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Sample records for abnormal occurrences october december

  1. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1992

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1992. There are two abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants and six abnormal occurrences involving medical misadministration (all therapeutic) at NRC-licensed facilities discussed in this report. No abnormal occurrences were reported by the NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating three previously reported abnormal occurrences

  2. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1991

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence of an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period October through December 1991. Five abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. None of these occurrences involved a nuclear power plant. Four involved medical therapy misadministrations and one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration. The NRC's Agreement States reported three abnormal occurrences. Two involved exposures of non-radiation workers and one involved a medical therapy misadministration. The report also contains information that updates some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  3. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October-December 1987

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 to December 31, 1987. The report states that for this reporting period, these was one abnormal occurrence at the NRC licensees; the item involved the suspension of license of an oil and gas well tracer company for noncompliance with NRC regulatory requirements. There were no abnormal occurrences report by the Agreement States. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  4. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October-December 1986

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 to December 31, 1986. The report states that for this reporting period, there were three abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate. The events were (1) loss of low pressure service water systems at Oconee, (2) degraded safety systems due to incorrect torque switch settings on Rotors motor operators at Catawba and McGuire Nuclear Stations, and (3) a secondary system pipe break resulting in the death of four persons at Surry Unit 2. There were six abnormal occurrences at the other NRC licensees. One involved release of americium-241 inside a waste storage building at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; three involved medical misadministrations, one therapeutic and two diagnostic; one involved a suspension of license for servicing teletherapy and radiography units; and one involved an immediately effective order modifying license and order to show cause issued to an industrial radiography company. There were no abnormal occurrences reported by the Agreement States. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  5. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1993. Volume 16, No. 4

    1994-04-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1993. This report discusses six abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities. Five involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and one involved an overexposure to a nursing infant. Seven abnormal occurrences that were reported by the Agreement States are also discussed, based on information provided by the Agreement States as of February 28, 1994. Of these events, three involved brachytherapy misadministrations, one involved a teletherapy misadministration, one involved a theft of radioactive material during transport and improper disposal, and two involved lost sources.

  6. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1994. Volume 17, No. 4

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such occurrences to be made to Congress. This report provides a description of those incidents and events that have been determined to be AOs during the period of October 1 through December 31, 1994. This report addresses four AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. These occurrences involved the following: a generic concern relating to core shroud cracking in boiling water reactors; recurring incidents of administering higher doses than procedurally allowed for diagnostic imaging at a single facility; one medical teletherapy misadministration; and one medical brachytherapy misadministration. Agreement States submitted four AO reports. These four occurrences involved the following: one major contamination at a commercial facility; two medical brachytherapy misadministrations; and one medical teletherapy misadministration. The report also contains updates of seven AOs previously reported by NRC licensees and four AOs previously reported by the Agreement States. Two ''Other Events of Interest'' are also being reported. These occurrences involved the operability of safety relief valves at a nuclear power plant, and an error in the installation process of a Leksell Gamma KnifeR teletherapy unit that resulted in an operational failure

  7. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1994. Volume 17, No. 4

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such occurrences to be made to Congress. This report provides a description of those incidents and events that have been determined to be AOs during the period of October 1 through December 31, 1994. This report addresses four AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. These occurrences involved the following: a generic concern relating to core shroud cracking in boiling water reactors; recurring incidents of administering higher doses than procedurally allowed for diagnostic imaging at a single facility; one medical teletherapy misadministration; and one medical brachytherapy misadministration. Agreement States submitted four AO reports. These four occurrences involved the following: one major contamination at a commercial facility; two medical brachytherapy misadministrations; and one medical teletherapy misadministration. The report also contains updates of seven AOs previously reported by NRC licensees and four AOs previously reported by the Agreement States. Two ``Other Events of Interest`` are also being reported. These occurrences involved the operability of safety relief valves at a nuclear power plant, and an error in the installation process of a Leksell Gamma KnifeR teletherapy unit that resulted in an operational failure.

  8. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 through June 30, 1990. The report discusses six abnormal occurrences, none involving a nuclear power plant. There were five abnormal occurrences at NRC licensees: (1) deficiencies in brachytherapy program; (2) a radiation overexposure of a radiographer; (3) a medical diagnostic misadministration; (4) administration of iodine-131 to a lactating female with subsequent uptake by her infant; and (5) a medical therapy misadministration. An Agreement State (Arizona) reported an abnormal occurrence involving a medical diagnostic misadministration. The report also contains information that updates a previously reported occurrence

  9. LLE Review 101 (October-December 2004)

    Shmayda, W. T. [editor

    2005-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October to December 2004, highlights the significance of shaped adiabats to inertial confinement fusion. Theory suggests that inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules compressed by shaped adiabats will exhibit improved hydrodynamic stability.

  10. Report on Congress on abnormal occurrences

    Section 208 of the energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1991. The report discusses six abnormal occurrences, none of which involved a nuclear power plant. Five of the events occurred at NRC-licensed facilities: one involved a significant degradation of plant safety at a nuclear fuel cycle facility, one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration, and three involved medical therapy misadministrations. An Agreement State (Arizona) reported one abnormal occurrence that involved medical therapy misadministrations

  11. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: October-December 2008

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Pravec, Petr; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2008-10-01

    We present here four lists of “targets of opportunity” for the period 2008 October-December. The first list is those asteroids reaching a favorable apparition during this period, are rotation rate. Don’t hesitate to solicit help from other observers at widely spread longitudes should the initial findings show that a single station may not be able to finish the job.

  12. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1996

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the third quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

  13. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1998

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the third quarter of 1998. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 58 tabs.

  14. Report to congress on abnormal occurrences: January--March 1992

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1992. The abnormal occurrences involving medical therapy misadministrations at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. There were no abnormal occurrences at a nuclear power plant, and none were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  15. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1994

    NONE

    1995-05-23

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the third quarter of 1994. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  16. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1997

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities. This report presents detailed quarterly data for october through December 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the third quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

  17. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1989

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. For this reporting period, there was one abnormal occurrence at nuclear power plants licensed to operate involving significant deficiencies in management controls at Slurry Nuclear Power Station. There was one abnormal occurrence under other NRC-issued licenses; the event involved a medical therapy misadministration. One other abnormal occurrence, involving industrial radiography overexposures, was reported by an Agreement State (Texas). 40 refs

  18. LLE Review 117 (October-December 2008)

    Bittle, W., editor

    2009-05-28

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2008, features 'Demonstration of the Shock-Timing Technique for Ignition Targets at the National Ignition Facility' by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, J. A. Marozas, T. C. Sangster, D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE), D. Munro, P. M. Celliers, D. G. Hicks, G. W. Collins, H. F. Robey, O. L. Landen (LLNL), and R. E. Olson (SNL). In this article (p. 1) the authors report on a technique to measure the velocity and timing of shock waves in a capsule contained within hohlraum targets. This technique is critical for optimizing the drive profiles for high-performance inertial-confinement-fusion capsules, which are compressed by multiple precisely timed shock waves. The shock-timing technique was demonstrated on OMEGA using surrogate hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV and fitted with a re-entrant cone and quartz window to facilitate velocity measurements using velocity interferometry. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were also used to validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in NIF ignition targets, thereby optimizing these critical parameters.

  19. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July--September 1988

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from July 1 to September 30, 1988. For this reporting period, there were no abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants licensed to operate. There were two abnormal occurrences under other NRC-issued licenses: multiple medical therapy misadministrations at a single hospital and a medical diagnostic misadministration. There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an Agreement State (Texas) involving a medical diagnostic misadministration. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  20. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1977

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report, the ninth in the series, covers the period from April 1 to June 30, 1977. The NRC has determined that during this period: there were two abnormal occurrences at the 64 nuclear power plants licensed to operate, one involved a breach of a plant's physical security system and the other involved degraded fuel rods; there were no abnormal occurrences at fuel cycle facilities (other than nuclear power plants); and there were two abnormal occurrences at other licensee facilities, one involved improper radioactive source handling procedures and the other involved overexposure of two radiographers. Information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences is also included

  1. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1988

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 to June 30, 1988. For this reporting period, there were no abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants licensed to operate. There were two abnormal occurrences at other NRC licensees: a significant breakdown in management and procedural controls at a medical facility and a medical diagnostic misadministration. There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an Agreement State (Texas) involving radioactive material released during a transportation accident. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  2. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January-March 1983

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 to March 31, 1983. The report states that for this report period, there were three abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed by the NRC to operate. The first involved a main feedwater line break due to water hammer. The second involved management and procedural control deficiencies. The third involved failure of the automatic reactor trip system. There were no abnormal occurrences for the other NRC licensees. There were six abnormal occurrences at Agreement State licensees. One involved an individual who ingested and was contaminated by radioactive material. Four involved lost or stolen radioactive sources. One involved radioactive contamination of a metals production facility

  3. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July--September 1991

    Section 108 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period July through September 1991. The report discusses two abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities, neither involving a nuclear power plant. One involved radiation exposures to members of the public from a lost radioactive source and the other involved a medical diagnostic midadministration. The Agreement States reported no abnormal occurrences. The report also contains information that updates some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  4. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1992

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 through June 30, 1992. Five abnormal occurrences are discussed in this report. One involved an extended loss of high-head safety injection capability at the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant. The other four involved medical misadministrations (three therapeutic and one diagnostic) at NRC-licensed facilities. No abnormal occurrences were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating a previously reported abnormal occurrence

  5. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July--September 1989

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from July 1 to September 30, 1989. For this reporting period, there were five abnormal occurrences. One abnormal occurrence took place at a licensed nuclear power plant and involved significant deficiencies associated with the containment recirculation sump at the Trojan facility. The other four abnormal occurrences took place under other NRC-issued licenses: the first involved a medical diagnostic misadministration; the second involved a medical therapy misadministration; the third involved a radiation overexposure of a radiographer; and the fourth involved a significant breakdown and careless disregard of the radiation safety program at three of a licensee's manufacturing facilities. The Agreement States reported no abnormal occurrences during the reporting period. The report also contains information that updates some previously reported abnormal occurrences. 17 refs

  6. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1978

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report, the thirteenth in the series, covers the period from April 1 to June 30, 1978. The following incidents or events in that period were determined by the Commission to be significant and reportable: (1) There were two abnormal occurrences at the 69 nuclear power plants licensed to operate. One involved a generic concern pertaining to fuel assembly control rod guide tube integrity. The second involved an overexposure of two radiation protection technicians. (2) There were no abnormal occurrences at fuel cycle facilities (other than nuclear power plants). (3) There were no abnormal occurrences at other licensee facilities. (4) There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an agreement state. The event involved willful violations of regulations and subsequent termination of a license. This report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  7. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July-September 1986

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from July 1 to September 30, 1986. The report states that for this reporting period, there were four abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate. The events were (1) a differential pressure switch problem in safety systems at LaSalle facility, (2) abnormal cooldown and depressurization transient at Catawba Unit 2, (3) significant safeguards deficiencies at Wolf Creek and Fort St. Vrain, and (4) significant deficiencies in access controls at River Bend Station. There was one abnormal occurrence at the other NRC licensees; it involved a therapeutic medical misadministration. There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an Agreement State; it involved a therapeutic medical misadministration. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  8. Southwestern Power Administration Update, October- December 2004

    None

    2004-12-01

    On October 29, 2004, Southwestern and Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP) reached agreement on interim arrangements to be implemented after the October 31, 2004, expiration of the membership agreement between the two parties. According to Jim McDonald, Director of Southwestern’s Division of Customer Service, the interim agreement forged between Southwestern and SPP seeks to minimize impacts to SPP as well as to Southwestern and its customers while Southwestern and SPP work on a seams/coordination agreement to succeed the expired membership agreement.

  9. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2009 October-December

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Pravec, Petr; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2009-10-01

    We present four lists of “targets of opportunity” for the period 2009 October-September. The first list is those asteroids reaching rotation rate. Don’t hesitate to solicit help from other observers at widely spread longitudes should the initial findings show that a single station may not be able to finish the job.

  10. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1981

    Edler, S. K.

    1982-03-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and post accident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  11. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January--March 1988

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 to March 31, 1988. For this reporting period, there were three abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants licensed to operate: a potential for common mode failure of safety-related components due to a degraded instrument air system at Fort Calhoun; common mode failures of main steam isolation valves at Perry Unit 1; and a cracked pipe weld in a safety injection system at Farley Unit 2. There were six abnormal occurrences at other NRC licensees: a diagnostic medical misadministration; a breakdown in management controls at the Georgia Institute of Technology reactor facility; release of polonium-210 from static elimination devices manufactured by the 3M Company; two therapeutic medical misadministrationS; and a significant widespread breakdown in the radiation safety program at Case Western Reserve University research laboratories. There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an Agreement State (Texas) involving radiation injury to two radiographers. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences. 43 refs

  12. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, July-September 1987

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from July 1 to September 30, 1987. The report states that for this reporting period, there were two abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate. The first involved a significant degradation of plant safety at Oyster Creek; and the second involved a steam generator tube rupture at North Anna Unit 1. There were four abnormal occurrences at the other NRC licensees. The first involved a therapeutic medical misadministration; the second involved a failure to report diagnostic medical misadministrations; the third involved the suspension of a well logging company's license; and the fourth involved the suspension of an industrial radiography company's license. There were two abnormal occurrences reported by an Agreement State (New York). The first involved a hospital contamination incident and the second involved therapeutic medical misadministrations. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  13. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April-June 1986

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 to June 30, 1986. The report states that for this reporting period, there were two abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate. One involved an out of sequence control rod withdrawal and the other involved a boiling water reactor emergency core cooling system design deficiency. There were five abnormal occurrences at the other NRC licensees. Two involved willful failure to report diagnostic medical misadministrations to the NRC; one involved a therapeutic medical misadministration; and two involved diagnostic medical misadministrations. There were two abnormal occurrences reported by the Agreement States. One involved an uncontrolled release of krypton-85 to an unrestricted area; the other involved a contaminated radiopharmaceutical used in diagnostic administrations. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  14. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January--March 1990

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1990. for this reporting period, there were 10 abnormal occurrences. One involved the loss of vital ac power with a subsequent reactor coolant system heat-up at the Vogtle Unit 1 nuclear power plant during shutdown. The event was investigated by an NRC Incident Investigation Team (IIT). The other nine abnormal occurrences involved nuclear material licensees and are described in detail under other NRC-issued licenses: eight of these involved medical therapy misadministrations; the other involved the receipt of an unshielded radioactive source at Amersham Corporation in Burlington, Massachusetts. The latter event was also investigated by an NRC IIT. No abnormal occurrences were reported by the Agreement States. The report also contains information that updates a previously reported abnormal occurrence

  15. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1993

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period April through June 1993, and discusses four abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities, three involving medical brachytherapy misadministrations and one involving a research reactor that operated without a safety system. One pool irradiation facility contamination event, two medical misadministrations (one ''sodium iodide'' and one brachytherapy), and one industrial radiographer overexposure event that were reported by NRC Agreement States are also discussed. The report also contains information updating one previously reported abnormal occurrence and information on three other events of interest

  16. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program: Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    1994-02-01

    This report describes activities and reports on progress for the second quarter (October 93 - December 93) of the second year of the grant to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP). It reports progress against grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant.

  17. Management & communication: Programme of Seminars October to December 2004

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Situation : 11.10.2004 Bilingual seminar Dates Days Places available Communication Techniques - 1 20, 21, 22 October 3 oui Quality Management 8, 9 November 2 oui Risk Management 6, 7 December 2 oui Project Management - Case Study 22 November 1 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively in your team 14, 15 October 2 yes Performance Appraisal - MAPS 24, 25, 26 November 3 yes Performance Appraisal - MAPS 8, 9, 10 December 3 yes Séminaires en Français Appréciation des performances - MAPS 1, 2, 3 d&eacut...

  18. Bulk shielding facility quarterly report, October, November, and December 1976

    Hurt, III, S. S.; Lance, E. D.; Thomas, J. R.

    1977-08-01

    The BSR operated at an average power level of 1,836 kw for 78.01 percent of the time during October, November, and December. Water-quality control in both the reactor primary and secondary cooling systems was satisfactory. The PCA was used in training programs and was operated on two occasions when the University of Kentucky students actively participated in training laboratories.

  19. Progress report, October 1 to December 31, 1959. Physics Division

    This is a progress report of the Physics Division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories from October 1, to December 31, 1959. It describes the research in nuclear physics, general physics, theoretical physics and electronics. The research areas covered in this report include nuclear structure, the tandem accelerator, particle detector development, developments in electronics, neutron decay, beta ray spectrometer, fission studies, electronics development and neutron transport theory.

  20. LLE Review quarterly report, October--December 1992. Volume 53

    Meyerhofer, D.D. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review covers the three-month period October--December 1992. On 18 December, the OMEGA Laser Facility fired its last shot. It will be decommissioned during the next quarter to make room for the OMEGA Upgrade Laser Facility. This volume deals with two areas of interest for the OMEGA Upgrade, the development of advanced x-ray and neutron diagnostics and the development of long-pulse (>1-ns) laser sources. The first three articles discuss the development of time-dependent diagnostics. The development of an x-ray framing camera is described and measurements of the high-voltage pulse propagation in the camera are presented. Time-resolved and time-integrated neutron diagnostics for the OMEGA Upgrade are then discussed. Two schemes for the generation of >1-ns laser pulses are presented. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  1. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1990). Volume 45

    Epperlein, E. M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1990-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1990, contains descriptions of a new phase-conversion technique designed to improve irradiation uniformity, a report on the interpretation of highdensity implosion experiments of argon-filled targets, and an article on the use of absorption spectroscopy to diagnose compressed target layers. The section on advanced technology has a report on the application of KTP crystals as electro-optic amplitude modulators, and describes the use of chirped-pulse technology to measure X(3) by nearly degenerate four-wave mixing. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  2. LLE review. Quarterly report, Volume 69, October--December 1996

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1996, includes a review of 2-D SSD as implemented on the OMEGA laser system. A summary of the detailed mathematical formalism is shown, and the predicted level of uniformity achievable on OMEGA is given. The first experimental results on uniformity using narrow-band 2-D SSD are compared to theoretical calculations. Excellent agreement between experiment and theory is found, which gives confidence that broadband 2-D SSD with polarization wedges should achieve an rms nonuniformity in the 1%-2% level necessary for cryogenic implosion experiments.

  3. Performance Analysis of Occurrences January 1, 2011-December 31, 2011

    Ludwig, M

    2012-03-16

    This report documents the analysis of the occurrences during the period January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. The report compares LLNL occurrences by reporting criteria and significance category to see if LLNL is reporting occurrences along similar percentages as other DOE sites. The three-year trends are analyzed. It does not include the analysis of the causes or the lessons learned from the occurrences, as they are analyzed separately. The number and types of occurrences that LLNL reports to DOE varies over time. This variation can be attributed to normally occurring changes in frequency; DOE's or LLNL's heightened interest in a particular subject area; changes in LLNL processes; or emerging problems. Since all of the DOE sites use the same reporting criteria, it is helpful to understand if LLNL is consistent with or diverging from reporting at other sites. This section compares the normalized number of occurrences reported by LLNL and other DOE sites. In order to compare LLNL occurrence reports to occurrence reports from other DOE sites, we normalized (or standardized) the data from the sites. DOE sites vary widely in their budgets, populations, and scope of work and these variations may affect reporting frequency. In addition, reports are required for a wide range of occurrence types, some of which may not be applicable to all DOE sites. For example, one occurrence reporting group is Group 3, Nuclear Safety Basis, and not all sites have nuclear operations. Because limited information is available for all sites, the sites were normalized based on best available information. Site effort hours were extracted from the DOE Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) and used to normalize (or standardize) the number of occurrences by site. Effort hours are those hours that employees normally work and do not include vacation, holiday hours etc. Sites are responsible for calculating their effort hours and ensuring entry into CAIRS. Out of the

  4. LLE review. Volume 61, Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This volume of the LLE review, covering the period of October--December 1994, contains articles on a diagnostic method employing krypton spectroscopy for measurement of temperature and shell-fuel mixing in high-temperature implosions; the first direct assessment of the ion-acoustic decay instability in a large-scale length, hot plasma; measurements of polarization mode dispersion and group-velocity walkaway in birefringent media using a frequency domain interferometer; an evaluation of the magnetic flux dynamics occurring in an optically triggered, thin-film superconducting switch; the effect of slurry fluid chemistry on particle size distribution during aqueous polishing of optical glass; and the influence of thermal and mechanical processing history in the preparation of well-ordered liquid crystal elastomer systems.

  5. LLE review. Volume 65. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    Boehly, T.R. [ed.

    1996-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1995, contains a description of the generation and characterization of continuous, deep-surface-relief phase plates that are more efficient and versatile than previous designs. The LLE program plan has scheduled a number of enhancements to OMEGA`s performance and uniformity, the first of which is the implementation of these new distributed phase plates. Other articles in this volume include the discussion of an x-ray diagnostic method to measure shell-fuel mixing, the theoretical analysis of ablation-front stability, a description of a major subsystem in the OMEGA control system software, a study of the population inversions in intensely pumped Nd:YLF, and a description of a new ultrafast laser system and its uses.

  6. LLE review. Volume 61, Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    This volume of the LLE review, covering the period of October--December 1994, contains articles on a diagnostic method employing krypton spectroscopy for measurement of temperature and shell-fuel mixing in high-temperature implosions; the first direct assessment of the ion-acoustic decay instability in a large-scale length, hot plasma; measurements of polarization mode dispersion and group-velocity walkaway in birefringent media using a frequency domain interferometer; an evaluation of the magnetic flux dynamics occurring in an optically triggered, thin-film superconducting switch; the effect of slurry fluid chemistry on particle size distribution during aqueous polishing of optical glass; and the influence of thermal and mechanical processing history in the preparation of well-ordered liquid crystal elastomer systems

  7. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 2000). Volume 85

    Sources, John M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2000-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2000, begins with an article by R. Betti, M. Umansky, V. Lobatchev, V. N. Goncharov, and R. L. McCrory, who report on the development of a model for the deceleration phase of an imploding inertial fusion capsule (p. 1). The model shows that the ablative flow off the inner shell surface plays a critical role in reducing the growth rate and suppressing short-wavelength modes in the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Other articles in this volume are: The Effect of Shock Heating on the Stability of Laser-Driven Targets; Spherical Cavity Expansion in Material with Densification; Design and Performance of a Selectable-Rate Streak-Camera Deflection Ramp Generator; Unique High-Bandwidth, UV Fiber Deliver System for OMEGA Diagnostics Applications; Fabrication and Properties of an Ultrafast NbN Hot-Electron Single-Photon detector; and, Preliminary Design of NIF 2-D SSD.

  8. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January 1-March 31, 1982

    The report states that there were four abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate. The first involved diesel generator engine cooling system failures. The second involved pressure transients during shutdown. The third involved major deficiencies in management controls. The fourth involved a steam generator tube rupture. There were no abnormal occurrences for the other NRC licensees during the report period. The Agreement States reported no abnormal occurrences to the NRC. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  9. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 2001). Volume 89

    Donaldson, William R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2001-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2001, features “Time-Integrated Light Images of OMEGA Implosions” by P. Morley and W. Seka (p. 1). E. Kowaluk initiated this project for aesthetic rather than scientific reasons when he began taking visible light photographs of imploding OMEGA targets. These beautiful images are used to communicate LLE’s mission to the general public. A closer examination of the images revealed a one-to-one correspondence between the bright spots in the image and each of the 60 laser beams. The intensity of the bright spots has been related to refraction and absorption in the plasma surrounding the imploding target. These photographs are now proving to be the basis of a new laser-plasma interaction diagnostic. Other articles in this volume are titled the following: Analytical Model of Nonlinear, Single-Mode, Classical Rayleigh-Taylor Instability at Arbitrary Atwood Numbers; A High-Pass Phase Plate Design for OMEGA and the NIF; Advanced Tritium Recovery System; Establishing Links Between Single Gold Nanoparticles Buried Inside SiO2 Thin Film and 351-nm Pulsed-Laser-Damage Morphology; Resistive Switching Dynamics in Current-Biased Y-Ba-Cu-O Microbridges Excited by Nanosecond Electrical Pulses; and, Properties of Amorphous Carbon Films.

  10. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April-June 1985. Volume 8, No. 2

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. For this reporting period, there were three abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate: (1) inoperable safety injection pumps, (2) significant deficiencies in reactor operator training and material false statements, and (3) loss of main and auxiliary feedwater systems. There were four abnormal occurrences at the other NRC licensees. Three events involved diagnostic or therapeutic medical misadministrations; the other involved a breakdown in management controls. There was one abnormal occurrence reported by an Agreement State; the event involved overexposures of a radiographer and an assistant radiographer. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  11. LLE review, Volume 77. Quarterly report, October--December 1998

    Regan, S.P. [ed.

    1998-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October--December 1998, includes two articles addressing issues applicable to direct-drive ICF on the National Ignition Facility (NIF): laser-plasma interactions and laser-irradiation uniformity. Additional highlights of the research presented in this issue are: (1) P.B. Radha and S. Skupsky present a novel charged-particle diagnostic that performs simultaneous {rho}R measurements of the fuel, shell, and ablator regions of a compressed ICF target, consisting of an inner DT fuel region, a plastic (CH) shell, and an ablator (CD), by measuring the knock-on deuteron spectrum. (2) F. Dahmani, S. Burns, J. Lambropoulos, S. Papernov, and A. Schmid report results from stress-inhibited laser-driven crack propagation and stress-delayed damage-initiation experiments in fused silica at 351 nm. Research is underway presently to determine the ramifications of these findings for large-aperture systems, such as OMEGA. (3) V. Goncharov presents an analytic theory of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, which shows that the main stabilizing mechanism of the ablation-front perturbations is the dynamic overpressure of the blowoff plasma with respect to the target material. The perturbation evolution during the shock transit time is studied to determine the initial conditions for the Rayleigh-Taylor phase of the instability and to analyze the level of laser imprint on ICF direct-drive targets. (4) J.M. Larkin, W.R. Donaldson, T.H. Foster, and R.S. Knox examine the triplet state of rose bengal, a dye used in photodynamic therapy, that is produced by 1,064-nm excitation of T{sub 1}. (5) R. Adam, M. Currie, R. Sobolewski, O. Harnack, and M. Darula report measurements of the picosecond photoresponse of a current-biased YBCO microbridge coupled to a bicrystal YBCO Josephson junction.

  12. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report: Quarterly report, October 1988--December 1988

    This periodical covers the results of inspections performed by the NRC's Vendor Inspection Branch that have been distributed to the inspected organization during the period from October 1988 through December 1988

  13. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    This periodical covers the results of inspections performed by the NRC's Special Inspection Branch, Vendor Inspection Section, that have been distributed to the inspected organizations during the period from October 1995 through December 1995

  14. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    This periodical covers the results of inspections performed by the NRC's Special Inspection Branch, Vendor Inspection Section, that have been distributed to the inspected organizations during the period from October 1996 through December 1996

  15. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This periodical covers the results of inspections performed by the NRC`s Special Inspection Branch, Vendor Inspection Section, that have been distributed to the inspected organizations during the period from October 1996 through December 1996.

  16. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report: Quarterly report, October 1986-December 1986

    This periodical covers the results of inspections performed by the NRC's Vendor Program Branch that have been distributed to the inspected organizations during the period from October 1986 through December 1986. Also, included in this issue are the results of certain inspections performed prior to October 1986 that were not included in previous issues of NUREG-0040

  17. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report: Quarterly report, October 1987-December 1987

    This periodical covers the results of inspections performed by the NRC's Vendor Inspection Branch that have been distributed to the inspected organizations during the period from October 1987 thru December 1987. Also, included in this issue are the results of certain inspections performed prior to October 1987 that were not included in previous issues of NUREG-0040

  18. Calhoun Refuge Narrative Report : September, October, November, December, 1946

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing...

  19. National Elk Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1951

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. National Elk Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1948

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. Narrative report North Platte Refuge: September, October, November, & December, 1942

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for North Platte National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1942. The report begins by...

  2. Narrative report, Crescent Lake Refuge : September, October, November & December, 1942

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1942. The report begins by...

  3. Narrative report, Crescent Lake Refuge : September, October, November, & December, 1945

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by...

  4. Narrative report, Crescent Lake Refuge : September, October, November, & December, 1943

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by...

  5. National Elk Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1950

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Elk Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  6. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences: [Quarterly report], January-March 1987

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 to March 31, 1987. The report states that for this reporting period, there was one abnormal occurrence at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate. The item involved the NRC suspension of power operations of the Peach Bottom Facility due to inattentiveness of the control room staff. There were seven abnormal occurrences at the other NRC licensees. Four involved diagnostic medical misadministrations; the other three involved breakdowns in management controls at three separate industrial radiography licensees. There were two abnormal occurrences reported by the Agreement States. Both involved breakdowns in management controls at industrial radiography licensees. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences. Appendix A contains the criteria used to define an abnormal occurrence. 13 refs

  7. NEAMS Update. Quarterly Report for October - December 2011.

    Bradley, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-02-16

    The Advanced Modeling and Simulation Office within the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has been charged with revolutionizing the design tools used to build nuclear power plants during the next 10 years. To accomplish this, the DOE has brought together the national laboratories, U.S. universities, and the nuclear energy industry to establish the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program. The mission of NEAMS is to modernize computer modeling of nuclear energy systems and improve the fidelity and validity of modeling results using contemporary software environments and high-performance computers. NEAMS will create a set of engineering-level codes aimed at designing and analyzing the performance and safety of nuclear power plants and reactor fuels. The truly predictive nature of these codes will be achieved by modeling the governing phenomena at the spatial and temporal scales that dominate the behavior. These codes will be executed within a simulation environment that orchestrates code integration with respect to spatial meshing, computational resources, and execution to give the user a common 'look and feel' for setting up problems and displaying results. NEAMS is building upon a suite of existing simulation tools, including those developed by the federal Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing and Advanced Simulation and Computing programs. NEAMS also draws upon existing simulation tools for materials and nuclear systems, although many of these are limited in terms of scale, applicability, and portability (their ability to be integrated into contemporary software and hardware architectures). NEAMS investments have directly and indirectly supported additional NE research and development programs, including those devoted to waste repositories, safeguarded separations systems, and long-term storage of used nuclear fuel. NEAMS is organized into two broad efforts, each comprising four elements. The quarterly highlights October-December

  8. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January-March 1986. Volume 9, No. 1

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 to March 31, 1986. The report states that for this reporting period, there were two abnormal occurrences at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate. The events were (1) a loss of power and water hammer event and (2) a loss of integrated control system power and overcooling transient. There were five abnormal occurrences at the other NRC licensees. The events were (1) a rupture of a uranium hexafluoride cylinder and release of gases, (2) a therapeutic medical misadministration, (3) an overexposure to a member of the public from an industrial gauge, (4) a breakdown of management controls at an irradiator facility, and (5) a tritium overexposure and laboratory contamination. There were four abnormal occurrences reported by the Agreement States. Three of the events involved radiation injuries to people working either as radiographers or assistant radiographers; the other event involved contamination of a scrap steel facility. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  9. Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    1982-12-01

    Research progress is reported on developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual design activity of the two industry teams that are designing offshore OTEC pilot plants that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway in which tests of a different kind of ocean-energy device, a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber, are being planned. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1982.

  10. Enforcement actions: significant actions resolved. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1985. Volume 4, No. 4

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1985) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory commission to licensees with respects to these enforcement actions, and the licensees' responses

  11. [Glass Development Laser (GDL) Facility upgrade.] LLE Review. Quarterly report, October-December 1984. Volume 21

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the upgrade of the GDL (Glass Development) system, theoretical advances in the laser fusion effort, improved target fabrication capabilities, x-ray laser research, developments in the picosecond optics research of the LLE advanced technology program, and on the National Laser Users Facility activities for October-December 1984. 56 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs

  12. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October - December 2007). Volume 113

    Zuegel, Jonathan D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2007-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October–December 2007, features “High-Intensity Laser–Plasma Interactions in the Refluxing Limit,” by P. M. Nilson, W. Theobald, J. Myatt, C. Stoeckl, M. Storm, O. V. Gotchev, J. D. Zuegel, R. Betti, D. D. Meyerhofer, and T. C. Sangster. In this article (p. 1), the authors report on target experiments using the Multi-Terawatt (MTW) Laser Facility to study isochoric heating of solid-density targets by fast electrons produced from intense, short-pulse laser irradiation. Electron refluxing occurs due to target-sheath field effects and contains most of the fast electrons within the target volume. This efficiently heats the solid-density plasma through collisions. X-ray spectroscopic measurements of absolute Kα (x-radiation) photon yields and variations of the Kβ/Kα b emission ratio both indicate that laser energy couples to fast electrons with a conversion efficiency of approximately 20%. Bulk electron temperatures of at least 200 eV are inferred for the smallest mass targets.

  13. LLE Review Quarterly Report October - December 2011. Volume 129

    Shvydky, Alex [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2011-12-01

    This volume of LLE Review, covering October–December 2011, features “Crossed-Beam Energy Transfer in Direct-Drive Implosions” by I. V. Igumenshchev, W. Seka, D. H. Edgell, D. T. Michel, D. H. Froula, R. S. Craxton, R. Follett, J. H. Kelly, T. Z. Kosc, J. F. Myatt, T. C. Sangster, A. Shvydky, S. Skupsky, and C. Stoeckl (LLE); V. N. Goncharov and A. V. Maximov (LLE and Department of Mechanical Engineering, U. of Rochester); L. Divol and P. Michel (LLNL); and R. L. McCrory and D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE and Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Physics, U. of Rochester). In this article (p. 1), direct-drive–implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1995)] have shown discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicates the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10% to 20%. The authors attribute this degradation in laser coupling to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)— which is electromagnetically seeded—low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  14. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences: January--March 1994. Volume 17, No. 1

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report provides a description of those events that have been determined to be abnormal occurrences during the period of January 1 through March 31, 1994. This report addresses seven AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. One involved inoperable main steam isolation valves at a boiling water reactor, four involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, one involved a medical teletherapy misadministration, and one involved four lost reference sources. One AO that was reported by an Agreement State is also discussed; the information is current as of April 25, 1994. This event involved a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical misadministration. The report also contains updates on seven abnormal occurrences previously reported by NRC licensees and one abnormal occurrence previously reported by an Agreement State license. For the period January 1 to March 31, 1994, no new ''Other Events of Interest'' were reported but an update to a therapeutic misadministration previously reported as an ''Other Event of Interest'' is included

  15. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1990

    1991-01-31

    During the fourth quarter of 1990, steady-state performance testing at the Nucla Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) resumed under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. Co-sponsorship of the Demonstration Test Program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was completed on June 15, 1990. From October through December, 1990, Colorado-Ute Electric Association (CUEA) completed a total of 23 steady-state performance tests, 4 dynamic tests, and set operating records during November and December as the result of improved unit operating reliability. Highlight events and achievements during this period of operation are presented.

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved; Quarterly progress report, October--December 1993: Volume 12, No. 4

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  17. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1994: Volume 17, Number 2

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report provides a description of those events that have been determined to be abnormal occurrences during the period of April 1 through June 30, 1994. This report addresses seven abnormal occurrences (AOs) at NRC-licensed facilities. Five involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, one involved a medical teletherapy misadministration, and one involved a medical sodium iodide misadministration. Four AOs were reported by the Agreement States as of August 3, 1994. Two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, one involved a radiation burn received by an industrial radiographer, and one involved a lost well logging source. The report also contains updates of seven AOs previously reported by NRC licensees and five AOs previously reported by Agreement State licensees. Three ''Other Events of Interest'' are also reported. One involved a deliberate cover up of an error in a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical administration at an NRC licensee, one involved an Order Suspending License and Demand for Information at an NRC licensee, and one involved an overexposure of an industrial radiographer at an Agreement State licensee

  18. Quarterly report on wildlife and activities appurtenant thereto: October 1, 1937 to December 31, 1937: [National Bison Range

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1937. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  19. Quarterly report on wildlife and activities appurtenant thereto: October 1, 1938 to December 31, 1938: [National Bison Range

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1938. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  20. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report. Quarterly report, October-December 1985. Volume 9, No. 4

    This periodical covers the results of inspections performed by the NRCs vendor program branch that have been distribution to the inspected organizations during the period from October 1985 through December 1985

  1. Quarterly report on wildlife and activities appurtenant thereto, from October 1, 1936 to December 31, 1936: [National Bison Range

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1936. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  2. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (October-December 2006)

    2006-01-01

    he Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the PERL, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, scheduled until the end of this year: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19 October 2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 19-20 October 2006 (2 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30 Oct. -1 Nov. 2006 (3 days) PERL 5 - Advanced Aspects: 2 November 2006 (1 day) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16 November 2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7 December 2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15 December 2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans : 18.20 December 2006 (3 days) All the above sessions will be given in English, at the CERN Training Centre....

  3. Report on safety related occurrences and reactor trips July 1, 1977 - December 31, 1977

    This is a systematically arranged report on all reported safety related occurrences and reactor trips in Swedish nuclear power plants in operation during July 1 to December 31, 1977 inclusive. The facilities involved are Barsebaeck 1 and 2, Oskarshamn 1 and 2 and Ringhals 1 and 2. During this period of 6 months 48 safety related occurrences and 49 reactor trips have been reported to the Nuclear Power Inspectorate. Included is also one incident June 21 in Barsebaeck 2 which was not included in the last compilation of occurrences. As earlier experiences have shown it is to the greatest extent the conventional components which bring about the safety related occurrences or occurrences leading to outages or power reductions. However, the component errors discovered in the safety related systems have not affected the function of their redundant systems and other diverse systems have not been involved. Therefore the reactor safety has been satisfactory. The total number of reactor trips have increased nearly 30% since the last period. Those occurred during power operation however, were less. More than 50% of the reactor trips happened in the shutdown condition. The fact that even small deviations from prescribed operation result in automatic and safe shut down of the reactor, does not always imply a conflict with operational availability. The greatest outages are caused by occurrences withou02068NRM 0000169 450

  4. CERN Technical Training 2006: Office Software Curriculum Scheduled Course Sessions (October-December 2006)

    2006-01-01

    The Office Software Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme currently offers comprehensive training in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Access, Outlook), MS Project, Frontpage, Dreamweaver, Indesign, LaTeX, and CERN EDMS. There are some places available on the following Microsoft Office 2003 course sessions, currently scheduled until December 2007: EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : ECDL - 16-17 October (2 days, session in French) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge - 2 November (morning, bilingual session) WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document - 2 November (afternoon, bilingual session) OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation - 3 November (morning, bilingual session) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Link cells, worksheets and workbooks - 3 November (afternoon, bilingual session) EXCEL 2003 - Level 1: ECDL - 13-14 November (2 days, session in English) ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL - 5-6 December (2 days, session in English) The abo...

  5. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, October 1995--December 1995

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the U.S. Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 titled {open_quotes}Decontamination Systems Information and Research programs{close_quotes} (DOE Instrument No. DE-FC21-92MC29467) This report contains the efforts of the research projects comprising the Agreement for the 4th calendar quarter of 1995, and is the final quarterly report deliverable required for the period ending 31 December 1995. The projects reported for the WVU Cooperative Agreement are categorized into the following three areas: 1.0 In Situ Remediation Process Development, 2.0 Advanced Product Applications Testing, and 3.0 Information Systems, Public Policy, Community Outreach, and Economics. Summaries of the significant accomplishments for the projects reported during the period 1 October 95 through 31 December 95 are presented in the following discussions.

  6. Nosocomial outbreak of disseminated orf infection in a burn unit, Gaziantep, Turkey, October to December 2012

    ERGÖNÜL, Önder; Midilli, K.; Erkılıç, A.; Kuskucu, M.; Analay, H.; Erkılıç, S.; Benzonana, N.; Yıldırım, M. S.; Muelayim, K.; Acar H.

    2013-01-01

    www.eurosurveillance.org 1 Rapid communications Nosocomial outbreak of disseminated orf infection in a burn unit, Gaziantep, Turkey, October to December 2012 K Midilli1, A Erkılıç2, M Kuşkucu1, H Analay2, S Erkılıç3, N Benzonana4, M S Yıldırım2, K Mülayim2, H Acar4, O Ergonul ()5 1. Istanbul University, Cerrahpaşa Medical School, Istanbul 2. Dr.Ersin Arslan Hospital, Gaziantep, Turkey 3. Gaziantep University, School of Medicine, Gaziantep, Turkey ...

  7. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved: Quarterly progress report, October--December 1988

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1988) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  8. Quarterly Progress Report Research And Development Activities Waste Fixation Program October Through December 1976

    Research and development activities of the Waste Fixation Program for October through December 1976 are described in this report. The objective of this program is to develop processes to convert high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW) to solid forms that are demonstrated to be physically, chemically, and radiolytically stable and inert. The scope of this program encompasses plans to make available a flexible advancing technology for the solidification of radioactive waste. Early technology will produce borosilicate glass by in-can melting and continuous electric melters. Multibarrier waste forms will be developed for future application

  9. Plasma physics research (Tokapole II). Technical progress report, October 1, 1981-December 31, 1983

    Progress during the 27-month period, October 1, 1981 to December 31, 1983 on Tokapole II research is described. Tokapole II is a 4-node poloidal divertor tokamak that can also be run as an octupole. Research during this period has concentrated on studies of discharges with safety factor q less than one and on the identification of the shear Alfven wave resonance. Other topics include measurements of the loop voltage reduction through ECRH startup, plasma gun refueling, fluctuations and transport, pumped limiter studies, plasma-wall interactions, diagnostic development, polarization of electron cyclotron emission, and poloidal ohmic heating

  10. Report on safety related occurrences and reactor trips July 1, 1979 - December 31, 1979

    This is a report on all reported safety related occurrences and reactor trips in Swedish nuclear power plants in operation during July 1 to December 31, 1979 inclusive. The facilities involved are Barsebaeck 1 and 2, Oskarshamn 1 and 2 and Ringhals 1 and 2. During this period of 6 months 76 safety related occurrences and 27 reactor trips have been reported to the Nuclear Power Inspectorate. It is to the greatest extent conventional components such as valves and pumps which bring about the safety related occurrences or occurrences leading to outages or power reductions. However, the component errors discovered in the safety related systems have not affected the function of their redundant system and other diverse systems have not been involved. Therefore the reactor safety has been satisfactory. The total number of reactor trips are normal. The average value for these 6 months is 4.5 trips/unit. Approximetely one half of the reactor trips happened at zero or very low power operation. The fact that even small deviations from prescribed operation result in an automatic and safe shut down of the reactor, does not always imply a conflict with operational availability. The greatest outages are caused by occurrences without safety significance. (author)

  11. Report on safety related occurrences and reactor trips July 1, 1976-December 31, 1976

    This is a systematically arranged report on all reported safety related occurrences and reactor trips in Swedish nuclear power plants in operation during July 1, 1976 to December 31, 1976 inclusive. The facilities involved are Oskarshamn 1 and 2, Ringhals 1 and 2 and Barsebaeck 1. During this period of the 6 months 37 safety related occurrences and 34 reactor trips have been reported to the Nuclear Power Inspectorate. As earlier experiences have shown it is to the greatest extent the conventional components which bring about the safety related occurrences or occurrences leading to outages or power reductions. However, the component errors discovered in the safety related systems have not affected the function of their redundant systems and other diverse systems have not been involved. Therefore the reactor safety has been satisfactory. The fact that even small deviations from prescribed operation results in automatic and safe shut down of the reactor, does not always imply a conflict with operational availability. The number of reactor trips are almost as low as during the last period, which is a drastic reduction compared to earlier time periods. The greatest outages are caused by occurrences without safety significance.(author)

  12. Report on the safety related occurrences and reactor trips July 1, 1980 - December 31, 1980

    This is a systematically arranged report on all reported safety related occurrences and reactor trips in Swedish nuclear power plants in operation during July 1 to December 31, 1981 inclusive. The facilities involved are Barsebaeck 1 and 2, Oskarhamn 1 and 2, Ringhals 1, 2 and 3 and Forsmark 1 and 2. During this period of 6 months 88 safety related occurrences and 51 reactor trips have been reported to the Nuclear Power Inspectorate. As earlier experiences have shown it is to the greatest extent conventional components such as valves and pumps which bring about the safety related occurrences or occurrences leading to outages or power reductions. However, the component errors discovered in the safety related systems have not affected the function of their redundant system and other diverse systems have not been involved. Therefore the reactor safety has been satisfactory. The total number of reactor trips are normal. The average value for these 6 months is 2,3 trips/unit if one looks at the 6 units in commercial operation. As can be expected, Ringhals 3 and Forsmark 1 have had significantly more reactor trips. These units have been in the start up phase during this period, which includes different transient and trip tests. Forsmark 2, beeing in its hot functional test period, has not yet been the subject of many of these tests. This is reflected in very few incidents and reactor trips. The fact that even small deviations from prescribed operation result in an automatic and safe shut down of the reactor, does not always imply a conflict with operational availability. The greatest outages are caused by occurrences without safety significance. (author)

  13. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, fiscal year 1997. Volume 20

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety. The Federal Reports Elimination and Sunset Act of 1995 requires that AOs be reported to Congress on an annual basis. This report includes those events that NRC has determined to be AOs during fiscal year 1997. This report addresses two AOs at NRC licensed facilities. One involved an event at a nuclear power plant, and one involved materials overexposure. The report also addresses four Agreement State AOs. Two of these AOs involved overexposures and two involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. In addition, Appendix C of the report includes five events of loss of control of licensed materials.

  14. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, fiscal year 1997. Volume 20

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety. The Federal Reports Elimination and Sunset Act of 1995 requires that AOs be reported to Congress on an annual basis. This report includes those events that NRC has determined to be AOs during fiscal year 1997. This report addresses two AOs at NRC licensed facilities. One involved an event at a nuclear power plant, and one involved materials overexposure. The report also addresses four Agreement State AOs. Two of these AOs involved overexposures and two involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. In addition, Appendix C of the report includes five events of loss of control of licensed materials

  15. Yucca Mountain Project Integrated Data System (IDS). Final report, October 1, 1989--December 31, 1990

    This final report for LANL Subcontract 9-XS8-2604-1 includes copies of all formal letters, memorandums, and reports provided by CAG to support the IDS effort in the LANL Test Managers Office, Las Vegas, Nevada from October 1, 1989 through the end of the contract on December 31, 1990. The material is divided into two sections; the Functional Requirements Document (FRD) and other reports, letters, and memorandums. All documents are arranged in chronological order with most recent last. Numerous draft copies of the FRD were prepared and cover sheets for all drafts are included. The complete text of only the last version supplied (July 27, 1990) is included in this document

  16. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Progress report, October 1992--December 1993

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  17. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program. Progress report, October 1992--December 1993

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG ampersand G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG ampersand G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support

  18. Yucca Mountain Project Integrated Data System (IDS); Final report, October 1, 1989--December 31, 1990

    NONE

    1991-05-23

    This final report for LANL Subcontract 9-XS8-2604-1 includes copies of all formal letters, memorandums, and reports provided by CAG to support the IDS effort in the LANL Test Managers Office, Las Vegas, Nevada from October 1, 1989 through the end of the contract on December 31, 1990. The material is divided into two sections; the Functional Requirements Document (FRD) and other reports, letters, and memorandums. All documents are arranged in chronological order with most recent last. Numerous draft copies of the FRD were prepared and cover sheets for all drafts are included. The complete text of only the last version supplied (July 27, 1990) is included in this document.

  19. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences: April--June 1995. Volume 18, Number 2

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such occurrences to be made to Congress. This report provides a description of those incidents and events that have been determined to be AOs during the period of April 1 through June 30, 1995. This report addresses five AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. One involved a reactor coolant system blowdown at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, one involved a previously unidentified path for the potential release of radioactivity at a PWR nuclear power plant, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and one involved a medical therapeutic radiopharmaceutical misadministration. Four AOs submitted by the Agreement States are included. One involved a medical teletherapy misadministration, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and one involved the overexposure of personnel at a medical center. The report also contains an update of one AO previously reported by an NRC licensee, and two AOs previously reported by the Agreement States. No ''Other Events of Interest'' items are being reported

  20. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences: April--June 1995. Volume 18, Number 2

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such occurrences to be made to Congress. This report provides a description of those incidents and events that have been determined to be AOs during the period of April 1 through June 30, 1995. This report addresses five AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. One involved a reactor coolant system blowdown at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, one involved a previously unidentified path for the potential release of radioactivity at a PWR nuclear power plant, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and one involved a medical therapeutic radiopharmaceutical misadministration. Four AOs submitted by the Agreement States are included. One involved a medical teletherapy misadministration, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and one involved the overexposure of personnel at a medical center. The report also contains an update of one AO previously reported by an NRC licensee, and two AOs previously reported by the Agreement States. No ``Other Events of Interest`` items are being reported.

  1. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  2. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported

  3. LSAT Dimensionality Analysis for the December 1991, June 1992, and October 1992 Administrations. Statistical Report. LSAC Research Report Series.

    Douglas, Jeff; Kim, Hae-Rim; Roussos, Louis; Stout, William; Zhang, Jinming

    An extensive nonparametric dimensionality analysis of latent structure was conducted on three forms of the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) (December 1991, June 1992, and October 1992) using the DIMTEST model in confirmatory analyses and using DIMTEST, FAC, DETECT, HCA, PROX, and a genetic algorithm in exploratory analyses. Results indicate that…

  4. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences: Fiscal year 1996. Volume 19

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 (PL 93-438) identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety. The Federal Reports Elimination and Sunset Act of 1995 (PL 104-66) requires that AOs be reported to Congress on an annual basis. This report includes those events that NRC determined to be AOs during fiscal year 1996. This report addresses eighteen AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. Two involved events at nuclear power plants, eleven involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and five involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. Eight AOs submitted by the Agreement States are included. One involved stolen radiography cameras, one involved a ruptured source, one involved release of radioactive material while being transported, one involved a lost source, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and two involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. Four updates of previously reported AOs are included in this report. Three ''Other Events of Interest'' events are being reported, and one previously reported ''Other Events of Interest'' event is being updated

  5. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences: Fiscal year 1996. Volume 19

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 (PL 93-438) identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety. The Federal Reports Elimination and Sunset Act of 1995 (PL 104-66) requires that AOs be reported to Congress on an annual basis. This report includes those events that NRC determined to be AOs during fiscal year 1996. This report addresses eighteen AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. Two involved events at nuclear power plants, eleven involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and five involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. Eight AOs submitted by the Agreement States are included. One involved stolen radiography cameras, one involved a ruptured source, one involved release of radioactive material while being transported, one involved a lost source, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and two involved radiopharmaceutical misadministrations. Four updates of previously reported AOs are included in this report. Three ``Other Events of Interest`` events are being reported, and one previously reported ``Other Events of Interest`` event is being updated.

  6. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1997

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-98 (October--December 1997). It describes 216 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps and material for high school debates, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, space heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, electric power and snow melting. Research activities include work on model construction specifications of lineshaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers, a comprehensive aquaculture developer package and revisions to the Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 18, No. 4) which was devoted entirely to geothermal activities in South Dakota, dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisition and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

  7. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    1994-02-01

    This report is a summary of the work conducted for the period of October--December 1993 by the West Virginia University for the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Research under the program focuses on pertinent technology for hazardous waste clean-up. This report reflects the progress performed on sixteen technical projects encompassed by this program: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; Site remediation technologies: (a) Drain-enhanced soil flushing and (b) In situ bio-remediation of organic contaminants; Excavation systems for hazardous waste sites: Dust control methods for in-situ nuclear waste handling; Chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; Development of organic sensors: Monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; Remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming; Microbial enrichment for enhancing biodegradation of hazardous organic wastes in soil; Soil decontamination with a packed flotation column; Treatment of volatile organic compounds using biofilters; Use of granular activated carbon columns for the simultaneous removal of organic, heavy metals, and radionuclides; Compact mercuric iodide detector technology development; Evaluation of IR and mass spectrometric techniques for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds; and Improved socio-economic assessment of alternative environmental restoration techniques.

  8. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Jungers, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between November 20 and February 25, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  9. Pipeline investigation report : natural gas compressor station occurrence : Gazoduc TQM Inc., December 2000

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    On December 28, 2000, a release of natural gas resulted in an explosion that destroyed the electrical and services building at the Gazoduc TQM East Hereford compressor station, damaging the compressor building. Before the occurrence, the station had been shut down due to a manual initiation of the station's emergency shutdown system. A maintenance person was sent to the station to reinitiate the electric motor-driven compressor unit. The on-site maintenance person was seriously injured. This report presents factual information about the accident, the injuries and the damage to equipment. It also reviews particulars of the pipeline system, the compressor station design, construction and operations. An analysis of the natural gas stream found an unknown product in the compressor station. A history of previous explosions, ruptures, leaks and fires was presented along with quality control programs. Findings as to the causes and contributing factors of the accident were revealed along with findings as to risk and safety actions. tabs., figs.

  10. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Employees of Iranian Petrochemical Industries: October 2009 to December 2012

    A Haghayegh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs are a common health problem throughout the world and a major cause of disability in the workplace.Objective: To determine the prevalence rate of MSDs, assessment of ergonomics working conditions and identification of major risk factors associated with MSDs symptoms among employees of Iranian petrochemical industries between October 2009 and December 2012.Methods: In this study, we studied 1184 randomly selected employees of 4 Iranian petrochemical companies with at least one year of work experience in office or operational units. For those with office jobs, data were collected using Nordic Musculoskeletal disorders Questionnaire (NMQ and ergonomics checklist for the assessment of working conditions. For those with operational jobs, NMQ and Quick Exposure Check (QEC method were used for data collection.Results: The most prevalent MSD symptoms were reported in lower back (41.5% and neck (36.5%. The prevalence of MSDs in all body regions but elbows and thighs of the office staff was significantly higher than that of operational workers. Assessment of working conditions in office staff revealed that the lowest index was attributed to workstation. QEC technique among operational workers showed that in 73.8% of the workers studied, the level of exposure to musculoskeletal risks was “high” or “very high.” MSDs were associated with type of job, age, body mass index, work experience, gender, marital status, educational level and type of employment.Conclusion: The prevalence of MSDs in the office staff was higher than that of operational workers. Level of exposure to MSDs risk was high in operational workers. Corrective measures are thus necessary for improving working conditions for both office and operational units.

  11. Occurrence and sources of Escherichia coli in metropolitan St. Louis streams, October 2004 through September 2007

    Wilkison, Donald H.; Davis, Jerri V.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence and sources of Escherichia coli (E. coli), one of several fecal indicator bacteria, in metropolitan St. Louis streams known to receive nonpoint source runoff, occasional discharges from combined and sanitary sewers, and treated wastewater effluent were investigated from October 2004 through September 2007. Three Missouri River sites, five Mississippi River sites, and six small basin tributary stream sites were sampled during base flow and storm events for the presence of E. coli and their sources. E. coli host-source determinations were conducted using local library based genotypic methods. Human fecal contamination in stream samples was additionally confirmed by the presence of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, an anaerobic, enteric bacterium with a high occurrence in, and specificity to, humans. Missouri River E. coli densities and loads during base flow were approximately 10 times greater than those in the Mississippi River above its confluence with the Missouri River. Although substantial amounts of E. coli originated from within the study area during base flow and storm events, considerable amounts of E. coli in the Missouri River, as well as in the middle Mississippi River sections downstream from its confluence with the Missouri River, originated in Missouri River reaches upstream from the study area. In lower Mississippi River reaches, bacteria contributions from the numerous combined and sanitary sewer overflows within the study area, as well as contributions from nonpoint source runoff, greatly increased instream E. coli densities. Although other urban factors cannot be discounted, average E. coli densities in streams were strongly correlated with the number of upstream combined and sanitary sewer overflow points, and the percentage of upstream impervious cover. Small basin sites with the greatest number of combined and sanitary sewer overflows (Maline Creek and the River des Peres) had larger E. coli densities, larger loads, and a greater

  12. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From October 1, 1934 to December 31, 1934: [National Bison Range

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1934. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  13. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from October 1, 1935 to December 31, 1935: [National Bison Range

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1935. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  14. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From October 1, 1933, to December 31, 1933: [National Bison Range

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1933. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  15. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the AQUALAB from 14 October 1968 to 11 December 1968 (NODC Accession 7100270)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the AQUALAB from 14 October 1968 to 11 December 1968. Data were submitted by the Southern...

  16. Geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) from 31 October 1989 to 31 December 1989 (NODC Accession 9000022)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of geodetic data records (GDRs) from the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of October 31, 1989 to December 31,...

  17. Department of Veterans Affairs Quarterly Notice to Congress on Data Breaches First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2014 October 1, 2013 through December 31, 2013

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This is a quarterly notice to congress containing statistics on data breeches for fiscal year 2014 for the first quarter (2014 October 1, 2013 through December 31,...

  18. Occurrence of maxillary sinus abnormalities detected by cone beam CT in asymptomatic patients

    Rege Inara Carneiro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images of the maxillofacial region allow the inspection of the entire volume of the maxillary sinus (MS, identifying anatomic variations and abnormalities in the image volume, this is frequently neglected by oral radiologists when interpreting images of areas at a distance from the dentoalveolar region, such as the full anatomical aspect of the MS. The aim of this study was to investigate maxillary sinus abnormalities in asymptomatic patients by using CBCT. Methods 1113 CBCT were evaluated by two examiners and identification of abnormalities, the presence of periapical lesions and proximity to the lower sinus wall were recorded. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and Kappa statistics. Results Abnormalities were diagnosed in 68.2% of cases (kappa = 0.83. There was a significant difference between genders (p Conclusions Abnormalities in maxillary sinus emphasizes how important it is for the dentomaxillofacial radiologist to undertake an interpretation of the whole volume of CBCT images.

  19. Occurrence of cancer in a cohort of 183 persons with constitutional chromosome 7 abnormalities

    Hasle, H; Olsen, J H; Hansen, J;

    1998-01-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities in human malignancies frequently involve chromosome 7. The existence of several tumor suppressor genes on the long arm of chromosome 7 has been suggested in both epithelial and hematologic malignancies. From the Danish Cytogenetic Register, we identified 183 persons with...... constitutional abnormalities involving chromosome 7, including 16 patients with Williams syndrome. By linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry, we found five persons with cancer, including one thyroid carcinoma, three carcinomas of the digestive tract, and one malignant melanoma. There were no cases of leukemia...

  20. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    1980-04-18

    This report presents the results of work performed from October 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described. This includes: screening creep results, weight gain and post-exposure mechanical properties for materials thermally exposed at 750/sup 0/ and 850/sup 0/C (1382/sup 0/ and 1562/sup 0/F). In addition, the status of the data management system is described.

  1. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1994, Volume 13, No. 4, Part 1

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1994) and includes copies of letters Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees (non-medical). Quarterly progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1994) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees (non-medical) with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1994, Volume 13, No. 4, Part 1

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1994) and includes copies of letters Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees (non-medical). Quarterly progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1994) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees (non-medical) with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  5. Occurrence and type of chromosomal abnormalities in consecutive malignant monoclonal gammopathies: correlation with survival

    Lisse, I M; Drivsholm, A; Christoffersen, P

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome studies were done on 73 patients with multiple myeloma and three patients with plasma cell leukemia. Eighteen of 76 patients (24%) had chromosomally abnormal clones, including all three patients with PCL. The most common anomalous chromosomes were #1, #14, and #12. In addition, i(17q...

  6. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  7. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1956

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  8. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1954

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge Batchtown National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of...

  9. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November December 1960

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR (including Chase Lake NWR and District VI Easement Refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December...

  10. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November December 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR (including Chase Lake NWR and District VI Easement Refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December...

  11. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November December 1958

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR (including Chase Lake NWR and District VI Easement Refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December...

  12. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November December 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR (including Chase Lake NWR and District VI Easement Refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December...

  13. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November December 1959

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR (including Chase Lake NWR and District VI Easement Refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December...

  14. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1958

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by...

  15. Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September, October, November, December, 1948

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by...

  16. Talcot Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, & December 1945

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Talcot Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1943

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1946

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1948

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1945

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1947

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Medicine Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  2. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1960

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December 1953

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by...

  4. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area : September, October, November, and December, 1953

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by...

  5. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1945

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1945. The report begins by...

  6. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1958

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1958. The report begins by...

  7. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1960

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1960. The report begins by...

  8. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1948

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1948. The report begins by...

  9. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1950

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1950. The report begins by...

  10. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1957

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1957. The report begins by...

  11. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1946

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1946. The report begins by...

  12. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1949

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1949. The report begins by...

  13. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1955

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1955. The report begins by...

  14. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1951

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1951. The report begins by...

  15. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1956

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1956. The report begins by...

  16. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1944

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1944. The report begins by...

  17. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1947

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1947. The report begins by...

  18. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1959

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1959. The report begins by...

  19. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1942

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December of 1942. The report begins by...

  20. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1952

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1952. The report begins by...

  1. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1953

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1953. The report begins by...

  2. Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Narrative Report : September, October, November, December 1943

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December of 1943. The report begins by...

  3. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1961

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  4. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  5. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1956

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  6. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1957

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by...

  7. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  8. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1961

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by summarizing...

  9. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1960

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by...

  11. September, October, November, & December, 1958: Narrative report: Valentine National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Narrative report: Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, & December, 1959

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Valentine NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  15. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1958

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by...

  16. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  17. Narrative report: Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November, December, 1959

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by...

  18. A narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1955: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1949

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1948

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  2. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1944

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : September, October, November, December, 1951

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by summarizing...

  4. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1955

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by...

  5. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : September, October, November, December, 1950

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by summarizing...

  6. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : September, October, November, December, 1948

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by summarizing...

  7. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : September, October, November, December, 1949

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : September, October, November, December, 1947

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The report begins by summarizing...

  9. Calhoun and Batchtown Refuges Narrative Report : September, October, November, December, 1952

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Calhoun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area Narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1951

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Burford Lake Wildlife Management Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by...

  11. DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for September, October, November, December, 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November - December 1954

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period September, October, November, December, 1958

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November - December - 1953

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November December 1955

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  16. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge : Narrative report : For period September, October, November, December, 1955

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1953

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Narrative report for September, October, November and December 1943 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by...

  19. A narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1954: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. A narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1959: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. A narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1957: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  2. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1960

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. A narrative report: September, October, November and December, 1953: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1959

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  5. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1950 Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IVa

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by...

  6. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1950 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by...

  7. Narrative report for September, October, November and December 1944 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1944. The report begins by...

  8. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1947 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The report begins by...

  9. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1946 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by...

  10. Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September, October, November & December 1946

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by...

  11. Narrative report, Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September, October, November & December, 1947

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The report begins by...

  12. Narrative report: Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge: September, October, November and December, 1947

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The report begins by...

  13. Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge, Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1956

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pathfinder National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  14. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December 1951

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December 1952

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by...

  16. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1947

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Trempealeau NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September, October, November and December 1944

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Necedah NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Quarterly narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1952: Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Chautauqua NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1950

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November December 1956

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962: Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lake Andes NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  2. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : September - October - November - December 1946

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Pulmonary dysfunction in advanced liver disease: frequent occurrence of an abnormal diffusing capacity

    Abnormalities in pulmonary function have been reported in association with chronic liver disease of varied etiology. The aim of this study was to better define the frequency and nature of these abnormalities in patients who were being evaluated for liver transplantation. We performed a battery of pulmonary function tests and chest radiographs in 116 consecutive patients (50 men, 66 women; aged 19 to 70 years, mean 44.6 years) with severe advanced liver disease who were hospitalized specifically for evaluation for possible orthotopic liver transplantation and were able to perform technically satisfactory tests. In 17 patients, quantitative whole-body technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin perfusion scanning was also performed for assessment of possible right-to-left shunting through intrapulmonary vascular dilatations. The most commonly affected test of lung function was the single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), which was abnormal in 48%, 45%, and 71% of patients who never smoked, former smokers, and current smokers, respectively. Ventilatory restriction was noted in 25% of all patients, airflow obstruction (reduced ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity) in only 3%, and a widened alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient in 45%. Diffusion impairment was accompanied by a restrictive defect in only 35% of the patients and by an abnormally widened alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient in 60%. When diffusion impairment was accompanied by an oxygenation defect, it was also associated with a significantly increased right-to-left shunt fraction (mean 24.9%) assessed from quantitative whole-body perfusion imaging

  4. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 1, October--December 1992

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program which are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The reporting period covered is October through December 1992(first quarter of FY 1993). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been formally approved as FY 1993 commitments. This first section is followed by: significant accomplishments; technical status at Y-12 operable units, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge K-25 site, Clinch River, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and technical oversight and technical programs; and response action contractor assignments

  5. Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 24

    None

    1984-04-01

    This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water reactors (LWRs) and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

  6. United States Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal program. Special projects research and coordination assistance. Final report, 1 December 1978-30 October 1980

    Dorfman, M.H.; Morton, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    Work for the period, December 1, 1978 through October 31, 1980, is documented. The following activities are covered: project technical coordination assistance and liaison; technical assistance for review and evaluation of proposals and contract results; technical assistance for geopressured-geothermal test wells; technical assistance, coordination, and planning of surface utilization program; legal research; and special projects. (MHR)

  7. Occurrence of the blanketing sporadic E layer during the recovery phase of the October 2003 superstorm

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Resende, Laysa Cristina Araújo; Moro, Juliano; Chen, Sony Su

    2016-05-01

    We have routinely monitored the total frequency ( ftEs) and the blanketing frequency ( fbEs) of sporadic E layers with the digital sounder under the magnetic equator in the Brazilian sector. Sporadic layers appear in the equatorial region (Esq) at heights between 90 and 130 km, mainly due to irregularities in the equatorial electrojet current. However, during the recovery phase of the October 2003 superstorm, an anomalous intensification of the ionospheric density that exceeded the normal ambient background values for local time and location was observed. The parameter fbEs rose to almost 7.5 MHz during this event, due to a type "c" blanketing sporadic layer (Esc), which is driven by wind shear. This result is discussed in terms of the atmosphere dynamics based on magnetic signature of the equatorial electrojet current using magnetometer data. Also, using data measured by sensors onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 10 we analyze the possible influence of the solar flare-associated X-ray flux as an additional source of ionization.

  8. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    Bool, L.E. III; Senior, C.L. [Physical Sciences Inc., Andover, MA (United States); Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UKy), the University of Connecticut, and Princeton University to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI`s existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). During the past quarter the final program coal, from the Wyodak seam in the Powder River Basin, was acquired and distributed. Extensive coal characterization and laboratory work is underway to develop and test new sub-models. Coal characterization in the past quarter included direct identification of the modes of occurrence of various trace inorganic species in coal and ash using unique analytical techniques such as XAFS analysis and selective leaching. Combustion testing of the bituminous coals continued and additional data were obtained on trace element vaporization in the combustion zone. Studies of post-combustion trace element transformations, such as mercury speciation in the flue gas, were also begun in the last quarter.

  9. Occurrence and transport of nitrogen in the Big Sunflower River, northwestern Mississippi, October 2009-June 2011

    Barlow, Jeannie R.B.; Coupe, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    The Big Sunflower River Basin, located within the Yazoo River Basin, is subject to large annual inputs of nitrogen from agriculture, atmospheric deposition, and point sources. Understanding how nutrients are transported in, and downstream from, the Big Sunflower River is key to quantifying their eutrophying effects on the Gulf. Recent results from two Spatially Referenced Regressions on Watershed attributes (SPARROW models), which include the Big Sunflower River, indicate minimal losses of nitrogen in stream reaches typical of the main channels of major river systems. If SPARROW assumptions of relatively conservative transport of nitrogen are correct and surface-water losses through the bed of the Big Sunflower River are negligible, then options for managing nutrient loads to the Gulf of Mexico may be limited. Simply put, if every pound of nitrogen entering the Delta is eventually delivered to the Gulf, then the only effective nutrient management option in the Delta is to reduce inputs. If, on the other hand, it can be shown that processes within river channels of the Mississippi Delta act to reduce the mass of nitrogen in transport, other hydrologic approaches may be designed to further limit nitrogen transport. Direct validation of existing SPARROW models for the Delta is a first step in assessing the assumptions underlying those models. In order to characterize spatial and temporal variability of nitrogen in the Big Sunflower River Basin, water samples were collected at four U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations located on the Big Sunflower River between October 1, 2009, and June 30, 2011. Nitrogen concentrations were generally highest at each site during the spring of the 2010 water year and the fall and winter of the 2011 water year. Additionally, the dominant form of nitrogen varied between sites. For example, in samples collected from the most upstream site (Clarksdale), the concentration of organic nitrogen was generally higher than the concentrations of

  10. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

  11. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

  12. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  13. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October--December 1996

    Jubin, R.T.

    1997-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October-December 1996. The report describes ten tasks conducted in four major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area -- Chemical Processes for Waste Management -- includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents, and Sludge Treatment Studies. Within the second research area -- Reactor Fuel Chemistry -- the distribution of iodine in containment during an AP600 design-basis accident was evaluated using models in the TRENDS code. Within the third research area -- Thermodynamics -- efforts continued in the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of energy-Related Materials task. The fourth major research area -- Processes for Waste Management -- includes work on these tasks: Ion-Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Search for Technetium in Natural Metallurgical Residues, and Waste Form Development and Testing of a Glass- and Cement-Based Dedicated Hot-Cell Facility.

  14. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ''Whiteoak'' Creek)

  15. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Second quarterly technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    NONE

    1995-01-19

    This document contains the Quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Micronized Magnetite Testing Project being performed at PETC`s Process Research Facility (PRF). This second quarterly report covers the period from October, 1994 through December, 1994. The main accomplishments of Custom Coals and the project subcontractors, during this period, included: (1) Submitted all overdue project documents and kept up with routine reporting requirements; (2) Worked with CLI Corporation, the design subcontractor, and completed the circuit design and finalized all design drawings; (3) Specified and procured all of the process equipment for the circuit, as well as a number of ancillary equipment, instruments, and supplies; (4) Assisted Vangura Iron Inc. in detailing and constructing the structural and platework steel; (5) Subcontracted Rizzo & Sons to perform the circuit mechanical and electrical installation, and prepared for January 23rd installation start date; (6) Organized and prepared for coal and magnetite procurement; (7) Specified and organized an operating personnel plan for the commissioning and testing tasks in the project; (8) Assessed analytical challenges for project, and began to research problem areas. This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the abovementioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  16. Enumeration of Salmonids in the Okanogan Basin Using Underwater Video, Performance Period: October 2005 (Project Inception) - 31 December 2006.

    Johnson, Peter N.; Rayton, Michael D.; Nass, Bryan L.; Arterburn, John E.

    2007-06-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes) identified the need for collecting baseline census data on the timing and abundance of adult salmonids in the Okanogan River Basin in order to determine basin and tributary-specific spawner distributions, evaluate the status and trends of natural salmonid production in the basin, document local fish populations, and augment existing fishery data. This report documents the design, installation, operation and evaluation of mainstem and tributary video systems in the Okanogan River Basin. The species-specific data collected by these fish enumeration systems are presented along with an evaluation of the operation of a facility that provides a count of fish using an automated method. Information collected by the Colville Tribes Fish & Wildlife Department, specifically the Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program (OBMEP), is intended to provide a relative abundance indicator for anadromous fish runs migrating past Zosel Dam and is not intended as an absolute census count. Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program collected fish passage data between October 2005 and December 2006. Video counting stations were deployed and data were collected at two locations in the basin: on the mainstem Okanogan River at Zosel Dam near Oroville, Washington, and on Bonaparte Creek, a tributary to the Okanogan River, in the town of Tonasket, Washington. Counts at Zosel Dam between 10 October 2005 and 28 February 2006 are considered partial, pilot year data as they were obtained from the operation of a single video array on the west bank fishway, and covered only a portion of the steelhead migration. A complete description of the apparatus and methodology can be found in 'Fish Enumeration Using Underwater Video Imagery - Operational Protocol' (Nass 2007). At Zosel Dam, totals of 57 and 481 adult Chinook salmon were observed with the video monitoring system in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Run

  17. Physical, chemical, and other data from the EASTWARD and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 01 October 1972 to 07 December 1974 (NODC Accession 7700536)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, and other data were collected from the EASTWARD and other platforms from 01 October 1972 to 07 December 1974. Data were collected by the...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMAGI MARU and other platforms from North Pacific Ocean by the Hokkaido Regional Fisheries Research Laboratory and other institutions from 04 October 1904 to 31 December 1985 (NODC Accession 9200262)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMAGI MARU and other platforms from 04 October 1904 to 31 December 1985. Data were collected by the...

  19. Oceanographic station, meteorological and other data from bottle casts from the ALBATROSS IV and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 22 October 1978 to 21 December 1980 (NODC Accession 8100544)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle casts from the ALBATROSS IV and other platforms from 22 October 1978 to 21 December...

  20. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 19 December 1977 - 29 October 1978 (NODC Accession 7900097)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from December 19, 1977 to October 29, 1978. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  1. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN RIGEL as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 31 October 1976 to 12 December 1976 (NODC Accession 7700035)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN RIGEL from 31 October 1976 to 12 December 1976. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  2. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, October--December 1992. Progress review No. 73, quarter ending December 31, 1992

    1993-12-01

    Accomplishments for this quarter ending December 31, 1992 are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; reservoir classes; and novel technology.

  3. Abnormal Resistance Switching Behaviors of NiO Thin Films: Possible Occurrence of Simultaneous Formation and Rupture of Conducting Channels

    Liu, Chunli; Chae, S. C.; Chang, S. H.; Lee, S B; Noh, T. W.; Lee, J. S.; Kahng, B.; Kim, D. -W.; Jung, C.U.; Seo, S.; Ahn, Seung-Eon

    2008-01-01

    We report the detailed current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of resistance switching in NiO thin films. In unipolar resistance switching, it is commonly believed that conducting filaments will rupture when NiO changes from a low resistance to a high resistance state. However, we found that this resistance switching can sometimes show abnormal behavior during voltage- and current-driven I-V measurements. We used the random circuit breaker network model to explain how abnormal switching behavio...

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E. (eds.)

    1990-03-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  5. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1953

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by...

  6. Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1945 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by...

  7. Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1946 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by...

  8. Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1942 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1942. The report begins by...

  9. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1963 Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IVA & Waterfowl Production Areas

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  10. Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December, 1943 for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Lake Zahl, Clearwater, Shell Lake Easement Refuges

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by...

  11. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1951

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by...

  12. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1952

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by...

  13. Narrative report for September, October, November, December, 1945 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge and Easement Refuges in District IV

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by...

  14. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1954

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by...

  15. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge and North Platte National Wildlife Refuge Refuge narrative report : September, October, November, December, 1955

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by...

  16. Narrative report Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge Dugway, UT for the period September - October - November - December, 1961

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  17. Narrative report Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge Dugway, UT for the period September - October - November - December, 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  18. Narrative report Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge Dugway, UT for the period September - October - November - December, 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  19. Narrative report Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge Dugway, UT for the period September - October - November - December, 1960

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by...

  20. Analysis of clinical outcomes for prenatal diagnosis of occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities for new babies%产前诊断中胎儿新发生染色体异常的临床结局分析

    郭化山; 陈曼萍; 吴来春

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical outcomes for prenatal diagnosis of occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities for new babies. METHODS 6 cases of chromosomal abnormalities were found in the 1 346 cases of prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal karyotype from January 2007 to December 2009. Observed the cytogenetic result of fetal chromosomal abnormalities, prenatal ultrasound findings and pregnancy outcome were taken for analysis in the 6 new cases. RESULTS There were 4 cases with unbalanced sex chromosome abnormalities, accounting for 66.7%. There were 2 cases of balanced chromosomal abnormalities, accounting for 33.3%. There were 2 cases of terminal pregnancy through induced abortion in the 4 cases of unbalanced chromosome abnormalities, among whom 1 case of term delivery, 1 case of losing follow-up, the former was found with delayed development in language. 2 cases of balanced chromosomal abnormalities had term delivery, in follow-up after birth, there were no abnormalities. CONCLUSION The fetal phenotype of new chromosomal abnormalities can be predicted by analysis of detailed karyorype and further molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome composition provided by the structural abnormalities. The prenatal ultrasound examination can provide a strong reference basis for the assessment of pregnancy outcomes.%目的 分析产前诊断中胎儿新发生染色体异常的临床结局.方法 对某院1997年1月-2009年12月1346例产前诊断细胞染色体核型分析发现的6例新发生的胎儿染色体异常病例进行分析,观察6例新发生的胎儿染色体异常病例的细胞遗传学检测结果、产前超声检查结果及妊娠结局.结果 6例新发生染色体异常的胎儿中,非平衡性染色体异常4例,占66.7%:2例平衡性染色体异常,占33.3%;4例非平衡染色体异常的胎儿中有2例选择引产终止妊娠,有1例足月分娩,1例出生后失访.足月分娩者随访至2周岁发现语言功能发育迟缓.2例平衡性染

  1. Reduce the occurrence of abnormal behaviour of chimpanzees with the addition of gaming devices in Ljubljana ZOO

    Rozman, Maja

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the occurrence of behavioural changes in chimpanzees whilst adding gaming aids to their living environment. At the beginning of the study, we encounter the spread of pneumonia in the Ljubljana zoo, where two younger chimpanzees and adult females lost their lives. The study included three female chimpanzees. After this tragic event we took a break in our research to give the chimpanzees some time to recover. We began recording a month later. After six months of observation, we...

  2. Estimation of Constituent Concentrations, Loads, and Yields in Streams of Johnson County, Northeast Kansas, Using Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring and Regression Models, October 2002 through December 2006

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2008-01-01

    Johnson County is one of the most rapidly developing counties in Kansas. Population growth and expanding urban land use affect the quality of county streams, which are important for human and environmental health, water supply, recreation, and aesthetic value. This report describes estimates of streamflow and constituent concentrations, loads, and yields in relation to watershed characteristics in five Johnson County streams using continuous in-stream sensor measurements. Specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen were monitored in five watersheds from October 2002 through December 2006. These continuous data were used in conjunction with discrete water samples to develop regression models for continuously estimating concentrations of other constituents. Continuous regression-based concentrations were estimated for suspended sediment, total suspended solids, dissolved solids and selected major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus species), and fecal-indicator bacteria. Continuous daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual loads were calculated from concentration estimates and streamflow. The data are used to describe differences in concentrations, loads, and yields and to explain these differences relative to watershed characteristics. Water quality at the five monitoring sites varied according to hydrologic conditions; contributing drainage area; land use (including degree of urbanization); relative contributions from point and nonpoint constituent sources; and human activity within each watershed. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were less than the Kansas aquatic-life-support criterion of 5.0 mg/L less than 10 percent of the time at all sites except Indian Creek, which had DO concentrations less than the criterion about 15 percent of the time. Concentrations of suspended sediment, chloride (winter only), indicator bacteria, and pesticides were substantially larger during periods of increased streamflow. Suspended

  3. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, October--December 1975

    1976-05-01

    Light water reactor safety activities performed during October--December 1975 are reported. The blowdown heat transfer tests series of the Semiscale Mod-1 test program was completed. In the LOFT Program, preparations were made for nonnuclear testing. The Thermal Fuels Behavior Program completed a power-cooling-mismatch test and an irradiation effects test on PWR-type fuel rods. Model development and verification efforts of the Reactor Behavior Program included developing new analysis models for the RELAP4 computer code, subroutines for the FRAP-S and FRAP-T codes, and new models for predicting reactor fuel restructuring and zircaloy cladding behavior; an analysis of post-CHF fuel behavior was made using FRAP-T.

  4. Distribution of marine birds on Georges Bank and adjacent waters. Progress report No. 4, October--December 1978

    Powers, K.D.

    1979-01-01

    From 27 September to 14 December 1978, MBO observers participated in 8 cruises from the U.S. mid-Atlantic area of the outer continental to western Nova Scotia. The U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service, Federal Republic of Germany, Peoples Republic of Poland, and U.S. Coast Guard were the agencies that provided at-sea platforms. The greater portion of the survey coverage involved the Southern New England--Georges Bank--Gulf of Maine area, where 779.32 km/sup 2/ were sampled. Bird densities were greatest in the Georges Bank area where averages in excess of 30 birds/km/sup 2/ were recorded during the final quarter of 1978. All data collected during 1978 has been submitted to U.S.F.W.S. Migratory Bird and Habitat Research Laboratory in Luurel, MD for punching. Fifteen of 24 MBO cruises conducted in 1978 have been submitted to USFWS--MBHRL for punching and the remaining 9 have been transcribed. Seven of 16 MBO cruises conducted in 1976 have been transcribed.

  5. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C. [AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-01-25

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 9 (October--December, 1995), parametric and optimization testing was completed for the Taggart, Sunnyside, and Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column. The detailed design of the 2-t/hr PDU grinding, flotation, and dewatering circuits neared completion with the specification of the major pieces of capital equipment to be purchased for these areas. Selective agglomeration test work investigated the properties of various industrial grades of heptane for use during bench- and PDU-scale testing. It was decided to use a hydrotreated grade of commercial heptane due to its low cost and low concentration of aromatic compounds. The final Subtask 6.4 CWF Formulation Studies Test Plan was issued. A draft version of the Subtask 6.5 Preliminary Design and Test Plan Report was also issued, discussing the progress made in the design of the bench-scale selective agglomeration unit. PDU construction work moved forward through the issuing of 26 request for quotations and 21 award packages for capital equipment.

  6. Equatorial sporadic E-layer abnormal density enhancement during the recovery phase of the December 2006 magnetic storm: A case study

    Resende, L. C. A.; Denardini, C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Sporadic layers appear in the equatorial region ( E sq) between 90 and 130 km mainly due to irregularities in the electrojet equatorial (EEJ) current. In the present work, we have analyzed the behavior of the frequency parameters associated with these sporadic layers, covering the days before, during, and subsequent to, the intense magnetic storm that occurred on December 14, 2006. The parameters used in our analyses are the top frequency ( f t E s) and blanketing frequency ( f b E s) of the E s layer as measured over São Luís, Brazil (2.33°S, 44.2°W, dip: -4.5°) by digital ionosonde. A tentative association between these parameters and X-ray data measured by sensors on board the GOES satellite was carried out. Also, we investigated the effects on the dynamics of the equatorial electrojet using magnetometer data related to the presence of these E s layers. Our analyses show that there are notable changes in the f b E s, which are characterized by the occurrence of peaks that exceed the ambient background values.

  7. CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1996

    Wehner, S.; Prieditis, J.

    1996-12-31

    The principal objective of the Central Vacuum Unit (CVU) CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process, coupled with the CVU reservoir characterization components will be used to determine if this process is technically and economically feasible for field implementation. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of energy`s (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc`s. (TEPI) mid-term plans are to implement a full-scale miscible CO{sub 2} project in the CVU. TEPI concluded all of the tasks associated with the First Budget Period by October, 1995. The DOE approved the TEPI continuation application. Budget Period No. 2 is in progress. Initial injection of CO{sub 2} began in November, and after a short shut-in period for the soak, the well was returned to production in late December, 1995. This report, covers TEPI`s efforts at history matching the results of the field demonstration. Costs and economics of the work are presented. The majority of effort during the fourth quarter has revolved around the selection of a new project site and refinement of the demonstration design and well selection.

  8. The role of ENSO and MJO on rapid intensification of tropical cyclones in the Bay of Bengal during October-December

    Girishkumar, M. S.; Suprit, K.; Vishnu, S.; Prakash, V. P. Thanga; Ravichandran, M.

    2015-05-01

    The influence of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and their combined effect on the rapid intensification (RI) of tropical cyclones (TCs) in the Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the primary cyclone season (October-December) is investigated. An empirical index, called genesis potential index (GPI), is used to quantify the relative importance of four environmental parameters responsible for the modulation of TCs characteristics. The analysis shows that TC frequency and RI of TC's is higher in La Niña than El Niño regime during the primary TC season in the BoB. The combined effect of enhancement (reduction) in mid-tropospheric humidity (primary factor) and relative vorticity (secondary factor) played a major role in the enhancement (reduction) of the TC activity under La Niña (El Niño) regime. In addition, when the MJO is active over the BoB (phases 3-4; characterized by enhanced convective activity in the BoB) under La Niña regime, environmental conditions were more conducive for enhancement of TC activity and RI of TCs compared to corresponding MJO phase under El Niño regime. Increase in mid-tropospheric humidity and reduction in vertical wind shear were identified as the primary and secondary factors enhancing the likelihood of RI of TCs in the BoB during phases 3-4 of MJO under La Niña regime. Further, the role of accumulated tropical cyclone heat potential (ATCHP) on the RI of TC during primary TC season is also investigated. Our analysis demonstrates that ATCHP is large for TCs which undergo RI compared to TCs not undergoing RI.

  9. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    Heinemann, H.; Iglesia, E.; Perry, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    This report covers the time period from October 1 through December 31, 1993. A description of tasks for fiscal year 1994 is included in this report. Highlights and progress of work performed during this quarter is reported in (a) catalytic steam gasification of coals and cokes; (b) oxidative coupling of methane; and (c) synthesis and characterization of catalysts. Attached to this report is a copy of a manuscript submitted to Proceeding of Fuels Technology Contractors Meeting {open_quotes}Steady-State and Transient Catalytic Oxidation and Coupling of Methane{close_quotes} by Heinemann, Iglesia, and Perry.

  10. Patients admitted in an Intensive Care Unit with severe clinical manifestations of Influenza, october-december 2009 Pacientes ingresados con formas graves de Enfermedad Tipo Influenza en una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, octubre a diciembre 2009

    Octavio Rivero Rodríguez; Diley Moreno Ruiz; Yanli Vázquez Villazón; Pablo Rodríguez Díaz; Alfredo Dario Espinosa Brito; Jaime Geroy Gómez; Francisco García Valdés; Ramón E Álvarez Cepero; Rudis Monzón Rodríguez; Jorge Luis Ulloa Capestani; Yenisey Quintero Mendez

    2011-01-01

    A descriptive study of a series of cases was carried out, where 109 patients with the presumptive diagnosis of severe clinical pictures of Influenza were included, the total of them admitted in one of our Intensive Care Units (ICU), prepared for that purpose during the recent pandemic, during the period comprised between October 1 and December 31, 2009. There were 62 women (56,9%), of which 19 were pregnant or postpartum women (17,4%). The mean age of the sick persons of this serie was of 52,...

  11. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1957 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by...

  12. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1956 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  13. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1951 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV and 4a

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by...

  14. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1954 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by...

  15. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1949 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by...

  16. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1955 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by...

  17. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1952 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by...

  18. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1953 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & 4a

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by...

  19. Temperature profile data from bucket, surface seawater intake, and XBT casts in a world wide distribution from 07 December 1995 to 18 October 1996 (NODC Accession 9600167)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bucket, surface seawater intake, and XBT casts from several vessels in a world wide distribution from December 07,...

  20. Nuclear waste repository simulation experiments (brine migration), Asse Mine of the Federal Republic of Germany: Quarterly brine migration data report, October--December 1985

    The tenth brine migration data report describes experiments simulating a nuclear waste repository at the 800-m (2624-ft) level of the Asse Salt Mine in the Federal Republic of Germany from May 1983 through December 1985. This report describes the test equipment, the Asse Salt Mine, and the pretest properties of the salt in the test gallery. This report includes test data for 31 months of operations on brine migration rates, borehole pressure, salt temperatures and thermomechanical behavior of the salt. 3 refs., 118 figs., 93 tabs

  1. Longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microflora in pregnancy suggests that L. crispatus promotes the stability of the normal vaginal microflora and that L. gasseri and/or L. iners are more conducive to the occurrence of abnormal vaginal microflora

    Temmerman Marleen

    2009-06-01

    the stability of this microflora in pregnancy: L. crispatus promotes the stability of the normal vaginal microflora while L. gasseri and/or L. iners predispose to some extent to the occurrence of abnormal vaginal microflora.

  2. LLE Review 121 (October-December 2009)

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Demonstration of the Highest Deuterium-Tritium Areal Density Using Triple-Picket Cryogenic Designs on OMEGA; (2) High-Precision Measurements of the Equation of State of Hydrocarbons at 1 to 10 Mbar Using Laser-Driven Shock Waves; (3) A Generalized Measurable Ignition Condition for Inertial Confinement Fusion (4) In-Situ Detection and Analysis of Laser-Induced Damage on a 1.5-m Multilayer-Dielectric Grating Compressor for High-Energy, Petawatt-Class Laser Systems; (5) Probing High-Areal-Density (ρR) Cryogenic-DT Implosions Using Down-Scattered Neutron Spectra Measured by the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer; (6) Strong-Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions; and (7) Neutron-Induced Nucleation Inside Bubble Chambers Using Freon 115 as the Active Medium.

  3. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2009 October-December

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Pravec, Petr; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2010-01-01

    With a New Year come new things. For this regular article it means an “In Focus” section at the top that highlights particular topics or calls extra attention to listed targets so that they don’t get overlooked. We have trimmed the material in the standard text, keeping the essential elements and Internet web sites. For more background on the program details for each list, refer to previous issues, e.g., Minor Planet Bulletin 36, 188.

  4. Congenital Abnormalities

    ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase the risk that a baby will be born with abnormalities (e.g. fetal alcohol spectrum disorders ). Eating raw or uncooked foods during pregnancy can also be dangerous to health of the ...

  5. Agreement with the government of India for the application of safeguards to all nuclear material subject to Agency safeguards under INFCIRC/154, part I and the agreements between India and the IAEA contained in exchanges of letters dated 1 October and 1 December 1993

    The text of the Exchange of Letters, constituting the amendment to the Agreement with the Government of India for the Application of Safeguards to all nuclear material subject to Agency safeguards under INFCIRC/154, Part I, and the Agreements between India and the IAEA contained in Exchanges of Letters dated 1 October and 1 December 1993, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The amendment to the Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 12 September 1994. The amendment to the Agreement entered into force, pursuant to the Exchange of Letters, on 12 September 1994

  6. Agreement with the Government of India for the application of safeguards to all nuclear material subject to Agency safeguards under INFCIRC/154, Part 1 and under the Agreements between India and the IAEA contained in exchanges of letters dated 1 October and 1 December 1993

    The text of the Exchange of Letters and the Attachment, constituting the Agreement with the Government of India for the Application of Safeguards to all nuclear material subject to Agency safeguards under INFCIRC/154, Part 1, and under the Agreements between India and the IAEA contained in Exchanges of Letters dated 1 October and 1 December 1993, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 21 February 1994. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to the Exchange of Letters, on 1 March 1994

  7. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts in the Gulf of Mexico and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from the NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 20 October 1985 to 14 December 1985 (NODC Accession 8700105)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from the NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the Gulf of Mexico and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 30 October...

  8. Physical, chemical, and biological data collected during two research cruises in the Ross Sea, Antarctica from December 2004 to January 2005 and October to November 2005 for Ross Sea Sulfur Dynamics study (NODC Accession 0117322)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains transect data from two research cruises to the Ross Sea, Antarctica, aboard the RV Nathaniel B. Palmer (NBP) in December 2004 to January 2005...

  9. Environmental occurrences

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the onsite and offsite releases of radioactive and regulated materials. The specific agencies notified of the releases depended on the type, amount, and location of the individual occurrences. The more significant of these off-normal environmental occurrences are summarized in this section

  10. Environmental occurrences

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the onsite and offsite releases of radioactive and regulated materials. The specific agencies notified of the releases depended on the type, amount, and location of the individual occurrences. The more significant of these off-normal environmental occurrences are summarized in this section.

  11. Patients admitted in an Intensive Care Unit with severe clinical manifestations of Influenza, october-december 2009 Pacientes ingresados con formas graves de Enfermedad Tipo Influenza en una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, octubre a diciembre 2009

    Octavio Rivero Rodríguez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive study of a series of cases was carried out, where 109 patients with the presumptive diagnosis of severe clinical pictures of Influenza were included, the total of them admitted in one of our Intensive Care Units (ICU, prepared for that purpose during the recent pandemic, during the period comprised between October 1 and December 31, 2009. There were 62 women (56,9%, of which 19 were pregnant or postpartum women (17,4%. The mean age of the sick persons of this serie was of 52,53 ± 22,54 years. The beginning of symptoms before the time of admission revealed an average of 4,90 ± 4,37 days. The predominant symptoms were: cough in 93 patients (85,3%, dyspnea in 86 (78,9%, fever in 76 (68,8% and general symptoms of asthenia and anorexia in 76 (68,8%. In the physical exam, the most frequent signs were: polypnea in 86 (78,9% and wet rales in 65 (59,6%. Personal antecedents were informed by patients suffering arterial hypertension in 31 (28,4%, bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease in 26 (23,9%, diabetes in 19 (17,4%, ischemic heart disease in 19 (17,4%, alcoholism in 5 (4,6% and valvulopathies in 4 (3,7%. Among the signs found in the thorax´s radiographies at the moment of admission, it prevailed the pattern of radiopacity diffuse hilar and bilateral parahilar in 31 patients (28,4%, followed by bilateral diffuse opacities toward medial and inferiors lobes in 16 (14,7%, unilateral diffuse radiopacity in 12 (11,0%, increment in the broncovascular network in 13 (11,9%, lobar consolidation in 7 (6,4% and pleural esfusion in 5 (4,6%. In 25 cases the initial X-ray films were normal. In electrocardiograms, alterations were verified of ST-T in 12 sick persons (11,0%, sinusal tachicardia in 12 (11,0%, supraventricular arrhythmias (that included acute auricular fibrillation and supraventricular paroxysmal tachicardia in 7 (6,4% and ventricular arrhythmias in 2 (1,8%. The complications verified with more frequency were the

  12. Patterns of Occurrence and Marine Mammal Acoustic Behavior in Relation to Navy Sonar Activity Off Jacksonville, Florida.

    Oswald, Julie N; Norris, Thomas F; Yack, Tina M; Ferguson, Elizabeth L; Kumar, Anurag; Nissen, Jene; Bell, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Passive acoustic data collected from marine autonomous recording units deployed off Jacksonville, FL (from 13 September to 8 October 2009 and 3 December 2009 to 8 January 2010), were analyzed for detection of cetaceans and Navy sonar. Cetaceans detected included Balaenoptera acutorostrata, Eubalaena glacialis, B. borealis, Physeter macrocephalus, blackfish, and delphinids. E. glacialis were detected at shallow and, somewhat unexpectedly, deep sites. P. macrocephalus were characterized by a strong diel pattern. B. acutorostrata showed the strongest relationship between sonar activity and vocal behavior. These results provide a preliminary assessment of cetacean occurrence off Jacksonville and new insights on vocal responses to sonar. PMID:26611034

  13. Post waterflood CO{sub 2} miscible flood in light oil, fluvial: Dominated deltaic reservoir. First quarterly technical progress report, Fiscal year 1994, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    1994-01-15

    Production from the Port Neches CO{sub 2} project was initiated on December 6, 1993 after having been shut-in since the start of CO{sub 2} injection on September 22, 1993 to allow reservoir pressure to build. Rates were established at 236 barrels of oil per day (BOPD) from two wells in the 235 acre waterflood project area, which before project initiation had produced only 80 BOPD from the entire area. These wells are flowing large amounts of fluid due to the high reservoir pressure and their oil percentages are increasing as a result of the CO{sub 2} contacting the residual oil. One well, the H. J. Kuhn No. 15-R is flowing 217 BOPD, 1139 BWPD, and 2500 MCFPD of CO{sub 2} at a flowing tubing pressure (FTP) of 890 psi. The other producing well, the H. J. Kuhn No. 33, is currently flowing 19 BOPD, 614 BWPD, and 15 MCFPD at a FTP of 400 psi. Unexpectedly high rates of CO{sub 2} production are being made from Well No. 15-R and from the W. R. Stark ``B`` No. 8. This No. 8 well produced 7 BOPD, 697 BWPD, and 15 MCFPD prior to being shut-in during September to allow for the reservoir pressure to build by injecting CO{sub 2}, but when opened on December 6, the well flowed dry CO{sub 2} at a rate of 400 MCFPD for a two day test period. More sustained production tests will be obtained after all wells are tied into the new production facility. Many difficulties occurred in the drilling of the horizontal CO{sub 2} injection well but a successful completion across 2501 of sand has finally been accomplished. A formation dip of 11--14 degrees in the area where the well was being drilled made the proposed 1500{prime} horizontal sand section too difficult to accomplish. The shale section directly above the sand caused sticking problems on two separate occasions resulting in two sidetracks of the well around stuck pipe. The well will be tied into the facility and CO{sub 2} injection into the well will begin before February 1, 1994.

  14. Nuclear data project evaluation activity report. October 1998 - October 2000

    This report summarizes the activities of the ORNL Nuclear Data Project since the IAEA Advisory Group meeting in December 1998. The group's future plans are also included. The ORNL Nuclear Data Project's responsibility includes the compilation/evaluation of astrophysics data, as well as the evaluation and compilation of nuclear structure data. The Nuclear Data Project, therefore, is composed of two groups. The Nuclear Data Project staff through September 2000 is listed below. Accomplishments for the period of October 1998 through September 2000 of the nuclear structure data group and the nuclear astrophysics group are submitted in this Nuclear Data Project report

  15. Report on the inquiry into sale price fluctuations of gasoline and diesel fuel in the regions of Abitibi-Temiscamingue, Saguenay-Lac Saint Jean and the Upper Mauricie, October 1998 to 31 December 1999

    An inquiry was initiated by the President of the Quebec Energy Board (Regie de l'energie) on October 7, 1999 to review the reasons for the wide fluctuations in the retail sale prices of gasoline and diesel fuel in the regions of Abitibi-Temiscamingue, Saguenay/Lac-Saint-Jean and the Upper Mauricie, although the Board has no jurisdiction over the prices charged for petroleum products or anti-competitive practices. Consequently, the inquiry confined itself to an analysis of the information pertaining to the structure and forces driving the petroleum products market, and an examination of price mechanisms and consumer reactions in these regions. The inquiry reviewed the relevant legislation and regulation, the social, economic and energy situations in the affected regions, and the structure and functioning of the market for gasoline and diesel fuel. The inquiry came to the conclusion that the price fluctuations during the period under review reflected the wholesale prices recorded at Montreal and Quebec, which are determined by national and international market forces over which Quebec has no significant control. Furthermore, the inquiry concluded that although market forces are present and functioning in the regions, there are relatively few outlets affiliated with major oil companies, and a large number of independent retail outlets with relatively small volumes of annual sales. They essentially set their own prices at a level that reflect their cost of operation. Appendices contain the Inquiry's mandate, a list of those who testified before the Inquiry, a map showing the geographic profile of the regions surveyed and a list of figures and tables. 18 tabs., 31 figs

  16. Urine - abnormal color

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  17. S822 and S823 Airfoils: October 1992--December 1993

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A family of thick airfoils for 3- to 10-meter, stall-regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines, the S822 and S823, has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moments and airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied.

  18. LLE review, volume 73. Quarterly report, October 1997--December 1997

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This progress report contains discussion on the following topics: A high-bandwidth electrical-waveform generator based on aperture-coupled striplines for OMEGA pulse-shaping applications; sweep deflection circuit development using computer-aided circuit design for the OMEGA multichannel streak camera; D-{sup 3}He protons as a diagnostic for target {rho}R; growth rates of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion; three-dimensional analysis of the power transfer between crossed laser beams; characterization of freestanding polymer films for application in 351-nm, high-peak-power laser systems; subsurface damage in microgrinding optical glasses; bound-abrasive polishers for optical glass; and color gamut of cholesteric liquid crystal films and flakes by standard colorimetry.

  19. Progress report, Physics Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1981

    The work of the Physics Division during the quarter is reviewed. Nuclear physics activities included parity violation experiments, mass difference measurements using the ISOL facility, studies of high spin state decays, and scattering length measurements. In accelerator physics, construction of the heavy-ion superconducting cyclotron continued and development of the fast intense neutron source and the high current proton accelerator progressed. Neutron scattering experiments were carried out on a number of solids. Work in applied mathematics and computation is also reviewed

  20. Progress report, Physics Division: 1982 October 1 - December 31

    Research activities in nuclear physics included use of a new transient field apparatus to measure spin rotation in Yb-162, study of the interference effect in thermal neutron radiative capture reaction in C-12, and analysis of the results of photo-fission measurements on U-238. In accelerator and applied physics, work has continued on the heavy-ion superconducting cyclotron and the electron test accelerator, and on the development of a high current proton accelerator. Data was compiled on thermal neutron cross sections of the elements and measurements were made of total neutron yields from (p,xn) reactions on Cu, Fe and Th targets. Investigations in solid state physics included neutron scattering studies of red blood cells and CsCoBr3, magnetic and phonon properties of USn3, and positron annihilation measurements on FeAl. In applied mathematics and computation, work was carried out on coolant boiling and heat transfer in Slowpoke-III, and the MARC code was applied to analysis of pump seal deformations and to temperature distribution around cracks in Bruce pressure tubes

  1. Characterization engineering status report october 1998 - december 1998

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-13

    Characterization Engineering (CE) continues to make progress in support of the project goal of characterizing the Hanford high-level waste tanks. Two core sampling systems were operational during this reporting period-push mode core sampling system No. 1 and rotary mode core sampling system No. 4. The availability average for core sampling systems No. 1 , No. 3 and No. 4, combined, was 45 percent, down from 79percent for the previous quarter and 58 percent for FY 1998. System No. 2 did not have scope during the quarter, and availability was not hacked. System No. 3 was out of service the entire quarter for corrective maintenance. Two tanks were core sampled during the reporting period, and 24 samples were retrieved. Core sample recovery increased slightly during the quarter. System No. 1 average sample recovery increased from 80percent to 81 percent, The rotary mode core sampling average recovery increased to 62 percent from 55 percent for the previous quarter. sampling six tanks, one more than scheduled. Vapor Sampling was utilized in support of the sluicing of tank 241-C-106 and for emissions monitoring of three exhaust stacks. Increased support was provided for Vapor Sampling the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. The sampling was necessary due to freezing problems with the field-installed systems. Preparations are continuing for the Light-Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) deployment with configuration and minor hardware upgrades. The LDUA Operational Readiness Review continues. The oversight of the Nested, Fixed-Depth Sampler system development has started to increase in order to ensure that a usable system is received when the project is completed. To improve configuration control, 92 drawing sheet revisions were completed along with the generation of nine new drawing sheets. The number of outstanding Engineering Change Notices increased slightly because of the addition of more drawings into the project. continues to develop. Organizational responsibilities are being identified and documented as well as the scope and deliverables. Finishing Plant was completed, and the final reviews to authorize starting work have begun. Significant progress was made in other areas as well. Grab Sampling completed The stewardship of the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal equipment The engineering and work planning for opening tank 241-2361 at the Plutonium.

  2. Progress report, Physics Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1979

    Kinemetic shifts have been measured in the β-delayed α-decay of 20Na in order to deduce β-ν angular correlations. Analysis of the data is in progress. In a significant advance in techniques to measure quadrupole moments of isomeric states, the electric field gradient experienced by 147Gd isomers was determined in a target of single-crystal gadolinium using Coulomb excitation. Commissioning of the Alvarez accelerator for the High Current Test Facility continues. The Alvarez tank has been cleaned, reasssembled with some modifications and subjected to initial steps of rf conditioning. A successful test was made of the radiation processing facility. A current of 6 mA was accelerated to 4 MeV and allowed to pass through a 0.75 mm stainless steel window into the fast-flowing cooling water. Conversion measurements were carried out with 19-element thorium and 7- and 37-element uranium targets. Preliminary data for distributions of characteristic radioactive products have been extracted for the 7-element target. Operations of the MP Tandem Accelerator and the main site computing facility are also summarized. (OT)

  3. Progress report, Physics, Division, October 1 to December 31, 1980

    There were thirteen experiments performed on the CRNL MP tandem accelerator during the quarter. Nuclear physics research activities included the bombardment of tungsten with 97 MeV 16O ions, construction of a decay scheme for71Br, measurement of differences in reaction Q-values, experimental determination of average γ-ray widths for nuclei far from stability, use of the(3He,n) reaction in inverse Doppler shift attenuation measurements, and measurement of the full spectrum of gamma rays from the 13C(n,γ) 14C reaction. Construction and development of the heavy ion superconducting cyclotron, the high current proton accelerator, and the electron test accelerator continued. Research in solid state physics included investigations of solid β-N2, measurments of the temperature dependence of the positron annihilation peak coincidence rate in FeCo, observations of the excitation spectrum in the anisotropic quasi one-dimensional antiferromagnet CsCoBr3, and development of a theory of neutron diffraction for cubic crystals of the type Msub(c)Asub(1-c)B. Additional hardware was installed in the computer centre, increasing the computer memory and disc facilties. (L.L.)

  4. Stripa project, Quarterly report October through December 1981

    The methodology development for hydrogeological investigations in boreholes is continuing in combination with hydraulic, chemical and isotopic characterization of granites and groundwaters. The migration investigation is continued by drilling sampling holes and desigming the equipment. The first buffer mass tests have covered the measurement of temperature, swelling pressures and water migration in two deposition holes. The preparation of the bentonite/sand backfill has started. (G.B.)

  5. ARM Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2013

    Voyles, Jimmy W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. This quarterly report is written to comply with this requirement. This reports on the first quarter facility statistics.

  6. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Status Report October - December 2008

    2009-03-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) constitutes an important part of SKB's work to design and construct a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and to develop and test methods for characterisation of a suitable site. The plans for SKB's research and development of technique during the period 2008-2013 are presented in SKB's RDandD-Programme 2007 /SKB 2007/. The information given in the RDandD-Programme related to Aespoe HRL is annually detailed in the Aespoe HRL Planning Report /SKB 2008/. This Aespoe HRL Status Report is a collection of the main achievements obtained during the fourth quarter of 2008.

  7. Platinum Publications, October 30–December 31, 2015 | Poster

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  8. Plasma research. Final report, October 1, 1968--December 31, 1976

    The research in plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear research at M.I.T. has evolved from a relatively long tradition of basic theoretical and experimental contributions, during the period covered by this contract. A major commitment to research in magnetically confined plasmas was undertaken with the Alcator program that began in 1969 and with the theoretical effort necessary to back this up. The Alcator A device was brought to successful operation and, after the identification of a sequence of plasma regimes that have been realized in it, let to attainment record values of plasma density, of the confinement parameter n tau, and of the degree of plasma purity. A second more advanced device, Alcator C, has been designed and is presently under construction. A line of toroidal experiments characterized by relatively low cost and extreme simplicity has been developed in order to study basic plasma physics problems related to magnetic confinement and relevant processes of plasma decontamination. The devices that have been operated are Versator I, now discontinued, Rector, with non-circular cross section, Erasmus, with small aspect ratio and Versator II. A number of theoretical contributions concerning the interpretation of the regimes found in Alcator, runaway phenomena, new trapped particle instabilities, internal resistive modes, etc. have been given and presented in publications or appropriate meetings. A special consideration, within the theoretical effort, has been devoted to the study of plasma regimes that are important in devising future experiments of thermonuclear interest

  9. General Chemistry Division quarterly report, October--December 1978

    Hill, J.

    1979-03-03

    The current status of the following projects is reported: associative ionization in the alkaline earths using multi-step laser excitation; an electronic terminal emulator for timing automatic samplers; color display system for the electron microprobe; examination of copper surfaces; stabilizer circuit for a mode-locker; investigation of the iron-chlorine reaction by modulated molecular beam mass spectroscopy; characterization of the mode-locked krypton ion laser; photoelectrochemistry; discrete-sampling wire atomizer and the microwave-induced plasma; modification of a Mettler buret; analysis of explosive composites; nonaquesus titrimetry; assay of ammonium nitrate and ethylenediamine dinitrate; potentiometric microdetermination of pentaerythritol tetranitrate; and testing of proprietary chemical additives and seeding for the reduction of scale in hypersaline geothermal systems. (LK)

  10. Mirror fusion. Quarterly report, October-December 1981

    Research during this period is described for the following areas: (1) simulation of long-timescale plasma phenomena, (2) analytic model of radiation-dominated decay of a compact toroid, (3) hf microinstabilities in hot-electron plasma, (4) improved heating with two-frequency ecrh, (5) exact and approximate configurational invariants, (6) negative ion formation in hydrogen discharges, (7) confinement systems, (8) development and technology, and (9) MFTF

  11. Energy Information Administration quarterly coal report, October--December 1992

    The United States produced just over 1 billion short tons of coal in 1992, 0.4 percent more than in 1991. Most of the 4-million-short-ton increase in coal production occurred west of the Mississippi River, where a record level of 408 million short tons of coal was produced. The amount of coal received by domestic consumers in 1992 totaled 887 million short tons. This was 7 million short tons more than in 1991, primarily due to increased coal demand from electric utilities. The average price of delivered coal to each sector declined by about 2 percent. Coal consumption in 1992 was 893 million short tons, only 1 percent higher than in 1991, due primarily to a 1-percent increase in consumption at electric utility plants. Consumer coal stocks at the end of 1992 were 163 million short tons, a decrease of 3 percent from the level at the end of 1991, and the lowest year-end level since 1989. US coal exports fell 6 percent from the 1991 level to 103 million short tons in 1992. Less coal was exported to markets in Europe, Asia, and South America, but coal exports to Canada increased 4 million short tons

  12. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1981-03-01

    Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

  13. Platinum Publications, October 30–December 31, 2015 | Poster

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  14. Progress report, Physics Division, October 1 to December 31, 1978

    Several experiments are in progress to measure parity violation in strong interactions. The g-factors of eight high-spin isomeric states in four gadolinium isotopes have been added to the previously determined spin and parity data. Existing data on neutron-capture M1 γ-ray widths have been analyzed to deduce the position and spreading width of the M1 giant resonance in heavy nuclei. Solutions to long-standing differences between experimental and theoretical values for the thermal neutron capture cross sections of 1H and 3He are being sought in the framework of a more complete meson exchange theory. The standards group has submitted a value to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in a major international comparison of the measurement of the activity of 134Cs. Development of the Fast Intense Neutron Source and the superconducting cyclotron continues. Preliminary design work is complete and component fabrication is underway for a preaccelerator suitable for accelerator breeder applications. Development is continuing on a multi-aperture duoPIGatron ion source with beam current and emittance suitable for a high current accelerator. In fertile-to-fissile conversion experiments at TRIUMF, the relative counting efficiencies of the β detectors used for proton beam monitoring and for neutron absorption rate measurement have been re-determined. Fusion studies included a preliminary study of anomalous energy loss mechanisms for high density relativistic electron beams ineracting with matter, and calculations to develop reliable neutronic evaluaton of fusion breeder blanket assemblies. Operations of the MP tandem accelerator and the main site computing facility are also summarized. (OST)

  15. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-04-01

    Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

  16. ITER ITA newsletter. No. 18, October-November-December 2004

    This issue of ITER ITA (ITER Transitional Arrangements) newsletter contains concise information about ITER related meetings, namely, the fourth preparatory meeting for ITER decision making, which was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna on 9 November 2004 and the 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, which was held on 1-6 November 2004 in Vilamoura, Portugal

  17. LLE Review, Volume 57. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    Simon, A. [ed.

    1993-12-31

    During this quarter, the visible fruits of long design labors on the OMEGA Upgrade began to appear. The target mirror structure was put in place, along with the target chamber itself. The laser bay structures were also installed, and the bay is now being prepared to receive optomechanical, control, and laser assemblies. Further details are in the OMEGA Upgrade Status Report in this issue. Theory and analysis of previous experiments continued during this reporting period. Articles contained herein describe an improved theory of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability; a novel proposal for characterizing plasma-density profiles by using grid image refractometry; a much-improved treatment of the damping of ion sound waves in a mixture of light and heavy ions; and, finally, a new interpretation of measurements of 3/2-harmonic radiation emitted from the long-scale-length plasmas created in earlier OMEGA experiments.

  18. Thermal properties. Period covered: October--December 1975

    Myers, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal decomposition investigation of PETN using an LX-13 type PETN was begun this quarter. Samples are being conditioned at 373, 353 and 333/sup 0/K and others will be conditioned at 393 and 383/sup 0/K. Data from five samples are reported. A series of chemical reactivity tests was made using PETN to determine if decomposition rates could be calculated from the results. The data fit a semilogarithmic plot of the gas evolved as a function of time reasonably well. The last of a series of HNAB and PETN samples was evaluated to determine if the two are compatible. These samples were conditioned at 80/sup 0/C for 26 and 25 months and showed no indication of reactivity. The investigation into methods of improving the chemical reactivity test data has continued and a source of a small variation in the instrument sensitivity was determined.

  19. Extrudable explosives. Quarterly report, October--December, 1971

    Warren, T.W.; Irion, C.E.

    1972-12-31

    Several extrudable HE formulations using, principally, HNAB as the explosive component were examined in efforts to develop an extrudable composition more temperature-resistant than Extex. It is shown that extrudability is dependent upon particle character, wetting of the binder compound, roll-milling technique and the addition of fine metallic oxides to improve flow properties, while detonability is dependent upon explosive concentration, a hard cure, and the shock parameters of the confining media.

  20. He synthesis. Quarterly report, October--December, 1971

    Hayes, D.V.; Honea, F.I.

    1972-12-31

    Existing supplies of bis-trinitroanisole and picryl hydrazine were used to make 2 kg of bis-hexanitrohydrazobenzene. Development of the HNAB recrystallization process was temporarily stopped due to the need to produce a supply of the intermediate products (picryl chloride and HNHB). Purchase orders for DINOL and DNPIA required for synthesis of AFNOL were awarded.

  1. Coal demonstration plants. Quarterly report, October-December 1978

    1979-09-01

    The Department of Energy's demonstration plant program was started in 1974 by one of the Department of Energy's predecessor agencies: the Office of Coal Research, US Department of the Interior. The objective of the program is to establish the technical and financial feasibility of coal conversion technologies proven during pilot plant testing. Demonstration plants will minimize the technical and economic risks of commercialization by providing a near commercial size plant for testing and production. Thus, DOE is sponsoring the development of a series of demonstration plants, each of which will be a smaller version of commercial plants envisioned for the 1980's. These plants will be wholly integrated, self-sufficient in terms of heat generation, and dependent only on feedstock of coal, water, and air. Under the DOE program, contracts for designing, constructing, and operating the demonstration plants will be awarded through competitive procedures and will be jointly funded. The conceptual design phase will be funded by the government, with the detailed design, procurement, construction, and operating phases being co-funded, 50% from industry and 50% from the government. The cost involved in building and operating a demonstration plant will probably be between $200 million and $500 million, depending on the size of the plant. Individual demonstration plant contracts are described briefly.

  2. Progress report, Physics Division, October 1 to December 31, 1976

    A summary is given of the CRNL MP Tandem operation, research activities covering the range of nuclear and solid state physics, progress in CdTe detector technology, and mathematics and computation applied to the overall CRNL research program. (E.C.B.)

  3. Petroleum supply monthly, December 1997 with data from October 1997

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describes the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregates, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. 16 figs., 66 tabs.

  4. Coal liquefaction process research quarterly report, October-December 1979

    Bickel, T.C.; Curlee, R.M.; Granoff, B.; Stohl, F.V.; Thomas, M.G.

    1980-03-01

    This quarterly report summarizes the activities of Sandia's continuing program in coal liquefaction process research. The overall objectives are to: (1) provide a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of coal liquefaction; (2) determine the role of catalysts in coal liquefaction; and (3) determine the mechanism(s) of catalyst deactivation. The program is composed of three major projects: short-contact-time coal liquefaction, mineral effects, and catalyst studies. These projects are interdependent and overlap significantly.

  5. Petroleum supply monthly, December 1995: With data for October 1995

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas--the US (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1980

    Calculations have been made of the radiation doses received in the vicinity of a neutron source, taking into account the interactions of neutrons with concrete and the reflection of thermal neutrons from the body surface. Further calculations have been carried out on the leakage spectrum of fission neutrons through shields of polyethylene and iron. A new TLD dosimeter plaque is under development, and several models of a light-weight tritium-in-air monitor have been assembled. The design of an instrument for detecting plutonium in wastes has been completed. Studies have been initiated on the aquaculture of clams in warm fresh water. Studies on the neutralization of acid precipitation by soil minerals have been concluded. Cellulose is being separated from the wood of a tree which grew in the Inner Area of CRNL for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Two-dimensional flow modelling has been attempted on an underground contaminant plume. Research continues into the nature of DNA damage and the repair of strand breaks; the repair process is being studied at radiation doses down to 250 rad. An experiment on the relative biological effectiveness of tritium beta rays as related to breast cancer in female rats has been started. The first details from the follow-up of past CRNL employees are available and show no major discrepancies in gross categories of causes of death. Dosimetric and metabolic models for calculating doses from internally deposited technetium have been reviewed. (L.L.)

  7. General Chemistry Division quarterly report, October--December 1976

    Harrar, J.E.; Lentzner, H.L. (eds.)

    1977-03-09

    Reported are: determination of imperfections on a laser spatial-filter lens; oxidation of U in O/sub 2/--N/sub 2/ mixtures; use of polarized x-rays to improve detection limits in energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis; detection of less than 1 ppT of organic compounds by laser-induced molecular fluorescence; a Stark-shift laser spectrometer; photoionization thresholds of Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, and Er; response tests of chloride ion-selective electrodes; chemical analyses of explosive composites; solid formation and corrosion in geothermal brine; analysis of carbonates in oil shales; models of methane combustion; and biofuel production from algae. (DLC)

  8. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs: October--December 1976

    Fuel-cycle studies reported for this period include pyrochemical separation of plutonium and americium oxides from contaminated materials of construction such as steel. The actinides are partitioned to a high degree into slags that are contacted by the molten metal. Studies of advanced solvent extraction techniques focussed on the development of centrifugal contactors for use in Purex processes. A miniature contactor is to be used for performance studies applicable to larger units. Review of literature on the process chemistry of zirconium and ruthenium has been carried out to aid in improving the process when fast contactors are used. A review of information on the dispersion of reagents during accidents in reprocessing has been initiated to develop systematic data useful in identifying source terms. A review and evaluation of the encapsulation of high level waste in a metal matrix has been initiated. The data will be used to identify the state of the art and the importance of selected features of this process. Criteria for the handling of hulls are being developed on the basis of past work on the pyrophoricity of zirconium alloys and related criteria from several sources. These suggested criteria will be assembled together with the necessary technical rationalization, into a package for review by interested parties. A brief program to explore the disposal of noble gas fission products by deep-well injection has been started

  9. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October--December 1977

    None

    1978-05-01

    Progress on seventeen projects related to coal liquefaction or the upgrading of coal liquids and supported by US DOE is reported with emphasis on funding, brief process description history and current progress. (LTN)

  10. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October-December 1978

    1979-09-01

    DOE's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of DOE's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and ERDA. The Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, had started work in the 1930's. Current work is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and noncatalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, especially boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, and gasoline, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, DOE is supporting the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Each of these processes are described briefly.

  11. Progress report, Health Sciences Division: 1982 October 1 - December 31

    Highlights of work in health physics include investigation of electrochemical etching procedures, further studies of gels saturated with superheated liquid drops, development of a beta dose rate meter using a chopper-stabilized amplifier, and operational tests of dose distributions on workers exposed in high gradient fields. Work in environmental research has included development of a model (LEEM) of one-dimensional vertical mixing of heat in lakes, further studies of the influence of sediment-water interaction on movement of contaminants in surface waters, application of nuclear techniques to an analysis of borehole waters for measurement of pipe flows, and efforts to determine the scale dependence of dispersivity. Research activity in radiation biology centres around the effects of radiation on a variety of organisms. The principal sensitive target is believed to be DNA and work continues towards understanding the nature of the damage and the response of cells as they attempt to repair the injury. Biomedical research has focussed on the study of metal ion-amino acid complexes and assembling data bases for internal dosimetry calculations. Computer codes are being developed to establish standard models and evaluate specific contamination cases

  12. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 30, 1983

    1984-04-01

    Several new initiatives were begun in coal preparation, including a project to develop a liquid CO/sub 2/ coalescence process that will produce a superclean coal containing less than 1% ash. Another new project in this area is focusing on chemical coal cleaning for the removal of harmful trace elements, such as arsenic, lead, and zinc. Milestones were reached in both of our major electron beam flue gas cleanup projects. In the area of coal-water mixtures, our major industrial contracts are now approaching critical milestones. The analysis of our in-house combustion testing of micronized coal-water mixtures in PETC's 700-horsepower oil-designed boiler has been completed. By reducing the coal particle size from 90% minus 200 mesh down to 87% minus 19 microns, the carbon conversion efficiency increased from a level of 96% to 98%. Combustion tests with a commercially available CWM showed that combustion air enriched to 23% oxygen reduced the needed air preheat temperature from 370/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/F. Work also got underway in the new projects selected last summer to investigate advanced direct liquefaction processes. At Kerr-McGee, three scoping runs on their 350 pound/day integrated bench-scale unit were successfully completed. The objective of these runs was to evaluate subbituminous coal process options in terms of catalyst performance, distillate yields, and generation of coke precursors. Cities Service began its project on the characterization of hydrogen donor solvents in two-stage liquefaction. 7 figures, 33 tables.

  13. Petroleum supply monthly, December 1998 with data for October 1998

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. 82 tabs.

  14. NRC Regulatory Agenda: Quarterly report, October--December 1988

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules which the NRC has proposed or is considering action on, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission

  15. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1981

    The work of the Health Sciences Division during the quarter included development of improved radiation counters and dosimeters, studies of radionuclide migration through the environment, investigations of the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms, and calculation of improved dosimetry factors

  16. Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, October-December 1982

    This quarterly report provides current information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant and offplant participants. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, in situ storage or disposal, waste from development and characterization, process and equipment development, and low-level waste management are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations Program: surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low-level effluent waste, tank replacement/waste transfer, and solid waste storage and related activities

  17. Technical Reports - FY16 Q1 - October-December 2015

    Lordi, Vincenzo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubenstein, Brenda M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ray, Keith G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-20

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the frequency dependence of motional heating rates in ion traps can vary dramatically with temperature.1-6 More specifically, it has been shown that, at temperatures below roughly 70 K, heating rates are substantially lower than those observed at temperatures above 70 K.1,2 These observations, combined with experiments that show that ion bombardment may also reduce heating rates,4,5 suggest that one potential source of heating may be the presence of unwanted adatoms on trap surfaces. Based upon this evidence, this past quarter, we have used our previously detailed microscopic model of anomalous heating to study which adatoms may be responsible for the observed temperature-dependent scaling of motional heating rates with frequency. We have also examined the validity of one of the key assumptions in our model - that surface adatom dipoles can be accurately obtained from a variational ansatz - by using more direct DFT calculations of the dipole moments. Our current results suggest that the adatoms potentially responsible for the observed motional heating rates should bind weakly to the electrode surface and likely have a mass that exceeds that of Ne. Preliminary DFT calculations suggest that an analytical adatom dipole model,9 previously used in the ion trap noise literature7 to obtain the dipole as a function of adatom-surface distance, may be insufficiently accurate. Therefore, we are working toward obtaining a tabulation of the distance-dependent dipole for several adsorbates using first principles calculations for more accurate input to the heating model. The accurate calculation of the adatom dipole is important because its fluctuation is what couples to and heats the trapped ion qubit. Future work will focus on calculating the frequency spectra of a variety of hydrocarbons, which should have the binding characteristics identified below as necessary for reproducing experimental results. Upcoming efforts will moreover be directed toward deriving an improved microscopic model of heating which will enable direct comparisons of heating rates with measured ion-surface distances and will more accurately account for experimental parameters such as the trapping frequency, ion-electrode distance, and RF power applied to the electrodes.

  18. Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, October-December 1982

    None

    1983-07-01

    This quarterly report provides current information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant and offplant participants. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, in situ storage or disposal, waste from development and characterization, process and equipment development, and low-level waste management are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations Program: surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low-level effluent waste, tank replacement/waste transfer, and solid waste storage and related activities.

  19. LFCM vitrification technology. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1985

    Burkholder, H.C.; Jarrett, J.H.; Minor, J.E. (comps.)

    1986-09-01

    This report is compiled by the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to document progress on liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) vitrification technology. Progress in the following technical subject areas during the first quarter of FY 1986 is discussed: melting process chemistry and glass development, feed preparation and transfer systems, melter systems, canister filling and handling systems, off-gas systems, process/product modeling and control, and supporting studies.

  20. Ion-exchange resins. October 1983-December 1987 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for October 1983-December 1987

    This bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion-exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Regeneration and disposal of ion-exchange resins are also covered. (This updated bibliography contains 430 citations, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  1. Urine - abnormal color

    The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. ... Abnormal urine color may be caused by infection, disease, medicines, or food you eat. Cloudy or milky urine is a sign ...

  2. Quarterly report on the Florida Island Refuges for quarter ending December 31, 1939.

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Florida Islands National Wildife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from October through December of 1939. Wildlife- including...

  3. Quarterly report on the Florida Island Refuges for the quarter ending December 31, 1940.

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Florida Islands National Wildife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from October through December of 1940. Wildlife- including...

  4. THE BLIZZARD FROM 25-26 OCTOBER 2014 AND ITS IMPACT ON AIR FLIGHTS

    ŞCHIOPU C.-L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available On a calendar basis, October is considered the middle month of the fall, and for this reason, some meteorological phenomena such as blizzards, specific of the cold season, may occur extremely rare. Throughout the latest years there haven’t been any blizzards on this specific month, the earliest snow occurring on 15 October 1970 and the first snow cover on 26 October 1988. Climatologically the first month in which blizzard occurs is November with 0-1 days, when the multi-annual average is 0.4 days, therefore, the occurrence of this phenomenon on this month may be considered as an abnormal event which exceeds by far the multi-annual climatologic normalized standards. In order to highlight the synoptic context which determined the blizzard, the authors have revised the synoptic maps of air-pressure topography at the 500 hPa and ground levels and the meteorological data which were extracted from www.wetter3.de, www.ogimet.com, www.sat24.com, www.zamg.ac.at, www.weather.uwyo.edu. On 25-26 October 2014, the air flight activity was disturbed by the unexpected blizzard conditions and the Air Operators were taken by surprise and the Emergency and Rescue Air Unit (SMURD could not intervene. Also, the military helicopters were not able to fly in transport missions to Carei (Satu Mare county where there is the commemoration of the Romanian Army Day and the high officials of the Romanian state which were taking part have arrived with military aircrafts (C-27J Spartan, C-130B Hercules, An-30. After this event, at the landing on Otopeni Military Aerodrome they encountered severe meteorological hazard, but the aircrafts landed in safety conditions.

  5. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  7. Basil Willey, Sixty Years after (October 22, 2007)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Claus

    On the occasion of the sixtieth anniversary of the foundation of the Danish Association of English Teachers' newsletter, Anglo Files, the essay reconsiders the contents of the first issue from December 1947, Cambridge professor Basil Willey's address to the Association on October 22, 1947, 'Poetr...

  8. The Gravitation of the Moon Plays Pivotal Roles in the Occurrence of the Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Ryotaro Wake

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction (AMI is a social burden. However, being able to predict AMI could lead to prevention. A previous study showed only the relation between the lunar phase and the occurrence of AMI, but the period it takes for the moon to orbit around the earth and the period of the lunar phase differ. This study investigated the effect of the gravitation of the moon on AMI. Data was comprised of 1369 consecutive patients with first AMI at 5 hospitals from October, 1984 to December, 1997. The universal gravitation of the moon was calculated and compared to the earth onset time of AMI. Universal gravitation of the moon was derived by G*m/d2 (G: universal gravitation constant, m: the mass of the moon, d: the distance between the center of the moon and the center of the earth. The relationship between m/d2 and the cases of AMI was determined. There was an increase in cases, when there is a distance of more than 399864 km from the center of the earth to the center of the moon. The gravitation of more than 399864 km was determined to be weaker gravitation. It is confirmed that the number of AMI patients significantly increases at weaker gravitation periods in this multicenter trial. In conclusion, these results suggest that the gravitation of the moon may have an influence on the occurrence of AMI.

  9. A STUDY OF SEASONAL VARIATION OBSERVED IN OCCURRENCE OF IMMINENT ECLAMPSIA AND ECLAMPSIA AT TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Ashutosh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Eclampsia is an occurrence of seizures in women with pre-eclampsia. It is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity in India. Their etiology is poorly understood even today. Seasonal variation is considered as one of the cause. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To see the frequency of occurrence of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia during rainy (June to August and winter (October to December season. MATERIALS AND METHOD This is a descriptive, retrospective, observational and analytical study on seasonal variations in admission of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia patients in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in KIMS, Karad, from 2012 to 2014. RESULT Among 9122 total number of admissions in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 7678 got delivered in our institute. In which 4150 deliveries occurred in rainy season in which imminent eclampsia were 55 (1.3%, eclampsia cases were 42 (1.01%. While 3528 cases delivered in winter in which imminent eclampsia were 28 (0.7% and eclampsia were 24 (0.68%. The study showed frequency of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia being more common in rainy season than that of winter season. CONCLUSION In our study, we observed the seasonal variation in occurrence of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia. Number of cases of both imminent eclampsia and eclampsia was more common in rainy season. Regular health checkup, availability of health facilities and prompt referral to tertiary hospital can decrease mortality and morbidity of patient.

  10. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje;

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination...... abnormality independently predicted transition to disability or death [HR (95 % CI) 1.53 (1.01-2.34)]. The hazard increased with increasing number of abnormalities. Among MRI lesions, only ARWMC of severe grade independently predicted disability or death [HR (95 % CI) 2.18 (1.37-3.48)]. In our cohort...

  11. Dopaminergic system abnormalities Etiopathogenesis of dystonia

    Shuhui Wu; Huifang Shang; Xiaoyi Zou

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Much research has focused on the close relationship between etiopathogenesis of dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Nevertheless, details of the mechanism are still not clear.OBJECTIVE: To review studies from the past few years about pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system.RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: Using the key words "dystonia" and "dopamine", PubMed database and SCI databases were searched from January 1990 to December 2005 for relevant English publications. A total of 73 articles were searched and, initially, all articles were selected. Inclusive criteria: studies based on pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Exclusive criteria: duplicated studies. A total of 19 articles were extracted after preliminary screening.LITERATURE EVALUATION: The data sources were the PubMed and SCI databases. The types of articles chosen were reviews and original articles.DATA SYNTHESIS: Metabolism and function of dopamine in the central nervous system: the chemical constitution of dopamine is a single benzene ring. The encephalic regions of dopamine synthesis and their fiber projections comprise four nervous system pathways. One of these pathways is the substantia nigra-striatum dopamine pathway, which is a side-loop of the basal ganglia circuitry that participates in movement control and plays a main role in the adjustment of extracorticospinal tract movement. Dopamine can lead to the facilitation of movement. Dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system: different modes of dopamine abnormality exist in various forms of dystonia. Abnormalities of the dopaminergic system in several primary dystonias: at present, fifteen gene loci of primary dystonia have been reported (DYT1-DYT15). The relationship between abnormalities of the dopaminergic system and the

  12. Livestock Update. December 2012

    Greiner, Scott Patrick; McCann, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Includes the December and January beef management calendars, announcement of an upcoming webinar and symposium, 2012 Culpeper bull sale results, summary of the national beef quality audit, and winter sheep management tips.

  13. CT of pleural abnormalities

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  14. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    张文娟; 安宇

    2015-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%–70%as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models.

  15. Ultrasonography of splenic abnormalities

    Ming-Jen Chen; Ming-Jer Huang; Wen-Hsiung Chang; Tsang-En Wang; Horng-Yuan Wang; Cheng-Hsin Chu; Shee-Chan Lin; Shou-Chuan Shih

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This report gives a comprehensive overview of ultrasonography of splenic abnormalities. Certain ultrasonic features are also discussed with pathologic correlation.METHODS: We review the typical ultrasonic characteristics of a wide range of splenic lesions, illustrating them with images obtained in our institution from 2000 to 2003.One hundred and three patients (47 men, 56 women),with a mean age of 54 years (range 9-92 years), were found to have an abnormal ultrasonic pattern of spleen.RESULTS: We describe the ultrasonic features of various splenic lesions such as accessory spleen, splenomegaly,cysts, cavernous hemangiomas, lymphomas, abscesses,metastatic tumors, splenic infarctions, hematomas, and rupture, based on traditional gray-scale and color Doppler sonography.CONCLUSION: Ultrasound is a widely available, noninvasive,and useful means of diagnosing splenic abnormalities. A combination of ultrasonic characteristics and clinical data may provide an accurate diagnosis. If the US appearance alone is not enough, US may also be used to guide biopsy of suspicious lesions.

  16. Cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children

    Colombo; Sri Lanka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cytogenetic analysis is a valuable investigation in the diagnostic work up of children with suspected chromosomal disorders. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of various types of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children undergoing cytogenetic analysis. Methods: Cytogenetic reports of 1554 consecutive children with suspected chromosomal disorders who underwent karyotyping in two genetic centers in Sri Lanka from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: A total of 1548 children were successfully karyotyped. Abnormal karyotypes were found in 783 (50.6%) children. Numerical and structural abnormalities accounted for 90.8% and 9.2%, respectively. Down syndrome was the commonest aneuploidy identifi ed. Other various autosomal and sex chromosomal aneuploidies as well as micro-deletion syndromes were also detected. Conclusions: The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children undergoing cytogenetic analysis for suspected chromosomal disorders was relatively higher than that in Caucasian and other Asian populations.

  17. Abnormal austenite-ferrite transformation behavior in pure iron

    LIU Yongchang; F.Sommer; E.J. Mittemeijer

    2004-01-01

    The austenite → ferrite transformation is the most important reaction route in the manufacture of Fe-based materials. Here the austenite (γ) → ferrite (α)transformation of pure iron was systematically explored by high-resolution dilatometry. Abnormal transformation kinetics, multi-peak discontinuous reaction, was recognized in pure iron according to the variation of the ferrite-formation rate. The occurrence the one or the other type of γ→α trans formation strongly depends on the grain size: the transformation type changes from abnormal to normal (single-peak continuous reaction) with decreasing grain size. The inherent reason for the occurrence of abnormal transformation could be attributed to the repeated nucleation in front of the moving γ/α interface induced by the accumulation of elastic and plastic accommodation energy.

  18. Bakers' cyst and tibiofemoral abnormalities are more distinctive MRI features of symptomatic osteoarthritis than patellofemoral abnormalities

    Visser, A W; Mertens, B; Reijnierse, M; Bloem, J L; de Mutsert, R; le Cessie, S; Rosendaal, F R; Kloppenburg, M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate which structural MR abnormalities discriminate symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA), taking co-occurrence of abnormalities in all compartments into account. Methods The Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study is a population-based cohort aged 45–65 years. In 1285 participants (median age 56 years, 55% women, median body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m2), MRI of the right knee were obtained. Structural abnormalities (osteophytes, cartilage loss, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), subchondral cysts, meniscal abnormalities, effusion, Baker's cyst) at 9 patellofemoral and tibiofemoral locations were scored following the knee OA scoring system. Symptomatic OA in the imaged knee was defined following the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Logistic ridge regression analyses were used to investigate which structural abnormalities discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic OA, crude and adjusted for age, sex and BMI. Results Symptomatic knee OA was present in 177 individuals. Structural MR abnormalities were highly frequent both in individuals with OA and in those without. Baker's cysts showed the highest adjusted regression coefficient (0.293) for presence of symptomatic OA, followed by osteophytes and BMLs in the medial tibiofemoral compartment (0.185–0.279), osteophytes in the medial trochlear facet (0.262) and effusion (0.197). Conclusions Baker's cysts discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic knee OA. Structural MR abnormalities, especially in the medial side of the tibiofemoral joint and effusion, add further in discriminating symptomatic OA. Baker's cysts may present as a target for treatment. PMID:27252896

  19. Urological anomalies in the Northern Region Fetal Abnormality Survey.

    Scott, J. E.; Renwick, M

    1993-01-01

    From 1 January 1985 to 31 December 1990, the Northern Region Fetal Abnormality Survey received 736 notifications of fetuses with suspected urological abnormalities; a prevalence of three per 1000 births. There was a male:female ratio of 2:1, the ratio was higher in obstructive than in intrinsic renal parenchymal lesions. Overall diagnostic sensitivity was 68.9% and positive predictive value 50.8%. Hydronephrosis was the most frequent antenatal diagnosis (421 cases, 57.2%): 233 (55.3%) of thes...

  20. Energy situation - December 2011

    This report makes a status of the French energy expenses, prices, production, consumption, demand, import and export during the recent years and up to December 2011. Details are given separately for primary energy, solid mineral, fuels, petroleum products, natural gas and electric power. (J.S.)

  1. Energy situation - December 2015

    This report presents a summary of the French energy expenses, prices, production, consumption, demand, import and export during the recent years and up to December 2015. Details are given separately for primary energy, solid mineral fuels, petroleum products, natural gas and electricity

  2. Mail Delivery | 19 December

    Mail Office

    2014-01-01

    Due to the annual closure of CERN, no mail will be distributed on Friday, 19 December but mail will still be collected in the morning. Nevertheless, it will be possible for you to bring outgoing mail to building 555-R-002 until 12 noon.

  3. What's Happening in December?

    Pla, Myrna; Toro, Leonor

    Part of a series of monthly booklets designed as a teacher resource for teaching about Puerto Rican and U.S. culture, the booklet provides brief information on two December events: winter and Christmas. Brief information is provided on winter, Hanukkah, Christmas traditions in Connecticut and in Puerto Rico, and Christmas symbols (the tree,…

  4. Energy situation. October 2004

    This report makes a status of the French energy expenses, prices, production, consumption, demand, import and export since January 2002 and up to September or October 2004. Details are given separately for primary energy, solid mineral fuels, petroleum products, natural gas and electric power. (J.S.)

  5. Energy situation. October 2003

    This report makes a status of the French energy expenses, prices, production, consumption, demand, import and export since January 2001 and up to September or October 2003. Details are given separately for primary energy, solid mineral fuels, petroleum products, natural gas and electric power. (J.S.)

  6. Energy situation october 2005

    The monthly energy situation analysis in France at october 2005, is presented. Statistics are given for energy consumption, demand, import and export. A special attention is given to the primary energy, the solid fuels, the petroleum products, the natural gas and the electric power. (A.L.B.)

  7. Energy situation October 2006

    The monthly energy situation in France, at October 2006, is presented. Statistics are given for the energy expenses, consumption, demand, import and export. A special attention is given to the primary energy, the solid fuels, the petroleum products, the natural gas and the electric power. (A.L.B.)

  8. Energy situation - October 2015

    This report presents a summary of the French energy expenses, prices, production, consumption, demand, import and export during the recent years and up to October 2015. Details are given separately for primary energy, solid mineral fuels, petroleum products, natural gas and electricity

  9. Rainfall induced landslides in December 2004 in south-western Umbria, central Italy: types, extent, damage and risk assessment

    M. Cardinali; Galli, M.; Guzzetti, F.; Ardizzone, F.; P. Reichenbach; P. Bartoccini

    2006-01-01

    The autumn of 2004 was particularly wet in Umbria, with cumulative rainfall in the period from October to December exceeding 600 mm. On 4–6 December and on 25–27 December 2004, two storms hit the Umbria Region producing numerous landslides, which were abundant near the town of Orvieto where they affected volcanic deposits and marine sediments. In this work, we document the type and abundance of the rainfall-induced landslides in the Orvieto area, in south-western...

  10. Prevalence of Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Couples in Romania

    Mierla Dana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in one of the partners and infertility. This retrospective study was performed at the Department of Reproductive Medicine, Life Memorial Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, between August 2007 to December 2011. Two thousand, one hundred and ninety-five patients with reproductive problems were investigated, and the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was calculated. The control group consisting of 87 fertile persons who had two or more children, was investigated in this retrospective study. All the patients of this study were investigated by cytogenetic techniques and the results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. In this study, 94.99% patients had a normal karyotype and 5.01% had chromosomal abnormalities (numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities. In the study group, numerical chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.14% of infertile men and 0.62% of infertile women, and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.38% of infertile men and 1.87% of infertile women, respectively. The correlation between the incidence of chromosomal anomalies in the two sexes in couple with reproductive problems was not statistically significant. Recently, a possible association between infertility and chromosomal abnormalities with a significant statistical association has been reported. Our study shows that there is no association between chromosomal abnormalities and infertility, but this study needs to be confirmed with further investigations and a larger control group to establish the role of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of infertility.

  11. Occurrence of fipronil and its biologically active derivatives in urban residential runoff.

    Gan, J; Bondarenko, S; Oki, L; Haver, D; Li, J X

    2012-02-01

    Insecticides are commonly used around homes for controlling insects such as ants, termites, and spiders. Such uses have been linked to pesticide contamination and toxicity in urban aquatic ecosystems. Fipronil is a relatively new and popular urban-use insecticide that has acute toxicity to arthropods at low-ppb levels. In this study, we collected runoff water from 6 large communities, each consisting of 152 to 460 single-family homes, in Sacramento County and Orange County, California, and evaluated the occurrence of fipronil and its biologically active derivatives over 26 months under dry weather conditions. Statistical modeling showed that the levels of fipronil and derivatives in the runoff water were both spatially and temporally correlated. More than 10-fold differences were observed between the Sacramento and Orange County sites, with the much higher levels for Orange County (southern California) coinciding with heavier use. The median concentrations of combined fipronil and derivatives for the Orange County sites were 204-440 ng L(-1), with the 90th percentile levels ranging from 340 to 1170 ng L(-1). These levels frequently exceeded the LC50 values for arthropods such as mysid shrimp and grass shrimp. The highest levels occurred from April to October, while decreases were seen from October to December and from January to March, likely reflecting seasonal use patterns and the effect of rain-induced washoff. Fipronil and fipronil sulfone (oxidation derivative) each accounted for about 35% of the total concentrations, with desulfinyl fipronil (a photolytic product) contributing about 25%. Results of this study clearly established residential drainage as a direct source for pesticide contamination in urban waterways, and for the first time, identified fipronil as a new and widespread contaminant with potential ecotoxicological significance. PMID:22242791

  12. Analysis of abnormalities of snubbers in nuclear-reactor service (Report 1)

    An investigation was conducted of malfunctions of snubbers (seismic-shock arrestors) in service in nuclear power plants. The construction and use of snubbers is summarized, and the history of snubber problems in nuclear service is reviewed. Reports of many hundreds of snubber malfunctions were found in the abnormal-occurrence reports of the docket literature. The great majority of these abnormal occurrences consisted of hydraulic snubbers whose hydraulic fluid had leaked out because of deteriorated seals; snubbers that were damaged in manufacture, shipping, installation, refitting, or use; and snubbers whose performance did not match service requirements. Additional information about the failures was obtained from the reactor operators, snubber manufacturers, reactor vendors, and independent laboratories. The abnormal occurrences were classified into 12 categories. Analyses of the causes of the individual abnormalities are presented, and preliminary comments on the current state of snubber manufacture and use are made

  13. Analysis of abnormalities of snubbers in nuclear-reactor service (Report 1)

    Butler, J.H.; O' Hara, F.M. Jr.

    1976-10-14

    An investigation was conducted of malfunctions of snubbers (seismic-shock arrestors) in service in nuclear power plants. The construction and use of snubbers is summarized, and the history of snubber problems in nuclear service is reviewed. Reports of many hundreds of snubber malfunctions were found in the abnormal-occurrence reports of the docket literature. The great majority of these abnormal occurrences consisted of hydraulic snubbers whose hydraulic fluid had leaked out because of deteriorated seals; snubbers that were damaged in manufacture, shipping, installation, refitting, or use; and snubbers whose performance did not match service requirements. Additional information about the failures was obtained from the reactor operators, snubber manufacturers, reactor vendors, and independent laboratories. The abnormal occurrences were classified into 12 categories. Analyses of the causes of the individual abnormalities are presented, and preliminary comments on the current state of snubber manufacture and use are made.

  14. A review of two recent occurrences at the Advanced Test Reactor involving subcontractor activities

    This report documents the results of a brief, unofficial investigation into two incidents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility, reported on October 25 and 31, 1997. The first event was an unanticipated breach of confinement. The second involved reactor operation with an inoperable seismic scram subsystem, violating the reactor's Technical Specifications. These two incidents have been found to be unrelated. A third event that occurred on December 16, 1996, is also discussed because of its similarities to the first event listed above. Both of these incidents were unanticipated breaches of confinement, and both involved the work of construction subcontractor personnel. The cause for the subcontractor related occurrences is a work control process that fails to effectively interface with LMITCO management. ATR Construction Project managers work sufficient close with construction subcontractor personnel to understand planned day-to-day activities. They also have sufficient training and understanding of reactor operations to ensure adherence to applicable administrative requirements. However, they may not be sufficiently involved in the work authorization and control process to bridge an apparent communications gap between subcontractor employees and Facility Operations/functional support personnel for work inside the reactor facility. The cause for the inoperable seismic scram switch (resulting from a disconnected lead) is still under investigation. It does not appear to be subcontractor related

  15. Abnormal neuronal migration: radiologic-clinic study

    We present our experience in 18 pediatric patients with abnormal neuronal migration. Seven cases of heterotopia of the gray matter, 7 agyria-pachygyria complexes, 1 case of polymicrogyria, 2 cases of schizencephaly and 1 case of hemimegalencephaly were diagnosed by means of ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. The clinical picture was reviewed in each case, with special attention to the occurrence of convulsions, psycho motor development and visual changes. In general, the greater the morphological change, the greater the neurological involvement in these patients. However, the two cases of schizencephaly presented mild clinical expression. Magnetic resonance increases the diagnostic yield in neuronal migration disorders. Nevertheless, either ultrasonography or, especially, computed tomography is useful as a first diagnostic approach in these malformative disorders. (Author)

  16. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases.

  17. 2012/13 abnormal cold winter in Japan associated with Large-scale Atmospheric Circulation and Local Sea Surface Temperature over the Sea of Japan

    Ando, Y.; Ogi, M.; Tachibana, Y.

    2013-12-01

    On Japan, wintertime cold wave has social, economic, psychological and political impacts because of the lack of atomic power stations in the era of post Fukushima world. The colder winter is the more electricity is needed. Wintertime weather of Japan and its prediction has come under the world spotlight. The winter of 2012/13 in Japan was abnormally cold, and such a cold winter has persisted for 3 years. Wintertime climate of Japan is governed by some dominant modes of the large-scale atmospheric circulations. Yasunaka and Hanawa (2008) demonstrated that the two dominant modes - Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Pacific (WP) pattern - account for about 65% of the interannual variation of the wintertime mean surface air temperature of Japan. A negative AO brings about cold winter in Japan. In addition, a negative WP also brings about cold winter in Japan. Looking back to the winter of 2012/13, both the negative AO and negative WP continued from October through December. If the previous studies were correct, it would have been extremely very cold from October through December. In fact, in December, in accordance with previous studies, it was colder than normal. Contrary to the expectation, in October and November, it was, however, warmer than normal. This discrepancy signifies that an additional hidden circumstance that heats Japan overwhelms these large-scale atmospheric circulations that cool Japan. In this study, we therefore seek an additional cause of wintertime climate of Japan particularly focusing 2012 as well as the AO and WP. We found that anomalously warm oceanic temperature surrounding Japan overwhelmed influences of the AO or WP. Unlike the inland climate, the island climate can be strongly influenced by surrounding ocean temperature, suggesting that large-scale atmospheric patterns alone do not determine the climate of islands. (a) Time series of a 5-day running mean AO index (blue) as defined by Ogi et al., (2004), who called it the SVNAM index. For

  18. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Zodwa Dlamini; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Rodney Hull

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 f...

  19. Forest Fires Under Abnormal Weather Conditions in Central Siberia

    E. N. Valendik; Ye. K. Kisilyakhov; V. A. Ryzhkova; E. I. Ponomarev; J. G. Goldammer

    2014-01-01

    Occurrence of forest fires and their development to large and catastrophic wildfires are considered for Central Siberia taiga subzones under abnormal drought conditions. The combination of natural conditions that determine the appearance and spread of these fires are given for drought conditions. A map of the large wildfires distribution in the boreal forest subzones of Central Siberia is compiled for 1979 to 2011. A brief analysis is made of dry periods and their relation to the planetary a...

  20. Abnormal Seedlings in Madhuca latifolia-An important biodiesel tree

    sangram bhanudas chavan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mahua is one of the most important tree species for tribals in parts of central India for their livelihood security. It is promising oil yielding tree species for biodiesel production having properties that replaces diesel fuel. During the germination study of Madhuca latifolia conducted at NRCAF nursery, abnormalities in the form of twin and triplet seedlings were recorded. Reporting of this type of occurrence will be helpful for management of seedlings in nursery as well as for future breeding program.

  1. Possible Electromagnetic Effects on Abnormal Animal Behavior Before an Earthquake

    Masashi Hayakawa

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Possible electromagnetic effects on abnormal animal behavior before earthquakes. Abstract The former statistical properties summarized by Rikitake (1998) on unusual animal behavior before an earthquake (EQ) have first been presented by using two parameters (epicentral distance (D) of an anomaly and its precursor (or lead) time (T)). Three plots are utilized to characterize the unusual animal behavior; (i) EQ magnitude (M) versus D, (ii) log T versus M, and (iii) occurrence hist...

  2. The Correlation between Electroencephalography Amplitude and Interictal Abnormalities: Audit study

    Sami F. Al-Rawas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between background amplitude and interictal abnormalities in routine electroencephalography (EEG. Methods: This retrospective audit was conducted between July 2006 and December 2009 at the Department of Clinical Physiology at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman. A total of 1,718 electroencephalograms (EEGs were reviewed. All EEGs were from patients who had been referred due to epilepsy, syncope or headaches. EEGs were divided into four groups based on their amplitude: group one ≤20 μV; group two 21–35 μV; group three 36–50 μV, and group four >50 μV. Interictal abnormalities were defined as epileptiform discharges with or without associated slow waves. Abnormalities were identified during periods of resting, hyperventilation and photic stimulation in each group. Results: The mean age ± standard deviation of the patients was 27 ± 12.5 years. Of the 1,718 EEGs, 542 (31.5% were abnormal. Interictal abnormalities increased with amplitude in all four categories and demonstrated a significant association (P <0.05. A total of 56 EEGs (3.3% had amplitudes that were ≤20 μV and none of these showed interictal epileptiform abnormalities. Conclusion: EEG amplitude is an important factor in determining the presence of interictal epileptiform abnormalities in routine EEGs. This should be taken into account when investigating patients for epilepsy. A strong argument is made for considering long-term EEG monitoring in order to identify unexplained seizures which may be secondary to epilepsy. It is recommended that all tertiary institutions provide EEG telemetry services.

  3. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    ... ency/article/003242.htm Skin - abnormally dark or light To use the sharing features on this page, ... the hands. The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the ...

  4. Statistics of GNSS amplitude scintillation occurrences over Dakar, Senegal, at varying elevation angles during the maximum phase of solar cycle 24

    Akala, A. O.; Awoyele, A.; Doherty, P. H.

    2016-03-01

    This study characterizes Global Navigation Satellite System amplitude scintillation over Dakar (14.75°N, 17.45°W, magnitude latitude: 5.88°N), Senegal. The data, which we arranged on daily and monthly scales, cover 14 months: September-November 2012; February-December 2013; and January-February 2014. The data were further binned into three levels of scintillation using the S4 index: weak (0.3 ≤ S4 < 0.4), moderate (0.4 ≤ S4 < 0.7), and intense (S4 ≥ 0.7), over varying elevation angles (10°, 20°, and 30°). Daily occurrences of scintillation were most frequent around 22-02 LT. On a month-by-month basis, October recorded the highest occurrences of scintillations, while June recorded the least. Furthermore, contrary to Akala et al. (2014, 2015) who earlier reported January as off season for scintillation occurrences at some sites in Africa, namely, Lagos (Central West Africa), Nairobi, and Kampala (East Africa), the current study recorded some scintillation occurrences at Dakar (far west of West Africa) in January. It therefore implies that longitudinal variations do exist in the climatology of ionospheric scintillations over Africa. Consequently, detailed understanding of the climatology and daily distributions of ionospheric scintillations over equatorial Africa, which is our key objective in this study (from the perspective of Dakar), is the basic requirement for developing robust physics-based scintillation models for the African equatorial region. Finally, we noted that the conventional adoption of high-elevation masking angles during scintillation data processing, with a view to suppressing multipath effects usually hid important ionospheric-induced scintillation data.

  5. 76 FR 72009 - Sunshine Act Notice-December 8, 2011 Board of Directors Meeting

    2011-11-21

    ... CORPORATION Sunshine Act Notice--December 8, 2011 Board of Directors Meeting DATES: Time and Date: Thursday... Counsel. 4. Minutes of the Open Session of the September 22, 2011 Board of Directors Meeting. 5. Minutes of the Open Session of the October 27, 2011 Board of Directors Meeting. Further Matters To...

  6. Protruding labia minora: abnormal or just uncool?

    Michala, Lina; Koliantzaki, Sofia; Antsaklis, Aris

    2011-09-01

    There is a wide variety in the appearance of normal female external genitalia. Nevertheless a specific prototype is promoted by the media, leading to a false sense that all other appearances are abnormal. As adolescents become sexually aware at an earlier age, most of them are worried about the appearance of their genitalia, especially when labia minora protrude beyond labia majora. This is a prospective audit of adolescents presenting for assessment of their perceived abnormal genitalia. Sixteen girls aged 10.2 to 17.8 years presented between June 2009 and December 2010 to a specialist adolescent gynecology service. Their mean labial width was 36 mm (range: 20-55 mm). In six girls, the reason for attending the service was inequality of the size of labia ranging between 6 mm and 35 mm (mean of 20 mm). Among the remaining 10 girls, the concern had arisen through comparison with a prepubescent sibling (one case), change of genitalia during puberty (four cases), looking at internet pictures (four cases), and looking at an anatomy book (one case). Risks of Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery (FGCS) have not been adequately documented, especially with regards to sexual function and long-term patient satisfaction. External genitalia are likely to change during puberty and therefore, any genital operation in the absence of clear pathology should be deferred until adulthood. Even then, women should have clear expectations of what will be achieved with the operation in terms of appearance and function. PMID:21696338

  7. Occurrence of Ionophores in the Danish Environment

    Søren Alex Bak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics in the environment are a potential threat to environmental ecosystems as well as human health and safety. Antibiotics are designed to have a biological effect at low doses, and the low levels detected in the environment have turned focus on the need for more research on environmental occurrence and fate, to assess the risk and requirement for future regulation. This article describes the first occurrence study of the antibiotic polyether ionophores (lasalocid, monensin, narasin, and salinomycin in the Danish environment. Various environmental matrices (river water, sediment, and soil have been evaluated during two different sampling campaigns carried out in July 2011 and October 2012 in an agricultural area of Zealand, Denmark. Lasalocid was not detected in any of the samples. Monensin was measured at a concentration up to 20 ng·L−1 in river water and 13 µg·kg−1 dry weight in the sediment as well as being the most frequently detected ionophore in the soil samples with concentrations up to 8 µg·kg−1 dry weight. Narasin was measured in sediment samples at 2 µg·kg−1 dry weight and in soil between 1 and 18 µg·kg−1 dry weight. Salinomycin was detected in a single soil sample at a concentration of 30 µg·kg−1 dry weight.

  8. Occurrence of Chrysomya bezziana in a buffalo in Jammu

    Katoch, R.; Godara, R.; Yadav, Anish; Sharma, Shikha; Ahmad, Irshad

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous myiasis caused by the Old World screw-worm fly, Chrysomya bezziana, is a commonly occurring infestation of livestock and man in Southeast Asian and African countries. A buffalo, aged five years was presented with traumatic wound in the abnormal growth at the base of tail, housing maggots in it. Based on morphological features, the collected larvae were identified as C. bezziana larvae. The first ever occurrence of C. bezziana in a buffalo from this part of country and its public hea...

  9. Memetics clarification of abnormal behavior

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Biological medicine is hard to fully and scientifically explain the etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors; while, researches on philosophy and psychology (including memetics) are beneficial to better understand and explain etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors. At present, the theory of philosophy and psychology is to investigate the entity of abnormal behavior based on the views of memetics.METHODS: Abnormal behavior was researched in this study based on three aspects, including instinctive behavior disorder, poorly social-adapted behavior disorder and mental or body disease associated behavior disorder. Most main viewpoints of memetics were derived from "The Meme Machine", which was written by Susan Blackmore. When questions about abnormal behaviors induced by mental and psychological diseases and conduct disorder of teenagers were discussed, some researching achievements which were summarized by authors previously were added in this study, such as aggressive behaviors, pathologically aggressive behaviors, etc.RESULTS: The abnormal behaviors mainly referred to a part of people's substandard behaviors which were not according with the realistic social environment, culture background and the pathologic behaviors resulted from people's various psychological diseases. According to the theory of "meme", it demonstrated that the relevant behavioral obstacles of various psychological diseases, for example, the unusual behavior of schizophrenia, were caused, because the old meme was destroyed thoroughly but the new meme was unable to establish; psychoneurosis and personality disorder were resulted in hard establishment of meme; the behavioral obstacles which were ill-adapted to society, for example, various additional and homosexual behaviors, were because of the selfish replications and imitations of "additional meme" and "homosexual meme"; various instinct behavioral and congenital intelligent obstacles were not significance

  10. Thyroid abnormality in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Prasanna Byna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AUB is a common but complicated clinical presentation and occurs in 15-20% of women between menarche to menopause and significantly affects the women's health. Women with thyroid dysfunction often have menstrual irregularities, infertility and increased morbidity during pregnancy. The objective of present study is to find the correlation between thyroid disorders and AUB in perimenopausal women attending gynecology OPD. Methods: In the present study, fifty five patients with AUB were included and were evaluated for the cause including thyroid abnormality. Thyroid function tests were done in all patients. Results: Among 55 patients, 12 patients were diagnosed as hypothyroidism and 7 as hyperthyroidism, women with AUB 36 (65.4% were euthyroid. Among 19 women with thyroid abnormality, heavy menstrual bleeding was seen in 8 (42% women, 6 (31.57% had polymenorrhagia, 5 (26.31% had oligomenorrhoea. The frequent menstrual abnormality in women with hypothyroidism (12 women was heavy menstrual bleeding in 5 (41.6% women, 3 (25% had oligomennorhoea, 4 (33.3% had polymenorrhagia. Out of 7 women with hyperthyroidism, 2 (28.57% had oligomenorrhoea, 3 (42.8% had heavy menstrual bleeding, 2 (28.57% had polymenorrhagia. In a total of 55 patients with AUB, 11 (20% had structural abnormalities in uterus and ovaries. 5 (9% had adenomyosis, 3 (5.4% had ovarian cysts, 3 (5.4% had fibroids. Conclusions: It is important to screen all women for thyroid abnormality who are presenting with AUB especially with non-structural causes of AUB. Correction of thyroid abnormalities also relieves AUB. This will avoid unnecessary hormonal treatment and surgery. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3250-3253

  11. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test ...

  12. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION: Programme of Seminars September to December 2003

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION Nathalie Dumeaux tel. 78144 management.communication@cern.ch Situation : 13.10.2003 Dates Days Places Available Bilingual seminars Interpersonal Communication (Module 1-CM) 21, 22, 23 October 3 non* Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager (Module 2) 28, 29 October 2 non Quality Management 10, 11, 12 November 3 oui Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager (Module 3) 11, 12 November 2 non Risk Management 11, 12 December 2 oui Seminars In English Communicating Effectively (first part) 12, 13 November & 4...

  13. Management & Communication: Programme of Seminars September to December 2004

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    Situation : 13.07.2004 Bilingual seminars Dates Days Places Available Project Management 13, 14, 15 September 3 oui Introduction to Management 20, 21, 22 September 3 oui Managing by project 28, 29 September 2 oui Project Management Case study 8 October 1 oui Communication Techniques - 1 20, 21, 22 October 3 oui Quality Management 8, 9 November 2 oui Risk Management 6, 7 December 2 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively 20 September, 1 october + 2, 3 November 4 yes Communicating effectively in your team 14, 15 October 2 yes Séminaires en Français Communiquer efficacement 21, 22 septembre + 12, 13 octobre 4 oui Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 27, 28 septembre + 18 octobre 3 oui Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail 15, 16, 17 novembre 3 oui * If you are interested in a seminar where there are no places available, please fill in an application form and we will contact you as soon as a new session is organised. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICA...

  14. Neuroimaging abnormalities in Griscelli's disease

    Griscelli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a 7-1/2-month-old white girl who presented with this syndrome, but initially without neurological abnormalities. Initial CT of the brain was normal. Despite haematological remission with chemotherapy, she developed neurological symptoms, progressing to coma. At this time, CT showed areas of coarse calcification in the globi pallidi, left parietal white matter and left brachium pontis. Hypodense areas were present in the genu and posterior limb of the internal capsule on the right side, as well as posterior aspects of both thalami, together with minimal generalised atrophy. MRI revealed areas of increased T2 signal and a focal area of abnormal enhancement in the subcortical white matter. Griscelli's disease should be added to the list of acquired neuroimaging abnormalities in infants. (orig.)

  15. Knee loading for abnormal gait

    Hutchison, J.; Madsen, D.; Norman, T. L.; -Blaha, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a mathematical model for determining knee loads for abnormal gait. Abnormal gait was defined as a person with varus, i.e. “bowleggedness”, or a person who had an external rotation of the femur (or the inability to internally rotate the femur) which caused an indirect varus in the forward positions of gait. Conditions such as these have been observed clinically to result in increased wear on the medial condyle of total knee replacements. This problem was...

  16. Occurrence of adults and biological aspects of Geniates borelli Camerano (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Rutelinae in Aquidauana, MS, Brazil

    Sergio Roberto Rodrigues

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of adults and biological aspects of Geniates borelli Camerano (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Rutelinae in Aquidauana, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Due to the importance of Geniates borelli Camerano as a pest in many crops, studies were developed at Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, Aquidauana campus, MS, Brazil. Adults were collected with a light trap from January 2006 to December 2007. 3,320 adults were collected, and the highest quantities were obtained in October 2006 and November 2007, with 1,548 and 802 adults recorded, respectively. Collected adults were kept in plastic containers with soil and Brachiaria decumbens seedlings for oviposition. 535 eggs measuring 2.30 × 1.60 mm were obtained. As the embryonic development progressed, eggs increased in size to 3.00 × 2.70 mm, and this change occurred between 6 and 10 days after oviposition. The embryonic period lasted 17.9 days. The first, second, and third instars lasted 37.6, 49.7, and 74 days, respectively. The prepupal stage lasted 65.9 days and the pupal stage lasted an average of 18.5 days. The biological cycle is completed in 315.8 days, which characterizes the species as univoltine. The average longevity of females was 35.4 days and 28.5 days for males.

  17. Individual grain orientations and texture development of nanocrystalline electrodeposits showing abnormal grain growth

    Klement, Uta [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)]. E-mail: uta.klement@chalmers.se; Silva, Melina da [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2007-05-31

    The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique has been used to determine grain orientations of abnormally grown grains in nanocrystalline Ni electrodeposits upon annealing. The results show that the first grown grains have a <3 1 1>//ND orientation. Upon annealing further grain growth occurs and the preferred alignment of the abnormally growing grains changes from <3 1 1>//ND to <1 1 1>//ND. The subgrain coalescence model adopted from recrystallization is used to describe the occurrence of abnormal grain growth, and energy considerations are put forward for explaining the dominance of the <1 1 1>//ND texture component after longer annealing treatments.

  18. Abnormal Austenite-Ferrite Transformation Behaviors of Fe-Si:Dilatometric Measurements

    LIU Yong-chang; ZHANG Zhe-ping; ZHAO Kai; LI Bao-yin

    2004-01-01

    The isochronal γ→α transformation of Fe-1Si alloy was measured by high-resolution dilatometry. According to the variation of the ferrite formation rate, an abnormal γ→α phase transformation was recognized, while normal reaction,i.e. one peak continuous reaction, was also detected. The occurrence the one or the other type of γ→α transformation strongly depends on the grain size: the transformation type changes from abnormal to normal with decreasing grain size. In the abnormal transformation process the first stage of the transformation corresponds to the first peaks in the transformation rate, which are not thermally activated.

  19. Sperm abnormalities in exposed humans

    Šrám, Radim; Rubeš, J.

    Cambridge : Issue in Toxicology, Royal Society of Chemistry Publ.,, 2007, s. 247-258. ISBN 978-0-85404-847-2 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/740/5/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : air pollution exposure * sperm abnormalities * male reproductive health Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality

  20. Occurrence of halogenated alkaloids.

    Gribble, Gordon W

    2012-01-01

    Once considered to be isolation artifacts or chemical "mistakes" of nature, the number of naturally occurring organohalogen compounds has grown from a dozen in 1954 to >5000 today. Of these, at least 25% are halogenated alkaloids. This is not surprising since nitrogen-containing pyrroles, indoles, carbolines, tryptamines, tyrosines, and tyramines are excellent platforms for biohalogenation, particularly in the marine environment where both chloride and bromide are plentiful for biooxidation and subsequent incorporation into these electron-rich substrates. This review presents the occurrence of all halogenated alkaloids, with the exception of marine bromotyrosines where coverage begins where it left off in volume 61 of The Alkaloids. Whereas the biological activity of these extraordinary compounds is briefly cited for some examples, a future volume of The Alkaloids will present full coverage of this topic and will also include selected syntheses of halogenated alkaloids. Natural organohalogens of all types, especially marine and terrestrial halogenated alkaloids, comprise a rapidly expanding class of natural products, in many cases expressing powerful biological activity. This enormous proliferation has several origins: (1) a revitalization of natural product research in a search for new drugs, (2) improved compound characterization methods (multidimensional NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry), (3) specific enzyme-based and other biological assays, (4) sophisticated collection methods (SCUBA and remote submersibles for deep ocean marine collections), (5) new separation and purification techniques (HPLC and countercurrent separation), (6) a greater appreciation of traditional folk medicine and ethobotany, and (7) marine bacteria and fungi as novel sources of natural products. Halogenated alkaloids are truly omnipresent in the environment. Indeed, one compound, Q1 (234), is ubiquitous in the marine food web and is found in the Inuit from their diet of whale

  1. Status of ground-water resources at U.S. Navy Support Facility, Diego Garcia; summary of hydrologic and climatic data, January 1993 through December 1995

    Torikai, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains hydrologic and climatic data that describe the status of ground-water resources at U.S. Navy Support Facility, Diego Garcia. Data presented are from January 1993 through December 1995, although the report focuses on hydrologic events from October through December 1995 (fourth quarter of 1995). Cumulative rainfall for October through December 1995 was about 41 inches, which is 32 percent more than the mean cumulative rainfall of about 31 inches for October through December. The period October through December is within the annual wet season. Mean cumulative rainfall is calculated for the fixed base period 1951-90. Ground-water withdrawal during October through December 1995 averaged 931,000 gallons per day. Withdrawal for the same 3 months in 1994 averaged 902,900 gallons per day. Patterns of withdrawal during the fourth quarter of 1995 did not change significantly since 1993 at all five ground-water production areas. At the end of December 1995, the chloride concentration of the composite water supply was 60 milligrams per liter, well below the 250 milligrams per liter secondary drinking-water standard established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Chloride concentrations of the composite water supply from October through December 1995 ranged between 28 and 67 milligrams per liter. Chloride concentration of ground water in monitoring wells at Cantonment and Air Operations continued to decrease during the fourth quarter of 1995, with water from the deepest monitoring wells decreasing in chloride concentration by as much as 2,000 milligrams per liter. This trend follows increases in chloride concentration during the first half of 1995. A fuel leak at Air Operations caused the shutdown of ten wells in May 1991. Four of the wells resumed pumping for water-supply purposes in April 1992. The remaining six wells are being used to hydraulically divert fuel migration away from water-supply wells by recirculating about 150,000 gallons of water

  2. An Unusual Occurrence of Multiple Dental Anomalies in a Single Nonsyndromic Patient: A Case Report

    N. B. Nagaveni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental anomalies are the formative defects caused by genetic disturbances or environmental factors during tooth morphogenesis. Simultaneous occurrence of various multiple anomalies has been reported previously, particularly in cases of chromosomal abnormalities that often manifest with multisystem involvement. Very few cases of multiple anomalies have been documented in patients with no known generalized abnormalities. The present paper shows an unusual occurrence of a combination of dental anomalies like mandibular canine transmigration, taurodontism in permanent mandibular molars, congenital agenesis of 14 numbers of permanent teeth excluding third molars, canine impaction, primary molars with pyramidal roots, midline diastema and generalized microdontia in an apparently normal 13-year-old Indian girl.

  3. The effects of a change in market abuse regulation on abnormal returns and volumes: Evidence from the Amsterdam stock market

    Bas ter Weel; T. Prevoo

    2010-01-01

    The Market Abuse Directive came into effect on 1 October 2005. One of its purposes is to reduce illegal insider trading and leakage of information prior to official releases by increasing penalties. This paper investigates the effects of the Market Abuse Directive through an event study approach. Using a dataset of almost 5,000 corporate news announcements, the analysis reveals that the information value of announcements, measured by the announcement day abnormal return and abnormal volume, i...

  4. Overview of Epidemiology, Genetics, Birth Defects, and Chromosome Abnormalities Associated With CDH

    Pober, Barbara R.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common and well-studied birth defect. The etiology of most cases remains unknown but increasing evidence points to genetic causation. The data supporting genetic etiologies which are detailed below include the association of CDH with recurring chromosome abnormalities, the existence of CDH-multiplex families, and the co-occurrence of CDH with additional congenital malformations.

  5. Hemostatic abnormalities following Echis carinatus (saw-scaled viper) envenomation in the rhesus monkey.

    Chugh, K S; Mohanthy, D; Pal, Y; Das, K C; Ganguly, N K; Chakravarty, R N

    1981-09-01

    Hemostatic abnormalities following lethal and sublethal doses of Echis carinatus venom were studied in a subhuman primate model. The observations suggest the occurrence of disseminated intravascular coagulation of varying magnitude within a few hours of envenomation. A procoagulant effect of the venom of Echis carinatus is likely to be the major cause of the disturbance in the hemostatic mechanism. PMID:7283009

  6. Echocardiographic abnormalities in hypertensive patients

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in 120 hypertensive patients with a course of 5 or more years, who went to the emergency room of 'Saturnino Lora' Provincial Teaching Hospital from November 2010 to November 2011 in order to determine the presence or absence of echocardiographic abnormalities typical of hypertension. Of these, 78,3 % was affected, most of whom reported not to continue with regular previous medical treatment, and 21,7 % had not these abnormalities. Age group of 50-60 years, males and blacks prevailed in the case material. The most significant echocardiographic findings were left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure with ejection fraction of left ventricle preserved

  7. Is Dark Energy Abnormally Weighting?

    Fuzfa, A.; Alimi, J. -M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new interpretation of dark energy in terms of an \\textit{Abnormally Weighting Energy} (AWE). This means that dark energy does not couple to gravitation in the same way as ordinary matter, yielding a violation of the weak and strong equivalence principles on cosmological scales. The resulting cosmological mechanism accounts for the Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae in terms of both cosmic acceleration and variation of the gravitational constant while still accounting for the pr...

  8. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  9. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development. (orig.)

  10. Computed tomography abnormalities in hanging

    The CT pattern of bilateral and symmetrical round low density areas in the globi pallidi has been observed in a young man who attempted suicide by hanging. These CT abnormalities are similar to those described in other conditions such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, cyanide and methanol poisoning, hypoglycaemia, drowning and acute global central nervous system hypoperfusion.The findings appear to be correlated with acute cerebral hypoxia. (orig.)

  11. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart Syndrome) that has been described after acute stress. It is a reversible cardiac dysfunction with distinct imaging features(the echocardiographic or left ventricular angiographic image resembles a Tak...

  12. Hans Henriksen Ussing. 30 December 1911 - 22 December 2000

    Larsen, Erik Hviid

    2009-01-01

    Hans Ussing was born on 30 December 1911 at Sorø Academy in Denmark, where his father Dr Henrik Ussing was a lecturer and, as historian, a leading Danish folklorist. After his doctoral thesis in marine biology, Hans Ussing came to August Krogh's laboratory, where he studied protein turnover by...

  13. Rainfall induced landslides in December 2004 in south-western Umbria, central Italy: types, extent, damage and risk assessment

    M. Cardinali; Galli, M.; Guzzetti, F.; Ardizzone, F.; P. Reichenbach; P. Bartoccini

    2006-01-01

    The autumn of 2004 was particularly wet in Umbria, with cumulative rainfall in the period from October to December exceeding 600 mm. On 4–6 December and on 25–27 December 2004, two storms hit the Umbria Region producing numerous landslides, which were abundant near the town of Orvieto where they affected volcanic deposits and marine sediments. In this work, we document the type and abundance of the rainfall-induced landslides in the Orvieto area, in south-western Umbria, we study ...

  14. The Abnormal Choroidal Vessels in Aged Patients

    Shizhou Huang; Feng Wen; Dezheng Wu; Guangwei Luo; Caijiao Liu

    2002-01-01

    Background: To show the abnormal choroidal vessels in aged patients with indocyanine-green angiography (ICGA).Methods: ICGA was performed in 350 patients with TOPCON TRC-50IA fundus camera.The images were recorded and retrospectively reviewed.Results: Five aged patients out of 350 cases were found to have abnormal choroidalvessels. The incidence was 1.43%. The abnormal choroidal vessels showed round- shapet,focal enlargement, abnormal shape and entrance, satellite appearance, and vascularloops. These might be due to congenital abnormality of choroid.Conclusion: ICGA could be used to observe the abnormal choroidal vessels.

  15. Intracranial CT abnormality associated with childhood leukemia

    We showed three abnormal CT findings of childhood leukemia. Case 1: A 3-year-old boy was found to have acute lymphocytic leukemia in January, 1980. Following prophylactic skull irradiation totaling 2,300 rad and 30 mg of intrathecal methotrexate, he was treated with oral and intravenous methotrexate (10-15 mg once weekly, totaling 2,035 mg). CT taken 2 years and 3 months after the onset showed fine, high-density spots in the left frontal, temporal, and bilateral parietal subcortical regions, without any contrast enhancement. The high-density spots were diagnosed as parenchymal calcification induced by the irradiation and methotrexate therapy. Case 2: A 5-year-old boy complaining of anemia and fever was diagnosed as having acute myelocytic leukemia and was treated with VAMP and DCVP. In March, 1982, he complained of severe headache, nausea, and vomiting 4.5 years after his onset. There were no neurological deficits nor any nuchal stiffness. A lumbar puncture showed increasing pressure of CSF over 250 mm H2O and a pleocytosis of the myeloblasts. CT showed an enhanced high-density mass in the pineal region and hydrocephalus. He improved and showed a normal CT after treatment with skull irradiation of 2,400 rad and four intraventricular injections of 15 mg methotrexate, 30 mg cytosine arabinoside, and 15 mg hydrocortisone via Ommaya's reservoir. Case 3: A 14-year-old boy who had suffered from acute lymphocytic leukemia, associated with meningeal infiltration, for 2 years and 10 months, complained of headache, disturbance of consciousness, and focal convulsion of the left upper limb in December, 1982. CT demonstrated multiple, round, high-density areas in the cerebral hemispheres. Those high-density areas were diagnosed as intracerebral leukemic masses and/or hemorrhages. After 1400 rad of skull irradiation and steroid therapy, the patient rallied shortly, but then expired. An autopsy was refused. (J.P.N.)

  16. Clinical mastitis in dairy cattle in Ontario: frequency of occurrence and bacteriological isolates.

    Sargeant, J.M.; Scott, H M; Leslie, K E; Ireland, M. J.; Bashiri, A

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the frequency of occurrence of clinical mastitis in dairy herds in Ontario. The study group consisted of 65 dairy farms involved in a 2-year observational study, which included recording all clinical mastitis cases and milk sampling of quarters with clinical mastitis. Lactational incidence risks of 9.8% for abnormal milk only, 8.2% for abnormal milk with a hard or swollen udder, and 4.4% for abnormal milk plus systemic signs of illness related to ma...

  17. 77 FR 37446 - Report to Congress on Abnormal Occurrences; Fiscal Year 2011; Dissemination of Information

    2012-06-21

    ... catheter was erroneously positioned approximately 2 to 2.5 cm away from the tumor. This was the result of... dose of 7 Gy (700 rad) and, 1 week later, noticed the appearance of two somewhat painful dark spots on the skin of her thigh. On May 18, 2010, the patient notified the licensee of the appearance of...

  18. Collection and evalution of abnormal occurrences in German nuclear power plants

    The systematic consideration of operating experiences which must be recorded, collected and evaluated, is important for the realisation of the aim of greater safety in nuclear power stations. Since commissioning of the first nuclear power stations in West Germany all significant events were communicated to the 'Laender' authorities responsible for controlling compliance with the licensing requirements. The evaluation of these events assured that the necessary consequences were carried out to prevent any recurrence. A systematic consideration of the operating experiences, however, was missing; therefore our institute was made responsible by the Federal Ministry of the Interior with the agreement of the 'Laender' authorities to record, collect and evaluate in accordance with reporting criteria and a classification system related to safety relevance. (orig./RW)

  19. 75 FR 41553 - Report to Congress on Abnormal Occurrences Fiscal Year 2009; Dissemination of Information

    2010-07-16

    ... wire, for needle 13, snagged on the seam between the aluminum connector and the plastic guide tube... catheter length on the catheter worksheet during the review of the treatment control unit and treatment... with the data in the treatment control unit. State--The Florida Bureau of Radiation Control...

  20. 76 FR 38214 - Report to Congress on Abnormal Occurrences; Fiscal Year 2010; Dissemination of Information

    2011-06-29

    ... determine pregnancy prior to administration of iodine- 131. AS10-02 Human Exposure to Radiation at Mercy... Consequences--Mercy Medical Center (the licensee) reported that a therapeutic dose of 1,110 MBq (30 mCi) of... reported as AOs. AS10-03 Medical Event at Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center in Toledo, Ohio Date and...

  1. 78 FR 54493 - Report to Congress on Abnormal Occurrences: Fiscal Year 2012, Revision 1; Dissemination of...

    2013-09-04

    .... The hospital also made organizational and personnel changes to improve the facility's safety culture... direction of the catheters was mistakenly reversed. This changed the starting position of the HDR source and... Licensee--Corrective actions included changes to the licensee's procedures so that the entrance site...

  2. Plankton studies in San Francisco Bay; II, Phytoplankton abundance and species composition, July 1977-December 1979

    Wong, Raymond L. J.; Cloern, James E.

    1981-01-01

    Data are presented on the phytoplankton species composition and abundance in San Francisco Bay from July 1977 through December 1979. Phytoplankton identification and enumerations were made at selected stations. Sample collections were made at selected stations in the main channel of the Bay from Rio Vista on the Sacramento River to Calaveras Point in South San Francisco Bay, and at shoal stations in the central portion of South San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and Suisun Bay. Also reported, from October 1978 through December 1979, are the calculated phytoplankton carbon and percent nondiatom carbon, and the species list. This study is one component of an ongoing interdisciplinary study of San Francisco Bay. (USGS)

  3. CT abnormality in multiple sclerosis analysis based on 28 probable cases and correlation with clinical manifestations

    In order to investigate the occurrence and nature of CT abnormality and its correlation with clinical manifestations in multiple sclerosis, 34 CT records obtained from 28 consecutive patients with probable multiple sclerosis were reviewed. Forty-six percent of all cases showed abnormal CT. Dilatation of cortical sulci was found in 39%; dilatation of the lateral ventricle in 36%; dilatation of prepontine or cerebello-pontine cistern and the fourth ventricle, suggesting brainstem atrophy, in 18%; dilatation of cerebellar sulci, superior cerebellar cistern and cisterna magna, suggesting cerebellar atrophy, in 11%. Low density area was found in the cerebral hemisphere in 11% of cases. Contrast enhancement, performed on 25 CT records, did not show any change. There was no correlation between CT abnormality and duration of the illness. Although abnormal CT tended to occur more frequently during exacerbations and chronic stable state than during remissions, the difference was not statistically significant. CT abnormalities suggesting brainstem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy or plaques were found exclusively during exacerbations and chronic stable state. The occurrence of CT abnormalities was not significantly different among various clinical forms which were classified based on clinically estimated sites of lesion, except that abnormal CT tended to occur less frequently in cases classified as the optic-spinal form. It is noteworthy that cerebral cortical atrophy and/or dilatation of the lateral ventricle were found in 31% of cases who did not show any clinical sign of cerebral involvement. There was a statistically significant correlation between CT abnormalities and levels of clinical disability. Eighty percent of the bedridden or severely disabled patients showed abnormal CT, in contrast with only 29% of those with moderate, slight or no disability. (author)

  4. Telephone switchboard closure | 19 December

    2014-01-01

    Exceptionally, the telephone switchboard will close at 4 p.m. on Friday, 19 December, instead of the usual time of 6 p.m., to allow time for closing all systems properly before the annual closure. Therefore, switchboard operator assistance to transfer calls from/to external lines will stop. All other phone services will run as usual.

  5. Planning a December to Remember

    Powers, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Because the population of today's schools is so multicultural, teachers may find a variety of religious beliefs represented in their classrooms, from Islam, Judaism, and Christianity to Jehovah's Witnesses, Hinduism, atheism, and many others. All of which makes the season of December a little tricky to navigate, even when one is teaching "the…

  6. Familial occurrence of primary fibromyalgia.

    Pellegrino, M J; Waylonis, G W; Sommer, A

    1989-01-01

    Seventeen families of patients with primary fibromyalgia were studied for evidence of inherited primary fibromyalgia. Fifty parents and siblings were included in the analysis. Twenty-six (52%, mean age 33.5 years) had characteristic symptoms and findings of primary fibromyalgia. Eleven (22%, mean age 28 years) were asymptomatic but had clinical evidence of abnormal muscle consistency to palpation without tender or trigger points. One person had clinical evidence of lupus. Thirteen (26%) had no evidence of fibromyalgia or abnormal muscle consistency. The mode of inheritance was autosomal dominant. Identical twins are described who developed symptoms of primary fibromyalgia within six months of each other, as are two brothers who developed abnormal palpable muscle consistency years before acquiring the characteristic findings of the fibromyalgia syndrome. Primary fibromyalgia may be an inherited condition with a variable latent stage before clinical expression of the disease. PMID:2916922

  7. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  8. MR imaging of abnormal synovial processes

    MR imaging can directly image abnormal synovium. The authors reviewed over 50 cases with abnormal synovial processes. The abnormalities include Baker cysts, semimembranous bursitis, chronic shoulder bursitis, peroneal tendon ganglion cyst, periarticular abscesses, thickened synovium from rheumatoid and septic arthritis, and synovial hypertrophy secondary to Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. MR imaging has proved invaluable in identifying abnormal synovium, defining the extent and, to a limited degree, characterizing its makeup

  9. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH SPERM DISORDERS

    L. Y. Pylyp; L. A. Spinenko; V. D. Zukin; N. M. Bilko

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intrac...

  10. 78 FR 42041 - U.S. Healthcare Trade Mission to Russia, October 21-25, 2013; Correction

    2013-07-15

    ... International Trade Administration U.S. Healthcare Trade Mission to Russia, October 21-25, 2013; Correction AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice; Cancellation. SUMMARY... Federal Register of December 4, 2012, in 78 FR 32369 on page 32369, title, note a top of page, correct...

  11. Synoptic backgrounds of the widest wildfire in Mazandaran Province of Iran during December 11-13, 2010

    Ghavidel, Yousef; Farajzadeh, Manuchehr; Khaleghi Babaei, Meysam

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, atmospheric origins of the widest wildfire in Mazandaran province on 11-13th of December, 2010 have been investigated. Data sets of this research include maximum daily temperature (MDT), minimum relative humidity (MRH) of terrestrial stations, dynamic and thermodynamic features of the atmosphere, Gridded data sets of Self-Calibrated Palmer drought severity index (SCPDSI) and global drought dataset standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration index (SPEI) and data related to the time and the extent of the wildfire. The ``environmental to circulation'' approach to synoptic classification has been used to investigate relationships between local-scale surface environment (wildfire) and the synoptic-scale atmospheric circulation conditions. Results of study show that during the 3-day wide wildfire, the average of MDT and the MRH was significantly different from the long-term average. During the aforementioned wildfire, the average of MDT in Mazandaran province was 26 °C and the average of MRH was reported 35 %. The long-term average of MDT and the MRH in Mazandaran province during 3 days of wildfire was 12.3 °C and 68 %, respectively. Therefore, the MDT has a positive abnormality of 13.7 °C and the MRH has a negative abnormality of 33 %. In addition, monthly SCPDSI and SPEI indicated severe drought conditions at December 2010 in Mazandaran. Analysis of SLP maps shows that during the 3-day fire, a pressure center of 1110 hPa on Persian Gulf and a very low-pressure center on Turkey and Asia Minor were created. Normally, this event has caused the pressure gradient and warm and dry air advection from Arabian Peninsula to higher longitudes, particularly Mazandaran province. Consequently, the MDT increased and the wildfire of Mazandaran forest took place in an area of 220 ha. Zonal wind maps signify the weakness of Zonal wind and meridional wind maps show the southern direction of meridional wind flow during the wide wildfire. Moreover, Omega maps prove

  12. Ventilation abnormalities in pulmonary embolus

    The ventilation scans of 11 patients with angiographically-proven PE were reviewed. All patients had one or more lung perfusion defects. The chest roentgenograph was abnormal in 11 of the patients. The ventilation studies were performed in the posterior positron prior to the perfusion lung scan using Xe-133. The ventilation study consists of washin, equilibrium, and washout images. In four patients with normal washin there was retention of the Xe-133 (delayed washout) at the site of the perfusion defect. All had roentgenographic abnormalities. Another pattern was observed at the sites of some perfusion defects in six patients. In these, there was decreased washin at the perfusion defect location. Two patients had both decreased washin and delayed washout. In only one case was the typical ventilation pattern of normal washin and normal washout. The method of retention is unclear, but may be due to decreased clearance of Xe-133 secondary to decreased blood flow in the area or deposition of some fat soluble component left at the site of embolization. The etiology of the reduced washin is unclear, but may be due to reduced surfactant production. This study suggests that more attention must be paid to the ventilation study, where there may be additional clues to the diagnosis of pulmonary embolus

  13. Characterizing abnormal behavior in a large population of zoo-housed chimpanzees: prevalence and potential influencing factors

    Jacobson, Sarah L.; Bloomsmith, Mollie A.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal behaviors in captive animals are generally defined as behaviors that are atypical for the species and are often considered to be indicators of poor welfare. Although some abnormal behaviors have been empirically linked to conditions related to elevated stress and compromised welfare in primates, others have little or no evidence on which to base such a relationship. The objective of this study was to investigate a recent claim that abnormal behavior is endemic in the captive population by surveying a broad sample of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), while also considering factors associated with the origins of these behaviors. We surveyed animal care staff from 26 accredited zoos to assess the prevalence of abnormal behavior in a large sample of chimpanzees in the United States for which we had information on origin and rearing history. Our results demonstrated that 64% of this sample was reported to engage in some form of abnormal behavior in the past two years and 48% of chimpanzees engaged in abnormal behavior other than coprophagy. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the historical variables that best predicted the occurrence of all abnormal behavior, any abnormal behavior that was not coprophagy, and coprophagy. Rearing had opposing effects on the occurrence of coprophagy and the other abnormal behaviors such that mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform coprophagy, whereas non-mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform other abnormal behaviors. These results support the assertion that coprophagy may be classified separately when assessing abnormal behavior and the welfare of captive chimpanzees. This robust evaluation of the prevalence of abnormal behavior in our sample from the U.S. zoo population also demonstrates the importance of considering the contribution of historical variables to present behavior, in order to better understand the causes of these behaviors and any potential relationship to psychological

  14. Characterizing abnormal behavior in a large population of zoo-housed chimpanzees: prevalence and potential influencing factors.

    Jacobson, Sarah L; Ross, Stephen R; Bloomsmith, Mollie A

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal behaviors in captive animals are generally defined as behaviors that are atypical for the species and are often considered to be indicators of poor welfare. Although some abnormal behaviors have been empirically linked to conditions related to elevated stress and compromised welfare in primates, others have little or no evidence on which to base such a relationship. The objective of this study was to investigate a recent claim that abnormal behavior is endemic in the captive population by surveying a broad sample of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), while also considering factors associated with the origins of these behaviors. We surveyed animal care staff from 26 accredited zoos to assess the prevalence of abnormal behavior in a large sample of chimpanzees in the United States for which we had information on origin and rearing history. Our results demonstrated that 64% of this sample was reported to engage in some form of abnormal behavior in the past two years and 48% of chimpanzees engaged in abnormal behavior other than coprophagy. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the historical variables that best predicted the occurrence of all abnormal behavior, any abnormal behavior that was not coprophagy, and coprophagy. Rearing had opposing effects on the occurrence of coprophagy and the other abnormal behaviors such that mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform coprophagy, whereas non-mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform other abnormal behaviors. These results support the assertion that coprophagy may be classified separately when assessing abnormal behavior and the welfare of captive chimpanzees. This robust evaluation of the prevalence of abnormal behavior in our sample from the U.S. zoo population also demonstrates the importance of considering the contribution of historical variables to present behavior, in order to better understand the causes of these behaviors and any potential relationship to psychological

  15. Left globus pallidus abnormality in never-medicated patients with schizophrenia

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder characterized by onset in young adulthood, the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions, and the development of enduring psychosocial disability. The pathophysiology of this disorder remains unknown. Studies of cerebral blood flow and metabolism designed to identify brain abnormalities in schizophrenia have been limited by inadequate methods of anatomical localization and the possibility of persistent medication effects. The authors have now used positron emission tomography and a validated method of anatomical localization in an attempt to identify abnormalities of regional cerebral blood flow in newly diagnosed never-medicated patients with schizophrenia. An exploratory study of 5 patients and 10 normal control subjects identified abnormally high blood flow in the left globus pallidus of patients with schizophrenia. A replication study of 5 additional patients and 10 additional control subjects confirmed this finding. No other abnormalities were found

  16. Abnormal duodenal loop demonstrated by X-ray. Correlation to symptoms and prognosis of dyspepsia

    Thommesen, P.; Funch-Jensen, P.

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspeptic symptoms has previously been correlated with the shape of the duodenal loop in patients with X-ray-negative dyspepsia. An abnormal duodenal loop was associated with a significantly higher incidence of symtoms provoked by meals, vomiting, regurgitations, heartburn, and the irritable bowel syndrome. 89% of these patients (26 patients with a normal duodenal loop and 39 patients with abnormal duodenal loop) were available for a 5-year follow-up study of symptomatic outcome. The incidence of symptoms provoked by meals was still significantly higher in patients with an abnormal duodenal loop, and there was also a significant difference concerning symptomatic outcome. Approximately 75% of the patients with a normal duodenal loop had improved, and 25% had unchanged clinical conditions. Approximately 50% of the patients with an abnormal duodenal loop had improved, and 50% had an unchanged or even deteriorated clinical condition.

  17. Abnormal Event Detection Using Local Sparse Representation

    Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    We propose to detect abnormal events via a sparse subspace clustering algorithm. Unlike most existing approaches, which search for optimized normal bases and detect abnormality based on least square error or reconstruction error from the learned normal patterns, we propose an abnormality...... measurement based on the difference between the normal space and local space. Specifically, we provide a reasonable normal bases through repeated K spectral clustering. Then for each testing feature we first use temporal neighbors to form a local space. An abnormal event is found if any abnormal feature is...

  18. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:22809542

  19. Occurrence and Genetic Diversity of Arcobacter butzleri in an Artisanal Dairy Plant in Italy

    Giacometti, Federica; Lucchi, Alex; Manfreda, Gerardo; Florio, Daniela; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Serraino, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the presence, distribution, and persistence of Arcobacter spp. in an artisanal dairy plant and to test the isolates to determine their different genotypes in the processing plant and in foods. Samples were collected in an artisanal cheese factory on four occasions between October and December 2012. Food samples (raw milk, ricotta cheese, mozzarella cheese, and conditioning liquid), water samples, and environmental samples were analyzed by the culture met...

  20. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    Daniela Mierla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, karyotype analysis by G-banding was performed from peripheral blood in 967 women infertility. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found to 79 women (8,17%. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in the studied population correlates with the data in the literature. Chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions.

  1. Nuclear reactor safety. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1977

    Progress in reactor safety research is summarized. LWR studies include TRAC code development for thermal-hydraulic analysis of accidents, containment systems evaluation, and safety experiments. LMFBR studies include SIMMER code development and applications, modeling of core disruptive accidents, and safety test facilities studies. HTGR safety studies cover fission product release and transport, structural evaluation, phenomena modeling, systems analysis, and accident delineation. GCFR studies are focussed on core disruptive testing

  2. Polysaccharides and bacterial plugging. [Progress report], October 1--December 31, 1992

    Fogler, H.S.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this research are to elucidate and model bacterial transport in porous media, to determine the importance of polysaccharides bridging as a retentive mechanism, and to identify key parameters that influence porous media plugging. A continuum core plugging model is being development. This model will include the resulting cell, polysaccharide, and nutrient profiles as growth occurs with time. Initial cell profiles were found to be needed for the model. Experiments and a cell retainment model has been completed to predict cell profiles for a high permeability cores. The continuum model starts with applying a mass balance to an elemental volume of porous media and makes the assumptions that: cells once deposited remain sessile; polymer and enzyme remain in location of cells; neglect dispersion and diffusion in model; neglect yeast extract balance, and neglect changes in the interstitial velocity.

  3. Survey of the Marine Science Community on IODE (polled 29 October – 3 December 2004)

    2005-01-01

    In view of the ongoing review of IODE, the planned development of an IOC data management strategy and the preparations of the JCOMM strategy it is important that the IODE data and information management community thinks about the prioritization of IODE activities and projects. There are currently a significant number of global and regional projects. Some of these are funded through donors but many require IOC funding. As the funding for IODE for the UNESCO regular programme is not likely t...

  4. Technical progress report for the quarter 1 October-31 December 1980

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments on the commercial nuclear waste management programs and on the geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. The program is organized into eight tasks: systems, waste package, site, repository, regulatory and institutional, test facilities and excavations, land acquisition, and program management. (DLC)

  5. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods. Fifth quarterly report, October--December 1988

    Stock, L.M.

    1988-12-31

    Liquefaction of coal by depolymerization in an organic solvent has been studied for several years. The liquefied coal extract which results from such a process is far more suitable for conversion into liquid fuel by hydrogenolysis than is the untreated coal. Investigations on the chemical structure and the reactive sites of coal can help to select useful reactions for the production of liquids from coal. Sternberg et al. demonstrated that the reductive alkylation method transforms bituminous coal into an enormously soluble substance, irrespective of the mild reaction conditions. The effectiveness of newly introduced alkyl groups for the disruption of intermolecular hydrogen bonds and pi-pi interactions between the aromatic sheets in coal macromolecules has been recognized. It has been reported by Ignasiak et al. that a C-alkylabon reaction using sodium or potassium amide in liquid ammonia can be used to introduce alkyl groups at acidic carbon sites. A method has been developed recently in this laboratory for the solubilization of high rank coals. In the previous reports it was shown that n-butyl lithium and potassium t-butoxide in refluxing heptane produced coal anions which could be alkylated with different alkyl halides. Such alkylated coals were soluble up to 92% in solvents like pyridine. Though the solubilization of coal depended very much on the length of the alkyl group, it also depended very much on the nature of the base used. Strong bases like n-butyl lithium (pKa=42) can cause proton abstraction from aromatic structures, if the more acidic benzylic protons are absent. The utility of this procedure, initially developed and used by Miyake and Stock, has now been tested with the high oxygen containing, low rank Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals.

  6. Geothermal overview project: preliminary environmental assessments. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1978--December 31, 1978

    Phelps, P.L.

    1979-01-03

    The following are included: geothermal overview projects initiated in FY 1979, geothermal overview projects initiated in FY 1978, the agenda and participants in the overview planning meeting, the Oregon status reports, and the Hawaii status reports. (MHR)

  7. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative report: September - October - November December 1961

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge (including Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge and District VI Easement Refuges) outlines Refuge...

  8. Nuclear Science Division, Annual report, October 1, 1988--December 31, 1990

    Poskanzer, A.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Lofdahl, J.B. (eds.)

    1991-04-01

    This report contains short papers of research conducted in the following areas: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation; and, 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  9. Nuclear Safety. Technical Progress Journal, October--December 1991: Volume 32, No. 4

    1991-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  10. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1977

    HTGR safety evaluation included studies on fission product release; materials, chemistry, and instrumentation; structural evaluation; and analytical safety evaluation. LMFBR safety evaluation included studies on accident sequences, technical coordination of structural integrity, and SSC code development and validation. LWR safety studies included thermal/hydraulic accident analysis, THOR code development, and stress corrosion cracking of PWR steam generator tubing

  11. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  12. STREAM Journal, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp 1-16. October-December 2002

    2002-01-01

    CONTENTS: Hon Mun MPA Pilot Project on community-based natural resources management, by Nguyen Thi Hai Yen and Bernard Adrien. An experience with participatory research in Tam Giang Lagoon, Thua Thien-Hue, by Ton That Chat. Experiences and benefits of livelihoods analysis, by Michael Reynaldo, Orlando Arciaga, Fernando Gervacio and Catherine Demesa. Lessons learnt in implementing PRA in livelihoods analysis, by Nguyen Thi Thuy. Lessons learnt from livelihoods analysis and PRA in the Trao Reef...

  13. Radionuclide distributions in deep-ocean sediment cores. Progress report, 1 October 1976 -- 31 December 1977

    Disruption, in the past year, of the supply of 237Pu tracer from Oak Ridge caused us to put more of effort into analyses of core samples previously collected, and into data collation, than into the laboratory experiments originally projected. Accompanying this report are two review papers, one for a Congressional Committee and one in press, a report in press of a device for conducting microbiological tracer experiments under controlled atmospheres, and a description of radionuclide distributions in sediments of Atlantic and Pacific solid waste dump sites. Described in the body of the report are experiments relating the time course of association of 237Pu tracer with diatoms (dead or alive) or glass beads, to the constitution of the media, the history of the cells, or the presence of exometabolites. Also described are studies of the differential removal of 239240Pu, 241Am, and 137Cs from coastal seawater currents contaminated by waste released from a fuel-reprocessing facility

  14. Chemistry and morphology of coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1981

    Heinemann, H.

    1981-12-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following six tasks: (1) selective synthesis of gasoline range components from synthesis gas; (2) electron microscopy studies of coal during hydrogenation; (3) catalysed low temperature hydrogenation of coal; (4) selctive hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis and alkylation of coal and coal liquids by organo-metallic systems; (5) chemistry of coal solubilization and liquefaction; (6) coal conversion catalysts-deactivation studies. Highlights are as follows: (1) In the presence of hydrogen and the absence of base, using the catalyst RuCl/sub 2/ (CO)/sub 2/ (phi/sub 3/ P)/sub 2/ excellent yields of reduced polynuclear heteroaromatic nitrogen compound were produced with 100% selectivity for the N-containing ring. (2) A careful gas chromatographic analysis of Fischer-Tropsch products has shown that major peaks, previously thought to be single compounds are composites of two or more compounds. Resolution of these peaks will enable one to establish a rational grouping of n/i and paraffin/olefin ratios. (3) Addition of iron or rhodium to potassium impregnated graphite did not result in the production of heavier hydrocarbons than methane from the graphite-steam reaction at low temperature. However, small amounts of iron enhanced the methane production. (ATT)

  15. Chemistry and morphology of coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October 5, 1985-December 31, 1985

    Heinemann, H.; Fish, R.H.

    1985-12-01

    Having recently discovered that polynuclear heteroaromaic nitrogen compounds can be selectively reduced only at the nitrogen containing ring, we have now turned our attention towards the cleavage of the carbon nitrogen bonds in this reduced ring. We are currently focusing on the use of highly loaded supported nickel catalysts for the hydrodenitrogenation of the selectively reduced aromatic, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline, as well as for the HDN of quinoline. The conditions we are investigating are mild, 1 atm hydrogen at 200/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C. We need to characterize better all of the products being formed in these reactions, both liquids and gasses. We also need to determine the kinetics of the various reactions involved in HDN. We are currently planning to construct a new reactor system that will allow for on-line product sampling (both gas and liquid) and so facilitate the above studies. Additionally, more information is needed about the morphology and structure/activity relations for the catalysts we are studying. We plan to obtain XPS, TEM, SEM and BET surface area data for various catalysts in used and unused states. Hopefully this data will allow us to explain more effectively the different HDN activities we have observed in various catalysts, and will enable us to make qualitatitive predictions about the HDN activity of as yet untried materials.

  16. Chemistry and morphology of coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1984

    Heinemann, H.

    1984-12-01

    The reactions of model coal nitrogen compounds with metal clusters to determine bonding and hopefully gain insight into the cleavage of carbon-nitrogen bonds were initiated. In addition, studies were begun involving the reaction of a saturated nitrogen heterocyclic compound, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline, with bulk metal catalysts in order to determine whether carbon-nitrogen bonds could be cleaved in this model coal compound under conditios of very varied temperatures and low pressures of hydrogen gas. It has been demonstrated during the report period that quinoline will react with triruthenium dodecacarbonyl to form a compound with ruthenium carbonyls bound to the nitrogen. The compound has been identified. A similar but more complex structure is formed from tetrahydroquinoline. These compounds will be subjected to secondary reactions in attempts to split the nitrogen-carbon bond. Early attempts to cause nitrogen-carbon bond breaking in model compounds using metal catalysts have not been successful.

  17. Chemistry and morphology of coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1983

    Heinemann, H.

    1983-12-01

    Work with unsupported iron oxide (Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/) catalysts has shown that prereduction in H/sub 2/ gives initial high activity, but gives rapid deactivation due to carbon and eventually graphite formation. Catalysts brought on stream with syngas and without prior reduction gradually increased in activity and reached a steady state activity lasting over extended periods of time. A study of the effects of support composition for Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts on the composition of Fischer-Tropsch products has been completed. Synthesis activity decreases in the order TiO/sub 2/ > SiO/sub 2/ > Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ approx. = MgO. Catalysts with the lowest dispersions (TiO/sub 2/ and MgO supported) showed the highest probability of chain growth. Olefin/paraffin ratio and water gas shift activity decrease in the order MgO > SiO/sub 2/ > Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ > TiO/sub 2/. Basic supports therefore seem to act like basic promoters. It has previously been shown that the production of hydrocarbons from KOH impregnated graphite and water at 800/sup 0/K is stoichiometrically limited by the formation of a phenolate type compound. Recent work has shown that this compound is decomposed in the presence of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and that the production of hydrocarbons and hydrogen proceeds catalytically and for long periods of time. It has also been found that lithium hydroxide promoted the formation of hydrocarbons and hydrogen without the stocihiometric limitation observed with KOH, perhaps because of greater instability of lithium phenolate. A comparison between polymer-supported Wilkinson's catalyst and its homogeneous analogue in the selective hydrogenation of polynuclear heteroaromatic compounds provides evidence for differences in initial rates and ability to exchange aromatic hydrogens for deuterium. 4 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory report on controlled thermonuclear reactor technology, October 1975--December 1975

    Survey calculations are being made on three blanket configurations for a conceptual hybrid design based on a Two Component Torus (TCT) in a cooperative effort between Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and PNL. Other studies are underway to provide background data in the design of a minimum thickness shield and a convertor region for the TCT hybrid. The effect the plasma and associated radiation and emission will have upon the surfaces of the first wall are being studied. A variety of metal targets were prepared for neutron irradiation and were evaluated. Radioactive recoil sputtering ratios are summarized with complete results being prepared for separate publication. The development and testing of the ion blistering equipment is continuing with the design and installation of a special differential pumping stage. Analysis of the molybdenum specimens irradiated for the initial BCC ion correlation experiment is completed and data from the participants have been compared. Graphite cloth and fibers irradiated in EBR-II to approximately 3 x 1021 cm-2 at approximately 5000C are being evaluated for radiation damage effects. Helium effects are being studied on five alloys specified in CTR conceptual designs. Tests were designed to determine the effects of oxidation potential on low-level contaminant/metal interactions. Niobium and vanadium are being studied for mechanical property effects after injection of helium by the tritium trick method. An advanced state-of-the-art Acoustics Emission Event Energy Analyzer (AEEEA) has been developed and tested

  19. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    Neuhauser, E.

    1998-05-01

    The focus of the DOE/USDA sponsored biomass power for rural development project is to develop commercial energy crops for power generation by the year 2000. The New York based Salix Consortium project is a multi-partner endeavor, implemented in three stages. Phase-1, Final Design and Project Development, will conclude with the preparation of construction and/or operating permits, feedstock production plans, and contracts ready for signature. Field trials of willow (Salix) have been initiated at several locations in New York (Tully, Lockport, King Ferry, La Fayette, Massena, and Himrod) and co-firing tests are underway at Greenidge Station (NYSEG) and Dunkirk Station (NMPC). Phase-2 of the project will focus on scale-up of willow crop acreage, construction of co-firing facilities at Dunkirk Station (NMPC), and final modifications for Greenidge Station. Cofiring willow is also under consideration for GPU`s Seward Station where testing is underway. There will be an evaluation of the energy crop as part of the gasification trials occurring at BED`s McNeill Power Station. Phase-3 will represent fullscale commercialization of the energy crop and power generation on a sustainable basis. During the fourth quarter of 1997 the Consortium submitted a Phase-2 proposal. A few of the other more important milestones are outlined below. The first quarter of 1998 will be dominated by pre-planting activity in the spring.

  20. Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 11, October-December 1978

    Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1979-06-01

    In a one month shake-down test at East Mesa, 32 cement formulations were exposed to flowing brine at 150/sup 0/C and 95 psig. Based upon the results from this test, 15 formulations were selected for evaluation in a 2 year test. Experimental work indicates that none of the cements under consideration cause severe corrosion to steel casing. Compared with the possible corrosive attack on the steel casing by the geothermal environment, the corrosive effects of the cement are minimal. A promising cementing composition has been sent to the National Bureau of Standards for additional tests, and at least one more composition will be submitted. Pumpability tests performed on hydrothermal cements indicate several formulations that are pumpable for at least 2 hr at 316/sup 0/C. Polymer concrete samples containing 50 wt% styrene - 35 wt% acrylonitrile - 5 wt% acrylamide - 10 wt% divinyl benzene have not shown any reduction in strength after exposure to 25% brine at 240/sup 0/C for 8 months. This is the highest strength formulation to date and is the first formulation that has not exhibited any strength reduction after brine exposure. Strengths of 204 MPa and 162 MPa were measured at 20/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C, respectively, after 8 months in brine.

  1. Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) System. Topical report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    This report describes the results of Phase 1 efforts to develop a Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) System for the detection of semivolatile organic contaminants on concrete, transite, and metal surfaces. The characterization of equipment and building surfaces for the presence of contaminants as part of building decontamination and decommissioning activities is an immensely large tacks of concern to both government and industry. Contaminated and clean materials must be clearly identified and segregated so that the clean materials can be recycled or reused, if possible, or disposed of more cheaply as nonhazardous waste. Characterization of building and equipment surfaces will be needed during initial investigations, during cleanup operations, and during the final confirmatory process, increasing the total number of samples well beyond that needed for initial characterization. This multiplicity of information places a premium on the ability to handle and track data as efficiently as possible. Aware of the shortcomings of traditional surface characterization technology, GE, with DOE support has undertaken a 12-month effort to complete Phase 1 of a proposed four-phase program to develop the RSSAR system. The objectives of this work are to provide instrumentation to cost-effectively sample concrete and steel surfaces, provide a quick-look indication for the presence or absence of contaminants, and collect samples for later, more detailed analysis in a readily accessible and addressable form. The Rapid Surface Sampling and Archival Record (RSSAR) System will be a modular instrument made up of several components: (1) sampling heads for concrete surfaces, steel surfaces, and bulk samples; (2) quick-look detectors for photoionization and ultraviolet; (3) multisample trapping module to trap and store vaporized contaminants in a manner suitable for subsequent detailed lab-based analyses

  2. Laser induced coal fluorescence. Ninth quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1984. [Alginite

    Borst, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The work during this reporting period has included a systematic fluorescence analysis of thirteen New Albany Shale samples of the Illinois basin. Fluorescence spectra obtained by continuous wave (c-w) excitation of 45 alginite macerals were collected for each shale sample. This work is now being continued by collecting the time-resolved data, and preliminary results are reported here. Additional software has been written to simplify the acquisition and manipulation of the time-resolved data. 9 figures, 4 tables.

  3. Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments and heterogeneity. Final report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1996

    Van Kirk, C.

    1998-01-01

    A case study approach using Terry Sandstone production from the Hambert-Aristocrat Field, Weld County, Colorado was used to document the process of integration. One specific project goal is to demonstrate how a multidisciplinary approach can be used to detect reservoir compartmentalization and improve reserve estimates. The final project goal is to derive a general strategy for integration for independent operators. Teamwork is the norm for the petroleum industry where teams of geologists, geophysicists, and petroleum engineers work together to improve profits through a better understanding of reservoir size, compartmentalization, and orientation as well as reservoir flow characteristics. In this manner, integration of data narrows the uncertainty in reserve estimates and enhances reservoir management decisions. The process of integration has proven to be iterative. Integration has helped identify reservoir compartmentalization and reduce the uncertainty in the reserve estimates. This research report documents specific examples of integration and the economic benefits of integration.

  4. Aquatic ecosystems of the lower Pecos drainage, October-December, 1980

    Emphasis of work completed in 1980 was placed on analysis of macrobenthos and preparation of the dominant component, the Chironomidae (Diptera) for further study. One series of chironomid larvae was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The limnological survey techniques used during this study are the same as those described in earlier reports of work at the Los Medanos site by Sublette and Sublette. The Pecos River below Carlsbad is a severely perturbed stream. Human activity has resulted in the regulation of stream flow and nutrient enrichment from sewage effluents and return flow from fields adjacent to the river. Stream flow regulation is most noticeable below 10 Mile Dam near Loving where virtually all flow is diverted into irrigation ditches. Flow regulation minimizes the effects of spates (periods of high flow) resulting in reduced attachment sites for macrobenthos. A protracted period of no spates preceded the January 1978 sampling period and, as would be expected, numbers of taxa were reduced. After a period of heavy local flooding, a colonizer effect was observed in the composition of the January 1979 samples. By January of 1980, the fauna had returned essentially to the 1978 condition. A heavy saline inflow at Malaga Bend results in impoverished macrobenthos in terms of numbers of species and individuals. This is believed to result from both elevated salinity and heavy metals concentrations; a synergistic effect may exist. Slight variations in fish composition occur between up-stream, lower salinity stations and down-stream, higher salinity stations. Up-stream stations show greater diversity in fish populations

  5. Update: nuclear power program information and data, October-December 1981

    UPDATE is published by the Office of Coordination and Special Projects, Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs, to provide a quick reference source on the current status of nuclear powerplant construction and operation in the United States and for information on the fuel cycle, economics, and performance of nuclear generating units. Similar information on other means of electric generation as related to nuclear power is included when appropriate. The subject matter of the reports and analyses presented in UPDATE will vary from issue to issue, reflecting changes in foci of interest and new developments in the field of commercial nuclear power generation. UPDATE is intended to provide a timely source of current statistics, results of analyses, and programmatic information proceeding from the activities of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs and other components of the Department of Energy, as well as condensations of topical articles from other sources of interest to the nuclear community. It also facilitates quick responses to requests for data and information of the type often solicited from this office

  6. NRC Regulatory Agenda. Quarterly report, October-December 1985. Volume 4, No. 4

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed, or is considering action as well as those on which it has recently completed action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received and are pending disposition by the Commission

  7. Fundamental studies of catalytic gasification: Quarterly report, October 1, 1986-December 31, 1986

    Heinemann, H.

    1986-12-01

    This program studies the basic chemistry of the reaction of carbonaceous materials with water in the presence of catalysts to produce hydrogen and/or synthesis gas. Relatively low temperatures are being used. The catalysts under investigation are compounds of potassium and a transition metal oxide. Major objectives are the extension of the work from chars to coke; the effect of H/sub 2/, CO and CO/sub 2/ partial pressure on the gaseous product distribution; and the inhibition of catalyst poisoning by ash components. Some of the highlights are: (1) Activation energies for K/Ni catalyzed steam gasification of graphite and of chars are identical, indicating the same mechanism prevails though rates are much higher for chars. This permits extrapolation of findings in high vacuum equipment from graphite to chars. (2) The CO/CO/sub 2/ ratio of gases produced along with hydrogen varies with different chars. The ratio is 0.8 for Illinois No. 6 char and 0.08 for North Dakota char. Methane production is several orders of magnitude smaller and ceases after about 2 hours. (3) Comparison of K/Ni catalyst for steam gasification of Illinois No. 6 char with K or Ni alone indicates: (a) K alone produces much higher CO/CO/sub 2/ ratios than K/Ni. (b) Ni alone is almost inactive for the steam gasification of Illinois No. 6 except for the short first period of operation. (4) Montana char treated with aqua regia to remove ash components prior to impregnation with K/Ni has 75% of the activity of untreated char but exhibits little deactivation with time so that it gasifies better than untreated char after a few hours. (5) Controlled atmosphere electron microscopy studies have been extended to wet hydrogen and wet oxygen treatments of K/Ni impregnated graphite 3 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1978

    Burch, W.D.; Feldman, M.J.; Groenier, W.S.; Vondra, B.L.; Unger, W.E.

    1979-03-01

    The status of the following studies is reported: plutonium (IV) polymer reaction in aqueous solutions; plutonium reductive stripping studies; plutonium--uranium--thorium coprocessing studies; plutonium losses due to solution instability and solids formation; solvent cleanup; nitrogen compound chemistry; fission product chemistry; electrochemical methods evaluation; evaluation of alternate extractants; hot-cell development; solvent extraction; product conversion; analytical chemistry development; voloxidation; dissolution; feed preparation; off-gas processing; and engineering systems. (LK)

  9. Peat biogasification development program. Quarterly progress report No. 5, for period October 1 - December 31, 1980

    Wise, Dr., Donald L.

    1981-01-15

    Progress is reported in the peat biogasification development program. The objective of the research is to compile the necessary data for the design and operation of a peat anaerobic digestion process development unit. Five areas are addressed: pretreatment information; anaerobic digestion; evaluation of waste streams; process model development and economic analysis; and planning for the process development unit. During the reporting period extensive data was taken for the development of the predictive process model. A number of batch and continuous pretreatment experiments were completed and analyzed. The four samples being analyzed through solvent extration were completed, and the results are presented. Work on High Pressure Liquid Chromatography continued, and the development of the gradient elution solvent system was completed with encouraging results. Pretreated peat has been batch fermented; the continuously oxidized peat has shown conversions of close to 30%. This is significantly higher than the conversions for the batch oxidized peat. Continuous digesters have been in operation for approximately one month. Development of a predictive process model for the three phases of peat biogasification, solubilization, oxidation, and fermentation, continued with very good results. The models for solubilization and oxidation were developed and experimental data are being gathered for the fermentation phase of the process model. (DMC)

  10. Peat biogasification development program. Quarterly progress report No. 1, October 1-December 31, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Batch experiments have been performed to determine the effects of different alkalis, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures on the solubility of peat organic material. Multi-stage pretreatment was investigated by pretreating the effluent from previous NaOH pretreatment cooks. Bacteria from three inoculation sources are being grown anaerobically on a growth medium containing a standard nutrient medium and one of twelve aromatic compounds. The concentration of aromatic compound is increased gradually to acclimate the bacteria to compounds which may result from peat pretreatment. These bacteria are being prepared for future digestion of pretreated peat. Laboratory procedures to determine pretreated solids energy content and pretreated solids dewatering characteristics are being developed. The environmental effects of liquid effluent disposal into the peat bog is being evaluated through a review of relevant literature. A preliminary design for a full scale peat biogasification plant has been developed. The plant is designed to produce 75 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of pipeline quality methane. Major segments of the plant are concerned with the transport, handling, pretreating, and fermenting of the aqueous peat slurry, and the purification of the resulting methane gas. The information necessary for continuous PDU scale operation is being evaluated as part of Task 4. A detailed proposal for specific design plans and experiments has not yet begun yet, however.

  11. The single electron chemistry of coals. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Larsen, J.W.; Rothenberg, S.E.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate and characterize the single electron reactions of alkyl and alkoxy aromatic compounds in order to determine the role these reactions play in the chemistry of coal. The work here is concerned with the interactions of coals, such as Illinois No. 6, with tetracyanoethylene.

  12. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October--December 1992. Volume 3, No. 1

    Dixit, S.N. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The Beamlet Front End: Prototype of a new pulse generation system;imaging biological objects with x-ray lasers; coherent XUV generation via high-order harmonic generation in rare gases; theory of high-order harmonic generation; two-dimensional computer simulations of ultra- intense, short-pulse laser-plasma interactions; neutron detectors for measuring the fusion burn history of ICF targets; the recirculator; and lasnex evolves to exploit computer industry advances.

  13. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 7, October 1990--December 1990

    Hargrove, M.J.; Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1991-02-01

    During the fourth quarter of 1990, the following technical progress was made: (1) Calculated the kinetic characteristics of chars from the combustion of microbubble flotation beneficiated products; (2) continued drop tube combustion tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; (3) analyzed the data from three (MIT) pilot-scale combustion tests of the Upper Freeport feed coal; and (4) continued analyses of the data from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels.

  14. ICF quarterly report, October-December 1998, volume 8, number 4

    Kaufmann, B

    1998-09-30

    The ICF Quarterly Report is pub-lished four times each fiscal year by the Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility and High-Energy-Density Experimental Science (ICF/NIF/ HEDES) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The journal summarizes selected current research achievements of the LLNLICF/NIF/HEDES Program.

  15. Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1990

    1991-01-23

    This report, on research preformed at the Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, contain contributions on such topics as: formation of carbenium ions or yields from carbenes, photochemical oxidations and reductions, photoreactivity of molybdates, radiolysis of water, spin trapping kinetics, pulse radiolysis, photogenerated radical anions, photochemistry of Fe and Re complexes, hyperfine coupling calculations, electron energy loss in hydrocarbons, radiolysis of halophenols, conductivity in lipid monolayers, solitonsin polyacetylene, triplet-triplet annhilation, random walk problems, proton and electron impact on water luminescence quenching, raman spectrum of ozonide ion, time-resolved spectra of supercritical fluids, sequential biphotonic photochemistry, reduction of CO{sub 2} with Cu(I) macrocycles,and studies on photosensitizing dyes and on air-water interface problems. (CBS)

  16. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

  17. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers. Quarterly report, 1 October 1992--30 December 1992

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on availability of additional R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  19. Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 11, October 1-December 31, 1979

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.; Bhatt, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) when the caking bituminous coals are used with diluents, only 20% Pittsburgh No. 8 coal can be added to the diluent swhile 40% Illinois No. 6 could be added due to the higher free swelling index of the Pittsburgh No. 8; (2) When limestone is used as a diluent, considerably more sulfur is retained in the char than when using sand; (3) when the char from an experiment using limestone is recycled as the diluent for another experiment, the char continually retains additional sulfur through at least three recycles; (4) decomposition of the limestone and reduction is indicated by the high concentrations of CO observed at 900/sup 0/C; (5) increasing the coal feed rate by a factor of 4 from 2.4 to 10.7 lb/hr at low H/sub 2//Coal ratios (approx. = 0.6) results in no appreciable change in gaseous HC yields (approx. = 27%) or concentration (approx. = 45%) but higher BTX yields (1.1% vs. 5.4%); (6) although only one experiment was conducted, it appears that hydrogasification of untreated New Mexico sub-bituminous coal at 950/sup 0/C does not give an increase in yield over hydrogasification at 900/sup 0/C; (7) the hydrogasification of Wyodak lignite gives approximately the same gaseous HC yields as that obtained from North Dakota lignite but higher BTX yields particularly at 900/sup 0/C and 1000 psi (9% vs. 2%); (8) treating New Mexico sub-bituminous coal with NaCO/sub 3/ does not increase its hydrogasification qualities between 600/sup 0/C and 900/sup 0/C at 1000 psi but does decrease the BTX yield.

  20. High-level waste immobilization program. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    Larson, D.E.; Rusin, J.M.; Ross, W.A.

    1979-12-01

    In hydrothermal environment tests, three simulated high-level waste (HLW) glasses, supercalcine, and SYNROC exhibit similar leaching behavior. Releases from the glasses are lowest at temperatures below 250/sup 0/C (the expected repository temperature range). Corrosion tests of candidate metallic-container materials in 250/sup 0/C Hanford ground water are under way and a group of polymers that shows good resistance to 200/sup 0/C water in autoclave tests is undergoing gamma irradiation. Methods of reducing melt-foaming in ceramic melters were investigated. Inclusion of monoxides of iron, nickel and manganese in the calcine significantly improved melt quality and reduced foaming. The addition of cornstarch to the melt, which inhibits foaming in laboratory studies, continues to be evaluated. A successful pilot-scale test of the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process was done using simulated waste representing the combined contents of the neutralized and Thorex waste tanks at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center. Flexibility of the process for handling high-sodium waste was demonstrated.

  1. Development and evaluation of elastomeric materials for geothermal applications. Annual report, October 1977-December 1978

    Mueller, W.A.; Kalfayan, S.H.; Reilly, W.W.; Yavrouian, A.H.; Mosesman, I.D.; Ingham, J.D.

    1979-05-15

    The research involved formulation of commercially available materials and synthesis of new elastomers. Formulation studies at JPL and elsewhere produced a material having about 250-350 psi tensile strength and 30 to 80% elongation at 260/sup 0/C for at least 24 hours in simulated brine. The relationship between these laboratory test results and sealing performance in actual or simulated test conditions is not entirely clear; however, it is believed that no conventional formation or casing packer design is likely to perform well using these materials. The synthetic effort focused on high temperature block copolymers and development of curable polystyrene. Procedures were worked out for synthesizing these new materials. Initial results with heat-cured unfilled polystyrene gum at 260/sup 0/C indicated a tensile strength of about 50 psi. Cast films of the first sample of polyphenyl quinoxaline-polystyrene block copolymer, which has a graft-block structure consisting of a polystyrene chain with pendant polyphenyl quinoxaline groups, showed elastomeric behavior in the required temperature range. Its tensile strength and elongation at 260/sup 0/C were 220 to 350 psi and 18 to 36%, respectively. All of these materials also showed satisfactory hydrolytic stability. A procedure for the synthesis of a linear block copolymer of this type has been devised, and the required new intermediates have been synthesized and characterized. A description of the previous year's work is included in an appendix.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    Gill, D.H.

    1995-02-01

    During the 1994 summer institute NTEP teachers worked in coordination with LANL and the Los Alamos Middle School and Mountain Elementary School to gain experience in communicating on-line, to gain further information from the Internet and in using electronic Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs) to exchange ideas with other teachers. To build on their telecommunications skills, NTEP teachers participated in the International Telecommunications In Education Conference (Tel*ED `94) at the Albuquerque Convention Center on November 11 & 12, 1994. They attended the multimedia keynote address, various workshops highlighting many aspects of educational telecommunications skills, and the Telecomm Rodeo sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Rodeo featured many presentations by Laboratory personnel and educational institutions on ways in which telecommunications technologies can be use din the classroom. Many were of the `hands-on` type, so that teachers were able to try out methods and equipment and evaluate their usefulness in their own schools and classrooms. Some of the presentations featured were the Geonet educational BBS system, the Supercomputing Challenge, and the Sunrise Project, all sponsored by LANL; the `CU-seeMe` live video software, various simulation software packages, networking help, and many other interesting and useful exhibits.

  3. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980

    Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

  4. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1996-07-01

    Recent research in the author`s laboratory has established the viability of the catalytic deoxygenation of phenols by Co monoxide. The deoxygenation of phenols is a problem of both fundamental and practical importance. The deoxygenation of phenols to arenes is a conceptually simple, yet a very difficult chemical transformation to achieve. The phenolic C-O bond energy of 103 kcal/mol is as strong as a benzene C-H bond and over 10 kcal/mol stronger than the C-O bonds of methanol or ethanol. Catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of phenols over sulfided Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or other supported metal oxide catalysts can be achieved, at exceedingly high hydrogen pressures and temperature. Arene ring hydrogenation generally competes effectively with hydrodeoxygenation, and was found to occur an order of magnitude faster than HDO. As a consequence, most of the hydrogen is consumed in hydrogenation of the aromatic rings. HDO catalysts are easily poisoned. The inefficiency of catalysts for phenol deoxygenation in the presence of hydrogen can be attributed to the absence of a low energy mechanistic pathway for the hydrogenolysis of the strong phenol C-O bond. The authors are currently studying new transition metal catalysts for the efficient and selective deoxygenation of phenols using the Co/Co{sub 2} couple to remove phenolic oxygen atoms. The paper describes recent results on the mechanism of Co insertion into metal-oxygen bonds of phenoxides.

  5. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Instrument Report Fourth Quarter: October 1–December 30, 2010

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-97. It describes 174 contracts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on greenhouse peaking. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  7. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October-December 1985. Volume 5, No. 4

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1985. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  8. NRC TLD [thermoluminescent dosimeter] Direct Radiation Monitoring Network: Progress report, October--December 1988

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1988. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 4 tabs

  9. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1940: Camps FWS-1&2: 2: October-December

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report from the Civilian Conservation Corps summarizes activities done for Sod House and Five Mile on Malheur Migratory Waterfowl Refuge. Topics...

  10. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1941: Camps FWS-1&2: 4: October-December

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report from the Civilian Conservation Corps summarizes activities done for Sod House, Buena Vista and Five Mile on Malheur Migratory Waterfowl...

  11. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October to 31 December 1979

    This is the second quarterly progress report of the Health Sciences Division. Developments in health physics include construction of a simple monitor for measurement of tritium concentration at or above the maximum permissible level and measurements on the behaviour of Geiger counters at high temperature for monitoring activity in reactor cooling circuits. Environmental Research Branch continues to monitor groundwater in the vicinity of the glass blocks containing fission products. Work in radiation biology deals with the effects of radiation on a variety of living organisms. Emphasis continued on the study of damage to DNA and its repair. Research into certain human diseases which are believed to be caused by a deficient DNA repair mechanism is also summarized. (OT)

  12. Thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Quarterly report No. 1, October 1-December 31, 1979

    Sarma, K.R.; Rice, M.J.; Legge, R.

    1979-01-01

    The MoSi/sub 2/ separation layer growth rate has been studied as a function of time and temperature. The presence of small amounts of O/sub 2/ in the silicon deposition ambient were found to inhibit the growth rate of the MoSi/sub 2/ layer and also to affect the reliability of shear separation. Void formation in silicon at the Si-MoSi/sub 2/ interface, due predominantly to diffusion of silicon through the MoSi/sub 2/ layer was observed. This is believed to be responsible for shear separation occurring in the silicon film. Gas chromatograhic procedures were developed for characterizing the silicon deposition process. Coherent twin bundles in the grain-enhanced silicon films were not found to adversely influence solar cell efficiency. Several 1 cm x 2 cm solar cells were fabricated. Performance characteristics of these cells are discussed; the best device had a conversion efficiency of 10.7% (under simulated AM1 illumination) with V/sub OC/ = 0.545 V, J/sub SC/ = 28.65 mA/cm/sup 2/ and FF = 68.3%.

  13. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1978

    Steindler, M J; Ader, M; Barletta, R E

    1980-01-01

    In the program on pyrochemical and dry processing methods (PDPM) for nuclear fuel, tungsten crucibles were successfully spun for use in laboratory-scale experiments. Corrosion testing of refractory metals and alloys in PDPM environments was done. Ceramic substrates were successfully coated with tungsten. Solubility measurements were made to determine Cd/Mg alloy composition and temperature at which dissolved Th will precipitate. Experiments were started to study the reduction of high-fired ThO/sub 2/ with Ca in a molten metal-molten salt system. Work on the fused salt electrolysis of CaO was started. Equipment for determining phase diagrams for U-Cu-Mg system was set up. The reaction of UO/sub 2/ with molten equimolar NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ was studied as part of a project to identify chemically feasible nonaqueous fuel reprocessing methods. Work was continued on development of a flowsheet for reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting actinides into ammonium chloro-aluminate (and alternative salts) from a bismuth solution. Preparation of Th, U, and Pu nitrides after dissolution of spent fuel elements in molten tin is being studied. Leach rates of glass beads, pulverized beads, and beads encapsulated in a lead matrix with no protective envelope were studied. A method (employing no pressure or vacuum systems) of encapsulating various solid wastes in a lead metal matrix was developed and tested. A preliminary integration was made of earlier data on effects of impacts on metal-matrix waste forms.Leach migration experiments were compared with conventional infiltration experiments as methods of evaluating geologic formations as barriers to nuclide migration. The effect of the streaming potential on the rates of transport of radioactive I/sup -/ and Na/sup +/ through kaolinite columns was measured, as well as adsorption of iodide and iodate by several compounds; implications of the results upon the disposal of radioactive iodine are discussed.

  14. Sources and delivery of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery. Final report, October 1977--December 1978

    Hare, M.; Perlich, H.; Robinson, R.; Shah, M.; Zimmerman, F.

    1978-12-01

    Results are presented from a comprehensive study by Pullman Kellogg, with assistance from Gulf Universities Research Consortium (GURC) and National Cryo-Chemics Incorporated (NCI), of the carbon dioxide supply situation for miscible flooding operations to enhance oil recovery. A survey of carbon dioxide sources within the geographic areas of potential EOR are shown on four regional maps with the tabular data for each region to describe the sources in terms of quantity and quality. Evaluation of all the costs, such as purchase, production, processing, and transportation, associated with delivering the carbon dioxide from its source to its destination are presented. Specific cases to illustrate the use of the maps and cost charts generated in this study have been examined.

  15. Modeling of solar heating and air conditioning. Progress report, October 31, 1974--December 31, 1975

    Duffie, J.A.; Beckman, W.A.

    1975-12-31

    The principal objective of the research is to develop the means to identify and optimize practical systems for heating and cooling of buildings with solar energy in the United States. This will be done through simulation methods. Secondary objectives are to: extend and refine TRNSYS (a modular solar energy system simulation program); develop the means of supporting TRNSYS users in other laboratories; use TRNSYS (and other simulation programs) to develop design procedures for solar heating and cooling processes; design and evaluate an experimental solar heating system on a Wisconsin farm residence.

  16. Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1977

    Kitzner, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the first 3 months effort of the Ford/DOE Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program, specifically Task I which is Fuel Economy Assessment. At the beginning of this contract effort the projected fuel economy of the 4-215 Stirling engine was 21.16 MPG with a confidence level of 29 percent. Since that date, the fuel economy improvement projection of the 4-215 Stirling engine has been increased to 22.11 MPG, with a confidence level of 29 percent. Collection of fuel economy improvement data is directly related to engine durability. Engine durability has been limited. Since September 19, 1977 a total of 47.7 hours of engine running time has been accumulated using two engine builds. Progress is reported in sub-task studies of burners, preheaters, engine drive, blower system, power control, air-fuel ratio control, cooling system, and cycle control. (LCL)

  17. Fission product behavior in LWRs. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1977

    Analysis of release data obtained during High Burnup Fuel Test 10 (HBU-10) has been completed. In this test the fuel rod segment was ruptured by internal pressurization at 9000C, at which time the temperature was rapidly increased to 12000C and maintained at this temperature for 10 min. Approximately 0.061% of the total cesium inventory in the rod segment was released; this was accompanied by the release of about 1.69% of the total 85Kr inventory. Moreover, about 0.022% of the fuel was ejected from the rod as particulates. The feasibility and conceptual design study for an experimental facility to verify fission product transport computational models has been completed. Although the study focused entirely on a facility which would be employed to verify those aspects of the transport models that dealt with fission product source-term attenuation factors in the primary coolant circuit external to the pressure vessel, the need for a second facility, to simulate conditions within the pressure vessel, was also indicated

  18. Inertial confinement fusion. ICF quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993, Volume 4, Number 1

    Powell, H.T.; Schleich, D.P.; Murphy, P.W. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    In the 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report of its review of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, it was recommended that a high priority be placed on completing the Precision Nova Project and its associated experimental campaign. Since fiscal year 1990, the lab has therefore campaigned vigorously on Nova and in its supporting laboratories to develop the Precision Nova capabilities needed to perform the stressful target experiments recommended in the 1990 NAS report. The activities to enable these experiments have been directed at improvements in three areas - the Nova laser, target fabrication capabilities, and target diagnostics. As summarized in the five articles in this report, the Precision Nova improvements have been successfully completed. These improvements have had a positive impact on target performance and on the ability to diagnose the results, as evidenced by the HEP-1 experimental results. The five articles generally concentrate on improvements to the capabilities rather than on the associated target physics experiments. Separate abstracts are included for each paper.

  19. Gulf Island National Wildlife Refuges: Narrative report for the period September, October, November, December, 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Gulf Island National Wildlife Refuges (Petit Bois National Wildlife Refuge, Horn Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Breton National...

  20. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report October - December 1998, volume 9, number 1

    Powell, H

    1999-10-13

    The injection laser system (ILS), or front end, is the portion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) where a single pulse is produced, modulated, and shaped, then amplified and multiplexed to feed the 192 main amplifier chains in the NIF. The ILS's three major subsystems are summarized in the overview, then described in detail in their own sections. In many cases, the subsystems have been developed and are in an engineering prototype phase in which we work with outside vendors to produce hardware. We have also connected two of the subsystems, the master oscillator room (MOR) and preamplifier module (PAM) development labs, to perform integrated performance measurements on a combined system.