 0.49 respectively. Radioimmunoimaging was performed in nude mice bearing a huamn lung cancer xenograft and 131I-McAb 2E3 and 6D1 can be localized in the xenografts. The results suggest that McAb 2E3 and 6D1 can react specifically with lung cancer cells and will be useful for guiding diagnosis and therapy of lung cancer

  5. Effect of electron beam irradiation on immunoreactivity and biochemical properties of peanut allergens

    The effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on allergenicity and biochemical properties of peanut protein were investigated in this study. Peanut protein extracts solution and defatted powder were irradiated at the dose of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 15 and 20 kGy. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis was used to observe the change of molecular weight. Changes in allergenicity of irradiated peanut major allergen (Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3) were analyzed by immunoblotting and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA). The changes of concentration, turbidity and hydrophobicity of the irradiated protein solution were determined by UV and fluorescence spectrophotometer. Results showed that allergen solution was more sensitive to irradiation than allergen in solid state. When the irradiated dose was lower than 10 kGy, the immunoreactivity of allergen solution became little stronger; and when the dose higher than 10 kGy, the immunoreactivity was reduced. The IC50 was 11 times than the control, after irradiation at the dose of 20 kGy. The concentration and turbidity of the allergen solution increased with the increasing of irradiation dose. Hydrophobicity first went up with increasing irradiation and then decreased when the irradiation dose was above 15 kGy. The biochemical properties of peanut allergen were altered and immunoreactivity was reduced by EB irradiation, the effect of electron beam irradiation on peanut allergen in solid state was more significant. (authors)

  6. Heterogeneity of human plasma insulin: techniques for separating immunoreactive components and their determination by radioimmunoassay

    When human plasma is filtered on Sephadex G-SO fine, insulin immunoreactivity is recovered in two peaks: 'big insulin', the higher molecular weight component and 'little insulin', the lower molecular component, having elution volumes that correspond to those of porcine proinsulin 125I and porcine insulin 125I respectively. The presence of another form of immunoreactive insulin 'big big insulin' was detected from an insuloma suspect and its elution pattern corresponding to serum albumin. The eluates correspondent to 'big' and 'little' insulin as well as 'big big' component were assayed by radioimmunoassay using crystalline human insulin as a standard, porcine insulin 125 tracer and anti insulin serum. The antibody, raised in guinea-pigs, was sensitive and potent being adequate for the assay. The reactivity of insulin and proinsulin was tested against the antibody. The relative proportions of several components of total immunoreactive insulin in plasma were studied in basal conditions in five normal subjects and in the patient JSC with pancreatic insulin-secreting tumor as well as after glucose stimuli in all tolbutamide in JSC. (author)

  7. Evaluation of residual immunoreactivity in red and white wines clarified with gluten or gluten derivatives.

    Cattaneo, A; Ballabio, C; Bertelli, A A E; Fiocchi, A; Galli, C L; Isoardi, P; Terracciano, L; Restani, P

    2003-01-01

    Gluten or hydrolyzed gluten could be a suitable alternative to animal proteins in the wine clarification process, but their residues could represent a risk for individuals suffering from coeliac disease or allergic to cereal proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of gluten in wines treated with gluten or its hydrolysate in the clarification process and to assess its antigenicity in commercial products. The presence of residual immunoreactive gluten was evaluated by electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting. Data obtained in several red and white wine samples showed that no residue was detectable in any of the red wines. In white wines, gluten reduced the protein content less completely, but most samples showed no immunoreactivity after the wine had been treated with gluten or its derivatives, either alone or combined with bentonite, silica gel or tannins. The use of gluten derivatives coupled with bentonite was the most effective method of removing immunoreactive protein in white wines. In conclusion, the use of gluten derivatives in wine clarification seems to exclude a risk for subjects susceptible to coeliac disease or gluten allergy. However, it is recommended that wine producers continuously monitor the clarification process in order to protect the most sensitive individuals. PMID:14518594

  8. Tracheal cryopreservation: caspase-3 immunoreactivity in tracheal epithelium and in mixed glands

    A. Sotres-Vega

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation has an immunomodulating effect on tracheal tissue as a result of class II antigen depletion due to epithelium exfoliation. However, not all epithelium is detached. We evaluated the role of apoptosis in the remaining epithelium of 30 cryopreserved tracheal grafts. Caspase-3 immunoreactivity of tracheal epithelium was studied in canine tracheal segments cryopreserved with F12K medium, with or without subsequent storage in liquid nitrogen at -196°C for 15 days. Loss of structural integrity of tracheal mixed glands was observed in all cryopreserved tracheal segments. Caspase-3 immunoreactivity in tracheal mucosa and in mixed glands was significantly decreased, in contrast to the control group and to cryopreserved tracheal segments in which it remained high, due to the effect of storage in liquid nitrogen (P < 0.05, ANOVA and Tukey test. We conclude that apoptosis can be triggered in epithelial cells during tracheal graft harvesting even prior to cryopreservation, and although the epithelial caspase-3 immunoreactivity is reduced in tracheal cryopreservation, this could be explained by increased cell death. Apoptosis cannot be stopped during tracheal cryopreservation.

  9. Effect of Lamaze childbirth preparation on maternal plasma beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in active labor.

    Delke, I; Minkoff, H; Grunebaum, A

    1985-10-01

    Previous studies have documented a reduction in plasma beta-endorphin levels with the use of various analgesic techniques in labor, such as segmental epidural anesthesia or intrathecal morphine. The Lamaze method of childbirth preparation, which has been found to reduce the need for medication during childbirth and to decrease the subjective perception of pain during labor and delivery, has not been studied in this regard. In this study plasma beta-endorphin immunoreactivity levels were measured during the active phase of labor in 26 patients who had Lamaze classes and in 28 patients who did not have Lamaze classes. The Lamaze group had significantly lower plasma beta-endorphin immunoreactivity (37.2 vs. 68.5 pg/ml; P less than 0.001) and significantly shorter first stages of labor (8.28 hrs. vs. 9.86 hrs; P less than 0.02). It can be theorized that both lower beta-endorphin immunoreactivity and shorter labor in patients in the Lamaze group were related to the reduction of fear, tension, and the emotional stress of labor. PMID:2932121

  10. Sperm abnormalities in exposed humans

    Šrám, Radim; Rubeš, J.

    Cambridge : Issue in Toxicology, Royal Society of Chemistry Publ.,, 2007, s. 247-258. ISBN 978-0-85404-847-2 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/740/5/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : air pollution exposure * sperm abnormalities * male reproductive health Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality

  11. FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of the cephalopod mollusc, Idiosepius notoides

    Wollesen, Tim; Loesel, R; Wanninger, Andreas Wilhelm Georg

    ) of cephalopods with respect to their neurotransmitter phenotypes. This study presents preliminary results on the distribution of FMRFamide-like immunoreactive neurons within the CNS of the pygmy squid Idiosepius notoides . Its gross neuroanatomy resembles that of other cephalopods. FMRFamide...

  12. Apoptosis, cell proliferation and serotonin immunoreactivity in gut of Liza aurata from natural heavy metal polluted environments: preliminary observations

    S Ferrando

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the effect of natural environment nonlethal heavy metal concentration on cell renewal of Liza aurata intestinal epithelium, was studied by the TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling method and anti-PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry, in order to detect, respectively, apoptosis and cell proliferation. In addition, the presence and distribution of the cell renewal regulator, serotonin, was immunohistochemically investigated. In order to reduce variability, only immature specimens were considered. The results indicated that in the control specimens from non-polluted areas, the PCNA immunoreactive nuclei of the proximal intestinal epithelium were only located at the bottom of the intestinal folds, together with a few TUNEL-positive nuclei, and goblet mucous differentiated cells. In the specimens from polluted areas, the number of PCNA immunoreactive cells was greatly enhanced, and they extended along the mid portion of the intestinal folds; the number of TUNEL-positive nuclei was enhanced as well, but they were almost exclusively detected in the third apical portion of the intestinal folds. Serotonin immunoreactive nerve elements were more frequently detected in the intestinal wall of L. aurata specimens from polluted areas, and besides that, some serotonin immunoreactive endocrine cells were also present. Variations in distribution and frequency of TUNEL-positive nuclei, PCNA immunoreactive nuclei, and serotonin immunoreactivity put in evidence an alteration of cell renewal with an enhancement of cell proliferation, probably leading to morphological intestinal fold changes.

  13. Role of neuropsin in parvalbumin immunoreactivity changes in hippocampal basket terminals of mice reared in various environments

    Yoko Kogure

    2014-12-01

    PV-immunoreactive fibers surrounding hippocampal pyramidal and granular neurons in mice reared in their home cage were decreased in neuropsin-deficient mice, suggesting that neuropsin controls PV immunoreactivity. One- or two-week exposures of wild mice to novel environments, in which they could behave freely and run voluntarily in a wheel resulted in a marked upregulation of both neuropsin mRNA and protein in the hippocampus. To elucidate the functional relevance of the increase in neuropsin during exposure to a rich environment, the intensities of PV-immunoreactive fibers were compared between neuropsin-deficient and wild-type mice under environmental stimuli. When mice were transferred into novel cages (large cages with toys, the intensity of PV-immunoreactive fibers increased in wild-type mice and neuropsin-deficient mice. Therefore, behavioral stimuli control a neuropsin-independent form of PV immunoreactivity. However, the neuropsin-dependent part of the change in PV-immunoreactive fibers may occur in the stimulated hippocampus because increased levels of neuropsin continued during these enriched conditions.

  14. Echocardiographic abnormalities in hypertensive patients

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in 120 hypertensive patients with a course of 5 or more years, who went to the emergency room of 'Saturnino Lora' Provincial Teaching Hospital from November 2010 to November 2011 in order to determine the presence or absence of echocardiographic abnormalities typical of hypertension. Of these, 78,3 % was affected, most of whom reported not to continue with regular previous medical treatment, and 21,7 % had not these abnormalities. Age group of 50-60 years, males and blacks prevailed in the case material. The most significant echocardiographic findings were left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure with ejection fraction of left ventricle preserved

  15. Immune abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Economopoulos, T.; Economidou, J.; Giannopoulos, G; Terzoglou, C; Papageorgiou, E; Dervenoulas, J.; Arseni, P; Hadjioannou, J.; Raptis, S.

    1985-01-01

    The immune states of 52 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes classified according to the FAB criteria were studied. Serum electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis, direct Coombs test, and tests for organ and non-organ specific antibodies were performed. Twenty six patients had immunoglobulin abnormalities: six (11.5%) had monoclonal gammopathy; 17 (32.6%) had polyclonal increases in serum immunoglobulin; while in three (5.8%) immunoglobulin concentrations were decreased. The distribution ...

  16. Computed tomography abnormalities in hanging

    The CT pattern of bilateral and symmetrical round low density areas in the globi pallidi has been observed in a young man who attempted suicide by hanging. These CT abnormalities are similar to those described in other conditions such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, cyanide and methanol poisoning, hypoglycaemia, drowning and acute global central nervous system hypoperfusion.The findings appear to be correlated with acute cerebral hypoxia. (orig.)

  17. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development. (orig.)

  18. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  19. Sensorial abnormalities: Smell and taste

    Palheta Neto, Francisco Xavier; Targino, Mauricio Neres; Peixoto, Victor Soares; Alcântara, Flávia Barata; Jesus, Camila Corrêa de; Araújo, Dalila Costa de; Marçal Filho, Eduardo Flávio de Lacerda

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Taste and smell abnormalities have proven to be an extremely more complex subject than previously regarded. Wide-ranging nosologic entities arise along with smell and taste alterations, and they can be congenital or acquired. Objective: Analyze the main features of smell and taste dysfunctions. Method: Automated databases were used to collect data, by searching keywords like 'alteration', 'smell', and 'taste'. A non-systematic search was also made in scientific printings and med...

  20. Imaging of pediatric mesenteric abnormalities

    The relative paucity of mesenteric fat seen in the pediatric population can make detection and localization of processes in the mesentery difficult. This pictorial essay reviews pediatric mesenteric disorders and presents criteria that help localize processes to the mesentery. Disorders are categorized by specific patterns of involvement, which can readily be identified by imaging: developmental abnormalities of mesenteric rotation, diffuse mesenteric processes, focal mesenteric masses, and multifocal mesenteric masses. (orig.)

  1. Special report on abnormal climate in 2010

    This reports on abnormal climate in 2010 with impact on the each field. It is comprised of four chapters, which deal with Introduction with purpose of publish and background, current situation and cause of abnormal climate in 2010 on abnormal climate around the world and Korea, Action and impact against abnormal climate in 2010 to agriculture, industry and energy, prevention of disasters, forest, fishery products, environment and health, Evaluation and policy proposal. It also has an appendix about occurrence and damage on abnormal climate of the world in 2010 and media reports on abnormal climate in Korea in 2010.

  2. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutant vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein-B transgenic mice develop TAR-DNA-binding protein-43 pathology.

    Tudor, E L

    2010-05-19

    Cytoplasmic ubiquitin-positive inclusions containing TAR-DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) within motor neurons are the hallmark pathology of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). TDP-43 is a nuclear protein and the mechanisms by which it becomes mislocalized and aggregated in ALS are not properly understood. A mutation in the vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein-B (VAPB) involving a proline to serine substitution at position 56 (VAPBP56S) is the cause of familial ALS type-8. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which VAPBP56S induces disease, we created transgenic mice that express either wild-type VAPB (VAPBwt) or VAPBP56S in the nervous system. Analyses of both sets of mice revealed no overt motor phenotype nor alterations in survival. However, VAPBP56S but not VAPBwt transgenic mice develop cytoplasmic TDP-43 accumulations within spinal cord motor neurons that were first detected at 18 months of age. Our results suggest a link between abnormal VAPBP56S function and TDP-43 mislocalization.

  3. Correlation between Ocular Demodex Infestation and Serum Immunoreactivity to Bacillus Proteins in Patients with Facial Rosacea

    Li, Jianjing; O'Reilly, Niamh; Sheha, Hosam; Katz, Raananah; Raju, Vadrevu K.; Kavanagh, Kevin; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate correlation between ocular Demodex infestation and serum. Design A prospective study to correlate clinical findings with laboratory data. Participants We consecutively enrolled 59 patients: 34 men and 25 women with a mean age of 60.4±17.6 years (range, 17–93). Methods Demodex counting was performed based on lash sampling. Serum immunoreactivity to two 62-kDa and 83-kDa proteins derived from B oleronius was determined by Western blot analysis. Facial rosacea, lid margin, and ocular surface inflammation were documented by photography and graded in a masked fashion. Main Outcome Measures Statistical significance based on correlative analyses of clinical and laboratory data. Results These 59 patients were age matched, but not gender matched, regarding serum immunoreactivity, ocular Demodex infestation, or facial rosacea. There was a significant correlation between serum immunoreactivity and facial rosacea (P = 0.009), lid margin inflammation (P = 0.040), and ocular Demodex infestation (P = 0.048), but not inferior bulbar conjunctival inflammation (P = 0.573). The Demodex count was significantly higher in patients with positive facial rosacea (6.6±9.0 vs. 1.9±2.2; P = 0.014). There was a significant correlation of facial rosacea with lid margin inflammation (P = 0.016), but not with inferior bulbar conjunctival inflammation (P = 0.728). Ocular Demodex infestation was less prevalent in patients with aqueous tear-deficiency dry eye than those without (7/38 vs. 12/21; P = 0.002). Conclusions The strong correlation provides a better understanding of comorbidity between Demodex mites and their symbiotic B oleronius in facial rosacea and blepharitis. Treatments directed to both warrant future investigation. PMID:20079929

  4. Localization of neuropeptide-Y immunoreactivity in estradiol-concentrating cells in the hypothalamus

    Considerable evidence shows that gonadal steroids exert a facilitatory influence on levels and release of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) from the hypothalamus. However, it is not known whether gonadal steroids act directly on NPY-producing cells in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus to produce these facilitatory effects on NPY or whether they act on other cells that have a modulatory influence via synapses on ARC NPY cells. We applied the combined method of steroid autoradiography and immunocytochemistry to assess the localization of [3H]estradiol in relation to NPY-producing cells in the hypothalamus. Rats (n = 6) were bilaterally ovariectomized and injected intracerebroventricularly with colchicine. Twenty-four hours later each rat received an iv injection of 17 beta-[2,4,6,7,16,17(-3)H]estradiol (SA, 166 Ci/mmol) at a dose of 5.0 micrograms/kg BW. One hour after the injection of [3H]estradiol, the rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde; brains were removed, frozen in isopentane precooled in liquid nitrogen (-190 C), sectioned, and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were then incubated with specific antibodies for NPY immunostaining by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. The results revealed NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and cerebral cortex and a few cells in the median eminence. NPY-immunoreactive fibers were also detected in the internal layer of the median eminence. The largest number of neurons showing NPY immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm was detected in the ARC, and only in this nucleus did we observed colocalization of [3H]estradiol and NPY immunoreactivity in neurons. A population of NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC (10-20%) exhibited nuclear [3H]estradiol; the majority of these cells were located in the lateral and ventral portions of the ARC

  5. Substance P- and choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivities in somatostatin-containing, human submucosal neurons.

    Beyer, Jakob; Jabari, Samir; Rau, Tilman T; Neuhuber, Winfried; Brehmer, Axel

    2013-08-01

    The submucous layers of human small and large intestines contain at least two separate neuron populations. Besides morphological features, they differ in their immunoreactivities for calretinin (CALR) and somatostatin (SOM), respectively. In this study, submucosal wholemounts of 23 patients or body donors (including all segments of small intestine and colon) were immunohistochemically quadruple stained for CALR and SOM as well as for substance P (SP) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). We found that all SOM-positive neurons co-stained for ChAT and the majority for SP [between 50% in the small intestinal external submucosal plexus (ESP) and 75% in the colonic ESP]. In contrast, a majority of CALR-neurons contained ChAT (between 77% in the small intestinal ESP and 92% in the large intestinal ESP) whereas less than 4% of CALR-neurons were co-immunoreactive for SP. Another set of wholemounts was co-stained for peripherin, a marker enabling morphological analysis. Where identifiable, both SOM alone- and SOM/SP-neurons displayed a uniaxonal (supposed pseudouniaxonal) morphology. We suggest that the chemical code of SOM-immunoreactive, human submucosal neurons may be "ChAT+/SOM+/SP±". In additional sections double stained for SOM and SP, we regularly found double-labelled nerve fibres only in the mucosa. In contrast, around submucosal arteries mostly SOM alone- fibres were found and the muscularis propria contained numerous SP-alone fibres. We conclude that the main target of submucosal SOM(/SP)-neurons may be the mucosa. Due to their morpho-chemical similarity to human myenteric type II neurons, we further suggest that one function of human submucosal SOM-neurons may be a primary afferent one. PMID:23361835

  6. Localization of neuropeptide-Y immunoreactivity in estradiol-concentrating cells in the hypothalamus

    Sar, M.; Sahu, A.; Crowley, W.R.; Kalra, S.P. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Considerable evidence shows that gonadal steroids exert a facilitatory influence on levels and release of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) from the hypothalamus. However, it is not known whether gonadal steroids act directly on NPY-producing cells in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus to produce these facilitatory effects on NPY or whether they act on other cells that have a modulatory influence via synapses on ARC NPY cells. We applied the combined method of steroid autoradiography and immunocytochemistry to assess the localization of (3H)estradiol in relation to NPY-producing cells in the hypothalamus. Rats (n = 6) were bilaterally ovariectomized and injected intracerebroventricularly with colchicine. Twenty-four hours later each rat received an iv injection of 17 beta-(2,4,6,7,16,17(-3)H)estradiol (SA, 166 Ci/mmol) at a dose of 5.0 micrograms/kg BW. One hour after the injection of (3H)estradiol, the rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde; brains were removed, frozen in isopentane precooled in liquid nitrogen (-190 C), sectioned, and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were then incubated with specific antibodies for NPY immunostaining by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. The results revealed NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and cerebral cortex and a few cells in the median eminence. NPY-immunoreactive fibers were also detected in the internal layer of the median eminence. The largest number of neurons showing NPY immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm was detected in the ARC, and only in this nucleus did we observed colocalization of (3H)estradiol and NPY immunoreactivity in neurons. A population of NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC (10-20%) exhibited nuclear (3H)estradiol; the majority of these cells were located in the lateral and ventral portions of the ARC.

  7. The Spectrum of Hormone Immunoreactivity in Typical and Atypical Pituitary Adenomas

    Yeşim ERTAN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to assess the spectrum of hormone immunoreactivity in our pituitary adenoma cases and discuss the diagnostic parameters of atypical pituitary adenomas.Material and Methods: A total of 166 pituitary adenoma cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2008 in our department were included in the present study. Hematoxylin-eosin stained and immunohistochemistry performed slides (ACTH, PRL, GH, TSH, FSH, LH, Ki-67, and p53 were evaluated. Cases having more than two mitoses on 10 high power fields besides more than 3% Ki-67 index were accepted in the atypical group.Results: Histologically, 159 cases were typical pituitary adenoma and 7 were atypical pituitary adenoma. Of the atypical pituitary adenoma cases, one case was ACTH, one GH and one both GH and prolactin hormone immunoreactive pituitary adenomas. Four cases were hormone immunonegative adenomas. Of the typical pituitary adenoma cases, 39 cases were GH, 19 ACTH, 17 prolactin, 10 FSH, 8 LH and one TSH immunreactive pituitary adenomas. Fourty-seven cases were hormone immunonegative adenomas.Twenty-two of the all pitutary adenoma cases had recurrence. Of these cases, 18 were typical adenoma and four were atypical adenoma.Conclusion: The ratio of prolactin immunoreactive pituitary adenoma cases in the surgical material of neuropathology is decreasing due to medical therapy. Atypical pituitary adenomas are not the sole factor affecting the recurrence mechanism but these tumors have higher recurrence rate compared with typical pituitary adenomas and we think the proliferation index might be the principal approach in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  8. Serum antibody immunoreactivity to equine zona protein after SpayVac vaccination.

    Mask, Tracy A; Schoenecker, Kathryn A; Kane, Albert J; Ransom, Jason I; Bruemmer, Jason E

    2015-07-15

    Immunocontraception with porcine ZP (pZP) can be an effective means of fertility control in feral horses. Previous studies suggest that antibodies produced after pZP vaccination may both inhibit fertilization and cause follicular dysgenesis. Zonastat-H, PZP-22, and SpayVac are three pZP vaccines proposed for use in horses. Although all these vaccines contain the pZP antigen, variations in antigen preparation and vaccine formulation lead to differences in antigenic properties among them. Likewise, despite numerous efficacy and safety studies of Zonastat-H and PZP-22, the contraceptive mechanisms of SpayVac remain unclear. The preparation of pZP for SpayVac is thought to include more nonzona proteins, making it less pure than the other two vaccines. This may result in increased antigenicity of the vaccine. We therefore investigated the immunoreactivity of serum antibodies from SpayVac-vaccinated mares to equine zona protein. Western blot analyses revealed an immunoreactivity of these antibodies to protein isolated from mature equine oocytes, ZP, follicular tissues, and ovarian tissues. Immunohistochemical analyses were used to locate the binding of serum antibodies to the ZP of immature oocytes in ovarian stromal tissue. We also found serum antibodies from SpayVac-treated mares to be predominantly specific for zona protein 3. Collectively, our results suggest a model where serum antibodies produced in response to SpayVac vaccination are immunoreactive to equine zona protein in vitro. Our study lends insight into the contraceptive mechanisms underlying the infertility observed after SpayVac vaccination. PMID:25922172

  9. Rapid radioimmunoassay for human immunoreactive pancreatic phospholipase A2 and its normal values

    A rapid radioimmunoassay was developed for measuring immunoreactive pancreatic phospholipase A2 (IR-P-PLA2) in human sera. All analytic procedures could be accomplished within 3 hours. The assay was shown to be reproducible, sensitive and specific. The IR-P-PLA2 values were 7.39 ± 2.86 ng/ml in 111 healthy subjects. In the patients with chronic renal failure, the IR-P-PLA2 contents were significantly higher and did not decrease by blood dialysis

  10. Correlation between Ocular Demodex Infestation and Serum Immunoreactivity to Bacillus Proteins in Patients with Facial Rosacea

    Li, Jianjing; O'Reilly, Niamh; Sheha, Hosam; Katz, Raananah; Raju, Vadrevu K.; Kavanagh, Kevin; Scheffer, C. G. Tseng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose—To investigate correlation between ocular Demodex infestation and serum. Design—A prospective study to correlate clinical findings with laboratory data. Participants—We consecutively enrolled 59 patients: 34 men and 25 women with a mean age of 60.4±17.6 years (range, 17–93). Methods—Demodex counting was performed based on lash sampling. Serum immunoreactivity to two 62-kDa and 83-kDa proteins derived from B oleronius was determined by Western blot analysis. Facial ro...

  11. Variation in macrophage migration inhibitory factor [MIF] immunoreactivity during bovine gestation

    Paulesu, L.; Pfarrer, C.; Romagnoli, R.; Ietta, F.; Callesen, Henrik; Hambruch, N.; Dantzer, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    hemochorial human and mouse placentae. Here we studied the bovine placenta being multiplex, villous and synepitheliochorial with a low degree of invasion, to see if MIF could be involved. Placental tissues sampled from 12 cows at 9 stages of gestation (days 18-250), and endometrial tissues from two non......-pregnant animals were processed for immunohistochemistry. Bovine MIF was detected by Western blot using anti-human MIF monoclonal antibodies. An immunoreactive band of approximately 12kDa confirmed similarities between bovine and human MIFs. Compared to the non-pregnant stage with very faint staining, the...

  12. The presence and molecular forms of cardiodilatin immunoreactivity in the human and rat right atrium

    Meleagros, L.; Ghatei, M.A.; Anderson, J V; WHARTON, J.; Taylor, K. M.; Meijler, F.L.; Polak, J M; Bloom, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay has been developed for cardiodilatin; the N-terminal peptide sequence of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) prohormone. Cardiodilatin-immunoreactivity (-IR) concentrations in the human right atrial appendage were found to correlate with ANP-IR concentrations, determined by an established radioimmunoassay, (cardiodilatin-IR = 13.2 ± 1.2 nmol/g, ANP-IR = 19.8 ± 2.0 nmol/g, r = 0.80, p < 0.001). Characterisation of the cardiodilatin-IR ...

  13. ?-endorphin-like and ?-MSH-like immunoreactivities in human milk

    We measured with radioimmunoassay the ?-endorphin-like and ?-MSH-like immunoreactivities in milk and plasma of 8 lactating women. Mean ?-endorphin concentrations (± SD) were 16.6 ± 6.7 fmol/ml in milk and 9.9 ± 4.1 fmol/ml in plasma. ?-MSH concentrations were 39.4 ± 15.5 pg/ml in milk and 18.2 ± 8.4 pg/ml in plasma. The concentrations of both peptides in milk were significantly higher than in plasma. No significant correlation between milk and plasma concentrations of these peptides was found

  14. Immunoreactive helix-destabilizing protein localized in transcriptionally active regions of Drosophila polytene chromosomes

    Patel, G. L.; Thompson, P.E

    1980-11-01

    A highly purified helix-destabilizing protein (HDP) obtained from rat liver has been used to elicit specific, high-titer anti-HDP sera in rabbits. These antisera show immunological crossreaction with single-stranded DNA binding proteins from several very diverse eukaryotic sources, including Drosophila embryos. The use of such antisera in the labeling of Drosophila salivary gland chromosomes buy indirect immunofluorescence shows concentrations of immunoreactive HDP in many regions, but especially in chromosome puffs. There is a striking localization of HDP in heat shock puffs known to be sites of new transcription. The pattern of HDP distribution seems to implicate a transcriptional role, with some specificities independent of puffing itself.

  15. Vasopressin-immunoreactive neurons and neurohemal systems in cockroaches and mantids.

    Davis, N T; Hildebrand, J G

    1992-06-15

    Vasopressin-like neuropeptides of insects are of special interest because of their possible function as hormones and neuromodulators. Therefore, this study was undertaken by using whole-mount immunofluorescent staining by two antisera that recognize different types of vasopressin-like immunoreactive groups of neurons in the cockroaches Periplaneta americana, Leucophaea maderae, Nauphoeta cinerea, Diploptera punctata, and Blaberus discoidalis and in the mantids Litaneuria minor and Tenodera aridifolia sinensis. Using an antiserum to Arg/vasopressin, only two cells, the paired ventral paramedian (PVP) neurons, were immunostained in the central nervous system (CNS) of the cockroaches. These cells are located in the subesophageal ganglion, project throughout the CNS, and appear to be neurosecretory. Their varicose collaterals extend into the dorsal (motor) neuropil of the segmental ganglia, and this neuropil may be the principal site of the release of their neurosecretion. The PVP neurons were also stained by an antiserum to Lys/vasopressin; in addition, this antiserum stained several other groups of neurons, most of which appeared to be neurosecretory. Two pairs of Lys/vasopressin-immunoreactive cells are similar to the PVP neurons in that they are located in the subesophageal ganglion, extend through the ventral nerve cord, have collaterals in the dorsal neuropil of the segmental ganglia, and appear to be neurosecretory within the CNS. In addition, midventral and anteroventral clusters of Lys/vasopressin-immunoreactive neurosecretory neurons in the subesophageal ganglion project neurohemal release sites on the corpora allata. Other types of Lys/vasopressin-immunoreactive neurons include median and lateral neurosecretory cells of the protocerebrum and neurosecretory cells in the tritocerebrum, all of which project to the corpora cardiaca. In the abdominal ganglia there are posterolateral clusters of Lys/vasopressin neurosecretory neurons, and these cells extend to neurohemal release sites on the transverse and lateral cardiac nerves. In mantids the anti-Arg/vasopressin and anti-Lys/vasopressin antisera stained most of the same groups of neurons that these antisera recognized in cockroaches. The results of this study suggest that there are two or more vasopressin-like peptides in cockroaches and mantids and that these peptides may be released either as hormones in the blood or as neurosecretions within the CNS. Their function(s) in these insects remains to be determined. PMID:1613132

  16. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  17. Transient abnormal Q waves during exercise electrocardiography

    Alameddine, F F; Zafari, A M

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial ischaemia during exercise electrocardiography is usually manifested by ST segment depression or elevation. Transient abnormal Q waves are rare, as Q waves indicate an old myocardial infarction. The case of a patient with exercise induced transient abnormal Q waves is reported. The potential mechanisms involved in the development of such an abnormality and its clinical implications are discussed.

  18. Hand images: normal and abnormal

    Supplemental hand scintigrams with abnormal features were obtained from 29% of patients (134 of 463) who were referred for routine, minified bone imaging with /sup 99m/Tc-Sn-polyphosphate. A wide spectrum of normal activity distribution ranging from well-defined to ''wash-out'' images is described in 329 cases (71%). In the abnormal images of the joints and individual bones, the changes, although not always characteristic of some particular disease, may often suggest a diagnosis and/or its pathophysiologic status. The joints with heavy uptake correlate well with the presence of active clinical findings, e.g., in the arthritides. The bone features associated with metabolic disease, especially when full-blown, may be fairly characteristic. A potential application is in the assessment of digital circulation, particularly in obliterative vascular diseases such as scleroderma, Buerger's disease, chronic neuropathies, and possibly other collagen or vascular diseases that involve the hands. Interesting images, probably of somewhat limited usefulness, are observed in some congenital anomalies, fractures, camptodactyly, contracture deformities, unilateral lymphedema after mastectomy, etc

  19. Operator training for the abnormal

    Training of nuclear power plant control room operators, on actions to be taken for an abnormal event, has classically been limited to discussion, on-shift and/or during requalification training classes, of symptoms, logical thought processes, systems analysis, and operator experience. The prerequisites for these discussions are a common technical vocabulary, and a minimum basic comprehension of nuclear power plant fundamentals, plant component theory of operation, system configuration, system control philosophy and operating procedures. Nuclear power plant control room operators are not the only personnel who are or should be involved in these discussions. The shift supervisors, operations management, and auxiliary equipment operators require continuing training in abnormal operations, as well. More in-depth training is necessary for shift supervisors and control room operators. The availability of vendor simulators has improved the effectiveness of training efforts for these individuals to some extent by displaying typical situations and plant performance characteristics and by providing a degree of ''hands on'' experience. The evolution of in-depth training with these simulators is reviewed

  20. Estrophilin immunoreactivity versus estrogen receptor binding activity in meningiomas: evidence for multiple estrogen binding sites

    The existence of estrogen receptors in human meningiomas has long been a controversial issue. This may be explained, in part, by apparent heterogeneity of estrogen binding sites in meningioma tissue. In this study, estrogen receptors were determined in 58 meningiomas with an enzyme immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies against human estrogen receptor protein (estrophilin) and with a sensitive radioligand binding assay using 125I-labeled estradiol (125I-estradiol) as radioligand. Low levels of estrophilin immunoreactivity were found in tumors from 62% of patients, whereas radioligand binding activity was demonstrated in about 46% of the meningiomas examined. In eight (14%) tissue samples multiple binding sites for estradiol were observed. The immunoreactive binding sites correspond to the classical, high affinity estrogen receptors: the Kd for 125I-estradiol binding to the receptor was approximately 0.2 nM and the binding was specific for estrogens. The second, low affinity class of binding sites considerably influenced measurement of the classical receptor even at low ligand concentrations. The epidemiological and clinical data from patients with meningiomas, and the existence of specific estrogen receptors confirmed by immunochemical detection, may be important factors in a theory of oncogenesis

  1. Depletion of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the rat central nervous system by cysteamine

    Selective neurotoxins have been of value in providing a means for specifically interfering with the actions of endogenous neurotransmitter candidates. Others have shown cysteamine (CSH) to deplete the gastrointestinal tract and hypothalamus of rats of immunoreactive somatostatin, suggesting a toxic action of that compound directed against somatostatin-containing cells. The present study further defines the actions of cysteamine on somatostatin in the central nervous system. (CNS). Cysteamine hydrochloride administered subcutaneously results in a depletion of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) in the retina, brain, and cervical spinal cord of rats. The effect is demonstrable at doses of 30 mg/kg of body weight and above, occurs within 2 to 4 hr of a single injection of the drug, and is largely reversible within 1 week. The mean depletion of SLI observed within the CNS varies from 38% in cerebral cortex to 65% in cervical spinal cord 24 hr following administration of CSH, 300 mg/kg of body weight, s.c. By gel permeation chromatography, all molecular weight forms of SLI are affected, with the largest reductions in those forms that co-chromatograph with synthetic somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28. These results indicate that CSH has a generalized, rapid, and largely reversible effect in depleting SLI from the rat CNS

  2. GABA and glutamate immunoreactivity in tentacles of the sea anemone Phymactis papillosa (LESSON 1830).

    Delgado, Luz M; Couve, Eduardo; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2010-07-01

    Sea anemones have a structurally simple nervous system that controls behaviors like feeding, locomotion, aggression, and defense. Specific chemical and tactile stimuli are transduced by ectodermal sensory cells and transmitted via a neural network to cnidocytes and epithelio-muscular cells, but the nature of the neurotransmitters operating in these processes is still under discussion. Previous studies demonstrated an important role of peptidergic transmission in cnidarians, but during the last decade the contribution of conventional neurotransmitters became increasingly evident. Here, we used immunohistochemistry on light and electron microscopical preparations to investigate the localization of glutamate and GABA in tentacle cross-sections of the sea anemone Phymactis papillosa. Our results demonstrate strong glutamate immunoreactivity in the nerve plexus, while GABA labeling was most prominent in the underlying epithelio-muscular layer. Immunoreactivity for both molecules was also found in glandular epithelial cells, and putative sensory cells were GABA positive. Under electron microscopy, both glutamate and GABA immunogold labeling was found in putative neural processes within the neural plexus. These data support a function of glutamate and GABA as signaling molecules in the nervous system of sea anemones. PMID:20309875

  3. Age-related changes of calbindin D-28k-immunoreactive neurons in the myenteric plexus of gerbil duodenum.

    Choi, Jung Hoon; Lee, Choong Hyun; Chung, Dae Won; Hwang, In Koo; Won, Moo Ho; Seong, Je Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Lee, In Se

    2008-04-01

    We examined the age-related changes of calbindin D-28k (CB)-immunoreactive neurons and overall populations of neurons in the myenteric plexus of gerbil duodenum using whole mount preparations and immunohistochemistry. The circumference of duodenum increased age-dependently. CB-immunoreactive neurons were observed in all groups, and most of them had the Dogiel type II morphology. The fully developed cobweb-like structures were observed in the myenteric plexus of duodenum at postnatal month (PM) 3 to 24. Although the highest numbers of CB-immunoreactive neurons and overall population were observed in PM 1.5, it is related with significant increase of the size of circumference between PM 1.5 to PM 3. CB-immunoreactive neurons were slightly decreased with age between PM 3 to PM 24. We have also found that whole numbers of myenteric neurons were also significantly decreased in PM 24 group. These results suggest that loss of overall numbers of myenteric neurons and CB-immunoreactive neurons may be related with age-related neurodegeneration and functional loss of duodenum in the gerbil. PMID:18460827

  4. Substance P-immunoreactivity in the dorsal medial region of the medulla in the cat: effects of nodosectomy.

    Baude, A; Lanoir, J; Vernier, P; Puizillout, J J

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of substance P in the vagal system of the cat was studied by immunohistochemistry. Substance P-immunoreactive cell bodies and fibres were observed in the nodose ganglion. Numerous substance P-immunoreactive terminals and fibres were localized in their bulbar projection area, i.e. throughout the caudo-rostral extent of the nucleus of the solitary tract. Four subnuclei, among the nine forming the nucleus of the solitary tract, were strongly labelled: interstitial, gelatinosus, dorsal and commissural. The dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve also exhibited numerous substance P-immunoreactive terminals, sometimes closely apposed on the somata of preganglionic neurons. To determine the substance P component of the vagal afferent system a nodose ganglion was removed on one side. The ablation triggered ipsilaterally a large decrease of substance P immunoreactivity in the four subnuclei strongly labelled on normal cats. These results suggest the involvement of substance P-containing vagal fibres in integrative processes of the central regulation of cardiovascular, digestive and respiratory systems, viscerotopically organized throughout these four subnuclei. The nodose ablation also resulted in a decrease of substance P immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, suggesting monosynaptic vago-vagal interactions. PMID:2481465

  5. Particle-assisted abnormal grain growth

    Holm, E. A.; Hoffmann, T. D.; Rollett, A. D.; Roberts, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    Abnormal grain growth is observed in systems that are nominally pinned by static particle dispersions. We used mesoscale simulations to examine grain growth in three-dimensional polycrystals containing stable, inert particles located at grain boundaries. In the absence of pinning particles, only normal grain growth occurs. When particles are present, some normal grain growth occurs, until a Zener-Smith pinned state is achieved. However, after a long incubation time, a few grains can thermally fluctuate away from their particle clouds and grow abnormally. The abnormal events are rare and stochastic. The abnormal grains are always among the largest initial grains, but most of the largest initial grains do not grow abnormally.

  6. Differentially Expressed and Secreted Major Immunoreactive Protein Orthologs of Ehrlichia canis and E. chaffeensis Elicit Early Antibody Responses to Epitopes on Glycosylated Tandem Repeats

    Doyle, C. Kuyler; Nethery, Kimberly A.; Popov, Vsevolod. L.; McBride, Jere W.

    2006-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis major immunoreactive proteins of 36 and 19 kDa elicit the earliest detectable antibody responses during the acute phase of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Genes encoding the major immunoreactive 36-kDa protein of E. canis and the corresponding ortholog of E. chaffeensis (47 kDa) were identified and the proteins characterized. The molecular masses of the strongly immunoreactive recombinant proteins were larger than predicted (26.7 and 32.9 kDa, respectively) but were consistent ...

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of ganglia in the rat stomach serosa, containing neurons immunoreactive for gastrin-releasing peptide and vasoactive intestinal peptide

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Holst, J J

    1987-01-01

    Ganglia, not previously described, were identified in the rat stomach serosa along the minor curvature. The ganglia consisted of varying number of cell bodies lying in clusters along or within nerve bundles. The ganglia were shown to contain GRP and VIP immunoreactive nerve fibers and cell bodies...... and also some NPY immunoreactive fibers, whereas they were devoid of somatostatin immunoreactivity. Nerve ligation experiments indicated that the ganglia are intrinsic to the stomach....

  8. Effect of simulated gastric and intestinal digestion on temporal stability and immunoreactivity of peanut, almond, and pine nut protein allergens.

    Toomer, Ondulla T; Do, Andrew; Pereira, Marion; Williams, Kristina

    2013-06-19

    Current models of digestibility utilize pepsin stability to assess the safety of allergenic versus nonallergenic food proteins. Dietary protein digestion in vivo, however, requires acid denaturation and protease cleavage by pepsin, trypsin, and/or chymotrypsin. The ability of this approach to identify food protein stability in the mammalian gut may be limited. We determined the temporal stability and immunoreactivity of almond, pine nut, and peanut allergenic proteins under simulated physiologic gastric and intestinal digestive conditions in vitro. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analyses were used to determine protein stability and immunoreactivity, respectively. Peanut, almond, and pine nut proteins were pepsin- and pancreatin-stable and immunoreactive for up to 1 h after initiation of digestion. Moreover, successive acid denaturation and pepsin and pancreatin cleavage were necessary to hydrolyze these allergenic proteins and reduce their IgG- and IgE-binding capacity, which suggests that digestibility models must be improved for more accurate safety assessment of food allergens. PMID:23742710

  9. Abnormal Returns and Contrarian Strategies

    Ivana Dall'Agnol

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis that strategies which are long on portfolios of looser stocks and short on portfolios of winner stocks generate abnormal returns in Brazil. This type of evidence for the US stock market was interpreted by The Bondt and Thaler (1985 as reflecting systematic evaluation mistakes caused by investors overreaction to news related to the firm performance. We found evidence of contrarian strategies profitability for horizons from 3 months to 3 years in a sample of stock returns from BOVESPA and SOMA from 1986 to 2000. The strategies are more profitable for shorter horizons. Therefore, there was no trace of the momentum effect found by Jagadeesh and Titman (1993 for the same horizons with US data. There are remaing unexplained positive returns for contrarian strategies after accounting for risk, size, and liquidity. We also found that the strategy profitability is reduced after the Real Plan, which suggests that the Brazilian stock market became more efficient after inflation stabilization.

  10. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child. PMID:25403900

  11. Host dopaminergic afferents affect the development of DARPP-32 immunoreactivity in transplanted embryonic striatal neurons.

    Defontaines, B; Peschanski, M; Onteniente, B

    1992-06-01

    Homotopic transplantation provides an interesting way to observe the relationships between developing cells and ingrowing host afferents. We have performed a complete and selective elimination of the mesostriatal dopaminergic system in adult rats to observe the influence of its absence on the development and chemical differentiation of embryonic striatal cells. Cell suspensions from striatal primordia of 14-15-day-old embryos were transplanted into host striata that were (i) neuron-depleted by kainic acid (control group) or (ii) deprived of dopamine by 6-hydroxydopamine prior to the neuronal depletion by kainic acid (experimental group). The expression of dopamine- and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) by transplanted cells was observed in correlation with their innervation by host dopaminergic afferents which in turn were identified by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. Observations were made between four days and three months after transplantation. Four days after transplantation, no immunoreactivity for DARPP-32 was observed in transplants of control animals despite the presence of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunopositive fibers growing from the host to discrete cell clusters in the transplant. DARPP-32-labeled cells appeared soon afterwards. Six days after transplantation they displayed varying intensities of immunoreaction, ranging from just detectable to normal levels and were specifically targeted by developing tyrosine hydroxylase-immunopositive fibers. The number of DARPP-32-labeled cells increased rapidly and they formed increasingly compact clusters. Fourteen days after transplantation and afterwards, all the DARPP-32-labeled cells displayed an intensity of immunoreaction and a distribution comparable to that observed in long-term transplants. Transplants in the experimental hosts displayed the same organization and developmental features as the control transplants with the exception of DARPP-32 labeling which was not detected before eight days after transplantation. Ten days after transplantation, the distribution and intensity of DARPP-32 labeling was similar to that observed at six days in the control group. The evolution of DARPP-32 labeling after 10 days in the experimental group paralleled that observed six days post-transplantation and beyond in the control group. Dopaminergic mesostriatal host afferents are able to provide developing cells in grafted striatal tissues with normal innervation very rapidly. Despite this rapidity, the innervation does not seem to have any trophic influence on the general development of the transplant but does affect the onset time of the expression of neurochemical markers that are directly related to its synaptic function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1352865

  12. Losses of immunoreactive parvalbumin amacrine and immunoreactive alphaprotein kinase C bipolar cells caused by methylmercury chloride intoxication in the retina of the tropical fish Hoplias malabaricus

    Bonci D.M.O.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To quantify the effects of methylmercury (MeHg on amacrine and on ON-bipolar cells in the retina, experiments were performed in MeHg-exposed groups of adult trahiras (Hoplias malabaricus at two dose levels (2 and 6 µg/g, ip. The retinas of test and control groups were processed by mouse anti-parvalbumin and rabbit anti-alphaprotein kinase C (alphaPKC immunocytochemistry. Morphology and soma location in the inner nuclear layer were used to identify immunoreactive parvalbumin (PV-IR and alphaPKC (alphaPKC-IR in wholemount preparations. Cell density, topography and isodensity maps were estimated using confocal images. PV-IR was detected in amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer and in displaced amacrine cells from the ganglion cell layer, and alphaPKC-IR was detected in ON-bipolar cells. The MeHg-treated group (6 µg/g showed significant reduction of the ON-bipolar alphaPKC-IR cell density (mean density = 1306 ± 393 cells/mm² compared to control (1886 ± 892 cells/mm²; P < 0.001. The mean densities found for amacrine PV-IR cells in MeHg-treated retinas were 1040 ± 56 cells/mm² (2 µg/g and 845 ± 82 cells/mm² (6 µg/g, also lower than control (1312 ± 31 cells/mm²; P < 0.05, differently from the data observed in displaced PV-IR amacrine cells. These results show that MeHg changed the PV-IR amacrine cell density in a dose-dependent way, and reduced the density of alphaKC-IR bipolar cells at the dose of 6 µg/g. Further studies are needed to identify the physiological impact of these findings on visual function.

  13. Immunoreactivity and Radioimmunoscintigraphy of 4-Lysine Single Chain (Fv) Lym-1 Antibody for the Radiometal Chelation

    Small size of recombinant scFv, composed of VH and VL region of IgG, has many advantages such as faster blood clearance, improved tumor localization and reduced human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response. On the other hand, owing to small size, number of amino group, which was not involved in binding site, of ScFv lym-1 was insufficient in conjugation with CITC-DTPA chelator for radio metal labeling. The goal of this study is to introduce 4-lysine tag to the end of ScFv lym-1 sequence for radio metal conjugation and to evaluate the immunoreactivity and radioimmunoscintigraphy of chelator conjugated 4-lysine taq scFv lym-1 (4-lys scFv)

  14. Reduction of immunoreactivity of bovine beta-lactoglobulin upon combined physical and proteolytic treatment

    Bonomi, F.; Fiocchi, A.; Frøkiær, Hanne; Gaiaschi, A.; Iametti, S.; Poiesi, C.; Rasmussen, P.; Restani, P.; Rovere, P.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine beta-lactoglobulin was hydrolyzed with trypsin or chymotrypsin before, during and after treatment at 600 MPa and pH 6.8 for 10 min at 30, 37 and 44degreesC. The extent of beta-lactoglobulin hydrolysis under pressure was noticeably higher than at atmospheric pressure, particularly when...... from those obtained at atmospheric pressure when chymotrypsin was used. The residual immunochemical reactivity of the products of combined pressure-enzyme treatment was assessed on the unresolved hydrolysates by ELISA tests using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and on individual hydrolytic...... fractions by Western Blotting using sera of paediatric patients allergic to whey proteins in cow milk. The immunoreactivity of the whole hydrolysates was related to their content of residual intact beta-lactoglobulin, and no immunochemical reactivity was found for all the products of chymotrypsin hydrolysis...

  15. Therapeutic drug monitoring of digoxin: impact of endogenous and exogenous digoxin-like immunoreactive substances.

    Dasgupta, Amitava

    2006-01-01

    Digoxin is a cardioactive drug with a narrow therapeutic range. Therapeutic drug monitoring is essential in clinical practice for efficacy as well as to avoid digoxin toxicity. Immunoassays are commonly used in clinical laboratories for determination of serum or plasma digoxin concentrations. Unfortunately, digoxin immunoassays are affected by both endogenous and exogenous compounds. Endogenous compounds are termed 'digoxin-like immunoreactive substances' (DLIS), which are found in elevated concentrations in volume-expanded patients. Exogenous compounds that interfere with digoxin assays are various drugs such as spironolactone, potassium canrenoate as well as Digibind (Fab fragment of antidigoxin antibody), which is used in treating life-threatening digoxin overdose. Moreover, various Chinese medicines such as Chan Su, Lu-Shen Wan and oleander-containing herbal preparations also interfere with serum digoxin measurements by immunoassays. Monitoring unbound (free) digoxin concentration may under certain circumstances eliminate such interferences. Clinicians should be aware of limitations of therapeutic drug monitoring of digoxin using immunoassays. PMID:17288498

  16. Cogeneration of retrogradely labeled corticocortical projection and GABA-immunoreactive local circuit neurons in cerebral cortex.

    Miller, M W

    1985-12-01

    The times of origin of cortico-cortical projection neurons and local circuit neurons in rat visual cortex were determined. The birthdates of the projection neurons were assessed using a technique that combined retrograde labeling with lectin-bound horseradish peroxidase and tritiated thymidine autoradiography. The birthdates of some cortical local circuit neurons were determined by combining GABA immunocytochemistry with [3H]thymidine autoradiography. Double-labeled neurons (those with retrograde or immunoreactive label in their perikarya and autoradiographic silver grains over their nuclei) were born during the third week of gestation. Projection and local circuit neurons born on gestational day 14, 15, 17, 19 or 20 were located primarily in layer VIb, VIa, V, III or II, respectively. Thus, both populations of neurons are generated by parallel and concurrent inside-to-outside patterns. PMID:3910166

  17. Immunoreactive transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    Therkildsen, M H; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Bretlau, P

    1993-01-01

    Forty oral squamous cell carcinomas have been investigated immunohistochemically for the presence of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). The same cases were recently characterized for the expression of EGF-receptors. TGF-alpha was detected with a...... monoclonal mouse antibody and EGF with polyclonal rabbit antiserum. Thirty-five of the tumours were positive for TGF-alpha and 26 of the tumours for EGF. None of the poorly differentiated tumours was positive for EGF, but they all were for TGF-alpha. In sections including normal differentiated oral mucosa......, the cells above the basal cell layer were positive for both TGF-alpha and EGF. The same staining pattern was observed in oral mucosa obtained from healthy persons. In moderately to well differentiated carcinomas, the immunoreactivity was mainly confined to the cytologically more differentiated cells...

  18. Prevalence of systemic immunoreactivity to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin in relation to the incidence of myocardial infarction

    Jansson Jan-Håkan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic infections and associated inflammatory markers are suggested risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. The proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL-1?, is suggested to play a role in the regulation of local inflammatory responses in both CVD and periodontitis. The leukotoxin from the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has recently been shown to cause abundant secretion of IL-1? from macrophages. The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of systemic immunoreactivity to A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin in myocardial infarction (MI cases (n = 532 and matched controls (n = 1,000 in a population-based case and referents study in northern Sweden. Methods Capacity to neutralize A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin was analyzed in a bioassay with leukocytes, purified leukotoxin, and plasma. Plasma samples that inhibited lactate-dehydrogenase release from leukotoxin-lysed cells by ?50% were classified as positive. Results Neutralizing capacity against A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin was detected in 53.3% of the plasma samples. The ability to neutralize leukotoxin was correlated to increasing age in men (n = 1,082 but not in women (n = 450. There was no correlation between presence of systemic leukotoxin-neutralization capacity and the incidence of MI, except for women (n = 146. Women with a low neutralizing capacity had a significantly higher incidence of MI than those who had a high neutralizing capacity. Conclusion Systemic immunoreactivity against A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin was found at a high prevalence in the analyzed population of adults from northern Sweden. The results from the present study do not support the hypothesis that systemic leukotoxin-neutralizing capacity can decrease the risk for MI.

  19. Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma with anaplastic features presenting without GFAP immunoreactivity: implications for differential diagnosis.

    Gelpi, Ellen; Popovic, Mara; Preusser, Matthias; Budka, Herbert; Hainfellner, Johannes

    2005-09-01

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) is an uncommon, usually low-grade, astrocytic tumor. Characteristic histological features include tumor cell pleomorphism and lipidization of tumor cells. Albeit prognosis in PXA is generally good, cases with histological signs of anaplasia have been observed. In these cases, the differential diagnosis needs to exclude other malignancies, for example, glioblastoma or malignant fibrous histiocytoma. Immunocytochemical detection of GFAP may support exclusion of non-glial neoplasms resembling PXA. However, GFAP expression in PXA may be faint or focal, although complete lack of GFAP has not been described. A 43-year-old woman was operated on for a left occipital parasagital tumor attached to the dura. Histopathology showed a pleomorphic tumor with moderate mitotic activity and necrosis, lack of GFAP immunoreactivity and ultrastructural detection of premelanosome-like structures. These features led to the tentative diagnosis of amelanotic melanoma, and the patient was irradiated. Three years later she had local tumor recurrence and underwent another operation. The recurrent tumor showed similar plain histology as the first specimen. In contrast, anti-GFAP immunoreactivity was now detectable in pleomorphic tumor cells. Anti-GFAP staining of the first biopsy was repeated using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in combination with prolonged tissue pretreatment. Focal GFAP staining of tumor cells was now achieved. We conclude that non-standard GFAP staining protocols may enhance sensitivity and thus lead to detection of a low level of GFAP expression in tumor specimens, in which PXA is considered in the differential diagnosis. This may avoid misleading diagnostic considerations that impact on postoperative patient management. PMID:16193842

  20. Comparative Mapping of GABA-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Buccal Ganglia of Nudipleura Molluscs.

    Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2016-04-15

    Phylogenetic comparisons of neurotransmitter distribution are important for understanding the ground plan organization of nervous systems. This study describes the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-immunoreactive (GABA-ir) neurons in the buccal ganglia of six sea slug species (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Euthyneura, Nudipleura). In the nudibranch species, Hermissenda crassicornis, Tritonia diomedea, Tochuina tetraquetra, and Dendronotus iris, the number of GABA-ir neurons was highly consistent. Another nudibranch, Melibe leonina, however, contained approximately half the number of GABA-ir neurons. This may relate to its loss of a radula and its unique feeding behavior. The GABA immunoreactivity in a sister group to the nudibranchs, Pleurobranchaea californica, differed drastically from that of the nudibranchs. Not only did it have significantly more GABA-ir neurons but it also had a unique GABA distribution pattern. Furthermore, unlike the nudibranchs, the Pleurobranchaea GABA distribution was also different from that of other, more distantly related, euopisthobranch and panpulmonate snails and slugs. This suggests that the Pleurobranchaea GABA distribution may be a derived feature, unique to this lineage. The majority of GABA-ir axons and neuropil in the Nudipleura were restricted to the buccal ganglia, commissures, and connectives. However, in Tritonia and Pleurobranchaea, we detected a few GABA-ir fibers in buccal nerves that innervate feeding muscles. Although the specific functions of the GABA-ir neurons in the species in this study are not known, the innervation pattern suggests these neurons may play an integrative or regulatory role in bilaterally coordinated behaviors in the Nudipleura. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1181-1192, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26355705

  1. Beta-endorphin immunoreactivity during high-intensity exercise with and without opiate blockade.

    Angelopoulos, T J

    2001-11-01

    Nine highly fit men [mean (SE) maximum oxygen uptake, VO2max: 63.9 (1.7) ml x kg(-1) x min(-1); age 27.6 (1.6) years] were studied during two treadmill exercise trials to determine plasma beta-endorphin immunoreactivity during intense exercise (80% VO2max). A double-blind experimental design was used, and subjects performed the two exercise trials in counterbalanced order. Exercise trials were 30 min in duration and were conducted 7 days apart. One exercise trial was undertaken following administration of naloxone (1.2 3 cm3) and the other after receiving a placebo (0.9% NaCl saline; 3 cm3). Prior to each experimental trial, a flexible catheter was placed into an antecubital vein and baseline blood samples were collected. Thereafter, each subject received either a naloxone or placebo bolus injection. Blood samples were also collected after 10, 20 and 30 min of continuous exercise. beta-Endorphin was higher (P exercise when compared to pre-exercise in both trials. However, no statistically significant difference was found (P> 0.05) between exercise time points within either experimental trial. beta-endorphin immunoreactivity was greater (P exercise sampling time point [10 min: 63.7 (3.9) pg x ml(-1) vs 78.7 (3.8) pg x ml(-1); 20 min: 68.7 (4.1) pg x ml(-1) vs (4.3) pg x ml(-1); 30 min: 71.0 (4.3) pg x ml(-1) vs 82.5(3.2) pg x ml(-1)]. These data suggest that intense exer induces significant increases in beta-endorphin that are maintained over time during steady-rate exercise. Exercise and naloxone had an interactive effect on beta-endorphin release that warrants further investigation. PMID:11820329

  2. Effects of Dielectrophoresis on Growth, Viability and Immuno-reactivity of Listeria monocytogenes

    Bhunia Arun K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dielectrophoresis (DEP has been regarded as a useful tool for manipulating biological cells prior to the detection of cells. Since DEP uses high AC electrical fields, it is important to examine whether these electrical fields in any way damage cells or affect their characteristics in subsequent analytical procedures. In this study, we investigated the effects of DEP manipulation on the characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes cells, including the immuno-reactivity to several Listeria-specific antibodies, the cell growth profile in liquid medium, and the cell viability on selective agar plates. It was found that a 1-h DEP treatment increased the cell immuno-reactivity to the commercial Listeria species-specific polyclonal antibodies (from KPL by ~31.8% and to the C11E9 monoclonal antibodies by ~82.9%, whereas no significant changes were observed with either anti-InlB or anti-ActA antibodies. A 1-h DEP treatment did not cause any change in the growth profile of Listeria in the low conductive growth medium (LCGM; however, prolonged treatments (4 h or greater caused significant delays in cell growth. The results of plating methods showed that a 4-h DEP treatment (5 MHz, 20 Vpp reduced the viable cell numbers by 56.8–89.7 %. These results indicated that DEP manipulation may or may not affect the final detection signal in immuno-based detection depending on the type of antigen-antibody reaction involved. However, prolonged DEP treatment for manipulating bacterial cells could produce negative effects on the cell detection by growth-based methods. Careful selection of DEP operation conditions could avoid or minimize negative effects on subsequent cell detection performance.

  3. Advantage of highly immunoreactive monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoscintigraphy for tumor detection, (2)

    There is theoretically a potential benefit in using a highly immunoreactive monoclonal antibody. The effect of immunoreactivity (IR) on the antibody biodistribution, however, has not yet been described in detail. Thus, this study was designed to investigate the effect of IR on the biodistribution in an animal model. The hydroxylapatite high performance liquid chromatography (HA-HPLC) system has been tested and confirmed to separate the F ab 96.5, an anti melanoma p97 antigen, into high and low IR fractions. 125I-F ab 96.5 preparations with a different IR were administered to groups of nude mice bearing FEM-XII human skin melanoma xenografts for biodistribution and imaging studies. The biodistribution data showed that the high IR antibody improved tumor targeting by increasing activity ratios of tumor to non tumor tissue; the mechanism for the increased tumor to non tumor ratios was increased tumor activity uptake and prolonged tumor activity retention with associated rapid clearance from the blood and non tumor sites. The imaging study visually supported the results obtained in the biodistribution study; the high IR antibody demonstrated better and earlier tumor delineation and the tumor to non tumor contrast continued to improve with time. In this model system, where the whole body clearance rate was the same for the high IR and low IR preparations, the overall antibody metabolism and excretion were not significantly dependent on IR. Therefore, the effect of IR is to alter the distribution of antibody between tumor and blood, with high IR having increased tumor activity and reduced blood activity (consequently reduced non tumor organ activity). This would also be beneficial for therapeutic use of radiolabeled antibodies, since high IR antibodies can minimize undesirable radiation exposure to normal organs. In conclusion, high IR antibodies are essential for optimal tumor targeting. (author)

  4. Decreased nucleotide excision repair in steatotic livers associates with myeloperoxidase-immunoreactivity

    Chronic inflammation is characterized by the influx of neutrophils and is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species that can damage DNA. Oxidative DNA damage is generally thought to be involved in the increased risk of cancer in inflamed tissues. We previously demonstrated that activated neutrophil mediated oxidative stress results in a reduction in nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity, which could further enhance mutagenesis. Inflammation and oxidative stress are critical factors in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that is linked with enhanced liver cancer risk. In this report, we therefore evaluated the role of neutrophils and the associated oxidative stress in damage recognition and DNA repair in steatotic livers of 35 severely obese subjects with either nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (n = 17) or steatosis alone (n = 18). The neutrophilic influx in liver was assessed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining and the amount of oxidative DNA damage by measuring M1dG adducts. No differences in M1dG adduct levels were observed between patients with or without NASH and also not between individuals with high or low MPO immunoreactivity. However, we found that high expression of MPO in the liver, irrespective of disease status, reduced the damage recognition capacity as determined by staining for histone 2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). This reduction in γH2AX formation in individuals with high MPO immunoreactivity was paralleled by a significant decrease in NER capacity as assessed by a functional repair assay, and was not related to cell proliferation. Thus, the observed reduction in NER capacity upon hepatic inflammation is associated with and may be a consequence of reduced damage recognition. These findings suggest a novel mechanism of liver cancer development in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  5. Decreased nucleotide excision repair in steatotic livers associates with myeloperoxidase-immunoreactivity

    Schults, Marten A.; Nagle, Peter W. [Department of Toxicology, NUTRIM-School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Rensen, Sander S. [Department of Surgery, NUTRIM-School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Godschalk, Roger W. [Department of Toxicology, NUTRIM-School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Munnia, Armelle; Peluso, Marco [Cancer Risk Factor Branch, ISPO Cancer Prevention and Research Institute, Via Cosimo il Vecchio 2, 50139 Florence (Italy); Claessen, Sandra M. [Department of Toxicogenomics, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Greve, Jan W. [Department of Surgery, NUTRIM-School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Driessen, Ann [Department of Pathology, NUTRIM-School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Verdam, Froukje J.; Buurman, Wim A. [Department of Surgery, NUTRIM-School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Schooten, Frederik J. van [Department of Toxicology, NUTRIM-School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Chiu, Roland K., E-mail: r.k.chiu@med.umcg.nl [Department of Toxicology, NUTRIM-School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Chronic inflammation is characterized by the influx of neutrophils and is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species that can damage DNA. Oxidative DNA damage is generally thought to be involved in the increased risk of cancer in inflamed tissues. We previously demonstrated that activated neutrophil mediated oxidative stress results in a reduction in nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity, which could further enhance mutagenesis. Inflammation and oxidative stress are critical factors in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that is linked with enhanced liver cancer risk. In this report, we therefore evaluated the role of neutrophils and the associated oxidative stress in damage recognition and DNA repair in steatotic livers of 35 severely obese subjects with either nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (n = 17) or steatosis alone (n = 18). The neutrophilic influx in liver was assessed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining and the amount of oxidative DNA damage by measuring M{sub 1}dG adducts. No differences in M{sub 1}dG adduct levels were observed between patients with or without NASH and also not between individuals with high or low MPO immunoreactivity. However, we found that high expression of MPO in the liver, irrespective of disease status, reduced the damage recognition capacity as determined by staining for histone 2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX). This reduction in {gamma}H2AX formation in individuals with high MPO immunoreactivity was paralleled by a significant decrease in NER capacity as assessed by a functional repair assay, and was not related to cell proliferation. Thus, the observed reduction in NER capacity upon hepatic inflammation is associated with and may be a consequence of reduced damage recognition. These findings suggest a novel mechanism of liver cancer development in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  6. Glutamate-like immunoreactivity in identified neuronal populations of insect nervous systems.

    Bicker, G; Schäfer, S; Ottersen, O P; Storm-Mathisen, J

    1988-06-01

    Glutamate is considered to be the most likely transmitter candidate at excitatory synapses onto skeletal muscles of insects. We investigated the distribution of glutamate-like immunoreactivity (Glu-LI) in identified motor neurons of glutaraldehyde-fixed metathoracic ganglia of the locust in paraffin serial sections. The presumably glutamatergic fast and slow extensor tibiae motor neurons show Glu-LI, whereas other cells, including the GABAergic common inhibitory motor neurons and the cluster of octopaminergic dorsal unpaired median cells, show rather low levels of staining. Immunoreactivity of the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron is located in soma, neurites, axon, and the terminal arborizations. A double-labeling experiment on sections of the locust metathoracic ganglion showed that antisera against glutamate and GABA discriminate between the presumably glutamatergic and GABAergic motor neurons and that GABA-LI-positive neurons are low in Glu-LI. The results suggest that Glu-LI can be used as a marker for detecting potential glutamatergic neurons in insects under the present conditions. Application of the glutamate antiserum to sections of the honeybee brain revealed Glu-LI in motor neurons but also in certain interneurons. The most prominent populations of Glu-LI-positive cells were the monopolar cells and large ocellar interneurons, which are first-order interneurons of the visual and ocellar system. Several groups of descending interneurons also showed Glu-LI. The distributions of Glu-LI and GABA-LI are complementary in locust and bee ganglia. The high level of Glu-LI in certain interneuronal populations, as well as in identified glutamatergic motor neurons, suggests that insect central nervous systems may contain glutamatergic neuronal pathways. PMID:2898517

  7. Sodium channel Nav1.7 immunoreactivity in painful human dental pulp and burning mouth syndrome

    Yiangou Yiangos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage gated sodium channels Nav1.7 are involved in nociceptor nerve action potentials and are known to affect pain sensitivity in clinical genetic disorders. Aims and Objectives To study Nav1.7 levels in dental pulpitis pain, an inflammatory condition, and burning mouth syndrome (BMS, considered a neuropathic orofacial pain disorder. Methods Two groups of patients were recruited for this study. One group consisted of patients with dental pulpitis pain (n = 5 and controls (n = 12, and the other patients with BMS (n = 7 and controls (n = 10. BMS patients were diagnosed according to the International Association for the Study of Pain criteria; a pain history was collected, including the visual analogue scale (VAS. Immunohistochemistry with visual intensity and computer image analysis were used to evaluate levels of Nav1.7 in dental pulp tissue samples from the dental pulpitis group, and tongue biopsies from the BMS group. Results There was a significantly increased visual intensity score for Nav1.7 in nerve fibres in the painful dental pulp specimens, compared to controls. Image analysis showed a trend for an increase of the Nav1.7 immunoreactive % area in the painful pulp group, but this was not statistically significant. When expressed as a ratio of the neurofilament % area, there was a strong trend for an increase of Nav1.7 in the painful pulp group. Nav1.7 immunoreactive fibres were seen in abundance in the sub-mucosal layer of tongue biopsies, with no significant difference between BMS and controls. Conclusion Nav1.7 sodium channel may play a significant role in inflammatory dental pain. Clinical trials with selective Nav1.7 channel blockers should prioritise dental pulp pain rather than BMS.

  8. The first NINDS/NIBIB consensus meeting to define neuropathological criteria for the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    McKee, Ann C; Cairns, Nigel J; Dickson, Dennis W; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Keene, C Dirk; Litvan, Irene; Perl, Daniel P; Stein, Thor D; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Stewart, William; Tripodis, Yorghos; Crary, John F; Bieniek, Kevin F; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Alvarez, Victor E; Gordon, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegeneration characterized by the abnormal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein within the brain. Like many other neurodegenerative conditions, at present, CTE can only be definitively diagnosed by post-mortem examination of brain tissue. As the first part of a series of consensus panels funded by the NINDS/NIBIB to define the neuropathological criteria for CTE, preliminary neuropathological criteria were used by 7 neuropathologists to blindly evaluate 25 cases of various tauopathies, including CTE, Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, argyrophilic grain disease, corticobasal degeneration, primary age-related tauopathy, and parkinsonism dementia complex of Guam. The results demonstrated that there was good agreement among the neuropathologists who reviewed the cases (Cohen's kappa, 0.67) and even better agreement between reviewers and the diagnosis of CTE (Cohen's kappa, 0.78). Based on these results, the panel defined the pathognomonic lesion of CTE as an accumulation of abnormal hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) in neurons and astroglia distributed around small blood vessels at the depths of cortical sulci and in an irregular pattern. The group also defined supportive but non-specific p-tau-immunoreactive features of CTE as: pretangles and NFTs affecting superficial layers (layers II-III) of cerebral cortex; pretangles, NFTs or extracellular tangles in CA2 and pretangles and proximal dendritic swellings in CA4 of the hippocampus; neuronal and astrocytic aggregates in subcortical nuclei; thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glial limitans of the subpial and periventricular regions; and large grain-like and dot-like structures. Supportive non-p-tau pathologies include TDP-43 immunoreactive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and dot-like structures in the hippocampus, anteromedial temporal cortex and amygdala. The panel also recommended a minimum blocking and staining scheme for pathological evaluation and made recommendations for future study. This study provides the first step towards the development of validated neuropathological criteria for CTE and will pave the way towards future clinical and mechanistic studies. PMID:26667418

  9. Bone Marrow Abnormalities in HIV Disease

    Dhurve, Sharad A.; Dhurve, Alka S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hematological abnormalities are a common complication of HIV infection. Bone marrow abnormalities occur in all stages of HIV infection. Present work was carried out to study the bone marrow abnormalities in patients with HIV/AIDS. Methods 160 patients of HIV +ve were included in the study. A complete blood count, relevant biochemical investigations, CD4 counts were done, besides a thorough history and clinical examination. HIV positive patients were classified as those having AID...

  10. Hemostatic abnormalities in liver cirrhosis

    Kendal YALÇIN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 44 patients with liver cirrhosis were investigated for hemostatic parameters. Patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatorenal syndrome and cholestatic liver diseases were excluded. Patients were classified by Child-Pugh criterion and according to this 4 patients were in Class A, 20 in Class B and 20 in C. Regarding to these results, it was aimed to investigate the haematological disturbances in liver cirrhotic patients.In the result there was a correlation between activated partial thromboplastin time, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, haptoglobin and Child-Pugh classification. Besides there was no correlation between prothrombin time, factor 8 and 9, protein C and S, anti-thrombin 3, fibrinogen, fibrin degradation products, serum iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, leukocyte, mean corpuscular volume and Child-Pugh classification.There were significant difference, in terms of AST, ferritin, haptoglobulin, sex and presence of ascites between groups (p0.05. In the summary, we have found correlation between hemostatic abnormalities and disease activity and clinical prognosis in patients with liver cirrhosis which is important in the management of these patients. This is also important for identification of liver transplant candidiates earlier.

  11. Semen abnormalities with SSRI antidepressants.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of widespread use, the adverse effect profile of "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants has still not been fully elucidated. Studies in male animals have shown delayed sexual development and reduced fertility. Three prospective cohort studies conducted in over one hundred patients exposed to an SSRI for periods ranging from 5 weeks to 24 months found altered semen param-eters after as little as 3 months of exposure: reduced sperm concentration, reduced sperm motility, a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, and increased levels of sperm DNA fragmentation. One clinical trial showed growth retardation in children considered depressed who were exposed to SSRls. SSRls may have endocrine disrupting properties. Dapoxetine is a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is chemically related to fluoxetine and marketed in the European Union for men complaining of premature ejaculation. But the corresponding European summary of product characteristics does not mention any effects on fertility. In practice, based on the data available as of mid-2014, the effects of SSRI exposure on male fertility are unclear. However, it is a risk that should be taken into account and pointed out to male patients who would like to father a child or who are experiencing fertility problems. PMID:25729824

  12. Report on abnormal climate in 2011

    This paper reports of impact on abnormal climate in 2011. It has Introduction with purpose and background of publish and summary of this report. The cause and current state on abnormal climate of the world and Korea in 2011, Measurement and impact against abnormal climate in 2011 to agriculture, land and maritime, industry and energy, prevention of disasters, environment and health, assessment and advice on the policy. It lists the appendix about occurrence and damage on abnormal climate of the world and Korea in 2011 and media report data.

  13. Holoprosencephaly due to numeric chromosome abnormalities.

    Solomon, Benjamin D; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N; Meck, Jeanne M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-02-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common malformation of the human forebrain. When a clinician identifies a patient with HPE, a routine chromosome analysis is often the first genetic test sent for laboratory analysis in order to assess for a structural or numerical chromosome anomaly. An abnormality of chromosome number is overall the most frequently identified etiology in a patient with HPE. These abnormalities include trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy, though several others have been reported. Such chromosome number abnormalities are almost universally fatal early in gestation or in infancy. Clinical features of specific chromosome number abnormalities may be recognized by phenotypic manifestations in addition to the HPE. PMID:20104610

  14. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities

  15. Lack of relationship between TIMP-1 tumour cell immunoreactivity, treatment efficacy and prognosis in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Christensen, Rikke Kølby; Bartels, Annette; Brünner, Nils; Jakobsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    favor of the TIMP-1 tumour negative patients was found, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.28, Kaplan-Meier, log-rank test). Moreover, TIMP-1 immunoreactivity was not associated with CA125 response (p = 0.53) or response at second look surgery (p = 0.72). CONCLUSION: TIMP-1...

  16. Substance P immunoreactivity in the lumbar spinal cord of the turtle Trachemys dorbigni following peripheral nerve injury

    W.A. Partata

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoreactive substance P was investigated in turtle lumbar spinal cord after sciatic nerve transection. In control animals immunoreactive fibers were densest in synaptic field Ia, where the longest axons invaded synaptic field III. Positive neuronal bodies were identified in the lateral column of the dorsal horn and substance P immunoreactive varicosities were observed in the ventral horn, in close relationship with presumed motoneurons. Other varicosities appeared in the lateral and anterior funiculi. After axotomy, substance P immunoreactive fibers were reduced slightly on the side of the lesion, which was located in long fibers that invaded synaptic field III and in the varicosities of the lateral and anterior funiculus. The changes were observed at 7 days after axonal injury and persisted at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after the lesion. These findings show that turtles should be considered as a model to study the role of substance P in peripheral axonal injury, since the distribution and temporal changes of substance P were similar to those found in mammals.

  17. Platelet enzyme abnormalities in leukemias

    S Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate platelet enzyme activity in cases of leukemia. Materials and Methods: Platelet enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, pyruvate kinase (PK and hexokinase (HK were studied in 47 patients of acute and chronic leukemia patients, 16 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML(13 relapse, three in remission, 12 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL (five in relapse, seven in remission, 19 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Results: The platelet G6PD activity was significantly low in cases of AML, ALL and also in CML. G6PD activity was normalized during AML remission. G6PD activity, although persistently low during ALL remission, increased significantly to near-normal during remission (P < 0.05 as compared with relapse (P < 0.01. Platelet PK activity was high during AML relapse (P < 0.05, which was normalized during remission. Platelet HK however was found to be decreased during all remission (P < 0.05. There was a significant positive correlation between G6PD and PK in cases of AML (P < 0.001 but not in ALL and CML. G6PD activity did not correlate with HK activity in any of the leukemic groups. A significant positive correlation was however seen between PK and HK activity in cases of ALL remission (P < 0.01 and CML (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Both red cell and platelet enzymes were studied in 36 leukemic patients and there was no statistically significant correlation between red cell and platelet enzymes. Platelet enzyme defect in leukemias suggests the inherent abnormality in megakaryopoiesis and would explain the functional platelet defects in leukemias.

  18. Fine distribution of substance P-like immunoreactivity in the dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve in cats.

    Baude, A; Couraud, J Y; Puizillout, J J

    1992-01-01

    The ultrastructure of substance P (SP)-immunoreactive elements in the cat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve was examined using pre- and post-embedding immunocytochemical procedures. Substance P-like immunoreactivity was observed in axon terminals and axon fibres which were mostly unmyelinated. Quantitative data showed that at least 16% of axon terminals contained SP. Their mean diameter was larger than that of their non-immunoreactive counterparts. Most (83%) SP-containing terminals were seen to contact dendrites but some were observed adjoining soma or entirely embedded in the cytoplasm of vagal neurons (4.5%). Only 0.5% were observed to contact soma of internuerons. A few immunoreactive axon terminals (4%) were observed in contact with non-immunoreactive axon terminals. Round agranular vesicles and numerous dense core vesicles were visible in most SP-containing axon terminals (84.6%). The immunogold procedure showed the preferential subcellular location of SP to be dense core vesicles. In 32.4% of cases, SP-containing terminals were involved in synaptic contacts that were generally of the asymmetrical Gray type 1 and mainly apposed dendrites. The theoretical total of synaptic contacts was 74.5% and this suggests the existence of weak non-synaptic SP innervation involving approximately 25% of SP-containing axon terminals. No axo-axonic synapses were observed in the dorsal vagal nucleus. These results support the hypothesis that SP found in the dorsal vagal nucleus originates partly from vagal afferents and is involved in direct modulation of visceral functions mediated by vagal preganglionic neurons. PMID:1384553

  19. Abnormal Event Detection Using Local Sparse Representation

    Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    We propose to detect abnormal events via a sparse subspace clustering algorithm. Unlike most existing approaches, which search for optimized normal bases and detect abnormality based on least square error or reconstruction error from the learned normal patterns, we propose an abnormality measurem......We propose to detect abnormal events via a sparse subspace clustering algorithm. Unlike most existing approaches, which search for optimized normal bases and detect abnormality based on least square error or reconstruction error from the learned normal patterns, we propose an abnormality...... measurement based on the difference between the normal space and local space. Specifically, we provide a reasonable normal bases through repeated K spectral clustering. Then for each testing feature we first use temporal neighbors to form a local space. An abnormal event is found if any abnormal feature is...... found that satisfies: the distance between its local space and the normal space is large. We evaluate our method on two public benchmark datasets: UCSD and Subway Entrance datasets. The comparison to the state-of-the-art methods validate our method's effectiveness....

  20. Can transcutaneous recordings detect gastric electrical abnormalities?

    Familoni, B O; Bowes, K L; Kingma, Y J; Cote, K R

    1991-01-01

    The ability of transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity to detect gastric electrical abnormalities was determined by simultaneous measurements of gastric electrical activity with surgically implanted serosal electrodes and cutaneous electrodes in six patients undergoing abdominal operations. Transient abnormalities in gastric electrical activity were seen in five of the six patients during the postoperative period. Recognition of normal gastric electrical activity by visual an...

  1. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period January through March 1993. There is one abnormal occurrence at a nuclear power plant disposed in this report that involved a steam generator tube rupture at Palo Verde Unit 2, and none for fuel cycle facilities. Three abnormal occurrences involving medical misadminstrations (two therapeutic and one diagnostic) at NRC-licensed facilities are also discussed in this report. No abnormal occurrences were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases of sex chromosome aneuploidy and 2 cases of terminal deletion of Y chromosome. Klinefelter syndrome was detected in 67% of patients with azoospermia. A significant increase in the frequency of numerical chromosomal abnormalities was observed in a group of patients with azoospermia (P < 0.001. No differences were detected in the frequency of structural abnormalities in subgroups of patients. An increase in the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities with the decrease of sperm count was observed. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected with frequency 1.1% in a group of patients with normospermia, 1.9% in a group of patients with asthenozoospermia, 4.3% in patients with asthenoteratozoospermia, 6.5% in patients with oligoasthenozoospermia, 11.6% in patients with oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and 35% in a group of patients with azoospermia. Significant increase of the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was detected in subgroups of patients with azoospermia (P < 0.001 and oligozoospermia (P = 0.001 as compared to patients with normozoospermia. These results are considered to be criteria for selection of patients in need of cytogenetic studies before in vitro fertilization cycles because of the highest risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection.

  3. RARE CYTOGENETIC ABNORMALITIES IN MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES

    Julie Schanz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype represents one of the main cornerstones for the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS and the revised IPSS-R (IPSS-R that are most widely used for prognostication in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. The most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS, i.e. del(5q, -7/del(7q, +8, complex karyotypes, or –Y have been extensively explored for their prognostic impact. The IPSS-R considers also some less frequent abnormalities such as del(11q, isochromosome 17, +19, or 3q abnormalities. However, more than 600 different cytogenetic categories had been identified in a previous MDS study. This review aims to focus interest on selected rare cytogenetic abnormalities in patients with MDS. Examples are numerical gains of the chromosomes 11 (indicating rapid progression, of chromosome 14 or 14q (prognostically intermediate to favorable, -X (in females, with an intermediate prognosis, or numerical abnormalities of chromosome 21. Structural abnormalities are also considered, e.g. del(13q that is associated with bone marrow failure syndromes and favorable response to immunosuppressive therapy. These and other rare cytogenetic abnormalities should be integrated into existing prognostication systems such as the IPSS-R. However, due to the very low number of cases, this is clearly dependent on international collaboration. Hopefully, this article will help to inaugurate this process.

  4. Rare cytogenetic abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Bacher, Ulrike; Schanz, Julie; Braulke, Friederike; Haase, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The karyotype represents one of the main cornerstones for the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the revised IPSS-R (IPSS-R) that are most widely used for prognostication in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS, i.e. del(5q), -7/del(7q), +8, complex karyotypes, or -Y have been extensively explored for their prognostic impact. The IPSS-R also considers some less frequent abnormalities such as del(11q), isochromosome 17, +19, or 3q abnormalities. However, more than 600 different cytogenetic categories had been identified in a previous MDS study. This review aims to focus interest on selected rare cytogenetic abnormalities in patients with MDS. Examples are numerical gains of the chromosomes 11 (indicating rapid progression), of chromosome 14 or 14q (prognostically intermediate to favorable), -X (in females, with an intermediate prognosis), or numerical abnormalities of chromosome 21. Structural abnormalities are also considered, e.g. del(13q) that is associated with bone marrow failure syndromes and favorable response to immunosuppressive therapy. These and other rare cytogenetic abnormalities should be integrated into existing prognostication systems such as the IPSS-R. However, due to the very low number of cases, this is clearly dependent on international collaboration. Hopefully, this article will help to inaugurate this process. PMID:25960862

  5. Ionizing radiation alters beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity in brain but not blood

    Previous behavioral and pharmacological studies have implicated endorphins in radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the C57BL/6J mouse. However, the endogenous opiate(s) responsible for this behavioral change have not been identified. The present study measured beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (beta-END-LI) in brain, blood, and combined brain and pituitary samples from irradiated and sham-irradiated C57BL/6J mice. After radiation exposure, levels of beta-END-LI decreased significantly in the brain. A similar, but not statistically significant, decline was measured in combined brain and pituitary samples. Concentrations of blood beta-END-LI were not changed by irradiation. These radiogenic changes in beta-END-LI are in some ways similar to those observed after other stresses. However, radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity may be mediated more by alterations of beta-END-LI in the brain than in the periphery. Other endogenous opiate systems may also contribute to this behavioral change in the C57BL/6J mouse

  6. Rapid lymphocyte immunoreactivity test utilizing [3H]uridine in vitro

    A microculture assay utilizing [3H]uridine incorporation was developed to test murine spleen lymphocyte immunoreactivity in vitro. Parameters of the culture technique which included cell density, doses of LPS, Con A, PHA, [3H]uridine levels, and length of culture time were investigated. Responses were detectable at 4 h for all 3 mitogens, with labelling ranging up to 180% of the control value. By 8 h there was a 200-350% increase in mitogen-induced incorporation of radioactivity. Similar increases were observed in a serum-free system. The responses were the result of increased incorporation of label by stimulated cultures rather than decreased labeling of non-mitogen treated cultures over time. The [3H]uridine incorporation was demonstrated to be the selective response of T or B cell populations when stimulated with appropriate lectins. This assay detects early RNA synthesis, as supported by experimental observations in which accumulation of radioactivity in stimulated lymphocytes was TCA precipitable, resistant to SDS treatment, and inhibited by actinomycin D. (Auth.)

  7. Digoxin-like immunoreactivity, endogeneous cardiac glycoside-like factors (s) and natriuretic hormone

    Endogenous factors crossreacting with antidigoxin antibodies (digoxin-like immunoreactive substances=DLIS) have been found in several tissues and body fluids of animals and humans, using commercially avaiable digoxin RIA or EIA methods. Detectable DLIS concentration were found in blood and urine extracts of adults (normal healthy controls, hypertensive patients and salt loaded healthy subjects), while higher levels were generally observed in plasma samples of pregnant women, newborns and patients with renal insufficiency. The chemical characteristics of this endogenous factor are, at present, unknown, although it has been suggested that DLIS could be a substance with low molecular weight. Experimental studies and theoretical consideration suggest that DLIS, in addition to reacting with antibodies, might also bind to the specific cellular receptor of the cardiac glycosides and thus inhibit the membrane Na+/K+ ATPase (sodium pump). Therefore, it has been suggested that DLSI is an endogeneous modulator of the membrane sodium-potassium pump and it could play a role in the regulation of fluid and electrolytes muscular tone of myocardial and also in pathogenesis of hypertension

  8. Enteric nervous system ?-synuclein immunoreactivity in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder

    Sprenger, Fabienne S.; Stefanova, Nadia; Gelpi, Ellen; Seppi, Klaus; Navarro-Otano, Judith; Offner, Felix; Vilas, Dolores; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Aldecoa, Iban; Gaig, Carles; Gines, Angels; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Iranzo, Alex; Wenning, Gregor K.; Vogel, Wolfgang; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of ?-synuclein in colonic biopsies of patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) and address if ?-synuclein immunostaining of tissue obtained via colonic biopsies holds promise as a diagnostic biomarker for prodromal Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Patients with iRBD, patients with PD, and healthy controls were prospectively recruited to undergo colonic biopsies for comparison of ?-synuclein immunoreactivity patterns between the groups by using 2 different antibodies. Results: There was no difference in colonic mucosal and submucosal immunostaining between groups using the 15G7 ?-synuclein antibody, which was found in almost all participants enrolled in this study. By contrast, immunostaining for serine 129-phosphorylated ?-synuclein (pSyn) in submucosal nerve fibers or ganglia was found in none of 14 controls but was observed in 4 of 17 participants with iRBD and 1 out of 19 patients with PD. Conclusions: The present findings of pSyn immunostaining of colonic biopsies in a substantial proportion of iRBD participants raise the possibility that this tissue marker may be a suitable candidate to study further as a prodromal PD marker in at-risk cohorts. PMID:26475692

  9. Prominent system of RFamide immunoreactive neurons in the rhopalia of box jellyfish (Cnidaria: Cubozoa).

    Parkefelt, Linda; Ekström, Peter

    2009-09-20

    The four visual sensory structures of a cubomedusa, the rhopalia, display a surprisingly elaborate organization by containing two lens eyes and four bilaterally paired pigment cup eyes. Peptides containing the peptide sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide) occur in close association with visual structures of cnidarians, including the rhopalia and rhopalial stalk of cubomedusae, suggesting that RFamide functions as a neuronal marker for certain parts of the visual system of medusae. Using immunofluorescence we give a detailed description of the organization of the RFamide-immunoreactive (ir) nervous system in the rhopalia and rhopalial stalk of the cubomedusae Tripedalia cystophora and Carybdea marsupialis. The bilaterally symmetric RFamide-ir nervous system contains four cell groups and three morphologically different cell types. Neurites spread throughout the rhopalia and occur in close vicinity of the pigment cup eyes and the lower lens eye. Two commissures connect the two sides of the system and neurites of one rhopalial cell group extend into the rhopalial stalk. The RFamide-ir nervous system in the rhopalia of cubomedusae is more widespread and comprises more cells than earlier discerned. We suggest that the system might not only integrate visual input but also signals from other senses. One of the RFamide-ir cell groups is favorably situated to represent pacemaker neurons that set the swimming rhythm of the medusa. PMID:19598151

  10. Predictive value of bcl-2 immunoreactivity in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    Background and purpose: Recent experimental evidence suggests that overexpression of bcl-2, a protein functioning by blocking apoptosis, may influence the treatment outcome in human tumours, including prostate cancer. To test the clinical implications of this hypothesis, tumours from patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were investigated for bcl-2 immunoreactivity (IR) and correlated with prognosis and treatment outcome. Materials and methods: Bcl-2 IR was evaluated in archival tumour specimens obtained through transurethral resection from 42 patients with localized prostate cancer (T0-T4, N0 and M0). Bcl-2 IR expression was related to stage, grade and cancer-specific survival. Specimens were obtained prior to administrating routine radiotherapy for all patients. Results: Bcl-2 IR was present in 19/42 (45%) tumours. The bcl-2-positive patients had a significantly longer cancer-specific survival than the bcl-2-negative patients (10.3 versus 3.4 years, P<0.04). At follow-up (7-19 years), nine patients were still alive, 26 patients had died of prostate cancer and seven patients had died of other causes. Conclusions: This study indicates that pre-treatment bcl-2 overexpression is related to a favourable outcome in prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy. Low bcl-2 along with a high stage may be a predictor of poor prognosis and these patients might benefit from additional treatment. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Alzheimer's-associated A? oligomers show altered structure, immunoreactivity and synaptotoxicity with low doses of oleocanthal

    It now appears likely that soluble oligomers of amyloid-?1-42 peptide, rather than insoluble fibrils, act as the primary neurotoxin in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Consequently, compounds capable of altering the assembly state of these oligomers (referred to as ADDLs) may have potential for AD therapeutics. Phenolic compounds are of particular interest for their ability to disrupt A? oligomerization and reduce pathogenicity. This study has focused on oleocanthal (OC), a naturally-occurring phenolic compound found in extra-virgin olive oil. OC increased the immunoreactivity of soluble A? species, when assayed with both sequence- and conformation-specific A? antibodies, indicating changes in oligomer structure. Analysis of oligomers in the presence of OC showed an upward shift in MW and a ladder-like distribution of SDS-stable ADDL subspecies. In comparison with control ADDLs, oligomers formed in the presence of OC (A?-OC) showed equivalent colocalization at synapses but exhibited greater immunofluorescence as a result of increased antibody recognition. The enhanced signal at synapses was not due to increased synaptic binding, as direct detection of fluorescently-labeled ADDLs showed an overall reduction in ADDL signal in the presence of OC. Decreased binding to synapses was accompanied by significantly less synaptic deterioration assayed by drebrin loss. Additionally, treatment with OC improved antibody clearance of ADDLs. These results indicate oleocanthal is capable of altering the oligomerization state of ADDLs while protecting neurons from the synaptopathological effects of ADDLs and suggest OC as a lead compound for development in AD therapeutics.

  12. Analysis of the brain ACTH-immunoreactive peptide spectrum in inbred mice

    Mice of the BALB/c (C) and C57BL/6 (B6) strains, characterized by high and low emotionality respectively in open field tests, have been shown to differ considerably in both the initial level and the time course of changes in the plasma ACTH concentration after exposure to stress in an open field and after administration of a benzodiazepine tranquilizer. The ACTH concentration in the pituitary gland of animals of these lines also differs. The ACTH molecule is known to contain regions with neurotropic activity. It can therefore be postulated that differences in the level of this hormone and the products of its bioconversion in the brain are an essential factor in the mechanisms of formation of the hereditary features of emotional behavior. In this first stage of this investigation, represented in this paper and undertaken to test this hypothesis, spectra of ACTH-immunoreactive peptides were studied in chromatographic fractions of an acid brain extract as well as in the blood plasma of mice belonging to B6 and C lines and their hybrids. The peptides were determined by radioimmunoassay

  13. Immunoreactivity of S100β protein in the hippocampus of chinchilla

    Krawczyk Aleksandra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate S100β protein in astrocytes of CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus proper and the dentate gyrus with the hilus yet undefined in mature males of chinchilla. The presence of S100β was determined using indirect immunohistochemical peroxidase-antiperoxidase method with specific monoclonal antibody against this protein. Most of the S100β-positive cells were detected in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and in the middle part of the hilus. In CA3 area, it was found that the most numerous cells with S100β are in stratum radiatum. In CA1 area, there were single astrocytes expressing this protein. This data demonstrates species differences and a large quantity of S100β immunoreactive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of chinchilla, which may be associated with structural reorganisation of the hippocampus and with neurogenesis, learning, and memorising process dependent on the hippocampus.

  14. Porcine theca cells produce immunoreactive beta-endorphin and change steroidogenesis in response to opioid agonist.

    Kamiński, T; Okrasa, S; Bogacka, I; Siawrys, G; Przała, J

    2001-01-01

    In earlier in vitro experiments opioids affected steroidogenesis in porcine luteal and granulosa cells. The present studies were undertaken to examine the effects of FK 33-824 (opioid agonist) alone or in combination with LH, PRL or naloxone (NAL, opioid antagonist) on steroidogenesis in cultured porcine theca cells. Moreover, we have tested beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (beta-END-LI) concentrations in culture media under control conditions and following treatments of theca cells with LH, PRL, progesterone (P4), oestradiol (E2) or testosterone (T). FK 33-824 and NAL significantly increased P4 release by theca cells and inhibited stimulatory effect of LH on this steroid output. PRL-induced P4 secretion from the cells was blunted only by FK 33-824. Secretion of androstenedione (A4) and T was essentially elevated in the presence of FK 33-824 and this potentiation of both androgen release was completely abolished by PRL. NAL blocked stimulatory effect of the opioid agonist only in case of T. Secretion of oestradiol and oestrone was completely free from the influence of both the opioid agonist and antagonist. Pig theca cells were able to produce beta-END-LI but none of tested hormones (LH, PRL, P4, E2 and T alone or in combination) significantly affected this production. In conclusion, these data indicate that porcine theca cells may produce beta-END-LI and change their steroidogenesis in response to opioid peptides. PMID:11702344

  15. Hysterosalpingography: analysis of 473 abnormal examinations

    The authors reviewed the reports of 4/3 abnormal hysterosalpingographies from 1,200 medical records of patients at the sterility and infertility out-patient clinic of the School of Medical Sciences of the State University of Campinas (Unicamp), from July, 1974 to December, 1981. The objective was to evaluate the incidence and main alterations diagnosed by hysterosalpingography. The most frequent findings were tuboperitoneal factors in 91% of the examinations, uterine cavity abnormalities in 17.4% and cervical factor in 6.3% of the cases. The examinations showed a great incident of tuboperitoneal abnormalities as cause of sterility from lower social classes. (author)

  16. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-immunoreactivity in the rat hippocampus. A light and electron microscopic study with anti-GABA antibodies.

    Gamrani, H; Onteniente, B; Seguela, P; Geffard, M; Calas, A

    1986-01-29

    The distribution of GABA-immunoreactive neurons and axonal varicosities was investigated in the hippocampal region of the rat brain by means of an indirect peroxidase immunocytochemical method with recently developed anti-GABA antibodies. The immunolabeling was found to be restricted to nervous structures: neuronal cell bodies, dendrites and axon terminals. Myelinated axons showing GABA-immunoreactivity were also observed. GABA-immunoreactive neurons were found in great number in the stratum pyramidale, the superficial part of the stratum oriens and the deep part of the stratum radiatum in the Ammon's horn. Less were found in the other regions; rare labeled cells were observed in the superficial part of the stratum radiatum and the middle part of the stratum oriens. The dentate gyrus exhibited numerous labeled cells in the granular layer, few in the hilus, rare in the molecular layer. A high density of GABA-immunoreactive terminals was found at the limit of the stratum oriens with the alveus, in the stratum pyramidale and in the stratum lacunosum. A lower density of labeled fibers was observed in the other areas. The somata and proximal dendrites of pyramidal and granular cells were encompassed by characteristic pericellular arrangements of GABA-immunoreactive varicosities. Ultrastructural observations revealed a diffuse immunoreaction product spread over the cytoplasm and the nucleus without specific relationship with the organelles, and immunoreactive aggregates in the cytoplasm. Labeled dendrites often showed enlargements displaying the immunoreaction whereas thinner segments were devoid of it. They received numerous asymmetrical synapses from unlabeled axon terminals. GABA-immunoreactive terminals were filled with small clear vesicles with immunopositive membranes and were observed in symmetrical contact with somata and dendrites. PMID:3512033

  17. Neuroanatomy of pars intercerebralis neurons with special reference to their connections with neurons immunoreactive for pigment-dispersing factor in the blow fly Protophormia terraenovae.

    Yasuyama, Kouji; Hase, Hiroaki; Shiga, Sakiko

    2015-10-01

    Input regions of pars intercerebralis (PI) neurons are examined by confocal and electron microscopies with special reference to their connections with neurons immunoreactive for pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) in the blow fly, Protophormia terraenovae. PI neurons are a prerequisite for ovarian development under long-day conditions. Backfills from the cardiac recurrent nerve after severance of the posterior lateral tracts labeled thin fibers derived from the PI neurons in the superior medial protocerebrum. These PI fibers were mainly synapsin-negative and postsynaptic to unknown varicose profiles containing dense-core vesicles. Backfilled fibers in the periesophageal neuropils, derived from the PI neurons or neurons with somata in the subesophageal zone, were varicose and some were synapsin-positive. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of both presynaptic and postsynaptic sites in backfilled fibers in the periesophageal neuropils. Many PDF-immunoreactive varicosities were found in the superior medial and lateral protocerebrum and double-labeling showed that 60-88 % of PDF-immunoreactive varicosities were also synapsin-immunoreactive. Double-labeling with the backfills and PDF immunocytochemistry showed that the PI fibers and PDF-immunoreactive varicosities were located close to each other in the superior medial protocerebrum. Results of triple-labeling of PI neurons, PDF-immunoreactive neurons and synapsin-immunoreactive terminals demonstrated that the synapsin-positive PDF-immunoreactive varicosities contacted the PI fibers. These data suggest that PI neurons receive synaptic contacts from PDF-immunoreactive fibers, which are derived from circadian clock neurons, of small ventral lateral neurons (previously called OL2) or posterior dorsal (PD) neurons with somata in the pars lateralis. PMID:25971932

  18. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    ... because they do not affect hearing. However, sometimes cosmetic surgery is recommended. Skin tags may be tied off, ... 5 years old. More severe abnormalities may require surgery for cosmetic reasons as well as for function. Surgery to ...

  19. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

    Oleksandr V. Popovych

    2014-12-01

    abnormally coupled and synchronized state to a desynchronized regime with normalized synaptic connectivity, which significantly outlasts the stimulation cessation, so that long-lasting therapeutic effects can be achieved.

  20. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 through June 30, 1990. The report discusses six abnormal occurrences, none involving a nuclear power plant. There were five abnormal occurrences at NRC licensees: (1) deficiencies in brachytherapy program; (2) a radiation overexposure of a radiographer; (3) a medical diagnostic misadministration; (4) administration of iodine-131 to a lactating female with subsequent uptake by her infant; and (5) a medical therapy misadministration. An Agreement State (Arizona) reported an abnormal occurrence involving a medical diagnostic misadministration. The report also contains information that updates a previously reported occurrence

  1. Abnormal condition detector of a reactor container

    Object: To readily and accurately detect abnormality and abnormal point of a lining applied on the inside of a concrete wall within a container in a sodium cooled fast breeder. Structure: A dual lining made of steel is disposed internally of a room surrounded by concrete to house cooling equipment and piping therein. A space formed between the dual lining is divided into a plurality of spacers by partitioning plates. Each space is formed with an opening, which is connected to a pipe, and connected to a blower in an annulus exhaust system through a respective opening and closing valve in the midst thereof. A leak detector is provided in the midst thereof. The space in the lining is always maintained at negative pressure. When the abnormality is detected, the aforesaid valves are all closed and subsequently these valves are opened one by one. This operation can tell which divided space has abnormality. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. Abnormal Events for Emergency Trip in HANARO

    This report gathers abnormal events related to emergency trip of HANARO that happened during its operation over 10 years since the first criticality on February 1995. The collected examples will be utilized to the HANARO's operators as a useful guide

  3. Amphibian abnormalities on National Wildlife Refuges

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This fact sheet outlines a study done to 1 find the percentage of abnormal frogs and toads on the nations National Wildlife Refuges and 2 determine how the...

  4. FA1 immunoreactivity in endocrine tumours and during development of the human fetal pancreas; negative correlation with glucagon expression

    Tornehave, D; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Teisner, B; Larsson, L I

    1996-01-01

    Fetal antigen 1 (FA1) is a glycoprotein containing six epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats. It is closely similar to the protein translated from the human delta-like (dlk) cDNA and probably constitutes a proteolytically processed form of dlk. dlk is homologous to the Drosophila homeotic...... tumours. A negative correlation between FA1 and glucagon immunoreactants in these tumours prompted a reexamination of FA1 immunoreactants during fetal pancreatic development. At the earliest stages of development, FA1 was expressed by most of the non-endocrine parenchymal cells and, with ensuing...... development, gradually disappeared from these cells and became restricted to insulin-producing beta cells. Throughout development FA1 was not detected in endocrine glucagon, somatostatin or pancreatic polypeptide cells. Moreover, developing insulin cells that coexpressed glucagon were negative for FA1. Thus...

  5. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents

    Mohamed Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1% individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8% at the second screening, (P <0.001. Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8% adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1% individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6% individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3% individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5% individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6% of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6% individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1% of them. Asymp- tomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9% of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6% of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8% indivi- duals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8% individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01 and (P <0.001, respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population.

  6. Abnormal ''Contamination' Levels On Garden Appliances

    During routine contamination checks we encountered an abnormal high level of Alpha and Beta emitting radioisotopes on working gloves of employees of the gardening department. It came out that the source was due to ''contamination'' levels on steering wheels of some gardening machines. In order to ensure that no real contamination of these workers was involved , a series of checks was started to identity the source of the abnormal levels found during monitoring

  7. Evidence of portuguese stock market abnormal returns

    Duarte, Elisabete Mendes; Oliveira, Lisete Trindade

    2011-01-01

    According to the stock market efficiency theory, it is not possible to consistently beat the market. However, technical analysis is more and more spread as an efficient way to achieve abnormal returns. In fact there is evidence that momentum investing strategies provide abnormal returns in different stock markets, Jegadeesh, N. and Titman, S. (1993), George, T. and Hwang, C. (2004) and Du, D. (2009). In this work we study if like other markets, the Portuguese stock market also allows to obtai...

  8. Abnormal Head Position in Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome

    Susana Noval; Mar González-Manrique; José María Rodríguez-Del Valle; José María Rodríguez-Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or ta...

  9. Linear bubble model of abnormal grain growth

    Mullins, W. W.; Vinals, Jorge

    2001-01-01

    A linear bubble model of grain growth is introduced to study the conditions under which an isolated grain can grow to a size much larger than the surrounding matrix average (abnormal growth). We first consider the case of bubbles of two different types such that the permeability of links joining unlike bubbles is larger than that of like bubbles (a simple model of grain boundary anisotropy). Stable abnormal growth is found both by mean field analysis and direct numerical solution. We next stu...

  10. Holoprosencephaly due to Numeric Chromosome Abnormalities

    Solomon, Benjamin D.; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N.; Meck, Jeanne M.; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common malformation of the human forebrain. When a clinician identifies a patient with HPE, a routine chromosome analysis is often the first genetic test sent for laboratory analysis in order to assess for a structural or numerical chromosome anomaly. An abnormality of chromosome number is overall the most frequently identified etiology in a patient with HPE. These abnormalities include trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy, though several others have been ...

  11. Heterotaxy syndromes and abnormal bowel rotation

    Newman, Beverley [Stanford University, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Koppolu, Raji; Sylvester, Karl [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Surgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Murphy, Daniel [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Cardiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bowel rotation abnormalities in heterotaxy are common. As more children survive cardiac surgery, the management of gastrointestinal abnormalities has become controversial. To evaluate imaging of malrotation in heterotaxy with surgical correlation and provide an algorithm for management. Imaging reports of heterotaxic children with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) and/or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) were reviewed. Subsequently, fluoroscopic images were re-reviewed in conjunction with CT/MR studies. The original reports and re-reviewed images were compared and correlated with surgical findings. Nineteen of 34 children with heterotaxy underwent UGI, 13/19 also had SBFT. In 15/19 reports, bowel rotation was called abnormal: 11 malrotation, 4 non-rotation, no cases of volvulus. Re-review, including CT (10/19) and MR (2/19), designated 17/19 (90%) as abnormal, 10 malrotation (abnormal bowel arrangement, narrow or uncertain length of mesentery) and 7 non-rotation (small bowel and colon on opposite sides plus low cecum with probable broad mesentery). The most useful CT/MR findings were absence of retroperitoneal duodenum in most abnormal cases and location of bowel, especially cecum. Abnormal orientation of mesenteric vessels suggested malrotation but was not universal. Nine children had elective bowel surgery; non-rotation was found in 4/9 and malrotation was found in 5/9, with discrepancies (non-rotation at surgery, malrotation on imaging) with 4 original interpretations and 1 re-review. We recommend routine, early UGI and SBFT studies once other, urgent clinical concerns have been stabilized, with elective laparoscopic surgery in abnormal or equivocal cases. Cross-sectional imaging, usually obtained for other reasons, can contribute diagnostically. Attempting to assess mesenteric width is important in differentiating non-rotation from malrotation and more accurately identifies appropriate surgical candidates. (orig.)

  12. Changes of GFAP-immunoreactivity after partial food deprivation in the lateral septum of female and ovariectomized rats

    Balázs Szőke

    2009-01-01

    Neural elements in the lateral septum (LS) of rats react sensitively to food deprivation. It is still not known whether these changes include plastic rearrangements of synaptic connections. A reliable indicator of such changes is the detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a specific marker of astroglia. In previous studies after partial food deprivation significant increase in the amount of GFAP-immunoreactive elements of the LS of male rats was observed. Our aim was to reveal d...

  13. Distribution and Chemical Coding of Corticotropin Releasing Factor-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Guinea-Pig Enteric Nervous System

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; HU, HONG-ZHEN; Wang, Xiyu; Wang, Guo-Du; Fang, Xiucai; GAO, XIANG; XIA, YUN; WOOD, JACKIE D.

    2006-01-01

    Immunofluorescence was used to study immunoreactivity (IR) for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in the guinea-pig enteric nervous system. CRF-IR was expressed in both the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of all regions of the large and small intestine and the myenteric plexus of the stomach. CRF-IR-nerve fibers were present in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, in the circular muscle coat and surrounding submucosal arterioles. Most of the CRF-IR fibers persisted in the myenteric and ...

  14. Differences between unipolar and bipolar I depression in the quantitative analysis of glutamic acid decarboxylase-immunoreactive neuropil

    Gos, Tomasz; Steiner, Johann; Bielau, Hendrik; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Günther, Karoline; Mawrin, Christian; Krzyżanowski, Maciej; Hauser, Roman; Brisch, Ralf; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Braun, Katharina; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in GABAergic neurotransmission are assumed to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is the key enzyme in GABA synthesis. This study aimed to differentiate between unipolar and bipolar I depression using quantitative evaluation of GAD-immunoreactive (GAD-ir) neuropil in several brain regions known to be involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Immunohistochemical staining of GAD 65/67 was performed in the orbitofro...

  15. White matter abnormalities in tuberous sclerosis complex

    The aim of this study was to investigate and describe the range of white matter abnormalities in children with tuberous sclerosis complex by means of MR imaging. Material and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed on the basis of MR imaging findings in 20 cases of tuberous sclerosis complex in children aged 17 years or younger. Results: White matter abnormalities were present in 19/20 (95%) cases of tuberous sclerosis complex. These were most frequently (19/20 cases) found in relation to cortical tubers in the supratentorial compartment. White matter abnormalities related to tubers were found in the cerebellum in 3/20 (15%) cases. White matter abnormalities described as radial migration lines were found in relation to 5 tubers in 3 (15%) children. In 4/20 (20%) cases, white matter abnormalities were found that were not related to cortical tubers. These areas had the appearance of white matter cysts in 3 cases and infarction in the fourth. In the latter case there was a definable event in the clinical history, supporting the diagnosis of stroke. Conclusion: A range of white matter abnormalities were found by MR imaging in tuberous sclerosis complex, the commonest being gliosis and hypomyelination related to cortical tubers. Radial migration lines were seen infrequently in relation to cortical tubers and these are thought to represent heterotopic glia and neurons along the expected path of cortical migration. (orig.)

  16. White matter abnormalities in tuberous sclerosis complex

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Academic Dept. of Radiology; Bolton, P. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Section of Developmental Psychiatry; Verity, C. [Addenbrooke`s NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Paediatric Radiology

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and describe the range of white matter abnormalities in children with tuberous sclerosis complex by means of MR imaging. Material and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed on the basis of MR imaging findings in 20 cases of tuberous sclerosis complex in children aged 17 years or younger. Results: White matter abnormalities were present in 19/20 (95%) cases of tuberous sclerosis complex. These were most frequently (19/20 cases) found in relation to cortical tubers in the supratentorial compartment. White matter abnormalities related to tubers were found in the cerebellum in 3/20 (15%) cases. White matter abnormalities described as radial migration lines were found in relation to 5 tubers in 3 (15%) children. In 4/20 (20%) cases, white matter abnormalities were found that were not related to cortical tubers. These areas had the appearance of white matter cysts in 3 cases and infarction in the fourth. In the latter case there was a definable event in the clinical history, supporting the diagnosis of stroke. Conclusion: A range of white matter abnormalities were found by MR imaging in tuberous sclerosis complex, the commonest being gliosis and hypomyelination related to cortical tubers. Radial migration lines were seen infrequently in relation to cortical tubers and these are thought to represent heterotopic glia and neurons along the expected path of cortical migration. (orig.)

  17. Correlative Analysis of Immunoreactivity in Confocal Laser-Scanning Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Focused Ion Beam Milling

    Takahiro Sonomura

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of rat brain with minimal effort has recently been realized by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam milling (FIB-SEM. Because application of immunohistochemical staining to electron microscopy has a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures, we here tried to apply immunocytochemistry to FIB-SEM and correlate immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM with that in FIB-SEM. The dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in rat neostriatum were visualized with a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion, and thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2. After detecting the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites in CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for electron microscopy by the immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB methods, respectively. In the contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitation and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were easily recognizable as in the images of transmission electron microscopy. In the sites of interest, some appositions were revealed to display synaptic specialization of asymmetric type. The present method is thus useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connection in the central neural circuit.

  18. Housing Complexity Alters GFAP-Immunoreactive Astrocyte Morphology in the Rat Dentate Gyrus

    Salois, Garrick; Jeffrey S. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Rats used in research are typically housed singly in cages with limited sensory stimulation. There is substantial evidence that housing rats in these conditions lead to numerous neuroanatomical and behavioral abnormalities. Alternatively, rats can be housed in an enriched environment in which rats are housed in groups and given room for exercise and exploration. Enriched environments result in considerable neuroplasticity in the rodent brain. In the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, enriched ...

  19. Protein Misdirection Inside and Outside Motor Neurons in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS: A Possible Clue for Therapeutic Strategies

    Akemi Ido

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness with no effective cure. Emerging evidence supports the notion that the abnormal conformations of ALS-linked proteins play a central role in triggering the motor neuron degeneration. In particular, mutant types of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 and TAR DNA binding protein 43kDa (TDP-43 are key molecules involved in the pathogenesis of familial and sporadic ALS, respectively. The commonalities of the two proteins include a propensity to aggregate and acquire detrimental conformations through oligomerization, fragmentation, or post-translational modification that may drive abnormal subcellular localizations. Although SOD1 is a major cytosolic protein, mutated SOD1 has been localized to mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and even the extracellular space. The nuclear exclusion of TDP-43 is a pathological hallmark for ALS, although the pathogenic priority remains elusive. Nevertheless, these abnormal behaviors based on the protein misfolding are believed to induce diverse intracellular and extracellular events that may be tightly linked to non-cell-autonomous motor neuron death. The generation of mutant- or misfolded protein-specific antibodies would help to uncover the distribution and propagation of the ALS-linked proteins, and to design a therapeutic strategy to clear such species. Herein we review the literature regarding the mislocalization of ALS-linked proteins, especially mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 species, and discuss the rationale of molecular targeting strategies including immunotherapy.

  20. Induction patterns of Fos-like immunoreactivity in the forebrain as predictors of atypical antipsychotic activity.

    Robertson, G S; Matsumura, H; Fibiger, H C

    1994-11-01

    Clozapine and haloperidol produce different induction patterns of c-fos expression in the forebrain, with haloperidol increasing Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, lateral septal nucleus and clozapine producing such effects in the nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex and lateral septal nucleus. Accordingly, it was deemed possible that this approach may be useful in characterizing compounds with known or suggested antipsychotic actions. We therefore examined the effects of 17 compounds considered to be either typical, or atypical, antipsychotics on FLI in the prefrontal cortex, medial and dorsolateral striatum, nucleus accumbens and the lateral septal nucleus. Consistent with the hypothesis that the prefrontal cortex may be a target for some antipsychotic actions, FLI was elevated in this structure by clozapine, ICI 204,636, fluperlapine, RMI-81,582, remoxipride, molindone, melperone and tiospirone. Likewise, the ability of all of the compounds, except for risperidone, to enhance FLI in the lateral septal nucleus suggests that this limbic region also may be an important locus of antipsychotic action. All of the compounds examined elevated FLI in the nucleus accumbens and medial striatum, indicating that potential antipsychotic activity is predicted most consistently on this basis. Neuroleptics with a clearly documented liability for producing extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) such as chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, haloperidol, loxapine, metoclopramide and molindone elevated FLI in the dorsolateral striatum. In contrast, compounds unlikely to produce EPS such as clozapine, thioridazine, risperidone, remoxipride, fluperlapine, sulpiride, melperone and RMI-81,582 either failed to increase or produced minor elevations in FLI in the dorsolateral striatum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7965768

  1. PCNA immunoreactivity revealing normal proliferative activity in the brain of adult Lampetra planeri (Bloch, 1784).

    Margotta, Vito; Caronti, Brunella; Colombari, Paolo Tito; Castiglia, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    It is now well known that the Teleosts among Osteichthyes, Urodele and Anuran Amphibians, Lacertilian Reptiles possess encephalic natural proliferative activities even into adulthood, as demonstrated by a great number of researches performed both under normal and various experimental conditions. Few years ago we have undertaken in adult heterothermic vertebrates a reappraisal on spontaneous cerebral proliferative events involving some organisms (Podarcis sicula, Triturus carnifex, Rana esculenta, Carassius carassius) representative of these vertebrates and belonging to the same or phylogenetically similar species used by previous researchers in studies having the same object. In our investigations, these performances were revealed by a proliferative immunocytochemical marker, the Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA). At this point of our study in the scenario emerging from findings a missing piece is represented by Petromyzontidae. To fill up this gap in the present investigation, using our usual test, we have paid attention to adult specimens of Lampetra planeri. The obtained immunostaining panorama has revealed the presence of a considerable number of spontaneous proliferative activities. These events might differ in quantity, in various encephalic districts. PCNA-labelled cells appeared scattered in the cranial portion of olfactory bulbs, while the PCNA expression has been observed steadily localized with a distinctly continous distribution in cells interposed among the ependymal epithelium which lines the cavities of the proximal portion of the olfactory region and of the cerebral ventricles. DNA synthesis activity has been also found in cells scattered in the telencephalic, diencephalic, mesencephalic and medulla oblongata periventricular grey. This immunoreactivity was not revealable in the cerebellum. Our findings are discussed in the light of bibliographic news. PMID:17580660

  2. Relation of CD117 immunoreactivity and microvascular density in invasive breast carcinoma

    Maha M Amin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: In breast cancer, the expression of CD117 represents a highly controversial subject but the majority of studies have found decreased c-kit expression in malignant breast epithelium. A number of studies have reported that increased intratumoral microvessel density (MVD is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The aim of the study was to assess the relation of CD117 and MVD with other clinicopathological parameters in invasive breast carcinomas using the tissue microarray technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 126 cases of invasive breast carcinoma of different histological types and grades were collected from files of a pathology department during 2010. Clinicopathological and histological parameters were evaluated. Sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues microarray blocks were immunostained with CD117 and CD34. Statistical analysis of data was done using SPSS, version 16.0. Results: About 29% of invasive breast carcinomas were CD117 positive. There were significant differences between expression of CD117 in the tumor epithelial cells and age of the patient; tumor grade; tumor size, and LN metastasis. Also, there was significant relation between expression of CD117 in the tumor epithelial cells and MVD, expression of estrogen, and progesterone receptors. On multivariate analysis, the most important predictors of negativity of CD117 were tumor size and positive lymph node involvement. Conclusion: Lack of CD117 immunoreactivity in invasive breast carcinoma was associated with features of more aggressive tumor behavior as higher microvessel density, larger size, higher tumor grade, more lymph node metastasis, and negative estrogen and progesterone receptors.

  3. Astroglial distribution of neurokinin-2 receptor immunoreactivity in the rat spinal cord.

    Zerari, F; Karpitskiy, V; Krause, J; Descarries, L; Couture, R

    1998-06-01

    Two mouse monoclonal antibodies, 11H9.1 and 1G7.10, raised against the COOH-terminus peptide (359-390) of the rat neurokinin-2 receptor, were used to visualize by light and electron microscope immunocytochemistry the distribution of this receptor in adult rat spinal cord. At all spinal levels, immunoreactivity was mainly observed in two narrow crescentic zones bordering the gray matter of the dorsal and ventral horns, and around the central canal. In the light microscope, this labelling was the densest within the outer part of lamina I facing the dorsal column, where it took the form of minute dots and streaks scattered in the neuropil. In the electron microscope, such a localization was exclusively astrocytic and essentially involved astrocytic leaflets, as indicated by the size and irregular shape of the immunostained processes, their location between and around neuronal profiles, and their occasional display of glial filaments. The diaminobenzidine reaction product showed some predilection for the plasma membrane and was occasionally seen at gap junctions of these labelled processes. Many labelled astrocytic leaflets were observed in the immediate vicinity of axon terminals containing large dense-cored vesicles, and around fibres morphologically identifiable as primary afferent, unmyelinated C-fibres. These observations suggest that astrocytic neurokinin-2 receptors could define the effective sphere of neurokinin A neuromodulation in rat spinal cord, via alterations in the regulation of the extracellular environment and glutamate uptake by astrocytes and/or the release of putative astroglial mediators. The astrocyte neurokinin-2 receptors, activated by extrasynaptic neurokinin A, might thus co-operate with neurokinin-1 and neurokinin-3 neuronal receptors in the modulation of nociceptive information. PMID:9578409

  4. Postnatal development of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity in area 17 of normal and visually deprived rhesus monkeys.

    Tigges, M; Tigges, J; McDonald, J K; Slattery, M; Fernandes, A

    1989-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were used to examine neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactive neurons and fibers in area 17 of rhesus monkeys during the first year of life. NPY-immunoreactive (+) neurons are nonpyramidal cells which are either multipolar, bipolar, or bitufted in shape. They occur most frequently in layer 6 and the subjacent white matter, are sparser in the supragranular layers, and absent from layer 4C. Labeled somata in the supragranular layers are smaller compared to those in layer 6 and the white matter. A typical axon originates from the NPY+ soma or from a primary dendrite and frequently is varicose. Distribution and morphologies of NPY+ neurons in area 17 of infants are similar to those of adult monkeys. Thus, it seems that NPY+ neurons in rhesus monkeys are mature from birth. NPY+ fibers occur in area 17 from birth; however, they differ in density and distribution from those of older infant and adult monkeys. At birth, a prominent fiber plexus is found in the deepest part of layer 1, and another in the white matter. Immunoreactive processes are sparse in the remaining cortical gray, except for some vertical fibers extending from pia to white matter. By 4 months of age, labeled fibers form a coarse network in layers 2, 3, 5, and 6. In addition, a distinct plexus extends through layers 4B, 4A, and the lowest aspect of layer 3. Also, a thin immunoreactive fiber band is found at the bottom of layer 4C. In the remainder of layer 4C, NPY+ fibers are scant. The supragranular layers also exhibit a unique immunoreactive "snarl" of fibers. Increases in density of NPY+ processes in the older infants are gradual so that between 7 and 13 months of age, NPY+ fibers appear to have achieved adultlike densities. These observations indicate that NPY+ fibers in area 17 of newborn rhesus monkeys undergo postnatal maturation which reaches a plateau around 4 months of age. After monocular visual deprivation from birth to 4 months of age, either by eyelid suture or by occlusion with an opaque contact lens, density and distribution of NPY+ neurons and fibers, including snarls, appear similar to those of age-matched undeprived infants. Thus, disruption of the normal binocular input does not seem to arrest the maturation of the NPY system in area 17 of rhesus monkeys during a sensitive period of early postnatal development. PMID:2487655

  5. Lack of TIMP-1 tumour cell immunoreactivity predicts effect of adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy in patients (n=647) with primary breast cancer

    Willemoe, Gro L.; Hertel, Pernille Bræmer; Bartels, Annette; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Balslev, Eva; Rasmussen, Birgitte B.; Mouridsen, H T; Ejlertsen, Bent Laursen; Brunner, Nils

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: A number of prospective studies have shown that adjuvant CEF significantly improves disease-free and overall survival as compared to CMF in breast cancer patients. Our aim was to determine whether the benefit of epirubicin versus methotrexate differs according to TIMP-1 tumour cell immun...... immunoreactivity seems to predict a favourable effect of epirubicin-containing adjuvant therapy in primary breast cancer. However, an independent study is awaited to validate the potential predictive value of TIMP-1 immunoreactivity...

  6. A pilot study evaluating changes in pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity concentrations in canines treated with L-asparaginase (ASNase), vincristine, or both for lymphoma

    Wright, Zachary; Steiner, Joerg; Suchodolski, Jan; Rogers, Kenita; Barton, Claudia; Brown, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    L-asparaginase (ASNase) is a common chemotherapy agent for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. L-asparaginase has been reported to cause clinical pancreatitis in both humans and canines. Canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) is now a common diagnostic tool for evaluating pancreatitis in dogs. A total of 52 dogs were enrolled into this study. Canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) concentrations were evaluated before and after administration of ASNase, vincristine, or ...

  7. OPHTHALMOLOGIC ABNORMALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH IMPAIRED HEARING

    Inderjit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the nature of ophthalmologic abnormalities in severe and profound grades of hearing impaired children and to treat visual impairment if any at the earliest . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study was conducted on100 children in the age group of 5 - 14 years with severe and profound hearing loss visiting outpatient department of Ram Lal Eye and ENT hospital Govt. Medical College Amritsar and subjected to detailed ophthalmological examination. RESULTS: 100 children in the age group 5 - 14 years with hearing impairment were enrolled for t he study , 68 had profound and 32 had severe hearing loss . Visual disorders were found to be as high as 71%. Highest percentage was seen in children aged 7 years. Majority of them (50% had refractive error. Out of these 50 children , 28(56% had myopia , 10 (20% hypermetropia and 12(24% had astigmatism . The other ophthalmic abnormalities in our study were conjunctivitis 14(19.71% , fundus abnormalities and squint 11(15.49% , blepharitis 5 (7.04% , vitamin A deficiency 6 (8.04% , amblyopia 8 (11.26% , pupil disorder 3 (4.22% , cataract 3 (4.22% and heterochromia iridis 7 (9.85%. CONCLUSION : The high prevalence of ophthalmic abnormalities in deaf children mandate screening them for possible ophthalmic abnormalities. Early diagnosis and correction of visual d isturbances would go a long way in social and professional performance of these children.

  8. Adolescents' drawings of their cardiac abnormality.

    Wang, QiFeng; Hay, Margaret; Clarke, David; Menahem, Samuel

    2011-10-01

    Following advances in overall management and improved outcomes, an increasing number of adolescents with cardiac disease are reaching adult age. Patients in general, including adolescents, seem to have a poor knowledge of their illness, which may further reflect in a less optimal quality of life. As a guide to their knowledge of their cardiac condition, adolescents were asked to draw a diagram of their cardiac abnormality. Relatively well adolescents aged 12-20 years with a cardiac abnormality were consecutively recruited from an ambulatory setting. All were asked to draw a picture of their cardiac abnormality and describe their condition. A total of 120 patients were recruited and had conditions varying from a hyperplastic right ventricle to a small ventricular septal defect. Only 60 (50%) of the patients completed a drawing, of which one-third did so at the time of attendance. Nevertheless, there was no difference between the accuracy of the adolescents' drawings completed at home or at the clinic. Only three patients drew an accurate diagram of their congenital cardiac abnormality. A further nine patients drew a reasonably correct diagram, 13 patients a partially correct diagram, whereas 35 patients submitted incorrect diagrams. Adolescents with congenital cardiac disease, many having been cared for since infancy with regular cardiological reviews, had a poor anatomical knowledge of their cardiac lesion, as reflected by their inability to correctly draw their abnormality. These findings suggest the need for improved strategies in developing appropriate education programmes for this patient population. PMID:21554829

  9. Cellular and subcellular distribution of substance P receptor immunoreactivity in the dorsal vagal complex of the rat and cat: a light and electron microscope study.

    Baude, A; Shigemoto, R

    1998-12-14

    Immunoreactivity for the substance P receptor (NK1 receptor) has been investigated by light and electron microscopy in the dorsal vagal complexes of adult rats and cats. The general pattern of NK1 immunoreactivity was similar for both rat and cat. Numerous NK1-immunoreactive neurons were present in the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve. The density of labelled neurons differed between the subnuclei of the nucleus of the solitary tract. Overall, the efferent neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve highly expressed NK1 when compared to neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract. The results are discussed with reference to the viscerotopic organisation of the dorsal vagal complex. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that NK1 immunoreactivity was present only at the membrane surface of somatic and dendritic profiles of neurons. No labelling was found in axon terminals, axons, or glial processes. NK1 immunoreactivity, as revealed by a preembedding immunogold technique in serial ultrathin sections, was preferentially located at nonsynaptic sites. A semiquantitative study suggested that the density of NK1 receptors is statistically higher at membrane sites free of any contact (synaptic or not) with axon terminals. The subcellular localisation of NK1 immunoreactivity was similar for neurons of both rat and cat. These results suggest that in the dorsal vagal complex, substance P might act on NK1 receptors through a process of volume transmission. PMID:9845242

  10. Osseous temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatic disease

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was compared with hypocycloidal tomography in 30 joints of 15 adults with rheumatic disease. CT included 1.5 mm thick axial scans (at 1.0 mm intervals) with reformatted oblique sagittal and oblique coronal sections. Multisection (at 2.0 mm intervals) tomography included oblique sagittal and occasionally, oblique coronal sections. CT demonstrated bone abnormalities in 21 and tomography in 20 joints, indicating high agreement between the imaging modalities regarding number of abnormal TMJs. Bone structures were, however, better visualized by multiplanar CT due to superior contrast and spatial resolution particularly in the most lateral and medial parts of the joint, indicating superiority of CT for depicting subtle bony TMJ abnormalities in patients with rheumatic disease. (orig.)

  11. Report on Congress on abnormal occurrences

    Section 208 of the energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1991. The report discusses six abnormal occurrences, none of which involved a nuclear power plant. Five of the events occurred at NRC-licensed facilities: one involved a significant degradation of plant safety at a nuclear fuel cycle facility, one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration, and three involved medical therapy misadministrations. An Agreement State (Arizona) reported one abnormal occurrence that involved medical therapy misadministrations

  12. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  13. Radiographic abnormalities in tricyclic acid overdose

    Several case reports have described adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to tricyclic acid (TCA) overdose. During a 1-year period 83 patients requiring intubation secondary to drug overdose were evaluated. Abnormalities on chest radiographs occurred in 26 (50%) of the 54 patients with TCA overdose, compared to six (21%) of the 29 patients overdosed with other drugs. In addition, five (9%) of the patients with TCA overdose subsequently had radiographic and clinical abnormalities meeting the criteria for ARDS. Only one (3%) of the patients with non-TCA overdose subsequently had change suggesting ARDS. TCAs should be added to the list of drugs associated with ARDS, and TCA overdose should be considered a major risk factor in the development of radiographically evident abnormalities

  14. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  15. Abnormal Head Position in Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome

    Noval, Susana; González-Manrique, Mar; Rodríguez-Del Valle, José María; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José María

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or take the form of a tilt, even though the nystagmus itself is horizontal. The aim of this article is to review available information about the origin and treatment of the abnormal head position associated to nystagmus, and to describe our treatment strategies. PMID:24533187

  16. Cone photopigment bleaching abnormalities in diabetes.

    Elsner, A E; Burns, S A; Lobes, L A; Doft, B H

    1987-04-01

    We have used a color-matching technique to obtain estimates of the optical density of cone photopigments as a function of retinal illuminance in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We found that the half-bleach illuminance of some patients is abnormally high. That is, it takes more light to bleach an equivalent amount of photopigment in these patients. Since low illuminance color matches for these patients are normal, this implies that these patients have normal amounts of photopigment, but the photopigment is not bleaching normally. This result clearly points to abnormalities in the outer retina of these diabetic patients. The most likely causes of this abnormality are either decreases in the ability of the cones to absorb light, or an increased rate of regeneration of the cone photopigments. PMID:3557875

  17. [Pathogenetical aspects of complicated abnormal renal mobility].

    Tatevosian, A S; Tonian, A G; Khalafian, A A

    2013-01-01

    The present article is devoted to the search for topographic and anatomical factors of abnormal renal mobility that affects renal hemodynamics and determines complicated course of nephroptosis. Comparative evaluation of hemodynamics in patients with chronic pyelonephritis and symptomatic hypertension in abnormal renal mobility depending on the distribution on the degree of rotation and skeletotopic omission of kidney was performed. According to the data of frequency analysis and correspondence analysis of Statistics 6.0 program, it was determined that kidney rotated in three dimensions, and mainly in II degree descent kidney in study group. It was found that consistent multiple view scanning of patients with abnormal renal mobility allows to accurately assess the violations of tissue blood flow, which determine severity of complications of the disease, and to choose an adequate conservative and surgical treatment in each case. PMID:23789359

  18. Parsing abnormal grain growth in specialty aluminas

    Lawrence, Abigail Kremer

    Grain growth in alumina is strongly affected by the impurities present in the material. Certain impurity elements are known to have characteristic effects on abnormal grain growth in alumina. Specialty alumina powders contain multiple impurity species including MgO, CaO, SiO2, and Na 2O. In this work, sintered samples made from alumina powders containing various amounts of the impurities in question were characterized by their grain size and aspect ratio distributions. Multiple quantitative methods were used to characterize and classify samples with varying microstructures. The grain size distributions were used to partition the grain size population into subpopulations depending on the observed deviation from normal behavior. Using both grain size and aspect ratio a new visual representation for a microstructure was introduced called a morphology frequency map that gives a fingerprint for the material. The number of subpopulations within a sample and the shape of the distribution on the morphology map provided the basis for a classification scheme for different types of microstructures. Also using the two parameters a series of five metrics were calculated that describe the character of the abnormal grains in the sample, these were called abnormal character values. The abnormal character values describe the fraction of grains that are considered abnormal, the average magnitude of abnormality (including both grain size and aspect ratio), the average size, and variance in size. The final metric is the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio for the entire population of grains. The abnormal character values give a sense of how different from "normal" the sample is, given the assumption that a normal sample has a lognormal distribution of grain size and a Gaussian distribution of aspect ratios. In the second part of the work the quantified measures of abnormality were correlated with processing parameters such as composition and heat treatment conditions. A multivariate statistical tool called canonical correlation analysis was adopted to seek out relationships between a set of input variables and the abnormal character values. The input variables include the MgO, CaO, Na 2O, and SiO2 contents, the ratio of MgO:(CaO+SiO2), and the annealing time and temperature. The analysis was applied to 33 different samples and showed that the composition ratio and MgO content were the strongest processing variables. These variables are most closely related to the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio, the average magnitude of abnormality, and the variance in grain size. The physical implications of these relationships are explored for a number of samples with different abnormal grain growth behaviors. Several of the samples contained a beta"-alumina phase that is shown to have a dampening effect on abnormal grain growth. TEM investigation provides evidence that there is a grain boundary complexion with a different composition and structure than the second phase. A series of samples are compared after annealing for different times and are shown to have very different behaviors as a result of the second phase competing with complexions for control over the microstructure.

  19. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  20. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Primary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Objective: To determine the frequency of cytogenetic abnormalities in patients diagnosed as primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) using conventional karyotyping. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Clinical Laboratory, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, between January 2006 - June 2012. Methodology: Patients of all ages and either gender who fulfilled WHO criteria for MDS were included. Cytogenetic analysis was conducted at the time of diagnosis. Patients who had secondary MDS were excluded from analysis. Chromosome identification and karyotype description was done according to the International System for Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN, 1995) and described as frequency percentage. Results: Out of the 122 cases of MDS, 71 patients had their karyotype done at the time of diagnosis, including 42 males (59.2%) and 29 females (40.8%) with median age of 60 years. Forty one (57.7%) showed normal karyotype and 30 (42.3%) showed clonal karyotypic abnormalities at diagnosis. Out of which 14 (19.7%) had single, 11 (15.5%) had complex and 6 (8.5%) had double cytogenetic abnormalities. The common abnormalities found were: trisomy 8 in 7 cases (9.9%), -7/del (7q) in 3 cases (4.2%), -Y and complex 5q in 2 cases (2.8%) each, complex trisomy 8, del 11q , inversion 9, trisomy 19 and del 20q were found in 1 case (1.4%) each. Other abnormalities were found in 11 cases (15.5%). Conclusion: Trisomy 8 was the most common disorder/abnormality found in this study population followed by the complex cytogenetics. (author)

  1. Abnormal vibration induced illusion of movement in essential tremor: evidence for abnormal muscle spindle afferent function

    Frima, N; Grunewald, R

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Vibration induced illusion of movement (VIIM) is abnormal in patients with idiopathic focal dystonia, an abnormality which corrects with fatigue of the vibrated muscle. Since dystonia and essential tremor sometimes coexist in families, we investigated the perception of VIIM and the effect of fatigue on VIIM in patients with essential tremor.

  2. Calcium-binding Protein Calretinin Immunoreactivity in the Dog Superior Colliculus

    We studied calretinin-immunoreactive (IR) fibers and cells in the canine superior colliculus (SC) and studied the distribution and effect of enucleation on the distribution of this protein. Localization of calretinin was immunocytochemically observed. A dense plexus of anti-calretinin-IR fibers was found within the upper part of the superficial gray layer (SGL). Almost all of the labeled fibers were small in diameter with few varicosities. The intermediate and deep layers contained many calretinin-IR neurons. Labeled neurons within the intermediate gray layer (IGL) formed clusters in many sections. By contrast, labeled neurons in the deep gray layer (DGL) did not form clusters. Calretinin-IR neurons in the IGL and DGL varied in morphology and included round/oval, vertical fusiform, stellate, and horizontal neurons. Neurons with varicose dendrites were also labeled in the IGL. Most of the labeled neurons were small to medium in size. Monocular enucleation produced an almost complete reduction of calretinin-IR fibers in the SC contralateral to the enucleation. However, many calretinin-IR cells appeared in the contralateral superficial SC. Enucleation appeared to have no effect on the distribution of calretinin-IR neurons in the contralateral intermediate and deep layers of the SC. The calretinin-IR neurons in the superficial dog SC were heterogeneous small- to medium-sized neurons including round/oval, vertical fusiform, stellate, pyriform, and horizontal in shape. Two-color immunofluorescence revealed that no cells in the dog SC expressed both calretinin and GABA. Many horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled retinal ganglion cells were seen after injections into the superficial layers. The vast majority of the double-labeled cells (HRP and calretinin) were small cells. The present results indicate that antibody to calretinin labels subpopulations of neurons in the dog SC, which do not express GABA. The results also suggest that the calretinin-IR afferents in the superficial layers of the dog SC originate from small class retinal ganglion cells. The expression of calretinin might be changed by the cellular activity of selective superficial collicular neurons. These results are valuable in delineating the basic neurochemical architecture of the dog visual system

  3. Behavioral alterations and Fos protein immunoreactivity in brain regions of bile duct-ligated cirrhotic rats

    LUCIANA LE, SUEUR-MALUF; MILENA B., VIANA; MÁRCIA R., NAGAOKA; ANA LAURA B., AMORIM; AMANDA N., CARDOSO; BRUNA C., RODRIGUES; NATÁLIA F., MENDES; JACKSON C., BITTENCOURT; ISABEL C., CÉSPEDES.

    Full Text Available A Encefalopatia hepática (HE) engloba uma variedade de sintomas neuropsiquiátricos, incluindo ansiedade e disfunção psicomotora. Embora seja uma complicação frequente da cirrose hepática, os substratos neurobiológicos responsáveis por suas manifestações clínicas são em grande parte desconhecidos. No [...] presente estudo, ratos Wistar machos foram submetidos ao procedimento cirúrgico de ligação e secção do ducto biliar (BDL; bile-duct ligation), para indução da cirrose hepática e, no 21º dia após a cirurgia, submetidos aos testes comportamentais no labirinto em cruz elevado (LCE) e campo aberto para avaliação da ansiedade e atividade locomotora. A análise da imunorreatividade à proteína Fos (Fos-ir) foi utilizada para melhor compreender as alterações neurobiológicas presentes nos animais do grupo BDL. Foi realizada a quantificação da concentração de amônia plasmática e análise histopatológica dos fígados. Os ratos do grupo BDL mostraram diminuição significativa na porcentagem de entradas e tempo gasto nos braços abertos do LCE, caracterizando efeito ansiogênico. Estes animais também apresentaram redução significativa na Fos-ir no núcleo septal lateral e núcleo medial da amígdala. A concentração plasmática de amônia foi significativamente mais elevada que a do grupo sham e o diagnóstico de cirrose foi confirmado por análise histopatológica. Estes resultados indicam que o modelo de HE induzido por BDL induz efeito ansiogênico possivelmente relacionado à ativação de circuitos mediadores da ansiedade e à hiperamonemia. Abstract in english Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) encompasses a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, including anxiety and psychomotor dysfunction. Although HE is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis, the neurobiological substrates responsible for its clinical manifestations are largely unclear. In the present stu [...] dy, male Wistar rats were bile duct-ligated (BDL), a procedure which induces liver cirrhosis, and on the 21st day after surgery tested in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and in an open field for anxiety and locomotor activity measurements. Analysis of Fos protein immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) was used to better understand the neurobiological alterations present in BDL animals. Plasma levels of ammonia were quantified and histopathological analysis of the livers was performed. BDL rats showed a significant decrease in the percentage of entries and time spent in the open arms of the EPM, an anxiogenic effect. These animals also presented significant decreases in Fos-ir in the lateral septal nucleus and medial amygdalar nucleus. Their ammonia plasma levels were significantly higher when compared to the sham group and the diagnosis of cirrhosis was confirmed by histopathological analysis. These results indicate that the BDL model induces anxiogenic results, possibly related to changes in the activation of anxiety-mediating circuitries and to increases in ammonia plasma levels.

  4. Behavioral alterations and Fos protein immunoreactivity in brain regions of bile duct-ligated cirrhotic rats

    LUCIANA LE, SUEUR-MALUF; MILENA B., VIANA; MÁRCIA R., NAGAOKA; ANA LAURA B., AMORIM; AMANDA N., CARDOSO; BRUNA C., RODRIGUES; NATÁLIA F., MENDES; JACKSON C., BITTENCOURT; ISABEL C., CÉSPEDES.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A Encefalopatia hepática (HE) engloba uma variedade de sintomas neuropsiquiátricos, incluindo ansiedade e disfunção psicomotora. Embora seja uma complicação frequente da cirrose hepática, os substratos neurobiológicos responsáveis por suas manifestações clínicas são em grande parte desconhecidos. No [...] presente estudo, ratos Wistar machos foram submetidos ao procedimento cirúrgico de ligação e secção do ducto biliar (BDL; bile-duct ligation), para indução da cirrose hepática e, no 21º dia após a cirurgia, submetidos aos testes comportamentais no labirinto em cruz elevado (LCE) e campo aberto para avaliação da ansiedade e atividade locomotora. A análise da imunorreatividade à proteína Fos (Fos-ir) foi utilizada para melhor compreender as alterações neurobiológicas presentes nos animais do grupo BDL. Foi realizada a quantificação da concentração de amônia plasmática e análise histopatológica dos fígados. Os ratos do grupo BDL mostraram diminuição significativa na porcentagem de entradas e tempo gasto nos braços abertos do LCE, caracterizando efeito ansiogênico. Estes animais também apresentaram redução significativa na Fos-ir no núcleo septal lateral e núcleo medial da amígdala. A concentração plasmática de amônia foi significativamente mais elevada que a do grupo sham e o diagnóstico de cirrose foi confirmado por análise histopatológica. Estes resultados indicam que o modelo de HE induzido por BDL induz efeito ansiogênico possivelmente relacionado à ativação de circuitos mediadores da ansiedade e à hiperamonemia. Abstract in english Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) encompasses a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, including anxiety and psychomotor dysfunction. Although HE is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis, the neurobiological substrates responsible for its clinical manifestations are largely unclear. In the present stu [...] dy, male Wistar rats were bile duct-ligated (BDL), a procedure which induces liver cirrhosis, and on the 21st day after surgery tested in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and in an open field for anxiety and locomotor activity measurements. Analysis of Fos protein immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) was used to better understand the neurobiological alterations present in BDL animals. Plasma levels of ammonia were quantified and histopathological analysis of the livers was performed. BDL rats showed a significant decrease in the percentage of entries and time spent in the open arms of the EPM, an anxiogenic effect. These animals also presented significant decreases in Fos-ir in the lateral septal nucleus and medial amygdalar nucleus. Their ammonia plasma levels were significantly higher when compared to the sham group and the diagnosis of cirrhosis was confirmed by histopathological analysis. These results indicate that the BDL model induces anxiogenic results, possibly related to changes in the activation of anxiety-mediating circuitries and to increases in ammonia plasma levels.

  5. Influence of the Carbohydrate Moieties on the Immunoreactivity and Digestibility of the Egg Allergen Ovomucoid

    Benedé, Sara; López-Fandiño, Rosina; Reche, Marta; Molina, Elena; López-Expósito, Iván

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovomucoid (OM) has two carbohydrate chains on each of the first and second domains and one in the third. The contribution of the covalently bound carbohydrate chains to the overall OM allergenicity is controversial. Another aspect directly related with the immunological properties of OM that has not been studied in depth is the importance of the carbohydrate chains on its digestibility. Objective The aim of the study was to assess the involvement of the carbohydrate moieties of OM in its digestibility and allergenic properties. Methods IgE-binding and basophil activation by glycosylated and enzymatically deglycosylated OM (dOM) were compared using blood from egg-allergic patients. The peptides obtained after digestion using a physiologically relevant model were identified by RP-HPLC-MS/MS and the IgE-binding of the resulting fragments was evaluated by DOT-Blot. Results No structural changes were observed after deglycosylation of OM. 80% of the patients showed lower IgE binding to dOM as compared with OM and, in some patients, IgE reactivity could not be inhibited by pre-incubation with dOM. A subtle reduction in the percentage of activated basophils was observed when incubated with dOM as compared to OM. Following simulated digestion, dOM was more extensively degraded than OM, particularly during the gastric phase and both, OM and dOM, yielded, after the duodenal phase, immunoreactive fragments that were totally or partially coincident with previously described epitopes. Conclusion & Clinical Relevance: this work demonstrated an enhanced IgE reactivity towards carbohydrate containing OM in some egg-allergic patients that could be attributed to cross-sensitization or sensitization to the glycosylated components. The carbohydrate chains contributed to an increased resistance to proteolysis, and thus, to its allergenic potency. Evaluation of the products of digestion of OM and dOM revealed the presence of high-frequency IgE-binding epitopes that could remain linked by disulphide bonds. PMID:24244718

  6. Vestibular and oculomotor abnormalities in vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    Corvera, J; Benitez, L D; Lopez-Rios, G; Rabiela, M T

    1980-01-01

    The early diagnosis of vertebrobasilar insufficiency in patients with vertigo as their only symptom was attempted using a battery of vestibulo-oculomotor tests. With this testing procedure, we were able to find abnormal vestibulo-oculomotor mechanisms that could account for the vertigo in 41 of 42 patients. These abnormalities, however, did not fall into an easily recognizable pattern that could be considered characteristic of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. The large intersubject variability probably arises from the very different and widespread lesions that occur at the vestibular and neurological levels as a consequence of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. PMID:6968173

  7. Abnormal carbene-silicon halide complexes.

    Wang, Yuzhong; Xie, Yaoming; Wei, Pingrong; Schaefer, Henry F; Robinson, Gregory H

    2016-04-14

    Reaction of the anionic N-heterocyclic dicarbene (NHDC), [:C{[N(2,6-Pr(i)2C6H3)]2CHCLi}]n (1), with SiCl4 gives the trichlorosilyl-substituted (at the C4 carbon) N-heterocyclic carbene complex (7). Abnormal carbene-SiCl4 complex (8) may be conveniently synthesized by combining 7 with HCl·NEt3. In addition, 7 may react with CH2Cl2 in warm hexane, giving the abnormal carbene-complexed SiCl3(+) cation (9). The nature of the bonding in 9 was probed with complementary DFT computations. PMID:26605692

  8. RARE CYTOGENETIC ABNORMALITIES IN MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES

    Julie Schanz; Friederike Braulke; Detlef Haase

    2015-01-01

    The karyotype represents one of the main cornerstones for the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the revised IPSS-R (IPSS-R) that are most widely used for prognostication in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS, i.e. del(5q), -7/del(7q), +8, complex karyotypes, or –Y have been extensively explored for their prognostic impact. The IPSS-R considers also some less frequent abnormalities such as del(11q), isochromosome 1...

  9. Rare Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Bacher, Ulrike; Schanz, Julie; Braulke, Friederike; Haase, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The karyotype represents one of the main cornerstones for the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the revised IPSS-R (IPSS-R) that are most widely used for prognostication in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS, i.e. del(5q), -7/del(7q), +8, complex karyotypes, or ?Y have been extensively explored for their prognostic impact. The IPSS-R also considers some less frequent abnormalities such as del(11q), isochromosome 1...

  10. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research. PMID:26460794

  11. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  12. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  13. Extensive FUS-immunoreactive Pathology in Juvenile Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Basophilic Inclusions

    Huang, Eric J.; Zhang, Jiasheng; Geser, Felix; Trojanowski, John Q.; Strober, Jonathan B.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Brown, Robert H.; Shapiro, Barbara E.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with basophilic inclusions is a well-recognized entity. However, the molecular underpinnings of this devastating disease are poorly understood. Here, we present genetic and neuropathological characterizations in two young women with fatal rapidly progressive ALS with basophilic inclusions. In one case, a germline mutation (P525L) was detected in the FUS/TLS (fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma) gene, whereas no mutation was identified in the other case. Postmortem examination in both cases revealed severe loss of spinal motor neurons with remaining neurons showing basophilic inclusions that contain abnormal aggregates of FUS proteins and disorganized intracellular organelles, including mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. In both patients, the FUS-positive inclusions were also detected in neurons in layers IV–V of cerebral cortex and several brainstem nuclei. In contrast, spinal motor neurons in patients with late-onset sporadic ALS showed no evidence of abnormal accumulation of FUS protein. These results underscore the importance of FUS mutations and pathology in rapidly progressive juvenile ALS. Furthermore, our study represents the first detailed characterizations of neuropathological findings in rapidly progressive juvenile ALS patients with a mutation in the FUS/TLS gene. PMID:20579074

  14. Estradiol replacement enhances sleep deprivation-induced c-Fos immunoreactivity in forebrain arousal regions of ovariectomized rats.

    Deurveilher, S; Cumyn, E M; Peers, T; Rusak, B; Semba, K

    2008-10-01

    To understand how female sex hormones influence homeostatic mechanisms of sleep, we studied the effects of estradiol (E(2)) replacement on c-Fos immunoreactivity in sleep/wake-regulatory brain areas after sleep deprivation (SD) in ovariectomized rats. Adult rats were ovariectomized and implanted subcutaneously with capsules containing 17beta-E(2) (10.5 microg; to mimic diestrous E(2) levels) or oil. After 2 wk, animals with E(2) capsules received a single subcutaneous injection of 17beta-E(2) (10 microg/kg; to achieve proestrous E(2) levels) or oil; control animals with oil capsules received an oil injection. Twenty-four hours later, animals were either left undisturbed or sleep deprived by "gentle handling" for 6 h during the early light phase, and killed. E(2) treatment increased serum E(2) levels and uterus weights dose dependently, while attenuating body weight gain. Regardless of hormonal conditions, SD increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in all four arousal-promoting areas and four limbic and neuroendocrine nuclei studied, whereas it decreased c-Fos labeling in the sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). Low and high E(2) treatments enhanced the SD-induced c-Fos immunoreactivity in the laterodorsal subnucleus of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis and the tuberomammillary nucleus, and in orexin-containing hypothalamic neurons, with no effect on the basal forebrain and locus coeruleus. The high E(2) treatment decreased c-Fos labeling in the VLPO under nondeprived conditions. These results indicate that E(2) replacement modulates SD-induced or spontaneous c-Fos expression in sleep/wake-regulatory and limbic forebrain nuclei. These modulatory effects of E(2) replacement on neuronal activity may be, in part, responsible for E(2)'s influence on sleep/wake behavior. PMID:18753261

  15. Localisation of NG2 immunoreactive neuroglia cells in the rat locus coeruleus and their plasticity in response to stress

    Johannes Jacobus Van Der Want

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The locus coeruleus (LC nucleus modulates adaptive behavioural responses to stress and dysregulation of LC neuronal activity is implicated in stress-induced mental illnesses. The LC is composed primarily of noradrenergic neurons together with various glial populations. A neuroglia cell-type largely unexplored within the LC is the NG2 cell. NG2 cells serve primarily as oligodendrocyte precursor cells throughout the brain. However, some NG2 cells are in synaptic contact with neurons suggesting a role in information processing. The aim of this study was to neurochemically and anatomically characterise NG2 cells within the rat LC. Furthermore, since NG2 cells have been shown to proliferate in response to traumatic brain injury, we investigated whether such NG2 cells plasticity also occurs in response to emotive insults such as stress. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that NG2 cells were enriched within the pontine region occupied by the LC. Close inspection revealed that a sub-population of NG2 cells were located within unique indentations of LC noradrenergic somata and were immunoreactive for the neuronal marker NeuN whilst NG2 cell processes formed close appositions with clusters immunoreactive for the inhibitory synaptic marker proteins gephyrin and the GABA-A receptor alpha3-subunit, on noradrenergic dendrites. In addition, LC NG2 cell processes were decorated with vesicular glutamate transporter 2 immunoreactive puncta. Finally, ten days of repeated restraint stress significantly increased the density of NG2 cells within the LC. The study demonstrates that NG2 IR cells are integral components of the LC cellular network and they exhibit plasticity as a result of emotive challenges.

  16. Serologic immunoreactivity to Neospora caninum antigens in dogs determined by indirect immunofluorescence, western blotting and dot-ELISA.

    Pinheiro, A M; Costa, M F; Paule, B; Vale, V; Ribeiro, M; Nascimento, I; Schaer, R E; Almeida, M A O; Meyer, R; Freire, S M

    2005-06-10

    Neospora caninum, is a coccidian protozoan known as a major cause of bovine abortion and canine neuropathies. The aim of the present study was to develop a reliable and quick test to detect antibodies to N. caninum in dog sera. Sixty-five serum samples from dogs, including 35 positive and 30 negative for N. caninum antibodies were used for standardization of the test. In parallel, immunoreactivity of the sera to Toxoplasma gondii antigens was investigated using a passive agglutination test. A dot-ELISA test, using soluble extract of N. caninum tachyzoites on nitrocellulose ester membranes, was developed and standardized. SDS-PAGE and complementary analysis of reactivity by Western blotting were used for the characterization of the immunoreactive fractions of all tested sera. The sensitivity and specificity of the dot-ELISA were 94 and 73%, respectively, compared to IFAT at a cut-off of 1:50, and 87 and 100% compared to IFAT at a cut-off of 1:25. Among the sera that tested positively for both IFAT and dot-ELISA, only 8.6% were reactive to T. gondii. The most immunoreactive fractions in Western blots were the 14-, 33-, 42- and 55 kDa bands, with percentages of 42, 60, 42 and 37%, respectively. The 60 kDa band showed a non-specific reaction in 43% of neosporosis-negative animals by both dot-ELISA and IFAT. These results indicate that the dot-ELISA using N. caninum antigen present good sensitivity and specificity, and might be used as a screening test to detect antibodies to N. caninum in dogs. PMID:15893072

  17. Abnormal Events for Emergency Trip in HANARO

    Ahn, Guk Hun; Choi, M. J.; Park, S. I.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, S. J.; Park, J. H.; Kwon, I. C

    2006-12-15

    This report gathers abnormal events related to emergency trip of HANARO that happened during its operation over 10 years since the first criticality on February 1995. The collected examples will be utilized to the HANARO's operators as a useful guide.

  18. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES. METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%. Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%, abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%, prominent occiput (52%, posteriorly rotated (46% and low set ears (44%, and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%. Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%, orofacial clefts (12%, preauricular tags (10%, facial palsy (4%, encephalocele (4%, absence of external auditory canal (2% and asymmetric face (2%. One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature.

  19. Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Refractory Metals

    Noell, Philip J.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2015-11-01

    High-temperature plastic deformation of the body-centered cubic (BCC) refractory metals Mo and Ta can initiate and propagate abnormal grains at significantly lower temperatures and faster rates than is possible by static annealing alone. This discovery reveals a new and potentially important aspect of abnormal grain growth (AGG) phenomena. The process of AGG during plastic deformation at elevated temperatures, termed dynamic abnormal grain growth (DAGG), was observed at homologous temperatures between 0.52 and 0.72 in both Mo and Ta sheet materials; these temperatures are much lower than those for previous observations of AGG in these materials during static annealing. DAGG was used to repeatedly grow single crystals several centimeters in length. Investigations to date have produced a basic understanding of the conditions that lead to DAGG and how DAGG is affected by microstructure in BCC refractory metals. The current state of understanding for DAGG is reviewed in this paper. Attention is given to the roles of temperature, plastic strain, boundary mobility and preexisting microstructure. DAGG is considered for its potential useful applications in solid-state crystal growth and its possibly detrimental role in creating undesired abnormal grains during thermomechanical processing.

  20. An abnormal carbohydrate tolerance in acromegaly

    An abnormal secretion of plasma human growth hormore (hGH) and insulin in 67 acromegalic patients had been previously treated by external pituitary radiation were studied. All subjects, following an overnight fast, a standard 100 g oral glucose tolerance test, were performed and venous blood samples were taken at 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min. They were measured for blood glucose, plasma insulin and hGH. The results of this study have shown that, of the 67 subjects, 23 cases had an abnormal glucose tolerance(34.32%). Diabetes was detected in 17 cases (23.37%) and 6 patients had decreased glucose tolerance(8.69%). In all, hGH levels were consistantly above 5 ng/ml and were not suppressed after an oral glucose load. In these patients, however, about one-third had abnormal glucose tolerance. Low plasma insulin response to glucose and that of the releasing were evident in them than the normal glucose tolerance and a healthy control group. In addition, the mechanism of the abnormal secretion of hGH and insulin were disscussed

  1. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease

  2. Abnormal fetal head shape: aetiology and management

    Petersen, Olav Bjørn; David, Anna; Thomasson, Louise; Chitty, Lyn S

    2007-01-01

    , I-cell disease, Muenke craniosynostosis and two with an as yet undefined craniosynostosis syndrome. Overall, 16.5 % had an underlying genetic syndrome. Conclusions: Abnormal fetal head shape may be a normal variant, but is commonly associated with a wide variety of underlying pathologies. In view of...

  3. Reversible splenial abnormality in hypoglycemic encephalopathy

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Choi, Jeong Yoon; Koh, Seong-Beom [Korea University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Younghen [Korea University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ansan Hospital, Ansan City (Korea)

    2007-03-15

    Lesions involving the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC) have been rarely reported in cases of hypoglycemic brain injury. We identified signal abnormalities in the SCC in three adult patients with hypoglycemic encephalopathy by using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) on a 1.5-T MR scanner. Repeat DWI was performed in all patients following a marked clinical improvement, and MR angiography and routine MRI were also performed. We examined each patient's detailed medical history and blood laboratory tests in order to exclude other conditions causing similar SCC abnormalities. Initial DWI was performed during which each patient showed altered mental status that was attributed to profound hypoglycemia. We observed an identical pattern of DWI abnormality characterized by high signals in the SCC with apparent diffusion coefficient reductions that were reversed completely within several days following appropriate correction of hypoglycemia. T2-weighted or FLAIR images also showed no residual lesion in the SCC and MR angiography was normal in all patients. These case reports suggest that the SCC should be added to the list of selective vulnerability to hypoglycemia and that hypoglycemia, in turn, be included in the differential diagnosis of reversible SCC abnormalities. (orig.)

  4. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  5. Reversible splenial abnormality in hypoglycemic encephalopathy

    Lesions involving the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC) have been rarely reported in cases of hypoglycemic brain injury. We identified signal abnormalities in the SCC in three adult patients with hypoglycemic encephalopathy by using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) on a 1.5-T MR scanner. Repeat DWI was performed in all patients following a marked clinical improvement, and MR angiography and routine MRI were also performed. We examined each patient's detailed medical history and blood laboratory tests in order to exclude other conditions causing similar SCC abnormalities. Initial DWI was performed during which each patient showed altered mental status that was attributed to profound hypoglycemia. We observed an identical pattern of DWI abnormality characterized by high signals in the SCC with apparent diffusion coefficient reductions that were reversed completely within several days following appropriate correction of hypoglycemia. T2-weighted or FLAIR images also showed no residual lesion in the SCC and MR angiography was normal in all patients. These case reports suggest that the SCC should be added to the list of selective vulnerability to hypoglycemia and that hypoglycemia, in turn, be included in the differential diagnosis of reversible SCC abnormalities. (orig.)

  6. Abnormal Lobulation in a Dogs Right Lung

    Ayse Serbest

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an abnormal lobulation of right lung, observed in a 3-4 years old, female Kangal dog was reported. The cranial lobe was found to be in two parts by means of an accessory fissure.

  7. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  8. Morphological Abnormalities of Thalamic Subnuclei in Migraine

    Magon, Stefano; May, Arne; Stankewitz, Anne; Goadsby, Peter J; Tso, Amy R; Ashina, Messoud; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Seifert, Christian L; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Müller, Jannis; Sprenger, Till

    2015-01-01

    migraine. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: This multicenter imaging study shows morphological thalamic abnormalities in a large cohort of patients with episodic migraine compared with healthy subjects using state-of-the-art MRI and advanced, fully automated multiatlas segmentation techniques. The results stress...

  9. Sensory Abnormalities in Autism: A Brief Report

    Klintwall Lars; Holm, Anette; Eriksson, Mats; Carlsson, Lotta Hoglund; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Hedvall, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sensory abnormalities were assessed in a population-based group of 208 20-54-month-old children, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and referred to a specialized habilitation centre for early intervention. The children were subgrouped based upon degree of autistic symptoms and cognitive level by a research team at the centre. Parents…

  10. Immunoreactive inhibin-like material in serum and gastric juice of patients with benign and malignant diseases of the stomach.

    Shanbhag, S. A.; Sheth, A. R.; Nanivadekar, S. A.; Sheth, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    Immunoreactive inhibin-like material (ILM) was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in serum and gastric juice samples of 23 fasting normal men, 27 men with chronic superficial gastritis (CSG), and 21 men with carcinoma of stomach (5 for gastric analysis). Serum ILM levels in carcinoma of stomach patients (367 +/- 55.5 ng ml-1) were significantly higher than in normal men (15.4 +/- 2.6 ng ml-1; P less than 0.01) and in patients with CSG (109.8 +/- 17.7 ng ml-1; P less than 0.05). Sixty two per ...

  11. Loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactivity in mouse brain regions after repeated intermittent administration of esketamine, but not R-ketamine.

    Yang, Chun; Han, Mei; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Ren, Qian; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-05-30

    Clinical use of the rapid antidepressant drug ketamine is limited, due to psychotomimetic side effects. R-ketamine appears to be a potent, long-lasting and safer antidepressant, relative to S-ketamine (esketamine), since it is free of psychotomimetic side effects. Repeated, intermittent administration of esketamine (10mg/kg, once per week for 8-weeks), but not R-ketamine, caused loss of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of mouse brains, regions associated with psychosis. This study suggests that repeated intermittent use of R-ketamine is safer than esketamine in the treatment of depression. PMID:27043274

  12. Characterization of β-endorphin-immunoreactivity in limbic brain structures of rats self-administering heroin or cocaine

    Sweep, C G J; Van Ree, J.M.; Wiegant, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of intravenous self-administration of 30 μg infusions of either heroin or cocaine, or saline on the concentrations of β-endorphin-immunoreactivity (βE-IR) in the anterior part of the rat brain limbic system were studied. Self-administration of heroin and cocaine for 5 daily sessions resulted in a marked reduction of the concentrations of βE-IR in the nucleus accumbens, rostral striatum, septum and hippocampus at the time of the scheduled next session on day 6. In pooled extracts o...

  13. Injected TFF1 and TFF3 bind to TFF2-immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract in rats

    Poulsen, S S; Thulesen, J; Hartmann, B; Kissow, Hannelouise; Nexø, Ebba; Thim, L

    2003-01-01

    injected TFF2 ends up in the mucus layer. In the present study, tissue binding and metabolism of parenterally administered human TFF1 and TFF3 in rats were described and compared to the immunohistochemical localization of the TFF peptides. 125I-TFF1 monomer and 125I-TFF3 mono- and dimer were given...... excess unlabelled peptide. The TFF peptides were localized in histologic sections from the GI tract by immunohistochemistry. Injected TFF3 dimer (12%) was taken up by the GI tract. At autoradiography, grains were localized to the same cells that were immunoreactive to TFF2. The binding could be displaced...

  14. Serotonin immunoreactive interneurons in the brain of the Remipedia: new insights into the phylogenetic affinities of an enigmatic crustacean taxon

    Stemme Torben

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Remipedia, a group of homonomously segmented, cave-dwelling, eyeless arthropods have been regarded as basal crustaceans in most early morphological and taxonomic studies. However, molecular sequence information together with the discovery of a highly differentiated brain led to a reconsideration of their phylogenetic position. Various conflicting hypotheses have been proposed including the claim for a basal position of Remipedia up to a close relationship with Malacostraca or Hexapoda. To provide new morphological characters that may allow phylogenetic insights, we have analyzed the architecture of the remipede brain in more detail using immunocytochemistry (serotonin, acetylated α-tubulin, synapsin combined with confocal laser-scanning microscopy and image reconstruction techniques. This approach allows for a comprehensive neuroanatomical comparison with other crustacean and hexapod taxa. Results The dominant structures of the brain are the deutocerebral olfactory neuropils, which are linked by the olfactory globular tracts to the protocerebral hemiellipsoid bodies. The olfactory globular tracts form a characteristic chiasm in the center of the brain. In Speleonectes tulumensis, each brain hemisphere contains about 120 serotonin immunoreactive neurons, which are distributed in distinct cell groups supplying fine, profusely branching neurites to 16 neuropilar domains. The olfactory neuropil comprises more than 300 spherical olfactory glomeruli arranged in sublobes. Eight serotonin immunoreactive neurons homogeneously innervate the olfactory glomeruli. In the protocerebrum, serotonin immunoreactivity revealed several structures, which, based on their position and connectivity resemble a central complex comprising a central body, a protocerebral bridge, W-, X-, Y-, Z-tracts, and lateral accessory lobes. Conclusions The brain of Remipedia shows several plesiomorphic features shared with other Mandibulata, such as deutocerebral olfactory neuropils with a glomerular organization, innervations by serotonin immunoreactive interneurons, and connections to protocerebral neuropils. Also, we provided tentative evidence for W-, X-, Y-, Z-tracts in the remipedian central complex like in the brain of Malacostraca, and Hexapoda. Furthermore, Remipedia display several synapomorphies with Malacostraca supporting a sister group relationship between both taxa. These homologies include a chiasm of the olfactory globular tract, which connects the olfactory neuropils with the lateral protocerebrum and the presence of hemiellipsoid bodies. Even though a growing number of molecular investigations unites Remipedia and Cephalocarida, our neuroanatomical comparison does not provide support for such a sister group relationship.

  15. Parenchymal abnormalities associated with developmental venous anomalies

    To report a retrospective series of 84 cerebral developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), focusing on associated parenchymal abnormalities within the drainage territory of the DVA. DVAs were identified during routine diagnostic radiological work-up based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (60 cases), computed tomography (CT) (62 cases) or both (36 cases). Regional parenchymal modifications within the drainage territory of the DVA, such as cortical or subcortical atrophy, white matter density or signal alterations, dystrophic calcifications, presence of haemorrhage or a cavernous-like vascular malformation (CVM), were noted. A stenosis of the collecting vein of the DVA was also sought for. Brain abnormalities within the drainage territory of a DVA were encountered in 65.4% of the cases. Locoregional brain atrophy occurred in 29.7% of the cases, followed by white matter lesions in 28.3% of MRI investigations and 19.3% of CT investigations, CVMs in 13.3% of MRI investigations and dystrophic calcification in 9.6% of CT investigations. An intracranial haemorrhage possibly related to a DVA occurred in 2.4% cases, and a stenosis on the collecting vein was documented in 13.1% of cases. Parenchymal abnormalities were identified for all DVA sizes. Brain parenchymal abnormalities were associated with DVAs in close to two thirds of the cases evaluated. These abnormalities are thought to occur secondarily, likely during post-natal life, as a result of chronic venous hypertension. Outflow obstruction, progressive thickening of the walls of the DVA and their morphological organization into a venous convergence zone are thought to contribute to the development of venous hypertension in DVA. (orig.)

  16. Transdifferentiation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Tyrosine Hydroxylase Immunoreactive Cells Associated with Angiogenesis in Parkinsonian Rats

    Maryam Haji Ghasem Kashani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study is an attempt to examine the transdifferentiation of bone marrowstromal cells (BMSCs into tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive cells in parkinsonian ratsassociated with angiogenesis.Materials and Methods: In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats received unilateral stereotaxicinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine(6-OHDA into the left corpus striatum and then weredivided into two groups. One group, the negative control, received only medium while theother group was treated with BMSCs. BMSCs were harvested from femur bones, labeledwith bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and then transplanted into parkinsonian rats, where a behavioralstudy and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the treatment.Results: The results showed statistically significant improvement in rotational behavior.Anti-BrdU antibody showed engraftment of the transplanted cells at the transplantationsite. Additionally, double immunolabeling confirmed that these cells were positive for neurofilament-200 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH.Conclusion: It may be concluded that BMSCs transplants could engraft and differentiateinto TH immunoreactive cells which may cause recovery from motor deficits. Also, BMSCsmay contribute to angiogenesis at the transplantation site.

  17. Absent and abundant MET immunoreactivity is associated with poor prognosis of patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    De Herdt, Maria J; Willems, Stefan M; van der Steen, Berdine; Noorlag, Rob; Verhoef, Esther I; van Leenders, Geert J L H; van Es, Robert J J; KoljenoviÄ, Senada; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J; Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2016-03-15

    Although the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) MET is widely expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), its prognostic value remains unclear. This might be due to the use of a variety of antibodies and scoring systems. Here, the reliability of five commercial C-terminal MET antibodies (D1C2, CVD13, SP44, C-12 and C-28) was evaluated before examining the prognostic value of MET immunoreactivity in HNSCC. Using cancer cell lines, it was shown that D1C2 and CVD13 specifically detect MET under reducing, native and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) conditions. Immunohistochemical staining of routinely FFPE oral SCC with D1C2 and CVD13 demonstrated that D1C2 is most sensitive in the detection of membranous MET. Examination of membranous D1C2 immunoreactivity with 179 FFPE oral and oropharyngeal SCC - represented in a tissue microarray - illustrated that staining is either uniform (negative or positive) across tumors or differs between a tumor's center and periphery. Ultimately, statistical analysis revealed that D1C2 uniform staining is significantly associated with poor 5-year overall and disease free survival of patients lacking vasoinvasive growth (HR = 3.019, p < 0.001; HR = 2.559, p < 0.001). These findings might contribute to reliable stratification of patients eligible for treatment with biologicals directed against MET. PMID:26909606

  18. Immunoreactivity of monoclonal anti-melanoma antibodies in relation to the amount of radioactive iodine substituted to the antibody molecule

    Matzku, S.; Kirchgessner, H.; Dippold, W.G.; Brueggen, J.

    1985-11-01

    The damage to monoclonal anti-melanoma antibodies caused by iodination was investigated by comparing the results obtained using the chloramine-T method and the 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3..cap alpha..,6..cap alpha..-diphenyl-glycoluril (IODOGEN) method at different levels of iodine substitution to the molecule. The level of substitution at which losses in immunoreactivity occurred were evaluated in each monoclonal antibody (MAb) studied. This phenomenon was not dependent on the method of substitution, provided that mild conditions of reaction were used. Lineweaver-Burk plots and - in cases of alterations in binding affinity - Scatchard plots were found to provide an adequate description of the binding behaviour of individual MAbs after labelling. Immunoreactivity was shown to be determined not only by the proportion of bona fide reactive MAb molecules, but also by a substitution-dependent decrease in affinity constants. The practical consequences of altered binding parameters were demonstrated by quantitating specific antibodyaccumulation in melanoma transplants in vivo.

  19. Proliferative enteropathy (PE: Induced changes in galanin-like immunoreactivity in the enteric nervous system of the porcine distal colon

    Gonkowski S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of galanin (GAL like immonoreactivity in the porcine descending colon during proliferative entheropathy (PE. Accordingly, the distribution pattern of GAL - like immunoreactive (GAL-LI nerve structures was studied by the immunofluorescence technique in the circular muscle layer, myenteric (MP, outer submucous (OSP and inner submucous plexuses (ISP, as well as in the mucosal layer of the porcine descending colon under physiological conditions and during PE. In control animals GAL-LI perikarya have been shown to constitute 4.03 ± 0.1%, 6.67 ± 0.3% and 11.20 ± 0.5% in MP, OSP and ISP, respectively. PE caused changes in the GAL - like immunoreactivity, which differed in particular parts of the studied bowel segment. During PE the number of GAL-LI perikarya amounted to 2.90±0.5%, 8.42±1.0% and 21.72±1,4% within the MP, OSP and ISP, respectively. Moreover PE caused an increase in the number of GAL-LI nerve fibers in the colonic circular muscle and mucosal layers, as well as in all intramural plexuses, especially in ISP, where nearly every ganglion contained a very dense meshwork of the GAL-positive nerve fibers under the studied pathological factor. This study for the first time reports on changes in GAL-LI nerve structures of the porcine descending colon during Lawsonia intracellularis infection.

  20. Serotonin-immunoreactive neurons in the ventral nerve cord of Crustacea: a character to study aspects of arthropod phylogeny.

    Harzsch, S; Waloszek, D

    2000-01-01

    The number of serotonin-expressing neurons in the nervous system of Euarthropoda is small and their neurites have a characteristic branching pattern. They can be identified individually, which provides a character well suited for phylogenetic analyses. In order to gain data that may be useful in the ongoing discussion on insect-crustacean relationships, we documented the pattern of serotonin immunoreactive neurons in the ventral nerve cord of four crustacean species: the phyllocarid malacostracan Nebalia bipes Fabricius, 1780 (Phyllocarida, Leptostraca) and the entomostracans Artemia salina Linnaeus, 1758 (Branchiopoda, Anostraca, Sarsostraca), Triops cancriformis Bosc, 1801 (Branchiopoda, Phyllopoda, Calmanostraca, Notostraca), and Leptestheria dahalacensis Rüppell, 1837 (Branchiopoda, Phyllopoda, Diplostraca, Conchostraca, Spinicaudata). In the entomostracan taxa investigated, the pattern of serotonergic cells in the thoracic hemiganglia comprises an anterior and a posterior bilateral pair of neurons with ipsi- and/or contralateral neurites. Comparing these data to existing information on serotonin-immunoreactivity in the ventral nerve cord of other malacostracan and entomostracan groups enabled us to determine several features of these thoracic neurons being part of the ground pattern of these taxa. Our data demonstrate that studying individually identifiable neurons in Arthropoda can be used to analyse the phylogeny of this taxon. PMID:18088936

  1. Abnormal cervical cytology and health care use

    Frederiksen, Maria Eiholm; Baillet, Miguel Vázquez-Prada; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Rygaard, Carsten; Hallas, Jesper; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the long-term use of health care services in women with abnormal cytology results compared to women with normal cytology results. METHODS: We did a nationwide population-based study, using women aged 23 to 59years participating in the national organized...... cytology result and for the 5-year period "after" the result. RESULTS: During the "before" period exposed women had more contacts to GPs, more contacts to psychologists/psychiatrist, and more hospital admissions than non-exposed women. In both exposed and non-exposed women, health care use increased from...... the "before" to the "after" period. This increase was significantly higher for exposed than non-exposed women regarding contacts to GP, admissions to hospitals, and drug use. CONCLUSION: Women with abnormal cytology results constitute a selected group with a higher health care use than other women...

  2. [Major risk factors of glucose metabolism abnormalities].

    Misnikova, I V; Dreval', A V; Barsukov, I A; Dzebisashvili, T G

    2011-01-01

    Using the data of population base study of adult residents of 2 districts of Moscow Region (2638 persons), prevalence is studied and influence on occurrence of glucose metabolism abnormalities of major risk factors is estimated. Influence of risk factors was estimated with Cox regression analyses. High prevalence undiagnosed glucose metabolism abnormalities among persons (24,9%) is taped; it is established that relative risk of diabetes mellitus type 2 significantly raised at persons is more than 50 years of age independently of BMI, at the same time first-degree obesity increased relative risk of diabetes mellitus type 2 in 4,3 times and third-degree obesity--in 9,0 times independently of age. PMID:22232886

  3. Abnormal grain growth in TD-nickel.

    Petrovic, J. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Characteristics of the coarse grain transformation occurring in TD-nickel 1 in. bar under certain conditions of deformation and annealing were examined. The transformation exhibits Avrami-type kinetics, with an activation energy of 250 kcal per mole. Characteristics of untransformed regions are like those of the as-received state. The transformed grain size increases with increasing deformation and decreasing annealing temperature. The coarse grain transformation is significantly different from primary recrystallization in pure nickel. Its characteristics cannot be rationalized in terms of primary recrystallization concepts, but may be explained in terms of an abnormal grain growth description. The coarse grain transformation in TD-nickel is abnormal grain growth rather than primary recrystallization. The analysis suggests an explanation for the effect of thermomechanical history on the deformation and annealing behavior of TD-nickel.

  4. Embalse NGS: Abnormal event procedures development lifecycle

    Based on the present used philosophy in Canada and in Atucha Nuclear Generating Station (Argentina) it was decided to develop the Abnormal Event Procedures (EOP's) in a logical diagram format. The EOP's have in general two parts: the diagnosis and the operative action to mitigate the event. Some serious incidents can be resolved by the EOP's, but the philosophy is first, to satisfy the EOP's requirements. Taking into account the operating experience, the Final Safety Report and the results of simulations done by appropriate codes, it was possible to obtain the corresponding sequence for each abnormal event. With the information available in the Control Room (windows, alarms, trends, etc) for each part of the EOP's was associated the instrumentation that the operator must observe. 3 figs

  5. Trace element abnormalities in chronic uremia

    We studied the elemental composition of autopsy tissue samples to characterize the trace element changes induced in various human tissues by uremia. Samples from the United States and Australia, including those from 120 uremic patients who had been on dialysis, 29 uremic patients who had not been on dialysis, and 64 control subjects, were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence. Tissues analyzed were aorta, bone, brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, and spleen; elements measured included potassium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium, bromine, rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, tin, and uranium. Uremic abnormalities that were statistically very significant were found, including increases of calcium, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, and tin and decreases of potassium and rubidium. The distribution of iron, copper, and zinc are altered. We conclude that these abnormalities are primarily the result of the uremia and that, generally, they are neither greatly moderated nor exacerbated by the dialysis procedure

  6. Abnormal cervical cytology and health care use

    Frederiksen, Maria Eiholm; Baillet, Miguel Vázquez-Prada; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Rygaard, Carsten; Hallas, Jesper; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the long-term use of health care services in women with abnormal cytology results compared to women with normal cytology results. METHODS: We did a nationwide population-based study, using women aged 23 to 59years participating in the national organized...... cervical cancer screening program. We included a study population of 40,153 women with abnormal cytology (exposed) and 752,627 women with normal cytology (non-exposed). We retrieved data from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Pathology Data Bank, the National Health Service, the National...... cytology result and for the 5-year period "after" the result. RESULTS: During the "before" period exposed women had more contacts to GPs, more contacts to psychologists/psychiatrist, and more hospital admissions than non-exposed women. In both exposed and non-exposed women, health care use increased from...

  7. Trace element abnormalities in chronic uremia.

    Smythe, W R; Alfrey, A C; Craswell, P W; Crouch, C A; Ibels, L S; Kubo, H; Nunnelley, L L; Rudolph, H

    1982-03-01

    We studied the elemental composition of autopsy tissue samples to characterize the trace element changes induced in various human tissues by uremia. Samples from the United States and Australia, including those from 120 uremic patients who had been on dialysis, 29 uremic patients who had not been on dialysis, and 64 control subjects, were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence. Tissues analyzed were aorta, bone, brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, and spleen; elements measured included potassium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium, bromine, rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, tin, and uranium. Uremic abnormalities that were statistically very significant were found, including increases of calcium, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, and tin and decreases of potassium and rubidium. The distribution of iron, copper, and zinc are altered. We conclude that these abnormalities are primarily the result of the uremia and that, generally, they are neither greatly moderated nor exacerbated by the dialysis procedure. PMID:7059092

  8. Migraine and structural abnormalities in the brain

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim is to provide an overview of recent studies of structural brain abnormalities in migraine and to discuss the potential clinical significance of their findings. RECENT FINDINGS: Brain structure continues to be a topic of extensive research in migraine. Despite advances in...... neuroimaging techniques, it is not yet clear if migraine is associated with grey matter changes. Recent large population-based studies sustain the notion of increased prevalence of white matter abnormalities in migraine, and possibly of silent infarct-like lesions. The clinical relevance of this association is...... not clear. Structural changes are not related to cognitive decline, but a link to an increased risk of stroke, especially in patients with aura, cannot be ruled out. SUMMARY: Migraine may be a risk factor for structural changes in the brain. It is not yet clear how factors such as migraine sub...

  9. Gastric emptying abnormalities in progressive systemic sclerosis

    The authors studied gastric emptying (GE) in patients with peripheral manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) using a radionuclide method. 18 patients underwent esophageal manometry and a GE study using chicken liver labeled in vivo with Tc-99m sulfur colloid as a marker of solid emptying. GE was also measured in 13 normal volunteers. 4 PSS patients with normal esophageal motility also had normal GE. The GE of 14 PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility was significantly (p < 0.05) delayed; with 67.4% retention of isotope after 2 hours compared to 49.8 in normals. The authors conclude that GE of solids is slow in approximately 2/3 of PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility but is normal if the esophagus is uninvolved; Delayed GE may contribute to the severity of gastroesophageal reflux in PSS patients and the degree of dysphasgia; and Metoclopramide accelerates GE in PSS patients and should have a valuable therapeutic role

  10. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Calretinin-Immunoreactive Hypoinnervation in Down Syndrome (DS): Report of an Infant with Very Short-Segment Hirschsprung Disease and Comparison to Biopsy Findings in 20 Normal Infants and 11 Infants with DS and Chronic Constipation.

    Warren, Mikako; Kaul, Ajay; Bove, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    In Down syndrome (DS) constipation is common, and the incidence of Hirschsprung disease (HD) is 1-2%. Rectal suction biopsies (RSBs) in DS may show discordant features; calretinin immunoreactivity (CRir) often helps resolve discrepancies. We report a case of unequivocal very short-segment HD (vsHD) in an infant with DS who had aganglionosis with abnormal acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity in 3 RSBs. The CRir patterns were scanty positive rather than the expected absent CRir innervation in the lamina propria (LP). The resection specimen was grossly typical for short-segment HD, with a 5.5-cm, narrow but normally ganglionated segment proximal to the verified very short distal anganglionic zone. Unequivocal calretinin hypoinnervation was limited to the distal 2 cm, substantiating the warning of Kapur that small numbers of CRir nerves in the LP do not exclude a diagnosis of vsHD. We evaluated RSBs from 11 DS and 20 randomly selected normal infants <6 months of age with chronic constipation. The normal infants had abundant mucosal calretinin innervation and AChE histochemistry. We observed variable CRir hypoinnervation in RSBs in DS infants (including 6/7 with "normal" original diagnosis and 1/4 with HD). Our findings caution against overdependence on "normal" calretinin immunohistochemistry and suggest that AChE may be more reliable than CRir in the context of DS. An unknown number of patients with DS may have enteric nervous system disorders functionally similar to HD, which are possibly related to abnormal or imbalanced autonomic innervation, of which distal calretinin hypoinnervation is one manifestation, despite the presence of ganglia. PMID:26230373

  12. Metabolic abnormalities in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Palacios Verd??, Mar??a Gabriela, 1983-; Segura Puimedon, Maria, 1985-; Borralleras, Cristina; Flores, Raquel; Campo Casanelles, Miguel del, 1966-; Campuzano Uceda, Mar??a Victoria; P??rez Jurado, Luis Alberto

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS, OMIM-194050) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystemic manifestations caused by a 1.55-1.83???Mb deletion at 7q11.23 including 26-28 genes. Reported endocrine and metabolic abnormalities include transient hypercalcaemia of infancy, subclinical hypothyroidism in ???30% of children and impaired glucose tolerance in ???75% of adult individuals. The purpose of this study was to further study metabolic alterations in patients with WBS, as well a...

  13. CT of trauma to the abnormal kidney

    Traumatic injuries to already abnormal kidneys are difficult to assess by excretory urography and clinical evaluation. Bleeding and urinary extravasation may accompany minor trauma; conversely, underlying tumors, perirenal hemorrhage, and extravasation may be missed on urography. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in eight cases including three neoplasms, one adult polycystic disease, one simple renal cyst, two hydronephrotic kidneys, and one horseshoe kidney. CT provided specific and clinically useful information in each case that was not apparent on excretory urography

  14. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

    Oleksandr V. Popovych; Tass, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    AbstractIn the nervous system, synchronization processes play an important role, e.g., in the context of information processing and motor control. However, pathological, excessive synchronization may strongly impair brain function and is a hallmark of several neurological disorders. This focused review addresses the question of how an abnormal neuronal synchronization can specifically be counteracted by invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation as, for instance, by deep brain stimulation fo...

  15. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

    Oleksandr V. Popovych; Tass, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    In the nervous system synchronization processes play an important role, e.g., in the context of information processing and motor control. However, pathological, excessive synchronization may strongly impair brain function and is a hallmark of several neurological disorders. This focused review addresses the question of how an abnormal neuronal synchronization can specifically be counteracted by invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation as, for instance, by deep brai...

  16. Electrocardiographic Abnormalities in Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    2005-01-01

    Aim: We study the electrocardiographic abnormalities at time of diagnosis of acute PE in our series of consecutive patients of the last years. We conclude that the electrocardiogram may have diagnostic and prognostic value in patients with acute PE. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 154 consecutive patients with acute PE.Diagnosis of PE was established by a high-probability ventilation/perfusion lung scan (121 patients), pulmonary angiography or spiral computed tomography (1...

  17. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

    Kumarasamy Sivarajan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediabetes (PreDM in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV. Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S rats (n = 19 after weaning were fed either an American (AD or a standard (SD diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin, and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP and heart rate (HR were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day and active (night periods. Pulse pressure (PP was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP. Results [mean(SEM]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental basis for examining the relationship between dysglycemia and perturbation of the underlying mechanisms (adipose tissue dysfunction induced local and systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and alteration of adipose tissue precursors for the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system which generate abnormal CBPV.

  18. Renal abnormalities in congenital chloride diarrhea

    Congenital chloride diarrhea CLD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the chloride/ bicarbonate exchange in the ileum and colon. It is characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal distension, hypochloremic hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with high fecal content of chloride >90 mmol/l. We report 3 patients with CLD associated with various renal abnormalities including chronic renal failure secondary to renal hypoplasia, nephrocalcinosis and congenital nephrotic syndrome. (author)

  19. Chromagen lenses and abnormal colour perception

    O. Matthew Oriowo; Abdullah Z Alotaibi

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Chromagen lens system comprises of tinted spectacle or contact lenses, each with a specific colour wavelength filter which controls the spectra of the light entering the eye. This study investigated whether spectacle-mounted Chromagen lenses would enhance colour perception in individuals with abnormal colour vision.Methods: The Ishihara colour test was used to test for colour vision deficiency (CVD) and also to evaluate the effect of the Chromagen spectacle lens on colour perc...

  20. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Aaron J. Kaye; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate the...

  1. Chronic daily headache: biochemical and neurotransmitter abnormalities

    Gallai, Virgilio; Sarchielli, Paola; Genco, Sergio; Alberti, Andrea; D'Andrea, Giovanni

    2000-01-01

    Although chronic daily headache (CDH) represents one of the most relevant complaints of patients in headache centers, the mechanisms underlying the chronicization of head pain are poorly understood. Experimental animal models of chronic pain suggest the involvement of a functional disturbance of several neuronal pathways. The disturbances include an abnormal excitability of nociceptive fibers supplying pain-sensitive structures in the brain responsible for peripheral sensitization (chronic ne...

  2. Mapping Brain Abnormalities in Boys with Autism

    Brun, Caroline; Nicolson, Rob; Leporé, Natasha; Chou, Yi-Yu; Vidal, Christine N.; DeVito, Timothy J.; Drost, Dick J.; Williamson, Peter C.; Rajakumar, Nagalingam; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit characteristic cognitive and behavioral differences, but no systematic pattern of neuroanatomical differences has been consistently found. Recent neurodevelopmental models posit an abnormal early surge in subcortical white matter growth in at least some autistic children, perhaps normalizing by adulthood, but other studies report subcortical white matter deficits. To investigate the profile of these alterations in 3D, we mapped brain volume...

  3. Abnormal peripheral auditory asymmetry in schizophrenia

    Veuillet, E; Georgieff, N; Philibert, B; Dalery, J; Marie-Cardine, M; L. Collet

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Auditory processing difficulties have been reported in schizophrenia. This study explores peripheral auditory function in patients with schizophrenia in whom certain early disturbances of auditory message filtering have been found and may be associated with certain abnormalities which are particularly localised in the left temporal lobe.
METHODS—Otoacoustic emissions, including click evoked and spontaneous emissions and measurements of functioning of the medial ...

  4. Anorectal malformations with sacral bony abnormalities.

    Nour, S.; Kumar, D.; Dickson, J A

    1989-01-01

    A range of anorectal malformations with sacral bony abnormalities was found in members from three generations of two kindreds. The anorectal anomaly was low in all but one of the patients. Partial sacral agenesis was the main bony defect in one family, and meningomyelocele and spina bifida occulta were noted in the second. The inheritance pattern in these kinships is autosomal dominant. This may be a variant of caudal regression syndrome, which seems to be aetiologically heterogeneous.

  5. Electrophysiological abnormalities in the transplanted human heart.

    Bexton, R. S.; Nathan, A W; Hellestrand, K J; Cory-Pearce, R; Spurrell, R A; English, T A; Camm, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Fourteen relatively long term survivors of cardiac transplantation underwent systematic electrophysiological evaluation and ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. Six patients had prolonged conduction intervals during sinus rhythm. Sinus node function could be assessed in all donor atria and in 10 recipient atria. Sinus node recovery times were prolonged in four of the donor atria and in six recipient atria. In the donor atria abnormalities of sinus node automaticity were invariably asso...

  6. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  7. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip join can be measured by means of computed tomography. (Auth.)

  8. Chromosomal Abnormality in Men with Impaired Spermatogenesis

    Dana Mierla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions are regarded as two most frequent genetic causes associated with failure of spermatogenesis in the Caucasian population. Materials and Methods: To investigate the distribution of genetic defects in the Romanian population with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, karyotype analysis by G-banding was carried out in 850 idiopathic infertile men and in 49 fertile men with one or more children. Screening for microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region of Y chromosome was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR on a group of 67 patients with no detectable chromosomal abnormality. The results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. Results: In our study chromosomal abnormalities were observed in 12.70% and 8.16% of infertile and fertile individuals respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggests that infertile men with severe azoospermia have higher incidences of genetic defects than fertile men and also patients from any other group. Infertile men with normal sperm present a higher rate of polymorphic variants. It is important to know whether there is a genetic cause of male infertility before patients are subjected to intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI or testicular sperm extraction (TESE/ICSI treatment.

  9. Trading networks, abnormal motifs and stock manipulation

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xiong, Xiong; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Zhou, W -X

    2013-01-01

    We study trade-based manipulation of stock prices from the perspective of complex trading networks constructed by using detailed information of trades. A stock trading network consists of nodes and directed links, where every trader is a node and a link is formed from one trader to the other if the former sells shares to the latter. Specifically, three abnormal network motifs are investigated, which are found to be formed by a few traders, implying potential intention of price manipulation. We further investigate the dynamics of volatility, trading volume, average trade size and turnover around the transactions associated with the abnormal motifs for large, medium and small trades. It is found that these variables peak at the abnormal events and exhibit a power-law accumulation in the pre-event time period and a power-law relaxation in the post-event period. We also find that the cumulative excess returns are significantly positive after buyer-initiated suspicious trades and exhibit a mild price reversal afte...

  10. [Hematologic abnormalities in infantile visceral leishmaniasis].

    Chouchene, S; Braham, N; Bouatay, A; Hizem, S; Berriri, S; Eljemai, A; Boughamoura, L; Kortas, M

    2015-11-01

    The clinical and biological manifestations of visceral leishmaniasis are often confusing, most particularly because it can mimic and lead to a variety of hematological disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the hematologic abnormalities observed in infantile visceral leishmaniasis from January 2000 and December 2013. The study included 35 children with a mean age of 3.5 years. Clinical manifestations were dominated by splenomegaly, fever, and paleness, defining the classic triad in 16% of our patients. Anemia was present in all patients. Leukopenia was found in 51% of the cases. Thrombocytopenia was observed in 48% of our patients and 36% had pancytopenia. All cases were confirmed by the presence of Leishman bodies (amastigotes) in the bone marrow smears. Quantitative and qualitative megakaryocyte abnormalities were found. Similarly, dysgranulopoiesis was observed in 31% of the cases, eosinophilia was present in 6%, erythroid hypoplasia in 3%, and erythroid hyperplasia in 34%. Different features of dyserythropoiesis were revealed in 71% of the patients with images of hemophagocytosis in 6% and multiple dysplasias in 9%. The knowledge of these hematological abnormalities associated with infantile visceral leishmaniasis can assist us in searching for Leishman bodies in the bone marrow smears to provide a diagnosis more quickly without necessarily resorting to more sophisticated tests. PMID:26433577

  11. Sensory abnormalities in autism. A brief report.

    Klintwall, Lars; Holm, Anette; Eriksson, Mats; Carlsson, Lotta Höglund; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Hedvall, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sensory abnormalities were assessed in a population-based group of 208 20-54-month-old children, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and referred to a specialized habilitation centre for early intervention. The children were subgrouped based upon degree of autistic symptoms and cognitive level by a research team at the centre. Parents were interviewed systematically about any abnormal sensory reactions in the child. In the whole group, pain and hearing were the most commonly affected modalities. Children in the most typical autism subgroup (nuclear autism with no learning disability) had the highest number of affected modalities. The children who were classified in an "autistic features" subgroup had the lowest number of affected modalities. There were no group differences in number of affected sensory modalities between groups of different cognitive levels or level of expressive speech. The findings provide support for the notion that sensory abnormality is very common in young children with autism. This symptom has been proposed for inclusion among the diagnostic criteria for ASD in the upcoming DSM-V. PMID:21111574

  12. Chromosomal Abnormality in Men with Impaired Spermatogenesis

    Mierla, Dana; Jardan, Dumitru; Stoian, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions are regarded as two most frequent genetic causes associated with failure of spermatogenesis in the Caucasian population. Materials and Methods: To investigate the distribution of genetic defects in the Romanian population with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, karyotype analysis by G-banding was carried out in 850 idiopathic infertile men and in 49 fertile men with one or more children. Screening for microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region of Y chromosome was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a group of 67 patients with no detectable chromosomal abnormality. The results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. Results: In our study chromosomal abnormalities were observed in 12.70% and 8.16% of infertile and fertile individuals respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggests that infertile men with severe azoospermia have higher incidences of genetic defects than fertile men and also patients from any other group. Infertile men with normal sperm present a higher rate of polymorphic variants. It is important to know whether there is a genetic cause of male infertility before patients are subjected to intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or testicular sperm extraction (TESE)/ICSI treatment. PMID:24696767

  13. A sensitive radioimmunoassay measuring endothelin-like immunoreactivity in human plasma: comparison of levels in patients with essential hypertension and normotensive control subjects

    A radioimmunoassay was developed to measure endothelin-like immunoreactivity in human plasma using antibody raised against endothelin-1 which also cross-reacts with big endothelin-1 and endothelin-2 but not endothelin-3. The sensitivity was 1 fmol/tube with inter- and intra-assay coefficients of variation of 13% and 9%, respectively. Cross-reactivity with endothelin-3 and non-endothelin peptides was less than 1%. Endothelin-like immunoreactivity was present in plasma of hypertensive patients (n = 25) at 5.7±0.5 pmol/1 (mean±SEM), not significantly different from that of age-matched control subjects (5.1±0.5 pmol/1). At these levels, endothelin-1 is unlikely to function as a circulating hormone. In the normotensive group, the concentration of endothelin-like immunoreactivity in plasma was positively correlated with mean arterial blood pressure, but in hypertensive patients it showed significant negative correlation. (author)

  14. Abnormal cross-talk between mutant presenilin 1 (I143T, G384A) and glycosphingolipid biosynthesis.

    Mutoh, Tatsuro; Kawamura, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Shima, Sayuri; Miyashita, Tadayuki; Ito, Shinji; Asakura, Kunihiko; Araki, Wataru; Cazzaniga, Emanuela; Muto, Eri; Masserini, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Mutations in the presenilin 1 (PS1) gene are associated with early onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). In this study, we found that the expression of mutant-PS1 in stable transfectants of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells results in a reduction of the biosynthesis and steady-state levels of glucosylceramide. As an in vivo corroboration of these data, there was a significant reduction of brain glucosylceramide and gangliosides in an animal model of FAD. In mutant-PS1-transfectants (I143T, G384A), immunocytochemistry disclosed a remarkable reduction of glucosylceramide synthase (GlcT-1)-like immunoreactivity in the cells when compared with those of mock- and wild-PS1 transfectants. Immunoprecipitation of GlcT-1 protein from mutant-PS1 transfectants demonstrated a marked reduction in GlcT-1 protein, but there was no reduction in the levels of GlcT-1 mRNA. Both coprecipitation and ?-secretase inhibition experiments suggest that mutant-PS1 seems to form a complex with GlcT-1 protein and to be involved in GlcT-1 degradation, which was never found in other cell types. Thus, mutations in the PS1 gene result in profound glycosphingolipids abnormalities by abnormal molecular interaction with GlcT-1. PMID:22508690

  15. A latex agglutination test for the field determination of abnormal vitellogenin production in male fishes contaminated by estrogen mimics

    Estrogen mimics are pollutants present in the aquatic environment. These compounds induce abnormalities in the reproductive system of male fishes, which lead to a total or partial male feminization, or to their demasculinization. Ultimately, these alterations could lead to a disappearance of the total contaminated fish population. Moreover, these toxic substances possess the capacity to mimic endogenous estrogens and to induce the abnormal production of vitellogenin (VTG) in male and immature fishes. The purpose of this research was to develop an easy, specific, cheap and fast method for diagnosing the contamination of male fishes by estrogen mimics, using VTG as biomarker. The selected method is based on a reverse latex agglutination test (rLAT), developed with monoclonal antibodies specific of this biomarker. The development of this VTG-rLAT has involved, firstly, the purification of carp VTG to produce monoclonal antibodies, specifics of this protein. One of these antibodies was selected to recover latex particles (diameter: 1 μm). Finally, the immunoreactivity of the VTG-rLAT was verified with different fish plasma samples from males treated with 17β-estradiol and non-treated males or females in vitellogenesis

  16. Changes in oxytocin immunoreactivity and mRNA expression in the sheep brain during pregnancy, parturition and lactation and in response to oestrogen and progesterone.

    Broad, K D; Kendrick, K M; Sirinathsinghji, D J; Keverne, E B

    1993-08-01

    The effects of pregnancy, parturition and lactation and exogenous treatments with oestradiol and progesterone on oxytocin (OXY) immunoreactivity and gene expression in the sheep brain were investigated. Immunocytochemistry was used to demonstrate that increased OXY-immunoreactivity occurred in cells of the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON), the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), the anterior commissural nuclei (ACN) and the periventricular part of the medial preoptic area (PvMP). Oxytocin immunoreactive terminals were also seen in the accessory olfactory nucleus, the glomerular and peri-glomerular layers of the olfactory bulb, the lateral septum, the zona incerta and the pars compacta of the substantia nigra. Compared to ovariectomized and late pregnant animals, the intensity of immunoreactivity was increased in all of these oxytocinergic elements at parturition, during lactation and following exogenous treatment with oestradiol. The OXY-immunoreactivity was also more intense in late pregnant animals compared to ovariectomized ones. Quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry showed that cells in the PVN, SON, BNST and PvMP all showed significantly increased expression of OXY mRNA in animals at parturition and during lactation compared to late pregnant or ovariectomized animals. Expression levels in late pregnant animals were also significantly higher than in ovariectomized ones. Progesterone treatment significantly increased OXY mRNA in the PVN, SON, BNST and PvMP whereas oestradiol treatment was only effective in the PVN, BNST and PvMP. Combined treatment with these steroids did not significantly increase OXY mRNA levels in comparison with their administration alone. These results show that OXY-immunoreactivity and mRNA expression are at their highest in the sheep brain when maternal behaviour is induced. The increased synthesis/storage of the peptide at parturition may be due to changes in circulating concentrations of both progesterone and oestradiol during late pregnancy. PMID:8401567

  17. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities in the arcuate-median eminence complex and their link to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons

    W. Romero-Fernandez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region.  Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly and differentially modulate the activity and /or Dopamine synthesis of substantial numbers of tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons at the somatic and terminal level. The immunohistochemical work also gives support to the view that dopamine D1 receptors and/or dopamine D2 receptors in the lateral palisade zone by mediating dopamine volume transmission may contribute to the inhibition of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone release from nerve terminals in this region.

  18. NACP/alpha-synuclein immunoreactivity in diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification (DNTC).

    Yokota, Osamu; Terada, Seishi; Ishizu, Hideki; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Kenji; Uéda, Kenji; Kuroda, Shigetoshi

    2002-10-01

    Diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification (DNTC) is a rare tangle-predominant dementia, as well as one of the tauopathies lacking Abeta deposition. It is characterized by temporo-frontal lobar atrophy, Fahr-type calcification and, histopathologically, numerous neurofibrillary tangles in the limbic system and neocortex. Recently, accumulation of alpha-synuclein (alphaS), the precursor of the non-beta amyloid component (NAC) of Alzheimer's disease, has been shown in diverse neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, Alzheimer's disease, multiple system atrophy and parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam. To clarify whether alphaS accumulates in other neurodegenerative disorders, we investigated eight DNTC brains using immunohistochemistry and demonstrated remarkable alphaS deposition in the neurons and astrocytes in many anatomical regions. Abundant Lewy bodies were observed in the amygdala (seven cases) and hippocampus (seven cases), and, to a lesser degree, in the substantia nigra (six cases) and dorsal vagal nucleus (five cases). In the hippocampus, many Lewy neurites were distributed in the stratum oriens and stratum pyramidale in the CA2-3 and the subiculum. Furthermore, numerous NAC-positive astrocytes were detected in the hippocampus and temporal cortex. This investigation reveals that neurons and astrocytes are extensively involved in remarkable alphaS pathology in the DNTC brain, and that the alphaS pathology compounds the cardinal pathological features of tau pathology. These findings suggest that (1) DNTC shares a common pathophysiological background with Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy in which abnormal alphaS aggregation is observed, and (2) there is an interaction between alphaS and tau pathology that does not involve amyloid in DNTC. PMID:12200618

  19. Heterotaxia syndrome: the role of screening for intestinal rotation abnormalities

    Choi, M.; Borenstein, S; Hornberger, L; Langer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Heterotaxia syndrome involves multiple anomalies, including cardiac malformations and intestinal rotation abnormalities. Most authors recommend routine radiological evaluation, with laparotomy and Ladd procedure if a rotation abnormality is found.

  20. Novel brain MRI abnormalities in Gitelman syndrome.

    El Beltagi, Ahmed; Norbash, Alexander; Vattoth, Surjith

    2015-10-01

    Gitelman syndrome is an autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. The syndrome is caused by a defective thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubules of the kidneys. Gitelman syndrome could be confused with Bartter syndrome; the main differentiating feature is the presence of low urinary calcium excretion in the former. Descriptions of neuroradiological imaging findings associated with Gitelman syndrome are very scarce in the literature and include basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic intracranial hypertension and sclerochoroidal calcification. Cauda equina syndrome-like presentation has been reported, but without any corresponding imaging findings on lumbar spine MRI. We report a 13-year-old male with Gitelman syndrome who presented with altered mental status following a fall and scalp laceration and unremarkable brain CT, followed during hospitalization by somnolence and seizures. Metabolically the patient demonstrated hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. MRI demonstrated features of encephalopathy including predominantly right-sided cerebral hemispheric signal abnormality and cytotoxic edema, with bilateral symmetric involvement of the thalami, midbrain tegmentum and tectum and cerebellar dentate nuclei. MRI after five months obtained during a later episode of encephalopathy showed resolution of the signal abnormalities with setting in of brain atrophy and also areas of newly developed cytotoxic edema in the left thalamus, bilateral dorsal midbrain and right greater than left dentate nuclei. The described abnormalities, either recurrent or in isolation, have not previously been published in patients with Gitelman syndrome. We believe that the findings are due to alteration of respiratory chain function secondary to the metabolic derangement and hence have a similar imaging appearance as encephalopathy related to mitochondrial cytopathy or metabolic encephalopathy. PMID:26443301

  1. MRI study on urinary abnormalities of fetus

    Objective: To illustrate the important complemental function of MRI in dignosing the urinary abnormalities of the fetus by analyzing MR features. Methods: MRI findings in 34 fetal urinary abnormalities were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Upper urinary tract dilatation was found in 12 cases: one case presented obstructed right renal dysplasia and was on the follow-up, postnatal MR imaging proved the duplex anomaly in one case, one case showed left PUJO on postnatal US imaging and prepared to surgery, 7 cases were normal on postnatal US imaging, 2 cases were lost to follow up. Bilateral urinary anomalies were found in 7 cases: Muhicystic renal dysplasia (n=3), Combined horseshoe kidney in 2 fetuses and bilateral renal aplasia in one case. Bilateral renal dysplasia was diagnosed in 2 cases, one was still bom and proved by autopsy and the other was lost to follow up. The case of bilateral renal agenesis displayed the appearance of sirenomelia on general specimen. The case of right renal agenesis associated contralateral kidney dyspalsia (n=1) was lost to follow up. MR imaging showed low signal intensity of lung and oligohydramnios in the bilateral anomalies. Unilateral urinary anomalies was found in 15 cases, including 9 cases of unilateral renal dysplasia. Two fetuses were aborted and 3 fetuses were proved with postnatal US or MR. One was lost to follow up; 3 cases were on the follow-up. There were 4 cases of unilateral renal agenesis, two fetuses were aborted and 2 fetuses were proved with postnatal US or MR imaging. The case of ectopic kidney was proved with postnatal US imaging. One case of urachal cyst was aborted without autopsy. In the unilateral anomalies, the volume of amniotic fluid was normal, and the fetal lung presented homogenious high signal intensity. Conclusion: As a complemental method, MRI is of great value in displaying and dignosing the urinary abnormalities of fetus. (authors)

  2. Radiological and orthopedic abnormalities in Satoyoshi syndrome

    Haymon, M.L. [Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Willis, R.B. [Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics; Ehlayel, M.S. [Div. of Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Orleans, LA (United States)]|[Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States). Center for Molecular and Human Genetics; Lacassie, Y. [Div. of Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Orleans, LA (United States)]|[Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States). Center for Molecular and Human Genetics]|[Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics

    1997-05-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a are disorder on unknown etiology characterized by progressive, painful intermittent muscle spasms, serve skeletal abnormalities mimicking a skeletal dyplasia, malabsorption, alopecia, and amenorrhea. We further report on a 20{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old Caucasian woman whith characteristic manifestation of the syndrome. Since the establishment of the diagnostic 1 year ago, she has been treated with prednisone with good response. However, treatment of the multiple deformities and fractures has been difficult and challenging. The early recognition and treatment of this disorder is of utmost importance, as the skeletal deformities and fractures seem to be secondary to the muscular spasms, as suggested by Satoyoshi.

  3. Vitamin D and Risk of Neuroimaging Abnormalities

    Littlejohns, Thomas J.; Kos, Katarina; Henley, William E.; Lang, Iain A.; Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Chaves, Paulo H. M.; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Llewellyn, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential mechanisms underlying these associations by determining whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with the development of incident cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative neuroimaging abnormalities. The population consisted of 1,658 participants aged ≥65 years from the US-based Cardiovascular Health Study who were free from prevalent cardiovascular disease, stroke and dementia at baseline in 1992–93. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry from blood samples collected at baseline. The first MRI scan was conducted between 1991–1994 and the second MRI scan was conducted between 1997–1999. Change in white matter grade, ventricular grade and presence of infarcts between MRI scan one and two were used to define neuroimaging abnormalities. During a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, serum 25(OH)D status was not significantly associated with the development of any neuroimaging abnormalities. Using logistic regression models, the multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for worsening white matter grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient (<25 nmol/L) and deficient (≥25–50 nmol/L) were 0.76 (0.35–1.66) and 1.09 (0.76–1.55) compared to participants with sufficient concentrations (≥50 nmol/L). The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for ventricular grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 0.49 (0.20–1.19) and 1.12 (0.79–1.59) compared to those sufficient. The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for incident infarcts in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 1.95 (0.84–4.54) and 0.73 (0.47–1.95) compared to those sufficient. Overall, serum vitamin D concentrations could not be shown to be associated with the development of cerebrovascular or neurodegenerative neuroimaging abnormalities in Cardiovascular Health Study participants. PMID:27166613

  4. Radiological and orthopedic abnormalities in Satoyoshi syndrome

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a are disorder on unknown etiology characterized by progressive, painful intermittent muscle spasms, serve skeletal abnormalities mimicking a skeletal dyplasia, malabsorption, alopecia, and amenorrhea. We further report on a 201/2-year-old Caucasian woman whith characteristic manifestation of the syndrome. Since the establishment of the diagnostic 1 year ago, she has been treated with prednisone with good response. However, treatment of the multiple deformities and fractures has been difficult and challenging. The early recognition and treatment of this disorder is of utmost importance, as the skeletal deformities and fractures seem to be secondary to the muscular spasms, as suggested by Satoyoshi

  5. TRANSIENT ABNORMAL MYELOPOIESIS IN A NEONATE

    Ketan P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM is a unique di sorder of newborns associated intimately with Down’s syndrome, present ing with clinical and morphological features indistinguishable from acute myeloid leuka emia (AML. We report a case in a neonate, presenting with severe perinatal asphyxia and cyanosis ; complicated by metabolic acidosis. The hemogram revealed leucocytosis and thrombocytopenia. The peripheral smear showed marked left shift and 55% circulating myeloblasts. Additio nal findings included a hepatomegaly and mild dysmorphic features. The child eventually succu mbed to pulmonary hemorrhage on day one itself. TAM has to be differentiated from conge nital leukemia which portends a poor prognosis

  6. Gallbladder and biliary abnormalities in AIDS

    Over the past 1 1/2 years, biliary abnormalities have been detected on US in seven patients with AIDS. All had gallbladder wall thickening, and two patients had dilated bile ducts. Only five patients had symptoms and signs, while all had elevated blood chemistries. Gallbladder walls measured between 0.4 and 1.5 cm in thickness. Sequential imaging demonstrated changed in wall thickness that did not necessarily correlate with clinical status. Three patients had pericholcystic fluid; none had gallstones. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare was recovered from the gallbladder wall at cholecystectomy in one patient. Crptosporidium was recovered from duodenal aspirates of the two patients with dilated bile ducts

  7. Skeletal abnormalities of acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome

    We report the skeletal abnormalities in a 4 1/2-year-old boy with acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome of premature aging of the skin without the involvement of internal organs seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Acro-osteolysis of the distal phalanges, delayed cranial suture closure with wormian bones, linear lucent defects of the metaphyses, and antegonial notching of the mandible are the predominant skeletal features of the disorder. The skeletal features described in 21 other reported cases of acrogeria are summarized. (orig.)

  8. Skeletal abnormalities of acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome

    Ho, A.; White, S.J.; Rasmussen, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report the skeletal abnormalities in a 4 1/2-year-old boy with acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome of premature aging of the skin without the involvement of internal organs seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Acro-osteolysis of the distal phalanges, delayed cranial suture closure with wormian bones, linear lucent defects of the metaphyses, and antegonial notching of the mandible are the predominant skeletal features of the disorder. The skeletal features described in 21 other reported cases of acrogeria are summarized.

  9. Thyroid abnormality secondary to tortuous carotid artery

    A 59-year-old man was referred to the nuclear medicine service for a thyroid scan, as his neck was thick and the thyroid was not palpable. In the past the patient had undergone head and neck irradiation for acne. A 123I-thyroid scan was interpreted as a ''cold'' nodule in the lower pole of the right lobe, but thyroid ultrasound showed no thyroid abnormality. Repeat ultrasound examination eventually showed a tortuous carotid artery behind the lower pole of the right lobe of the thyroid that corresponded to the ''cold'' defect. (orig.)

  10. A Study on the Glucose and Immunoreactive Insulin Response during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    The blood glucose and plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured during aral glucose tolerance test in 7 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic liver diseases. The glucose tolerance was impaired in 5 of the 6 patients and normal in I. Plasma IRI responses were markedly increased and delayed in all patients, suggesting endogenous insulin resistance. Patients with more glucose intolerance showed less increase in plasma IRI than the group with less intolerance. lt is suggested that some insulin antagonists may decrease the peripheral insulin sensitivity and stimulate compensatory hyperactivity of pancreatic islets. If the compensatory hyperactivity is inadequate due to gemetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus or exhaustion of ?-cells of pancreatic islets, the glucose intolerance and overt diabetes mellitus may ensue.

  11. Radioimmunoassay of digoxin in serum using monoclonal antibodies and assessment of interference by digoxin-like immunoreactive substances

    Loucari-Yiannakou, E.; Yiannakou, L.; Souvatzoglou, A.; Diamandis, E.P. (Alexandra General Hospital, Athens (Greece))

    1990-03-01

    We used 7 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and one polyclonal antibody to develop radioimmunoassays (RIAs) for digoxin in serum or plasma. These RIAs were tested for measuring apparent digoxin concentrations in serum from patients receiving the drug, from normal individuals, and in cord blood plasma. We found that two MoAbs cross-reacted significantly with substances in cord blood. The magnitude of cross-reactivity was dependent on the incubation time and temperature. Under equilibrium conditions, one antibody gave apparent digoxin values in cord blood plasma averaging 2.15 ng/ml. We suggest that this cross-reactivity is partially due to progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone in cord blood plasma. The antibody that shows high cross-reactivity with digoxin-like immunoreactive substances may prove a useful tool for studies dealing with characterization of the cross-reacting compounds.

  12. Radioimmunoassay of digoxin in serum using monoclonal antibodies and assessment of interference by digoxin-like immunoreactive substances

    We used 7 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and one polyclonal antibody to develop radioimmunoassays (RIAs) for digoxin in serum or plasma. These RIAs were tested for measuring apparent digoxin concentrations in serum from patients receiving the drug, from normal individuals, and in cord blood plasma. We found that two MoAbs cross-reacted significantly with substances in cord blood. The magnitude of cross-reactivity was dependent on the incubation time and temperature. Under equilibrium conditions, one antibody gave apparent digoxin values in cord blood plasma averaging 2.15 ng/ml. We suggest that this cross-reactivity is partially due to progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone in cord blood plasma. The antibody that shows high cross-reactivity with digoxin-like immunoreactive substances may prove a useful tool for studies dealing with characterization of the cross-reacting compounds

  13. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouacil. [Propylthiouracil

    Kato, N.; Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in this study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  14. Immunoreactive somatostatin and. beta. -endorphin content in the brain of mature rats after neonatal exposure to propylthiouracil

    Kato, N. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada); Sundmark, V.C.; Van Middlesworth, L.; Havlicek, V.; Friesen, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    The contents of immunoreactive somatostatin (IR-SRIF) and ..beta..-endorphin (IR-..beta..-EP) in 12 brain regions were examined in rats exposed neonatally to propylthiouracil (PTU) through the mother's milk. Since the dose of PTU used in the study is lower than the usual dose employed to induce hypothyroidism, a milder form of neonatal hypothyroidism resulted. This conclusion is supported by the only mild subnormal growth of rats to adulthood and serum T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations in the normal range. Adult rats treated with PTU neonatally had significantly higher IR-SRIF contents in several brain regions compared to controls, whereas IR-..beta..-EP levels were not significantly different (significant increase only in the thalamus) in most regions. The results indicate that even mild hypothyroidism during early postnatal development causes permanent impairment of brain function, which manifests itself in part by an altered brain content of IR-SRIF.

  15. VEGF, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 immunoreactivity in the porcine arteries of vascular subovarian plexus (VSP during the estrous cycle.

    A Andronowska

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is an important angiogenic factor in the female reproductive tract. It binds to cell surface through ligand-stimulatable tyrosine kinase receptors, the most important being VEGFR-1 (flt-1 and VEGFR-2 (flk-1. The broad ligament of the uterus is a dynamic organ consisting of specialized complexes of blood vessels connected functionally to the uterus, oviduct and ovary. Endothelial cells form an inner coating of the vessel walls and thus they stay under the influence of various modulators circulating in blood including ovarian steriods involved in developmental changes in the female reproductive system. The aim of the present study was to immunolocalize VEGF and its two receptors: VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 in the broad ligament of the uterus in the area of vascular subovarian plexus during different phases of the estrous cycle in pig and to determine the correlation between immunoreactivity of the investigated factors and phases of the estrous cycle. The study was performed on cryostat sections of vascular subovarian plexus stained immunohistochemically by ABC method. Specific polyclonal antibodies: anti-VEGF, anti-VEGFR-1 and anti-VEGFR-2 were used. Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance. Our study revealed the presence of VEGF and its receptors in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of VSP arteries. All agents displayed phase-related differences in immunoreactivity suggesting the modulatory effect of VEGF, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 on the arteries of the VSP in the porcine broad ligament of the uterus.

  16. Sequential activation of microglia and astrocyte cytokine expression precedes increased iba-1 or GFAP immunoreactivity following systemic immune challenge.

    Norden, Diana M; Trojanowski, Paige J; Villanueva, Emmanuel; Navarro, Elisa; Godbout, Jonathan P

    2016-02-01

    Activation of the peripheral immune system elicits a coordinated response from the central nervous system. Key to this immune to brain communication is that glia, microglia, and astrocytes, interpret and propagate inflammatory signals in the brain that influence physiological and behavioral responses. One issue in glial biology is that morphological analysis alone is used to report on glial activation state. Therefore, our objective was to compare behavioral responses after in vivo immune (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) challenge to glial specific mRNA and morphological profiles. Here, LPS challenge induced an immediate but transient sickness response with decreased locomotion and social interaction. Corresponding with active sickness behavior (2-12 h), inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression was elevated in enriched microglia and astrocytes. Although proinflammatory cytokine expression in microglia peaked 2-4 h after LPS, astrocyte cytokine, and chemokine induction was delayed and peaked at 12 h. Morphological alterations in microglia (Iba-1(+) ) and astrocytes (GFAP(+) ), however, were undetected during this 2-12 h timeframe. Increased Iba-1 immunoreactivity and de-ramified microglia were evident 24 and 48 h after LPS but corresponded to the resolution phase of activation. Morphological alterations in astrocytes were undetected after LPS. Additionally, glial cytokine expression did not correlate with morphology after four repeated LPS injections. In fact, repeated LPS challenge was associated with immune and behavioral tolerance and a less inflammatory microglial profile compared with acute LPS challenge. Overall, induction of glial cytokine expression was sequential, aligned with active sickness behavior, and preceded increased Iba-1 or GFAP immunoreactivity after LPS challenge. GLIA 2016;64:300-316. PMID:26470014

  17. Calcitonin-like immunoreactivity and calcitonin gene expression in the placenta and in the mammary gland of the rat

    Recently, the presence of monomeric CT in plasma and milk was reported by others in a lactating woman surgically thyroidectomized. Similarly, the placenta was thought to be a possible source of CT. Since such findings were based exclusively on immunological arguments, we have investigated the CT gene expression in these rat tissues. CT mRNAs were detected by dot-blot hybridization of total RNAs extracted from rat tissues with a 32P-labelled human CT cDNa probe. Subcellular fractions of each tissue were screened for CT-like immunoreactivity using two different antibodies. With one antibody, extracts of the mammary gland and placenta both produced full displacement of labelled human CT from the antiserum and serial dilutions of the extracts gave displacement curves parallel to that of synthetic human CT, which suggests immunological similarity. However, dilution curves were not parallel for the second antibody, and for both antisera, CT-like immunoreactivity was found in all subsellular fractions from nuclei to cytosols. Immunoprecipitation of translation products from poly (A)+RNAs of placenta showed two major bands around 30 kD. Under stringent conditions, the weak hybridization of placental RNAs seen by dot-blot under less stringent conditions disappeared. Northern analyses of total RNAs from the placenta failed to detect mRNA of 1 k base size like in thyroid glands, but hybridization under weak stringent conditions occurred with larger mRNAs (around 4.4 and 2.4 k bases). Immunoprecipitation of translation products from mRNAs of rat mammary glands showed three major bands around 46, 30 and 20 kD. Our results suggest that the CT gene is not expressed in the rat placenta and in rat mammary gland, since CT mRNAs were not detected in either tissues. (EB)

  18. Combined laryngeal inflammation and trauma mediate long-lasting immunoreactivity response in the brainstem sensory nuclei in the rat

    Kristina Simonyan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensory feedback from the larynx plays a critical role in regulation of normal upper airway functions, such as breathing, deglutition and voice production, while altered laryngeal sensory feedback is known to elicit a variety of pathological reflex responses, including persistent coughing, dysphonia and laryngospasm. Despite its clinical impact, the central mechanisms underlying the development of pathological laryngeal responses remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of persistent vocal fold (VF inflammation and trauma, as frequent causes of long-lasting modulation of laryngeal sensory feedback, on brainstem immunoreactivity in the rat. Combined VF inflammation and trauma were induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS solution and compared to VF trauma alone from injection of vehicle solution and to controls without any VF manipulations. Using a c-fos marker, we found significantly increased Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI in the bilateral intermediate/parvicellular reticular formation (IRF/PCRF with a trend in the left solitary tract nucleus (NTS only in animals with LPS-induced VF inflammation and trauma. Further, FLI in the right NTS was significantly correlated with the severity of LPS-induced VF changes. However, increased brainstem FLI response was not associated with FLI changes in the first-order neurons of the laryngeal afferents located in the nodose and jugular ganglia in either group. Our data indicate that complex VF alterations (i.e., inflammation/trauma vs. trauma alone may cause prolonged excitability of the brainstem nuclei receiving a direct sensory input from the larynx, which, in turn, may lead to (malplastic changes within the laryngeal central sensory control.

  19. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript and calcium binding proteins immunoreactivity in the subicular complex of the guinea pig.

    Wasilewska, Barbara; Najdzion, Janusz; Równiak, Maciej; Bogus-Nowakowska, Krystyna; Hermanowicz, Beata; Kolenkiewicz, Ma?gorzata; ?akowski, Witold; Robak, Anna

    2016-03-01

    In this study we present the distribution and colocalization pattern of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and three calcium-binding proteins: calbindin (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) in the subicular complex (SC) of the guinea pig. The subiculum (S) and presubiculum (PrS) showed higher CART-immunoreactivity (-IR) than the parasubiculum (PaS) as far as the perikarya and neuropil were concerned. CART- IR cells were mainly observed in the pyramidal layer and occasionally in the molecular layer of the S. In the PrS and PaS, single CART-IR perikarya were dispersed, however with a tendency to be found only in superficial layers. CART-IR fibers were observed throughout the entire guinea pig subicular neuropil. Double-labeling immunofluorescence showed that CART-IR perikarya, as well as fibers, did not stain positively for any of the three CaBPs. CART-IR fibers were only located near the CB-, CR-, PV-IR perikarya, whereas CART-IR fibers occasionally intersected fibers containing one of the three CaBPs. The distribution pattern of CART was more similar to that of CB and CR than to that of PV. In the PrS, the CART, CB and CR immunoreactivity showed a laminar distribution pattern. In the case of the PV, this distribution pattern in the PrS was much less prominent than that of CART, CB and CR. We conclude that a heterogeneous distribution of the CART and CaBPs in the guinea pig SC is in keeping with findings from other mammals, however species specific differences have been observed. PMID:26617160

  20. Effects of sex and reproductive experience on the number of orexin A-immunoreactive cells in the prairie vole brain.

    Donlin, Michael; Cavanaugh, Breyanna L; Spagnuolo, Olivia S; Yan, Lily; Lonstein, Joseph S

    2014-07-01

    Large populations of cells synthesizing the neuropeptide orexin (OX) exist in the caudal hypothalamus of all species examined and are implicated in physiological and behavioral processes including arousal, stress, anxiety and depression, reproduction, and goal-directed behaviors. Hypothalamic OX expression is sexually dimorphic in different directions in laboratory rats (F>M) and mice (M>F), suggesting different roles in male and female physiology and behavior that are species-specific. We here examined if the number of hypothalamic cells immunoreactive for orexin A (OXA) differs between male and female prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster), a socially monogamous species that pairbonds after mating and in which both sexes care for offspring, and if reproductive experience influences their number of OXA-immunoreactive (OXA-ir) cells. It was found that the total number of OXA-ir cells did not differ between the sexes, but females had more OXA-ir cells than males in anterior levels of the caudal hypothalamus, while males had more OXA-ir cells posteriorly. Sexually experienced females sacrificed 12 days after the birth of their first litter, or one day after birth of a second litter, had more OXA-ir cells in anterior levels but not posterior levels of the caudal hypothalamus compared to females housed with a brother (incest avoidance prevents sibling mating). Male prairie voles showed no effect of reproductive experience but showed an unexpected effect of cohabitation duration regardless of mating. The sex difference in the distribution of OXA-ir cells, and their increased number in anterior levels of the caudal hypothalamus of reproductively experienced female prairie voles, may reflect a sex-specific mechanism involved in pairbonding, parenting, or lactation in this species. PMID:24874707

  1. Significant difference in p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity in HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 has previously been found in 19/41 breast carcinomas (46%) in women with a history of HPV 16 positive CIN III lesions. There was no significant difference in distribution of histological subtypes, mean or median tumour diameter or number of regional lymph node metastases in the HPV positive and HPV negative breast carcinoma groups. P53, p21 and c-erbB-2 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in the HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas. There was a significant difference in p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity between HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas (p=0.0091 and p=0.0040), with a significant less detectable p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity in the HPV 16 positive cases. There was also a significant difference in the coexpression of p53/p21 between the HPV 16 positive and HPV 16 negative breast carcinomas (p=0.002). No significant difference in immunostaining for c-erbB-2 protein in the two groups was found (p=0.15), or for the coexpression of p53/c-erbB-2 (p=0.19). The significantly lower expression of p53 and p21 proteins in HPV 16 positive than in HPV 16 negative breast carcinomas supports the hypothesis of inactivation and degradation of wild-type p53 proteins by HPV 16 E6 and that p53 mutation is not necessary for transformation in the HPV 16 positive cases. (orig.)

  2. Factors affecting immunoreactivity in long-term storage of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    Grillo, Federica; Pigozzi, Simona; Ceriolo, Paola; Calamaro, Paola; Fiocca, Roberto; Mastracci, Luca

    2015-07-01

    Antigen decay in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections for immunohistochemistry is a well-known phenomenon which may have repercussions on translational and research studies and length of storage time appears fundamental. The aim of this study was to evaluate all possible factors which may lead to antigen decay on a prospective standardized collection of human tissues with a panel of 14 routinely used antibodies. Serial slide sections from FFPE control tissues were stored using different methods (routine storage at room temperature, Parafilm(®) protected, paraffin coated and cold stored at 4 °C) and for different time periods: 1, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 36 months. Immunohistochemistry was performed at each time cutoff simultaneously on stored sections and on freshly cut sections using a panel of 14 antibodies. Immunoreactivity was compared with immunoreactions performed at time zero. Reduction in immunostaining was observed for a subset of antibodies (CD3, CD 31, CD117, estrogen and progesterone receptors, Ki67, p53, TTF-1, vimentin) while for others (smooth muscle actin, keratins 7, 20, AE1/AE3, 34?E12), no antigen decay was observed. Loss of antigenicity was proportional to tissue section age and was dependent on mode of storage with cold storage slides being the least affected. All antigens with reductions in immunosignal were nuclear or membranous, and they all required heat pre-treatment for antigen retrieval. In contrast to results from other studies, when pre-analytical factors are strictly controlled and standardized, antigen decay seems to be restricted to nuclear or membrane antigens which require heat antigen retrieval. PMID:25757745

  3. Identification and characterization of nesfatin-1 immunoreactivity in endocrine cell types of the rat gastric oxyntic mucosa.

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Yakubov, Iskandar; Wang, Lixin; Witcher, Derrick; Coskun, Tamer; Taché, Yvette; Sachs, George; Lambrecht, Nils W G

    2009-01-01

    Hypothalamic nesfatin-1, derived from the nucleobindin2 (NUCB2) precursor, inhibits nocturnal food intake and body weight gain in rats. Nesfatin-1 is able to cross the blood-brain barrier, suggesting a peripheral source of nesfatin-1. Many centrally acting food intake regulatory neuropeptides are also produced in the periphery, especially in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, we investigated the gene expression of NUCB2 and distribution of nesfatin-1-immunoreactive cells in the stomach. Microarray mRNA expression profiles in purified small endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa substantiated by quantitative RT-PCR showed significantly higher NUCB2 mRNA expression compared with brain and heart. Western blot confirmed the expression of NUCB2 protein and its transport into a secretory soluble fraction of gastric mucosal endocrine cell homogenates. Immunohistochemical colabeling for nesfatin-1 and ghrelin, histidine decarboxylase, or somatostatin revealed two subtypes of nesfatin-1-positive endocrine cells. Cells in the midportion of the glands coexpressed nesfatin-1 and ghrelin, whereas few cells in the glandular base coexpressed nesfatin-1 and somatostatin or histidine decarboxylase. High-resolution three-dimensional volume imaging revealed two separate populations of intracytoplasmic vesicles in these cells, one containing nesfatin-1 and the other ghrelin immunoreactivity. Microarray rat genome expression data of NUCB2 in small gastric endocrine cells confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR showed significant down-regulation of NUCB2 after 24 h fasting. In summary, NUCB2 mRNA expression as well as protein content is present in a specific subset of gastric endocrine cells, most of which coexpress ghrelin. NUCB2 gene expression is significantly regulated by nutritional status, suggesting a regulatory role of peripheral nesfatin-1 in energy homeostasis. PMID:18818289

  4. Significant difference in p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity in HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas

    Hennig, E.M. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Faculty of Medicine; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Inst. for Cancer Res.; Kvinnsland, S. [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Oncology; Holm, R.; Nesland, J.M. [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Inst. for Cancer Res.

    1999-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 has previously been found in 19/41 breast carcinomas (46%) in women with a history of HPV 16 positive CIN III lesions. There was no significant difference in distribution of histological subtypes, mean or median tumour diameter or number of regional lymph node metastases in the HPV positive and HPV negative breast carcinoma groups. P53, p21 and c-erbB-2 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in the HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas. There was a significant difference in p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity between HPV 16 positive and HPV negative breast carcinomas (p=0.0091 and p=0.0040), with a significant less detectable p53 and p21 protein immunoreactivity in the HPV 16 positive cases. There was also a significant difference in the coexpression of p53/p21 between the HPV 16 positive and HPV 16 negative breast carcinomas (p=0.002). No significant difference in immunostaining for c-erbB-2 protein in the two groups was found (p=0.15), or for the coexpression of p53/c-erbB-2 (p=0.19). The significantly lower expression of p53 and p21 proteins in HPV 16 positive than in HPV 16 negative breast carcinomas supports the hypothesis of inactivation and degradation of wild-type p53 proteins by HPV 16 E6 and that p53 mutation is not necessary for transformation in the HPV 16 positive cases. (orig.)

  5. Seizure increases electroencephalographic abnormalities in children with tuberculous meningitis

    Prastiya Indra Gunawan

    2016-01-01

    The EEG pattern in children with TBM varies, and EEG abnormalities were more frequently localized in the frontotemporal region. Seizures were associated with EEG abnormalities in children with TBM. EEG abnormalities occurring simultaneously with seizures may predict the occurrence of seizures.

  6. Functional neuroimaging abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Megan L. McGill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques have been used to quantitatively assess focal and network abnormalities. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE is characterized by bilateral synchronous spike–wave discharges on electroencephalography (EEG but normal clinical MRI. Dysfunctions involving the neocortex, particularly the prefrontal cortex, and thalamus likely contribute to seizure activity. To identify possible morphometric and functional differences in the brains of IGE patients and normal controls, we employed measures of thalamic volumes, cortical thickness, gray–white blurring, fractional anisotropy (FA measures from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF in thalamic subregions from resting state functional MRI. Data from 27 patients with IGE and 27 age- and sex-matched controls showed similar thalamic volumes, cortical thickness and gray–white contrast. There were no differences in FA values on DTI in tracts connecting the thalamus and prefrontal cortex. Functional analysis revealed decreased fALFF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC subregion of the thalamus in patients with IGE. We provide minimum detectable effect sizes for each measure used in the study. Our analysis indicates that fMRI-based methods are more sensitive than quantitative structural techniques for characterizing brain abnormalities in IGE.

  7. First trimester ultrasound screening of chromosomal abnormalities

    Trninić-Pjević Aleksandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A retrocervical subcutaneous collection of fluid at 11-14 weeks of gestation, can be visualized by ultrasound as nuchal translucency (NT. Objective. To examine the distribution of fetal nuchal translucency in low risk population, to determine the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities in the population of interest based on maternal age and NT measurement. Method. Screening for chromosomal defects, advocated by The Fetal Medicine Foundation (FMF, was performed in 1,341 pregnancies in the period January 2000 - April 2004. Initial risk for chromosomal defects (based on maternal and gestational age and corrected risk, after the NT measurement, were calculated. Complete data were collected from 1,048 patients. Results. Out of 1,048 pregnancies followed, 8 cases of Down’s syndrome were observed, 7 were detected antenatally and 6 out of 7 were detected due to screening that combines maternal age and NT measurement. According to our results, sensitivity of the screening for aneuploidies based on maternal age alone was 12.5% and false positive rate 13.1%, showing that screening based on NT measurement is of great importance. Screening by a combination of maternal age and NT, and selecting a screening-positive group for invasive testing enabled detection of 75% of fetuses with trisomy 21. Conclusion. In screening for chromosomal abnormalities, an approach which combines maternal age and NT is effective and increases the detection rate compared to the use of any single test. .

  8. Forensic significance of skull development abnormalities

    Pilija Vladimir I.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In the course of bone tissue development some genetic disorders such as exostoses and enostoses, may occur. Exostoses and enostoses represent bone tissue hyperplasia that can develop at any part of skeleton. Neurotrauma can cause fatal biological consequences, which is directly associated with skull development abnormalities. Case report This is a case report of a male cadaver 36 years of age. The autopsy revealed massive hemorrhage on the left side of the neck and the right side of the lower jaw. A major fissure of the arterial wall was found on the basilar artery. A bony, wart-like excrescence was found on the clivus of the occipital bone. Discussion Coinciding ruptures and consequential bleeding from basilar artery with presence of development abnormalities in the clivus region, suggest that one has to clearly distinguish the result of the injury from anomalies already existing in the skull. The position of the attacker can be determined by concise and objective investigation. Conclusion This is a case report of an anomaly in bone development: a bony, wart-like excrescence on the right side of the clivus. Due to neurotrauma and consequential sliding of brain structures, the damage of basilar artery and of the bony excrescence occurred, which led to bleeding and fatal outcome.

  9. Screening human populations for abnormal radiosensitivity

    A relatively rapid and inexpensive in vitro growback assay was developed that uses the irradiated versus the unirradiated re-growth responses of lymphoblastoid cell lines developed from individual donors as an estimator of donor radioresponse. The purpose of this project was to furnish an estimate of the proportion of strains derived from various study populations that may be regarded as exhibiting abnormal radioresponse. The emphasis in this study was on hypersensitivity, because of the known radiation-hypersensitivity and cancer proneness associated with the genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. Using methods developed especially for survival analyses, the percentage of significantly hypersensitive responses was 5.5% in a donor population composed of ostensibly normal individuals. We also examined lines derived from an unselected cancer patient population. These were not enriched, compared to the reference normal population, for hypersensitive responses. We thus conclude that hypersensitivity in vitro is not associated with increased risk for spontaneous development of cancer. However, the failure to observe an association between hypersensitivity and spontaneous cancer does not preclude a correlation between such sensitivity and radiogenic cancer. At the present stage, we would caution against the application of this assay or related in vitro tests to the situation of an individual, as opposed to a population. While we have clear indications that hypersensitivity in vitro is associated with abnormal radioresponse in vivo, this study has identified sources of variation that must be understood before attempts are made to unambiguously attribute a particular type of radioresponse to an individual

  10. Abnormal reward system activation in mania.

    Abler, Birgit; Greenhouse, Ian; Ongur, Dost; Walter, Henrik; Heckers, Stephan

    2008-08-01

    Transmission of reward signals is a function of dopamine, a neurotransmitter known to be involved in the mechanism of psychosis. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated how expectation and receipt of monetary rewards modulate brain activation in patients with bipolar mania and schizophrenia. We studied 12 acutely manic patients with a history of bipolar disorder, 12 patients with a current episode of schizoaffective disorder or schizophrenia and 12 healthy subjects. All patients were treated with dopamine antagonists at the time of the study. Subjects performed a delayed incentive paradigm with monetary reward in the scanner that allowed for investigating effects of expectation, receipt, and omission of rewards. Patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects showed the expected activation of dopaminergic brain areas, that is, ventral tegmentum activation upon expectation of monetary rewards and nucleus accumbens activation during receipt vs omission of rewards. In manic patients, however, we did not find a similar pattern of brain activation and the differential signal in the nucleus accumbens upon receipt vs omission of rewards was significantly lower compared to the healthy control subjects. Our findings provide evidence for abnormal function of the dopamine system during receipt or omission of expected rewards in bipolar disorder. These deficits in prediction error processing in acute mania may help to explain symptoms of disinhibition and abnormal goal pursuit regulation. PMID:17987058

  11. Involvement of the brain region containing pigment-dispersing factor-immunoreactive neurons in the photoperiodic response of the bean bug, Riptortus pedestris.

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Numata, Hideharu; Goto, Shin G; Shiga, Sakiko

    2014-02-01

    The concept of insect photoperiodism based on a circadian clock has been supported by many studies demonstrating that the behavioural circadian rhythm and the photoperiodic response are driven by the same circadian clock genes. However, the neuronal mechanism of the circadian clock underlying photoperiodism is poorly understood. To examine whether circadian rhythm and photoperiodism share a neuronal mechanism, we focused on the neurons that express neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) in the bean bug, Riptortus pedestris. PDF has been identified as an important regulator of the insect circadian rhythm and is expressed in circadian clock neurons of various insect species. In R. pedestris, PDF immunoreactivity was detected in some clusters of cells and their fibres in the optic lobe and the protocerebrum. cDNA encoding a PDF precursor protein was highly conserved between R. pedestris and many other insects. Differences between day and night were not observed in the immunolabelling intensity in cell bodies of PDF-immunoreactive neurons and pdf mRNA expression levels in the head. Surgical removal of the region containing PDF-immunoreactive cell bodies at the medulla disrupted the photoperiodic regulation of diapause. However, gene suppression of pdf by RNA interference did not affect the photoperiodic response. These results suggest that the region containing PDF-immunoreactive somata is important for the photoperiodic response in R. pedestris, but pdf mRNA expression is probably not required for the response. PMID:24198258

  12. Report to congress on abnormal occurrences: January--March 1992

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1992. The abnormal occurrences involving medical therapy misadministrations at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. There were no abnormal occurrences at a nuclear power plant, and none were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  13. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1992

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1992. There are two abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants and six abnormal occurrences involving medical misadministration (all therapeutic) at NRC-licensed facilities discussed in this report. No abnormal occurrences were reported by the NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating three previously reported abnormal occurrences

  14. Association of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) immunoreactivity with specific histopathologic lesions in subacute and chronic experimental radiation enteropathy

    Irradiated intestine consistently exhibits increased immunoreactivity of transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1). It is not known whether this increase occurs secondary to mucosal barrier disruption (consequential injury) or to injury in late-responding tissue compartments (primary radiation enteropathy). This study therefore assessed the association between TGF-β immunoreactivity and specific consequential and primary histopathologic alterations. A small bowel loop was fixed inside the scrotum in male rats and subsequently exposed to either 18 daily fractions of 2.8 Gy or nine daily fractions of 5.6 Gy orthovoltage X-radiation. Radiation-induced intestinal complications were recorded and groups of animals were euthanized 2 and 26 weeks post-irradiation. Radiation injury was assessed with a histopathologic radiation injury score (RIS). Total TGF-β was detected immunohistochemically and measured with interactive computerized image analysis. The image analysis technique yielded highly reproducible quantitation data. The 2.8-Gy group maintained mucosal integrity and had fewer intestinal complications, lower RIS and lower TGF-β levels than the 5.6-Gy group. There was highly significant correlation between TGF-β immunoreactivity and radiation injury at both observation times (P < 0.001 and P < 0.0001). At 2 weeks, TGF-β immunoreactivity correlated with mucosal ulceration (P = 0.002), epithelial atypia (P = 0.005), and serosal thickening (P = 0.0004). At 26 weeks, TGF-β levels correlated significantly with six of seven histopathologic parameters, most strikingly with vascular sclerosis (P = 0.0003). We conclude that mucosal barrier breakdown is closely associated with increased TGF-β immunoreactivity in consequential radiation enteropathy. The highly significant correlation between TGF-β expression levels and alterations in late-responding tissue compartments also suggest a role for TGF-β in primary radiation enteropathy

  15. The effects of 1 week of REM sleep deprivation on parvalbumin and calbindin immunoreactive neurons in central visual pathways of kittens.

    Hogan, D; Roffwarg, H P; Shaffery, J P

    2001-12-01

    Many maturational processes in the brain are at high levels prenatally as well as neonatally before eye-opening, when extrinsic sensory stimulation is limited. During these periods of rapid brain development, a large percentage of time is spent in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, a state characterized by high levels of endogenously produced brain activity. The abundance of REM sleep in early life and its ensuing decline to lower levels in adulthood strongly suggest that REM sleep constitutes an integral part of the activity-dependent processes that enable normal physiological and structural brain development. We examined the effect of REM sleep deprivation during the critical period for visual development on the development of two calcium-binding proteins that are associated with developmental synaptic plasticity and are found in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and visual cortex. In this study, REM sleep deprivation was carried out utilizing a computer-controlled, cage-shaking apparatus that successfully suppressed REM sleep. Body weight data suggested that this method of REM sleep deprivation produced less stress than the classical multiple-platform-over-water method. In REM sleep-deprived animals with normal binocular vision, the number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV) neurons in LGN was found to be lower compared with control animals but was not affected in visual cortex. The pattern of calbindin-immunoreactivity (CaB) was unchanged at either site after REM sleep deprivation. Parvalbumin-immunoreactivity develops later than calbindin-immunoreactivity in the LGN, and the REM sleep deprivation that we applied from postnatal day 42-49 delayed this essential step in the development of the kitten's visual system. These data suggest that in early postnatal brain development, REM sleep facilitates the usual time course of the expression of PV-immunoreactivity in LGN neurons. PMID:11903858

  16. "Idiopathic" mental retardation and new chromosomal abnormalities

    El-Malhany Nadia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mental retardation is a heterogeneous condition, affecting 1-3% of general population. In the last few years, several emerging clinical entities have been described, due to the advent of newest genetic techniques, such as array Comparative Genomic Hybridization. The detection of cryptic microdeletion/microduplication abnormalities has allowed genotype-phenotype correlations, delineating recognizable syndromic conditions that are herein reviewed. With the aim to provide to Paediatricians a combined clinical and genetic approach to the child with cognitive impairment, a practical diagnostic algorithm is also illustrated. The use of microarray platforms has further reduced the percentage of "idiopathic" forms of mental retardation, previously accounted for about half of total cases. We discussed the putative pathways at the basis of remaining "pure idiopathic" forms of mental retardation, highlighting possible environmental and epigenetic mechanisms as causes of altered cognition.

  17. Persistent Pain and Sensory Abnormalities after Abdominoplasty

    Presman, Benjamin; Finnerup, Kenneth; Andresen, Sven Robert; Nikolajsen, Lone; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2015-01-01

    characteristics of persistent pain after abdominoplasty, which is one of the most frequent cosmetic surgical procedures. METHODS: In September 2014, a link to a web-based questionnaire was mailed to 217 patients who had undergone abdominoplasty between 2006 and 2014 at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Aalborg......BACKGROUND: Persistent postsurgical pain is a well-recognized problem after a number of common surgical procedures, such as amputation, thoracotomy, and inguinal hernia repair. Less is known about persistent pain after cosmetic surgical procedures. We, therefore, decided to study the incidence and...... University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire included questions about pain and sensory abnormalities located to the abdominal skin, and physical and psychological function; patient satisfaction with surgery was rated on a 4-point scale. RESULTS: One hundred seventy patients answered the questionnaire...

  18. Abnormal neuronal migration: radiologic-clinic study

    We present our experience in 18 pediatric patients with abnormal neuronal migration. Seven cases of heterotopia of the gray matter, 7 agyria-pachygyria complexes, 1 case of polymicrogyria, 2 cases of schizencephaly and 1 case of hemimegalencephaly were diagnosed by means of ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. The clinical picture was reviewed in each case, with special attention to the occurrence of convulsions, psycho motor development and visual changes. In general, the greater the morphological change, the greater the neurological involvement in these patients. However, the two cases of schizencephaly presented mild clinical expression. Magnetic resonance increases the diagnostic yield in neuronal migration disorders. Nevertheless, either ultrasonography or, especially, computed tomography is useful as a first diagnostic approach in these malformative disorders. (Author)

  19. Equipment abnormality monitoring method and device therefor

    In the present invention, it is judged whether the operation state of equipments used in a plant are normal or not by using learning performances. That is, a plurality of monitoring parameters are measured for an equipment. Previously determined monitoring parameters are extracted. A leaning mode or a monitoring mode is selected. In the leaning mode, based on the values of previously determined monitoring parameters, values of other monitoring parameters during normal states are learned. In the monitoring mode, based on the values of the previously determined monitoring parameters, typical values of other leaned monitoring parameters are outputted. The typical values of other normal monitoring parameters after learning and the values of other parameters at the present time are compared. If the values of the other parameters at the present time are out of normal range, it is judged as abnormal, and the result is alarmed and displayed. (I.S.)

  20. Glucose abnormalities in hepatitis C virus infection.

    Huang, Jee-Fu; Yu, Ming-Lung; Dai, Chia-Yen; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2013-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most important causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and has a tremendous impact on public health worldwide. HCV is both hepatotropic and lymphotropic. Replication of HCV in diseased extrahepatic organs and tissues may either trigger latent autoimmunity or induce autoimmune disorders. In addition to established liver injury, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an important feature of extrahepatic metabolic disorders which is attributed to HCV infection. It also has some impact on the disease activity, disease course, clinical outcomes, and treatment efficacy of antiviral therapy. Previous experimental and clinical findings have highly suggested that HCV per se is diabetogenic. The cause-effect interaction between a common endocrine disorder and an infectious disease is an important issue to elucidate. Although the precise mechanisms whereby HCV infection leads to insulin resistance (IR) and glucose abnormalities are not entirely clear, it differs from the usual pathogenesis of T2DM in those with non-HCV liver diseases. This review initially highlights epidemiological and pathophysiological studies addressing the mutual link between chronic HCV infection (CHC) and T2DM. The characteristics of glucose abnormalities in this special population are depicted from the current evidence. The mutual roles of IR and CHC with respect to the prediction of treatment efficacy, how treatment response affects IR, and the role of pancreatic beta cell function in the entire suite are discussed. With the rapid progression of antiviral therapy for CHC in the past decade, we have also listed some points of future perspective in this issue. PMID:23347806

  1. The usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies

    The clinical usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies was evaluated. Pelvic MRI was carried out on 29 cases suspected of abnormal pregnancy by ultrasonography and clinical examinations. The abnormal pregnancies were classified into three categories: (1) maternal abnormalities, (2) fetal abnormalities and (3) placental abnormalities. MRI was of great value for the diagnosis of maternal abnormalities, particularly in cases of coexistent pelvic tumor. MRI allowed diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and dermoid cyst through its excellent tissue characterization and broad range of vision. MRI was useful in making diagnoses of fetal central nervous anomalies and fetal death, since the lack of fetal movement and the lesions were clear enough to be detected by MRI. However, anomalies in the fetal trunk or extremities could only be demonstrated, but not diagnosed, by MRI owing to its inferior spatial and time resolution. MRI showed placenta accreta and placental hematoma. Although accurate diagnosis was difficult because of their rarity, MRI revealed the hemorrhagic component of the lesions, which was not shown by ultrasonography. The author believes MRI has potential usefulness in making diagnoses of placental abnormalities through its tissue characterization. MRI was superior to ultrasonography in the soft tissue characterization, field of view, while MRI was inferior in time and spatial resolution. In summary, MRI hould be used in case of abnormal pregnancies such as pelvic tumors, fetal nervous anomalies and placental hemorrhagic lesions. MRI will become useful for the diagnosis of other abnormalities as its spatial resolution and fast scan technology advances. (author)

  2. Increased proportion of nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive neurons in rat ileal myenteric ganglia after severe acute pancreatitis

    Lin Zhong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP remains a potentially life-threatening disease. Gastrointestinal motility disturbance such as intestinal ileus is seen in every case. By now, the mechanisms of pancreatitis-induced ileus are largely unknown. The main purpose of the present study was to observe changes of nitric oxide synthase-immunoreactive (NOS-IR neurons in ileal myenteric ganglia in SAP rats with gastrointestinal dysmotility, trying to explore underlying nervous mechanisms of pancreatitis-induced ileus. Methods Twenty Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham operated group and SAP group. SAP was induced by retrograde cholangiopancreatic duct injection of 5% sodium taurocholate. Abdominal X-ray and intestinal transit were performed to detect the existence of paralytic ileus and intestinal dysmotility. Pathological damage of pancreas was evaluated. Double-immunolabeling was employed for the whole-mount preparations of ileal myenteric ganglia. The morphology of NOS-IR neurons were observed and the percentage of NOS-IR neurons was calculated based on the total Hu-immunoreactive neurons. Total RNA of ileum was extracted according to Trizol reagent protocol. Neuronal NOS (nNOS mRNA expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Results The small intestinal transit index in the SAP group was significantly lower compared with the sham operated group (29.21 ± 3.68% vs 52.48 ± 6.76%, P 0.01. The percentage of NOS-IR neurons in ileal myenteric ganglia in the SAP group was significantly higher than that in the sham operated group (37.5 ± 12.28% vs 26.32 ± 16.15%, P 0.01. nNOS mRNA expression in ileum of SAP group was significantly higher than that in the sham operated group (1.02 ± 0.10 vs 0.70 ± 0.06, P Conclusions The increased quantity of NOS-IR neurons in ileal myenteric ganglia and increased nNOS mRNA expression may suggest nNOS over expression as one of the nervous mechanisms of gastrointestinal dysmotility in SAP rat.

  3. Abnormal grain growth in undoped strontium and barium titanate

    Abnormal grain growth is a commonly observed phenomenon in perovskite materials. In order to study this phenomenon, grain growth experiments were conducted over a temperature range from 1425 to 1600 deg. C for the model system SrTiO3 to analyse the nucleation of abnormal grains and to identify the growth mechanism involved for normal and abnormal grains. Grain boundaries of normal and abnormal grains were investigated in quenched samples by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and by energy-dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. No amorphous film was observed at the grain boundaries for either normal or abnormal grains. Non-stoichiometry at the grain boundaries was identified as a possible reason for the differences in growth speed. The results are compared to the nucleation and growth of abnormal grains in BaTiO3.

  4. An Abnormal Speech Detection Algorithm Based on GMM-UBM

    Jun He

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the defects of common used algorithms based on model for abnormal speech recognition, which existed insufficient training data and difficult to fit each type of abnormal characters, an abnormal speech detection method based on GMM-UBM was proposed in this paper. For compensating the defects of methods based on model which difficult to deal with the diversification speech. Firstly, many normal utterances and unknowing type abnormal utterances came from different speaker, were used to train the GMM-UBM for normal speech and abnormal speech, respectively; secondly, the GMM-UBM obtained by training normal speech and abnormal speech were used to s core for these testing utterances. From the results show that compared with GMM and GMM-SVM methods under 24 Gaussians and the ratio of training speech and testing is 6:4, the correct classification ratio of this proposed have 6.1% and 4.4% improvement, respectively

  5. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type

    Tueysuez, Beyhan [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Gazioglu, Nurperi [Istanbul University, Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Uenguer, Savas [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Aji, Dolly Yafet [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Tuerkmen, Seval [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Universitatsklinikum Berlin, Charite Virchow-Klinik, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. (orig.)

  6. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. (orig.)

  7. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Gazioğlu, Nurperi; Ungür, Savaş; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Türkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. PMID:19002453

  8. Noise Effects on the Complex Patterns of Abnormal Heartbeats

    Schulte-Frohlinde, V; Glass, L; Goldberger, A L; Stanley, H E; Plamen, C I; Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Glass, Plamen Ch. Ivanov Leon; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2001-01-01

    We show that complex patterns of certain abnormal heartbeats in the normal heart rhythm can be described by a model of two independent oscillators with stochastic elements. We find that this model successfully reproduces key statistical properties of the abnormal beats within a 12-hour heartbeat record, and demonstrate how the noise accounts for the emergence of the patterns of normal and abnormal heartbeats. We observe a best agreement with the data when an `optimal' level of noise is introduced.

  9. Crowd Abnormal Behavior Detection Based on Machine Learning

    Yu Haibin; Huailiang Peng; Dongping Zhang; Yafei Lu

    2013-01-01

    The detection of abnormal behavior is an important area of research in computer vision and is also driven by a wide of application domains, such as intelligent video surveillance. However, there are few detection algorithms to recognize abnormal behavior in crowds. This study proposed a novel method which can detect whether the crowd is abnormal or not in particular scene, such as stampede, fight and panic. For this purpose, a kind of feature extraction and description scheme has been put for...

  10. Incidence of malignancy and clonal chromosomal abnormalities in Fanconi anemia

    B R Vundinti; S Korgaonkar; Ghosh, K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive, cancer susceptibility disorder characterized by diverse clinical features, such as short stature, skeletal or skin abnormalities, progressive bone marrow (BM) failure, and increased risk of malignancies. Clonal chromosomal abnormalities are frequently reported in FA patients transformed to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aim: To study the incidence of malignancy and clonal chromosomal abnormalities in ...

  11. Differential fractional anisotropy abnormalities in adolescents with ADHD or schizophrenia

    Davenport, Nicholas D.; Karatekin, Canan; White, Tonya; Lim, Kelvin O.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia and ADHD are associated with similar deficits in working memory, attention, and inhibition. Both disorders also involve abnormalities of white matter integrity, possibly reflecting neural communication disruptions. There are likely some regional white matter abnormalities that underlie the common cognitive impairment, though also some regional abnormalities unique to each disorder. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to compare white matter integrity, as indicated by fraction...

  12. Distribution of Vasotocin- and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide-like Immunoreactivity in the Brain of Blue Tit (Cyanistes coeruleus

    Tamas Szekely

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Blue tits (Cyanistes coeruleus are songbirds, used as model animals in numerous studies covering a wide field of research. Nevertheless, the distribution of neuropeptides in the brain of this avian species remains largely unknown. Here we present some of the first results on distribution of Vasotocine (AVT and Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP in the brain of males and females of this songbird species, using immunohistochemistry mapping. The bulk of AVT-like cells are found in the hypothalamic supraoptic, paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and along the lateral forebrain bundle. Most AVT-like fibers course toward the median eminence, some reaching the arcopallium, and lateral septum. Further terminal fields occur in the dorsal thalamus, ventral tegmental area and pretectal area. Most VIP-like cells are in the lateral septal organ and arcuate nucleus. VIP-like fibers are distributed extensively in the hypothalamus, preoptic area, lateral septum, diagonal band of Broca. They are also found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdaloid nucleus of taenia, robust nucleus of the arcopallium, caudo-ventral hyperpallium, nucleus accumbens and the brainstem. Taken together, these results suggest that both AVT and VIP immunoreactive structures show similar distribution to other avian species, emphasizing evolutionary conservatism in the history of vertebrates. The current study may enable future investigation into the localization of AVT and VIP, in relation to behavioral and ecological traits in the brain of tit species.

  13. Distribution of vasotocin- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity in the brain of blue tit (Cyanistes coeruleus).

    Montagnese, Catherine M; Székely, Tamás; Csillag, András; Zachar, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Blue tits (Cyanistes coeruleus) are songbirds, used as model animals in numerous studies covering a wide field of research. Nevertheless, the distribution of neuropeptides in the brain of this avian species remains largely unknown. Here we present some of the first results on distribution of Vasotocine (AVT) and Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the brain of males and females of this songbird species, using immunohistochemistry mapping. The bulk of AVT-like cells are found in the hypothalamic supraoptic, paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and along the lateral forebrain bundle. Most AVT-like fibers course toward the median eminence, some reaching the arcopallium, and lateral septum. Further terminal fields occur in the dorsal thalamus, ventral tegmental area and pretectal area. Most VIP-like cells are in the lateral septal organ and arcuate nucleus. VIP-like fibers are distributed extensively in the hypothalamus, preoptic area, lateral septum, diagonal band of Broca. They are also found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdaloid nucleus of taenia, robust nucleus of the arcopallium, caudo-ventral hyperpallium, nucleus accumbens and the brainstem. Taken together, these results suggest that both AVT and VIP immunoreactive structures show similar distribution to other avian species, emphasizing evolutionary conservatism in the history of vertebrates. The current study may enable future investigation into the localization of AVT and VIP, in relation to behavioral and ecological traits in the brain of tit species. PMID:26236200

  14. Transforming Growth Factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1 immunoreactivity in heterotopic grafts of adult dental apical papilla.

    Telmo José Mezadri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the expression of transforming growth factor-ß1 in heterotopic grafts of adult dental apical papillae. Methodology: Adult apical papillae of Wistar rats were grafted in the ear of the same donor rats. 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after grafting, rats were perfused and the tissue containing the graft was processed for histological conventional technique and for immunohistochemical detection of transforming growth factor-ß1. Results: Heterotopically grafted apical papilla developed osteoid dentine. In an early post-grafting stage, odontoblast-like cells organized themselves in palisade and synthesized dentine. However, newly formed dentine possessed the structural appearance of reactive osteoid dentine, which was systematically destroyed by the activity of osteoclaste-like cells. Transforming Growth Factor-ß1 was observed in mesenchymal cells, extracellular matrix of the graft and surrounding host tissue, while odontoblast-like cells were systematically devoid of immunoreactivity. Conclusion: The different expression of transforming growth factor-ß1 between normal tissue and grafted tissue development suggests that in heterotopic graft conditions the inflammatory mediation of the transforming growth factor-ß1 prevails against its morphogenetic role.

  15. Prognostic Significance of Immunoreactive Neutrophil Elastase in Human Breast Cancer: Long-Term Follow-Up Results in 313 Patients

    Miwa Akizuki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We have measured the concentration of immunoreactive neutrophil elastase (ir-NE in the tumor extracts of 313 primary human breast cancers. Sufficient time has elapsed, and we are now ready to analyze its prognostic value in human breast cancer. METHODS: ir-NE concentration in tumor extracts was determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that enables a rapid measurement of both free-form ir-NE and the α1-protease inhibitor-complexed form of ir-NE. We analyzed the prognostic value of this enzyme in human breast cancer in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: Patients with breast cancer tissue containing a high concentration of ir-NE had poor survival compared to those with a low concentration of ir-NE at the cutoff point of 9.0 µg/100 mg protein (P = .0012, which had been previously determined in another group of 49 patients. Multivariate stepwise analysis selected lymph node status (P= .0004; relative risk = 1.46 and ir-NE concentration (P= .0013; relative risk = 1.43 as independent prognostic factors for recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Tumor ir-NE concentration is an independent prognostic factor in patients with breast cancer who undergo curative surgery. This enzyme may play an active role in tumor progression that leads to metastasis in human breast cancer.

  16. Bombesin-stimulated serum immunoreactive trypsin in the different diagnosis between endocrine and exocrine tumors of the pancreas

    Bombesin administration was recently found to induce a marked increase in circulating immunoreactive trypsin (IRT), whose magnitude seems to reflect the functional capacity of pancreatic acinar cell mass. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of bombesin infusion on serum IRT concentration in patients with endocrine or exocrine tumors of the pancreas. Fifteen patients with pancreatic endocrine tumor, 17 patients with pancreatic exocrine carcinoma and 15 healty subjects were investigated. Serum IRT was measured by radioimmunoassay before and for 120 minutes after the start of bombesin infusion (9 ng/kg/min over 30 min). The integrated serum IRT response to bombesin administration in patients with endocrine tumor of the pancreas did not differ significantly from controls, but were significantly higher than in patients with exocrine carcinoma. In the latter the integrated IRT responses to bombesin infusion in patients with endocrine tumor can probably be explained by small tumor size and/or little invasion of the glandular parenchyma, resulting in an undetectable impairment of exocrine pancreatic function. The very low IRT responses in patients with exocrine carcinoma could reflect the presence of severe pancreatic damage. The results suggest that this newly proposed bombesin test may be useful in the preoperative differential diagnosis between endocrine and exocrine tumors of the pancreas

  17. In vivo and in vitro effects of bradykinin on the release of beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity.

    Matsumura, M; Ohura, M; Shimizu, I; Yamonoi, A; Iwasaki, A; Saito, S

    1985-08-01

    The effect of bradykinin (BK) on the release of beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (beta-EpLI) in rats was studied in vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal injection of BK at 5 micrograms/100 g body weight resulted in significant increase in the plasma beta-EpLI level after 15 min. BK at concentrations of 10(-12)-10(-7) M also caused dose-dependent stimulation of beta-EpLI release from dispersed cells of rat anterior pituitary. On gel chromatography, the beta-EpLI released by incubation of the cells with 10(-7) M BK separated into two components, eluted in the same positions as human beta-lipotropin and human beta-endorphin, respectively. BK did not stimulate beta-EpLI release in Ca++-free medium. Addition of 10(-3) M verapamil or 10(-6) M dexamethasone to the incubation medium inhibited BK-induced beta-EpLI release from the cells. Quabain (10(-5) M) also stimulated beta-EpLI release, but its effect was not additive with that of BK. These results indicate that BK stimulates beta-EpLI release and that calcium ion is involved in the mechanism of this effect. PMID:2931612

  18. Somatostatin-like immunoreactive primary sensory neurons supplying the porcine adrenal glands in physiological conditions and after adrenalectomy

    Gonkowski Sławomir

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde neuronal tracing, using fast blue, in combination with a single-labelling immunofluorescence technique, was applied to determine whether somatostatin (SOM participates in sensory innervating of the porcine adrenal glands in physiological conditions and after adrenalectomy. In control animals, SOM-like immunoreactive neurons comprised 7.0 ± 0.7% of adrenal gland-projecting cells in dorsal root ganglia (DRG at neuromeres Th6-7 and 6.5 ± 1.2% at neuromeres Th12-14. After adrenalectomy the percentage of SOM-positive DRG cells considerably increased and attained the level of 44.7 ± 2.5% at neuromeres Th6-7 and 36.6 ± 1.7% at neuromeres Th12-14. The obtained results demonstrate that SOM is not only a neuromediator within sensory neurones supplying the porcine adrenal glands, but also suggest the role of this substance during repairing processes within the nervous system after adrenalectomy.

  19. Platelet met-enkephalin immunoreactivity and 5-hydroxytryptamine concentrations in migraine patients: effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan, amitriptyline and chlorimipramine treatment.

    Boiardi, A; Picotti, G B; Di Giulio, A M; Bussone, G; Galva, M D; La Mantia, L; Mantegazza, P

    1984-06-01

    In thirty patients with common migraine the platelet concentrations of met-enkephalin immunoreactivity (ME) (76 +/- 9 pg/mg protein) were similar to those in 23 healthy volunteers (77 +/- 5), suggesting that there is no alteration in the ME pool in this biochemical compartment in migraine. Chronic treatment (4 weeks) with drugs that interfere with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) synthesis or uptake induced the expected changes in platelet 5-HT levels, i.e. a rise following administration of the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (daily dose: 300-500 mg, n = 9) and a decrease after amine uptake inhibition by amitryptyline (30-75 mg, n = 7) and even more by chlorimipramine (30-50 mg, n = 9). Platelet ME concentrations rose by up to approximately 90% over the basal values after either 5-hydroxytryptophan (significantly from week 2) or amitriptyline (at week 2) and were unchanged after chlorimipramine, indicating that 5-HT and ME concentrations in platelets can vary independently. The high platelet ME levels following 5-hydroxytryptophan and amitriptyline cannot be explained at present. They might be due either to increased ME synthesis, possibly in the megakaryocyte, or to decreased utilization by platelets or both. PMID:6610476

  20. Neonatal handling and the expression of immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase in the hypothalamus of adult male rats

    Hermel E.E.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal handling has long-lasting effects on behavior and stress reactivity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of neonatal handling on the number of dopaminergic neurons in the hypothalamic nuclei of adult male rats as part of a series of studies that could explain the long-lasting effects of neonatal stimulation. Two groups of Wistar rats were studied: nonhandled (pups were left undisturbed, control and handled (pups were handled for 1 min once a day during the first 10 days of life. At 75-80 days, the males were anesthetized and the brains were processed for immunohistochemistry. An anti-tyrosine hydroxylase antibody and the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method were used. Tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR neurons were counted bilaterally in the arcuate, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus in 30-µm sections at 120-µm intervals. Neonatal handling did not change the number of TH-IR neurons in the arcuate (1021 ± 206, N = 6; 1020 ± 150, N = 6; nonhandled and handled, respectively, paraventricular (584 ± 85, N = 8; 682 ± 62, N = 9 or periventricular (743 ± 118, N = 7; 990 ± 158, N = 7 nuclei of the hypothalamus. The absence of an effect on the number of dopaminergic cells in the hypothalamus indicates that the reduction in the amount of neurons induced by neonatal handling, as shown by other studies, is not a general phenomenon in the brain.

  1. Immunoreactivity of apo B towards monoclonal antibodies that inhibit the LDL-receptor interaction: effects of LDL oxidation.

    Negri, S; Roma, P; Fogliatto, R; Uboldi, P; Marcovina, S; Catapano, A L

    1993-06-01

    We studied the immunochemical stability of the epitopes for six monoclonal antibodies to human apolipoprotein B-100 upon Cu(2+)-mediated (20 microM) oxidation of LDL. The antibodies used in this study, some of which are known to interfere with the interaction of LDL with their cellular receptors, recognize epitopes in the amino terminal region (Mb 19), in the middle part (6B, 2A, 7A, and 9A) and near aa 3500 (Mb 47) of native apo B. All antibodies except one (7A) recognized native and oxidized LDL (OxLDL) equally well; the immunoreactivity of the epitope for Ab 7A was markedly reduced upon LDL oxidation. Since antibodies 2A, 7A, 9A, and Mb 47 inhibit the LDL-receptor interaction and OxLDL poorly interact in vitro with the LDL receptor we conclude that: (1) various epitopes for monoclonal antibodies against native apo B are spared upon LDL oxidation; and (2) the epitopes for antibodies 2A, 9A, and Mb 47 do not define a unique domain of apo B directly involved in the binding of LDL to their receptor. PMID:7692863

  2. Localization of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA and immunoreactivity in the rat heart and human atrial appendage

    The localization of mRNA encoding preproatrial natriuretic peptide was investigated in tissue sections and cultures of rat heart and in sections of human right atrial appendage using the technique of in situ hybridization with 32P- and 35S-labeled RNA probes. Rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) transcripts were demonstrated in numerous atrial myocytes and, to a lesser extent, in ventricular myocytes in both tissue sections and newborn rat heart cultures. These findings are consistent with those obtained by RNA blot analysis of rat heart total RNA, indicating that a single prepro-ANP transcript of ∼ 900 nucleotides was present in the ventricles as well as the atria. Using a 35S-labeled RNA probe for human ANP mRNA, ANP transcripts were also localized to the majority of myocytes in the human right atrial appendage. Only background levels of autoradiographic labeling were obtained when RNA probes identical to the coding sequence of rat or human ANP mRNA were used. A close correlation was found between the distribution of ANP immunoreactivity and prepro-ANP mRNA in these preparations. These results provide unequivocal evidence for the expression of the ANP gene in the rat ventricles, as well as the atria, because myocytes in these tissues have been established as the sites of both ANP localization and precursor biosynthesis. The combined use of cardiac cultures and in situ hybridization may be of value in future studies investigating the regulation of ANP synthesis in cardiac myocytes

  3. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity is reduced during induction of pituitary tumors by chronic estrogen treatment

    The role that estrogen plays in the regulation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is not known. A radioimmunoassay specific for rat CRF was utilized to measure the CRF-like immunoreactivity (CRF-ir) in the hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats treated with estradiol for periods up to 12 weeks. Compared to ovariectomized controls, estradiol treatment resulted in significantly reduced CRF-ir after 3 and 12 weeks, although no significant change was seen after 8 weeks. Anterior pituitary (AP) weight was greatly increased by estradiol treatment at all time points studied. Bromocriptine treatment for the last 3 weeks of the 12-week period, or removal of estradiol for 3 weeks after 9 weeks of treatment did not reverse the changes in CRF-ir even though significant regressions of tumor size was achieved. There was no correlation between AP weight and CRF-ir in individual animals. These data show that chronic treatment with estrogen reduced hypothalamic CRF-ir content. Neither a direct estrogenic effect or an indirect effect mediated through alterations in the adenohypophysis could be ruled out. 21 references, 3 figures

  4. Localization of amylin-like immunoreactivity in melanocyte-stimulating hormone-containing cells of the pars intermedia but not those of the pars distalis in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were employed to investigate the distribution of amylin-like immunoreactivity in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Amylin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the pars intermedia, and these cells were found to be immunoreactive for α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH) as well. In contrast, αMSH-immunoreactive cells in the pars distalis were immuno-negaitive for amylin. These light microscopic findings were confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Amylin-immunoreactive signals were located on the haloes of presumable secretory granules in association with αMSH-immunoreactive signals in the amylin-positive cells. However, in the pars distalis, the αMSH-positive cells did not contain amylin-immunoreactive secretory granules. Western blot analysis of axolotl pituitary extracts revealed the labeling of a protein band at approximately 10.5-kDa by the anti-rat amylin serum, which was not labeled by the anti-αMSH antibody. These findings indicate that amylin secreted from MSH-producing cells in the pars intermedia may modulate MSH secretion in an autocrine fashion and may participate in MSH functions such as fatty homeostasis together with MSH. PMID:26797189

  5. Update: consequences of abnormal fetal growth.

    Chernausek, Steven D

    2012-03-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is prevalent worldwide and affects children and adults in multiple ways. These include predisposition to type 2 diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, persistent reduction in stature, and possibly changes in the pattern of puberty. A review of recent literature confirms that the metabolic effects of being born small for gestational age are evident in the very young, persist with age, and are amplified by adiposity. Furthermore, the pattern of growth in the first few years of life has a significant bearing on a person's later health, with those that show increasing weight gain being at the greatest risk for future metabolic dysfunction. Treatment with exogenous human GH is used to improve height in children who remain short after being small for gestational age at birth, but the response of individuals remains variable and difficult to predict. The mechanisms involved in the metabolic programming of IUGR children are just beginning to be explored. It appears that IUGR leads to widespread changes in DNA methylation and that specific "epigenetic signatures" for IUGR are likely to be found in various fetal tissues. The challenge is to link such alterations with modifications in gene expression and ultimately the metabolic abnormalities of adulthood, and it represents one of the frontiers for research in the field. PMID:22238390

  6. Brain MRI abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica

    Wang Fei, E-mail: feiwang1973@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Liu Yaou, E-mail: asiaeurope80@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Duan Yunyun, E-mail: duanyun2003@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Li Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Education Ministry Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Disease, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore brain MRI findings in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and to investigate specific brain lesions with respect to the localization of aquaporin-4 (AQP-4). Materials and methods: Forty admitted patients (36 women) who satisfied the 2006 criteria of Wingerchuk et al. for NMO were included in this study. All patients received a neurological examination and MRI scanning including brain and spinal cord. MRIs were classified as normal, nonspecific, multiple sclerosis-like, typical abnormalities. MS-like lesions were too few to satisfy the Barkhof et al. criteria for MS. Confluent lesions involving high AQP-4 regions were considered typical. Non-enhancing deep white matter lesions other than MS-like lesions or typical lesions were classified as nonspecific. Results: Brain MRI lesions were delineated in 12 patients (25%). Four patients (10%) had hypothalamus, brainstem or periventricle lesions. Six (15%) patients were nonspecific, and 2 (5%) patients had multiple sclerosis-like lesions. Conclusion: Brain MRIs are negative in most NMO, and brain lesions do not exclude the diagnosis of NMO. Hypothalamus, brainstem or periventricle lesions, corresponding to high sites of AQP-4 in the brain, are indicative of lesions of NMO.

  7. Abnormal visual phenomena in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Gorgoraptis, Nikos; Kaski, Diego; Ryan, Natalie; Husain, Masud; Warrington, Elizabeth K

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) report a host of unusual and poorly explained visual disturbances. This preliminary report describes a single patient (CRO), and documents and investigates abnormally prolonged colour afterimages (concurrent and prolonged perception of colours complimentary to the colour of an observed stimulus), perceived motion of static stimuli, and better reading of small than large letters. We also evaluate CRO's visual and vestibular functions in an effort to understand the origin of her experience of room tilt illusion, a disturbing phenomenon not previously observed in individuals with cortical degenerative disease. These visual symptoms are set in the context of a 4-year longitudinal neuropsychological and neuroimaging investigation of CRO's visual and other cognitive skills. We hypothesise that prolonged colour after-images are attributable to relative sparing of V1 inhibitory interneurons; perceived motion of static stimuli reflects weak magnocellular function; better reading of small than large letters indicates a reduced effective field of vision; and room tilt illusion effects are caused by disordered integration of visual and vestibular information. This study contributes to the growing characterisation of PCA whose atypical early visual symptoms are often heterogeneous and frequently under-recognised. PMID:20818540

  8. Imaging findings in fetal diaphragmatic abnormalities

    Imaging plays a key role in the detection of a diaphragmatic pathology in utero. US is the screening method, but MRI is increasingly performed. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is by far the most often diagnosed diaphragmatic pathology, but unilateral or bilateral eventration or paralysis can also be identified. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration can be located in the diaphragm and, exceptionally, diaphragmatic tumors or secondary infiltration of the diaphragm from tumors originating from an adjacent organ have been observed in utero. Congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm impair normal lung development. Prenatal imaging provides a detailed anatomical evaluation of the fetus and allows volumetric lung measurements. The comparison of these data with those from normal fetuses at the same gestational age provides information about the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and improves predictions about the fetus's outcome. This information can help doctors and families to make decisions about management during pregnancy and after birth. We describe a wide spectrum of congenital pathologies of the diaphragm and analyze their embryological basis. Moreover, we describe their prenatal imaging findings with emphasis on MR studies, discuss their differential diagnosis and evaluate the limits of imaging methods in predicting postnatal outcome. (orig.)

  9. Imaging findings in fetal diaphragmatic abnormalities.

    Alamo, Leonor; Gudinchet, François; Meuli, Reto

    2015-12-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the detection of a diaphragmatic pathology in utero. US is the screening method, but MRI is increasingly performed. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is by far the most often diagnosed diaphragmatic pathology, but unilateral or bilateral eventration or paralysis can also be identified. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration can be located in the diaphragm and, exceptionally, diaphragmatic tumors or secondary infiltration of the diaphragm from tumors originating from an adjacent organ have been observed in utero. Congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm impair normal lung development. Prenatal imaging provides a detailed anatomical evaluation of the fetus and allows volumetric lung measurements. The comparison of these data with those from normal fetuses at the same gestational age provides information about the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and improves predictions about the fetus's outcome. This information can help doctors and families to make decisions about management during pregnancy and after birth. We describe a wide spectrum of congenital pathologies of the diaphragm and analyze their embryological basis. Moreover, we describe their prenatal imaging findings with emphasis on MR studies, discuss their differential diagnosis and evaluate the limits of imaging methods in predicting postnatal outcome. PMID:26255159

  10. Chromagen lenses and abnormal colour perception

    O. Matthew Oriowo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Chromagen lens system comprises of tinted spectacle or contact lenses, each with a specific colour wavelength filter which controls the spectra of the light entering the eye. This study investigated whether spectacle-mounted Chromagen lenses would enhance colour perception in individuals with abnormal colour vision.Methods: The Ishihara colour test was used to test for colour vision deficiency (CVD and also to evaluate the effect of the Chromagen spectacle lens on colour perception in 13 subjects. An Oculus Anomaloscope was used to confirm and sub-classify the types of CVD. Subjects comprised of school age children from the Riyadh area in Saudi Arabia.Results: The distribution amongst the male participants comprised two subjects with protanomaly, two with protanopia, five with deuteranomaly, and two with deuteranopia. Amongst the two female participants, one subject showed deuteranomaly, and one showed protanomaly. Different types of Chromagen spectacle lenses displayed some levels of colour vision enhancement depending on type of CVD.Conclusion: The findings support the notion that chromagen lenses could enhance colour vision perception in some cases of red-green colour vision defects. Clients with CVD should be managed on an individual case basis. (S Afr Optom 2011 70(2 69-74 

  11. Thyroid abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation

    The thyroid gland is the largest pure endocrine gland in the body and one of the organs most likely to produce clinically significant abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation. Radiation doses to the thyroid that exceed approximately 26 Gy frequently produce hypothyroidism, which may be clinically overt or subclinical, as manifested by increased serum thyrotropin and normal serum-free thyroxine concentrations. Pituitary or hypothalamic hypothyroidism may arise when the pituitary region receives doses exceeding 50 Gy with conventional, 1.8-2 Gy fractionation. Direct irradiation of the thyroid may increase the risk of Graves' disease or euthyroid Graves' opthalmopathy. Silent thyroiditis, cystic degeneration, benign adenoma, and thyroid cancer have been observed after therapeutically relevant doses of external radiation. Direct or incidental thyroid irradiation increases the risk for well-differentiated, papillary, and follicular thyroid cancer from 15- to 53-fold. Thyroid cancer risk is highest following radiation at a young age, decreases with increasing age at treatment, and increases with follow-up duration. The potentially prolonged latent period between radiation exposure and the development of thyroid dysfunction, thyroid nodularity, and thyroid cancer means that individuals who have received neck or pituitary irradiation require careful, periodic clinical and laboratory evaluation to avoid excess morbidity

  12. Salivary abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Hart, S.; Poshva, C. [Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Although abnormal saliva is a well documented finding in PWS, little is known about the saliva in these individuals. We have recently undertaken a study to characterize the salivary composition from PW patients and to see if there is any correlation with their underlying molecular diagnosis (deletion vs. disomy). We have collected whole saliva on 3 patients; 2 had normal high-resolution karyotype analysis (Cases 1 & 3) and 1 had a deletion of 15q11q13 (Case 3). For all parameters, Case 3`s values were notably different from those of his unaffected sibling. The salivary flow rates and concentrations for all 3 PW patients are similar and are significantly different from normal controls (mean {plus_minus} SE) (p<0.05). Although this data is from only 3 PW patients, it provides valuable information. First, decreased flow appears to be due to an effect of PWS and not medications since Cases 2 & 3 are not on any medications. Second, decreased flow appears to be present in younger as well as older individuals. Third, deviations from normal in the salivary composition are evident. It is possible that these alterations are concentration effects relative to a decrease in flow rate. We are currently obtaining saliva from more PW individuals to see if these alterations are present in all PW patients and whether they can be applied as a screening test.

  13. Abnormal expression of CD antigens in mastocytosis.

    Escribano, Luis; Díaz-Agustín, Beatriz; Núñez, Rosa; Prados, Aranzazu; Rodríguez, Ramón; Orfao, Alberto

    2002-02-01

    Human mast cells are myeloid cells derived from human pluripotential CD34+ stem cells. Normal mast cells exhibit a myeloid immunophenotype characterized by the expression of CD117, CD33 and Fc epsilon RI in the absence of reactivity for CD14, CD15 and lymphoid-lineage-associated antigens. Multiparametric flow-cytometric studies have shown that mast cells from mastocytosis display unique immunophenotypic characteristics, including coexpression of CD2 and CD25 antigens together with abnormally high levels of the activation-related antigens CD35, CD63 and CD69 among others. Such aberrant immunophenotypic features are of great relevance in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of the disease, flow-cytometric immunophenotyping of mast cells representing the most sensitive method for the diagnosis of tissue involvement in mastocytosis. From the pathogenetic point of view, the immunophenotypical patterns described suggest the existence of profound changes regarding the adhesion and activation status of mast cells in mastocytosis and may represent a useful tool for a better understanding of some pathophysiological aspects of the disease. PMID:11919422

  14. Surrogate Motherhood and Abortion for Fetal Abnormality.

    Walker, Ruth; van Zyl, Liezl

    2015-10-01

    A diagnosis of fetal abnormality presents parents with a difficult - even tragic - moral dilemma. Where this diagnosis is made in the context of surrogate motherhood there is an added difficulty, namely that it is not obvious who should be involved in making decisions about abortion, for the person who would normally have the right to decide - the pregnant woman - does not intend to raise the child. This raises the question: To what extent, if at all, should the intended parents be involved in decision-making? In commercial surrogacy it is thought that as part of the contractual agreement the intended parents acquire the right to make this decision. By contrast, in altruistic surrogacy the pregnant woman retains the right to make these decisions, but the intended parents are free to decide not to adopt the child. We argue that both these strategies are morally unsound, and that the problems encountered serve to highlight more fundamental defects within the commercial and altruistic models, as well as in the legal and institutional frameworks that support them. We argue in favour of the professional model, which acknowledges the rights and responsibilities of both parties and provides a legal and institutional framework that supports good decision-making. In particular, the professional model acknowledges the surrogate's right to decide whether to undergo an abortion, and the intended parents' obligation to accept legal custody of the child. While not solving all the problems that arise in surrogacy, the model provides a framework that supports good decision-making. PMID:25688455

  15. Mapping brain abnormalities in boys with autism.

    Brun, Caroline C; Nicolson, Rob; Leporé, Natasha; Chou, Yi-Yu; Vidal, Christine N; DeVito, Timothy J; Drost, Dick J; Williamson, Peter C; Rajakumar, Nagalingam; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2009-12-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit characteristic cognitive and behavioral differences, but no systematic pattern of neuroanatomical differences has been consistently found. Recent neurodevelopmental models posit an abnormal early surge in subcortical white matter growth in at least some autistic children, perhaps normalizing by adulthood, but other studies report subcortical white matter deficits. To investigate the profile of these alterations in 3D, we mapped brain volumetric differences using a relatively new method, tensor-based morphometry. 3D T1-weighted brain MRIs of 24 male children with ASD (age: 9.5 years +/- 3.2 SD) and 26 age-matched healthy controls (age: 10.3 +/- 2.4 SD) were fluidly registered to match a common anatomical template. Autistic children had significantly enlarged frontal lobes (by 3.6% on the left and 5.1% on the right), and all other lobes of the brain were enlarged significantly, or at trend level. By analyzing the applied deformations statistically point-by-point, we detected significant gray matter volume deficits in bilateral parietal, left temporal and left occipital lobes (P = 0.038, corrected), trend-level cerebral white matter volume excesses, and volume deficits in the cerebellar vermis, adjacent to volume excesses in other cerebellar regions. This profile of excesses and deficits in adjacent regions may (1) indicate impaired neuronal connectivity, resulting from aberrant myelination and/or an inflammatory process, and (2) help to understand inconsistent findings of regional brain tissue excesses and deficits in autism. PMID:19554561

  16. Abnormality diagnosis device for nuclear reactor

    The device of the present invention rapidly detects leakage of primary coolants due to rupture of heat transfer pipes in a steam generator of a PWR type reactor. That is, a neutron detector is disposed, as a dose rate measuring system, to a secondary main steam system, a secondary main steam pipeline, or a turbine. A calculation processing system compares the data obtained therefrom and a normal state, to judge the presence of an abnormal symptom due to leakage and calculate radioactivity concentration in the main steams at a measuring point based on the dose rate. With such procedures, if a heat transfer pipe in the steam generator should be ruptured, radioactive materials in the primary coolants reach the position of the neutron detector in several seconds. Based on the result, progress of the leakage is forecast, to estimate the scale of the ruptured portion with lapse of time. Since neutrons are an object of the measurement in the device of the present invention, the device does not undergo influence of gamma rays released from a radiation source nuclide present in natural radiation rays and the primary system. (I.S.)

  17. Imaging findings in fetal diaphragmatic abnormalities

    Alamo, Leonor; Gudinchet, Francois [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Unit of Radiopediatrics, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Imaging plays a key role in the detection of a diaphragmatic pathology in utero. US is the screening method, but MRI is increasingly performed. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is by far the most often diagnosed diaphragmatic pathology, but unilateral or bilateral eventration or paralysis can also be identified. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration can be located in the diaphragm and, exceptionally, diaphragmatic tumors or secondary infiltration of the diaphragm from tumors originating from an adjacent organ have been observed in utero. Congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm impair normal lung development. Prenatal imaging provides a detailed anatomical evaluation of the fetus and allows volumetric lung measurements. The comparison of these data with those from normal fetuses at the same gestational age provides information about the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and improves predictions about the fetus's outcome. This information can help doctors and families to make decisions about management during pregnancy and after birth. We describe a wide spectrum of congenital pathologies of the diaphragm and analyze their embryological basis. Moreover, we describe their prenatal imaging findings with emphasis on MR studies, discuss their differential diagnosis and evaluate the limits of imaging methods in predicting postnatal outcome. (orig.)

  18. Abnormal cortisol levels affect zebrafish early embryogenesis.

    Dinushan Nesan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR signaling in the stress response has been well studied in adult vertebrates. In general, the stress response is activated after hatching in fishes, and in late stage fetal development in mammals. However, until recently, the function of GR in early development was unknown. Our prior research detailed a critical role for the glucocorticoid receptor in initial embryogenesis using zebrafish (Danio rerio as a model. We have shown that levels of cortisol, the primary GR ligand in teleosts and most mammals, decrease temporally after initial maternal hormone deposition and prior to hatching (Alsop and Vijayan, 2008. We hypothesized that this pre-hatch time period represents a phase of tightly regulated cortisol signaling and that low cortisol levels maintain the proper developmental patterns mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor. To test this, we microinjected cortisol (32pg/egg into the yolk of one-cell zebrafish embryos and observed morphological changes during embryogenesis. We observed accelerated growth over the first 24 hours post fertilization (hpf, as measured by developmental staging and the development of somites from 12-15 hpf. In addition, a significant percentage of 48 hpf embryos develop heart defects, with some embryos exhibiting cardiac edema and others developing without a heart. Overall, abnormal cortisol levels during early development lead to growth and cardiac defects in zebrafish.

  19. Abnormal traffic flow data detection based on wavelet analysis

    Xiao Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the traffic flow data of non-stationary, the abnormal data detection is difficult.proposed basing on the wavelet analysis and least squares method of abnormal traffic flow data detection in this paper.First using wavelet analysis to make the traffic flow data of high frequency and low frequency component and separation, and then, combined with least square method to find abnormal points in the reconstructed signal data.Wavelet analysis and least square method, the simulation results show that using wavelet analysis of abnormal traffic flow data detection, effectively reduce the detection results of misjudgment rate and false negative rate.

  20. Prenatal imaging of distal limb abnormalities using OCT in mice

    Larina, Irina V.; Syed, Saba H.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Overbeek, Paul; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the limbs are common birth defects. These include missing or extra fingers or toes, abnormal limb length, and abnormalities in patterning of bones, cartilage or muscles. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a 3-D imaging modality, which can produce high-resolution (~8 μm) images of developing embryos with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Here we demonstrate the capability of OCT to perform 3D imaging of limb development in normal embryos and a mouse model with congenital abnormalities. Our results suggest that OCT is a promising tool to analyze embryonic limb development in mammalian models of congenital defects.

  1. Abnormal feeling in swallowing: a complication of cervical spondylopathy

    Objective: To study the relationship between abnormal feeling in swallowing and cervical spondylopathy and improve the understanding of cervical spondylopathy complicated by abnormal feeling in swallowing. Method: The study group included 11 patients who were clinically diagnosed as cervical spondylopathy in our hospital from 1996 to 2002. On Toshiba 500 mA KXO-15C radiography system, patient swallowing dense barium was examined in several projections. Results: Hyperostosis of vertebral body resulted in local compression of the laryngopharynx and the posterior wall of upper esophageal tube, causing abnormal feeling in swallowing. Conclusion: Abnormal feeling in swallowing could be one of the clinical symptoms of cervical spondylopathy

  2. Dynamic upper respiratory abnormalities in Thoroughbred racehorses in South Africa

    Javier E., Mirazo; Patrick, Page; Luis, Rubio-Martinez; Hendrick J., Marais.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper airway endoscopy at rest has been the diagnostic method of choice for equine upper respiratory tract (URT) conditions. Development of high-speed treadmill endoscopy improved the sensitivity of URT endoscopy by allowing observation of the horse's nasopharynx and larynx during exercise. However, [...] treadmill exercise may not always accurately represent the horse's normal exercise as track surface, rider, tack and environmental variables are altered. Recently, the development of dynamic overground endoscopy (DOE) has addressed some of these shortcomings. A retrospective study was undertaken to describe the URT abnormalities detected during DOE in racehorses presenting with poor performance and/or abnormal respiratory noise. Patient records of Thoroughbred racehorses undergoing DOE from November 2011 to August 2012 were reviewed. Data collected included signalment, primary complaint, distance exercised, maximum speed and dynamic airway abnormalities detected. Fifty-two horses underwent DOE for investigation of poor performance and/or abnormal respiratory noise. The main abnormalities detected included axial deviation of the aryepiglottic folds (40%), vocal cord collapse (35%), abnormal arytenoid function (33%) and dorsal displacement of the soft palate (25%). A total of 40 horses were diagnosed with one or more abnormalities of the URT (77%). Fifteen horses (29%) had a single abnormality and 25 horses (48%) had multiple abnormalities. This study showed that DOE is a useful technique for investigating dynamic disorders of the URT in racehorses in South Africa. The total number and type of dynamic pathological conditions were comparable with those identified in similar populations in other geographical locations.

  3. Real-time Multiple Abnormality Detection in Video Data

    Have, Simon Hartmann; Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in video sequences has recently gained an increasing attention within the research community. Although progress has been seen, there are still some limitations in current research. While most systems are designed at detecting specific abnormality, others which are...... capable of detecting more than two types of abnormalities rely on heavy computation. Therefore, we provide a framework for detecting abnormalities in video surveillance by using multiple features and cascade classifiers, yet achieve above real-time processing speed. Experimental results on two datasets...

  4. FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in rat brain: development of a radioimmunoassay and its application in studies of distribution and chromatographic properties

    A radioimmunoassay is described for the molluscan neuropeptide, Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2(FMRFamide). The antibody used is C-terminal-specific and shows slight but significant (1-2%) cross-reactivity with chicken pancreatic polypeptide (APP). The assay has been used to identify in rat brain extracts a pair of molecules that may represent mammalian counterparts of FMRFamide. Their concentrations were highest in spinal cord and hypothalamus (>10 pmol.g-1) and lowest in cerebellum and striatum (-1). The two immunoreactive peptides were separated on CM ion-exchange chromatography where they appeared to be less basic than FMRFamide. On Sephadex G50 gel filtration one eluted in a similar position to FMRFamide and the other slightly earlier suggesting it may be of higher molecular weight. The rat immunoreactive components do not correspond to previously described neuropeptides or hormones, and may be members of a new group of mammalian neuropeptides with transmitter or modulatory functions. (Auth.)

  5. Intracranial CT abnormality associated with childhood leukemia

    We showed three abnormal CT findings of childhood leukemia. Case 1: A 3-year-old boy was found to have acute lymphocytic leukemia in January, 1980. Following prophylactic skull irradiation totaling 2,300 rad and 30 mg of intrathecal methotrexate, he was treated with oral and intravenous methotrexate (10-15 mg once weekly, totaling 2,035 mg). CT taken 2 years and 3 months after the onset showed fine, high-density spots in the left frontal, temporal, and bilateral parietal subcortical regions, without any contrast enhancement. The high-density spots were diagnosed as parenchymal calcification induced by the irradiation and methotrexate therapy. Case 2: A 5-year-old boy complaining of anemia and fever was diagnosed as having acute myelocytic leukemia and was treated with VAMP and DCVP. In March, 1982, he complained of severe headache, nausea, and vomiting 4.5 years after his onset. There were no neurological deficits nor any nuchal stiffness. A lumbar puncture showed increasing pressure of CSF over 250 mm H2O and a pleocytosis of the myeloblasts. CT showed an enhanced high-density mass in the pineal region and hydrocephalus. He improved and showed a normal CT after treatment with skull irradiation of 2,400 rad and four intraventricular injections of 15 mg methotrexate, 30 mg cytosine arabinoside, and 15 mg hydrocortisone via Ommaya's reservoir. Case 3: A 14-year-old boy who had suffered from acute lymphocytic leukemia, associated with meningeal infiltration, for 2 years and 10 months, complained of headache, disturbance of consciousness, and focal convulsion of the left upper limb in December, 1982. CT demonstrated multiple, round, high-density areas in the cerebral hemispheres. Those high-density areas were diagnosed as intracerebral leukemic masses and/or hemorrhages. After 1400 rad of skull irradiation and steroid therapy, the patient rallied shortly, but then expired. An autopsy was refused. (J.P.N.)

  6. An analysis of epilepsy with chromosomal abnormalities.

    Yamanouchi, Hideo; Imataka, George; Nakagawa, Eiji; Nitta, Akihisa; Suzuki, Naomitsu; Hirao, Jun-ichi; Hirano, Jun-ichi; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Arisaka, Osamu; Eguchi, Mitsuoki

    2005-08-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of neonates with chromosomal abnormalities and epilepsy who had been admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and followed up at the outpatient clinic of Dokkyo University School of Medicine. Chromosomal anomalies were diagnosed in 128 of 5789 patients admitted from 1978 through 2001. Seventy-one neonates had trisomy 21, 29 had trisomy 18, 8 had trisomy 13, and 20 had other chromosomal anomalies. Seizures occurred in five patients with trisomy 21 and in one patient each with trisomy 18, 6q-, 13q-, 21q-, and mosaicism trisomy 13. Two patients with 4p- [Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome] were admitted to the NICU, but were not followed up at our outpatient clinic. The boy with 6q- (46,XY,-6, +der(6)t(6;11)(q25.1;q23.3)mat) had agenesis of the corpus callosum and multiple congenital anomalies as well as intractable epilepsy. The girl with 13q- (46, XX, t(2,4)(q24.2;p14), del (13)(q21.2q31.2)) had infantile spasms at 12 months, which were well controlled with nitrazepam and vitamin B6. The girl with mosaic trisomy 8q; (46, XX, der(8) (qter-->q11.2::p23.3-->qter)/46, XX), was not born at our hospital, but showed unique clinical features. She had intractable epilepsy characterized by episodes of vomiting and staring with astatic seizures. Computed tomography of the brain revealed bilateral calcification in the globus pallidus, associated with bursts of high-amplitude slow waves on electroencephalography. One of the two patients with del(15)(q12)[Angelman syndrome] had giant-amplitude visual evoked potential, suggesting hyperexcitability of the visual cortex. PMID:16023555

  7. Management of roads with abnormal radiation

    Several asphalt concrete (AC) roads in Taoyuan County of Taiwan were found radioactively abnormal in 1994. Atomic Energy Council (AEC), the regulatory agency, was asked to take the samples, to perform the radiochemical analysis and dose evaluation as well as to investigate the source of contamination. The cause of high radiation was due to high uranium and thorium concentration slag used in the AC. The dose rate was approximately 1 μSv/hr at the road surface. The maximum annual dose received by pedestrians was estimated at 0.13 mSv (2.5% of annual dose limit of 5 mSv for the public), or approximately 1/15 of the value of annual natural background radiation in the Taiwan area. Consequently, the AEC suggested that there was no need to implement engineering remedy measures to remove the AC surface of the roads. However, upon consideration of socioeconomic condition and public opinion, the local government still decided to remove the contaminated surface of these roads. The AEC helped to formulate the operational procedures for removal and disposal of the AC including the radiation protection program and the disposal site. To date, all the contaminated AC surface of the roads was removed and properly disposed. The contaminated AC roads are a typical example of improper disposal of wastes containing Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM). A new regulation was promulgated by AEC recently to limit the use of slag, coal ash or any other industrial wastes unless its radiation or activity level is below the limit. (author)

  8. Automatic semantic priming abnormalities in schizophrenia.

    Mathalon, Daniel H; Roach, Brian J; Ford, Judith M

    2010-02-01

    Abnormal activation of semantic networks characterizes schizophrenia and can be studied using the N400 event-related potential (ERP). N400 is elicited by words that are not primed by the preceding context and provides a direct measure of the neural mechanisms underlying semantic priming. Semantic priming refers to facilitated semantic processing gained through pre-exposure to semantic context, which can happen automatically if the interval between the prime and target is very short. We predicted that (1) schizophrenia patients have overly inclusive semantic networks, reflected in a less negative than expected N400 to relatively unprimed words, and (2) schizophrenia patients are deficient in their use of semantic context, responding to primed words as if they were unprimed, reflected in a more negative than expected N400 to primed words. N400s were acquired from patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia (n=26) and age-matched healthy comparison subjects (n=29) performing a picture-word verification (match vs. non-match) task. Word targets were presented 325ms after a picture prime, which either matched (CAMEL-->"camel"), or did not match (In Category: CAMEL-->"cow"; Out Category: CAMEL-->"candle") the prime. N400 data suggest that both patients and controls are sensitive to the difference between primed and unprimed words, but patients are less sensitive than controls. Similarly, N400 data suggest that both groups were sensitive to the subtler difference between classes of unprimed words (In Category versus Out Category picture-word non-matches), but patients are less sensitive, especially those with prominent negative symptoms. PMID:19995582

  9. [Developmental abnormalities and nevi of the scalp].

    Behle, V; Hamm, H

    2014-12-01

    Unusual congenital or early-onset skin lesions on the scalp often pose a diagnostic challenge particularly as the clinical evaluation may be hampered by dense hair growth. Thus, this paper provides a concise review on developmental abnormalities and nevi with exclusive or predominant scalp localization. Aplasia cutis congenita occurs as an isolated finding, in association with genetic syndromes, nevi and anomalies or as a consequence of intrauterine trauma and teratogens. A hairless area with a narrow surrounding rim of hypertrichosis (hair collar sign) may point to occult cranial dysraphism, especially if accompanied by further suggestive signs as port-wine stains, large hemangiomas, dimples, congenital dermoid cysts, and sinuses. Many diverse entities may hide behind cutis verticis gyrata with the primary essential form being rare and representing a diagnosis of exclusion. In contrast to former belief, benign adnexal tumors arise in a nevus sebaceus considerably more often than basal cell carcinomas and other malignant epithelial tumors. Provided that tumor development is not suspected, excision of a nevus sebaceus nevus is indicated primarily for aesthetic-psychosocial reasons. However, surgical treatment is considerably easier in small children. Nevus sebaceus may be a cutaneous marker for several complex syndromes whereas nevus psiloliparus presents almost always in connection with encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis. Congenital melanocytic nevi of the scalp tend toward clinical regression, so that surgical intervention in large lesions should be carefully considered. In contrast, the threshold for excision of blue nevi and other conspicuous melanocytic nevi on the scalp should be low, especially since they are difficult to monitor. PMID:25298254

  10. Is the presence of abnormal prion protein in the renal glomeruli of feline species presenting with FSE authentic?

    Bencsik Anna A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a recent paper written by Hilbe et al (BMC vet res, 2009, the nature and specificity of the prion protein deposition in the kidney of feline species affected with feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE were clearly considered doubtful. This article was brought to our attention because we published several years ago an immunodetection of abnormal prion protein in the kidney of a cheetah affected with FSE. At this time we were convinced of its specificity but without having all the possibilities to demonstrate it. As previously published by another group, the presence of abnormal prion protein in some renal glomeruli in domestic cats affected with FSE is indeed generally considered as doubtful mainly because of low intensity detected in this organ and because control kidneys from safe animals present also a weak prion immunolabelling. Here we come back on these studies and thought it would be helpful to relay our last data to the readers of BMC Vet res for future reference on this subject. Here we come back on our material as it is possible to study and demonstrate the specificity of prion immunodetection using the PET-Blot method (Paraffin Embedded Tissue - Blot. It is admitted that this method allows detecting the Proteinase K (PK resistant form of the abnormal prion protein (PrPres without any confusion with unspecific immunoreaction. We re-analysed the kidney tissue versus adrenal gland and brain samples from the same cheetah affected with TSE using this PET-Blot method. The PET-Blot analysis revealed specific PrPres detection within the brain, adrenal gland and some glomeruli of the kidney, with a complete identicalness compared to our previous detection using immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, these new data enable us to confirm with assurance the presence of specific abnormal prion protein in the adrenal gland and in the kidney of the cheetah affected with FSE. It also emphasizes the usefulness for the re-examination of any available tissue blocks with the PET-Blot method as a sensitive complementary tool in case of doubtful PrP IHC results.

  11. Simultaneous release by bradykinin of substance P- and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivities from capsaicin-sensitive structures in guinea-pig heart.

    Geppetti, P; Maggi, C A; Perretti, F; Frilli, S.; Manzini, S.

    1988-01-01

    Both bradykinin and capsaicin infusion evoked a marked increase in the outflow of substance P- (SP-LI) and calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity (CGRP-LI) from guinea-pig isolated, perfused heart. After acute exposure to capsaicin in vitro, or in hearts taken from animals pretreated in vivo with capsaicin, bradykinin failed to induce any release. The positive chronotropic effect of bradykinin was reduced after acute capsaicin administration. The effect of bradykinin in the gui...

  12. Exposure to chronic psychosocial stress and corticosterone in the rat: Effects on spatial discrimination learning and hippocampal protein kinase C gamma immunoreactivity

    KRUGERS, HJ; Douma, BRK; Bohus, B.; Korf, J.; Luiten, PGM; Krugers, Harm J.

    1997-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated a striking increase of the immunoreactivity of the gamma-isoform of protein kinase C (PKC gamma-ir) in Ammon's horn and dentate gyrus (DC) of rodent hippocampus after training in a spatial orientation task. In the present study, we investigated how 8 days of psychosocial stress affects spatial discrimination learning in a hole board and influences PKC gamma-ir in the hippocampal formation. The acquisition of both reference memory and working memory was signi...

  13. Folic acid deficiency increases delayed neuronal death, DNA damage, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 immunoreactivity, and gliosis in the hippocampus after transient cerebral ischemia.

    Hwang, In Koo; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Suh, Hong-Won; Kim, Young Sup; Kwon, Dae Young; Kwon, Young-Guen; Yoo, Jun-Hyun; Won, Moo-Ho

    2008-07-01

    Folic acid deficiency increases stroke risk. In the present study, we examined whether folic acid deficiency enhances neuronal damage and gliosis via oxidative stress in the gerbil hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia. Animals were exposed to a folic acid-deficient diet (FAD) for 3 months and then subjected to occlusion of both common carotid arteries for 5 min. Exposure to an FAD increased plasma homocysteine levels by five- to eightfold compared with those of animals fed with a control diet (CD). In CD-treated animals, most neurons were dead in the hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after ischemia/reperfusion, whereas, in FAD-treated animals, this occurred 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion. Immunostaining for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was performed to examine DNA damage in CA1 neurons in both groups after ischemia, and it was found that 8-OHdG immunoreactivity in both FAD and CD groups peaked at 12 hr after reperfusion, although the immunoreactivity in the FAD group was much greater than that in the CD group. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1; a final mediator of neutrophil transendothelial migration) immunoreactivity in both groups increased with time after ischemia/reperfusion: Its immunoreactivity in the FAD group was much higher than that in the CD group 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, reactive gliosis in the ischemic CA1 region increased with time after ischemia in both groups, but astrocytosis and microgliosis in the FAD group were more severe than in the CD group at all times after ischemia. Our results suggest that folic acid deficiency enhances neuronal damage induced by ischemia. PMID:18335523

  14. Changes in N-terminal glucagon-like immunoreactivity and insulin during short-term gluten challenge in childhood coeliac disease.

    Carson, D J; Glasgow, J. F.; Buchanan, K. D.; Sloan, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen patients (aged 3.5-14.3 years) with normal jejunal mucosa, originally diagnosed as having coeliac disease at least 18 months before, were started on gluten challenge. The 'end point' of challenge was significant deterioration in jejunal mucosa morphologically and morphometrically. Studies carried out both before and after challenge included intestinal absorption of D-xylose and glucose, and release of insulin and N-terminal glucagon-like immunoreactivity (N-GLI). After gluten challeng...

  15. Synaptic Connections between Endomorphin 2-Immunoreactive Terminals and μ-Opioid Receptor-Expressing Neurons in the Sacral Parasympathetic Nucleus of the Rat

    Dou, Xiao Liang; Qin, Rong Liang; Qu, Juan; Liao, Yong Hui; Lu, Ya cheng; Zhang, Ting; Shao, Chen; Li, Yun Qing

    2013-01-01

    The urinary bladder is innervated by parasympathetic preganglionic neurons (PPNs) that express μ-opioid receptors (MOR) in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus (SPN) at lumbosacral segments L6-S1. The SPN also contains endomorphin 2 (EM2)-immunoreactive (IR) fibers and terminals. EM2 is the endogenous ligand of MOR. In the present study, retrograde tract-tracing with cholera toxin subunit b (CTb) or wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) via the pelvic nerve combined ...

  16. An Immunoreactive 38-Kilodalton Protein of Ehrlichia canis Shares Structural Homology and Iron-Binding Capacity with the Ferric Ion-Binding Protein Family

    Doyle, C. Kuyler; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Popov, Vsevolod. L.; McBride, Jere W.

    2005-01-01

    Ehrlichiae are tick-transmitted, gram-negative, obligately intracellular bacteria that live and replicate in cytoplasmic vacuoles, but little is known about iron acquisition mechanisms necessary for their survival. In this study, a genus-conserved immunoreactive ferric ion-binding protein (Fbp) of Ehrlichia canis was identified and its iron-binding capability was investigated. E. canis Fbp was homologous to a family of periplasmic Fbp's involved in iron acquisition and transport in gram-negat...

  17. Change in platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus in gerbils fed a folate-deficient diet.

    Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Young Sup; Kwon, Dae Young; Won, Moo Ho

    2008-02-01

    Folate deficiency increases stroke risk. We examined whether folate deficiency affects platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), which is an immunoglobulin-associated cell adhesion molecule and mediates the final common pathway of neutrophil transendothelial migration, in blood vessels in the gerbil dentate gyrus after transient forebrain ischemia. Gerbils were exposed to a folic acid-deficient diet (FAD) for 3 months and then subjected to common carotid artery occlusion for 5 min. In the control diet (CD)- and FAD-treated sham-operated groups, weak PECAM-1 immunoreactivity was detected in the blood vessels located in the dentate gyrus. PECAM-1 immunoreactivity in both groups was increased by 4 days after ischemic insult. PECAM-1 immunoreactivity in the FAD-treated group was twice as high that in the CD-treated-sham-operated group 4 days after ischemic insult. Western blot analyses showed that the change patterns in PECAM-1 protein levels in the dentate gyrus in both groups after ischemic insult were similar to changes in PECAM-1 immunohistochemistry in the ischemic dentate gyrus. Our results suggest that folate deficiency enhances PECAM-1 in the dentate gyrus induced by transient ischemia. PMID:18850227

  18. The effect of water quality on the immunoreactivity of stress-response cells and gonadotropin-secreting cells in the pituitary gland of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    Mousa, Mostafa A; Ibrahim, Amal A E; Hashem, Amal M; Khalil, Noha A

    2015-03-01

    The present experiments investigated the effect of water quality characteristics on the condition factor, the ovarian activity, cortisol level, and the immunoreactivity of stress-response cells (adrenocorticotropic hormone; ACTH- and melanin stimulating hormone; MSH- and somatolactin; SL- secreting cells) and gonadotropin (GTH)-secreting cells in the pituitary gland of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. After 3 months of exposure to mixtures of water from different sources (Tap and Lake Manzalah waters), with high levels of minerals and heavy metals, water quality affected the number, size, and immunostaining of stress-response-immunoreactive (ir) cells and GTH-ir cells, which showed a dramatic decrease in their size. The integrated optical density (IOD) of immunoreactivity of MSH- and GTH- cells was significantly increased; however, it was significantly decreased for ACTH- and SL- cells. Also, high levels of cortisol were observed in females exposed to waters with high concentrations of minerals and heavy metals. In parallel, low values of gonadosomatic index (GSI%) and the ovarian histology revealed a decrease of maturing follicles concomitant with an increase of atretic follicles in females exposed to Lake Manzalah polluted water. Taken together, the increased activity of stress-response-ir pituitary cells, serum cortisol level and ovarian atretic follicles in response to elevated concentrations of minerals and heavy metals, supports the possible role of ACTH, MSH, and SL in the adaptive stress response of fish. Therefore, minerals and heavy metals must be considered when discussing tilapia aquaculture status. PMID:25675939

  19. Iodination of monoclonal IgG antibodies at a sub-stoichiometric level: immunoreactivity changes related to the site of iodine incorporation

    Thirteen monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were labeled with 125I to a different degree (0.5-20 ?Ci/?g). By SDS polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis, the amount of iodine incorporated into heavy (h) and light (l) chains was determined. Comparing different MAbs, h:l ratios varied from 0.6-34.6, but virtually no variation was observed with individual MAbs labeled at different levels. Immunoreactivity of labeled MAbs was analyzed with antigen-positive tumor cells according to the Lineweaver Burk method. Immunoreactive fractions were found to decrease with increasing iodine incorporation in 9/12 MAbs, while binding affinities decreased in 5/12 MAbs; only l MAb was stable in both respects. Immunoreactivity changes were not linked to preferential h or l chain labeling, nor to the isotype. This result indicated incorporation of the first iodine atom to take place at individually distinct residues, with a minimum estimate of two or four sites, depending on whether preferential chain labeling or random incorporation took place. In cases where increasing labeling led to a gradual decrease of binding affinity, a shift in the spectrum of acceptor residues has to be assumed. (author)

  20. Pterygium epithelium abnormal differentiation related to activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway in vitro

    Peng, Juan; Sha, Xiang-Yin; Liu, Yi; Yang, Rui-Ming; Wen, Ye

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate whether the abnormal differentiation of the pterygium epithelium is related to the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway in vitro. METHODS The expression levels of phosphorylated ERK (P-ERK), keratin family members including K19 and K10 and the ocular master control gene Pax-6 were measured in 16 surgically excised pterygium tissues and 12 eye bank conjunctiva. In colony-forming cell assays, the differences in clone morphology and in K10, K19, P-ERK and Pax-6 expression between the head and body were investigated. When cocultured with the ERK signaling pathway inhibitor PD98059, the changes in clone morphology, colony-forming efficiency, differentiated marker K10, K19 and Pax-6 expression and P-ERK protein expression level were examined by immunoreactivity and Western blot analysis. RESULTS The expression of K19 and Pax-6 decreased in the pterygium, especially in the head. No staining of K10 was found in the normal conjunctiva epithelium, but it was found to be expressed in the superficial cells in the head of the pterygium. Characteristic upregulation of P-ERK was observed by immunohistochemistry. The clone from the head with more differentiated cells in the center expressed more K10, and the clone from the body expressed more K19. The P-ERK protein level increased in the pterygium epithelium compared with conjunctiva and decreased when cocultured with PD98059. The same medium with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 was more effective in promoting clonal growth than conventional medium with 3T3 murine feeder layers. It was observed that the epithelium clone co-cultured with the inhibitor had decreased K10 expression and increased K19 and Pax-6 expression. CONCLUSION We suggest ERK signaling pathway activation might play a role in the pterygium epithelium abnormal differentiation. PMID:26682158