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Sample records for abnormal autophagy ubiquitination

  1. Abnormal autophagy, ubiquitination, inflammation and apoptosis are dependent upon lysosomal storage and are useful biomarkers of mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Tessitore, Alessandra; Pirozzi, Marinella; Auricchio, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background Lysosomal storage diseases are characterized by intracellular accumulation of metabolites within lysosomes. Recent evidence suggests that lysosomal storage impairs autophagy resulting in accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and dysfunctional mitochondria, ultimately leading to apoptosis. We studied the relationship between lysosome storage and impairment of different intracellular pathways and organelle function in mucopolysaccharidosis VI, which is characterized by accumulat...

  2. RNF2 is recruited by WASH to ubiquitinate AMBRA1 leading to downregulation of autophagy

    Xia, Pengyan; Wang, Shuo; Huang, Guanling; Du, Ying; Zhu, Pingping; Li, Man; Fan, Zusen

    2014-01-01

    WASH (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and SCAR homolog) was identified to function in endosomal sorting via Arp2/3 activation. We previously demonstrated that WASH is a new interactor of BECN1 and present in the BECN1-PIK3C3 complex with AMBRA1. The AMBRA1-DDB1-CUL4A complex is an E3 ligase for K63-linked ubiquitination of BECN1, which is required for starvation-induced autophagy. WASH suppresses autophagy by inhibition of BECN1 ubiquitination. However, how AMBRA1 is regulated during ...

  3. WASH inhibits autophagy through suppression of Beclin 1 ubiquitination

    Xia, Pengyan; Wang, Shuo; Du, Ying; Zhao, Zhenao; Shi, Lei; Sun, Lei; Huang, Guanling; Ye, Buqing; Li, Chong; Dai, Zhonghua; Hou, Ning; Cheng, Xuan; Sun, Qingyuan; Li, Lei(Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing, 102617, People's Republic of China); Yang, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy degrades cytoplasmic proteins and organelles to recycle cellular components that are required for cell survival and tissue homeostasis. However, it is not clear how autophagy is regulated in mammalian cells. WASH (Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and SCAR homologue) plays an essential role in endosomal sorting through facilitating tubule fission via Arp2/3 activation. Here, we demonstrate a novel function of WASH in modulation of autophagy. We show that WASH deficiency causes...

  4. Protein breakdown in muscle wasting: Role of autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome

    Sandri, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adapts its mass as consequence of physical activity, metabolism and hormones. Catabolic conditions or inactivity induce signaling pathways that regulate the process of muscle loss. Muscle atrophy in adult tissue occurs when protein degradation rates exceed protein synthesis. Two major protein degradation pathways, the ubiquitin-proteasome and the autophagy-lysosome systems, are activated during muscle atrophy and variably contribute to the loss of muscle mass. These degradatio...

  5. Autophagy collaborates with ubiquitination to downregulate oncoprotein E2A/Pbx1 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for the most cancer incidences in children. We present here that autophagy is downregulated in pediatric B-ALL, suggesting a possible link between autophagy failure and pediatric B-ALL leukemogenesis. With a pediatric t(1;19) B-ALL xenograft mouse model, we show here that activation of autophagy by preventive administration of rapamycin improved the survival of leukemia animals by partial restoration of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, whereas treatment of the animals with rapamycin caused leukemia bone marrow cell-cycle arrest. Activation of autophagy in vitro or in vivo by rapamycin or starvation downregulated oncogenic fusion protein E2A/Pbx1. Furthermore, E2A/Pbx1 was found to be colocalized with autophagy marker LC3 in autolysosomes and with ubiquitin in response to autophagy stimuli, whereas autophagy or ubiquitination inhibitor blocked these colocalizations. Together, our data suggest a collaborative action between autophagy and ubiquitination in the degradation of E2A/Pbx1, thereby revealing a novel strategy for targeted preventive or treatment therapy on the pediatric ALL

  6. MARCH2 regulates autophagy by promoting CFTR ubiquitination and degradation and PIK3CA-AKT-MTOR signaling.

    Xia, Dan; Qu, Liujing; Li, Ge; Hongdu, Beiqi; Xu, Chentong; Lin, Xin; Lou, Yaxin; He, Qihua; Ma, Dalong; Chen, Yingyu

    2016-09-01

    MARCH2 (membrane-associated RING-CH protein 2), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is mainly associated with the vesicle trafficking. In the present study, for the first time, we demonstrated that MARCH2 negatively regulates autophagy. Our data indicated that overexpression of MARCH2 impaired autophagy, as evidenced by attenuated levels of LC3B-II and impaired degradation of endogenous and exogenous autophagic substrates. By contrast, loss of MARCH2 expression had the opposite effects. In vivo experiments demonstrate that MARCH2 knockout mediated autophagy results in an inhibition of tumorigenicity. Further investigation revealed that the induction of autophagy by MARCH2 deficiency was mediated through the PIK3CA-AKT-MTOR signaling pathway. Additionally, we found that MARCH2 interacts with CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), promotes the ubiquitination and degradation of CFTR, and inhibits CFTR-mediated autophagy in tumor cells. The functional PDZ domain of MARCH2 is required for the association with CFTR. Thus, our study identified a novel negative regulator of autophagy and suggested that the physical and functional connection between the MARCH2 and CFTR in different conditions will be elucidated in the further experiments. PMID:27308891

  7. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O. [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seok-Seong, E-mail: sskang@ivi.int [Laboratory Sciences Division, International Vaccine Institute, Seoul 151-919 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Distinct inclusion bodies are developed by inhibition of UPP and ALP. {yields} The inclusion bodies differ in morphology, localization and formation process. {yields} The inclusion bodies are distinguishable by the localization of TSC2. {yields} Inhibition of both UPP and ALP simultaneously induces those inclusion bodies. -- Abstract: Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells.

  8. The ubiquitin signal and autophagy: an orchestrated dance leading to mitochondrial degradation.

    Yamano, Koji; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Keiji

    2016-03-01

    The quality of mitochondria, essential organelles that produce ATP and regulate numerous metabolic pathways, must be strictly monitored to maintain cell homeostasis. The loss of mitochondrial quality control systems is acknowledged as a determinant for many types of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). The two gene products mutated in the autosomal recessive forms of familial early-onset PD, Parkin and PINK1, have been identified as essential proteins in the clearance of damaged mitochondria via an autophagic pathway termed mitophagy. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding how the mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase PINK1 and the E3 ligase Parkin work together through a novel stepwise cascade to identify and eliminate damaged mitochondria, a process that relies on the orchestrated crosstalk between ubiquitin/phosphorylation signaling and autophagy. In this review, we highlight our current understanding of the detailed molecular mechanisms governing Parkin-/PINK1-mediated mitophagy and the evidences connecting Parkin/PINK1 function and mitochondrial clearance in neurons. PMID:26882551

  9. Autophagy and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis may not be involved in the degradation of spermatozoon mitochondria in mouse and porcine early embryos.

    Jin, Yong-Xun; Zheng, Zhong; Yu, Xian-Feng; Zhang, Jia-Bao; Namgoong, Suk; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial genome is maternally inherited in animals, despite the fact that paternal mitochondria enter oocytes during fertilization. Autophagy and ubiquitin-mediated degradation are responsible for the elimination of paternal mitochondria in Caenorhabditis elegans; however, the involvement of these two processes in the degradation of paternal mitochondria in mammals is not well understood. We investigated the localization patterns of light chain 3 (LC3) and ubiquitin in mouse and porcine embryos during preimplantation development. We found that LC3 and ubiquitin localized to the spermatozoon midpiece at 3 h post-fertilization, and that both proteins were colocalized with paternal mitochondria and removed upon fertilization during the 4-cell stage in mouse and the zygote stage in porcine embryos. Sporadic paternal mitochondria were present beyond the morula stage in the mouse, and paternal mitochondria were restricted to one blastomere of 4-cell embryos. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), did not affect the distribution of paternal mitochondria compared with the positive control, while an autophagy inducer, rapamycin, accelerated the removal of paternal mitochondria compared with the control. After the intracytoplasmic injection of intact spermatozoon into mouse oocytes, LC3 and ubiquitin localized to the spermatozoon midpiece, but remnants of undegraded paternal mitochondria were retained until the blastocyst stage. Our results show that paternal mitochondria colocalize with autophagy receptors and ubiquitin and are removed after in vitro fertilization, but some remnants of sperm mitochondrial sheath may persist up to morula stage after intracytoplasmic spermatozoon injection (ICSI). PMID:25513816

  10. Ubiquitin

    Vinther-Jensen, T.; Simonsen, A. H.; Budtz-Jorgensen, E.;

    2015-01-01

    well as aid in identifying an optimal time point for initiating a potential therapeutic intervention. METHODS: This explorative proteomics study evaluated cerebrospinal fluid from 94 Huntington's disease gene-expansion carriers (39 premanifest and 55 manifest) and 27 Huntington's disease gene...... controls. One of them identified as ubiquitin was shown to be dependent on the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale Total Functional Capacity, a pseudo-measure of disease severity (P = 0.001), and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (0.04) in manifest and CAG-age product score (P = 0.019) in all gene......BACKGROUND: Finding early and dynamic biomarkers in Huntington's disease is a key to understanding the early pathology of Huntington's disease and potentially to tracking disease progression. This would benefit the future evaluation of potential neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies, as...

  11. Autophagy in dementias.

    Kragh, Christine Lund; Ubhi, Kiren; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Wyss-Corey, Tony; Masliah, Eliezer

    2012-01-01

    Dementias are a varied group of disorders typically associated with memory loss, impaired judgment and/or language and by symptoms affecting other cognitive and social abilities to a degree that interferes with daily functioning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of a progressive dementia, followed by dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), (VaD) and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The pathogenesis of this group of disorders has been linked to the abnormal accumulation of proteins in the brains of affected individuals, which in turn has been related to deficits in protein clearance. Autophagy is a key cellular protein clearance pathway with proteolytic cleavage and degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway representing another important clearance mechanism. Alterations in the levels of autophagy and the proteins associated with the autophagocytic pathway have been reported in various types of dementias. This review will examine recent literature across these disorders and highlight a common theme of altered autophagy across the spectrum of the dementias. PMID:22150925

  12. Structure biology of selective autophagy receptors

    Kim, Byeong-Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a process tightly regulated by various autophagy-related proteins. It is generally classified into non-selective and selective autophagy. Whereas non-selective autophagy is triggered when the cell is under starvation, selective autophagy is involved in eliminating dysfunctional organelles, misfolded and/or ubiquitylated proteins, and intracellular pathogens. These components are recognized by autophagy receptors and delivered to phagophores. Several selective autophagy receptors have been identified and characterized. They usually have some common domains, such as motif, a specific cargo interacting (ubiquitin-dependent or ubiquitin-independent) domain. Recently, structural data of these autophagy receptors has been described, which provides an insight of their function in the selective autophagic process. In this review, we summarize the most up-to-date findings about the structure-function of autophagy receptors that regulates selective autophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 73-80] PMID:26698872

  13. Regulation of Mitochondrial Genome Inheritance by Autophagy and Ubiquitin-Proteasome System: Implications for Health, Fitness, and Fertility

    Won-Hee Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria, the energy-generating organelles, play a role in numerous cellular functions including adenosine triphosphate (ATP production, cellular homeostasis, and apoptosis. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is universally observed in humans and most animals. In general, high levels of mitochondrial heteroplasmy might contribute to a detrimental effect on fitness and disease resistance. Therefore, a disposal of the sperm-derived mitochondria inside fertilized oocytes assures normal preimplantation embryo development. Here we summarize the current research and knowledge concerning the role of autophagic pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis in sperm mitophagy in mammals, including humans. Current data indicate that sperm mitophagy inside the fertilized oocyte could occur along multiple degradation routes converging on autophagic clearance of paternal mitochondria. The influence of assisted reproductive therapies (ART such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, mitochondrial replacement (MR, and assisted fertilization of oocytes from patients of advanced reproductive age on mitochondrial function, inheritance, and fitness and for the development and health of ART babies will be of particular interest to clinical audiences. Altogether, the study of sperm mitophagy after fertilization has implications in the timing of evolution and developmental and reproductive biology and in human health, fitness, and management of mitochondrial disease.

  14. Regulation of mitochondrial genome inheritance by autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome system: implications for health, fitness, and fertility.

    Song, Won-Hee; Ballard, John William Oman; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the energy-generating organelles, play a role in numerous cellular functions including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, cellular homeostasis, and apoptosis. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is universally observed in humans and most animals. In general, high levels of mitochondrial heteroplasmy might contribute to a detrimental effect on fitness and disease resistance. Therefore, a disposal of the sperm-derived mitochondria inside fertilized oocytes assures normal preimplantation embryo development. Here we summarize the current research and knowledge concerning the role of autophagic pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis in sperm mitophagy in mammals, including humans. Current data indicate that sperm mitophagy inside the fertilized oocyte could occur along multiple degradation routes converging on autophagic clearance of paternal mitochondria. The influence of assisted reproductive therapies (ART) such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), mitochondrial replacement (MR), and assisted fertilization of oocytes from patients of advanced reproductive age on mitochondrial function, inheritance, and fitness and for the development and health of ART babies will be of particular interest to clinical audiences. Altogether, the study of sperm mitophagy after fertilization has implications in the timing of evolution and developmental and reproductive biology and in human health, fitness, and management of mitochondrial disease. PMID:25028670

  15. Ubiquitin at the crossroad of cell death and survival

    Yu-Shan Chen; Xiao-Bo Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitination is crucial for cellular processes, such as protein degradation, apoptosis, autophagy, and cell cycle progression. Dysregulation of the ubiquitination network accounts for the development of numerous diseases, including cancer. Thus, targeting ubiquitination is a promising strategy in cancer therapy. Both apoptosis and autophagy are involved in tumorigenesis and response to cancer therapy. Although both are categorized as types of celldeath, autophagy is general y considered to have protective functions, including protecting cells from apoptosis under certain cellular stress conditions. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy by ubiquitination.

  16. Autophagy in infection.

    Deretic, Vojo

    2010-04-01

    Autophagy is a ubiquitous eukaryotic cytoplasmic quality and quantity control pathway. The role of autophagy in cytoplasmic homeostasis seamlessly extends to cell-autonomous defense against intracellular microbes. Recent studies also point to fully integrated, multitiered regulatory and effector connections between autophagy and nearly all facets of innate and adaptive immunity. Autophagy in the immune system as a whole confers measured immune responses; on the flip side, suppression of autophagy can lead to inflammation and tissue damage, as evidenced by Crohn's disease predisposition polymorphisms in autophagy basal apparatus (Atg16L) and regulatory (IRGM) genes. Polymorphisms in the IRGM gene in human populations have also been linked to predisposition to tuberculosis. There are several areas of most recent growth: first, links between autophagy regulators and infectious disease predisposition in human populations; second, demonstration of a role for autophagy in infection control in vivo in animal models; third, the definition of specific antiautophagic defenses in highly evolved pathogens; and fourth, recognition of connections between the ubiquitin system and autophagy of bacteria (and interestingly mitochondria, which are incidentally organelles of bacterial evolutionary origin) via a growing list of modifier and adapter proteins including p62/SQSTM1, NDP52, Atg32, Parkin, and Nix/BNIP3L. PMID:20116986

  17. [Progress in ubiquitin, ubiquitin chain and protein ubiquitination].

    Lan, Qiuyan; Gao, Yuan; Li, Yanchang; Hong, Xuechuan; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is one of the most important and widely exist protein post-translational modifications in eukaryotic cells, which takes the ubiquitin and ubiquitin chains as signal molecules to covalently modify other protein substrates. It plays an important roles in the control of almost all of the life processes, including gene transcription and translation, signal transduction and cell-cycle progression, besides classical 26S protesome degradation pathway. Varied modification sites in the same substrates as well as different types of ubiquitin linkages in the same modification sites contain different structural information, which conduct different signal or even determine the fate of the protein substrates in the cell. Any abnormalities in ubiquitin chain formation or its modification process may cause severe problem in maintaining the balance of intracellular environment and finally result in serious health problem of human being. In this review, we discussed the discovery, genetic characteristics and the crystal structure of the ubiquitin. We also emphasized the recent progresses of the assembly processes, structure and their biological function of ubiquitin chains. The relationship between the disregulation and related human diseases has also been discussed. These progress will shed light on the complexity of proteome, which may also provide tools in the new drug research and development processes. PMID:27363196

  18. Contribution of the autophagy-lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasomal proteolytic systems to total proteolysis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) myotubes

    Two major proteolytic systems are thought to (co-) operate in the skeletal muscle of vertebrates, the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS) and the autophagic/lysosomal system (ALS). While their relative contribution to muscle loss has been already well documented in mammals, little is known in fish sp...

  19. Phosphorylation of the autophagy receptor optineurin restricts Salmonella growth

    Wild, Philipp; Farhan, Hesso; McEwan, David G; Wagner, Sebastian; Rogov, Vladimir V; Brady, Nathan R; Richter, Benjamin; Korac, Jelena; Waidmann, Oliver; Choudhary, Chunaram; Dötsch, Volker; Bumann, Dirk; Dikic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Selective autophagy can be mediated via receptor molecules that link specific cargoes to the autophagosomal membranes decorated by ubiquitin-like microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) modifiers. Although several autophagy receptors have been identified, little is known about mechanisms...... controlling their functions in vivo. In this work, we found that phosphorylation of an autophagy receptor, optineurin, promoted selective autophagy of ubiquitin-coated cytosolic Salmonella enterica. The protein kinase TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1) phosphorylated optineurin on serine-177, enhancing LC3 binding...... affinity and autophagic clearance of cytosolic Salmonella. Conversely, ubiquitin- or LC3-binding optineurin mutants and silencing of optineurin or TBK1 impaired Salmonella autophagy, resulting in increased intracellular bacterial proliferation. We propose that phosphorylation of autophagy receptors might...

  20. Pharmacological strategies in lung cancer-induced cachexia: effects on muscle proteolysis, autophagy, structure, and weakness.

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Fermoselle, Clara; Urtreger, Alejandro J; Mateu-Jimenez, Mercè; Diament, Miriam J; de Kier Joffé, Elisa D Bal; Sandri, Marco; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-11-01

    Cachexia is a relevant comorbid condition of chronic diseases including cancer. Inflammation, oxidative stress, autophagy, ubiquitin-proteasome system, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in the pathophysiology of cancer cachexia. Currently available treatment is limited and data demonstrating effectiveness in in vivo models are lacking. Our objectives were to explore in respiratory and limb muscles of lung cancer (LC) cachectic mice whether proteasome, NF-κB, and MAPK inhibitors improve muscle mass and function loss through several molecular mechanisms. Body and muscle weights, limb muscle force, protein degradation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, signaling pathways, oxidative stress and inflammation, autophagy, contractile and functional proteins, myostatin and myogenin, and muscle structure were evaluated in the diaphragm and gastrocnemius of LC (LP07 adenocarcinoma) bearing cachectic mice (BALB/c), with and without concomitant treatment with NF-κB (sulfasalazine), MAPK (U0126), and proteasome (bortezomib) inhibitors. Compared to control animals, in both respiratory and limb muscles of LC cachectic mice: muscle proteolysis, ubiquitinated proteins, autophagy, myostatin, protein oxidation, FoxO-1, NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, and muscle abnormalities were increased, while myosin, creatine kinase, myogenin, and slow- and fast-twitch muscle fiber size were decreased. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK, but not the proteasome system, induced in cancer cachectic animals, a substantial restoration of muscle mass and force through a decrease in muscle protein oxidation and catabolism, myostatin, and autophagy, together with a greater content of myogenin, and contractile and functional proteins. Attenuation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathway effects on muscles is beneficial in cancer-induced cachexia. PMID:24615622

  1. Role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Lee, Jae Keun; Shin, Jin Hee; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Eui-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons associated with the abnormal aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of ALS remain unclear, however. Autophagy is a major pathway for the elimination of protein aggregates and damaged organelles and therefore contributes to cellular homeostasis. This catabolic process begins with the formation of the double membrane-bound autophagosome that engulfs portions of the cytoplasm and subsequently fuses with a lysosome to form an autolysosome, in which lysosomal enzymes digest autophagic substrates. Defects at various stages of autophagy have been associated with pathological mutations of several ALS-linked genes including SOD1, p62, TDP-43, and optineurin, suggesting that such defects may play a causative role in the pathogenesis of this condition. In this review, we summarize the dysregulation of autophagy associated with ALS as well as potential therapeutic strategies based on modulation of the autophagic process. PMID:26264610

  2. Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-Like Modifications of the p53 Family

    Ian R. Watson

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of p53 by the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway has been studied considerably. Studies have also demonstrated that the ubiquitin-like proteins SUMO-1 and NEDD8 modify p53. Similarly, p63 and p73 are subject to regulation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications, and perturbations of these pathways in the regulation of the p53 family have been implicated in tumorigenesis and developmental abnormalities. Here, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the regulation of the p53 family by covalent modification by ubiquitin, SUMO-1, and NEDD8.

  3. Sch9 regulates intracellular protein ubiquitination by controlling stress responses

    Beibei Qie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination and the subsequent degradation are important means by which aberrant proteins are removed from cells, a key requirement for long-term survival. In this study, we found that the overall level of ubiquitinated proteins dramatically decreased as yeast cell grew from log to stationary phase. Deletion of SCH9, a gene encoding a key protein kinase for longevity control, decreased the level of ubiquitinated proteins in log phase and this effect could be reversed by restoring Sch9 function. We demonstrate here that the decrease of ubiquitinated proteins in sch9Δ cells in log phase is not caused by changes in ubiquitin expression, proteasome activity, or autophagy, but by enhanced expression of stress response factors and a decreased level of oxidative stress. Our results revealed for the first time how Sch9 regulates the level of ubiquitinated proteins and provides new insight into how Sch9 controls longevity.

  4. Autophagy selectivity through receptor clustering

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Brown, Aidan

    Substrate selectivity in autophagy requires an all-or-none cellular response. We focus on peroxisomes, for which autophagy receptor proteins NBR1 and p62 are well characterized. Using computational models, we explore the hypothesis that physical clustering of autophagy receptor proteins on the peroxisome surface provides an appropriate all-or-none response. We find that larger peroxisomes nucleate NBR1 clusters first, and lose them due to competitive coarsening last, resulting in significant size-selectivity. We then consider a secondary hypothesis that p62 inhibits NBR1 cluster formation. We find that p62 inhibition enhances size-selectivity enough that, even if there is no change of the pexophagy rate, the volume of remaining peroxisomes can significantly decrease. We find that enhanced ubiquitin levels suppress size-selectivity, and that this effect is more pronounced for individual peroxisomes. Sufficient ubiquitin allows receptor clusters to form on even the smallest peroxisomes. We conclude that NBR1 cluster formation provides a viable physical mechanism for all-or-none substrate selectivity in pexophagy. We predict that cluster formation is associated with significant size-selectivity. Now at Simon Fraser University.

  5. Inducing autophagy

    Harder, Lea M; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal-mediated catabolic process, which through degradation of different cytoplasmic components aids in maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival during exposure to extra- or intracellular stresses. Ammonia is a potential toxic and stress-inducing byproduct of glutamine...... catabolism, which has recently been found to induce autophagy in an MTOR independent way and support cancer cell survival. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to investigate the initial signaling events linking ammonia to the induction of autophagy. The MTOR inhibitor rapamycin was used...... as a reference treatment to emphasize the differences between an MTOR-dependent and -independent autophagy-induction. By this means 5901 phosphosites were identified of which 626 were treatment-specific regulated and 175 were coregulated. Investigation of the ammonia-specific regulated sites...

  6. Dysregulation of the Autophagy-Endolysosomal System in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Related Motor Neuron Diseases

    Asako Otomo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a heterogeneous group of incurable motor neuron diseases (MNDs characterized by a selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Most cases of ALS are sporadic, while approximately 5–10% cases are familial. More than 16 causative genes for ALS/MNDs have been identified and their underlying pathogenesis, including oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, neural inflammation, protein misfolding and accumulation, dysfunctional intracellular trafficking, abnormal RNA processing, and noncell-autonomous damage, has begun to emerge. It is currently believed that a complex interplay of multiple toxicity pathways is implicated in disease onset and progression. Among such mechanisms, ones that are associated with disturbances of protein homeostasis, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy, have recently been highlighted. Although it remains to be determined whether disease-associated protein aggregates have a toxic or protective role in the pathogenesis, the formation of them results from the imbalance between generation and degradation of misfolded proteins within neuronal cells. In this paper, we focus on the autophagy-lysosomal and endocytic degradation systems and implication of their dysfunction to the pathogenesis of ALS/MNDs. The autophagy-endolysosomal pathway could be a major target for the development of therapeutic agents for ALS/MNDs.

  7. Autophagy in DNA Damage Response

    Piotr Czarny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2–Atg13–FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADPribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  8. Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 escapes to the cytosol and actively subverts autophagy in human macrophages.

    Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Marshall-Batty, Kimberly; Nair, Vinod; Ding, Li; Greenberg, David E; Fraser, Iain D C

    2014-03-01

    Selective autophagy functions to specifically degrade cellular cargo tagged by ubiquitination, including bacteria. Strains of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are opportunistic pathogens that cause life-threatening infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). While there is evidence that defective macrophage autophagy in a mouse model of CF can influence B. cenocepacia susceptibility, there have been no comprehensive studies on how this bacterium is sensed and targeted by the host autophagy response in human macrophages. Here, we describe the intracellular life cycle of B. cenocepacia J2315 and its interaction with the autophagy pathway in human cells. Electron and confocal microscopy analyses demonstrate that the invading bacteria interact transiently with the endocytic pathway before escaping to the cytosol. This escape triggers theselective autophagy pathway, and the recruitment of ubiquitin, the ubiquitin-binding adaptors p62 and NDP52 and the autophagosome membrane-associated protein LC3B, to the bacterial vicinity. However, despite recruitment of these key autophagy pathway effectors, B. cenocepacia blocks autophagosome completion and replicates in the host cytosol. We find that a pre-infection increase in cellular autophagy flux can significantly inhibit B. cenocepacia replication and that lower autophagy flux in macrophages from immunocompromised CGD patients could contribute to increased B. cenocepacia susceptibility, identifying autophagy manipulation as a potential therapeutic approach to reduce bacterial burden in B. cenocepacia infections. PMID:24119232

  9. Tracking autophagy during proliferation and differentiation of Trypanosoma brucei

    William R. Proto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent degradation mechanism that sequesters target cargo into autophagosomal vesicles. The Trypanosoma brucei genome contains apparent orthologues of several autophagy-related proteins including an ATG8 family. These ubiquitin-like proteins are required for autophagosome membrane formation, but our studies show that ATG8.3 is atypical. To investigate the function of other ATG proteins, RNAi compatible T. brucei were modified to function as autophagy reporter lines by expressing only either YFP-ATG8.1 or YFP-ATG8.2. In the insect procyclic lifecycle stage, independent RNAi down-regulation of ATG3 or ATG7 generated autophagy-defective mutants and confirmed a pro-survival role for autophagy in the procyclic form nutrient starvation response. Similarly, RNAi depletion of ATG5 or ATG7 in the bloodstream form disrupted autophagy, but did not impede proliferation. Further characterisation showed bloodstream form autophagy mutants retain the capacity to undergo the complex cellular remodelling that occurs during differentiation to the procyclic form and are equally susceptible to dihydroxyacetone-induced cell death as wild type parasites, not supporting a role for autophagy in this cell death mechanism. The RNAi reporter system developed, which also identified TOR1 as a negative regulator controlling YFP-ATG8.2 but not YFP-ATG8.1 autophagosome formation, will enable further targeted analysis of the mechanisms and function of autophagy in the medically relevant bloodstream form of T. brucei.

  10. The putative role of proteolytic pathways in the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes mellitus: the 'autophagy' hypothesis.

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2014-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting different organs and tissues. New tools, such as genome-wide association studies, have provided evidence for new susceptibility loci and candidate genes in the disease process including common susceptibility genes involved in the immunological synapse and T cell activation. Close linkages have been found in a number of diseases, including ankylosing spondylitis, multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 1 diabetes mellitus). Evidence for some association with Type 1 diabetes was previously found in the region containing 5q15/ERAP1 (endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1) (rs30187, ARTS1). Recent data suggest that in eukaryotic cells in addition to the ubiquitin/proteasome system another proteolytic pathway may have a significant role in the autoimmunity process, i.e. the autophagic pathway which constitutes the principal regulated catabolic process mediated by lysosomes. Autophagy could play a role in MHC class I and class II self-antigen presentation at the basis of the autoimmunity process. Furthermore cross-talk among different proteolytic pathways was recently highlighted i.e. components processed in the ubiquitin/proteasome system possibly engaged in autophagic pathways. T1D is an autoimmune disease characterised by the destruction of pancreatic beta cells by autoreactive T cells. Immunological abnormalities can precede months to years the initial symptoms and clinical diagnosis. Our hypothesis suggests that in the autoimmune process autophagy can intervene at different levels, during the thymic selection process of T lymphocytes causing escape of autoreactive T cells, at the initiation stage of the disease, in the preclinical period or subsequently to the disease onset having a role at the level of perpetuation of the autoimmunity process. Supporting evidence derives from the already reported discovery of polymorphisms in autophagy-related genes in

  11. Sent to destroy: the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates cell signaling and protein quality control in cardiovascular development and disease.

    Willis, Monte S; Townley-Tilson, W H Davin; Kang, Eunice Y; Homeister, Jonathon W; Patterson, Cam

    2010-02-19

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays a crucial role in biological processes integral to the development of the cardiovascular system and cardiovascular diseases. The UPS prototypically recognizes specific protein substrates and places polyubiquitin chains on them for subsequent destruction by the proteasome. This system is in place to degrade not only misfolded and damaged proteins, but is essential also in regulating a host of cell signaling pathways involved in proliferation, adaptation to stress, regulation of cell size, and cell death. During the development of the cardiovascular system, the UPS regulates cell signaling by modifying transcription factors, receptors, and structural proteins. Later, in the event of cardiovascular diseases as diverse as atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, and ischemia/reperfusion injury, ubiquitin ligases and the proteasome are implicated in protecting and exacerbating clinical outcomes. However, when misfolded and damaged proteins are ubiquitinated by the UPS, their destruction by the proteasome is not always possible because of their aggregated confirmations. Recent studies have discovered how these ubiquitinated misfolded proteins can be destroyed by alternative "specific" mechanisms. The cytosolic receptors p62, NBR, and histone deacetylase 6 recognize aggregated ubiquitinated proteins and target them for autophagy in the process of "selective autophagy." Even the ubiquitination of multiple proteins within whole organelles that drive the more general macro-autophagy may be due, in part, to similar ubiquitin-driven mechanisms. In summary, the crosstalk between the UPS and autophagy highlight the pivotal and diverse roles the UPS plays in maintaining protein quality control and regulating cardiovascular development and disease. PMID:20167943

  12. Monitoring Ubiquitin-Coated Bacteria via Confocal Microscopy.

    Lork, Marie; Delvaeye, Mieke; Gonçalves, Amanda; Van Hamme, Evelien; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella is a gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is capable of infecting a variety of hosts. Inside host cells, most Salmonella bacteria reside and replicate within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. They use virulence proteins to manipulate the host cell machinery for their own benefit and hijack the host cytoskeleton to travel toward the perinuclear area. However, a fraction of bacteria escapes into the cytosol where they get decorated with a dense layer of polyubiquitin, which labels the bacteria for clearance by autophagy. More specifically, autophagy receptor proteins recognize the ubiquitinated bacteria and deliver them to autophagosomes, which subsequently fuse to lysosomes. Here, we describe methods used to infect HeLa cells with Salmonella bacteria and to detect their ubiquitination via immunofluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:27613040

  13. In the family with ubiquitin

    Alexandru, Gabriela; Pariente, Nonia; Xirodimas, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    The Cold Spring Harbor meeting on ‘The Ubiquitin family', held in May 2011, brought together scientists from a wide range of fields, all under the common umbrella of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like protein structure, function and regulation.

  14. Mechanisms of silver nanoparticle-induced toxicity and important role of autophagy.

    Mao, Bin-Hsu; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Chen, Chun-Wan; Yan, Shian-Jang; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2016-10-01

    Safety concerns have been raised over the extensive applications of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) because nano dimensions make them highly bioactive, being potentially harmful to the exposed humans. Surface physico-chemistry (shape, surface charge, chemical composition, etc.) that mainly dictates nano-bio interactions is relevant for influencing their biocompatibility and toxicity. Although the hazardousness of AgNPs has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, mechanistic understanding of the toxicity particularly at the molecular and organismal levels, in addition to oxidative stress and silver ion dissolution, has remained unclear. A growing body of research has elucidated that autophagy, being activated in response to exposure to various nanomaterials, may serve as a cellular defense mechanism against nanotoxicity. Recently, autophagy activation was shown to correlate with AgNPs exposure; however, the subsequent autophagosome-lysosome fusion was defective. As autophagy plays a crucial role in selective removal of stress-mediated protein aggregates and injured organelles, AgNPs-induced autophagic flux defect may consequently lead to aggravated cytotoxic responses. Furthermore, we suggest that p62 accumulation resulting from defective autophagy may also potentially account for AgNPs cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, AgNPs have been shown to interfere with ubiquitin modifications, either via upregulating levels of enzymes participating in ubiquitination, or through impairing the biological reactivity of ubiquitin (due to formation of AgNPs-ubiquitin corona). Ubiquitination both confers selectivity to autophagy as well as modulates stabilization, activation, and trafficking of proteins involved in autophagic clearance pathways. In this regard, we offer a new perspective that interference of AgNPs with ubiquitination may account for AgNPs-induced defective autophagy and cytotoxic effects. PMID:27240148

  15. Hypoxia, MTOR and autophagy

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    Although hypoxia can cause cell cycle arrest, it may simultaneously suppress a conversion from this arrest to senescence. Furthermore, hypoxia can suppress senescence caused by diverse stimuli, maintaining reversible quiescence instead. Hypoxia activates autophagy and inhibits MTOR, thus also activating autophagy. What is the relationship between autophagy and cellular senescence? Also, can inhibition of MTOR and stimulation of autophagy explain the gerosuppressive effects of hypoxia?

  16. Autophagy is essential to support skeletal muscle plasticity in response to endurance exercise

    Bernardi, Henri; Py, Guillaume; Candau, Robin B.

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise is a stress that can substantially modulate cellular signaling mechanisms to promote morphological and metabolic adaptations. Skeletal muscle protein and organelle turnover is dependent on two major cellular pathways: Forkhead box class O proteins (FOXO) transcription factors that regulate two main proteolytic systems, the ubiquitin-proteasome, and the autophagy-lysosome systems, including mitochondrial autophagy, and the MTORC1 signaling associated with protein translation ...

  17. The Selective Autophagy Receptor p62 Forms a Flexible Filamentous Helical Scaffold

    Rodolfo Ciuffa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold protein p62/SQSTM1 is involved in protein turnover and signaling and is commonly found in dense protein bodies in eukaryotic cells. In autophagy, p62 acts as a selective autophagy receptor that recognizes and shuttles ubiquitinated proteins to the autophagosome for degradation. The structural organization of p62 in cellular bodies and the interplay of these assemblies with ubiquitin and the autophagic marker LC3 remain to be elucidated. Here, we present a cryo-EM structural analysis of p62. Together with structures of assemblies from the PB1 domain, we show that p62 is organized in flexible polymers with the PB1 domain constituting a helical scaffold. Filamentous p62 is capable of binding LC3 and addition of long ubiquitin chains induces disassembly and shortening of filaments. These studies explain how p62 assemblies provide a large molecular scaffold for the nascent autophagosome and reveal how they can bind ubiquitinated cargo.

  18. Structure of autophagy-related protein Atg8 from the silkworm Bombyx mori

    The crystal structure of autophagy-related protein Atg8 from the silkworm B. mori has two additional helices at the N-terminus before the expected ubiquitin fold. Autophagy-related protein Atg8 is ubiquitous in all eukaryotes. It is involved in the Atg8–PE ubiquitin-like conjugation system, which is essential for autophagosome formation. The structures of Atg8 from different species are very similar and share a ubiquitin-fold domain at the C-terminus. In the 2.40 Å crystal structure of Atg8 from the silkworm Bombyx mori reported here, the ubiquitin fold at the C-terminus is preceded by two additional helices at the N-terminus

  19. It's all about talking: two-way communication between proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways via ubiquitin.

    Liebl, Martina P; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Selective degradation of proteins requires a fine-tuned coordination of the two major proteolytic pathways, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Substrate selection and proteolytic activity are defined by a plethora of regulatory cofactors influencing each other. Both proteolytic pathways are initiated by ubiquitylation to mark substrate proteins for degradation, although the size and/or topology of the modification are different. In this context E3 ubiquitin ligases, ensuring the covalent attachment of activated ubiquitin to the substrate, are of special importance. The regulation of E3 ligase activity, competition between different E3 ligases for binding E2 conjugation enzymes and substrates, as well as their interplay with deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) represent key events in the cross talk between the UPS and autophagy. The coordination between both degradation routes is further influenced by heat shock factors and ubiquitin-binding proteins (UBPs) such as p97, p62, or optineurin. Mutations in enzymes and ubiquitin-binding proteins or a general decline of both proteolytic systems during aging result in accumulation of damaged and aggregated proteins. Thus further mechanistic understanding of how UPS and autophagy communicate might allow therapeutic intervention especially against age-related diseases. PMID:27225656

  20. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  1. Postfertilization autophagy of sperm organelles prevents paternal mitochondrial DNA transmission.

    Al Rawi, Sara; Louvet-Vallée, Sophie; Djeddi, Abderazak; Sachse, Martin; Culetto, Emmanuel; Hajjar, Connie; Boyd, Lynn; Legouis, Renaud; Galy, Vincent

    2011-11-25

    In sexual reproduction of most animals, the spermatozoon provides DNA and centrioles, together with some cytoplasm and organelles, to the oocyte that is being fertilized. Paternal mitochondria and their genomes are generally eliminated in the embryo by an unknown degradation mechanism. We show that, upon fertilization, a Caenorhabditis elegans spermatozoon triggers the recruitment of autophagosomes within minutes and subsequent paternal mitochondria degradation. Whereas the nematode-specific sperm membranous organelles are ubiquitinated before autophagosome formation, the mitochondria are not. The degradation of both paternal structures and mitochondrial DNA requires an LC3-dependent autophagy. Analysis of fertilized mouse embryos shows the localization of autophagy markers, which suggests that this autophagy event is evolutionarily conserved to prevent both the transmission of paternal mitochondrial DNA to the offspring and the establishment of heteroplasmy. PMID:22033522

  2. Amelioration of neuronal cell death in a spontaneous obese rat model by dietary restriction through modulation of ubiquitin proteasome system.

    Shruthi, Karnam; Reddy, S Sreenivasa; Reddy, P Yadagiri; Shivalingam, Potula; Harishankar, Nemani; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2016-07-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has been shown to increase longevity, delay onset of aging, reduce DNA damage and oxidative stress and prevent age-related decline of neuronal activity. We previously reported the role of altered ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in the neuronal cell death in a spontaneous obese rat model (WNIN/Ob rat). In this study, we investigated the effect of DR on obesity-induced neuronal cell death in a rat model. Two groups of 40-day-old WNIN/Ob rats were either fed ad libitum (Ob) or pair-fed with lean. The lean phenotype of WNIN/Ob rats served as ad libitum control. These animals were maintained for 6.5months on their respective diet regime. At the end of the study, cerebral cortex was collected and markers of UPS, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasome was assayed by the fluorimetric method. Apoptotic cells were analyzed by TUNEL assay. DR improved metabolic abnormalities in obese rats. Alterations in UPS (up-regulation of UCHL1, down-regulation of UCHL5, declined proteasomal activity), increased ER stress, declined autophagy and increased expression of α-synuclein, p53 and BAX were observed in obese rats and DR alleviated these changes in obese rats. Further, DR decreased TUNEL-positive cells. In conclusion, DR in obese rats could not only restore the metabolic abnormalities but also preserved neuronal health in the cerebral cortex by preventing alterations in the UPS. PMID:27260470

  3. Selective Autophagy in Drosophila

    Ioannis P. Nezis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular self-eating and is a major pathway for degradation of cytoplasmic material by the lysosomal machinery. Autophagy functions as a cellular response in nutrient starvation, but it is also associated with the removal of protein aggregates and damaged organelles and therefore plays an important role in the quality control of proteins and organelles. Although it was initially believed that autophagy occurs randomly in the cell, during the last years, there is growing evidence that sequestration and degradation of cytoplasmic material by autophagy can be selective. Given the important role of autophagy and selective autophagy in several disease-related processes such as neurodegeneration, infections, and tumorigenesis, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of selective autophagy, especially at the organismal level. Drosophila is an excellent genetically modifiable model organism exhibiting high conservation in the autophagic machinery. However, the regulation and mechanisms of selective autophagy in Drosophila have been largely unexplored. In this paper, I will present an overview of the current knowledge about selective autophagy in Drosophila.

  4. Chemical Inhibition of Autophagy

    Baek, Eric; Lin Kim, Che; Gyeom Kim, Mi;

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells activate and undergo apoptosis and autophagy for various environmental stresses. Unlike apoptosis, studies on increasing the production of therapeutic proteins in CHO cells by targeting the autophagy pathway are limited. In order to identify the effects of chemic...

  5. Autophagy and cancer

    Si-Zhao; Lu; Duygu; Dee; Harrison-Findik

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic and evolutionarily conserved mechanism of self-digestion by which the cells degrade and recycle long-lived proteins and excess or damaged organelles.Autophagy is activated in response to both physiological and pathological stimuli including growth factor depletion,energy deficiency or the upregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression.A novel role of autophagy in various cancers has been proposed.Interestingly,evidence that supports both a positive and negative role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of cancer has been reported.As a tumor suppression mechanism,autophagy maintains genome stability,induces senescence and possibly autophagic cell death.On the other hand,autophagy participates in tumor growth and maintenance by supplying metabolic substrate,limiting oxidative stress,and maintaining cancer stem cell population.It has been proposed that the differential roles of autophagy in cancer are disease type and stage specific.In addition,substrate selectivity might be involved in carrying out the specific effect of autophagy in cancer,and represents one of the potential directions for future studies.

  6. Blocking autophagy prevents bortezomib-induced NF-κB activation by reducing I-κBα degradation in lymphoma cells.

    Li Jia

    Full Text Available Here we show that bortezomib induces effective proteasome inhibition and accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL cells. This leads to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress as demonstrated by accumulation of the protein CHOP, as well as autophagy, as demonstrated by accumulation of LC3-II proteins. Our data suggest that recruitment of both ubiquitinated proteins and LC3-II by p62 directs ubiquitinated proteins, including I-κBα, to the autophagosome. Degradation of I-κBα results in increased NF-κB nuclear translocation and transcription activity. Since bortezomib treatment promoted I-κBα phosphorylation, ubiquitination and degradation, this suggests that the route of I-κBα degradation was not via the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation system. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ significantly inhibited bortezomib-induced I-κBα degradation, increased complex formation with NF-κB and reduced NF-κB nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity. Importantly, the combination of proteasome and autophagy inhibitors showed synergy in killing DLBCL cells. In summary, bortezomib-induced autophagy confers relative DLBCL cell drug resistance by eliminating I-κBα. Inhibition of both autophagy and the proteasome has great potential to kill apoptosis-resistant lymphoma cells.

  7. Targeting Autophagy Addiction in Cancer

    Mancias, Joseph Douglas; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy inhibition is a novel cancer therapeutic strategy in the early stages of clinical trial testing. The initial rationale for using autophagy inhibition was generated by research revealing that autophagy is upregulated in response to external stresses, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Combining autophagy inhibition with agents that induce autophagy as a pro-survival response may therefore increase their therapeutic efficacy. Recent research has shown that some cancer cells, ...

  8. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian autophagy at a glance.

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Ghislat, Ghita; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-08-15

    Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that results in the lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic contents ranging from abnormal proteins to damaged cell organelles. It is activated  under diverse conditions, including nutrient deprivation and hypoxia. During autophagy, members of the core autophagy-related (ATG) family of proteins mediate membrane rearrangements, which lead to the engulfment and degradation of cytoplasmic cargo. Recently, the nuclear regulation of autophagy, especially by transcription factors and histone modifiers, has gained increased attention. These factors are not only involved in rapid responses to autophagic stimuli, but also regulate the long-term outcome of autophagy. Now there are more than 20 transcription factors that have been shown to be linked to the autophagic process. However, their interplay and timing appear enigmatic as several have been individually shown to act as major regulators of autophagy. This Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster highlights the main cellular regulators of transcription involved in mammalian autophagy and their target genes. PMID:27528206

  9. Site-specific Interaction Mapping of Phosphorylated Ubiquitin to Uncover Parkin Activation.

    Yamano, Koji; Queliconi, Bruno B; Koyano, Fumika; Saeki, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2015-10-16

    Damaged mitochondria are eliminated through autophagy machinery. A cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, a gene product mutated in familial Parkinsonism, is essential for this pathway. Recent progress has revealed that phosphorylation of both Parkin and ubiquitin at Ser(65) by PINK1 are crucial for activation and recruitment of Parkin to the damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which phosphorylated ubiquitin associates with and activates phosphorylated Parkin E3 ligase activity remains largely unknown. Here, we analyze interactions between phosphorylated forms of both Parkin and ubiquitin at a spatial resolution of the amino acid residue by site-specific photo-crosslinking. We reveal that the in-between-RING (IBR) domain along with RING1 domain of Parkin preferentially binds to ubiquitin in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, another approach, the Fluoppi (fluorescent-based technology detecting protein-protein interaction) assay, also showed that pathogenic mutations in these domains blocked interactions with phosphomimetic ubiquitin in mammalian cells. Molecular modeling based on the site-specific photo-crosslinking interaction map combined with mass spectrometry strongly suggests that a novel binding mechanism between Parkin and ubiquitin leads to a Parkin conformational change with subsequent activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:26260794

  10. Autophagy in protists.

    Duszenko, Michael; Ginger, Michael L; Brennand, Ana; Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Colombo, María Isabel; Coombs, Graham H; Coppens, Isabelle; Jayabalasingham, Bamini; Langsley, Gordon; de Castro, Solange Lisboa; Menna-Barreto, Rubem; Mottram, Jeremy C; Navarro, Miguel; Rigden, Daniel J; Romano, Patricia S; Stoka, Veronika; Turk, Boris; Michels, Paul A M

    2011-02-01

    Autophagy is the degradative process by which eukaryotic cells digest their own components using acid hydrolases within the lysosome. Originally thought to function almost exclusively in providing starving cells with nutrients taken from their own cellular constituents, autophagy is in fact involved in numerous cellular events including differentiation, turnover of macromolecules and organelles, and defense against parasitic invaders. During the last 10-20 years, molecular components of the autophagic machinery have been discovered, revealing a complex interactome of proteins and lipids, which, in a concerted way, induce membrane formation to engulf cellular material and target it for lysosomal degradation. Here, our emphasis is autophagy in protists. We discuss experimental and genomic data indicating that the canonical autophagy machinery characterized in animals and fungi appeared prior to the radiation of major eukaryotic lineages. Moreover, we describe how comparative bioinformatics revealed that this canonical machinery has been subject to moderation, outright loss or elaboration on multiple occasions in protist lineages, most probably as a consequence of diverse lifestyle adaptations. We also review experimental studies illustrating how several pathogenic protists either utilize autophagy mechanisms or manipulate host-cell autophagy in order to establish or maintain infection within a host. The essentiality of autophagy for the pathogenicity of many parasites, and the unique features of some of the autophagy-related proteins involved, suggest possible new targets for drug discovery. Further studies of the molecular details of autophagy in protists will undoubtedly enhance our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this cellular phenomenon and the opportunities it offers as a drug target. PMID:20962583

  11. Ability of Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1, and S100B To Differentiate Normal and Abnormal Head Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Suspected Mild or Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Welch, Robert D; Ayaz, Syed I; Lewis, Lawrence M; Unden, Johan; Chen, James Y; Mika, Valerie H; Saville, Ben; Tyndall, Joseph A; Nash, Marshall; Buki, Andras; Barzo, Pal; Hack, Dallas; Tortella, Frank C; Schmid, Kara; Hayes, Ronald L; Vossough, Arastoo; Sweriduk, Stephen T; Bazarian, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-15

    Head computed tomography (CT) imaging is still a commonly obtained diagnostic test for patients with minor head injury despite availability of clinical decision rules to guide imaging use and recommendations to reduce radiation exposure resulting from unnecessary imaging. This prospective multicenter observational study of 251 patients with suspected mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) evaluated three serum biomarkers' (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 [UCH-L1] and S100B measured within 6 h of injury) ability to differentiate CT negative and CT positive findings. Of the 251 patients, 60.2% were male and 225 (89.6%) had a presenting Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15. A positive head CT (intracranial injury) was found in 36 (14.3%). UCH-L1 was 100% sensitive and 39% specific at a cutoff value >40 pg/mL. To retain 100% sensitivity, GFAP was 0% specific (cutoff value 0 pg/mL) and S100B had a specificity of only 2% (cutoff value 30 pg/mL). All three biomarkers had similar values for areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve: 0.79 (95% confidence interval; 0.70-0.88) for GFAP, 0.80 (0.71-0.89) for UCH-L1, and 0.75 (0.65-0.85) for S100B. Neither GFAP nor UCH-L1 curve values differed significantly from S100B (p = 0.21 and p = 0.77, respectively). In our patient cohort, UCH-L1 outperformed GFAP and S100B when the goal was to reduce CT use without sacrificing sensitivity. UCH-L1 values <40 pg/mL could potentially have aided in eliminating 83 of the 215 negative CT scans. These results require replication in other studies before the test is used in actual clinical practice. PMID:26467555

  12. Lithium and autophagy.

    Motoi, Yumiko; Shimada, Kohei; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-06-18

    Lithium, a drug used to treat bipolar disorders, has a variety of neuroprotective mechanisms, including autophagy regulation, in various neuropsychiatric conditions. In neurodegenerative diseases, lithium enhances degradation of aggregate-prone proteins, including mutated huntingtin, phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein, and causes damaged mitochondria to degrade, while in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer's disease autophagy downregulation by lithium is observed. The signaling pathway of lithium as an autophagy enhancer might be associated with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent pathway, which is involved in myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the mTOR-dependent pathway might be involved in inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) in other diseases. Lithium's autophagy-enhancing property may contribute to the therapeutic benefit of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24738557

  13. Drosophila Parkin requires PINK1 for mitochondrial translocation and ubiquitinates Mitofusin

    Ziviani, E.; Tao, R.N.; Whitworth, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin causes early onset Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology. Parkin has been linked to multiple cellular processes including protein degradation, mitochondrial homeostasis, and autophagy; however, its precise role in pathogenesis is unclear. Recent evidence suggests that Parkin is recruited to damaged mitochondria, possibly affecting mitochondrial fission and/or fusion, to mediate their autophagic turnover. The precise mechan...

  14. Suppression of autophagy dysregulates the antioxidant response and causes premature senescence of melanocytes.

    Zhang, Cheng-Feng; Gruber, Florian; Ni, Chunya; Mildner, Michael; Koenig, Ulrich; Karner, Susanne; Barresi, Caterina; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Narzt, Marie-Sophie; Nagelreiter, Ionela M; Larue, Lionel; Tobin, Desmond J; Eckhart, Leopold; Tschachler, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy is the central cellular mechanism for delivering organelles and cytoplasm to lysosomes for degradation and recycling of their molecular components. To determine the contribution of autophagy to melanocyte (MC) biology, we inactivated the essential autophagy gene Atg7 specifically in MCs using the Cre-loxP system. This gene deletion efficiently suppressed a key step in autophagy, lipidation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (LC3), in MCs and induced slight hypopigmentation of the epidermis in mice. The melanin content of hair was decreased by 10-15% in mice with autophagy-deficient MC as compared with control animals. When cultured in vitro, MCs from mutant and control mice produced equal amounts of melanin per cell. However, Atg7-deficient MCs entered into premature growth arrest and accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage, ubiquitinated proteins, and the multi-functional adapter protein SQSTM1/p62. Moreover, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent expression of NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1, and glutathione S-transferase Mu 1 was increased, indicating a contribution of autophagy to redox homeostasis in MCs. In summary, the results of our study suggest that Atg7-dependent autophagy is dispensable for melanogenesis but necessary for achieving the full proliferative capacity of MCs. PMID:25290687

  15. Autophagy Promotes Focal Adhesion Disassembly and Cell Motility of Metastatic Tumor Cells through the Direct Interaction of Paxillin with LC3.

    Sharifi, Marina N; Mowers, Erin E; Drake, Lauren E; Collier, Chris; Chen, Hong; Zamora, Marta; Mui, Stephanie; Macleod, Kay F

    2016-05-24

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process that plays a housekeeping role in eliminating protein aggregates and organelles and is activated during nutrient deprivation to generate metabolites and energy. Autophagy plays a significant role in tumorigenesis, although opposing context-dependent functions of autophagy in cancer have complicated efforts to target autophagy for therapeutic purposes. We demonstrate that autophagy inhibition reduces tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro and attenuates metastasis in vivo. Numerous abnormally large focal adhesions (FAs) accumulate in autophagy-deficient tumor cells, reflecting a role for autophagy in FA disassembly through targeted degradation of paxillin. We demonstrate that paxillin interacts with processed LC3 through a conserved LIR motif in the amino-terminal end of paxillin and that this interaction is regulated by oncogenic SRC activity. Together, these data establish a function for autophagy in FA turnover, tumor cell motility, and metastasis. PMID:27184837

  16. Temporal separation of aggregation and ubiquitination during early inclusion formation in transgenic mice carrying the Huntington's disease mutation.

    Belvin Gong

    Full Text Available Abnormal insoluble ubiqitinated protein aggregates are found in the brains of Huntington's disease (HD patients and in mice transgenic for the HTT mutation. Here, we describe the earliest stages of visible NII formation in brains of R6/2 mice killed between 2 and 6 weeks of age. We found that huntingtin-positive aggregates formed rapidly (within 24-48 hours in a spatiotemporal manner similar to that we described previously for ubiquitinated inclusions. However, in most neurons, aggregates are not ubiquitinated when they first form. It has always been assumed that mutant huntingtin is recognised as 'foreign' and consequently ubiquitinated and targeted for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system pathway. Our data, however, suggest that aggregation and ubiquitination are separate processes, and that mutant huntingtin fragment is not recognized as 'abnormal' by the ubiquitin-proteasome system before aggregation. Rather, mutant Htt appears to aggregate before it is ubiquitinated, and then either aggregated huntingtin is ubiquitinated or ubiquitinated proteins are recruited into aggregates. Our findings have significant implications for the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the formation of aggregates, as they suggest that this system is not involved until after the first aggregates form.

  17. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Orfali, Nina [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); McKenna, Sharon L. [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Cahill, Mary R. [Department of Hematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork (Ireland); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); Mongan, Nigel P., E-mail: nigel.mongan@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects.

  18. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects

  19. Phosphoproteomic analysis of cells treated with longevity-related autophagy inducers

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Mariño, Guillermo; Pultz, Dennis;

    2012-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a self-cannibalistic process that enables cells to adapt to various stresses and maintain energy homeostasis. Additionally, autophagy is an important route for turnover of misfolded proteins and damaged organelles, with important implications in cancer, neurodegenerative diseases...... crosstalk between distinct networks of post-translational modifications and provide a resource for future analysis of autophagy and cell death....... to resveratrol and spermidine and that key proteins modulating the acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation and ubiquitination status were affected by changes in phosphorylation during the autophagic response. Essential parts of the apoptotic signaling network were subjected to post-translational...

  20. The Role of Ubiquitine Proteasome Pathway in Carcinogenesis

    N.Ceren Sumer Turanligil

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin works as a marker protein which targets misfolded or injured proteins to cellular degradation. It brings the abnormal proteins to a subcellular organelle named proteasome and it maintains the degradation of proteins in limited lenghts of peptides by leaving the process withuout being changed. Mistakes in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in various steps of carcinogenesis is known. In this review, we dealed with the effects of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP on carcinogenesis via intercellular signaling molecules like Ras, transcription factors like NF-kB, cytokines like TNF-alfa Tumor necrosis factor, protooncogenes like p53 and MDM2(murine double minute 2, components of cell cycle and DNA repair proteins like BRCA1. We also focused on the relationship of UPP on antigen presentation which is active in immune response and its place in the aetiology of colon cancer to provide a specific example. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(1.000: 36-55

  1. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael;

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite their...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com)....

  2. Receptor Proteins in Selective Autophagy

    Christian Behrends

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy has long been thought to be an essential but unselective bulk degradation pathway. However, increasing evidence suggests selective autophagosomal turnover of a broad range of substrates. Bifunctional autophagy receptors play a key role in selective autophagy by tethering cargo to the site of autophagosomal engulfment. While the identity of molecular components involved in selective autophagy has been revealed at least to some extent, we are only beginning to understand how selectivity is achieved in this process. Here, we summarize the mechanistic and structural basis of receptor-mediated selective autophagy.

  3. Oxidative stress, redox signaling pathways, and autophagy in cachectic muscles of male patients with advanced COPD and lung cancer.

    Puig-Vilanova, Ester; Rodriguez, Diego A; Lloreta, Josep; Ausin, Pilar; Pascual-Guardia, Sergio; Broquetas, Joan; Roca, Josep; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-02-01

    Muscle dysfunction and wasting are predictors of mortality in advanced COPD and malignancies. Redox imbalance and enhanced protein catabolism are underlying mechanisms in COPD. We hypothesized that the expression profile of several biological markers share similarities in patients with cachexia associated with either COPD or lung cancer (LC). In vastus lateralis of cachectic patients with either LC (n=10) or advanced COPD (n=16) and healthy controls (n=10), markers of redox balance, inflammation, proteolysis, autophagy, signaling pathways, mitochondrial function, muscle structure, and sarcomere damage were measured using laboratory and light and electron microscopy techniques. Systemic redox balance and inflammation were also determined. All subjects were clinically evaluated. Compared to controls, in both cachectic groups of patients, a similar expression profile of different biological markers was observed in their muscles: increased levels of muscle protein oxidation and ubiquitination (p<0.05, both), which positively correlated (r=0.888), redox-sensitive signaling pathways (NF-κB and FoxO) were activated (p<0.05, all), fast-twitch fiber sizes were atrophied, muscle structural abnormalities and sarcomere disruptions were significantly greater (p<0.05, both). Structural and functional protein levels were lower in muscles of both cachectic patient groups than in controls (p<0.05, all). However, levels of autophagy markers including ultrastructural autophagosome counts were increased only in muscles of cachectic COPD patients (p<0.05). Systemic oxidative stress and inflammation levels were also increased in both patient groups compared to controls (p<0.005, both). Oxidative stress and redox-sensitive signaling pathways are likely to contribute to the etiology of muscle wasting and sarcomere disruption in patients with respiratory cachexia: LC and COPD. PMID:25464271

  4. Selective autophagy of non-ubiquitylated targets in plants: looking for cognate receptor/adaptor proteins

    Vasko eVeljanovski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis is essential for the physiology of eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic cells, including plant cells, utilize two main pathways to adjust the level of cytoplasmic components, namely the proteasomal and the lysosomal/vacuolar pathways. Macroautophagy is a lysosomal/vacuolar pathway which, until recently, was thought to be non-specific and a bulk degradation process. However, selective autophagy which can be activated in the cell under various physiological conditions, involves the specific degradation of defined macromolecules or organelles by a conserved molecular mechanism. For this process to be efficient, the mechanisms underlying the recognition and selection of the cargo to be engulfed by the double-membrane autophagosome are critical, and not yet well understood. Ubiquitin (poly-ubiquitin conjugation to the target appears to be a conserved ligand mechanism in many types of selective autophagy, and defined receptors/adaptors recognizing and regulating the autophagosomal capture of the ubiquitylated target have been characterized. However, non-proteinaceous and non-ubiquitylated cargoes are also selectively degraded by this pathway. This ubiquitin-independent selective autophagic pathway also involves receptor and/or adaptor proteins linking the cargo to the autophagic machinery. Some of these receptor/adaptor proteins including accessory autophagy-related (Atg and non-Atg proteins have been described in yeast and animal cells but not yet in plants. In this review we discuss the ubiquitin-independent cargo selection mechanisms in selective autophagy degradation of organelles and macromolecules and speculate on potential plant receptor/adaptor proteins.

  5. Mechanism of action of the tuberculosis and Crohn disease risk factor IRGM in autophagy.

    Chauhan, Santosh; Mandell, Michael A; Deretic, Vojo

    2016-02-01

    Polymorphisms in the IRGM gene, associated with Crohn disease (CD) and tuberculosis, are among the earliest identified examples documenting the role of autophagy in human disease. Functional studies have shown that IRGM protects against these diseases by modulating autophagy, yet the exact molecular mechanism of IRGM's activity has remained unknown. We have recently elucidated IRGM's mechanism of action. IRGM functions as a platform for assembling, stabilizing, and activating the core autophagic machinery, while at the same time physically coupling it to conventional innate immunity receptors. Exposure to microbial products or bacterial invasion increases IRGM expression, which leads to stabilization of AMPK. Specific protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of IRGM, lead to a co-assembly with IRGM of the key autophagy regulators ULK1 and BECN1 in their activated forms. IRGM physically interacts with 2 other CD risk factors, ATG16L1 and NOD2, placing these 3 principal players in CD within the same molecular complex. This explains how polymorphisms altering expression or function of any of the 3 factors individually can affect the same process-autophagy. Furthermore, IRGM's interaction with NOD2, and additional pattern recognition receptors such as NOD1, RIG-I, and select TLRs, transduces microbial signals to the core autophagy apparatus. This work solves the long-standing enigma of how IRGM controls autophagy. PMID:26313894

  6. DNA damage and autophagy

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  7. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  8. The ubiquitin-proteasome system

    Dipankar Nandi; Pankaj Tahiliani; Anujith Kumar; Dilip Chandu

    2006-03-01

    The 2004 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the discovery of protein ubiquitination has led to the recognition of cellular proteolysis as a central area of research in biology. Eukaryotic proteins targeted for degradation by this pathway are first ‘tagged’ by multimers of a protein known as ubiquitin and are later proteolyzed by a giant enzyme known as the proteasome. This article recounts the key observations that led to the discovery of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In addition, different aspects of proteasome biology are highlighted. Finally, some key roles of the UPS in different areas of biology and the use of inhibitors of this pathway as possible drug targets are discussed.

  9. Autophagy studies in Bombyx mori

    L Tian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, which is well conserved from yeast to mammals, plays essential roles in development and diseases. Using the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, as a model insect, several reports on autophagy have been made recently. Autophagic features are observed in the midgut and fat body during the larval-pupal transition as well as the silk gland and ovarian nurse cells during the pupal stage. There are 14 autophagy related (Atg genes, including at least two transcript variants of Atg1, predicated in Bombyx. Expression of most Atg genes is consistent with the autophagy process in the fat body during the larval-pupal transition, and reduction of Atg1 expression by RNAi blocks this process. The molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E, and starvation induce autophagy in the fat body by upregulating Atg gene expression and blocking the PI3K-TORC1 pathway. Meanwhile, autophagy precedes apoptosis in the midgut and other larval tissues during the larval-pupal transition, while the detailed mechanism is not illustrated yet. We assume that there are at least four future directions about autophagy studies in Bombyx during the next years: (1 physiological functions of autophagy; (2 identification of new components involved in the autophagy process; (3 detailed molecular mechanism of autophagosome formation; (4 functional relationship between autophagy and apoptosis.

  10. Time-dependent changes of autophagy and apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide-induced rat acute lung injury

    Li Lin; Lijun Zhang; Liangzhu Yu; Lu Han; Wanli Ji; Hui Shen; Zhenwu Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Abnormal lung cell death including autophagy and apoptosis is the central feature in acute lung injury (ALI). To identify the cellular mechanisms and the chronology by which different types of lung cell death are activated during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI, we decided to evaluate autophagy (by LC3-II and autophagosome) and apoptosis (by caspase-3) at different time points after LPS treatment in a rat model of LPS-induced ALI. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley ra...

  11. Autophagy is required during cycling hypoxia to lower production of reactive oxygen species

    Background and purpose: Human tumors are characterized by the presence of cells that experience periodic episodes of hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. These cells are exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon reoxygenation and require adaptation to this stress by lowering ROS production or enhancing ROS-clearance for their survival. We hypothesized that autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway, may be involved in reducing ROS during periodic hypoxia through removal of ROS producing species. Materials and methods: Human tumor cells (MCF-7, HT29, U373) were exposed to cycles of hypoxia (O2 < 0.02%) and reoxygenation in the absence or presence of the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ). Clonogenic survival, ROS production and mitochondrial-DNA content were assessed. In addition, A549 cells overexpressing wild-type or K63-mutated ubiquitin (K63R) were analyzed for ROS production. Results: Our data indicate that CQ treatment sensitizes cells to cycling hypoxia, due to increased production of ROS, associated with an incapacity to reduce mitochondrial content. Addition of the ROS-scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine increased cell viability and neutralized CQ-effects. Additionally, genetic prevention of K63-linked ubiquitin chains that are required for the removal of toxic protein aggregates by autophagy, resulted in increased ROS production. Conclusions: Inhibition of autophagy substantially increases cell death induced by cycling hypoxia through increased ROS production, providing an opportunity to decrease the hypoxic fraction within tumors and enhance tumor therapy.

  12. The role of autophagy in epileptogenesis and in epilepsy-induced neuronal alterations.

    Giorgi, Filippo Sean; Biagioni, Francesca; Lenzi, Paola; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that autophagy alterations are present in a variety of neurological disorders. These range from neurodegenerative diseases to acute neurological insults. Thus, despite a role of autophagy was investigated in a variety of neurological diseases, only recently these studies included epilepsy. This was fostered by the evidence that rapamycin, a powerful autophagy inducer, strongly modulates a variety of seizure models and epilepsies. These findings were originally interpreted as the results of the inhibition exerted by rapamycin on the molecular complex named "mammalian Target of Rapamycin" (mTOR). Recently, an increasing number of papers demonstrated that mTOR inhibition produces a strong activation of the autophagy machinery. In this way, it is now increasingly recognized that what was once defined as mTORpathy in epileptogenesis may be partially explained by abnormalities in the autophagy machinery. The present review features a brief introductory statement about the autophagy machinery and discusses the involvement of autophagy in seizures and epilepsies. An emphasis is posed on evidence addressing both pros and cons making it sometime puzzling and sometime evident, the role of autophagy in the epileptic brain. PMID:25217966

  13. Autophagy During Cardiac Stress: Joys and Frustrations of Autophagy

    Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Mentzer, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The study of autophagy has been transformed by the cloning of most genes in the pathway and the introduction of GFP-LC3 as a reporter to allow visual assessment of autophagy. The field of cardiac biology is not alone in attempting to understand the implications of autophagy. The purpose of this review is to address some of the controversies and conundrums associated with the evolving studies of autophagy in the heart. Autophagy is a cellular process involving a complex orchestration of regulatory gene products as well as machinery for assembly, selective targeting, and degradation of autophagosomes and their contents. Our understanding of the role of autophagy in human disease is rapidly evolving as investigators examine the process in different tissues and different pathophysiological contexts. In the field of heart disease, autophagy has been examined in the settings of ischemia and reperfusion, preconditioning, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure. This review addresses the role of autophagy in cardioprotection, the balance of catabolism and anabolism, the concept of mitochondrial quality control, and the implications of impaired autophagic flux or frustrated autophagy. PMID:20148666

  14. New Insights Into Roles of Ubiquitin Modification in Regulating Plastids and Other Endosymbiotic Organelles.

    Broad, W; Ling, Q; Jarvis, P

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings have revealed important and diverse roles for the ubiquitin modification of proteins in the regulation of endosymbiotic organelles, which include the primary plastids of plants as well as complex plastids: the secondary endosymbiotic organelles of cryptophytes, alveolates, stramenopiles, and haptophytes. Ubiquitin modifications have a variety of potential consequences, both to the modified protein itself and to cellular regulation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) can target individual proteins for selective degradation by the cytosolic 26S proteasome. Ubiquitin modifications can also signal the removal of whole endosymbiotic organelles, for example, via autophagy as has been well characterized in mitochondria. As plastids must import over 90% of their proteins from the cytosol, the observation that the UPS selectively targets the plastid protein import machinery is particularly significant. In this way, the UPS may influence the development and interconversions of different plastid types, as well as plastid responses to stress, by reconfiguring the organellar proteome. In complex plastids, the Symbiont-derived ERAD-Like Machinery (SELMA) has coopted the protein transport capabilities of the ER-Associated Degradation (ERAD) system, whereby misfolded proteins are retrotranslocated from ER for proteasomal degradation, uncoupling them from proteolysis: SELMA components have been retargeted to the second outermost plastid membrane to mediate protein import. In spite of this wealth of new information, there still remain a large number of unanswered questions and a need to define the roles of ubiquitin modification further in the regulation of plastids. PMID:27241217

  15. Autophagy-independent enhancing effects of Beclin 1 on cytotoxicity of ovarian cancer cells mediated by proteasome inhibitors

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system and macroautophagy (hereafter referred to autophagy) are two complementary pathways for protein degradation. Emerging evidence suggests that proteasome inhibition might be a promising approach for tumor therapy. Accumulating data suggest that autophagy is activated as a compensatory mechanism upon proteasome activity is impaired. Autophagy activation was measured using acridine orange staining and LC3 transition. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured using MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Beclin 1 expression vectors or shRNA against Beclin 1 (shBeclin 1) were transfected to investigate the role of Beclin 1 in autophagy activation and cytotoxicity of ovarian cancer cells induced by proteasome inhibitors. Proteasome inhibitors suppressed proliferation and induced autophagy in ovarian cancer cells. Neither phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors nor shRNA against Beclin 1 could abolish the formation of acidic vacuoles and the processing of LC3 induced by proteasome inhibitors. Moreover, Beclin 1 overexpression enhanced anti-proliferative effects of proteasome inhibitors in ovarian cancer cells. For the first time, the current study demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors induced PI3K and Beclin 1-independent autophagy in ovarian cancer cells. In addition, this study revealed autophagy-independent tumor suppressive effects of Beclin 1 in ovarian cancer cells

  16. Autophagy in plants and phytopathogens.

    Yoshimoto, Kohki; Takano, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2010-04-01

    Plants and plant-associated microorganisms including phytopathogens have to adapt to drastic changes in environmental conditions. Because of their immobility, plants must cope with various types of environmental stresses such as starvation, oxidative stress, drought stress, and invasion by phytopathogens during their differentiation, development, and aging processes. Here we briefly describe the early studies of plant autophagy, summarize recent studies on the molecular functions of ATG genes, and speculate on the role of autophagy in plants and phytopathogens. Autophagy regulates senescence and pathogen-induced cell death in plants, and autophagy and pexophagy play critical roles in differentiation and the invasion of host cells by phytopathogenic fungi. PMID:20079356

  17. Autophagy in cardiovascular biology

    Lavandero, Sergio; Chiong, Mario; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. As such, there is great interest in identifying novel mechanisms that govern the cardiovascular response to disease-related stress. First described in failing hearts, autophagy within the cardiovascular system has been widely characterized in cardiomyocytes, cardiac fibroblasts, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. In all cases, a window of optimal autophagic activity appears to be critical to the mai...

  18. AUTOPHAGY IN LUNG CANCER

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lu, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The relatively poor cure rate in lung cancer patients has been associated with a resistance to chemotherapy and radiation that is at least in part related to defects in cellular apoptotic machinery. Exploitation of another form of cell death, autophagy, has the capacity to improve the therapeutic gain of current therapies. In an effort to develop novel treatment strategies to enhance the therapeutic ratio for lung cancer, we...

  19. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets

  20. Induction of autophagy by proteasome inhibitor is associated with proliferative arrest in colon cancer cells

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosome-dependent macroautophagy (autophagy) are two major intracellular pathways for protein degradation. Blockade of UPS by proteasome inhibitors has been shown to activate autophagy. Recent evidence also suggests that proteasome inhibitors may inhibit cancer growth. In this study, the effect of a proteasome inhibitor MG-132 on the proliferation and autophagy of cultured colon cancer cells (HT-29) was elucidated. Results showed that MG-132 inhibited HT-29 cell proliferation and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest which was associated with the formation of LC3+ autophagic vacuoles and the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles. MG-132 also increased the protein expression of LC3-I and -II in a time-dependent manner. In this connection, 3-methyladenine, a Class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, significantly abolished the formation of LC3+ autophagic vacuoles and the expression of LC3-II but not LC3-I induced by MG-132. Taken together, this study demonstrates that inhibition of proteasome in colon cancer cells lowers cell proliferation and activates autophagy. This discovery may shed a new light on the novel function of proteasome in the regulation of autophagy and proliferation in colon cancer cells

  1. Ubiquitin and proteasomes in transcription.

    Geng, Fuqiang; Wenzel, Sabine; Tansey, William P

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is vitally important for the maintenance of normal cellular homeostasis. Failure to correctly regulate gene expression, or to deal with problems that arise during the transcription process, can lead to cellular catastrophe and disease. One of the ways cells cope with the challenges of transcription is by making extensive use of the proteolytic and nonproteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Here, we review recent evidence showing deep mechanistic connections between the transcription and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Our goal is to leave the reader with a sense that just about every step in transcription-from transcription initiation through to export of mRNA from the nucleus-is influenced by the UPS and that all major arms of the system--from the first step in ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation through to the proteasome-are recruited into transcriptional processes to provide regulation, directionality, and deconstructive power. PMID:22404630

  2. Activation of antibacterial autophagy by NADPH oxidases

    Huang, Ju; Canadien, Veronica; Lam, Grace Y.; Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Mary C. Dinauer; Magalhaes, Marco A. O.; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in immunity to microbial pathogens. The autophagy system can target bacteria in phagosomes, promoting phagosome maturation and preventing pathogen escape into the cytosol. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling from phagosomes was found to initiate their targeting by the autophagy system, but the mechanism by which TLR signaling activates autophagy is unclear. Here we show that autophagy targeting of phagosomes is not exclusive to those containing TLR l...

  3. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    K Aurelia Ball; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Lewinski, Mary K; John Guatelli; Erik Verschueren; Krogan, Nevan J.; Matthew P Jacobson

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichm...

  4. Role and Regulation of Autophagy in Heat Stress Responses of Tomato Plants

    Jie eZhou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are constantly exposed to a wide spectrum of stress conditions such as high temperature, which causes protein misfolding. Misfolded proteins are highly toxic and must be efficiently removed to reduce cellular proteotoxic stress if restoration of native conformations is unsuccessful. Although selective autophagy is known to function in protein quality control by targeting degradation of misfolded and potentially toxic proteins, its role and regulation in heat stress responses have not been analyzed in crop plants. In the present study, we found that heat stress induced expression of autophagy-related (ATG genes and accumulation of autophagosomes in tomato plants. Virus-induced gene silencing of tomato ATG5 and ATG7 genes resulted in increased sensitivity of tomato plants to heat stress based on both increased development of heat stress symptoms and compromised photosynthetic parameters of heat-stressed leaf tissues. Silencing of tomato homologs for the selective autophagy receptor NBR1, which targets ubiquitinated protein aggregates, also compromised tomato heat tolerance. To better understand the regulation of heat-induced autophagy, we found that silencing of tomato ATG5, ATG7 or NBR1 compromised heat-induced expression of not only the targeted genes but also other autophagy-related genes. Furthermore, we identified two tomato genes encoding proteins highly homologous to Arabidopsis WRKY33 transcription factor, which has been previously shown to interact physically with an autophagy protein. Silencing of tomato WRKY33 genes compromised tomato heat tolerance and reduced heat-induced ATG gene expression and autophagosome accumulation. Based on these results, we propose that heat-induced autophagy in tomato is subject to cooperative regulation by both WRKY33 and ATG proteins and plays a critical role in tomato heat tolerance, mostly likely through selective removal of heat-induced protein aggregates.

  5. A genetic screen for modifiers of Drosophila caspase Dcp-1 reveals caspase involvement in autophagy and novel caspase-related genes

    Ahnn Joohong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caspases are cysteine proteases with essential functions in the apoptotic pathway; their proteolytic activity toward various substrates is associated with the morphological changes of cells. Recent reports have described non-apoptotic functions of caspases, including autophagy. In this report, we searched for novel modifiers of the phenotype of Dcp-1 gain-of-function (GF animals by screening promoter element- inserted Drosophila melanogaster lines (EP lines. Results We screened ~15,000 EP lines and identified 72 Dcp-1-interacting genes that were classified into 10 groups based on their functions and pathways: 4 apoptosis signaling genes, 10 autophagy genes, 5 insulin/IGF and TOR signaling pathway genes, 6 MAP kinase and JNK signaling pathway genes, 4 ecdysone signaling genes, 6 ubiquitination genes, 11 various developmental signaling genes, 12 transcription factors, 3 translation factors, and 11 other unclassified genes including 5 functionally undefined genes. Among them, insulin/IGF and TOR signaling pathway, MAP kinase and JNK signaling pathway, and ecdysone signaling are known to be involved in autophagy. Together with the identification of autophagy genes, the results of our screen suggest that autophagy counteracts Dcp-1-induced apoptosis. Consistent with this idea, we show that expression of eGFP-Atg5 rescued the eye phenotype caused by Dcp-1 GF. Paradoxically, we found that over-expression of full-length Dcp-1 induced autophagy, as Atg8b-GFP, an indicator of autophagy, was increased in the eye imaginal discs and in the S2 cell line. Taken together, these data suggest that autophagy suppresses Dcp-1-mediated apoptotic cell death, whereas Dcp-1 positively regulates autophagy, possibly through feedback regulation. Conclusions We identified a number of Dcp-1 modifiers that genetically interact with Dcp-1-induced cell death. Our results showing that Dcp-1 and autophagy-related genes influence each other will aid future

  6. Ubiquitin-binding proteins: similar, but different

    Andersen, Katrine M; Hofmann, Kay; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    ubiquitin conjugation to endoplasmic reticulum degradation), UEV [ubiquitin E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme) variant] and NZF (nuclear protein localization gene 4 zinc finger) domain-containing proteins appear to have more specialized functions. Here we discuss functional and structural properties of...

  7. Autophagy and neurodegenerative disorders

    Evangelia Kesidou; Roza Lagoudaki; Olga Touloumi; Kyriaki-Nefeli Poulatsidou; Constantina Simeonidou

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aberrant proteins and inclusion bodies are hallmarks in most neurodegenerative diseases. Consequently, these aggregates within neurons lead to toxic effects, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Autophagy is a significant intracel ular mechanism that removes damaged organelles and misfolded proteins in order to maintain cel homeostasis. Excessive or insufficient autophagic activity in neurons leads to altered homeostasis and influences their survival rate, causing neurodegeneration. The review article provides an update of the role of autophagic process in representative chronic and acute neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Orfali, Nina

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies.

  9. Autophagy regulates chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells

    Recent studies have shown that up-regulation of autophagy may be a tractable therapeutic intervention for clearing disease-causing proteins, including α-synuclein, ubiquitin, and other misfolded or aggregated proteins in pesticide-induced neurodegeneration. In a previous study, we reported that chlorpyrifos (CPF)-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis is mediated through reactive oxygen species in SH-SY5Y cells. In this study, we explored a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach to prevent CPF neurotoxicity involving the regulation of autophagy. We investigated the modulation of CPF-induced apoptosis according to autophagy regulation. We found that CPF induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, as demonstrated by the activation of caspase-3 and nuclear condensation. In addition, we observed that cells treated with CPF underwent autophagic cell death by monitoring the expression of LC3-II and p62. Pretreatment with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly enhanced the cell viability of CPF-exposed cells, and the enhancement of cell viability was partially due to alleviation of CPF-induced apoptosis via a decrease in levels of cleaved caspase-3. Specifically, rapamycin pretreatment decreased Bax and increased Bcl-2 expression in mitochondria. In addition, rapamycin significantly decreased cytochrome c release in from mitochondria into the cytosol. However, pretreatment of cells with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA), remarkably increased CPF toxicity in these cells; this with correlated with increased expression of Bax and decreased expression of Bcl-2 in mitochondria. Our results suggest that CPF-induced cytotoxicity is modified by autophagy regulation and that rapamycin protects against CPF-induced apoptosis by enhancing autophagy. Pharmacologic induction of autophagy by rapamycin may be a useful treatment strategy in neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is cytotoxic to SH-SY5Y cells ► CPF-induced cytotoxicity is mediated by

  10. Autophagy regulates chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells

    Park, Jae Hyeon [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Eun [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, In Chul [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hyun Chul, E-mail: hckoh@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that up-regulation of autophagy may be a tractable therapeutic intervention for clearing disease-causing proteins, including α-synuclein, ubiquitin, and other misfolded or aggregated proteins in pesticide-induced neurodegeneration. In a previous study, we reported that chlorpyrifos (CPF)-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis is mediated through reactive oxygen species in SH-SY5Y cells. In this study, we explored a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach to prevent CPF neurotoxicity involving the regulation of autophagy. We investigated the modulation of CPF-induced apoptosis according to autophagy regulation. We found that CPF induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, as demonstrated by the activation of caspase-3 and nuclear condensation. In addition, we observed that cells treated with CPF underwent autophagic cell death by monitoring the expression of LC3-II and p62. Pretreatment with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly enhanced the cell viability of CPF-exposed cells, and the enhancement of cell viability was partially due to alleviation of CPF-induced apoptosis via a decrease in levels of cleaved caspase-3. Specifically, rapamycin pretreatment decreased Bax and increased Bcl-2 expression in mitochondria. In addition, rapamycin significantly decreased cytochrome c release in from mitochondria into the cytosol. However, pretreatment of cells with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA), remarkably increased CPF toxicity in these cells; this with correlated with increased expression of Bax and decreased expression of Bcl-2 in mitochondria. Our results suggest that CPF-induced cytotoxicity is modified by autophagy regulation and that rapamycin protects against CPF-induced apoptosis by enhancing autophagy. Pharmacologic induction of autophagy by rapamycin may be a useful treatment strategy in neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is cytotoxic to SH-SY5Y cells ► CPF-induced cytotoxicity is mediated by

  11. Induction of autophagy by Imatinib sequesters Bcr-Abl in autophagosomes and down-regulates Bcr-Abl protein.

    Elzinga, Baukje M

    2013-06-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a disease of hematopoietic stem cells which harbor the chimeric gene Bcr-Abl. Expression levels of this constitutively active tyrosine kinase are critical for response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment and also disease progression, yet the regulation of protein stability is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that imatinib can induce autophagy in Bcr-Abl expressing cells. Autophagy has been associated with the clearance of large macromolecular signaling complexes and abnormal proteins, however, the contribution of autophagy to the turnover of Bcr-Abl protein in imatinib treated cells is unknown. In this study, we show that following imatinib treatment, Bcr-Abl is sequestered into vesicular structures that co-localize with the autophagy marker LC3 or GABARAP. This association is inhibited by siRNA mediated knockdown of autophagy regulators (Beclin 1\\/ATG7). Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also reduced Bcr-Abl\\/LC3 co-localization in both K562 and CML patient cells. Bcr-Abl protein expression was reduced with imatinib treatment. Inhibition of both autophagy and proteasome activity in imatinib treated cells was required to restore Bcr-Abl protein levels to those of untreated cells. This ability to down-regulate Bcr-Abl protein levels through the induction of autophagy may be an additional and important feature of the activity of imatinib.

  12. Neuronal Autophagy and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Hwang, Su-Kyung; Lee, Jin-A

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders include a wide range of diseases such as autism spectrum disorders and mental retardation. Mutations in several genes that regulate neural development and synapse function have been identified in neurodevelopmental disorders. Interestingly, some affected genes and pathways in these diseases are associated with the autophagy pathway. Autophagy is a complex, bulky degradative process that involves the sequestration of cellular proteins, RNA, lipids, and cellular org...

  13. Congenital Abnormalities

    ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase the risk that a baby will be born with abnormalities (e.g. fetal alcohol spectrum disorders ). Eating raw or uncooked foods during pregnancy can also be dangerous to health of the ...

  14. Autophagy and intestinal homeostasis.

    Patel, Khushbu K; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient absorption is the basic function that drives mammalian intestinal biology. To facilitate nutrient uptake, the host's epithelial barrier is composed of a single layer of cells. This constraint is problematic, as a design of this type can be easily disrupted. The solution during the course of evolution was to add numerous host defense mechanisms that can help prevent local and systemic infection. These mechanisms include specialized epithelial cells that produce a physiochemical barrier overlying the cellular barrier, robust and organized adaptive and innate immune cells, and the ability to mount an inflammatory response that is commensurate with a specific threat level. The autophagy pathway is a critical cellular process that strongly influences all these functions. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the components of this pathway and their influence on inflammation, immunity, and barrier function will facilitate our understanding of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23216414

  15. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    K Aurelia Ball

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well.

  16. Cold denaturation of encapsulated ubiquitin

    Pometun, Maxim S.; Peterson, Ronald W.; Babu, Charles R.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical considerations suggest that protein cold denaturation can potentially provide a means to explore the cooperative substructure of proteins. Protein cold denaturation is generally predicted to occur well-below the freezing point of water. Here NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin encapsulated in reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity alkanes is used to follow cold-induced unfolding to temperatures below −25 °C. Comparison of cold-induced structural transitions in a variety of reverse ...

  17. Ubiquitin-independent function of optineurin in autophagic clearance of protein aggregates.

    Korac, Jelena; Schaeffer, Veronique; Kovacevic, Igor; Clement, Albrecht M; Jungblut, Benno; Behl, Christian; Terzic, Janos; Dikic, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    Aggregation of misfolded proteins and the associated loss of neurons are considered a hallmark of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. Optineurin is present in protein inclusions observed in various neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Creutzfeld-Jacob disease and Pick's disease. Optineurin deletion mutations have also been described in ALS patients. However, the role of optineurin in mechanisms of protein aggregation remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that optineurin recognizes various protein aggregates via its C-terminal coiled-coil domain in a ubiquitin-independent manner. We also show that optineurin depletion significantly increases protein aggregation in HeLa cells and that morpholino-silencing of the optineurin ortholog in zebrafish causes the motor axonopathy phenotype similar to a zebrafish model of ALS. A more severe phenotype is observed when optineurin is depleted in zebrafish carrying ALS mutations. Furthermore, TANK1 binding kinase 1 (TBK1) is colocalized with optineurin on protein aggregates and is important in clearance of protein aggregates through the autophagy-lysosome pathway. TBK1 phosphorylates optineurin at serine 177 and regulates its ability to interact with autophagy modifiers. This study provides evidence for a ubiquitin-independent function of optineurin in autophagic clearance of protein aggregates as well as additional relevance for TBK1 as an upstream regulator of the autophagic pathway. PMID:23178947

  18. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  19. Autophagy and apoptosis: rivals or mates?

    Yan Cheng

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a cellular process of "self-eating" by which intracellular components are degraded within the lysosome, is an evolutionarily conserved response to various stresses. Autophagy is associated with numerous patho-physiological conditions, and dysregulation of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer. Depending on context, activation of autophagy may promote either cell survival or death, two major events that determine pathological process of many illnesses. Importantly, the activity of autophagy is often associated with apoptosis, another critical cellular process determining cellular fate. A better understanding of biology of autophagy and its implication in human health and disorder, as well as the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis, has the potential of facilitating the development of autophagy-based therapeutic interventions for human diseases such as cancer.

  20. Autophagy and apoptosis: rivals or mates?

    Yan Cheng; Jin-Ming Yang

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,a cellular process of "self-eating" by which intracellular components are degraded within the lysosome,is an evolutionarily conserved response to various stresses.Autophagy is associated with numerous patho-physiological conditions,and dysregulation of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer.Depending on context,activation of autophagy may promote either cell survival or death,two major events that determine pathological process of many illnesses.Importantly,the activity of autophagy is often associated with apoptosis,another critical cellular process determining cellular fate.A better understanding of biology of autophagy and its implication in human health and disorder,as well as the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis,has the potential of facilitating the development of autophagy-based therapeutic interventions for human diseases such as cancer.

  1. STAT3-Mediated Autophagy Dependence Identifies Subtypes of Breast Cancer where Autophagy Inhibition can be Efficacious

    Maycotte, Paola; Gearheart, Christy M.; Barnard, Rebecca; Aryal, Suraj; Mulcahy Levy, Jean M.; Fosmire, Susan P.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Morgan, Michael J.; Christopher C Porter; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a protein and organelle degradation pathway that is involved in diverse diseases including cancer. Recent evidence suggests that autophagy is a cell survival mechanism in tumor cells and that its inhibition especially in combination with other therapy could be beneficial but it remains unclear if all cancer cells behave the same way when autophagy is inhibited. We inhibited autophagy in a panel of breast cancer cell lines and found that some of them are dependent on autophagy for...

  2. Intracellular release of rapamycin from poly (lactic acid) nanospheres modifies autophagy.

    Nagata, Junpei; Matsui, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the autophagy activity of cells by the intracellular release of rapamycin (Rapa) of an autophagy inducer. Rapa was incorporated into nanospheres of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) for the controlled release of Rapa. Rapa was released from the PLGA nanospheres incorporating rapamycin (Rapa-PLGA-NS) with time while the Rapa-PLGA-NS were hydrolytically degraded. When human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells were incubated with the Rapa-PLGA-NS, the Rapa-PLGA-NS were internalized, and the intracellular concentration was maintained over four days, indicating the intracellular Rapa release. The microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (LC3) of an autophagy marker was significantly high for the Rapa-PLGA-NS group compared with the free Rapa group even after four days incubation. In addition, intracellular harmful ubiquitinated proteins were degraded by the intracellular release of Rapa even after four days incubation in contrast to free Rapa. It is concluded that the intracellular Rapa release is effective in modulating the autophagy activity over a longer time period. PMID:27320771

  3. Autophagy and mitophagy in cellular damage control

    Jianhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and mitophagy are important cellular processes that are responsible for breaking down cellular contents, preserving energy and safeguarding against accumulation of damaged and aggregated biomolecules. This graphic review gives a broad summary of autophagy and discusses examples where autophagy is important in controlling protein degradation. In addition we highlight how autophagy and mitophagy are involved in the cellular responses to reactive species and mitochondrial dysfunction. The key signaling pathways for mitophagy are described in the context of bioenergetic dysfunction.

  4. Autophagy: for better or for worse

    Wirawan, Ellen; Berghe, Tom Vanden; Lippens, Saskia; Agostinis, Patrizia; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that degrades damaged or superfluous cell components into basic biomolecules, which are then recycled back into the cytosol. In this respect, autophagy drives a flow of biomolecules in a continuous degradation-regeneration cycle. Autophagy is generally considered a pro-survival mechanism protecting cells under stress or poor nutrient conditions. Current research clearly shows that autophagy fulfills numerous functions in vital biological processes....

  5. Ubiquitin-mediated response to microsporidia and virus infection in C. elegans.

    Bakowski, Malina A; Desjardins, Christopher A; Smelkinson, Margery G; Dunbar, Tiffany L; Dunbar, Tiffany A; Lopez-Moyado, Isaac F; Rifkin, Scott A; Cuomo, Christina A; Troemel, Emily R

    2014-06-01

    Microsporidia comprise a phylum of over 1400 species of obligate intracellular pathogens that can infect almost all animals, but little is known about the host response to these parasites. Here we use the whole-animal host C. elegans to show an in vivo role for ubiquitin-mediated response to the microsporidian species Nematocida parisii, as well to the Orsay virus, another natural intracellular pathogen of C. elegans. We analyze gene expression of C. elegans in response to N. parisii, and find that it is similar to response to viral infection. Notably, we find an upregulation of SCF ubiquitin ligase components, such as the cullin ortholog cul-6, which we show is important for ubiquitin targeting of N. parisii cells in the intestine. We show that ubiquitylation components, the proteasome, and the autophagy pathway are all important for defense against N. parisii infection. We also find that SCF ligase components like cul-6 promote defense against viral infection, where they have a more robust role than against N. parisii infection. This difference may be due to suppression of the host ubiquitylation system by N. parisii: when N. parisii is crippled by anti-microsporidia drugs, the host can more effectively target pathogen cells for ubiquitylation. Intriguingly, inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) increases expression of infection-upregulated SCF ligase components, indicating that a trigger for transcriptional response to intracellular infection by N. parisii and virus may be perturbation of the UPS. Altogether, our results demonstrate an in vivo role for ubiquitin-mediated defense against microsporidian and viral infections in C. elegans. PMID:24945527

  6. Ubiquitin-mediated response to microsporidia and virus infection in C. elegans.

    Malina A Bakowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microsporidia comprise a phylum of over 1400 species of obligate intracellular pathogens that can infect almost all animals, but little is known about the host response to these parasites. Here we use the whole-animal host C. elegans to show an in vivo role for ubiquitin-mediated response to the microsporidian species Nematocida parisii, as well to the Orsay virus, another natural intracellular pathogen of C. elegans. We analyze gene expression of C. elegans in response to N. parisii, and find that it is similar to response to viral infection. Notably, we find an upregulation of SCF ubiquitin ligase components, such as the cullin ortholog cul-6, which we show is important for ubiquitin targeting of N. parisii cells in the intestine. We show that ubiquitylation components, the proteasome, and the autophagy pathway are all important for defense against N. parisii infection. We also find that SCF ligase components like cul-6 promote defense against viral infection, where they have a more robust role than against N. parisii infection. This difference may be due to suppression of the host ubiquitylation system by N. parisii: when N. parisii is crippled by anti-microsporidia drugs, the host can more effectively target pathogen cells for ubiquitylation. Intriguingly, inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS increases expression of infection-upregulated SCF ligase components, indicating that a trigger for transcriptional response to intracellular infection by N. parisii and virus may be perturbation of the UPS. Altogether, our results demonstrate an in vivo role for ubiquitin-mediated defense against microsporidian and viral infections in C. elegans.

  7. p53: The Janus of autophagy?

    Levine, Beth; Abrams, John

    2008-01-01

    The autophagy pathway functions in adaptation to nutrient stress and tumour suppression. The p53 tumour suppressor, previously thought to positively regulate autophagy, may also inhibit it. This dual interplay between p53 and autophagy regulation is enigmatic, but may underlie key aspects of metabolism and cancer biology.

  8. Autophagy in the Pathogenesis of Disease

    Levine, Beth; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is essential for survival, differentiation, development, and homeostasis. Autophagy principally serves an adaptive role to protect organisms against diverse pathologies, including infections, cancer, neurodegeneration, aging, and heart disease. However, in certain experimental disease settings, the self-cannibalistic or, paradoxically, even the prosurvival functions of autophagy may be deleterious. This Review summarizes recent advances in und...

  9. Crystal Structure of Oxidative Stress Sensor Keap1 in Complex with Selective Autophagy Substrate p62

    Kurokawa, Hirofumi

    Keap1, an adaptor protein of cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase complex, represses cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2 in an oxidative stress-dependent manner. The accumulation of selective autophagy substrate p62 also activates Nrf2 target genes, but the detailed mechanism has not been elucidated. Crystal structure of Keap1-p62 complex revealed the structural basis for the Nrf2 activation in which Keap1 is inactivated by p62. The accumulation of p62 is observed in hepatocellular carcinoma. The activation of Nrf2 target genes, including detoxifying enzymes and efflux transporters, by p62 may protect the cancer cells from anti-cancer drugs.

  10. Egr-1 regulates autophagy in cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Zhi-Hua Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive lung disease characterized by abnormal cellular responses to cigarette smoke, resulting in tissue destruction and airflow limitation. Autophagy is a degradative process involving lysosomal turnover of cellular components, though its role in human diseases remains unclear. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Increased autophagy was observed in lung tissue from COPD patients, as indicated by electron microscopic analysis, as well as by increased activation of autophagic proteins (microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3B, LC3B, Atg4, Atg5/12, Atg7. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE is an established model for studying the effects of cigarette smoke exposure in vitro. In human pulmonary epithelial cells, exposure to CSE or histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor rapidly induced autophagy. CSE decreased HDAC activity, resulting in increased binding of early growth response-1 (Egr-1 and E2F factors to the autophagy gene LC3B promoter, and increased LC3B expression. Knockdown of E2F-4 or Egr-1 inhibited CSE-induced LC3B expression. Knockdown of Egr-1 also inhibited the expression of Atg4B, a critical factor for LC3B conversion. Inhibition of autophagy by LC3B-knockdown protected epithelial cells from CSE-induced apoptosis. Egr-1(-/- mice, which displayed basal airspace enlargement, resisted cigarette-smoke induced autophagy, apoptosis, and emphysema. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate a critical role for Egr-1 in promoting autophagy and apoptosis in response to cigarette smoke exposure in vitro and in vivo. The induction of autophagy at early stages of COPD progression suggests novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of cigarette smoke induced lung injury.

  11. Coupling of HIV-1 Antigen to the Selective Autophagy Receptor SQSTM1/p62 Promotes T-Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Andersen, Aram Nikolai; Landsverk, Ole Jørgen; Simonsen, Anne; Bogen, Bjarne; Corthay, Alexandre; Øynebråten, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines aiming to promote T-cell-mediated immune responses have so far showed limited efficacy, and there is a need for novel strategies. Studies indicate that autophagy plays an inherent role in antigen processing and presentation for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Here, we report a novel vaccine strategy based on fusion of antigen to the selective autophagy receptor sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1)/p62. We hypothesized that redirection of vaccine antigen from proteasomal degradation into the autophagy pathway would increase the generation of antigen-specific T cells. A hybrid vaccine construct was designed in which the antigen is fused to the C-terminus of p62, a signaling hub, and a receptor that naturally delivers ubiquitinated cargo for autophagic degradation. Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 antigen Gagp24 to p62 resulted in efficient antigen delivery into the autophagy pathway. Intradermal immunization of mice revealed that, in comparison to Gagp24 delivered alone, fusion to p62 enhanced the number of Gagp24-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells, including CD8+ T cells. The strategy may also have the potential to modulate the antigenic peptide repertoire. Because p62 and autophagy are highly conserved between species, we anticipate this strategy to be a candidate for the development of T-cell-based vaccines in humans.

  12. The cellular decision between apoptosis and autophagy

    Yong-Jun Fan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis and autophagy are important molecular processes that maintain organismal and cellular homeostasis, respectively. While apoptosis fulfills its role through dismantling damaged or unwanted cells, autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis through recycling selective intracellular organelles and molecules. Yet in some conditions, autophagy can lead to cell death. Apoptosis and autophagy can be stimulated by the same stresses. Emerging evidence indicates an interplay between the core proteins in both pathways, which underlies the molecular mechanism of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy. This review summarizes recent literature on molecules that regulate both the apoptotic and autophagic processes.

  13. Sperm Ubiquitination Correlation with Human Semen Quality

    MR Sadeghi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ubiquitin, an 8.5 kDa peptide that marks other proteins for proteasomal degradation, tags defective sperm during epididymal passage. Thus, sperm ubiquitination is a universal marker for sperm defects and can be used as a sperm function test. The objective of the present study was to examine the relationships between sperm ubiquitination and clinical semen parameters, using simplified immunofluorescence assays in order to establish ubiquitin as a biomarker of male infertility. Methods: Semen samples from 100 couples attending Avicenna Infertility Clinic, Tehran, Iran, were collected and analyzed according to WHO criteria. Each sample was washed and adjusted at 106 sperm/ml concentration. Sperm were coated on slides, using cytospin centrifugation and were fixed in buffered formaldehyde. Subsequently ubiquitinated spermatozoa were evaluated by direct immunofluorescence microscopy using FITC-labeled anti-ubiquitin antibodies. After counting at least 200 sperm per sample, while employing light microscopy, the percentage of ubiquitinated spermatozoa was recorded on the same fields through epifluorescence microscopy. Results: Negative correlations were obtained between sperm ubiquitination and sperm count (r=-0.278, P< 0.001, sperm concentration (r=-0.37, P< 0.001, viability (r=-0.407, P< 0.001, sperm morphology (r=-0.509, P< 0.001, rapid progressive motility (a (r=-0.246, P< 0.001 and slow progressive motility (b (r=-0.474, P< 0.001. There was a positive correlation between ubiquitinated sperm and the percentage of immotile spermatozoa (r=0.486, P< 0.000. Conclusion: Increased sperm ubiquitination is inversely associated with good semen quality parameters, supporting the use of ubiquitin as a biomarker for evaluation of human sperm quality.

  14. Advances in Autophagy Regulatory Mechanisms

    Laura E. Gallagher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays a critical role in cell metabolism by degrading and recycling internal components when challenged with limited nutrients. This fundamental and conserved mechanism is based on a membrane trafficking pathway in which nascent autophagosomes engulf cytoplasmic cargo to form vesicles that transport their content to the lysosome for degradation. Based on this simple scheme, autophagy modulates cellular metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control to influence an unexpectedly wide range of normal mammalian physiology and pathophysiology. In this review, we summarise recent advancements in three broad areas of autophagy regulation. We discuss current models on how autophagosomes are initiated from endogenous membranes. We detail how the uncoordinated 51-like kinase (ULK complex becomes activated downstream of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1. Finally, we summarise the upstream signalling mechanisms that can sense amino acid availability leading to activation of MTORC1.

  15. Advances in Autophagy Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Gallagher, Laura E; Williamson, Leon E; Chan, Edmond Y W

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy plays a critical role in cell metabolism by degrading and recycling internal components when challenged with limited nutrients. This fundamental and conserved mechanism is based on a membrane trafficking pathway in which nascent autophagosomes engulf cytoplasmic cargo to form vesicles that transport their content to the lysosome for degradation. Based on this simple scheme, autophagy modulates cellular metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control to influence an unexpectedly wide range of normal mammalian physiology and pathophysiology. In this review, we summarise recent advancements in three broad areas of autophagy regulation. We discuss current models on how autophagosomes are initiated from endogenous membranes. We detail how the uncoordinated 51-like kinase (ULK) complex becomes activated downstream of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1). Finally, we summarise the upstream signalling mechanisms that can sense amino acid availability leading to activation of MTORC1. PMID:27187479

  16. Modulation of pathogen recognition by autophagy

    Ji Eun eOh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an ancient biological process for maintaining cellular homeostasis by degradation of long-lived cytosolic proteins and organelles. Recent studies demonstrated that autophagy is availed by immune cells to regulate innate immunity. On the one hand, cells exert direct effector function by degrading intracellular pathogens; on the other hand, autophagy modulates pathogen recognition and downstream signaling for innate immune responses. Pathogen recognition via pattern recognition receptors induces autophagy. The function of phagocytic cells is enhanced by recruitment of autophagy-related proteins. Moreover, autophagy acts as a delivery system for viral replication complexes to migrate to the endosomal compartments where virus sensing occurs. In another case, key molecules of the autophagic pathway have been found to negatively regulate immune signaling, thus preventing aberrant activation of cytokine production and consequent immune responses. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the role of autophagy in pathogen recognition and modulation of innate immune responses.

  17. Historical landmarks of autophagy research

    Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    The year of 2013 marked the 50th anniversary of C de Duve's coining of the term “autophagy” for the degradation process of cytoplasmic constituents in the lysosome/vacuole. This year we regretfully lost this great scientist, who contributed much during the early years of research to the field of autophagy. Soon after the discovery of lysosomes by de Duve, electron microscopy revealed autophagy as a means of delivering intracellular components to the lysosome. For a long time after the discove...

  18. Pink1, the first ubiquitin kinase

    Zheng, Xinde; Hunter, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Pink1 and Parkin, identified through studies of hereditary early onset Parkinson's disease, are involved in mitochondria quality control. Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity is activated by Pink1 kinase activity, although the mechanism is still elusive. Three recent reports uncover a surprising mechanism in which Pink1 directly phosphorylates ubiquitin to boost Parkin activity.

  19. Cardiac-specific catalase overexpression rescues anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction: role of oxidative stress and autophagy

    Kandadi Machender R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lethal and edema toxins secreted by Bacillus anthracis during anthrax infection were found to incite serious cardiovascular complications. However, the underlying mechanisms in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac anomalies remain unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of antioxidant enzyme catalase in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Methods Wild type (WT and cardiac-specific catalase overexpression mice were challenged with lethal toxin (2 μg/g, intraperotineally (i.p.. Cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties were assessed 18 h later using an IonOptix edge-detection system. Proteasome function was assessed using chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities. GFP-LC3 puncta and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate autophagy and protein ubiquitination. Results Lethal toxin exposure suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function (suppressed peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/re-lengthening, prolonged duration of shortening/re-lengthening, and impaired intracellular Ca2+ handling, the effects of which were alleviated by catalase. In addition, lethal toxin triggered autophagy, mitochondrial and ubiquitin-proteasome defects, the effects of which were mitigated by catalase. Pretreatment of cardiomyocytes from catalase mice with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly attenuated or ablated catalase-offered protection against lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. On the other hand, the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA ablated or significantly attenuated lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Conclusions Our results suggest that catalase is protective against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ anomalies, possibly through regulation of autophagy and mitochondrial function.

  20. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair through ubiquitination

    Jia Li; Audesh Bhat; Wei Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the most versatile DNA-repair pathway in all organisms.While bacteria require only three proteins to complete the incision step of NER,eukaryotes employ about 30 proteins to complete the same step.Here we summarize recent studies demonstrating that ubiquitination,a post-translational modification,plays critical roles in regulating the NER activity either dependent on or independent of ubiquitin-proteolysis.Several NER components have been shown as targets of ubiquitination while others are actively involved in the ubiquitination process.We argue through this analysis that ubiquitination serves to coordinate various steps of NER and meanwhile connect NER with other related pathways to achieve the efficient global DNA-damage response.

  1. Unraveling the roles of Atg4 proteases from autophagy modulation to targeted cancer therapy.

    Zhang, Lan; Li, Jingjing; Ouyang, Liang; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Atg4 proteases are cysteine proteases, which are well known for their crucial roles in the lipidation and delipidation of LC3 during the autophagy process. At least four human Atg4 homologs have been reported according to their sequence homology to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) Atg4. Accumulating evidence has recently indicated that abnormal expression levels of some human Atg4 proteins occur in several types of cancer cells, which may be closely related to tumor progression, tumor suppression and cancer therapy resistance. In this review, we focus on highlighting the pivotal roles of the human Atg4 proteases in the LC3 conjugation system and their major function in autophagy. Moreover, we further explore the roles of human Atg4 proteases as potential novel targets for cancer therapy. Taken together, these findings would shed light on elucidating the key roles of Atg4 proteases from autophagy modulation to targeted cancer therapy. PMID:26805760

  2. Ordered bulk degradation via autophagy

    Dengjel, Jörn; Kristensen, Anders Riis; Andersen, Jens S

    2008-01-01

    proteasomal and lysosomal degradation ample cross-talk between the two degradation pathways became evident. Degradation via autophagy appeared to be ordered and regulated at the protein complex/organelle level. This raises several important questions such as: can macroautophagy itself be specific and what is...

  3. Carbamazepine suppresses calpain-mediated autophagy impairment after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse livers

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays a causative role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Current therapeutic strategies for reducing reperfusion injury remain disappointing. Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated, catabolic process that timely eliminates abnormal or damaged cellular constituents and organelles such as dysfunctional mitochondria. I/R induces calcium overloading and calpain activation, leading to degradation of key autophagy-related proteins (Atg). Carbamazepine (CBZ), an FDA-approved anticonvulsant drug, has recently been reported to increase autophagy. We investigated the effects of CBZ on hepatic I/R injury. Hepatocytes and livers from male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to simulated in vitro, as well as in vivo I/R, respectively. Cell death, intracellular calcium, calpain activity, changes in autophagy-related proteins (Atg), autophagic flux, MPT and mitochondrial membrane potential after I/R were analyzed in the presence and absence of 20 μM CBZ. CBZ significantly increased hepatocyte viability after reperfusion. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBZ prevented calcium overloading, the onset of the MPT and mitochondrial depolarization. Immunoblotting and fluorometric analysis showed that CBZ blocked calpain activation, depletion of Atg7 and Beclin-1 and loss of autophagic flux after reperfusion. Intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mice demonstrated that CBZ substantially reversed autophagic defects and mitochondrial dysfunction after I/R in vivo. In conclusion, CBZ prevents calcium overloading and calpain activation, which, in turn, suppresses Atg7 and Beclin-1 depletion, defective autophagy, onset of the MPT and cell death after I/R. - Highlights: • A mechanism of carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced cytoprotection in livers is proposed. • Impaired autophagy is a key event contributing to lethal reperfusion injury. • The importance of autophagy is extended and confirmed in an in vivo model. • CBZ is a potential

  4. Carbamazepine suppresses calpain-mediated autophagy impairment after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse livers

    Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: Jae.Kim@surgery.ufl.edu; Wang, Jin-Hee, E-mail: jin-hee.wang@surgery.ufl.edu; Biel, Thomas G., E-mail: Thomas.Biel@surgery.ufl.edu; Kim, Do-Sung, E-mail: do-sung.kim@surgery.med.ufl.edu; Flores-Toro, Joseph A., E-mail: Joseph.Flores-Toro@surgery.ufl.edu; Vijayvargiya, Richa, E-mail: rvijayvargiya@ufl.edu; Zendejas, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.zendejas@surgery.ufl.edu; Behrns, Kevin E., E-mail: Kevin.Behrns@surgery.ufl.edu

    2013-12-15

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays a causative role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Current therapeutic strategies for reducing reperfusion injury remain disappointing. Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated, catabolic process that timely eliminates abnormal or damaged cellular constituents and organelles such as dysfunctional mitochondria. I/R induces calcium overloading and calpain activation, leading to degradation of key autophagy-related proteins (Atg). Carbamazepine (CBZ), an FDA-approved anticonvulsant drug, has recently been reported to increase autophagy. We investigated the effects of CBZ on hepatic I/R injury. Hepatocytes and livers from male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to simulated in vitro, as well as in vivo I/R, respectively. Cell death, intracellular calcium, calpain activity, changes in autophagy-related proteins (Atg), autophagic flux, MPT and mitochondrial membrane potential after I/R were analyzed in the presence and absence of 20 μM CBZ. CBZ significantly increased hepatocyte viability after reperfusion. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBZ prevented calcium overloading, the onset of the MPT and mitochondrial depolarization. Immunoblotting and fluorometric analysis showed that CBZ blocked calpain activation, depletion of Atg7 and Beclin-1 and loss of autophagic flux after reperfusion. Intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mice demonstrated that CBZ substantially reversed autophagic defects and mitochondrial dysfunction after I/R in vivo. In conclusion, CBZ prevents calcium overloading and calpain activation, which, in turn, suppresses Atg7 and Beclin-1 depletion, defective autophagy, onset of the MPT and cell death after I/R. - Highlights: • A mechanism of carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced cytoprotection in livers is proposed. • Impaired autophagy is a key event contributing to lethal reperfusion injury. • The importance of autophagy is extended and confirmed in an in vivo model. • CBZ is a potential

  5. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    Li, Chao-Peng; Yao, Jin; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Li, Xiu-Miao; Jiang, Qin, E-mail: jqin710@vip.sina.com; Yan, Biao, E-mail: yanbiao1982@hotmail.com

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy.

  6. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy

  7. Mechanical unfolding of ubiquitin molecules

    Cieplak, Marek; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2005-11-01

    Mechanical stretching of ubiquitin and of its several repeats are studied through molecular-dynamics simulations. A Go-type model [H. Abe and N. Go, Biopolymers 20, 1013 (1981)] with a realistic contact map and with Lennard-Jones contact interactions is used. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimentally observed differences between force-extension patterns obtained on polyubiquitins stretched by various linkages. The terminal-to-terminal stretching of polyubiquitin results in peak forces similar to those measured for titin-based polyproteins and of a magnitude that matches measurements. Consistent with the experimental measurements, the simulated peak forces depend on the pulling speed logarithmically when thermal fluctuations are explicitly introduced. These results validate the application of topology-based models in the study of the mechanical stretching of proteins.

  8. Molecular mechanism and regulation of autophagy

    Ya-ping YANG; Zhong-qin LIANG; Zhen-lun GU; Zheng-hong QIN

    2005-01-01

    Autophagy is a major cellular pathway for the degradation of long-lived proteins and cytoplasmic organelles in eukaryotic cells. A large number of intracellular/extracellular stimuli, including amino acid starvation and invasion of microorganisms, are able to induce the autophagic response in cells. The discovery of the ATG genes in yeast has greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms participating in autophagy and the genes involved in regulating the autophagic pathway. Many yeast genes have mammalian homologs,suggesting that the basic machinery for autophagy has been evolutionarily conserved along the eukaryotic phylum. The regulation of autophagy is a very complex process. Many signaling pathways, including target of rapamycin (TOR) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-I (PI3K-I)/PKB, GTPases, calcium and protein synthesis all play important roles in regulating autophagy. The molecular mechanisms and regulation of autophagy are discussed in this review.

  9. FGF signalling regulates bone growth through autophagy.

    Cinque, Laura; Forrester, Alison; Bartolomeo, Rosa; Svelto, Maria; Venditti, Rossella; Montefusco, Sandro; Polishchuk, Elena; Nusco, Edoardo; Rossi, Antonio; Medina, Diego L; Polishchuk, Roman; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Settembre, Carmine

    2015-12-10

    Skeletal growth relies on both biosynthetic and catabolic processes. While the role of the former is clearly established, how the latter contributes to growth-promoting pathways is less understood. Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that plays a fundamental part in tissue homeostasis. We investigated the role of autophagy during bone growth, which is mediated by chondrocyte rate of proliferation, hypertrophic differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in growth plates. Here we show that autophagy is induced in growth-plate chondrocytes during post-natal development and regulates the secretion of type II collagen (Col2), the major component of cartilage ECM. Mice lacking the autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) in chondrocytes experience endoplasmic reticulum storage of type II procollagen (PC2) and defective formation of the Col2 fibrillary network in the ECM. Surprisingly, post-natal induction of chondrocyte autophagy is mediated by the growth factor FGF18 through FGFR4 and JNK-dependent activation of the autophagy initiation complex VPS34-beclin-1. Autophagy is completely suppressed in growth plates from Fgf18(-/-) embryos, while Fgf18(+/-) heterozygous and Fgfr4(-/-) mice fail to induce autophagy during post-natal development and show decreased Col2 levels in the growth plate. Strikingly, the Fgf18(+/-) and Fgfr4(-/-) phenotypes can be rescued in vivo by pharmacological activation of autophagy, pointing to autophagy as a novel effector of FGF signalling in bone. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a developmentally regulated process necessary for bone growth, and identify FGF signalling as a crucial regulator of autophagy in chondrocytes. PMID:26595272

  10. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in Cardiovascular Homeostasis

    Morales, Cyndi R.; Pedrozo, Zully; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process of intracellular protein and organelle recycling required to maintain cellular homeostasis in the face of a wide variety of stresses. Dysregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) leads to oxidative damage. Both autophagy and ROS/RNS serve pathological or adaptive roles within cardiomyocytes, depending on the context. Recent Advances: ROS/RNS and autophagy communicate with each other via both tra...

  11. Autophagy and oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases

    Mei, Yu; Thompson, Melissa D.; Cohen, Richard A.; Tong, XiaoYong

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation process by which intracellular components, including soluble macromolecules (e.g. nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids) and dysfunctional organelles (e.g. mitochondria, ribosomes, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum) are degraded by the lysosome. Autophagy is orchestrated by the autophagy related protein (Atg) composed protein complexes to form autophagosomes, which fuse with lysosomes to generate autolysosomes where the contents ar...

  12. The role of autophagy in Parkinson's disease

    Lei Zhang; Yaru Dong; Xiaoheng Xu; Zhong Xu

    2012-01-01

    Although Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, the mechanisms of pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Recent findings have shown that deregulation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. This review summarizes the most recent findings and discusses the unique role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson's disease to highlight the possibility of Parkinson's disease treatment strategies that incorporate autophagy-lysosome pathway modulation.

  13. Involvement of Autophagy in Coronavirus Replication

    Paul Britton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are single stranded, positive sense RNA viruses, which induce the rearrangement of cellular membranes upon infection of a host cell. This provides the virus with a platform for the assembly of viral replication complexes, improving efficiency of RNA synthesis. The membranes observed in coronavirus infected cells include double membrane vesicles. By nature of their double membrane, these vesicles resemble cellular autophagosomes, generated during the cellular autophagy pathway. In addition, coronavirus infection has been demonstrated to induce autophagy. Here we review current knowledge of coronavirus induced membrane rearrangements and the involvement of autophagy or autophagy protein microtubule associated protein 1B light chain 3 (LC3 in coronavirus replication.

  14. Modulating autophagy: a strategy for cancer therapy

    Jun-Lin Li; Shao-Liang Han; Xia Fan

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process in which long-lived proteins,damaged cell organelles,and other cellular particles are sequestered and degraded.This process is important for maintaining the cellular microenvironment when the cell is under stress.Many studies have shown that autophagy plays a complex role in human diseases,especially in cancer,where it is known to have paradoxical effects.Namely,autophagy provides the energy for metabolism and tumor growth and leads to cell death that promotes tumor suppression.The link between autophagy and cancer is also evident in that some of the genes that regulate carcinogenesis,oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,participate in or impact the autophagy process.Therefore,modulating autophagy will be a valuable topic for cancer therapy.Many studies have shown that autophagy can inhibit the tumor growth when autophagy modulators are combined with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.These findings suggest that autophagy may be a potent target for cancer therapy.

  15. Role of ubiquitination in meiotic recombination repair

    2010-01-01

    Programmed and unprogrammed double-strand breaks (DSBs) often arise from such physiological requirements as meiotic recombination, and exogenous insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR). Due to deleterious impacts on genome stability, DSBs must be appropriately processed and repaired in a regulatory manner. Recent investigations have indicated that ubiquitination is a critical factor in DNA damage response and meiotic recombination repair. This review summarizes the effects of proteins and complexes associated with ubiquitination with regard to homologous recombination (HR)-dependent DSB repair.

  16. Evolution of Plant HECT Ubiquitin Ligases

    Ignacio Marín

    2013-01-01

    HECT ubiquitin ligases are key components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is present in all eukaryotes. In this study, the patterns of emergence of HECT genes in plants are described. Phylogenetic and structural data indicate that viridiplantae have six main HECT subfamilies, which arose before the split that separated green algae from the rest of plants. It is estimated that the common ancestor of all plants contained seven HECT genes. Contrary to what happened in animals, the numb...

  17. Ubiquitination, intracellular trafficking, and degradation of connexins

    Su, Vivian; LAU, ALAN F.

    2012-01-01

    Gap junction channels provide a conduit for communication between neighboring cells. The function of gap junction channels is regulated by posttranslational modifications of connexins, the proteins that comprise these channels. Ubiquitination of connexins has increasingly been viewed as one mechanism by which cells regulate the level of connexins present in cells, as well as the corresponding intercellular communication. Here we review the current knowledge of connexin ubiquitination and the ...

  18. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation ...

  19. mRNA and protein dataset of autophagy markers (LC3 and p62) in several cell lines.

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Yakhine-Diop, Sokhna M S; Rodríguez-Arribas, Mario; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Martínez-Chacón, Guadalupe; Uribe-Carretero, Elisabet; Pinheiro de Castro, Diana C J; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Fuentes, José M; González-Polo, Rosa A

    2016-06-01

    We characterized the dynamics of autophagy in vitro using four different cell systems and analyzing markers widely used in this field, i.e. LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3; protein recruited from the cytosol (LC3-I) to the autophagosomal membrane where it is lipidated (LC3-II)) and p62/SQSTM1 (adaptor protein that serves as a link between LC3 and ubiquitinated substrates), (Klionsky et al., 2016) [1]. Data provided include analyses of protein levels of LC3 and p62 by Western-blotting and endogenous immunofluorescence experiments, but also p62 mRNA levels obtained by quantitative PCR (qPCR). To monitor the turnover of these autophagy markers and, thus, measure the flux of this pathway, cells were under starvation conditions and/or treated with bafilomycin A1 (Baf. A1) to block fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. PMID:27054171

  20. Autophagy and the (prorenin receptor

    KatrinaJeanBinger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The (prorenin receptor (PRR is a newly reported member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS; a hormonal cascade responsible for regulating blood pressure. Originally, the identification of PRR was heralded as the next drug target of the RAS, of which such therapies would have increased benefits against target-organ damage and hypertension. However, in the years since its discovery several conditional knockout mouse models of PRR have demonstrated an essential role for this receptor unrelated to the renin-angiotensin system and blood pressure. Deletion of PRR in podocytes or cardiomyocytes resulted in the rapid onset of organ failure, eventuating in animal mortality after only a matter of weeks. In both cases, deletion of PRR resulted in the intracellular accumulation of autophagosomes and misfolded proteins, indicating a disturbance in autophagy. In light of the fact that the majority of PRR is located intracellularly, this molecular function appears to be more relevant than its ability to bind to high, non-physiological concentrations of (prorenin. This review will focus on the role of PRR in autophagy and its importance in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Understanding the link between PRR, autophagy and how its loss results in cell death will be essential for deciphering its role in physiology and pathology.

  1. Characterization of the autophagy marker protein Atg8 reveals atypical features of autophagy in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Rahul Navale

    Full Text Available Conventional autophagy is a lysosome-dependent degradation process that has crucial homeostatic and regulatory functions in eukaryotic organisms. As malaria parasites must dispose a number of self and host cellular contents, we investigated if autophagy in malaria parasites is similar to the conventional autophagy. Genome wide analysis revealed a partial autophagy repertoire in Plasmodium, as homologs for only 15 of the 33 yeast autophagy proteins could be identified, including the autophagy marker Atg8. To gain insights into autophagy in malaria parasites, we investigated Plasmodium falciparum Atg8 (PfAtg8 employing techniques and conditions that are routinely used to study autophagy. Atg8 was similarly expressed and showed punctate localization throughout the parasite in both asexual and sexual stages; it was exclusively found in the pellet fraction as an integral membrane protein, which is in contrast to the yeast or mammalian Atg8 that is distributed among cytosolic and membrane fractions, and suggests for a constitutive autophagy. Starvation, the best known autophagy inducer, decreased PfAtg8 level by almost 3-fold compared to the normally growing parasites. Neither the Atg8-associated puncta nor the Atg8 expression level was significantly altered by treatment of parasites with routinely used autophagy inhibitors (cysteine (E64 and aspartic (pepstatin protease inhibitors, the kinase inhibitor 3-methyladenine, and the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine, indicating an atypical feature of autophagy. Furthermore, prolonged inhibition of the major food vacuole protease activity by E64 and pepstatin did not cause accumulation of the Atg8-associated puncta in the food vacuole, suggesting that autophagy is primarily not meant for degradative function in malaria parasites. Atg8 showed partial colocalization with the apicoplast; doxycycline treatment, which disrupts apicoplast, did not affect Atg8 localization, suggesting a role, but not exclusive, in

  2. The Ca2+ channel TRPML3 specifically interacts with the mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16 to regulate autophagy

    Highlights: •Split-ubiquitin MY2H screen identified GATE16 as an interacting protein of TRPML3. •TRPML3 specifically binds to a mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16, not to LC3B. •The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 facilitates autophagosome formation. •GATE16 is expressed in both autophagosome and extra-autophagosomal compartments. -- Abstract: TRPML3 is a Ca2+ permeable cation channel expressed in multiple intracellular compartments. Although TRPML3 is implicated in autophagy, how TRPML3 can regulate autophagy is not understood. To search interacting proteins with TRPML3 in autophagy, we performed split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (MY2H) screening with TRPML3-loop as a bait and identified GATE16, a mammalian ATG8 homologue. GST pull-down assay revealed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop specifically bind to GATE16, not to LC3B. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) experiments showed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop pull down only the lipidated form of GATE16, indicating that the interaction occurs exclusively at the organellar membrane. The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 and GATE16-positive vesicle formation were increased in starvation induced autophagy, suggesting that the interaction facilitates the function of GATE16 in autophagosome formation. However, GATE16 was not required for TRPML3 trafficking to autophagosomes. Experiments using dominant-negative (DN) TRPML3(D458K) showed that GATE16 is localized not only in autophagosomes but also in extra-autophagosomal compartments, by contrast with LC3B. Since GATE16 acts at a later stage of the autophagosome biogenesis, our results suggest that TRPML3 plays a role in autophagosome maturation through the interaction with GATE16, by providing Ca2+ in the fusion process

  3. The recognition of ubiquitinated proteins by the proteasome.

    Grice, Guinevere L; Nathan, James A

    2016-09-01

    The ability of ubiquitin to form up to eight different polyubiquitin chain linkages generates complexity within the ubiquitin proteasome system, and accounts for the diverse roles of ubiquitination within the cell. Understanding how each type of ubiquitin linkage is correctly interpreted by ubiquitin binding proteins provides important insights into the link between chain recognition and cellular fate. A major function of ubiquitination is to signal degradation of intracellular proteins by the 26S proteasome. Lysine-48 (K48) linked polyubiquitin chains are well established as the canonical signal for proteasomal degradation, but recent studies show a role for other ubiquitin linked chains in facilitating degradation by the 26S proteasome. Here, we review how different types of polyubiquitin linkage bind to ubiquitin receptors on the 26S proteasome, how they signal degradation and discuss the implications of ubiquitin chain linkage in regulating protein breakdown by the proteasome. PMID:27137187

  4. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs...

  5. Di-retinoid-pyridinium-ethanolamine (A2E) Accumulation and the Maintenance of the Visual Cycle Are Independent of Atg7-mediated Autophagy in the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium.

    Perusek, Lindsay; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Parmar, Tanu; Maeno, Hiroshi; Arai, Eisuke; Le, Yun-Zheng; Subauste, Carlos S; Chen, Yu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-11-27

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic mechanism that relieves cellular stress by removing/recycling damaged organelles and debris through the action of lysosomes. Compromised autophagy has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases, including retinal degeneration. Here we examined retinal phenotypes resulting from RPE-specific deletion of the autophagy regulatory gene Atg7 by generating Atg7(flox/flox);VMD2-rtTA-cre+ mice to determine whether autophagy is essential for RPE functions including retinoid recycling. Atg7-deficient RPE displayed abnormal morphology with increased RPE thickness, cellular debris and vacuole formation indicating that autophagy is important in maintaining RPE homeostasis. In contrast, 11-cis-retinal content, ERGs and retinal histology were normal in mice with Atg7-deficient RPE in both fasted and fed states. Because A2E accumulation in the RPE is associated with pathogenesis of both Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in humans, deletion of Abca4 was introduced into Atg7(flox/flox);VMD2-rtTA-cre+ mice to investigate the role of autophagy during A2E accumulation. Comparable A2E concentrations were detected in the eyes of 6-month-old mice with and without Atg7 from both Abca4(-/-) and Abca4(+/+) backgrounds. To identify other autophagy-related molecules involved in A2E accumulation, we performed gene expression array analysis on A2E-treated human RPE cells and found up-regulation of four autophagy related genes; DRAM1, NPC1, CASP3, and EIF2AK3/PERK. These observations indicate that Atg7-mediated autophagy is dispensable for retinoid recycling and A2E deposition; however, autophagy plays a role in coping with stress caused by A2E accumulation. PMID:26468292

  6. Autophagy in allografts rejection: A new direction?

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huaiquan; Liang, Ting; Hou, Guihua

    2016-03-18

    Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection is still a major risk for graft survival. Modulating the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs is not a good choice for all patients, new rejection mechanisms discovery are crucial to limit the inflammatory process and preserve the function of the transplant. Autophagy, a fundamental cellular process, can be detected in all subsets of lymphocytes and freshly isolated naive T lymphocytes. It is required for the homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes, which lead to cell survival or cell death depending on the context. T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and costimulator signals induce strong autophagy, and autophagy deficient T cells leads to rampant apoptosis upon TCR stimulation. Autophagy has been proved to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with grafts dysfunction. Furthermore, Autophagy has also emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune response to self-antigens, which relates with negative selection and Foxp3(+) Treg induction. Although, the role of autophagy in allograft rejection is unknown, current data suggest that autophagy indeed sweeps across both in the graft organs and recipients lymphocytes after transplantation. This review presents the rationale for the hypothesis that targeting the autophagy pathway could be beneficial in promoting graft survival after transplantation. PMID:26876576

  7. Tumor Suppression and Promotion by Autophagy

    Yenniffer Ávalos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  8. Autophagy- An emerging target for melanoma therapy.

    Ndoye, Abibatou; Weeraratna, Ashani T

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma accounts for only 5% of all cancers but is the leading cause of skin cancer death due to its high metastatic potential. Patients with metastatic melanoma have a 10-year survival rate of less than 10%. While the clinical landscape for melanoma is evolving rapidly, lack of response to therapies, as well as resistance to therapy remain critical obstacles for treatment of this disease. In recent years, a myriad of therapy resistance mechanisms have been unravelled, one of which is autophagy, the focus of this review. In advanced stages of malignancy, melanoma cells hijack the autophagy machinery in order to alleviate drug-induced and metabolic stress in the tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting resistance to multiple therapies, tumor cell survival, and progression.  Autophagy is an essential cellular process that maintains cellular homeostasis through the recycling of intracellular constituents. Early studies on the role of autophagy in cancer generated controversy as to whether autophagy was pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Currently, there is a consensus that autophagy is tumor-suppressive in the early stages of cancer and tumor-promoting in established tumors.  This review aims to highlight current understandings on the role of autophagy in melanoma malignancy, and specifically therapy resistance; as well as to evaluate recent strategies for therapeutic autophagy modulation. PMID:27583134

  9. Autophagy in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    Ciccia, Francesco; Haroon, Nigil

    2016-06-01

    The pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is not well understood, and treatment options have met with limited success. Autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism of controlled digestion of damaged organelles within a cell. It helps in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. The process of autophagy requires the formation of an isolation membrane. They form double-membraned vesicles called "autophagosomes" that engulf a portion of the cytoplasm. Beyond the role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, autophagy has been demonstrated as one of the most remarkable tools employed by the host cellular defense against bacteria invasion. Autophagy also affects the immune system and thus is implicated in several rheumatic disease processes. In this article, we explore the potential role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of AS. PMID:27075464

  10. Stress management by autophagy: Implications for chemoresistance.

    Huang, Zhao; Zhou, Li; Chen, Zhibin; Nice, Edouard C; Huang, Canhua

    2016-07-01

    Development of chemoresistance, which limits the efficiency of anticancer agents, has long been a major problem in cancer therapy and urgently needs to be solved to improve clinical outcomes. Factors contributing to chemoresistance are various, but a key factor is the cell's capability for stress management. Autophagy, a favored survival strategy that organisms employ to get over many kinds of stress, is emerging as a crucial player in drug resistance. It has been shown that autophagy facilitates the resistance of tumor cells to anticancer agents, and abrogation of autophagy could be therapeutically beneficial in some cases, suggesting autophagy could be a promising target for cancer treatments. Thus, defining the roles of autophagy in chemoresistance, and the mechanisms involved, will be critical to enhance the efficiency of chemotherapy and develop novel anticancer strategy interventions. PMID:26757106

  11. Autophagy and the immune function in aging.

    Cuervo, Ana Maria; Macian, Fernando

    2014-08-01

    Just when you thought that you had heard it all about autophagy-the conserved cellular process that mediates turnover of cellular constituents in the lysosomes - studies keep coming out highlighting new types of autophagy, new functions for autophagy or even new autophagy-independent roles for the proteins associated with this process. The field of immunology has been riding the autophagic wave since the beginning of its revival; first due to its role in the host defense against pathogens, and more recently through the better understanding of the unique characteristics and functions of different autophagic pathways in immune cells. Here, we describe some of these new functions that are tightening the connection between autophagy and acquired or innate immunity and their malfunctioning with age. PMID:24929664

  12. Mechanistically linking age-related diseases and dietary carbohydrate via autophagy and the ubiquitin proteolytic systems

    Epidemiological data indicate that consuming diets that deliver sugar to the blood rapidly (called high glycemic index, GI) is associated with enhanced risk for age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cataract and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These debilities...

  13. Autophagy modulates dynamics of connexins at the plasma membrane in a ubiquitin-dependent manner

    Bejarano, Eloy; Girao, Henrique; Yuste, Andrea; Patel, Bindi; Marques, Carla; Spray, David C.; Pereira, Paulo; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    Different pathways contribute to the turnover of connexins, the main structural components of gap junctions (GJs). The cellular pool of connexins targeted to each pathway and the functional consequences of degradation through these degradative pathways are unknown. In this work, we focused on the contribution of macroautophagy to connexin degradation. Using pharmacological and genetic blockage of macroautophagy both in vitro and in vivo, we found that the cellular pool targeted by this autoph...

  14. HERC 1 ubiquitin ligase mutation affects neocortical, CA3 hippocampal and spinal cord projection neurons. An ultrastructural study

    Rocío eRuiz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and, hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity.

  15. HERC 1 Ubiquitin Ligase Mutation Affects Neocortical, CA3 Hippocampal and Spinal Cord Projection Neurons: An Ultrastructural Study.

    Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Bachiller, Sara; Rosa, José Luis; Armengol, José Angel

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity. PMID:27147983

  16. Autophagy and bacterial clearance: a not so clear picture

    Mostowy, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy, an intracellular degradation process highly conserved from yeast to humans, is viewed as an important defence mechanism to clear intracellular bacteria. However, recent work has shown that autophagy may have different roles during different bacterial infections that restrict bacterial replication (antibacterial autophagy), act in cell autonomous signalling (non-bacterial autophagy) or support bacterial replication (pro-bacterial autophagy). This review will focus on newfound intera...

  17. Cellular contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis.

    Yuval Cinnamon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular contractility, essential for cell movement and proliferation, is regulated by microtubules, RhoA and actomyosin. The RhoA dependent kinase ROCK ensures the phosphorylation of the regulatory Myosin II Light Chain (MLC Ser19, thereby activating actomyosin contractions. Microtubules are upstream inhibitors of contractility and their depolymerization or depletion cause cells to contract by activating RhoA. How microtubule dynamics regulates RhoA remains, a major missing link in understanding contractility. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that contractility is inhibited by microtubules not only, as previously reported, in adherent cells, but also in non-adhering interphase and mitotic cells. Strikingly we observed that contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis by a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase. Inhibition of proteolysis, ubiquitination and neddylation all led to complete cessation of contractility and considerably reduced MLC Ser19 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results imply that cells express a contractility inhibitor that is degraded by ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, either constitutively or in response to microtubule depolymerization. This degradation seems to depend on a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase and is required for cellular contractions.

  18. Dengue Virus Genome Uncoating Requires Ubiquitination

    Byk, Laura A.; Iglesias, Néstor G.; De Maio, Federico A.; Gebhard, Leopoldo G.; Rossi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The process of genome release or uncoating after viral entry is one of the least-studied steps in the flavivirus life cycle. Flaviviruses are mainly arthropod-borne viruses, including emerging and reemerging pathogens such as dengue, Zika, and West Nile viruses. Currently, dengue virus is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and is responsible for about 390 million infections every year around the world. Here, we examined for the first time molecular aspects of dengue virus genome uncoating. We followed the fate of the capsid protein and RNA genome early during infection and found that capsid is degraded after viral internalization by the host ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, proteasome activity and capsid degradation were not necessary to free the genome for initial viral translation. Unexpectedly, genome uncoating was blocked by inhibiting ubiquitination. Using different assays to bypass entry and evaluate the first rounds of viral translation, a narrow window of time during infection that requires ubiquitination but not proteasome activity was identified. In this regard, ubiquitin E1-activating enzyme inhibition was sufficient to stabilize the incoming viral genome in the cytoplasm of infected cells, causing its retention in either endosomes or nucleocapsids. Our data support a model in which dengue virus genome uncoating requires a nondegradative ubiquitination step, providing new insights into this crucial but understudied viral process. PMID:27353759

  19. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins.

    Lehmann, Gilad; Ziv, Tamar; Braten, Ori; Admon, Arie; Udasin, Ronald G; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems - at least partially - in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. PMID:27157140

  20. Heat shock induced change in protein ubiquitination in Chlamydomonas

    Ubiquitin was purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its antibody was produced. Western blot analysis showed that the antibody cross-reacted with ubiquitins from a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a brown alga Laminaria angustata and a red alga Porphyridium cruentum but not with ubiquitin from a blue-green alga Synechococcus sp. In Chlamydomonas, the antibody also reacted with some ubiquitinated proteins including 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides. The isoelectric points of Chlamydomonas ubiquitin and the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins were 8.0, 8.9 and 10.3, respectively. The ubiquitinated proteins, including the 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides were detected after in vitro ATP-dependent ubiquitination of Chlamydomonas cell extract with l25I-labeled bovine ubiquitin. Heat treatment of Chlamydomonas cells (>40°C) caused drastic increase of ubiquitinated proteins with high mol wt (>60kDa), and coordinated redistribution or decrease of other ubiquitinated proteins and free ubiquitin. Quantitative analysis revealed that the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins showed different responses against heat stress, i.e. the former being more sensitive than the latter. (author)

  1. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation

    Grevengoed, Trisha J; Cooper, Daniel E; Young, Pamela A; Ellis, Jessica M; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2015-01-01

    protein and RNA synthesis and fatty acid metabolism, while decreasing autophagy. Compared with controls, Acsl1(T-/-) hearts contained 3 times more mitochondria with abnormal structure and displayed a 35-43% lower respiratory function. To study the effects of mTORC1 activation on mitochondrial structure......, which was likely caused by the 33-51% lower ATP synthase activity present in both vehicle- and rapamycin-treated Acsl1(T-/-) hearts. The turnover of microtubule associated protein light chain 3b in Acsl1(T-/-) hearts was 88% lower than controls, indicating a diminished rate of autophagy. Rapamycin...... treatment increased autophagy to a rate that was 3.1-fold higher than in controls, allowing the formation of autophagolysosomes and the clearance of damaged mitochondria. Thus, long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 (ACSL1) deficiency in the heart activated mTORC1, thereby inhibiting autophagy and...

  2. Homocysteine thiolactone affects protein ubiquitination in yeast.

    Bretes, Ewa; Zimny, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    The formation of homocysteine thiolactone (HcyTl) from homocysteine occurs in all examined so far organisms including bacteria, yeast, and humans. Protein N-homocysteinylation at the ε-amino group of lysine is an adverse result of HcyTl accumulation. Since tagging of proteins by ubiquitination before their proteasomal degradation takes place at the same residue, we wondered how N-homocysteinylation may affect the ubiquitination of proteins. We used different yeast strains carrying mutations in genes involved in the homocysteine metabolism. We found positive correlation between the concentration of endogenous HcyTl and the concentration of ubiquitinated proteins. This suggests that N-homocysteinylation of proteins apparently does not preclude but rather promotes their decomposition. PMID:24051443

  3. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells.

    Thien Tra

    Full Text Available Autophagy (macroautophagy is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC.

  4. Severe starvation-induced hepatocyte autophagy as a cause of acute liver injury in anorexia nervosa: a case report.

    Restellini, S; Spahr, L; Rubbia Brandt, L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Mild elevation of transaminase may be observed in anorexia nervosa, but acute liver injury is uncommon. A complex programmed cell death in response to starvation, called autophagy, has been described in experimental and human studies. Case Presentation. A 24-year-old woman suffering from anorexia nervosa was hospitalized for severe malnutrition. At admission, there were biological signs of acute liver injury but no electrolytic imbalance. After having ruled out the most common causes of liver injury, the patient was carefully refed. As liver tests remained abnormal, liver biopsy was performed. At histology and electron microscopy, numerous signs suggestive of starvation-induced hepatocyte autophagy were found. Discussion. Severe starvation can be associated with acute liver injury that is slowly reversible with careful enteral nutrition. In this clinical situation, profound hepatic glycogen depletion in association with autophagy appears as the leading cause of liver injury. PMID:25379300

  5. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic

  6. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Malaviya, Rama [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  7. High glucose induces autophagy of MC3T3-E1 cells via ROS-AKT-mTOR axis.

    Wang, Xiaoju; Feng, Zhengping; Li, Jiling; Chen, Lixue; Tang, Weixue

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate the function of ROS-AKT-mTOR axis on the apoptosis, proliferation and autophagy of MC3T3-E1 cells, and the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells after autophagy inhibition under high glucose conditions. MC3T3-E1 cells cultured in vitro were divided into the following groups: normal control group, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) group, 11.0 mM high glucose group, 11.0 mM high glucose + NAC group, 22.0 mM high glucose group, 22.0 mM high glucose + NAC group, CQ group, 22.0 mM high glucose + CQ group, 3-MA group and 3-MA + 22.0 mM high glucose group. ROS production was measured by DCFH-DA fluorescent probe. Cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay. Cells in different groups were stained with Annexin V-FITC/PI, and then apoptosis rate was detected by flow cytometry. Nucleus morphology was observed under fluorescence microscope after being incubated with Honchest33258. Protein expression was measured using Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Cell apoptosis and proliferation in high glucose group were increased and decreased, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Autophagy was significantly induced in high glucose group, even though different concentration of glucose induced autophagy in different stages of autophagy. ROS production in MC3T3-E1 cells was remarkably increased in high glucose group, but not in a dose-dependent manner. NAC, as an antioxidant, reduced ROS production and ameliorated cell apoptosis, proliferation abnormity and autophagy caused by high glucose. Expression of p-AKT and p-mTOR proteins were dramatically decreased in high glucose group, and NAC reversed their expression. In addition, 3-MA, an inhibitor of autophagy, significantly decreased the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells. When cocultured with 22.0 mM glucose that induced autophagy, proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells was not affected compared to 22.0 mM high glucose group. Our present findings reveal that high glucose affects apoptosis

  8. The Parkinson's disease-associated genes ATP13A2 and SYT11 regulate autophagy via a common pathway.

    Bento, Carla F; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-01-01

    Forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated with lysosomal and autophagic dysfunction. ATP13A2, which is mutated in some types of early-onset Parkinsonism, has been suggested as a regulator of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. However, little is known about the ATP13A2 effectors and how they regulate this pathway. Here we show that ATP13A2 depletion negatively regulates another PD-associated gene (SYT11) at both transcriptional and post-translational levels. Decreased SYT11 transcription is controlled by a mechanism dependent on MYCBP2-induced ubiquitination of TSC2, which leads to mTORC1 activation and decreased TFEB-mediated transcription of SYT11, while increased protein turnover is regulated by SYT11 ubiquitination and degradation. Both mechanisms account for a decrease in the levels of SYT11, which, in turn, induces lysosomal dysfunction and impaired degradation of autophagosomes. Thus, we propose that ATP13A2 and SYT11 form a new functional network in the regulation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway, which is likely to contribute to forms of PD-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:27278822

  9. Cytochrome P450 3A Conjugation to Ubiquitin in a Process Distinct from Classical Ubiquitination Pathway

    Zangar, Richard C.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Kimzey, Amy L.(ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Okita, Janice R.(Washington State University); Wunschel, David S.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Edwards, Robert J.(Imperial College School of Medical, Hammersmith Campus); Kim, Hyesook (Wayne State University); Okita, Richard T.(Washington State University)

    2001-12-01

    We characterize a novel microsome system that forms high-molecular-mass (HMM) CYP3A, CYP2E1, and ubiquitin conjugates, but does not alter CYP4A or most other microsomal proteins. The formation of the HMM bands was observed in hepatic microsomes isolated from rats treated 1 week or more with high doses (50 mg/kg/day) of nicardipine, clotrimazole, or pregnenolone 16alpha-carbonitrile, but not microsomes from control, dexamethasone-, nifedipine-, or diltiazem-treated rats. Extensive washing of the microsomes to remove loosely attached proteins or cytosolic contaminants did not prevent the conjugation reaction. In contrast to prototypical ubiquitination pathways, this reaction did not require addition of ubiquitin, ATP, Mg(2+), or cytosol. Addition of cytosol did result in the degradation of the HMM CYP3A bands in a process that was not blocked by proteasome inhibitors. Immunoprecipitated CYP3A contained HMM ubiquitin. Even so, mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides indicated that the HMM CYP3A was in molar excess to ubiquitin, suggesting that the formation of the HMM CYP3A may have resulted from conjugation to itself or a diffuse pool of ubiquitinated proteins already present in the microsomes. Addition of CYP3A substrates inhibited the formation of the HMM CYP3A and the cytosol-dependent degradation of HMM CYP3A. These results suggest that after extended periods of elevated CYP3A expression, microsomal factors are induced that catalyze the formation of HMM CYP3A conjugates that contain ubiquitin. This conjugation reaction, however, seems to be distinct from the classical ubiquitination pathway but may be related to the substrate-dependent stabilization of CYP3A observed in vivo.

  10. Autophagy is involved in the reduction of myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm during myelin maturation of the peripheral nerve.

    So Young Jang

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve myelination involves dynamic changes in Schwann cell morphology and membrane structure. Recent studies have demonstrated that autophagy regulates organelle biogenesis and plasma membrane dynamics. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in the development and differentiation of myelinating Schwann cells during sciatic nerve myelination. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays have shown that Schwann cells remove excess cytoplasmic organelles during myelination through macroautophagy. Inhibition of autophagy via Schwann cell-specific removal of ATG7, an essential molecule for macroautophagy, using a conditional knockout strategy, resulted in abnormally enlarged abaxonal cytoplasm in myelinating Schwann cells that contained a large number of ribosomes and an atypically expanded endoplasmic reticulum. Small fiber hypermyelination and minor anomalous peripheral nerve functions are observed in this mutant. Rapamycin-induced suppression of mTOR activity during the early postnatal period enhanced not only autophagy but also developmental reduction of myelinating Schwann cells cytoplasm in vivo. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy is a regulatory mechanism of Schwann cells structural plasticity during myelination.

  11. Wwp2, an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase That Targets Transcription Factor Oct-4 for Ubiquitination

    HuiMingXu; BingLiao; QianJunZhang; BeiBeiWang; Hui,Li; XiaoMinZhong; HuiZhenSheng; YingXinZhao; YingMingZhao; YingJin

    2005-01-01

    The POU transcription factor Oct-4 is a master regulator affecting the fate of pluripotent embryonic stem cells. However, the precise mechanisms by which the activation and expression of Oct-4 are regulated still remain to be elucidated. We describe here a novel murine ubiquitin ligase, Wwp2, that specifically interacts with Oct-4 and promotes its ubiquitination both in vivo and in vitro. Remarkably, the expression of a catalytically inactive point mutant of Wwp2 abolishes Oct-4 ubiquitination. Moreover, Wwp2 promotes Oct-4 degradation in the presence of overexpressed ubiquitin. The degradation is blocked by treatment with proteasome inhibitor. Fusion of a single ubiquitin to Oct-4 inactivates its transcriptional activity in a heterologous Oct-4-driven reporter system. Furthermore, overexpression of Wwp2 in embryonic stem cells significantly reduces the Oct-4-transcriptional activities. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time that Oct-4 can be posttranslationatly modified by ubiquitination and that this modification dramatically suppresses its transcriptional activity. These results reveal that the functional status of Oct-4, in addition to its expression level, dictates its transcriptional activity, and the results open up a new avenue to understand how Oct-4 defines the fate of embryonic stem cells.

  12. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    Ryter, Stefan W.; Augustine M K Choi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, an...

  13. Skeletal Muscle Autophagy: A New Metabolic Regulator

    Neel, Brian A.; Lin, Yuxi; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy classically functions as a physiological process to degrade cytoplasmic components, protein aggregates, and/or organelles, as a mechanism for nutrient breakdown, and as a regulator of cellular architecture. Proper autophagic flux is vital for both functional skeletal muscle, which controls support and movement of the skeleton, and muscle metabolism. The role of autophagy as a metabolic regulator in muscle has been previously studied; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms that...

  14. Mechanisms of mitochondria and autophagy crosstalk

    Rambold, Angelika S.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular survival pathway that recycles intracellular components to compensate for nutrient depletion and ensures the appropriate degradation of organelles. Mitochondrial number and health are regulated by mitophagy, a process by which excessive or damaged mitochondria are subjected to autophagic degradation. Autophagy is thus a key determinant for mitochondrial health and proper cell function. Mitophagic malfunction has been recently proposed to contribute to progressive neuro...

  15. The role of autophagy in Parkinson's disease☆

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Yaru; Xu, Xiaoheng; Xu, Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Although Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, the mechanisms of pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Recent findings have shown that deregulation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. This review summarizes the most recent findings and discusses the unique role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson's disease to highlight the possibility of Parkinson's disease treatment strategies that incorpo...

  16. Cockayne syndrome group B protein prevents the accumulation of damaged mitochondria by promoting mitochondrial autophagy

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Ramamoorthy, Mahesh; Sykora, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a devastating autosomal recessive disease characterized by neurodegeneration, cachexia, and accelerated aging. 80% of the cases are caused by mutations in the CS complementation group B (CSB) gene known to be involved in DNA repair and transcription. Recent evidence...... indicates that CSB is present in mitochondria, where it associates with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We report an increase in metabolism in the CSB(m/m) mouse model and CSB-deficient cells. Mitochondrial content is increased in CSB-deficient cells, whereas autophagy is down-regulated, presumably as a result...... of defects in the recruitment of P62 and mitochondrial ubiquitination. CSB-deficient cells show increased free radical production and an accumulation of damaged mitochondria. Accordingly, treatment with the autophagic stimulators lithium chloride or rapamycin reverses the bioenergetic phenotype of...

  17. Autophagy in the control of food intake.

    Singh, Rajat

    2012-04-01

    The cellular nutrient sensing apparatus detects nutritional depletion and transmits this information to downstream effectors that generate energy from alternate sources. Autophagy is a crucial catabolic pathway that turns over redundant cytoplasmic components in lysosomes to provide energy to the starved cell. Recent studies have described a role for hypothalamic autophagy in the control of food intake and energy balance. Activated autophagy in hypothalamic neurons during starvation mobilized neuron-intrinsic lipids to generate free fatty acids that increased AgRP levels. AgRP neuron-specific inhibition of autophagy decreased fasting-induced increases in AgRP levels and food intake. Deletion of autophagy in AgRP neurons led to constitutive increases in levels of proopiomelanocortin and its active processed product, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone that contributed to reduced adiposity in these rodents. The current manuscript discusses these new findings and raises additional questions that may help understand how hypothalamic autophagy controls food intake and energy balance. These studies may have implications for designing new therapies against obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:23700515

  18. RUFY4: Immunity piggybacking on autophagy?

    Terawaki, Seigo; Camosseto, Voahirana; Pierre, Philippe; Gatti, Evelina

    2016-03-01

    Although autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism among species and cell types, few are the molecules involved with the autophagic process that display cell- or tissue- specific expression. We have unraveled the positive regulatory role on autophagy of RUFY4 (RUN and FYVE domain containing 4), which is expressed in subsets of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). DCs orchestrate the eradication of pathogens by coordinating the action of the different cell types involved in microbe recognition and destruction during the immune response. To fulfill this function, DC display particular regulation of their endocytic and autophagy pathways in response to the immune environment. Autophagy flux is downmodulated in DCs upon microbe sensing, but is remarkably augmented, when cells are differentiated in the presence of the pleiotropic cytokine IL4 (interleukin 4). From gene expression studies aimed at comparing the impact of IL4 on DC differentiation, we identified RUFY4, as a novel regulator that augments autophagy flux and, when overexpressed, induces drastic membrane redistribution and strongly tethers lysosomes. RUFY4 is therefore one of the few known positive regulators of autophagy that is expressed in a cell-specific manner or under specific immunological conditions associated with IL4 expression such as allergic asthma. PMID:26760128

  19. Cooperativity of the SUMO and Ubiquitin Pathways in Genome Stability.

    Nie, Minghua; Boddy, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Covalent attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) or SUMO to DNA repair proteins plays critical roles in maintaining genome stability. These structurally related polypeptides can be viewed as distinct road signs, with each being read by specific protein interaction motifs. Therefore, via their interactions with selective readers in the proteome, ubiquitin and SUMO can elicit distinct cellular responses, such as directing DNA lesions into different repair pathways. On the other hand, through the action of the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) family proteins, ubiquitin and SUMO can cooperate in the form of a hybrid signal. These mixed SUMO-ubiquitin chains recruit "effector" proteins such as the AAA⁺ ATPase Cdc48/p97-Ufd1-Npl4 complex that contain both ubiquitin and SUMO interaction motifs. This review will summarize recent key findings on collaborative and distinct roles that ubiquitin and SUMO play in orchestrating DNA damage responses. PMID:26927199

  20. Cooperativity of the SUMO and Ubiquitin Pathways in Genome Stability

    Minghua Nie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Covalent attachment of ubiquitin (Ub or SUMO to DNA repair proteins plays critical roles in maintaining genome stability. These structurally related polypeptides can be viewed as distinct road signs, with each being read by specific protein interaction motifs. Therefore, via their interactions with selective readers in the proteome, ubiquitin and SUMO can elicit distinct cellular responses, such as directing DNA lesions into different repair pathways. On the other hand, through the action of the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL family proteins, ubiquitin and SUMO can cooperate in the form of a hybrid signal. These mixed SUMO-ubiquitin chains recruit “effector” proteins such as the AAA+ ATPase Cdc48/p97-Ufd1-Npl4 complex that contain both ubiquitin and SUMO interaction motifs. This review will summarize recent key findings on collaborative and distinct roles that ubiquitin and SUMO play in orchestrating DNA damage responses.

  1. Urine - abnormal color

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  2. Excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy contribute to developmental testicular toxicity induced by fluoride.

    Zhang, Shun; Niu, Qiang; Gao, Hui; Ma, Rulin; Lei, Rongrong; Zhang, Cheng; Xia, Tao; Li, Pei; Xu, Chunyan; Wang, Chao; Chen, Jingwen; Dong, Lixing; Zhao, Qian; Wang, Aiguo

    2016-05-01

    Fluoride, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is known to impair testicular functions and fertility; however the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In this study, we used a rat model to mimic human exposure and sought to investigate the roles of apoptosis and autophagy in testicular toxicity of fluoride. Sprague-Dawley rats were developmentally exposed to 25, 50, or 100 mg/L sodium fluoride (NaF) via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to post-puberty, and then the testes of offspring were excised on postnatal day 56. Our results demonstrated that developmental NaF exposure induced an enhanced testicular apoptosis, as manifested by a series of hallmarks such as caspase-3 activation, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Further study revealed that fluoride exposure elicited significant elevations in the levels of cell surface death receptor Fas with a parallel increase in cytoplasmic cytochrome c, indicating the involvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Intriguingly, fluoride treatment also simultaneously increased the number of autophagosomes and the levels of autophagy marker LC3-II but not Beclin1. Unexpectedly, the expression of p62, a substrate that is degraded by autophagy, was also significantly elevated, suggesting that the accumulated autophagosomes resulted from impaired autophagy degradation rather than increased formation. Importantly, these were associated with marked histopathological lesions including spermatogenic failure and germ cell loss, along with severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our findings provide deeper insights into roles of excessive apoptosis and defective autophagy in the aggravation of testicular damage, which could contribute to a better understanding of fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity. PMID:26840522

  3. Markers of autophagy are adapted to hyperglycaemia in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes

    Sørensen, Rikke Kruse; Vind, Birgitte F; Petersson, Stine J;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Autophagy is a catabolic process that maintains cellular homeostasis by degradation of protein aggregates and selective removal of damaged organelles, e.g. mitochondria (mitophagy). Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and altered...... protein metabolism. Here, we investigated whether abnormalities in autophagy are present in human muscle in obesity and type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Using a case-control design, skeletal muscle biopsies obtained in the basal and insulin-stimulated states from patients with type 2 diabetes during both...... of forkhead box O3A (FOXO3A) were similar among the groups. Insulin reduced lipidation of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)B-I to LC3B-II, a marker of autophagosome formation, with no effect on p62/sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) content in muscle of lean and obese individuals. In diabetic...

  4. Radiation inhibits proteasomes and increases ubiquitinated proteins

    Full text: Exposure of cells to ionizing radiation results in accumulation of a number of short lived proteins that mediate cell survival/death, proliferation, repair, and differentiation. Expression of most of these proteins, including p53, mdm2, p21, c-jun, IkB-a, bcl-2, bax, cyclins A, B, E, Cdc25A, DNA-PKcs, and caspase-3 is regulated at the post-transcriptional level through ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway. Several previous studies have shown that inhibition of proteasome activity by drugs leads to accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. In this study we show that irradiation can do the same due to its inhibitory effect on 26S, but not 20S, proteasome activity. Two prostate cancer cell lines, murine TRAMP-C1 and human PC3, were used to examine the effect of ionizing radiation on the catalytic activity of the 26S proteasome. Cells were irradiated with different doses ranging from 0.25 to 20 Gy and lysed at different time points after irradiation. Crude extracts of both cell lines showed a rapid 30-50% decrease in chymotryptic activity of the 26S proteasome, as measured by a fluorogenic assay. The same level of inhibition was observed if purified 26S proteasomes were themselves irradiated, indicating that radiation has direct effects on this multicatalytic enzyme complex. Neither direct irradiation of proteasomes or cells had effect on 20S catalytic activity, suggesting that radiation selectively acts on 26S structure. Next, we examined whether this partial inhibition had any effect on ability of 26S proteasome to efficiently remove ubiquitinated proteins. Cells were irradiated with 10Gy and lysed at different time points. Ubiquitinated proteins were precipitated and examined by Western blot. Levels of ubiquitinated conjugates slowly increased over time and peaked at 7h post-irradiation. Accumulation of ubiquitinated conjugates has been shown to lead to formation of protein aggregates which can induce cell death. It has also been shown that monoubiquitination

  5. Autophagy as a target for cancer therapy: new developments

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway that eliminates cytosolic proteins, macromolecules, organelles, and protein aggregates. Activation of autophagy may function as a tumor suppressor by degrading defective organelles and other cellular components. However, this pathway may also be exploited by cancer cells to generate nutrients and energy during periods of starvation, hypoxia, and stress induced by chemotherapy. Therefore, induction of autophagy has emerged as a drug resistance mechanism that promotes cancer cell survival via self-digestion. Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy enhances the activity of a broad array of anticancer agents. Thus, targeting autophagy may be a global anticancer strategy that may improve the efficacy of many standard of care agents. These results have led to multiple clinical trials to evaluate autophagy inhibition in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this review, we summarize the anticancer agents that have been reported to modulate autophagy and discuss new developments in autophagy inhibition as an anticancer strategy

  6. Characterization of early autophagy signaling by quantitative phosphoproteomics

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tg; Zarei, Mostafa; Sprenger, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    Under conditions of nutrient shortage autophagy is the primary cellular mechanism ensuring availability of substrates for continuous biosynthesis. Subjecting cells to starvation or rapamycin efficiently induces autophagy by inhibiting the MTOR signaling pathway triggering increased autophagic flu...

  7. Osteolytic bone metastasis is hampered by impinging on the interplay among autophagy, anoikis and ossification.

    Maroni, P; Bendinelli, P; Matteucci, E; Locatelli, A; Nakamura, T; Scita, G; Desiderio, M A

    2014-01-01

    Here we show that the fate of osteolytic bone metastasis depends on the balance among autophagy, anoikis resistance and ossification, and that the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling pathway seems to have an important role in orchestrating bone colonization. These findings are consistent with the pathophysiology of bone metastasis that is influenced by the cross-talk of supportive and neoplastic cells through molecular signaling networks. We adopted the strategy to target metastasis and stroma with the use of adenovirally expressed NK4 (AdNK4) and Dasatinib to block HGF/Met axis and Src activity. In human bone metastatic 1833 cells, HGF conferred anoikis resistance via Akt and Src activities and HIF-1α induction, leading to Bim isoforms degradation. When Src and Met activities were inhibited with Dasatinib, the Bim isoforms accumulated conferring anoikis sensitivity. The proviability effect of HGF, under low-nutrient stress condition, was related to a faster autophagy deactivation with respect to HGF plus Dasatinib. In the 1833 xenograft model, AdNK4 switched metastasis vasculature to blood lacunae, increasing HIF-1α in metastasis. The combination of AdNK4 plus Dasatinib gave the most relevant results for mice survival, and the following molecular and cellular changes were found to be responsible. In bone metastasis, we observed a hypoxic condition - marked by HIF-1α - and an autophagy failure - marked by p62 without Beclin-1. Then, osteolytic bone metastases were largely prevented, because of autophagy failure in metastasis and ossification in bone marrow, with osteocalcin deposition. The abnormal repair process was triggered by the dysfunctional autophagy/anoikis interplay. In conclusion, the concomitant blockade of HGF/Met axis and Src activity seemed to induce HIF-1α in metastasis, whereas the bone marrow hypoxic response was reduced. As a consequence, anoikis resistance might be hampered favoring, instead, autophagy failure and neoformation of woven

  8. Dual role of autophagy in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis

    Killian M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Autophagy, the major mechanism for degrading long-lived intracellular proteins and organelles, is essential for eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Autophagy also defends the cell against invasion by microorganisms and has important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Increasingly evident is that HIV-1 replication is dependent on select components of autophagy. Fittingly, HIV-1 proteins are able to modulate autophagy to maximize virus production. At the same time, HIV-1 proteins appear t...

  9. Interactions between Shigella flexneri and the Autophagy Machinery

    Krokowski, Sina; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, an intracellular degradation process, is increasingly recognized as having important roles in host defense. Interactions between Shigella flexneri and the autophagy machinery were first discovered in 2005. Since then, work has shown that multiple autophagy pathways are triggered by S. flexneri, and autophagic responses can have different roles during Shigella infection. Here, we review the interactions between S. flexneri and the autophagy machinery, highlighting that studies using...

  10. Bone Cell Autophagy Is Regulated by Environmental Factors

    Zahm, Adam M.; Bohensky, Jolene; Adams, Christopher S.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Srinivas, Vickram

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to ascertain whether bone cells undergo autophagy and to determine if this process is regulated by environmental factors. We showed that osteocytes in both murine and human cortical bone display a punctuate distribution of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3, indicative of autophagy. In addition, we noted a basal level of autophagy in preosteocyte-like murine long bone-derived osteocytic (MLO)-A5 cells. Autophagy was upregulated following nutrient d...

  11. The Ubiquitin System and Jasmonate Signaling

    Astrid Nagels Durand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin (Ub system is involved in most, if not all, biological processes in eukaryotes. The major specificity determinants of this system are the E3 ligases, which bind and ubiquitinate specific sets of proteins and are thereby responsible for target recruitment to the proteasome or other cellular processing machineries. The Ub system contributes to the regulation of the production, perception and signal transduction of plant hormones. Jasmonic acid (JA and its derivatives, known as jasmonates (JAs, act as signaling compounds regulating plant development and plant responses to various biotic and abiotic stress conditions. We provide here an overview of the current understanding of the Ub system involved in JA signaling.

  12. The ubiquitin-proteasome system meets angiogenesis.

    Rahimi, Nader

    2012-03-01

    A strict physiological balance between endogenous proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors controls endothelial cell functions, such that endothelial cell growth is normally restrained. However, in pathologic angiogenesis, a shift occurs in the balance of regulators, favoring endothelial growth. Much of the control of angiogenic events is instigated through hypoxia-induced VEGF expression. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a central role in fine-tuning the functions of core proangiogenic proteins, including VEGF, VEGFR-2, angiogenic signaling proteins (e.g., the PLCγ1 and PI3 kinase/AKT pathways), and other non-VEGF angiogenic pathways. The emerging mechanisms by which ubiquitin modification of angiogenic proteins control angiogenesis involve both proteolytic and nonproteolytic functions. Here, I review recent advances that link the UPS to regulation of angiogenesis and highlight the potential therapeutic value of the UPS in angiogenesis-associated diseases. PMID:22357635

  13. Autophagy and Retromer Components in Plant Innate Immunity

    Munch, David

    -hormone salicylic acid. Here, I present data that make it clear that NPR1 does not directly regulate autophagy, but instead control stress responses that indirectly activate autophagy. The observations presented will also clarify why autophagy has been described as being both a pro-death and pro-life pathway under...

  14. The increasing complexity of the ubiquitin code.

    Yau, Richard; Rape, Michael

    2016-05-27

    Ubiquitylation is essential for signal transduction as well as cell division and differentiation in all eukaryotes. Substrate modifications range from a single ubiquitin molecule to complex polymeric chains, with different types of ubiquitylation often eliciting distinct outcomes. The recent identification of novel chain topologies has improved our understanding of how ubiquitylation establishes precise communication within cells. Here, we discuss how the increasing complexity of ubiquitylation is employed to ensure robust and faithful signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27230526

  15. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Meets Angiogenesis

    Rahimi, Nader

    2012-01-01

    A strict physiological balance between endogenous pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors control endothelial cell functions, such that endothelial cell growth is normally restrained. However, in pathologic angiogenesis a shift occurs in the balance of regulators favoring endothelial growth. Much of control of angiogenic events is instigated through hypoxia-induced VEGF expression. Ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a central role in fine-tuning function of core pro-angiogenic proteins incl...

  16. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases.

  17. Canine hereditary ataxia in old english sheepdogs and gordon setters is associated with a defect in the autophagy gene encoding RAB24.

    Caryline Agler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters suffer from a juvenile onset, autosomal recessive form of canine hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex. The clinical and histological characteristics are analogous to hereditary ataxias in humans. Linkage and genome-wide association studies on a cohort of related Old English Sheepdogs identified a region on CFA4 strongly associated with the disease phenotype. Targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing of the region identified an A to C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located at position 113 in exon 1 of an autophagy gene, RAB24, that segregated with the phenotype. Genotyping of six additional breeds of dogs affected with hereditary ataxia identified the same polymorphism in affected Gordon Setters that segregated perfectly with phenotype. The other breeds tested did not have the polymorphism. Genome-wide SNP genotyping of Gordon Setters identified a 1.9 MB region with an identical haplotype to affected Old English Sheepdogs. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural evaluation of the brains of affected dogs from both breeds identified dramatic Purkinje neuron loss with axonal spheroids, accumulation of autophagosomes, ubiquitin positive inclusions and a diffuse increase in cytoplasmic neuronal ubiquitin staining. These findings recapitulate the changes reported in mice with induced neuron-specific autophagy defects. Taken together, our results suggest that a defect in RAB24, a gene associated with autophagy, is highly associated with and may contribute to canine hereditary ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters. This finding suggests that detailed investigation of autophagy pathways should be undertaken in human hereditary ataxia.

  18. The Ca{sup 2+} channel TRPML3 specifically interacts with the mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16 to regulate autophagy

    Choi, Suzy; Kim, Hyun Jin, E-mail: kimhyunjin@skku.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Split-ubiquitin MY2H screen identified GATE16 as an interacting protein of TRPML3. •TRPML3 specifically binds to a mammalian ATG8 homologue GATE16, not to LC3B. •The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 facilitates autophagosome formation. •GATE16 is expressed in both autophagosome and extra-autophagosomal compartments. -- Abstract: TRPML3 is a Ca{sup 2+} permeable cation channel expressed in multiple intracellular compartments. Although TRPML3 is implicated in autophagy, how TRPML3 can regulate autophagy is not understood. To search interacting proteins with TRPML3 in autophagy, we performed split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (MY2H) screening with TRPML3-loop as a bait and identified GATE16, a mammalian ATG8 homologue. GST pull-down assay revealed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop specifically bind to GATE16, not to LC3B. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) experiments showed that TRPML3 and TRPML3-loop pull down only the lipidated form of GATE16, indicating that the interaction occurs exclusively at the organellar membrane. The interaction of TRPML3 with GATE16 and GATE16-positive vesicle formation were increased in starvation induced autophagy, suggesting that the interaction facilitates the function of GATE16 in autophagosome formation. However, GATE16 was not required for TRPML3 trafficking to autophagosomes. Experiments using dominant-negative (DN) TRPML3(D458K) showed that GATE16 is localized not only in autophagosomes but also in extra-autophagosomal compartments, by contrast with LC3B. Since GATE16 acts at a later stage of the autophagosome biogenesis, our results suggest that TRPML3 plays a role in autophagosome maturation through the interaction with GATE16, by providing Ca{sup 2+} in the fusion process.

  19. Autophagy and Autoimmunity CrossTalks

    Abhisek eBhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, initially viewed as a conserved bulk-degradation mechanism, has emerged as a central player in a multitude of immune functions. Autophagy is important in host defense against intracellular and extracellular pathogens, metabolic syndromes, immune cell homeostasis, antigen processing and presentation and maintenance of tolerance. The observation that the above processes are implicated in triggering or exacerbating autoimmunity raises the possibility that the autophagy pathway is involved in mediating autoimmune processes, either directly or as a consequence of innate or adaptive functions mediated by the pathway. Genome-wide association studies have shown association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in autophagy related gene 5 (Atg5, and Atg16l1 with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematous (SLE and Crohn’s disease, respectively. Enhanced expression of Atg5 was also reported in blood of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS, and in T cells isolated from blood or brain tissues from patients with active relapse of MS. This review explores the roles of autophagy pathway in the innate and adaptive immune systems on regulating or mediating the onset, progression or exacerbation of autoimmune processes.

  20. Autophagy and Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Raffaele Cursio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver ischemia-reperfusion (I-R injury occurs during liver resection, liver transplantation, and hemorrhagic shock. The main mode of liver cell death after warm and/or cold liver I-R is necrosis, but other modes of cell death, as apoptosis and autophagy, are also involved. Autophagy is an intracellular self-digesting pathway responsible for removal of long-lived proteins, damaged organelles, and malformed proteins during biosynthesis by lysosomes. Autophagy is found in normal and diseased liver. Although depending on the type of ischemia, warm and/or cold, the dynamic process of liver I-R results mainly in adenosine triphosphate depletion and in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leads to both, a local ischemic insult and an acute inflammatory-mediated reperfusion injury, and results finally in cell death. This process can induce liver dysfunction and can increase patient morbidity and mortality after liver surgery and hemorrhagic shock. Whether autophagy protects from or promotes liver injury following warm and/or cold I-R remains to be elucidated. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge in liver I-R injury focusing on both the beneficial and the detrimental effects of liver autophagy following warm and/or cold liver I-R.

  1. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 11 (USP11) Deubiquitinates Hybrid Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)-Ubiquitin Chains to Counteract RING Finger Protein 4 (RNF4)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Schimmel, Joost; Eifler, Karolin; Olsen, Jesper V; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2015-01-01

    Ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase with a pivotal function in the DNA damage response (DDR). SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs) in the N-terminal part of RNF4 tightly bind to SUMO polymers, and RNF4 can ubiquitinate these polymers in vitro. Using a proteomic approach......, we identified the deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin-specific protease 11 (USP11), a known DDR-component, as a functional interactor of RNF4. USP11 can deubiquitinate hybrid SUMO-ubiquitin chains to counteract RNF4. SUMO-enriched nuclear bodies are stabilized by USP11, which functions downstream of...... RNF4 as a counterbalancing factor. In response to DNA damage induced by methyl methanesulfonate, USP11 could counteract RNF4 to inhibit the dissolution of nuclear bodies. Thus, we provide novel insight into cross-talk between ubiquitin and SUMO and uncover USP11 and RNF4 as a balanced SUMO...

  2. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Grune, Tilman

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner this...... raises the question whether these proteins are also oxidized and, if not, what proteins need to be ubiquitinated and degraded after oxidative conditions. By determination of oxidized- and ubiquitinated proteins we demonstrate here that most oxidized proteins are not preferentially ubiquitinated. However......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some of these...

  3. Ubiquitin is part of the retrovirus budding machinery

    Patnaik, Akash; Chau, Vincent; Wills, John W.

    2000-11-01

    Retroviruses contain relatively large amounts of ubiquitin, but the significance of this finding has been unknown. Here, we show that drugs that are known to reduce the level of free ubiquitin in the cell dramatically reduced the release of Rous sarcoma virus, an avian retrovirus. This effect was suppressed by overexpressing ubiquitin and also by directly fusing ubiquitin to the C terminus of Gag, the viral protein that directs budding and particle release. The block to budding was found to be at the plasma membrane, and electron microscopy revealed that the reduced level of ubiquitin results in a failure of mature virus particles to separate from each other and from the plasma membrane during budding. These data indicate that ubiquitin is actually part of the budding machinery.

  4. Ubiquitination directly enhances activity of the deubiquitinating enzyme ataxin-3

    Todi, Sokol V.; Winborn, Brett J; Scaglione, K Matthew; Blount, Jessica R.; Travis, Sue M.; Paulson, Henry L.

    2009-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) control the ubiquitination status of proteins in various cellular pathways. Regulation of the activity of DUBs, which is critically important to cellular homoeostasis, can be achieved at the level of gene expression, protein complex formation, or degradation. Here, we report that ubiquitination also directly regulates the activity of a DUB, ataxin-3, a polyglutamine disease protein implicated in protein quality control pathways. Ubiquitination enhances ubiquiti...

  5. Promoters active in interphase are bookmarked during mitosis by ubiquitination

    Arora, Mansi; Jie ZHANG; Heine, George F.; Ozer, Gulcin; Liu, Hui-Wen; Huang, Kun; Parvin, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed modification of chromatin by ubiquitination in human cells and whether this mark changes through the cell cycle. HeLa cells were synchronized at different stages and regions of the genome with ubiquitinated chromatin were identified by affinity purification coupled with next-generation sequencing. During interphase, ubiquitin marked the chromatin on the transcribed regions of ∼70% of highly active genes and deposition of this mark was sensitive to transcriptional inhibition. Promo...

  6. N-Methylcysteine-Mediated Total Chemical Synthesis of Ubiquitin Thioester

    Erlich, Lesly A.; Ajish Kumar, K. S.; Haj-Yahya, Mahmood; Dawson, Philip E.; Brik, Ashraf

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin thioester is a key intermediate in the ubiquitylation of proteins and is formed enzymatically through the activation of α-COOH of ubiquitin in an ATP dependent manner using the E1 enzyme. The current methods used for the preparation of ubiquitin thioester rely on either the enzymatic machinery or on expressed protein ligation technology. In this article, we report a new chemical strategy, combining native chemical ligation and N-methylcysteine containing peptides, to chemically prep...

  7. Exercise induces autophagy in peripheral tissues and in the brain

    He, Congcong; Sumpter, Jr., Rhea; Levine, Beth

    2012-01-01

    We recently identified physical exercise as a newly defined inducer of autophagy in vivo. Exercise induced autophagy in multiple organs involved in metabolic regulation, such as muscle, liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. To study the physiological role of exercise-induced autophagy, we generated mice with a knock-in nonphosphorylatable mutation in BCL2 (Thr69Ala, Ser70Ala and Ser84Ala) (BCL2 AAA) that are defective in exercise- and starvation-induced autophagy but not in basal autophagy. We ...

  8. Autophagy in the light of sphingolipid metabolism

    Harvald, Eva Bang; Olsen, Anne Sofie Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis requires tight and coordinated control of numerous metabolic pathways, which are governed by interconnected networks of signaling pathways and energy-sensing regulators. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway by which the cell self-digests its own components......, has over the past decade been recognized as an essential part of metabolism. Autophagy not only rids the cell of excessive or damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and invading microorganisms, it also provides nutrients to maintain crucial cellular functions. Besides serving as essential structural...... moieties of biomembranes, lipids including sphingolipids are increasingly being recognized as central regulators of a number of important cellular processes, including autophagy. In the present review we describe how sphingolipids, with special emphasis on ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate, can act as...

  9. Regulation and Cellular Roles of Ubiquitin-specific Deubiquitinating Enzymes

    Turcu, Francisca E. Reyes; Ventii, Karen H.; Wilkinson, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are proteases that process ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like gene products, reverse the modification of proteins by a single ubiquitin (or ubiquitin-like protein), and remodel polyubiquitin (or ubiquitin-like) chains on target proteins. The human genome encodes nearly 100 DUBs with specificity for ubiquitin in five families: the UCH, USP, OTU, Josephin, and JAMM families. Four families are cysteine proteases, while the later is a family of metalloproteases. Most DUB activity is cryptic and active site rearrangements often occur during the binding of ubiquitin and/or scaffold proteins. DUBs with specificity for ubiquitin contain multiple domains with insertions and extensions modulating DUB substrate specificity, protein-protein interactions, and cellular localization. Binding partners and multi-protein complexes with which DUBs associate modulate DUB activity and substrate specificity. Quantitative studies of activity and protein-protein interactions, together with genetic studies and the advent of RNAi, have lead to new insights into the function of yeast and human DUBs. This review will discuss ubiquitin-specific DUBs, some of the generalizations emerging from recent studies of the regulation of DUB activity, and their roles in various cellular processes. Specific examples are drawn from studies of protein degradation, DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle regulation, endocytosis, and modulation of signaling kinases. PMID:19489724

  10. Crystallographic structure of ubiquitin in complex with cadmium ions

    Cheung Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitination plays a critical role in regulating many cellular processes, from DNA repair and gene transcription to cell cycle and apoptosis. It is catalyzed by a specific enzymatic cascade ultimately leading to the conjugation of ubiquitin to lysine residues of the target protein that can be the ubiquitin molecule itself and to the formation of poly-ubiquitin chains. Findings We present the crystal structure at 3.0 Å resolution of bovine ubiquitin crystallized in presence of cadmium ions. Two molecules of ubiquitin are present in the asymmetric unit. Interestingly this non-covalent dimeric arrangement brings Lys-6 and Lys-63 of each crystallographically-independent monomer in close contact with the C-terminal ends of the other monomer. Residues Leu-8, Ile-44 and Val-70 that form a hydrophobic patch at the surface of the Ub monomer are trapped at the dimer interface. Conclusions The structural basis for signalling by poly-Ub chains relies on a visualization of conformations of alternatively linked poly-Ub chains. This arrangement of ubiquitin could illustrate how linkages involving Lys-6 or Lys-63 of ubiquitin are produced in the cell. It also details how ubiquitin molecules can specifically chelate cadmium ions.

  11. What to Eat: Evidence for Selective Autophagy in Plants

    Brice E.Floyd; Stephanie C.Morriss; Gustavo C.Maclntosh; Diane C.Bassham

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a macromolecular degradation pathway by which cells recycle their contents as a developmental process,house-keeping mechanism,and response to environmental stress.In plants,autophagy involves the sequestration of cargo to be degraded,transport to the cell vacuole in a double-membrane bound autophagosome,and subsequent degradation by lytic enzymes.Autophagy has generally been considered to be a non-selective mechanism of degradation.However,studies in yeast and animals have found numerous examples of selective autophagy,with cargo including proteins,protein aggregates,and organelles.Recent work has also provided evidence for several types of selective autophagy in plants.The degradation of protein aggregates was the first selective autophagy described in plants,and,more recently,a hybrid protein of the mammalian selective autophagy adaptors p62 and NBR1,which interacts with the autophagy machinery and may function in autophagy of protein aggregates,was described in plants.Other intracellular components have been suggested to be selectively targeted by autophagy in plants,but the current evidence is limited.Here,we discuss recent findings regarding the selective targeting of cell components by autophagy in plants.

  12. Induction of autophagy improves embryo viability in cloned mouse embryos

    Shen, XingHui; Zhang, Na; Wang, ZhenDong; Bai, GuangYu; Zheng, Zhong; Gu, YanLi; Wu, YanShuang; Liu, Hui; Zhou, DongJie; Lei, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular mechanism that degrades cytoplasmic proteins and organelles to recycle their components. Moreover, autophagy is essential for preimplantation development in mammals. Here we show that autophagy is also important for reprogramming in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Our data indicate that unlike fertilized oocytes, autophagy is not triggered in SCNT embryos during 6 hours of activation. Mechanistically, the inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation is due to the cytochalasin B (CB) caused depolymerization of actin filaments. In this study, we induced autophagy during SCNT activation by rapamycin and pp242, which could restore the expected level of autophagy and significantly enhance the development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage when compared with the control (68.5% and 68.7% vs. 41.5%, P autophagy is important for development of SCNT embryos and inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation might be one of the serious causes of low efficiency of SCNT. PMID:26643778

  13. Autophagy: A double-edged sword in intervertebral disk degeneration.

    Zhang, Shu-Jun; Yang, Wei; Wang, Cheng; He, Wen-Si; Deng, Hai-Yang; Yan, Yi-Guo; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Yong-Xiao; Wang, Wen-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic mechanism through which intracellular damaged organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled in response to increased metabolic demands or stresses. Although primarily cytoprotective, dysfunction of autophagy is often associated with many degenerative diseases, including intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration (IDD). As a main contributing factor to low back pain, IDD is the pathological basis for various debilitating spinal diseases. Either higher or lower levels of autophagy are observed in degenerative IVD cells. Despite the precise role of autophagy in disc degeneration that is still controversial, with difference from protection to aggravation, targeting autophagy has shown promise for mitigating disc degeneration. In the current review, we summarize the changes of autophagy in degenerative IVD cells and mainly discuss the relationship between autophagy and IDD. With continued efforts, modulation of the autophagic process could be a potential and attractive therapeutic strategy for degenerative disc disease. PMID:27018178

  14. Regulation of the Tumor-Suppressor Function of the Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Complex by Ubiquitin and SUMO

    Reidick, Christina [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany); El Magraoui, Fouzi; Meyer, Helmut E. [Biomedical Research, Human Brain Proteomics II, Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS, Dortmund 44139 (Germany); Stenmark, Harald [Department of Biochemistry, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Montebello, Oslo 0310 (Norway); Platta, Harald W., E-mail: harald.platta@rub.de [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany)

    2014-12-23

    The occurrence of cancer is often associated with a dysfunction in one of the three central membrane-involution processes—autophagy, endocytosis or cytokinesis. Interestingly, all three pathways are controlled by the same central signaling module: the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex and its catalytic product, the phosphorylated lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P). The activity of the catalytic subunit of the PI3K-III complex, the lipid-kinase VPS34, requires the presence of the membrane-targeting factor VPS15 as well as the adaptor protein Beclin 1. Furthermore, a growing list of regulatory proteins associates with VPS34 via Beclin 1. These accessory factors define distinct subunit compositions and thereby guide the PI3K-III complex to its different cellular and physiological roles. Here we discuss the regulation of the PI3K-III complex components by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. Especially Beclin 1 has emerged as a highly regulated protein, which can be modified with Lys11-, Lys48- or Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by distinct E3 ligases from the RING-, HECT-, RBR- or Cullin-type. We also point out other cross-links of these ligases with autophagy in order to discuss how these data might be merged into a general concept.

  15. Urine - abnormal color

    The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. ... Abnormal urine color may be caused by infection, disease, medicines, or food you eat. Cloudy or milky urine is a sign ...

  16. Lack of collagen VI promotes neurodegeneration by impairing autophagy and inducing apoptosis during aging.

    Cescon, Matilde; Chen, Peiwen; Castagnaro, Silvia; Gregorio, Ilaria; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein with a broad distribution in different tissues and mostly deposited at the close periphery of the cell surface. Previous studies revealed that collagen VI protects neurons from the toxicity of amyloid-βpeptides and from UV-induced damage. However, the physiological role of this protein in the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Here, we established primary neural cultures from murine cortex and hippocampus, and carried out in vitro and in vivo studies in wild-type and collagen VI null (Col6a1-/-) mice. Col6a1-/- neural cultures displayed an increased incidence of spontaneous apoptosis and higher vulnerability to oxidative stress, accompanied by altered regulation of autophagy with increased p62 protein levels and decreased LC3 lipidation. Analysis of brain sections confirmed increased apoptosis and abnormal regulation of autophagy in the CNS of collagen VI-deficient animals. To investigate the in vivo physiological consequences of these CNS defects, we carried out functional studies and found that motor and memory task performances were impaired in aged Col6a1-/-mice. These findings indicate that lack of collagen VI leads to spontaneous apoptosis and defective autophagy in neural cells, and point at a protective role for this ECM protein in the CNS during physiological aging. PMID:27060109

  17. LC3B is indispensable for selective autophagy of p62 but not basal autophagy

    Maruyama, Yoko [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Sou, Yu-Shin; Kageyama, Shun [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Takahashi, Takao [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ueno, Takashi [Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, Center for Biomedical Research Resources, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tanaka, Keiji [Laboratory of Protein Metabolism, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Komatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: komatsu-ms@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Ichimura, Yoshinobu, E-mail: ichimura-ys@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Knockdown of LC3 or GABARAP families did not affect the basal autophagy. • LC3B has a higher affinity for the autophagy-specific substrate, p62, than GABARAPs. • siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3B, but not that of GABARAPs, resulted in significant accumulation of p62. - Abstract: Autophagy is a unique intracellular protein degradation system accompanied by autophagosome formation. Besides its important role through bulk degradation in supplying nutrients, this system has an ability to degrade certain proteins, organelles, and invading bacteria selectively to maintain cellular homeostasis. In yeasts, Atg8p plays key roles in both autophagosome formation and selective autophagy based on its membrane fusion property and interaction with autophagy adaptors/specific substrates. In contrast to the single Atg8p in yeast, mammals have 6 homologs of Atg8p comprising LC3 and GABARAP families. However, it is not clear these two families have different or similar functions. The aim of this study was to determine the separate roles of LC3 and GABARAP families in basal/constitutive and/or selective autophagy. While the combined knockdown of LC3 and GABARAP families caused a defect in long-lived protein degradation through lysosomes, knockdown of each had no effect on the degradation. Meanwhile, knockdown of LC3B but not GABARAPs resulted in significant accumulation of p62/Sqstm1, one of the selective substrate for autophagy. Our results suggest that while mammalian Atg8 homologs are functionally redundant with regard to autophagosome formation, selective autophagy is regulated by specific Atg8 homologs.

  18. LC3B is indispensable for selective autophagy of p62 but not basal autophagy

    Highlights: • Knockdown of LC3 or GABARAP families did not affect the basal autophagy. • LC3B has a higher affinity for the autophagy-specific substrate, p62, than GABARAPs. • siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3B, but not that of GABARAPs, resulted in significant accumulation of p62. - Abstract: Autophagy is a unique intracellular protein degradation system accompanied by autophagosome formation. Besides its important role through bulk degradation in supplying nutrients, this system has an ability to degrade certain proteins, organelles, and invading bacteria selectively to maintain cellular homeostasis. In yeasts, Atg8p plays key roles in both autophagosome formation and selective autophagy based on its membrane fusion property and interaction with autophagy adaptors/specific substrates. In contrast to the single Atg8p in yeast, mammals have 6 homologs of Atg8p comprising LC3 and GABARAP families. However, it is not clear these two families have different or similar functions. The aim of this study was to determine the separate roles of LC3 and GABARAP families in basal/constitutive and/or selective autophagy. While the combined knockdown of LC3 and GABARAP families caused a defect in long-lived protein degradation through lysosomes, knockdown of each had no effect on the degradation. Meanwhile, knockdown of LC3B but not GABARAPs resulted in significant accumulation of p62/Sqstm1, one of the selective substrate for autophagy. Our results suggest that while mammalian Atg8 homologs are functionally redundant with regard to autophagosome formation, selective autophagy is regulated by specific Atg8 homologs

  19. Origin and diversification of TRIM ubiquitin ligases.

    Ignacio Marín

    Full Text Available Most proteins of the TRIM family (also known as RBCC family are ubiquitin ligases that share a peculiar protein structure, characterized by including an N-terminal RING finger domain closely followed by one or two B-boxes. Additional protein domains found at their C termini have been used to classify TRIM proteins into classes. TRIMs are involved in multiple cellular processes and many of them are essential components of the innate immunity system of animal species. In humans, it has been shown that mutations in several TRIM-encoding genes lead to diverse genetic diseases and contribute to several types of cancer. They had been hitherto detected only in animals. In this work, by comprehensively analyzing the available diversity of TRIM and TRIM-like protein sequences and evaluating their evolutionary patterns, an improved classification of the TRIM family is obtained. Members of one of the TRIM subfamilies defined, called Subfamily A, turn to be present not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, such as fungi, apusozoans, alveolates, excavates and plants. The rest of subfamilies are animal-specific and several of them originated only recently. Subfamily A proteins are characterized by containing a MATH domain, suggesting a potential evolutionary connection between TRIM proteins and a different type of ubiquitin ligases, known as TRAFs, which contain quite similar MATH domains. These results indicate that the TRIM family emerged much earlier than so far thought and contribute to our understanding of its origin and diversification. The structural and evolutionary links with the TRAF family of ubiquitin ligases can be experimentally explored to determine whether functional connections also exist.

  20. Autophagy as a Potential Target for Sarcopenia.

    Fan, Jingjing; Kou, Xianjuan; Jia, Shaohui; Yang, Xiaoqi; Yang, Yi; Chen, Ning

    2016-07-01

    Sarcopenia is an aging-related disease with a significant reduction in mass and strength of skeletal muscle due to the imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The loss of skeletal muscle is an inevitable event during aging process, which can result in the significant impact on the quality of life, and also can increase the risk for other aging-associated diseases in the elderly. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of aging-related skeletal muscle loss is still poorly understood. Autophagy is a degradation pathway for the clearance of dysfunctional organelles and damaged macromolecules during aging process. Appropriate induction or accurate regulation of autophagic process and improved quality control of mitochondria through autophagy or other strategies are required for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. In this article, we have summarized the current understanding of autophagic pathways in sarcopenia, and discussed the functional status of autophagy and autophagy-associated quality control of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. Moreover, this article will provide some theoretical references for the exploration of scientific and optimal intervention strategies such as exercise and caloric restriction for the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia through the regulation of autophagic pathways. PMID:26580995

  1. Avermectin induced autophagy in pigeon spleen tissues.

    Liu, Ci; Zhao, Yanbing; Chen, Lijie; Zhang, Ziwei; Li, Ming; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    The level of autophagy is considered as an indicator for monitoring the toxic impact of pesticide exposure. Avermectin (AVM), a widely used insecticide, has immunotoxic effects on the pigeon spleen. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of autophagy and the expression levels of microtubule-associated protein1 light chain 3 (LC3), beclin-1, dynein, autophagy associated gene (Atg) 4B, Atg5, target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) and target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2) in AVM-treated pigeon spleens. Eighty two-month-old pigeons were randomly divided into four groups: a control group, a low-dose group, a medium-dose group and a high-dose group, which were fed a basal diet spiked with 0, 20, 40 and 60 mg AVM/kg diet, respectively. Microscopic cellular morphology revealed a significant increase in autophagic structures in the AVM-treated groups. The expression of LC3, beclin-1, dynein, Atg4B and Atg5 increased, while mRNA levels of TORC1 and TORC2 were decreased in the AVM-treated groups relative to the control groups at 30, 60 and 90 days in the pigeon spleen. These results indicated that AVM exposure could up-regulate the level of autophagy in a dose-time-dependent manner in the pigeon spleen. PMID:26541719

  2. MicroRNA regulation of Autophagy

    Frankel, Lisa B; Lund, Anders H

    2012-01-01

    progress has recently contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the autophagy machinery, yet several gaps remain in our knowledge of this process. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) established a new paradigm of post-transcriptional gene regulation and during the past decade these...

  3. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Synaptic Plasticity

    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for…

  4. A means to an end: ubiquitination of Mpl

    Tong, Wei

    2010-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Saur and colleagues report that ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the Mpl receptor constrains Tpo-mediated cell proliferation, highlighting the importance of the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl in rapid down-regulation of Tpo/Mpl signaling.

  5. The thiazole derivative CPTH6 impairs autophagy.

    Ragazzoni, Y; Desideri, M; Gabellini, C; De Luca, T; Carradori, S; Secci, D; Nescatelli, R; Candiloro, A; Condello, M; Meschini, S; Del Bufalo, D; Trisciuoglio, D

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the thiazole derivative 3-methylcyclopentylidene-[4-(4'-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]hydrazone (CPTH6) induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether CPTH6 is able to affect autophagy. By using several human tumor cell lines with different origins we demonstrated that CPTH6 treatment induced, in a dose-dependent manner, a significant increase in autophagic features, as imaged by electron microscopy, immunoblotting analysis of membrane-bound form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3B-II) levels and by appearance of typical LC3B-II-associated autophagosomal puncta. To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms of elevated markers of autophagy induced by CPTH6 treatment, we silenced the expression of several proteins acting at different steps of autophagy. We found that the effect of CPTH6 on autophagy developed through a noncanonical mechanism that did not require beclin-1-dependent nucleation, but involved Atg-7-mediated elongation of autophagosomal membranes. Strikingly, a combined treatment of CPTH6 with late-stage autophagy inhibitors, such as chloroquine and bafilomycin A1, demonstrates that under basal condition CPTH6 reduces autophagosome turnover through an impairment of their degradation pathway, rather than enhancing autophagosome formation, as confirmed by immunofluorescence experiments. According to these results, CPTH6-induced enhancement of autophagy substrate p62 and NBR1 protein levels confirms a blockage of autophagic cargo degradation. In addition, CPTH6 inhibited autophagosome maturation and compounds having high structural similarities with CPTH6 produced similar effects on the autophagic pathway. Finally, the evidence that CPTH6 treatment decreased α-tubulin acetylation and failed to increase autophagic markers in cells in which acetyltransferase ATAT1 expression was silenced indicates a possible role of α-tubulin acetylation in

  6. Liver autophagy in anorexia nervosa and acute liver injury.

    Kheloufi, Marouane; Boulanger, Chantal M; Durand, François; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates' survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m(2) or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed. PMID:25250330

  7. Impairment of autophagy: From hereditary disorder to drug intoxication

    At first, the molecular mechanism of autophagy was unveiled in a unicellular organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), followed by the discovery that the basic mechanism of autophagy is conserved in multicellular organisms including mammals. Although autophagy was considered to be a non-selective bulk protein degradation system to recycle amino acids during periods of nutrient starvation, it is also believed to be an essential mechanism for the selective elimination of proteins/organelles that are damaged under pathological conditions. Research advances made using autophagy-deficient animals have revealed that impairments of autophagy often underlie the pathogenesis of hereditary disorders such as Danon, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, there are many reports that drugs and toxicants, including arsenic, cadmium, paraquat, methamphetamine, and ethanol, induce autophagy during the development of their toxicity on many organs including heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver. Although the question as to whether autophagic machinery is involved in the execution of cell death or not remains controversial, the current view of the role of autophagy during cell/tissue injury is that it is an important, often essential, cytoprotective reaction; disturbances in cytoprotective autophagy aggravate cell/tissue injuries. The purpose of this review is to provide (1) a gross summarization of autophagy processes, which are becoming more important in the field of toxicology, and (2) examples of important studies reporting the involvement of perturbations in autophagy in cell/tissue injuries caused by acute as well as chronic intoxication

  8. Liver Autophagy in Anorexia Nervosa and Acute Liver Injury

    Marouane Kheloufi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates’ survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m2 or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed.

  9. Induction of cytoprotective autophagy in PC-12 cells by cadmium

    Wang, Qiwen [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Bijie Pilot Area Research Institute of Bijie University, Bijie 551700 (China); Zhu, Jiaqiao; Zhang, Kangbao; Jiang, Chenyang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Liu, Zongping, E-mail: liuzongping@yzu.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Cadmium can promote early upregulation of autophagy in PC-12 cells. •Autophagy precedes apoptosis in cadmium-treated PC-12 cells. •Cadmium-induced autophagy is cytoprotective in PC-12 cells. •Class III PI3K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathway plays a positive role in cadmium-triggered autophagy. -- Abstract: Laboratory data have demonstrated that cadmium (Cd) may induce neuronal apoptosis. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in neurons. In this study, cell viability decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in PC-12 cells. As cells were exposed to Cd, the levels of LC3-II proteins became elevated, specific punctate distribution of endogenous LC3-II increased, and numerous autophagosomes appeared, which suggest that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. In the late stages of autophagy, an increase in the apoptosis ratio was observed. Likewise, pre-treatment with chloroquine (an autophagic inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagic inducer) resulted in an increased and decreased percentage of apoptosis in contrast to other Cd-treated groups, respectively. The results indicate that autophagy delayed apoptosis in Cd-treated PC-12 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with chloroquine reduced autophagy and cell activity. However, rapamycin had an opposite effect on autophagy and cell activity. Moreover, class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways served a function in Cd-induced autophagy. The findings suggest that Cd can induce cytoprotective autophagy by activating class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways. In sum, this study strongly suggests that autophagy may serve a positive function in the reduction of Cd-induced cytotoxicity.

  10. Induction of cytoprotective autophagy in PC-12 cells by cadmium

    Highlights: •Cadmium can promote early upregulation of autophagy in PC-12 cells. •Autophagy precedes apoptosis in cadmium-treated PC-12 cells. •Cadmium-induced autophagy is cytoprotective in PC-12 cells. •Class III PI3K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathway plays a positive role in cadmium-triggered autophagy. -- Abstract: Laboratory data have demonstrated that cadmium (Cd) may induce neuronal apoptosis. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in neurons. In this study, cell viability decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in PC-12 cells. As cells were exposed to Cd, the levels of LC3-II proteins became elevated, specific punctate distribution of endogenous LC3-II increased, and numerous autophagosomes appeared, which suggest that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. In the late stages of autophagy, an increase in the apoptosis ratio was observed. Likewise, pre-treatment with chloroquine (an autophagic inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagic inducer) resulted in an increased and decreased percentage of apoptosis in contrast to other Cd-treated groups, respectively. The results indicate that autophagy delayed apoptosis in Cd-treated PC-12 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with chloroquine reduced autophagy and cell activity. However, rapamycin had an opposite effect on autophagy and cell activity. Moreover, class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways served a function in Cd-induced autophagy. The findings suggest that Cd can induce cytoprotective autophagy by activating class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways. In sum, this study strongly suggests that autophagy may serve a positive function in the reduction of Cd-induced cytotoxicity

  11. PKC-Dependent GlyT1 Ubiquitination Occurs Independent of Phosphorylation: Inespecificity in Lysine Selection for Ubiquitination.

    Susana P Barrera

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter transporter ubiquitination is emerging as the main mechanism for endocytosis and sorting of cargo into lysosomes. In this study, we demonstrate PKC-dependent ubiquitination of three different isoforms of the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1. Incubation of cells expressing transporter with the PKC activator phorbol ester induced a dramatic, time-dependent increase in GlyT1 ubiquitination, followed by accumulation of GlyT1 in EEA1 positive early endosomes. This occurred via a mechanism that was abolished by inhibition of PKC. GlyT1 endocytosis was confirmed in both retinal sections and primary cultures of mouse amacrine neurons. Replacement of only all lysines in the N-and C-termini to arginines prevented ubiquitination and endocytosis, displaying redundancy in the mechanism of ubiquitination. Interestingly, a 40-50% reduction in glycine uptake was detected in phorbol-ester stimulated cells expressing the WT-GlyT1, whereas no significant change was for the mutant protein, demonstrating that endocytosis participates in the reduction of uptake. Consistent with previous findings for the dopamine transporter DAT, ubiquitination of GlyT1 tails functions as sorting signal to deliver transporter into the lysosome and removal of ubiquitination sites dramatically attenuated the rate of GlyT1 degradation. Finally, we showed for the first time that PKC-dependent GlyT1 phosphorylation was not affected by removal of ubiquitination sites, suggesting separate PKC-dependent signaling events for these posttranslational modifications.

  12. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  13. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  14. Mechanistic studies on activation of ubiquitin and di-ubiquitin-like protein, FAT10, by ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 6, Uba6.

    Gavin, James M; Chen, Jesse J; Liao, Hua; Rollins, Neil; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Qing; Ma, Jingya; Loke, Huay-Keng; Lingaraj, Trupti; Brownell, James E; Mallender, William D; Gould, Alexandra E; Amidon, Benjamin S; Dick, Lawrence R

    2012-05-01

    Uba6 is a homolog of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme, Uba1, and activates two ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs), ubiquitin and FAT10. In this study, biochemical and biophysical experiments were performed to understand the mechanisms of how Uba6 recognizes two distinct UBLs and catalyzes their activation and transfer. Uba6 is shown to undergo a three-step activation process and form a ternary complex with both UBLs, similar to what has been observed for Uba1. The catalytic mechanism of Uba6 is further supported by inhibition studies using a mechanism-based E1 inhibitor, Compound 1, which forms covalent adducts with both ubiquitin and FAT10. In addition, pre-steady state kinetic analysis revealed that the rates of UBL-adenylate (step 1) and thioester (step 2) formation are similar between ubiquitin and FAT10. However, distinct kinetic behaviors were also observed for ubiquitin and FAT10. FAT10 binds Uba6 with much higher affinity than ubiquitin while demonstrating lower catalytic activity in both ATP-PP(i) exchange and E1-E2 transthiolation assays. Also, Compound 1 is less potent with FAT10 as the UBL compared with ubiquitin in ATP-PP(i) exchange assays, and both a slow rate of covalent adduct formation and weak adduct binding to Uba6 contribute to the diminished potency observed for FAT10. Together with expression level analysis in IM-9 cells, this study sheds light on the potential role of cytokine-induced FAT10 expression in regulating Uba6 pathways. PMID:22427669

  15. Effect of inhibition of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and Hsp90 on growth and survival of Rhabdomyosarcoma cells in vitro

    Peron Marica

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS and the heat shock response (HSR are two critical regulators of cell homeostasis, as their inhibition affects growth and survival of normal cells, as well as stress response and invasiveness of cancer cells. We evaluated the effects of the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib and of 17-DMAG, a competitive inhibitor of Hsp90, in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS cells, and analyzed the efficacy of single-agent exposures with combination treatments. Methods To assess cytotoxicity induced by Bortezomib and 17-DMAG in RMS cells, viability was measured by MTT assay after 24, 48 and 72 hours. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analyses were carried out to elucidate the mechanisms of action. Apoptosis was measured by FACS with Annexin-V-FITC and Propidium Iodide. Results Bortezomib and 17-DMAG, when combined at single low-toxic concentrations, enhanced growth inhibition of RMS cells, with signs of autophagy that included intensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and conversion of cytosolic LC3-I protein to its autophagosome-associated form. Treatment with lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine facilitates apoptosis, whereas stimulation of autophagy by rapamycin prevents LC3-I conversion and cell death, suggesting that autophagy is a resistance mechanism in RMS cells exposed to proteotoxic drugs. However, combination treatment also causes caspase-dependent apoptosis, PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining, as simultaneous inhibition of both UPS and HSR systems limits cytoprotective autophagy, exacerbating stress resulting from accumulation of misfolded proteins. Conclusion The combination of proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib with Hsp90 inhibitor 17-DMAG, appears to have important therapeutic advantages in the treatment of RMS cells compared with single-agent exposure, because compensatory survival mechanisms that occur as side effects of treatment may be prevented.

  16. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 11 (USP11) Deubiquitinates Hybrid Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)-Ubiquitin Chains to Counteract RING Finger Protein 4 (RNF4).

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Schimmel, Joost; Eifler, Karolin; Olsen, Jesper V; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2015-06-19

    Ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase with a pivotal function in the DNA damage response (DDR). SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs) in the N-terminal part of RNF4 tightly bind to SUMO polymers, and RNF4 can ubiquitinate these polymers in vitro. Using a proteomic approach, we identified the deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin-specific protease 11 (USP11), a known DDR-component, as a functional interactor of RNF4. USP11 can deubiquitinate hybrid SUMO-ubiquitin chains to counteract RNF4. SUMO-enriched nuclear bodies are stabilized by USP11, which functions downstream of RNF4 as a counterbalancing factor. In response to DNA damage induced by methyl methanesulfonate, USP11 could counteract RNF4 to inhibit the dissolution of nuclear bodies. Thus, we provide novel insight into cross-talk between ubiquitin and SUMO and uncover USP11 and RNF4 as a balanced SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase/protease pair with a role in the DDR. PMID:25969536

  17. Nanomaterial-modulated autophagy: underlying mechanisms and functional consequences.

    Zheng, Wei; Wei, Min; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an essential lysosome-dependent process that controls the quality of the cytoplasm and maintains cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction of this protein degradation system is correlated with various disorders. A growing body of evidence suggests that nanomaterials (NMs) have autophagy-modulating effects, thus predicting a valuable and promising application potential of NMs in the diagnosis and treatment of autophagy-related diseases. NMs exhibit unique physical, chemical and biofunctional properties, which may endow NMs with capabilities to modulate autophagy via various mechanisms. The present review highlights the impacts of various NMs on autophagy and their functional consequences. The possible underlying mechanisms for NM-modulated autophagy are also discussed. PMID:27193191

  18. Research Progression of Cellular Autophagy in Liver System Diseases

    Chunyun Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic biological phenomenon widely existed in eukaryotic cells and an important mechanism for cells to adjust to the surrounding environment, prevent invasion of pathogenic micro-organisms and maintain homeostasis, whose activity changes evidently in multiple liver system diseases, suggesting that there is close association between autophagy and the generation and development of liver system diseases. It is also reported that autophagy develops and exerts an important function in many liver-related diseases, such as hepatic carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, viral liver disease and acute liver injury. Therefore, this study aimed to summarize the relationship between autophagy and multiple liver diseases, hoping to explore the effect of autophagy in liver system diseases and further study the regulative effect of autophagy so as to provide new thoughts for their treatment.

  19. Forms, Crosstalks, and the Role of Phospholipid Biosynthesis in Autophagy

    Leanne Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular process occurring during periods of stress to ensure a cell's survival by recycling cytosolic constituents and making products that can be used in energy generation and other essential processes. Three major forms of autophagy exist according to the specific mechanism through which cytoplasmic material is transported to a lysosome. Chaperone-mediated autophagy is a highly selective form of autophagy that delivers specific proteins for lysosomal degradation. Microautophagy is a less selective form of autophagy that occurs through lysosomal membrane invaginations, forming tubes and directly engulfing cytoplasm. Finally, macroautophagy involves formation of new membrane bilayers (autophagosomes that engulf cytosolic material and deliver it to lysosomes. This review provides new insights on the crosstalks between different forms of autophagy and the significance of bilayer-forming phospholipid synthesis in autophagosomal membrane formation.

  20. Pyrvinium targets autophagy addiction to promote cancer cell death

    Deng, Longfei; Lei, Yunlong; Liu, Rui; Li, Jingyi; Yuan, Kefei; Li, Yi; Chen, Yi; Liu, Yi; Lu, You; Edwards III, Carl K; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process by which long-lived proteins and damaged organelles are degradated by lysosomes. Activation of autophagy is an important survival mechanism that protects cancer cells from various stresses, including anticancer agents. Recent studies indicate that pyrvinium pamoate, an FDA-approved antihelminthic drug, exhibits wide-ranging anticancer activity. Here we demonstrate that pyrvinium inhibits autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. We further demonstrate that...

  1. The interplay between autophagy and ROS in tumorigenesis

    VassilikiKarantza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS at physiological levels are important cell signaling molecules. However, aberrantly high ROS are intimately associated with disease and commonly observed in cancer. Mitochondria are primary sources of intracellular ROS, and their maintenance is essential to cellular health. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process whereby cytoplasmic components are delivered to lysosomes for degradation, is responsible for mitochondrial turnover and removal of damaged mitochondria. Impaired autophagy is implicated in many pathological conditions, including neurological disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, aging and cancer. The first reports connecting autophagy to cancer showed that allelic loss of the essential autophagy gene BECLIN1 (BECN1 is prevalent in human breast, ovarian and prostate cancers and that Becn1+/- mice develop mammary gland hyperplasias, lymphomas, and lung and liver tumors. Subsequent studies demonstrated that Atg5-/- and Atg7-/- livers give rise to adenomas, Atg4-/- mice are susceptible to chemical carcinogenesis, and Bif1-/- mice are prone to spontaneous tumors, indicating that autophagy defects promote tumorigenesis. Due to defective mitophagy, autophagy-deficient cells accumulate damaged mitochondria and deregulated ROS levels, which likely contribute to their tumor-initiating capacity. However, the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is complex, as more recent work also revealed tumor dependence on autophagy: autophagy-competent mutant-Ras-expressing cells form tumors more efficiently than their autophagy-deficient counterparts; similarly, FIP200 deficiency suppresses PyMT-driven mammary tumorigenesis. These latter findings are attributed to the fact that tumors driven by powerful oncogenes have high metabolic demands catered to by autophagy. In this review, we discuss the relationship between ROS and autophagy and summarize our current knowledge on their functional interactions in

  2. Dexamethasone-induced autophagy mediates muscle atrophy through mitochondrial clearance

    Troncoso, Rodrigo; Paredes, Felipe; Parra, Valentina; Gatica, Damián; Vásquez-Trincado, César; Quiroga, Clara; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; López-Crisosto, Camila; Rodriguez, Andrea E; Oyarzún, Alejandra P; Kroemer, Guido; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone, enhance protein breakdown via ubiquitin–proteasome system. However, the role of autophagy in organelle and protein turnover in the glucocorticoid-dependent atrophy program remains unknown. Here, we show that dexamethasone stimulates an early activation of autophagy in L6 myotubes depending on protein kinase, AMPK, and glucocorticoid receptor activity. Dexamethasone increases expression of several autophagy genes, including ATG5, LC3, BECN1, and SQSTM1 a...

  3. Autophagy and mitophagy in the myocardium: therapeutic potential and concerns

    Jimenez, Rebecca E; Kubli, Dieter A.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2014-01-01

    The autophagic-lysosomal degradation pathway is critical for cardiac homeostasis, and defects in this pathway are associated with development of cardiomyopathy. Autophagy is responsible for the normal turnover of organelles and long-lived proteins. Autophagy is also rapidly up-regulated in response to stress, where it rapidly clears dysfunctional organelles and cytotoxic protein aggregates in the cell. Autophagy is also important in clearing dysfunctional mitochondria before they can cause ha...

  4. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition.

    Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. PMID:27181354

  5. Mcl-1 Ubiquitination: Unique Regulation of an Essential Survival Protein

    Barbara Mojsa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family that is essential for the survival of multiple cell lineages and that is highly amplified in human cancer. Under physiological conditions, Mcl-1 expression is tightly regulated at multiple levels, involving transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes. Ubiquitination of Mcl-1, that targets it for proteasomal degradation, allows for rapid elimination of the protein and triggering of cell death, in response to various cellular events. In the last decade, a number of studies have elucidated different pathways controlling Mcl-1 ubiquitination and degradation. Four different E3 ubiquitin-ligases (e.g., Mule, SCFβ-TrCP, SCFFbw7 and Trim17 and one deubiquitinase (e.g., USP9X, that respectively mediate and oppose Mcl-1 ubiquitination, have been formerly identified. The interaction between Mule and Mcl-1 can be modulated by other Bcl-2 family proteins, while recognition of Mcl-1 by the other E3 ubiquitin-ligases and deubiquitinase is influenced by phosphorylation of specific residues in Mcl-1. The protein kinases and E3 ubiquitin-ligases that are involved in the regulation of Mcl-1 stability vary depending on the cellular context, highlighting the complexity and pivotal role of Mcl-1 regulation. In this review, we attempt to recapitulate progress in understanding Mcl-1 regulation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  6. A cotranslational ubiquitination pathway for quality control of misfolded proteins.

    Wang, Feng; Durfee, Larissa A; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated that 6%-30% of newly synthesized proteins are rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system; however, the relationship of ubiquitination to translation for these proteins has been unclear. We report that cotranslational ubiquitination (CTU) is a robust process, with 12%-15% of nascent polypeptides being ubiquitinated in human cells. CTU products contained primarily K48-linked polyubiquitin chains, consistent with a proteasomal targeting function. While nascent chains have been shown previously to be ubiquitinated within stalled complexes (CTU(S)), the majority of nascent chain ubiquitination occurred within active translation complexes (CTU(A)). CTU(A) was increased in response to agents that induce protein misfolding, while CTU(S) was increased in response to agents that lead to translational errors or stalling. These results indicate that ubiquitination of nascent polypeptides occurs in two contexts and define CTU(A) as a component of a quality control system that marks proteins for destruction while they are being synthesized. PMID:23583076

  7. Enhanced detection of ubiquitin isopeptides using reductive methylation.

    Chicooree, Navin; Connolly, Yvonne; Tan, Chong-Teik; Malliri, Angeliki; Li, Yaoyong; Smith, Duncan L; Griffiths, John R

    2013-03-01

    Identification of ubiquitination (Ub) sites is of great interest due to the critical roles that the modification plays in cellular regulation. Current methods using mass spectrometry rely upon tryptic isopeptide diglycine tag generation followed by database searching. We present a novel approach to ubiquitin detection based upon the dimethyl labeling of isopeptide N-termini glycines. Ubiquitinated proteins were digested with trypsin and the resulting peptide mixture was derivatized using formaldehyde-D2 solution and sodium cyanoborohydride. The dimethylated peptide mixtures were next separated by liquid chromatography and analyzed on a quadrupole-TOF based mass spectrometer. Diagnostic b2' and a1' ions released from the isopeptide N-terminus upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to spectrally improve the identification of ubiquitinated isopeptides. Proof of principle was established by application to a ubiquitinated protein tryptic digest spiked into a six-protein mix digest background. Extracted ion chromatograms of the a1' and b2' diagnostic product ions from the diglycine tag resulted in a significant reduction in signal complexity and demonstrated a selectivity towards the identification of diglycine branched isopeptides. The method was further shown to be capable of identifying diglycine isopeptides resulting from in-gel tryptic digests of ubiquitin enriched material from a His-Ub transfected cell line. We envisage that these ions may be utilized in global ubiquitination studies with post-acquisition MS/MS (or MSe) data interrogation on high resolution hybrid mass spectrometers. ᅟ PMID:23361369

  8. Regulation of autophagy by cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A

    Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Eisenberg, Tobias;

    2014-01-01

    proteins, as well as the induction of autophagy, a homeostatic process of self-digestion. Multiple distinct manipulations designed to increase or reduce cytosolic AcCoA led to the suppression or induction of autophagy, respectively, both in cultured human cells and in mice. Moreover, maintenance of high Ac......CoA levels inhibited maladaptive autophagy in a model of cardiac pressure overload. Depletion of AcCoA reduced the activity of the acetyltransferase EP300, and EP300 was required for the suppression of autophagy by high AcCoA levels. Altogether, our results indicate that cytosolic AcCoA functions as a...

  9. Autophagy in Lepidoptera: more than old wine in new bottle

    G Tettamanti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular pathway that leads to the degradation of proteins and organelles. This process is usually involved in the maintenance of cell homeostasis when the organism experiences nutrient starvation, but in holometabolous insects autophagy also intervenes in the demolition of larval tissues and organs during metamorphosis. This review summarizes the current knowledge about autophagy research in Lepidoptera and discusses the use of moths and butterflies as models for tudying the roles and regulation of autophagy. It also gives insights into the cooperation between utophagy and apoptosis in cell death events that occur in lepidopteran in vivo and in vitro systems.

  10. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts