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Sample records for abnormal autoimmune profile

  1. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) gene expression patterns between 15 newly diagnosed HT patients and 15 matched healthy controls. However, the MNC expression levels of five genes were significantly upregulated in 25 IBD patients, compared to 18 matched healthy controls (CD14, FACL2, FCN1......, RNASE2, VNN2). There was concordance in the directional change for all genes between IBD and RA patients, i.e. increased expression compared to controls. These data show that one third of the genes significantly upregulated in MNC from RA patients were upregulated in patients with other chronic...

  2. Pancreatic duct abnormalities in focal autoimmune pancreatitis: MR/MRCP imaging findings

    Negrelli, Riccardo; Manfredi, Riccardo; Pedrinolla, Beatrice; Boninsegna, Enrico; Ventriglia, Anna; Mehrabi, Sara; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto [G.B. Rossi University Hospital, University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy); Frulloni, Luca [Universita di Verona, Department of Gastroenterology, Policlinico G.B. Rossi, Verona (Italy)

    2014-08-09

    To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-MR cholangiopancreatographic (MRCP) findings of focal forms of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) to describe ductal involvement at diagnosis. MR examinations of 123 patients affected by AIP were analysed. We included 26 patients who satisfied International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria and were suffering from focal AIP. Image analysis included: site of parenchymal enlargement, main pancreatic duct (MPD) diameter, MPD stenosis, stricture length, presence of upstream dilation within the stricture, signal intensity, and pancreatic enhancement. Signal intensity abnormalities were localized in the head in 10/26 (38.5 %) and in the body-tail in 16/26 (61.5 %) patients. MRCP showed a single MPD stenosis in 12/26 (46.1 %) and multiple MPD stenosis in 14/26 (53.8 %) patients, without a dilation of the upstream MPD (mean: 3.83 mm). Lesions showed hypointensity on T1-weighted images in all patients, and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images in 22/26 (84.6 %) patients. The affected parenchyma was hypovascular during the arterial phase in 25/26 (96.2 %) patients with contrast retention. MR-MRCP are effective techniques for the diagnosis of AIP showing the loss of the physiological lobulation and the typical contrastographic appearance. The presence of multiple, long stenoses without an upstream MPD dilation at MRCP suggests the diagnosis of AIP, and can be useful in differential diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.)

  3. Spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis in obese strain chickens: a genetic analysis of target organ abnormalities

    In this study the authors investigated the genetic background of primary abnormalities found in the thyroid gland of Obese strain (OS) chickens with spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT), i.e., susceptibility to passively transferred antibodies to thyroglobulin (TgAb) and incomplete suppression of iodine uptake by thyroxine (T4). Several crosses between the B15/B15 subline of OS chickens and the inbred CB line (B12/B12) were done and the progeny was analyzed for thyroiditis after injection of OS serum containing high titers of TgAb. It was found that passive transfer of TgAb increased the lymphoid infiltration in the thyroids of OS chickens, but had no effect on CB birds. A genetic analysis of backcrosses revealed that this trait is, in the case of simple Mendelian inheritance, encoded by at least three recessive genes. The thyroidal 131I uptake of these crosses under T4 was also determined and they found that this trait is most probably encoded by only one recessive gene

  4. Cytokines and Cytokine Profiles in Human Autoimmune Diseases and Animal Models of Autoimmunity

    Manfred Kunz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise pathomechanisms of human autoimmune diseases are still poorly understood. However, a deepened understanding of these is urgently needed to improve disease prevention and early detection and guide more specific treatment approaches. In recent years, many new genes and signalling pathways involved in autoimmunity with often overlapping patterns between different disease entities have been detected. Major contributions were made by experiments using DNA microarray technology, which has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, among which were rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes. In systemic lupus erythematosus, a so-called interferon signature has been identified. In psoriasis, researchers found a particular immune signalling cluster. Moreover the identification of a new subset of inflammatory T cells, so-called Th17 T cells, secreting interleukin (IL-17 as one of their major cytokines and the identification of the IL-23/IL-17 axis of inflammation regulation, have significantly improved our understanding of autoimmune diseases. Since a plethora of new treatment approaches using antibodies or small molecule inhibitors specifically targeting cytokines, cellular receptors, or signalling mechanisms has emerged in recent years, more individualized treatment for affected patients may be within reach in the future.

  5. Contrasuppression in autoimmunity. Abnormal contrasuppression facilitates expression of nephritogenic effector T cells and interstitial nephritis in kdkd mice

    1987-01-01

    We have used the murine model of spontaneous autoimmune interstitial nephritis in kdkd mice to examine the importance of abnormal immunoregulation in the expression of disease. T cells from naive congenic CBA/Ca mice suppress both histologic renal injury in the kdkd strain as well as the DTH reactivity to CBA/Ca renal tubular antigens mediated by lymphocytes from nephritic kdkd mice. These antigen- specific suppressor T cells are Lyt-2+, L3T4+, I-Jk+, genetically dominant and I-Jk restricted....

  6. Autoimmune gastritis and parietal cell reactivity in two children with abnormal intestinal permeability

    Greenwood, Deanne L. V.; Crock, Patricia; Braye, Stephen; Davidson, Patricia; Sentry, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is characterised by lymphocytic infiltration of the gastric submucosa, with loss of parietal and chief cells and achlorhydria. Often, gastritis is expressed clinically as cobalamin deficiency with megaloblastic anaemia, which is generally described as a disease of the elderly. H

  7. Profile of hematological abnormalities of Indian HIV infected individuals

    Sharma Aman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematological abnormalities are a common complication of HIV infection. These abnormalities increase as the disease advances. Bone marrow abnormalities occur in all stages of HIV infection. Methods Two hundred HIV infected individual were screened for hematological abnormalities from March 2007–March 2008. Absolute CD4 cell count analysis was carried out by flowcytometry. Depending on the results of the primary screening further investigations were performed, like iron studies, hemolytic work up, PNH work up and bone marrow evaluation. Other investigations included coagulation profile, urine analysis, blood culture (bacterial, fungal, mycobacterial, serology for Epstein Barr virus (EBV, Cytomegalovirus (CMV, Hepatitis B and C, and Parvo B19 infection. Results The most common hematological abnormality was anemia, seen in 65.5% (131/200 patients. Iron deficiency anemia was seen in 49.2% (/200 cases while anemia of chronic disease occurred in 50.7% (/200 cases. Bone marrow evaluation was carried out in 14 patients out of which staging marrow was performed in 2 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL and did not show any bone marrow infiltration. In remaining12 cases bone marrow was done for evaluation of pancytopenia. Among patients with pancytopenia 50% (6/12 showed granulomas (4 were positive for AFB, 2 were positive for fungal cryptococci, 25% (3/12 showed hemophagocytosis. There was a strong negative correlation between anemia and CD4 counts in this study. Thrombocytopenia was seen in 7% (14/200 cases and had no significant correlation with CD4 counts. No patient had absolute neutrophil count (ANC Conclusion Anemia in HIV patients can be a good clinical indicator to predict and access the underlying immune status. Patients should be investigated for hematological manifestations and appropriate steps should be taken to identify and treat the reversible factors.

  8. Connectivity and functional profiling of abnormal brain structures in pedophilia

    Poeppl, Timm B.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Fox, Peter T.; Laird, Angela R.; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold; Bzdok, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Despite its 0.5–1% lifetime prevalence in men and its general societal relevance, neuroimaging investigations in pedophilia are scarce. Preliminary findings indicate abnormal brain structure and function. However, no study has yet linked structural alterations in pedophiles to both connectional and functional properties of the aberrant hotspots. The relationship between morphological alterations and brain function in pedophilia as well as their contribution to its psychopathology thus remain unclear. First, we assessed bimodal connectivity of structurally altered candidate regions using meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and resting-state correlations employing openly accessible data. We compared the ensuing connectivity maps to the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) maps of a recent quantitative meta-analysis of brain activity during processing of sexual stimuli. Second, we functionally characterized the structurally altered regions employing meta-data of a large-scale neuroimaging database. Candidate regions were functionally connected to key areas for processing of sexual stimuli. Moreover, we found that the functional role of structurally altered brain regions in pedophilia relates to nonsexual emotional as well as neurocognitive and executive functions, previously reported to be impaired in pedophiles. Our results suggest that structural brain alterations affect neural networks for sexual processing by way of disrupted functional connectivity, which may entail abnormal sexual arousal patterns. The findings moreover indicate that structural alterations account for common affective and neurocognitive impairments in pedophilia. The present multi-modal integration of brain structure and function analyses links sexual and nonsexual psychopathology in pedophilia. PMID:25733379

  9. Connectivity and functional profiling of abnormal brain structures in pedophilia.

    Poeppl, Timm B; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Laird, Angela R; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold; Bzdok, Danilo

    2015-06-01

    Despite its 0.5-1% lifetime prevalence in men and its general societal relevance, neuroimaging investigations in pedophilia are scarce. Preliminary findings indicate abnormal brain structure and function. However, no study has yet linked structural alterations in pedophiles to both connectional and functional properties of the aberrant hotspots. The relationship between morphological alterations and brain function in pedophilia as well as their contribution to its psychopathology thus remain unclear. First, we assessed bimodal connectivity of structurally altered candidate regions using meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and resting-state correlations employing openly accessible data. We compared the ensuing connectivity maps to the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) maps of a recent quantitative meta-analysis of brain activity during processing of sexual stimuli. Second, we functionally characterized the structurally altered regions employing meta-data of a large-scale neuroimaging database. Candidate regions were functionally connected to key areas for processing of sexual stimuli. Moreover, we found that the functional role of structurally altered brain regions in pedophilia relates to nonsexual emotional as well as neurocognitive and executive functions, previously reported to be impaired in pedophiles. Our results suggest that structural brain alterations affect neural networks for sexual processing by way of disrupted functional connectivity, which may entail abnormal sexual arousal patterns. The findings moreover indicate that structural alterations account for common affective and neurocognitive impairments in pedophilia. The present multimodal integration of brain structure and function analyses links sexual and nonsexual psychopathology in pedophilia. PMID:25733379

  10. Exploration of high-density protein microarrays for antibody validation and autoimmunity profiling.

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Mattsson, Cecilia; Andersson, Eni; Hellström, Cecilia; Uhlen, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Ayoglu, Burcu; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-09-25

    High-density protein microarrays of recombinant human protein fragments, representing 12,412 unique Ensembl Gene IDs, have here been produced and explored. These protein microarrays were used to analyse antibody off-target interactions, as well as for profiling the human autoantibody repertoire in plasma against the antigens represented by the protein fragments. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies produced within the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) were analysed on microarrays of three different sizes, ranging from 384 antigens to 21,120 antigens, for evaluation of the antibody validation criteria in the HPA. Plasma samples from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients were also screened in order to explore the feasibility of these arrays for broad-scale profiling of autoantibody reactivity. Furthermore, analysis on these near proteome-wide microarrays was complemented with analysis on HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarrays. The HPA recombinant protein microarray with 21,120 antigens and the HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarray are currently the largest protein microarray platforms available to date. The results on these arrays show that the Human Protein Atlas antibodies have few off-target interactions if the antibody validation criteria are kept stringent and demonstrate that the HPA-produced high-density recombinant protein fragment microarrays allow for a high-throughput analysis of plasma for identification of possible autoantibody targets in the context of various autoimmune conditions. PMID:26417875

  11. Immunological profile of HTLV-1-infected patients associated with infectious or autoimmune dermatological disorders.

    Jordana Grazziela Alves Coelho-dos-Reis

    Full Text Available In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4(+HLA-DR(+, CD8(+ T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-α/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection.

  12. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant......A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes....

  13. Aspirin insensitive thrombophilia: Transcript profiling of blood identifies platelet abnormalities and HLA restriction

    Fallahi, Payam; Katz, Richard; Toma, Ian; Li, Ranyang; Reiner, Jonathan; VanHouten, Kiersten; Carpio, Larry; Marshall, Lorraine; Lian, Yi; Bupp, Sujata; Fu, Sidney W.; Rickles, Frederick; Leitenberg, David; Lai, Yinglei; Weksler, Babette B.; Rebling, Frederik; Yang, Zhaoqing; McCaffrey, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is the most widely used antiplatelet agent because it is safe, efficient, and inexpensive. However, a significant subset of patients does not exhibit a full inhibition of platelet aggregation, termed ‘aspirin resistance’ (AR). Several major studies have observed that AR patients have a 4-fold increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and other thrombotic events. Arachidonic acid-stimulated whole blood aggregation was tested in 132 adults at risk for ischemic events, and identified an inadequate response to aspirin therapy in 9 patients (6.8%). Expression profiling of blood RNA by microarray was used to generate new hypotheses about the etiology of AR. Among the differentially expressed genes, there were decreases in several known platelet transcripts, including clusterin (CLU), glycoproteins IIb/IIIa (ITGA2B/3), lipocalin (LCN2), lactoferrin (LTF), and the thrombopoetin receptor (MPL), but with increased mRNA for the T-cell Th1 chemokine CXCL10. There was a strong association of AR with expression of HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DQA1. Similar HLA changes have been linked to autoimmune disorders, particularly antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in which autoantibodies to phospholipid/protein complexes can trigger platelet activation. Consistent with APS, AR patients exhibited a 30% reduction in platelet counts. Follow-up testing for autoimmune antibodies observed only borderline titers in AR patients. Overall, these results suggest that AR may be related to changes in platelet gene expression creating a hyperreactive platelet, despite antiplatelet therapy. Future studies will focus on determining the protein levels of these differential transcripts in platelets, and the possible involvement of HLA restriction as a contributing factor. PMID:23454623

  14. An enhanced postnatal autoimmune profile in 24 week-old C57BL/6 mice developmentally exposed to TCDD

    Developmental exposure of mice to the environmental contaminant and AhR agonist, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), causes persistent postnatal suppression of T cell-mediated immune responses. The extent to which prenatal TCDD may induce or exacerbate postnatal autoimmune disease remains unknown. In the present study, time-pregnant high affinity AhR C57BL/6 mice received a single oral administration of 0, 2.5, or 5 μg/kg TCDD on gestation day (gd) 12. Offspring of these mice (n = 5/gender/treatment) were evaluated at 24 weeks-of-age and showed considerable immune dysregulation that was often gender-specific. Decreased thymic weight and percentages of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes, and increased CD4+CD8- thymocytes, were present in the female but not male offspring. Males but not females showed decreased CD4-CD8+ T cells, and increased Vβ3+ and Vβ17a+ T cells, in the spleen. Males but not females also showed increased percentages of bone marrow CD24-B220+ B cell progenitors. Antibody titers to dsDNA, ssDNA and cardiolipin displayed increasing trends in both male and female mice, reaching significance for anti-dsDNA in both genders and for ssDNA in males at 5 μg/kg TCDD. Immunofluorescent staining of IgG and C3 deposition in kidney glomeruli increased in both genders of prenatal TCDD-exposed mice, suggestive of early stages of autoimmune glomerulonephritis. Collectively, these results show that exposure to TCDD during immune system development causes persistent humoral immune dysregulation as well as altered cell-mediated responses, and induces an adult profile of changes suggestive of increased risk for autoimmune disease

  15. HLA, NFKB1 and NFKBIA gene polymorphism profile in autoimmune diabetes mellitus patients.

    Katarina, K; Daniela, P; Peter, N; Marianna, R; Pavlina, C; Stepanka, P; Jan, L; Ludmila, T; Michal, A; Marie, C

    2007-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the long-time studied autoimmune disorders. The triggering of the autoimmune process has been ascribed to various genes active in the regulation of the cytokine gene transcription including the Rel/NF-kappaB gene family. In our study the gene polymorphism of HLA class II, NFKB1 (nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 1) and NFKBIA (inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B) was tested. Patients were divided into the subgroups in relation to the disease type: T1DM in children, T1DM in adults, and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA). HLA-DRB1 (*)04 and HLA-DQB1 (*)0302 have been detected as risk factors for T1DM in adults and particularly in children (P<0.0001, OR=22.9 and 46.5 respectively). HLA-DRB1 (*)03 has been found as a single risk factor for LADA (P<0.0001, OR=4.9). We detected 15 alleles for the NFKB1 gene polymorphism (CA-repeats) in the Czech population. The alleles were ranging in size from 114-142 bp corresponding to 10-25 CA repeats. Frequency of the A7 allele of NFKB1 gene has been significantly increased in T1DM adults (P<0.01). There was no difference in A and a G allele frequency of NFKBIA gene between the control group and patients, but the association of the AA genotype of NFKBIA gene has been found for LADA (P<0.05). Summarizing our results we concluded that there is a high probability of association of gene polymorphism from Rel/NF-kappaB family with an autoimmune diabetes course. Due to the results obtained in the epidemiological study we have been looking also for the function significance of the genetic predisposition. No significant changes have been observed by real time PCR testing of HLA-DRB1 (*)04 gene and NFKB1 gene expression between T1DM diabetic group with different HLA, NFKB1, NFKBIA genetic background. PMID:17318773

  16. The Emerging Link Between Autoimmune Disorders and Neuropsychiatric Disease

    Kayser, Matthew S; Dalmau, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal autoimmune activity has been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this review, the authors discuss a newly recognized class of synaptic autoimmune encephalitides as well as behavioral and cognitive manifestations of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  17. Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Children

    Francesca Crea; Carla Bizzarri; Marco Cappa

    2011-01-01

    The two major autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) include Graves' disease (GD) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT); both of which are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid by T and B cells reactive to thyroid antigens, by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by abnormal thyroid function (hyperthyroidism in GD and hypothyroidism in AT). While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, it is believed to develop when a combination of genetic susceptibility and environment...

  18. Genetic and infectious profiles influence cerebrospinal fluid IgG abnormality in Japanese multiple sclerosis patients.

    Satoshi Yoshimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormal intrathecal synthesis of IgG, reflected by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF oligoclonal IgG bands (OBs and increased IgG index, is much less frequently observed in Japanese multiple sclerosis (MS cohorts compared with Western cohorts. We aimed to clarify whether genetic and common infectious backgrounds influence CSF IgG abnormality in Japanese MS patients. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed HLA-DRB1 alleles, and IgG antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA, and varicella zoster virus (VZV in 94 patients with MS and 367 unrelated healthy controls (HCs. We defined CSF IgG abnormality as the presence of CSF OBs and/or increased IgG index (>0.658. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CSF IgG abnormality was found in 59 of 94 (62.8% MS patients. CSF IgG abnormality-positive patients had a significantly higher frequency of brain MRI lesions meeting the Barkhof criteria compared with abnormality-negative patients. Compared with HCs, CSF IgG abnormality-positive MS patients showed a significantly higher frequency of DRB1 1501, whereas CSF IgG abnormality-negative patients had a significantly higher frequency of DRB1 0405. CSF IgG abnormality-positive MS patients had a significantly higher frequency of anti-C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies compared with CSF IgG abnormality-negative MS patients, although there was no difference in the frequency of anti-C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies between HCs and total MS patients. Compared with HCs, anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies were detected significantly less frequently in the total MS patients, especially in CSF IgG abnormality-negative MS patients. The frequencies of antibodies against EBNA and VZV did not differ significantly among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: CSF IgG abnormality is associated with Western MS-like brain MRI features. DRB1 1501 and C. pneumoniae infection confer CSF IgG abnormality, while DRB1 0405 and H. pylori infection are positively and negatively

  19. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    ... diagnosed? A health care provider will make a diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis based on symptoms, a physical exam, blood tests, ... 2. A health care provider will make a diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis based on symptoms, a physical exam, blood tests, ...

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  2. Antinuclear antibodies defining autoimmunity pathways

    Tan, Eng M.

    2014-01-01

    Immunofluorescent imaging has been a powerful technique in helping to identify intracellular nuclear and cytoplasmic molecules which are target antigens of autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune disorders. Patterns of staining can be correlated with molecules engaged in specific cellular functions and distributed in distinct cellular domains. Different autoimmune disorders have different profiles of autoantibodies, and immunodiagnostics has become an important adjunct in differential diagnosis...

  3. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    Grossi, Armando; Crinò, Antonino; Luciano, Rosa; Lombardo, Antonietta; Cappa, Marco; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and t...

  4. Differential gene expression profile associated with the abnormality of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in aplastic anemia.

    Jianping Li

    Full Text Available Aplastic anemia (AA is generally considered as an immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome with defective hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and marrow microenvironment. Previous studies have demonstrated the defective HSCs and aberrant T cellular-immunity in AA using a microarray approach. However, little is known about the overall specialty of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. In the present study, we comprehensively compared the biological features and gene expression profile of BM-MSCs between AA patients and healthy volunteers. In comparison with healthy controls, BM-MSCs from AA patients showed aberrant morphology, decreased proliferation and clonogenic potential and increased apoptosis. BM-MSCs from AA patients were susceptible to be induced to differentiate into adipocytes but more difficult to differentiate into osteoblasts. Consistent with abnormal biological features, a large number of genes implicated in cell cycle, cell division, proliferation, chemotaxis and hematopoietic cell lineage showed markedly decreased expression in BM-MSCs from AA patients. Conversely, more related genes with apoptosis, adipogenesis and immune response showed increased expression in BM-MSCs from AA patients. The gene expression profile of BM-MSCs further confirmed the abnormal biological properties and provided significant evidence for the possible mechanism of the destruction of the bone marrow microenvironment in AA.

  5. Autoimmune Diseases

    ... Some examples of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, ... Toll-Free: 877-226-4267 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, HHS Phone: ...

  6. Comparison of Immune Profiles in Fetal Hearts with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy, Maternal Autoimmune-Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy and the Normal Fetus.

    Nield, Lynne E; von Both, Ingo; Popel, Najla; Strachan, Kate; Manlhiot, Cedric; Shannon, Patrick; McCrindle, Brian W; Atkinson, Adelle; Miner, Steven E S; Jaeggi, Edgar T; Taylor, Glenn P

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (iDCM) remains unknown. Immune therapies have improved outcome in fetuses with DCM born to mothers with autoimmune disease (aDCM). The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the myocardial B and T cell profiles in fetuses and neonates with idiopathic DCM (iDCM) versus autoimmune-mediated DCM (aDCM) and to describe the normal cell maturation within the human fetal myocardium. Of 60 fetal autopsy cases identified from institutional databases, 10 had aDCM (18-38 weeks), 12 iDCM (19-37 weeks) and 38 had normal hearts (11-40 weeks). Paraffin-embedded myocardium sections were stained for all lymphocyte (CD45), B cells (CD20, CD79a), T cells (CD3, CD4, CD7, CD8) and monocyte (CD68) surface markers. Two independent, blinded cell counts were performed. Normal hearts expressed all B and T cell markers in a bimodal fashion, with peaks at 22 and 37 weeks of gestation. The aDCM cohort was most distinct from normal hearts, with less overall T cell markers [EST -9.1 (2.6) cells/mm(2), p = 0.001], CD4 [EST -2.0 (0.6), p = 0.001], CD3 [EST -3.9 (1.0), p development of the heart and evolution of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26481221

  7. [Autoimmune encephalitis].

    Davydovskaya, M V; Boyko, A N; Beliaeva, I A; Martynov, M Yu; Gusev, E I

    2015-01-01

    The authors consider the issues related to pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune encephalitis. It has been demonstrated that the development of autoimmune encephalitis can be associated with the oncologic process or be of idiopathic character. The pathogenesis of autoimmune encephalitis is caused by the production of antibodies that directly or indirectly (via T-cell mechanism) damage exo-and/or endocellular structures of the nerve cells. The presence of antobodies to endocellular structures of neurons in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with autoimmune encephalitis in the vast majority of cases (> 95%) indicates the concomitant oncologic process, the presence of antibodies to membranes or neuronal synapses can be not associated with the oncologic process. Along with complex examination, including neuroimaging, EEG, cerebrospinal fluid and antibodies, the diagnostic algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis should include the search for the nidus of cancer. The treatment algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis included the combined immunosupressive therapy, plasmapheresis, immunoglobulines, cytostatics as well as treatment of the oncologic process. PMID:26322363

  8. Comparison of gene expression profiles and responses to zinc chloride among inter- and intraspecific hybrids with growth abnormalities in wheat and its relatives.

    Takamatsu, Kiyofumi; Iehisa, Julio C M; Nishijima, Ryo; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid necrosis is a well-known reproductive isolation mechanism in plant species, and an autoimmune response is generally considered to trigger hybrid necrosis through epistatic interaction between disease resistance-related genes in hybrids. In common wheat, the complementary Ne1 and Ne2 genes control hybrid necrosis, defined as type I necrosis. Two other types of hybrid necrosis (type II and type III) have been observed in interspecific hybrids between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii. Another type of hybrid necrosis, defined here as type IV necrosis, has been reported in F1 hybrids between Triticum urartu and some accessions of Triticum monococcum ssp. aegilopoides. In types I, III and IV, cell death occurs gradually starting in older tissues, whereas type II necrosis symptoms occur only under low temperature. To compare comprehensive gene expression patterns of hybrids showing growth abnormalities, transcriptome analysis of type I and type IV necrosis was performed using a wheat 38k oligo-DNA microarray. Defense-related genes including many WRKY transcription factor genes were dramatically up-regulated in plants showing type I and type IV necrosis, similarly to other known hybrid abnormalities, suggesting an association with an autoimmune response. Reactive oxygen species generation and necrotic cell death were effectively inhibited by ZnCl2 treatment in types I, III and IV necrosis, suggesting a significant association of Ca(2+) influx in upstream signaling of necrotic cell death in wheat hybrid necrosis. PMID:26081164

  9. Autoimmunity and Turner's syndrome.

    Lleo, Ana; Moroni, Luca; Caliari, Lisa; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2012-05-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder, affecting female individuals, resulting from the partial or complete absence of one sex chromosome, and occurring in approximately 50 per 100,000 liveborn girls. TS is associated with reduced adult height and with gonadal dysgenesis, leading to insufficient circulating levels of female sex steroids and to infertility. Morbidity and mortality are increased in TS but average intellectual performance is within the normal range. TS is closely associated to the presence of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases (AID), especially autoimmune thyroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the fact that the strong association between TS and AID is well known and has been widely studied, the underlying immunopathogenic mechanism remains partially unexplained. Recent studies have displayed how TS patients do not show an excess of immunogenic risk markers. This is evocative for a higher responsibility of X-chromosome abnormalities in the development of AID, and particularly of X-genes involved in immune response. For instance, the long arm of the X chromosome hosts a MHC-locus, so the loss of that region may lead to a deficiency in immune regulation. Currently no firm guidelines for diagnosis exist. In conclusion, TS is a condition associated with a number of autoimmune manifestations. Individuals with TS need life-long medical attention. As a consequence of these findings, early diagnosis and regular screening for potential associated autoimmune conditions are essential in the medical follow-up of TS patients. PMID:22154619

  10. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B;

    2016-01-01

    and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM.......6-0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the...... profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration....

  11. Analysis of serum lipid profiles, metal ions and thyroid hormones levels abnormalities in - thalassaemic children of Bangladesh

    Objective: To assess the serum lipid profile of cardiovascular disease free male and female children with - thalassaemia. Levels of zinc, copper and magnesium in the serum were also determined along with the Thyroid profile. Methods: From January to December 2007, we enrolled 121 consecutive patients with -thalassaemia that visited The Thalassaemia Center at Dhaka Shishu (Children) Hospital, Bangladesh every month for routine examinations. Fasting blood lipid levels were measured in all participants. Zinc, Copper and Magnesium levels in serums were determined. Thyroid function was also assessed by evaluating T3, T4 and TSH levels. Results: Of the 121 patients, 65 were males (10.14 +- 3.91 years) and 56 were females (9.08 +- 4.32 years). Data analysis revealed that 2.0% males and 4.35% females had high total serum cholesterol, and 28.57% males and 21.74% females had high triglyceride levels. In addition, mean HDL-cholesterol levels were 21.14 +- 5.82 mg/dl in males and 21.17 +- 6.02 mg/dl in females; total-cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol ratios were 5.47 +- 1.66 and 5.96 +- 2.81 in males and females respectively. About 60% patients showed low serum level of Zn and Cu. Hypothyroidism was detected in 30% patients and 23% patients had abnormal experimental values of all the study parameters. Conclusions: The majority of the patients had blood lipid levels (by the exception of HDL-cholesterol) within the normal range, and consequently the prevalence of lipid abnormalities was much lower as compared to the general population of the same age. Interestingly, the total-cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol ratio was high in our patients, and may underline the importance of this index for the prognosis of future cardiac events in these patients. The serum Zn and Cu levels were low in most of the patients which may cause some metabolic abnormalities in future. Most of the patients also showed hypothyroidism indicating the presence of endocrine complications. (author)

  12. PECULIARITIES OF THE CYTOKINE PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS IN COMBINATION WITH AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS

    N. A. Kravchun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: study of the nature of changes in the immune system of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM in combination with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT and without it; comparative analysis of similar indicators of patients with type 1 DM in combination with AIT and without it.Materials and methods. 104 patients at the age of 22 to 62 y.o. (57 women and 47 men took part in the study. They were divided into 4 groups (type 2 DM, type 2 DM and AIT, type 1 DM, type 1 DM and AIT. Groups of patients who were examined regarding the state of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, indicators of the T-cell link of the immune system, concentration of interleukin 4 (IL-4, IL-6, interferon-gamma, and leptin level, were comparable regarding their sex, age, duration of disease.Results. Unidirectional relationship between body mass index (BMI, amount of CD4 +-, CD8+- lymphocytes, level of leptin, IL-4, IL-6 concentrations and BMI and immunoregulatory index of patients with type 2 DM both with AIT and without it was determined. Patients with type 2 DM displayed decreasing activity of the T-cell link of the immune system and increasing of the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines irrespectively of the availability of accompanying AIT, which evidenced primary development of autoimmune processes. At the same time, positivecorrelating relationship between the level of leptin and BMI and immunoregulatory index of patients with type 2 DM both with AIT and without it was revealed (r = 0.83; р < 0.005; r = 0.77; р < 0.01; r = 0.9; р < 0.001, and r = 0.53; р < 0.05 respectively, which demonstrates autoimmune directivity of immune system disorders in combination with metabolic shifts.Conclusion. For the purpose of performance of simultaneous correction of metabolic and immunological disorders of patients with type 2 DM, it is necessary to determine immunological indicators (of the CD+- range of lymphocytes. The latter is caused with higher

  13. PECULIARITIES OF THE CYTOKINE PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS IN COMBINATION WITH AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS

    N. A. Kravchun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: study of the nature of changes in the immune system of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM in combination with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT and without it; comparative analysis of similar indicators of patients with type 1 DM in combination with AIT and without it.Materials and methods. 104 patients at the age of 22 to 62 y.o. (57 women and 47 men took part in the study. They were divided into 4 groups (type 2 DM, type 2 DM and AIT, type 1 DM, type 1 DM and AIT. Groups of patients who were examined regarding the state of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, indicators of the T-cell link of the immune system, concentration of interleukin 4 (IL-4, IL-6, interferon-gamma, and leptin level, were comparable regarding their sex, age, duration of disease.Results. Unidirectional relationship between body mass index (BMI, amount of CD4 +-, CD8+- lymphocytes, level of leptin, IL-4, IL-6 concentrations and BMI and immunoregulatory index of patients with type 2 DM both with AIT and without it was determined. Patients with type 2 DM displayed decreasing activity of the T-cell link of the immune system and increasing of the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines irrespectively of the availability of accompanying AIT, which evidenced primary development of autoimmune processes. At the same time, positivecorrelating relationship between the level of leptin and BMI and immunoregulatory index of patients with type 2 DM both with AIT and without it was revealed (r = 0.83; р < 0.005; r = 0.77; р < 0.01; r = 0.9; р < 0.001, and r = 0.53; р < 0.05 respectively, which demonstrates autoimmune directivity of immune system disorders in combination with metabolic shifts.Conclusion. For the purpose of performance of simultaneous correction of metabolic and immunological disorders of patients with type 2 DM, it is necessary to determine immunological indicators (of the CD+- range of lymphocytes. The latter is caused with higher

  14. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients.

    Liesbeth Bieghs

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor (IGF signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM. In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6, leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS (n = 37, and control individuals (n = 15, using ELISA (IGFs and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs. MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5-3.8 fold and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6-0.5 fold in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration.

  15. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients.

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B; Abildgaard, Niels; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans E; Conover, Cheryl A; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin; Overgaard, Michael T; Nyegaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6), leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 37), and control individuals (n = 15), using ELISA (IGFs) and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs). MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5-3.8 fold) and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6-0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration. PMID:27111220

  16. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease. PMID:26903475

  17. (1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed Mycobacterium tuberculosis caused abnormal serum metabolic profile of cattle.

    Yingyu Chen

    Full Text Available To re-evaluate virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb in cattle, we experimentally infected calves with M. tb andMycobacterium bovisvia intratracheal injection at a dose of 2.0×10(7 CFU and observed the animals for 33 weeks. The intradermal tuberculin test and IFN-γin vitro release assay showed that both M. tb and M. bovis induced similar responses. Immunohistochemical staining of pulmonary lymph nodes indicated that the antigen MPB83 of both M. tb and M. bovis were similarly distributed in the tissue samples. Histological examinations showed all of the infected groups exhibited neutrophil infiltration to similar extents. Although the infected cattle did not develop granulomatous inflammation, the metabolic profiles changed significantly, which were characterized by a change in energy production pathways and increased concentrations of N-acetyl glycoproteins. Glycolysis was induced in the infected cattle by decreased glucose and increased lactate content, and enhanced fatty acid β-oxidation was induced by decreased TG content, and decreased gluconeogenesis indicated by the decreased concentration of glucogenic and ketogenic amino acids promoted utilization of substances other than glucose as energy sources. In addition, an increase in acute phase reactive serum glycoproteins, together with neutrophil infiltration and increased of IL-1β production indicated an early inflammatory response before granuloma formation. In conclusion, this study indicated that both M. tb and M.bovis were virulent to cattle. Therefore, it is likely that cattle with M. tb infections would be critical to tuberculosis transmission from cattle to humans. Nuclear magnetic resonance was demonstrated to be an efficient method to systematically evaluate M. tb and M. bovi sinfection in cattle.

  18. A mechanism for abnormal angiogenesis in human radiation proctitis. Analysis of expression profile for angiogenic factors

    Radiation proctitis is an increasingly prevalent problem, with many patients being treated with radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. However, the mechanisms by which radiation proctitis develops in humans are not well understood. In this study, the expression profiles of angiogenic factors were analyzed to clarify their role in the etiology of radiation proctitis. Rectal biopsies were taken from 8 patients with radiation proctitis and 8 normal subjects. Protein lysates of the tissues were applied to an antibody array for angiogenesis-related factors. The mRNA level of each factor was evaluated by Taqman real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Immunohistochemistry was performed using the labeled streptavidin biotin method. Antibody array analysis revealed 2.12- to 7.31-fold higher expression levels of angiogenin, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1), endoglin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and maspin in radiation proctitis tissues compared with normal rectal mucosa. The mRNA level of each factor in radiation proctitis tissue was significantly higher than in normal rectal mucosa, suggesting their transcriptional activation. Immunohistochemical staining showed strong expression of angiogenin and maspin in rectal epithelia, MMP-8 and uPA in infiltrating lymphocytes, FGF1 in fibroblasts and endoglin in endothelial cells. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was not evident. Our results suggest that in radiation proctitis, MMP-8 and uPA cooperatively degrade the extracellular matrix and basement membrane to provide space for angiogenesis. Simultaneously, angiogenin and FGF1 promote endothelial cell proliferation, and endoglin induces vessel formation, culminating in angiogenesis. Inhibitors of angiogenic factors such as angiogenin and FGF1 may be effective for treating radiation proctitis. (author)

  19. Autoimmune synaptopathies.

    Crisp, Sarah J; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Vincent, Angela

    2016-02-01

    Autoantibodies targeting proteins at the neuromuscular junction are known to cause several distinct myasthenic syndromes. Recently, autoantibodies targeting neurotransmitter receptors and associated proteins have also emerged as a cause of severe, but potentially treatable, diseases of the CNS. Here, we review the clinical evidence as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that autoantibodies account for myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune disorders of the CNS by disrupting the functional or structural integrity of synapses. Studying neurological and psychiatric diseases of autoimmune origin may provide new insights into the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying a broad range of CNS disorders. PMID:26806629

  20. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  1. Autoimmune disease

    2005-01-01

    2005164 Optimal cut-point of glutamic acid decar-boxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LI Xia(李霞), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Central South Univ, Changsha, 410011. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :34-38. Objective: To investigate the optimal cut-point of glutamate decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (I. ADA). Methods: The frequency

  2. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and the presence of clinical/pre-clinical autoimmune disorders and of autoantibodies was examined. Results Out of the 66 Turner patients, 26 had thyroid autoimmune disorders (39.4%), 14 patients had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis with clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism (21.2%) and 12 patients had circulating anti-thyroid antibodies, echographic pattern of diffuse hypoechogenicity and normal thyroid hormone levels (18.2%). None were affected by Graves’ disease. We analyzed the overall incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the 3 different age groups 0–9.9, 10–19.9 and 20–29.9 years. No statistically significant difference was observed in the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the age-groups (χ2-test p > 0.05). Out of the 66 patients, 31 patients had the 45,X karyotype; within this first group 14 out of 31 patients were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A second group of 29 patients included 19 patients with mosaicism, 5 patients with deletions and 5 patients with ring chromosome; out of these 29 patients 7 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A third group included 6 patients with X isochromosome; 5 out of 6 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A statistically significant difference in the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity within the different karyotype groups was observed (χ2-test p = 0.0173). When comparing the X isochromosome group with the pooled group of other karyotypes, of note, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was

  3. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type 1...

  4. Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases: A Short Review

    Jithin Jose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity is characterized by the reaction of cells (auto reactive T-lymphocytes or products (autoantibodies of the immune system against the organism’s own antigens (autoantigen. It may be part of the physiological immune response (natural autoimmunity or pathologically induced, which may eventually lead to development of clinical abnormalities (autoimmune disease. Different mechanisms are involved in the induction and progression of autoimmunity. These include genetic or acquired defects in immune tolerance or immune regulatory pathways, molecular mimicry to viral or bacterial protein, an impaired clearance of apoptotic cell material. A A number of diseases have been identified in which there is autoimmunity, due to copious production of autoantibodies and autoreactive cells. The aim of the present article is to review on the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  5. Subclinical Hypothyroidism and the Effect of Autoimmunity on the Echocardiography Indices of Left Ventricular Function, Lipid Profile, and Inflammatory Markers

    Zohreh Moossavi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism (Sch is the most frequent thyroid disease. The relationship between overt hypothyroidism and cardiovascular diseases has been well documented, but conflicting data have remained regarding Sch. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the effect of Sch on increasing the risk of cardiovascular involvement considering the autoimmune subset. Patients and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on thirty patients with Sch and 30 healthy controls. Serum levels of thyroperoxidase antibody (TPOab, lipids, hsCRP, homocysteine, and ferritin were measured. Besides, conventional echocardiographic study and tissue Doppler imaging (including strain rate indices was done to evaluate Left Ventricular (LV systolic function. Results: The results showed a significant difference between the Sch patients and the controls regarding the serum level of triglyceride (117.43 ± 63.51 mg/dL vs. 86.86 ± 41.57, P = 0.031, echocardiographic parameters (longitudinal systolic strain rate [SRs: -1.006 ± 0.4 vs. -1.26 ± 0.16, P = 0.002; SRl: -1.43 ± 0.27 vs. -1.68 ± 0.29, P = 0.001], and Sm of septal mitral annulus (6.90 ± 0.6 vs. 7.43 ± 0.8, P = 0.006]. However, no significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding the serum levels of the inflammatory markers. Moreover, a significant correlation was found between TSH and Sm (r = -0.36, P = 0.005 and longitudinal systolic strain rate (SRs: r = 0.42, P < 0.001; SRl: r = 0.40, P = 0.001. Systolic strain rate was significantly lower in the TPOab positive patients (-0.99 ± 0.18 vs. -1.15 ± 0.25, P = 0.047. Conclusions: The clear association between Sch and subclinical LV systolic dysfunction which was more evident in the subgroup of patients with circulating anti-thyroid antibodies would remind a greater emphasis for considering the subgroup of TPOab positive patients for directing toward hormone replacement.

  6. Autoimmune Encephalitis

    Leypoldt, Frank; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bien, Christian G; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The term autoimmune encephalitis is used to describe a group of disorders characterised by symptoms of limbic and extra-limbic dysfunction occurring in association with antibodies against synaptic antigens and proteins localised on the neuronal cell surface. In recent years there has been a rapidly expanding knowledge of these syndromes resulting in a shift in clinical paradigms and new insights into pathogenic mechanisms. Since many patients respond well to immunosuppressive treatment, the r...

  7. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type 1...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  8. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  9. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  10. ASP4058, a novel agonist for sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors 1 and 5, ameliorates rodent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with a favorable safety profile.

    Rie Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a biologically active sphingolipid that acts through the members of a family of five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5. S1P1 is a major regulator of lymphocyte trafficking, and fingolimod, whose active metabolite fingolimod phosphate acts as a nonselective S1P receptor agonist, exerts its immunomodulatory effect, at least in part, by regulating the lymphocyte trafficking by inducing down regulation of lymphocyte S1P1. Here, we detail the pharmacological profile of 5-{5-[3-(trifluoromethyl-4-{[(2S-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-yl]oxy}phenyl]-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl}-1H-benzimidazole (ASP4058, a novel next-generation S1P receptor agonist selective for S1P1 and S1P5. ASP4058 preferentially activates S1P1 and S1P5 compared with S1P2, 3, 4 in GTPγS binding assays in vitro. Oral administration of ASP4058 reduced the number of peripheral lymphocytes and inhibited the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in Lewis rats. Further, ASP4058 prevented relapse of disease in a mouse model of relapsing-remitting EAE. Although these immunomodulatory effects were comparable to those of fingolimod, ASP4058 showed a wider safety margin than fingolimod for bradycardia and bronchoconstriction in rodents. These observations suggest that ASP4058 represents a new therapeutic option for treating multiple sclerosis that is safer than nonselective S1P receptor agonists such as fingolimod.

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...... AIP responds to steroid treatment, also a trial with steroids, can help to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer. OUTLOOK AND DISCUSSION: This review presents the pathological, radiologic and laboratory findings of AIP. Moreover, the treatment and pathogenesis are discussed.......BACKGROUND: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a relatively newly recognized type of pancreatitis that is characterized by diffuse or focal swelling of the pancreas due to lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A PubMed literature search was...

  12. The autoimmune tautology

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Although autoimmune diseases exhibit contrasting epidemiological features, pathology, and clinical manifestations, three lines of evidence demonstrate that these diseases share similar immunogenetic mechanisms (that is, autoimmune tautology). First, clinical evidence highlights the co-occurrence of distinct autoimmune diseases within an individual (that is, polyautoimmunity) and within members of a nuclear family (that is, familial autoimmunity). Second, physiopathologic evidence indicates th...

  13. Thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases Anticuerpos antitiroideos en enfermedades autoinmunes

    Regina M. Innocencio; João H. Romaldini; Ward, Laura S.

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in the thyroid function and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with autoimmune diseases but seldom in antiphospholipid syndrome patients. In order to determine the prevalence of thyroid function and autoimmune abnormalities, we compared serum thyrotropin (TSH, serum free thyroxine (T4) levels, thyroid antithyroglobulin (TgAb) and antithyroperoxidase (TPOAb) levels of 25 patients with systemic sclerosis, 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 ...

  14. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    ... dermatomyositis . What are some of the treatments for autoimmune diseases? Of first importance in treating any autoimmune disease ... being researched. What is the family connection in autoimmune diseases? The ability to develop an autoimmune disease is ...

  15. Noonan syndrome associated with cronic autoimmune thyroiditis

    Ana Valea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a genetic dominant disease that presents a wide variety of clinical characteristics. Frequently, the syndrome is associated with some autoimmune diseases, especially with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We report the case of a 21 years old girl diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and autoimmune thyroiditis relatively late, at the age of 20. The diagnosis was suggested by a cluster of significant clinical elements: facial dysmorphism, short stature, moderate mental retardation. The hormonal profile and karyotype contributed to the final certainty diagnosis. At this moment she is under thyroid substitution treatment.

  16. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  17. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy

    ... Accessed 9/2/2015. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy Summary. Dysautonomia International . http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID= ... page Basic Information In Depth Information Basic Information Dysautonomia International offers an information page on Autoimmune autonomic ...

  18. Differential Gene Expression Profile Associated with the Abnormality of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Aplastic Anemia

    Li, Jianping; Yang, Shaoguang; Lu, Shihong; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Jianming; Li, Wenqian; Ma, Fengxia; Ren, Qian; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Yizhou; Han, Zhong Chao

    2012-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is generally considered as an immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome with defective hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and marrow microenvironment. Previous studies have demonstrated the defective HSCs and aberrant T cellular-immunity in AA using a microarray approach. However, little is known about the overall specialty of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). In the present study, we comprehensively compared the biological features and gene expression profile...

  19. Profile of micronucleus frequencies and nuclear abnormalities in different species of electric fishes (Gymnotiformes from the Eastern Amazon

    Karina Motta Melo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of spontaneous micronucleus (MN formation in fish species needs to be determined to evaluate their usefulness for genotoxic biomonitoring. The definition of a good bioindicator takes into account the current knowledge of its metabolic traits as well as other factors including its feeding behavior and relationship to the environment. In this study, we compared the basal frequencies of micronucleated erythrocytes and nuclear abnormalities (NA among different species of the fish Order Gymnotiformes (Rhamphichthys marmoratus, Steatogenys elegans, Sternopygus macrurus, Parapteronotus hasemani, Gymnotus mamiraua, Gymnotus arapaima, Brachyhypopomus beebei, Brachyhypopomus n. sp. BENN sampled in several localities of the Eastern Amazon. A baseline of MN and NA frequency in these fish was determined, enabling the identification of potentially useful species as models for genotoxicity studies. Only one impacted sample collected at a site in the River Caripetuba showed a significant number of NAs, which may be due to the release of wastewater by neighbouring mining industries and by the burnt fuel released by the small boats used by a local community. Our results may provide support for further studies in areas of the Eastern Amazon affected by mining, deforestation and other anthropogenic activities.

  20. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  1. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  2. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  3. Environmental Basis of Autoimmunity.

    Floreani, Annarosa; Leung, Patrick S C; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-06-01

    The three common themes that underlie the induction and perpetuation of autoimmunity are genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and immune regulation. Environmental factors have gained much attention for their role in triggering autoimmunity, with increasing evidence of their influence as demonstrated by epidemiological studies, laboratory research, and animal studies. Environmental factors known to trigger and perpetuate autoimmunity include infections, gut microbiota, as well as physical and environmental agents. To address these issues, we will review major potential mechanisms that underlie autoimmunity including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading, bystander activation, polyclonal activation of B and T cells, infections, and autoinflammatory activation of innate immunity. The association of the gut microbiota on autoimmunity will be particularly highlighted by their interaction with pharmaceutical agents that may lead to organ-specific autoimmunity. Nonetheless, and we will emphasize this point, the precise mechanism of environmental influence on disease pathogenesis remains elusive. PMID:25998909

  4. Evaluation of autoimmune phenomena in patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Bertini, Federico; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are basically characterized by obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics triggered by group-A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infections. Poor data are available about the clear definition of PANDAS's autoimmune origin. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of autoimmune phenomena, including thyroid function abnormalities, specific celiac disease antibodies, and positivity of organ- or nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in a large cohort of Caucasian children and adolescents with PANDAS. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (59 males, 18 females; mean age 6.3±2.5 years, range 2.0-14.5 years) strictly fulfilling the clinical criteria for PANDAS diagnosis were recruited. In all subjects we evaluated serum concentrations of free-T3, free-T4, thyrotropin, and the following auto-antibodies: anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, anti-thyrotropin receptor, anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-extractable nuclear antigens, anti-phospholipid, plus lupus-like anticoagulant. The results were compared with those obtained from 197 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (130 males, 67 females; mean age 6.8±2.9 years, range 2.3-14.8 years). The frequencies of subclinical (3.8% vs 3.6%) and overt hypothyroidism (1.2% vs 0%), autoimmune thyroiditis (2.46% vs 1.14%), celiac disease (1.2% vs 0.05%), and positivity of organ- and nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (5.1% vs 4.8%) were not statistically significant between patients with PANDAS and controls. Evaluating the overall disease duration, we did not observe any significant difference between patients with (3.4±2.15 years) and without (3.4±2.89 years) autoimmune abnormalities. However, PANDAS patients with autoimmune diseases or positivity for any organ- and nonorgan-specific antibodies showed significantly higher anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNAse B

  5. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state and...... another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  6. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune

  7. DNA methylation perspectives in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

    Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Luo, Zhi-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    DNA methylation is now widely recognized as being critical to maintain the function of immune cells. Recent studies suggest that aberrant DNA methylation levels not only can result in immune cells autoreactivity in vitro, but also are related to autoimmunity in vivo. Environmental factors and genetic polymorphisms cause abnormal methylation, which affects the expression of certain immune-related genes, being becoming hot spot of explaining the mechanism of autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews the importance of abnormal methylation during the development of common autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, aiming at a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and providing new ideas for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26821302

  8. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    ... Its 25th Anniversary With #25FOR25 Campaign During National Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA officially kicks of National Autoimmune ... will benefit AARDA. Click here to read more. Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two ...

  9. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Yiyangzi Ma; Na Shi; Mengtao Li; Fei Chen; Haitao Niu

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogen-esis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  10. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  11. Common variable immunodeficiency and autoimmunity--an inconvenient truth.

    Xiao, Xiao; Miao, Qi; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric; Ma, Xiong

    2014-08-01

    Coexisting morbidities in CVID include bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and malignancies. The incidence of autoimmune disease in CVID patients may approach 20% of cases. The most common autoimmune disease found in CVID patients is autoimmune cytopenia, but rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and now primary biliary cirrhosis have also been reported. The coexistence of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity appears paradoxical, since one represents a hypoimmune state and the other a hyperimmune state. However, this paradox may not actually be all that implausible due to the complex nature of immune cells, signaling pathways and their interactions. The cellular alterations in combined variable immunodeficiency include a range of T and B cell abnormalities. Selective immune derangements found in CVID include a downregulation of regulatory T cells (Treg cells), accelerated T cell apoptosis, abnormal cytokine production secondary to cytokine gene polymorphisms and increased autoreactive B cell production. The impact of these abnormalities on T and B cell interaction may not only explain the immunodeficiency but also the development of autoimmunity in select groups of patients with CVID. The variability in the clinical manifestations of CVID as a result of this immune interaction suggests that CVID is not one disease but many. This is important because it follows that the treatment of CVID may not always be the same, but may need to be directed specifically towards each individual patient. PMID:24747700

  12. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Jenny Amaya-Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD.

  13. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    György Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  14. Autoimmunity in visual loss.

    Petzold, Axel; Wong, Sui; Plant, Gordon T

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of autoimmune disorders which can affect visual function. There are a very large number of mechanisms in the visual pathway which could potentially be the targets of autoimmune attack. In practice it is the retina and the anterior visual pathway (optic nerve and chiasm) that are recognised as being affected in autoimmune disorders. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the commonest causes of visual loss in young adults because of the frequency of attacks of optic neuritis in that condition, however the basis of the inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis and the confirmation of autoimmunity is lacking. The immune process is known to be highly unusual in that it is not systemic and confined to the CNS compartment. Previously an enigmatic partner to Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica is now established to be autoimmune and two antibodies - to Aquaporin4 and to Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein - have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The term Chronic Relapsing Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy is applied to those cases of optic neuritis which require long term immunosuppression and hence are presumed to be autoimmune but where no autoimmune pathogenesis has been confirmed. Optic neuritis occurring post-infection and post vaccination and conditions such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and various vasculitides may cause direct autoimmune attack to visual structures or indirect damage through occlusive vasculopathy. Chronic granulomatous disorders such as Sarcoidosis affect vision commonly by a variety of mechanisms, whether and how these are placed in the autoimmune panoply is unknown. As far as the retina is concerned Cancer Associated Retinopathy and Melanoma Associated Retinopathy are well characterised clinically but a candidate autoantibody (recoverin) is only described in the former disorder. Other, usually monophasic, focal retinal inflammatory disorders (Idiopathic Big Blind Spot Syndrome, Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy and Acute Macular

  15. Autoimmunity and the Gut

    Andrew W. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases have increased dramatically worldwide since World War II. This is coincidental with the increased production and use of chemicals both in industrial countries and agriculture, as well as the ease of travel from region to region and continent to continent, making the transfer of a pathogen or pathogens from one part of the world to another much easier than ever before. In this review, triggers of autoimmunity are examined, principally environmental. The number of possible environmental triggers is vast and includes chemicals, bacteria, viruses, and molds. Examples of these triggers are given and include the mechanism of action and method by which they bring about autoimmunity.

  16. Prognostic Significance of Subclinical Atherosclerosis of Arteries for Cardiovascular Risk Identification in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Kazakova Т.А.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the state of arteries of elastic and muscular type in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and subclinical hypothyroidism to reveal potential factors of cardiovascular risk. Materials and Methods. There have been studied three groups of patients, each group consisting of 29 females: 1st — control group, with no abnormalities, 2nd — with autoimmune thyroiditis and euthyroid status, 3rd — with autoimmune thyroiditis and subclinical hypothyroidism. There have been estimated hormonal status (ТТГ, Т4, Т3, antibody level to thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxydase, endothelial function and arterial stiffness. Results. In subclinical hypothyroidism there is significant decrease of endothelial function of brachial artery, with normal indices of non-endothelium dependent vasodilation; arterial wall stiffness and endothelial dysfunction increase, that is determined by a number of factors including the levels of T3, T4, thyrotropic hormone, lipid profile, and arterial pressure. The level of systemic arterial pressure can be of great concern in the increase of arterial stiffness if there are no marked changes of lipid spectrum. The obtained data indicate the negative effect of even minimal thyroid function on vessel condition that can contribute to the increase of cardiovascular risk along with lipid spectrum disorders in this group of patients.

  17. Autoimmune Pancreatitis: A Succinct Overview

    Juan Putra; Xiaoying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis with characteristic clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis is often challenging due to its low incidence and nonspecific clinical and radiologic findings. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer share similar clinical presentations, including obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain and weight loss. Due to these overlapping features, autoimmune pancreatitis patients...

  18. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  19. Etiopathogenesis of insulin autoimmunity.

    Åke Lenmark; Moustakas, Antonis K; Papadopoulos, George K; Norio Kanatsuna

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmunity against pancreatic islet beta cells is strongly associated with proinsulin, insulin, or both. The insulin autoreactivity is particularly pronounced in children with young age at onset of type 1 diabetes. Possible mechanisms for (pro)insulin autoimmunity may involve beta-cell destruction resulting in proinsulin peptide presentation on HLA-DR-DQ Class II molecules in pancreatic draining lymphnodes. Recent data on proinsulin peptide binding to type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQ2 and ...

  20. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity.

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  1. Silica, Silicosis and Autoimmunity.

    Kenneth Michael Pollard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases SLE, SSc and RA. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However numerous questions remain unanswered.

  2. Congenital Abnormalities

    ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase the risk that a baby will be born with abnormalities (e.g. fetal alcohol spectrum disorders ). Eating raw or uncooked foods during pregnancy can also be dangerous to health of the ...

  3. The hygiene hypothesis revisited: autoimmune diseases, intestinal microbiota and vitamin D's role

    Clark, Allison

    2016-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis postulates that higher levels of hygiene and improper exposure to microorganisms early in childhood could disturb the intestinal microbiome functions resulting in abnormal immune responses that can later lead to allergies and autoimmune diseases. Additionally, vitamin D deficiency and vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms and function might also trigger abnormal immune responses that can lead to an autoimmune disease. Therefore, this review explores the role Western li...

  4. 儿童白癜风与甲状腺功能指标异常及其他免疫性疾病的关系%Abnormality of parameters of thyroid function and incidence of autoimmune diseases in children with vitiligo

    杨芸; 骆肖群; 傅雯雯

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨儿童白癜风与甲状腺功能指标异常及其他免疫性疾病的关系.方法 对363例白癜风儿童(男198例,女165例)和93例对照儿童(男55例,女38例)进行甲状腺功能指标的检查.结果 363例白癜风儿童中有43例(11.8%)儿童有不同程度的甲状腺功能指标的异常,93例对照组正常儿童中有4例儿童甲状腺功能指标异常,两者比较差异有统计学意义.白癜风儿童甲状腺功能指标异常发生率明显增高(P<0.05).而43例甲状腺功能异常的白癜风儿童中,寻常型白癜风儿童为39例(13.6%),节段型白癜风儿童为4例(5.3%),寻常型比节段型白癜风儿童甲状腺功能指标异常发生率有明显增高(P<0.05).结论 儿童寻常型白癜风患者的甲状腺功能指标异常的发生率明显增高.%Objective To investigate the abnormality of parameters of thyroid function and incidence of autoimmune diseases in children with vitiligo.Methods A total of 363 children with vitiligo,including 198 males and 165 females were recruited into this study together with 93 normal human controls(55 males and 38 females).The serum levels of free tetraiodothyronine,free triiodothyronine,thyroid stimulating hormone,antithyroperoxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody were determined by chemiluminescent immunoassay in these subiects.Results The abnormality of parameters of thyroid function was observed in 43 out of 363(11.8%)patients affected by vitiligo and in 4 out of 93(4.3%)normal human controls;a significant difference was observed between the two groups (P<0.05).Of the 43 patients wim abnormality of parameters of thyroid function,39 were diagnosed as vitiligo vulgaris,4 as segmental vitiligo.A significant increase Was observed in the incidence of abnormality of parameters of thyroid function in patients with vitiligo vulgaris compared with those with segmental vitiligo(P<0.05).Conclusion There is an increase in tbe abnormality of parameters of thyroid

  5. Autoimmune basal ganglia disorders.

    Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2012-11-01

    The basal ganglia are deep nuclei in the brain that include the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Pathological processes involving the basal ganglia often result in disorders of movement and behavior. A number of different autoimmune disorders predominantly involve the basal ganglia and can result in movement and psychiatric disorders. The classic basal ganglia autoimmune disorder is Sydenham chorea, a poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder. Resurgence in the interest in Sydenham chorea is the result of the descriptions of other poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders including tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder, broadly termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection. Encephalitic processes affecting the basal ganglia are also described including the syndromes basal ganglia encephalitis, encephalitis lethargica, and bilateral striatal necrosis. Last, systemic autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome can result in chorea or parkinsonism. Using paradigms learned from other autoantibody associated disorders, the authors discuss the autoantibody hypothesis and the role of systemic inflammation in autoimmune basal ganglia disorders. Identification of these entities is important as the clinician has an increasing therapeutic repertoire to modulate or suppress the aberrant immune system. PMID:22832771

  6. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    Jean C. Pfau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA, a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b exposure misclassification, (c latency of clinical disease, (d mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

  7. Autoimmunity in 2015.

    Selmi, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Compared to the clear trend observed in previous years, the number of peer-reviewed articles published during 2015 and retrieved using the "autoimmunity" key word declined by 4 %, while remaining 5 % of immunology articles. On the other hand, a more detailed analysis of the published articles in leading immunology and autoimmunity journals revealed exciting scenarios, with fascinating lines of evidence being supported by convincing data and likely followed by rapid translational or clinical developments. As examples, the study of the microbiome, the development of new serum or other tissue biomarkers, and a more solid understanding of disease pathogenesis and tolerance breakdown mechanisms have been central issues in the past year. Furthermore and similar to the oncology field, progress in the understanding of single autoimmune condition is becoming most specific with psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis being ideal paradigms with treatment options diverging after decades of common therapies, as illustrated by IL17-targeting approaches. The ultimate result of these advances is towards personalized medicine with an ideal approach being tailored on a single patient, based on a finely tuned definition of the immunogenetics, epigenetics, microbiome, and biomarkers. Finally, experimental reports suggest that cancer-associated immune mechanisms or the role of T and B cell subpopulations should be better understood in autoimmune diseases. While we hailed the 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world as part of an annus mirabilis, we should not be mistaken in the strong stimulus of research in autoimmunity represented by the 2015 articles that will be summarized in this article. PMID:27422713

  8. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  9. Autoimmunity in Addison's disease.

    Martín Martorell, P; Roep, B O; Smit, J W A; Martorell, P M

    2002-08-01

    Addison's disease has a low incidence and is most frequently the result of an autoimmune disease in developed countries. Addison's disease can present as an isolated entity or in combination with other autoimmune diseases: Addison's disease can be part of the distinct polyglandular autoimmune syndromes APS I and II. Autoantibodies in patients with isolated Addison's disease are directed against the enzymes involved in steroid synthesis, P45oc21, P45oscc and P45oc17. Addison's disease, both isolated and in the context of APS II, has been associated with the haplotype HLA-A1, -B8 and DR3. The value of the increased expression of these molecules on adrenocortical cells could point towards an infectious pathogenesis. Given the prevalence, up to 80 %, of autoantibodies in Addison's disease as well as the high predictive value for developing the disease when antibodies are present (41% in three years), we advise screening high-risk populations, such as patients with other autoimmune endocrinopathies or their relatives for the presence of these antibodies. The adrenocortical function of patients positive for antibodies should be followed yearly. PMID:12430572

  10. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  11. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani, Diego Vergani

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC, and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1 or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2. There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether

  12. Urticarial vasculitis: an autoimmune disorder following therapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    Strickland, D K; Ware, R E

    1995-09-01

    Immunological abnormalities have been described in patients with Hodgkin's disease, both associated with the malignancy itself and occurring secondary to therapy. These abnormalities often manifest as an immunodeficiency state, but can also present as immune dysregulation and autoimmune disease. We report two young patients with Hodgkin's disease who, following successful therapy, developed urticarial vasculitis (UV), a form of cutaneous autoimmune vasculitis. Both patients also had systemic symptoms including fever, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum copper, and abnormal in vitro studies of lymphocyte enumeration and proliferation. Distinguishing UV from recurrent Hodgkin's disease was especially difficult in one patient, and was possible only by lymph node biopsy. One patient has responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, while the other, who has more profound immune dysfunction, has developed a chronic autoimmune disorder. UV may thus occur in patients after therapy for Hodgkin's disease; we hypothesize that immune dysregulation, either associated with the malignancy or resulting from therapy, is important in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune process. PMID:7623731

  13. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion. PMID:27099223

  14. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  15. Update on autoimmune hepatitis

    Andreas Teufel; Peter R Galle; Stephan Kanzler

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a necroinflammatory liver disease of unknown etiology that occurs in children and adults of all ages. Characteristics are its autoimmune features, hyperglobulinemia (IgG), and the presence of circulating autoantibodies, as well as a response to immunosuppressant drugs. Current treatment consists of prednisone and azathioprine and in most patients this disease has become very treatable. Over the past 2 years, a couple of new insights into the genetic aspects, clinical course and treatment of AIH have been reported, which will be the focus of this review. In particular, we concentrate on genome-wide microsatellite analysis, a novel mouse model of AIH, the evaluation of a large AIH cohort for overlap syndromes,suggested novel criteria for the diagnosis of AIH, and the latest studies on treatment of AIH with budenoside and mycophenolate mofetil.

  16. Gangliosides and autoimmune diabetes.

    Misasi, R; Dionisi, S; Farilla, L; Carabba, B; Lenti, L; Di Mario, U; Dotta, F

    1997-09-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids which are formed by a hydrophobic portion, the ceramide, and a hydrophilic part, i.e. the oligosaccharide chain. First described in neural tissue, several studies have shown that gangliosides are almost ubiquitous molecules expressed in all vertebrate tissues. Within cells, gangliosides are usually associated with plasma membranes, where they can act as receptors for a variety of molecules and have been shown to take part in cell-to-cell interaction and in signal transduction. In addition, gangliosides are expressed in cytosol membranes like those of secretory granules of some endocrine cells (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets). As far as the role of gangliosides in diseases is concerned, there are some cases in which an aberrant ganglioside expression plays a crucial role in the disease pathogenetic process. These diseases include two major forms of ganglioside storage, namely GM2-gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and its beta-hexosaminidase deficiency) and GM1-gangliosidosis (beta-galactosidase deficiency), where the most prominent pathological characteristic is the lysosomal ganglioside accumulation in neurons. Other inflammatory or degenerative diseases both within and outside the nervous system have been shown to be associated with an altered pattern of ganglioside expression in the target organ. Since monoclonal antibodies have been discovered and used in immunology, a large variety of ganglioside antigens has been described both as blood group antigens and as tumour-related antigens. Several studies have also indicated that gangliosides can act not only as antigens, but also as autoantigens. As a matter of fact, auto-antibodies to gangliosides, detected by immunostaining methods performed directly on TLC plates or by ELISA, have been described in several autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and, last but not least, insulin

  17. MDSC in Autoimmunity

    Cripps, James G.; Gorham, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were first described nearly two decades ago. Until recently, however, descriptions of MDSC populations were found almost exclusively in animal models of cancer or in cancer patients. Over the last few years, an increasing number of reports have been published describing populations of myeloid cells with MDSC-like properties in murine models of autoimmune disease. In contrast to the proposed deleterious role of MDSC in cancer - where these cells likely i...

  18. [Diagnostics of autoimmune diseases].

    Beleznay, Zsuzsanna; Regenass, Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies play a key role in diagnostic laboratories as markers of autoimmune diseases. In addition to their role as markers they mediate diverse effects in vivo. Autoantibodies with protective effect have been described. Natural protective IgM autoantibodies against tumour-antigens of malignant cells or their precursors may contribute to increased survival rates of carcinoma patients. In a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus it has been shown that anti-dsDNA IgM autoantibodies protect from glomerular damage. In contrast, a direct pathogenic role of autoantibodies has been well established e.g. in myasthenia gravis or in Goodpasture syndrome. Similarly autoantibodies against SSA Ro52 are detrimental in neonatal lupus erythematosus with congenital heart block. Moreover, putatively protective autoantibodies may become pathogenic during the course of the disease such as the onconeuronal autoantibodies whose pathogenicity depends on their compartmentalisation. In patients with paraneoplastic syndromes tumour cells express proteins that are also naturally present in the brain. Anti-tumour autoantibodies which temporarily suppress tumour growth can provoke an autoimmune attack on neurons once having crossed the blood-brain barrier and cause specific neurological symptoms. Only a restricted number of autoantibodies are useful follow-up markers for the effectiveness of treatment in autoimmune diseases. Certain autoantibodies hold prognostic value and appear years or even decades before the diagnosis of disease such as the antimitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis or anti-citrullinated protein (CCP)-antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. It is crucial to know whether the autoantibodies in question recognise linear or conformational epitopes in order to choose the appropriate detection methods. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy remains a very useful tool for confirmation of results of commercially available immunoassays and for detection of

  19. Aberrant O-glycosylation and anti-glycan antibodies in an autoimmune disease IgA nephropathy and breast adenocarcinoma

    Stuchlová Horynová, Milada; Raška, Milan; Clausen, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation abnormalities have been observed in autoimmune diseases and cancer. Here, we compare mechanisms of aberrant O-glycosylation, i.e., formation of Tn and sialyl-Tn structures, on MUC1 in breast cancer, and on IgA1 in an autoimmune disease, IgA nephropathy. The pathways of aberrant O...

  20. Etiopathogenesis of Insulin Autoimmunity

    Norio Kanatsuna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity against pancreatic islet beta cells is strongly associated with proinsulin, insulin, or both. The insulin autoreactivity is particularly pronounced in children with young age at onset of type 1 diabetes. Possible mechanisms for (proinsulin autoimmunity may involve beta-cell destruction resulting in proinsulin peptide presentation on HLA-DR-DQ Class II molecules in pancreatic draining lymphnodes. Recent data on proinsulin peptide binding to type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 is reviewed and illustrated by molecular modeling. The importance of the cellular immune reaction involving cytotoxic CD8-positive T cells to kill beta cells through Class I MHC is discussed along with speculations of the possible role of B lymphocytes in presenting the proinsulin autoantigen over and over again through insulin-carrying insulin autoantibodies. In contrast to autoantibodies against other islet autoantigens such as GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8 transporters, it has not been possible yet to standardize the insulin autoantibody test. As islet autoantibodies predict type 1 diabetes, it is imperative to clarify the mechanisms of insulin autoimmunity.

  1. Autoimmune Progesterone Anaphylaxis

    Mohammad Hassan Bemanian

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone induced dermatitis is a rare disorder. It typically occurs in females due to anautoimmune phenomenon to endogenous progesterone production, but can also be caused byexogenous intake of a synthetic progestin. Here in, we present a case of autoimmune progesterone anaphylaxis (AIPA observed in an adolescent female.The patient is an 18-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history and noprior exogenous hormone use, who presented to her primary care physician complaining of cyclic skin eruptions with dyspnea, cough and respiratory distress. She noted that her symptoms occurred monthly, just prior to her menses. An intradermal skin test using 0.1 cml of progesterone was performed. The patient developed a 15mm wheal after 15 minutes, confirming the diagnosis of AIPA.The patient was started on a continuous regimen of an oral conjugated estrogen (0.625mg. The skin eruptions and respiratory symptoms have not returned since the initiation of this therapy.Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis manifests via the occurrence of cyclic skin eruptions.Women with the disorder commonly present with dermatologic lesions in the luteal phase of themenstrual cycle, if there are any other organ involvement in addition to skin (e.g. lung, GI thereaction should be called as autoimmune progesterone anaphylaxis. Diagnosis of AIPA is confirmed by performing a skin allergen test using progesterone.

  2. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana; Ičin Tijana; Novaković-Paro Jovanka; Bajkin Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a...

  3. DRESS syndrome with autoimmune hepatitis from strontium ranelate.

    di Meo, Nicola; Gubertini, Nicoletta; Crocè, Lory; Tiribelli, Claudio; Trevisan, Giusto

    2016-05-01

    Strontium ranelate, which is used for postmenopausal osteoporosis, has been associated with drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, a severe, acute, potentially fatal, multisystem adverse drug reaction characterized by skin rash, fever, hematological abnormalities, and lymphadenopathy with involvement of several internal organs. We report the case of a woman who developed DRESS syndrome with a generalized maculopapular rash, eosinophilia, dyspnea, bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy, and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with liver damage 3 weeks after administration of strontium ranelate for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Approximately 6 months after total remission of cutaneous symptoms, the patient developed autoimmune hepatitis. This case confirms that strontium ranelate should be considered as a possible factor in the etiopathology of DRESS syndrome as well as in the subsequent development of autoimmune hepatitis. The possibility of developing autoimmune hepatitis as a part of DRESS syndrome related to strontium ranelate use can occur months after the acute episode. PMID:27274555

  4. P15: The expression of Tc17 cells in thymoma accompany with autoimmune diseases or autoimmune disorders

    Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymoma is thymic epithelial cell tumor. Studies have shown that thymoma associated with autoimmune disorders and possible mechanisms of autoimmune diseases is the central immune tolerance and peripheral tolerance obstacles have resulted in the breaking of the autoimmune response activation and immune tolerance. Tc17 cells and Th17 cells have been shown play an important role in tumor and autoimmune diseases’ development process. This study test the distribution of Tc17cells in thymoma and the expression of RORγt in thymus of thymoma patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) or other autoimmune diseases, the frequency of Th17/Tc17 in PBMCs, to explore the expression of Th17/Tc17 cells in thymoma accompany with autoimmune diseases or autoimmune disorders. Methods In this study, grouped as follows: (I) thymoma non gravis group (Tm groups); (II) thymoma with MG group thymoma with MG (MG group); (III) thymoma with MG associated with other autoimmune diseases group or anti- nuclear antibodies abnormal elevation of the group (AD group), to analyze the basic differences between the groups. In this study, we examined the RT-PCR to detect RORγt in the thymoma tissue, immunohistochemical double staining method to detect Tc17 cells expression and localization in the thymoma tissue distribution expression Th17/Tc17 in PBMCs by flow cytometry [Interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD8+ cells as Thl7 cells and IL-17-producing CD4+ cells as Tcl7 cells], analysis of differential expression of three in each group thymoma; and explore of Th17/Tc17 expression. Results (I) Tm groups and AD group serum CD8+ cells was statistically significant (PTc17 cells in MG/AD group was significantly higher than that in Tm, was statistically significant (PTc17 cells have risen trend in Tm groups and MG/AD group. Conclusions (I) CD8+ cells, CD4+/CD8+ T ratio, immunoglobulin, CRP and complement C3 levels can be used as indicators of evaluation of the role of the immune status of patients with

  5. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E280-E283, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26875020

  6. Long-term observations of autoimmune-prone mice treated for autoimmune disease by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    Long-term effects of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) across major histocompatibility complex barriers were studied in (NZB x NZW)F1 (B/W), BXSB, and MRL/Mr-lpr-lpr (MRL/lpr) mice with established autoimmune disease at the time of ABMT. In the BXSB or B/W mice, ABMT cured all aspects of autoimmune disease. Glomerular damage, revealed by histological study was dramatically improved. Serological abnormalities and immunologic functions also were normalized. Correction of autoimmune disease and advanced renal disease in BXSB and B/W mice regularly lasted greater than 5-6 mo and even 1 yr after ABMT. In the MRL/lpr mice, however, autoimmune and renal disease at first improved but then recurred after ABMT, apparently because of intolerance of mice for high doses of irradiation and a high degree of resistance of recipient stem cells to irradiation. In this model, H-2 typing revealed that by the time of relapse, immunocompetent cells of the chimeric mice had been replaced by host (MRL/lpr; H-2k) cells. B220+ Ly-1+ cells, present in increased numbers in untreated MRL/lpr mice, initially returned to normal levels after ABMT but then reappeared in the MRL/lpr mice that had received marrow from donors having few such lymphocytes. Thus, our results show that MRL/lpr mice possess abnormal radioresistant stem cells and provide impressive evidence that the origin of autoimmune diseases in this strain, as in the several other strains studied, resids in abnormalities present in stem cells

  7. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics.

    Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, reduction of handling steps, increase of productivity, decrease of turnaround time, improvement of safety), consolidation (combining different analytical technologies or strategies on one instrument or on one group of connected instruments) and integration (linking analytical instruments or group of instruments with pre- and post-analytical devices) opened a new era in immunodiagnostics. In this article, we review the most important changes that have occurred in autoimmune diagnostics and present some models related to the introduction of automation in the autoimmunology laboratory, such as automated indirect immunofluorescence and changes in the two-step strategy for detection of autoantibodies; automated monoplex immunoassays and reduction of turnaround time; and automated multiplex immunoassays for autoantibody profiling. PMID:26138781

  8. Infections and autoimmune diseases.

    Bach, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    The high percentage of disease-discordant pairs of monozygotic twins demonstrates the central role of environmental factors in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. Efforts were first focussed on the search for triggering factors. The study of animal models has clearly shown that infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, as in the case of Coxsackie B4 virus in type I diabetes and the encephalomyocarditis virus in autoimmune myositis, two models in which viruses are thought to act by increasing immunogenicity of autoantigens secondary to local inflammation. The induction of a Guillain-Barré syndrome in rabbits after immunization with a peptide derived from Campylobacter jejuni is explained by mimicry between C. jejuni antigens and peripheral nerve axonal antigens. Other models involve chemical modification of autoantigens, as in the case of iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis. These mechanisms have so far only limited clinical counterparts (rheumatic fever, Guillain-Barré syndrome and drug-induced lupus or myasthenia gravis) but one may assume that unknown viruses may be at the origin of a number of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis) as illustrated by the convergent data incriminating IFN-alpha in the pathophysiology of type I diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. Perhaps the difficulties met in identifying the etiologic viruses are due to the long lag time between the initial causal infection and onset of clinical disease. More surprisingly, infections may also protect from autoimmune diseases. Western countries are being confronted with a disturbing increase in the incidence of most immune disorders, including autoimmune and allergic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and some lymphocyte malignancies. Converging epidemiological evidence indicates that this increase is linked to improvement of the socio-economic level of these countries, posing the question of the causal relationship and more precisely the

  9. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    Yunzhi Xu; Guangjie Chen

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases.

  10. A case of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III complicated with autoimmune hepatitis.

    Oki, Kenji; Yamane, Kiminori; Koide, Junko; Mandai, Koichi; Nakanishi, Shuhei; Fujikawa, Rumi; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2006-10-01

    A 58-year-old woman complaining of finger tremor was referred to our hospital. The diagnosis of Graves' disease was made based on increased free triiodothyronine (18.88 pg/ml) and free thyroxine (7.47 ng/dl), low TSH (TSH receptor binding antibody activity (70.9%). Serum level of AST (62 U/l) and ALT (93 U/l) were increased and liver biopsy revealed linkage of adjacent portal areas by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and fibrosis with piecemeal necrosis. Although antinuclear antibody was negative, these findings indicated that she had autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) according to the criteria of the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Scoring System. Slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) was confirmed by a diabetic response pattern due to 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test, and seropositivity towards anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (725 U/ml) and islet cell (80 JDF Units) antibodies. This case exhibited an extremely rare combination of three different autoimmune diseases, including Graves' disease, slowly progressive type 1 DM and AIH, and had no known sensitive human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing or haplotype for these disorders. Although it is common for patients with Graves' disease to exhibit abnormal liver function, it is important to make an accurate diagnosis of AIH because of this life-threatening disorder. PMID:16946565

  11. Adult autoimmune enteropathy

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that autoimmune enteropathy involving the small bowel may occur in adults as well as in children. Apparently, the endoscopic and histological changes are similar to celiac disease before treatment, but these are not altered by any form of dietary restriction, including a gluten-free diet. As in celiac disease, histologic changes in gastric and colonic biopsies have also been recorded. Anti enterocyte antibodies detected with immunofluorescent methods have been reported by a few laboratories, but these antibodies appear not to be specific and may simply represent epiphenomena. A widely available, reproducible and quantitative anti-enterocyte antibody assay is needed that could be applied in small bowel disorders that have the histological appearance of celiac disease, but fail to respond to a gluten-free diet.

  12. SOCS, inflammation and autoimmunity

    Akihiko eYoshimura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play essential roles in innate and adaptive immunity. However, excess cytokines or dysregulation of cytokine signaling can cause a variety of diseases, including allergies, autoimmune diseases, inflammation, and cancer. Most cytokines utilize the so-called Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT pathway. This pathway is negatively regulated by various mechanisms including suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS proteins. SOCS proteins bind to JAK or cytokine receptors, thereby suppressing further signaling events. Especially, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are strong inhibitors of JAK, because these two contain kinase inhibitory region (KIR at the N-terminus. Studies using conditional knockout mice have shown that SOCS proteins are key physiological as well as pathological regulators of immune homeostasis. Recent studies have also demonstrated that SOCS1 and SOCS3 are important regulators of helper T cell differentiation and functions.

  13. Lithium treatment and thyroid abnormalities

    Bocchetta Alberto

    2006-09-01

    autoimmunity do not much differ from those observed in the general population; h hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer are observed rarely during lithium treatment. Recommendations Thyroid function tests (TSH, free thyroid hormones, specific antibodies, and ultrasonic scanning should be performed prior to starting lithium prophylaxis. A similar panel should be repeated at one year. Thereafter, annual measurements of TSH may be sufficient to prevent overt hypothyroidism. In the presence of raised TSH or thyroid autoimmunity, shorter intervals between assessments are advisable (4–6 months. Measurement of antibodies and ultrasonic scanning may be repeated at 2-to-3-year intervals. The patient must be referred to the endocrinologist if TSH concentrations are repeatedly abnormal, and/or goitre or nodules are detected. Thyroid function abnormalities should not constitute an outright contraindication to lithium treatment, and lithium should not be stopped if a patient develops thyroid abnormalities. Decisions should be made taking into account the evidence that lithium treatment is perhaps the only efficient means of reducing the excessive mortality which is otherwise associated with affective disorders.

  14. Diagnostic criteria for autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan

    Terumi Kamisawa; Kazuichi Okazaki; Shigeyuki Kawa

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a particular type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology.Currently, AIP should be diagnosed based on combination of clinical, serological, morphological,and hisLopathological features. When diagnosing AlP,it is most Jmportant to differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. DJagnostic criteria for AIP, proposed by the Japan Pancreas Society in 2002 first in the world,were revised in 2006. The criteria are based on the minimum consensus of AIP and aim to avoid misdiagnosing pancreatic cancer as far as possible,but not for screening AIP. The criteria consist of the following radiological, serological, and histopathological items: (1) radiological imaging showing narrowing of the main pancreatic duct and enlargement of the pancreas, which are characteristic of the disease; (2)laboratory data showing abnormally elevated levels of serum γ-globulin, IgG or IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies; (3) histopathological examJnation of the pancreas demonstrating marked fibrosis and prominent infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells, which is called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). For a diagnosis of AIP, criterion 1 must be present, together with criterion 2 and/or criterion 3. However, it is necessary to exclude malignant diseases such as pancreatic or biliary cancer.

  15. Cellular stress and innate inflammation in organ-specific autoimmunity: lessons learned from vitiligo.

    Harris, John E

    2016-01-01

    For decades, research in autoimmunity has focused primarily on immune contributions to disease. Yet recent studies report elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and abnormal activation of the unfolded protein response in cells targeted by autoimmunity, implicating cellular stress originating from the target tissue as a contributing factor. A better understanding of this contribution may help to answer important lingering questions in organ-specific autoimmunity, as to what factors initiate disease and what directs its tissue specificity. Vitiligo, an autoimmune disease of the skin, has been the focus of translational research for over 30 years, and both melanocyte stress and immune mechanisms have been thought to be mutually exclusive explanations for pathogenesis. Chemical-induced vitiligo is a unique clinical presentation that reflects the importance of environmental influences on autoimmunity, provides insight into a new paradigm linking cell stress to the immune response, and serves as a template for other autoimmune diseases. In this review, I will discuss the evidence for cell stress contributions to a number of autoimmune diseases, the questions that remain, and how vitiligo, an underappreciated example of organ-specific autoimmunity, helps to answer them. PMID:26683142

  16. [Autoimmune pancreatitis as an element of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome].

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-05-26

    Autoimmune pancreatitis constantly belongs to diseases which often causes significant diagnostic problem and often runs out with surgical intervention as considered to be a pancreatic cancer. Important although usually underestimated problems are polyglandular syndromes, which may consist of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) problem as well. This case report is an example of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS), which was connected with the surgical treatment with biliary bypass anastomosis because of the unresectable lesion in the head of pancreas. The definite remission of the pancreatic lesion finally came after a steroid therapy. Differentiation between neoplastic and inflammatory pancreatic tumors very often remains a serious clinical problem. On grounds of imaging and cytopathology exams it is often difficult to decide about the nature of a lesion. The negative result of cytopathological biopsy examination does not finally settle straightforward diagnosis. Diagnostic problems affect also autoimmune pancreatitis. It is worth to undertake attempts to differentiate pancreatic lesions especially in cases of concomitance with other autoimmune polyglandular syndromes. That is because it is connected with completely different treatment and outcome. We should remember about diagnostic criteria of autoimmune pancreatitis. Appropriate diagnosis for patients with AIP gives them a chance to avoid serious surgical resection and possible complications. PMID:27234865

  17. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED)

    ... to order. Mention “VEDA” to receive a 15% discount. Paid Advertisement Disclaimer Information on this website is ... treatment of autoimmune inner ear disease. Although drug companies are not directly studying treatments for inner ear ...

  18. Sex differences in autoimmune diseases

    Voskuhl Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women are more susceptible to a variety of autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis (MS, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This increased susceptibility in females compared to males is also present in animal models of autoimmune diseases such as spontaneous SLE in (NZBxNZWF1 and NZM.2328 mice, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in SJL mice, thyroiditis, Sjogren's syndrome in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice and diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Indeed, being female confers a greater risk of developing these diseases than any single genetic or environmental risk factor discovered to date. Understanding how the state of being female so profoundly affects autoimmune disease susceptibility would accomplish two major goals. First, it would lead to an insight into the major pathways of disease pathogenesis and, secondly, it would likely lead to novel treatments which would disrupt such pathways.

  19. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26761426

  20. Gestational Diabetes and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Fabrizio Monaco; Giorgio Napolitano; Cesidio Giuliani; Ester Vitacolonna; Ines Bucci; Barbara Di Nenno; Annalisa Passante; Annunziata Lapolla; Dominique Cerrone; Fabio Capani

    2012-01-01

    Background. About 10% of pregnancies are complicated by previously unknown impairment of glucose metabolism, which is defined as gestational diabetes. There are little data available on prevalence of thyroid disorders in patients affected by gestational diabetes, and about their postgestational thyroid function and autoimmunity. We therefore investigated pancreatic and thyroid autoimmunity in gestational diabetic patients and in women who had had a previous gestational diabetic pregnancy. Met...

  1. Autoimmune sleep disorders.

    Silber, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A number of autoantibodies, some paraneoplastic, are associated with sleep disorders. Morvan syndrome and limbic encephalitis, associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies, principally against CASPR2 and LGI1, can result in profound insomnia and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Patients with aquaporin-4 antibodies and neuromyelitis optica may develop narcolepsy in association with other evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction, sometimes as the initial presentation. Central sleep apnea and central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antibody encephalitis, and obstructive sleep apnea, stridor, and hypoventilation are prominent features of a novel tauopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. In addition, paraneoplastic diseases may involve the hypothalamus and cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and RBD in those with Ma1 and Ma2 antibodies. Patients with antineuronal nuclear autoantibodies type 2 may develop stridor. Several lines of evidence suggest that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disorder. There is a strong relationship with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1*06:02 haplotype and polymorphisms in the T-cell receptor alpha locus and purinergic receptor P2Y11 genes. Patients with recent-onset narcolepsy may have high titers of antistreptococcal or other antibodies, although none has yet been shown to be disease-specific but, supporting an immune basis, recent evidence indicates that narcolepsy in children can be precipitated by one type of vaccination against the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic. PMID:27112685

  2. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Massolt, Elske T.; Effraimidis, Grigoris; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Visser, W. Edward; Peeters, Robin P.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects. Methods We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs). We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and IL-7 at baseline. Results BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, PTPO-Ab seroconversion in the next 5 years. PMID:27092550

  3. P-Glycoprotein and Drug Resistance in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Andrea Picchianti-Diamanti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA are chronic inflammatory disorders of unknown etiology characterized by a wide range of abnormalities of the immune system that may compromise the function of several organs, such as kidney, heart, joints, brain and skin. Corticosteroids (CCS, synthetic and biologic immunosuppressive agents have demonstrated the capacity to improve the course of autoimmune diseases. However, a significant number of patients do not respond or develop resistance to these therapies over time. P-glycoprotein (P-gp is a transmembrane protein that pumps several drugs out of the cell, including CCS and immunosuppressants; thus, its over-expression or hyper-function has been proposed as a possible mechanism of drug resistance in patients with autoimmune disorders. Recently, different authors have demonstrated that P-gp inhibitors, such as cyclosporine A (CsA and its analogue Tacrolimus, are able to reduce P-gp expression and or function in SLE, RA and PsA patients. These observations suggest that P-gp antagonists could be adopted to revert drug resistance and improve disease outcome. The complex inter-relationship among drug resistance, P-gp expression and autoimmunity still remains elusive.

  4. Autoimmune AQP4 channelopathies and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    Hinson, Shannon R; Lennon, Vanda A; Pittock, Sean J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders (SD) represent an evolving group of central nervous system (CNS)-inflammatory autoimmune demyelinating diseases unified by a pathogenic autoantibody specific for the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel. It was historically misdiagnosed as multiple sclerosis (MS), which lacks a distinguishing biomarker. The discovery of AQP4-IgG moved the focus of CNS demyelinating disease research from emphasis on the oligodendrocyte and myelin to the astrocyte. NMO is recognized today as a relapsing disease, extending beyond the optic nerves and spinal cord to include brain (especially in children) and skeletal muscle. Brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, identifiable in 60% of patients at the second attack, are consistent with MS in 10% of cases. NMOSD-typical lesions (another 10%) occur in AQP4-enriched regions: circumventricular organs (causing intractable nausea and vomiting) and the diencephalon (causing sleep disorders, endocrinopathies, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis). Advances in understanding the immunobiology of AQP4 autoimmunity have necessitated continuing revision of NMOSD clinical diagnostic criteria. Assays that selectively detect pathogenic AQP4-IgG targeting extracellular epitopes of AQP4 are promising prognostically. When referring to AQP4 autoimmunity, we suggest substituting the term "autoimmune aquaporin-4 channelopathy" for the term "NMO spectrum disorders." Randomized clinical trials are currently assessing the efficacy and safety of newer immunotherapies. Increasing therapeutic options based on understanding the molecular pathogenesis is anticipated to improve the outcome for patients with AQP4 channelopathy. PMID:27112688

  5. A rare presentation of hypopituitarism in hepatic overlap syndrome of autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis

    Gupta V; Singh H.; Talapatra P; Ray S

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune cholangitis is the antimitochondrial antibody-negative autoimmune hepatopathy with clinical and histological features similar to that of primary biliary cirrhosis. Autoimmune cholangitis has a predominant cholestatic phase. However, transaminasemia might be dominant in certain patients, indicating associated autoimmune hepatitis. Such an autoimmune hepatopathy has been termed as hepatic overlap syndrome. Due to the autoimmune nature of the disease, associated diseases of other orga...

  6. Toward molecular pathogenesis of an autoimmune disease: Refined genetic mapping of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED)

    Aaltonen, J.; Bjoerses, P.; Peltonen, L. [National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autoimmune reactions encoupled to many human diseases are still only partially understood. Unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of inherited diseases with a strong autoimmune component in their clinical expression could help to dissect individual components in the molecular background of abnormal immune response. One such genetic disorder is autosomal recessive autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (PGD I), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, MIM 240300). The disease is especially enriched in the genetically isolated population of Finland and we have assigned the APECED locus to human chromosome 21q22.3 in 14 Finnish families by linkage analyses. The best positional lod score of 6.49 was observed with marker D21S49. Based on the history of the Finns, the gene pool of this population clearly demonstrates the consequences of a founder effect and consequent isolation. In the Finnish population, we can take advantage of linkage disequilibrium and allelic association studies to more precisely define the critical DNA region for our disease gene of interest than would be possible by linkage analyses alone. We are now able to define the chromosomal region of interest between two flanking markers locating 1 cM apart. Linkage disequilibrium is observed with three of the markers used in the analyses and this suggests a distance of less than 500 kb to the disease locus, well approachable with molecular cloning techniques. Overlapping YAC and cosmid clones spanning our region of interest will facilitate the cloning of APECED gene in the near future.

  7. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  8. Urine - abnormal color

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  10. Thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases Anticuerpos antitiroideos en enfermedades autoinmunes

    Regina M. Innocencio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in the thyroid function and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with autoimmune diseases but seldom in antiphospholipid syndrome patients. In order to determine the prevalence of thyroid function and autoimmune abnormalities, we compared serum thyrotropin (TSH, serum free thyroxine (T4 levels, thyroid antithyroglobulin (TgAb and antithyroperoxidase (TPOAb levels of 25 patients with systemic sclerosis, 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome to a control group of 113 healthy individuals. Evaluation included a thorough clinical examination with particular attention to thyroid disease and a serologic immune profile including rheumatoid factor, antinuclear and anticardiolipin antibody measurements. Subclinical hypothyroidism (4.2Ciertas anormalidades en la función tiroidea y anticuerpos antitiroideos han sido frecuentemente descriptos en pacientes con enfermedades autoinmunes, y más raramente en pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico. Para determinar la prevalencía de anormalidades en la función tiroidea y de autoinmunidad, comparamos los niveles séricos de tirotropina (TSH tiroxina libre en suero (T4 anticuerpos antitiroglobulina (TgAb y antitiroperoxidasa (TPOAb en 25 pacientes con esclerosis sistémica, 25 pacientes con artritis reumatoidea y 13 pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico con un grupo control de 113 individuos aparentemente sanos. La evaluación incluyó un completo examen clínico con particular atención para las enfermedades de la tiroides y una evaluación inmunológica incluyendo dosaje del factor reumatoideo, anticuerpos antinucleares y anticardiolipina. Hipotiroidismo subclínico (4.2

  11. Defects in CTLA-4 are associated with abnormal regulatory T cell function in rheumatoid arthritis

    Flores-Borja, Fabian; Jury, Elizabeth C.; Mauri, Claudia; Ehrenstein, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal for the treatment of autoimmunity is to restore immunological tolerance. Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in immune tolerance, and Treg functional abnormalities have been identified in different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have previously shown that natural Treg from RA patients are competent at suppressing responder T cell proliferation but not cytokine production. Here, we explore the hypothesis that this Treg defect in RA is l...

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  13. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  14. [Infectious agents and autoimmune diseases].

    Riebeling-Navarro, C; Madrid-Marina, V; Camarena-Medellín, B E; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Barrera, R

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the molecular aspects of the relationships between infectious agents and autoimmune diseases, the mechanisms of immune response to infectious agents, and the more recent hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases are discussed. The antigens are processed and selected by their immunogenicity, and presented by HLA molecules to the T cell receptor. These events initiate the immune response with the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes. Although there are several hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases and too many findings against and in favor of them, there is still no conclusive data. All these hypothesis and findings are discussed in the context of the more recent advances. PMID:1615352

  15. [Bullous autoimmune disorders in children].

    Sárdy, M; Kasperkiewicz, M

    2013-06-01

    We review the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and therapy of autoimmune bullous skin diseases of childhood, especially of the most common linear IgA dermatosis. In autoimmune bullous diseases, autoantibodies are formed against different adhesion molecules of the skin. These are not only pathophysiologically relevant, but also serve as basis for diagnosis and follow-up of these diseases. In case an autoimmune bullous disease is suspected, histopathology and immunohistopathology (direct immunofluorescence microscopy) as well as serological tests (indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, ELISA, immunoblot) should be performed. Therapy depends on the diagnosis. In IgA-mediated pathogenesis, dapsone can be successfully used. In IgG-mediated diseases, immunosuppression with corticosteroids and steroid-sparing agents should be initiated, although only local therapy is sufficient to control a self-limiting pemphigus neonatorum. In dermatitis herpetiformis, a life-long gluten-free diet is recommended. PMID:23677541

  16. Thyroid dysfunction: an autoimmune aspect.

    Khan, Farah Aziz; Al-Jameil, Noura; Khan, Mohammad Fareed; Al-Rashid, May; Tabassum, Hajera

    2015-01-01

    Auto immune thyroid disease (AITD) is the common organ specific autoimmune disorder, Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and Grave's disease (GD) are its well-known sequelae. It occurs due to loss of tolerance to autoantigens thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R) which leads to the infiltration of the gland. T cells in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (cAIT) induce apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells and cause destruction of the gland. Presences of TPO antibodies are common in HT and GD, while Tg has been reported as an independent predictor of thyroid malignancy. Cytokines are small proteins play an important role in autoimmunity, by stimulating B and T cells. Various cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-14, TNF-α and IFN-γ are found in thyroid follicular cells which enhance inflammatory response with nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins. PMID:26221205

  17. Fetal Hox11 expression patterns predict defective target organs: a novel link between developmental biology and autoimmunity

    Lonyai, Anna; Kodama, Shohta; Burger, Douglas; Faustman, Denise L.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental biology has long been ignored in the etiology and diverse manifestations of autoimmune diseases. Yet a role for development is suggested by intriguing overlaps in particular organs targeted in autoimmune diseases, in this case type 1 diabetes and Sjogren’s syndrome. Patients with type 1 diabetes have high rates of co-occurring Sjogren’s syndrome, and both conditions are associated with hearing loss and tongue abnormalities. All of these co-occurrences are found in organs tracing...

  18. Tic disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder: is autoimmunity involved?

    Hoekstra, Pieter J; Minderaa, Ruud B

    2005-12-01

    The precise cause of tic disorders and paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is unknown. In addition to genetic factors, autoimmunity may play a role, possibly as a sequela of preceding streptococcal throat infections in susceptible children. Here we review the most recent findings, from July 2003 onwards, with regard to a possible relationship between tics/OCD and autoimmunity. Evidence about an intriguing correlation between streptococcal infections and tic disorders and OCD is accumulating. Specific criteria have been outlined for paediatric autoimmune disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), but autoimmunity may also be involved in tic disorders and/or OCD in general. Anti-basal ganglia auto-antibodies are an important potential indicator of autoimmunity. Although the lack of a standardized methodology makes comparisons of findings difficult, new data has emerged pointing to the possible involvement of specific auto-antigens. Earlier findings of increased D8/17 B cell expression as a putative susceptibility marker could not be replicated, possibly due to instability of the D8/17-binding antibody. Although PANDAS patients have been reported to improve after therapeutic plasma exchange, and antibiotics may prevent symptom exacerbations, immune-based treatments should not be routinely given. In future studies, demonstrating the pathogenetic significance of anti-basal ganglia antibodies in animals is a major challenge to draw any firm conclusions about a role for autoimmunity. Future longitudinal studies should be aimed at assessing the precise relationship between symptom exacerbations, infections, and immune parameters, possibly along with gene expression profiles. PMID:16401548

  19. Circulating Extracellular microRNA in Systemic Autoimmunity

    Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Carlsen, Anting Liu; Skovgaard, Kerstin;

    2015-01-01

    , extracellular miRNA is protected against degradation by complexation with carrier proteins and/or by being enclosed in subcellular membrane vesicles. This, together with their tissue- and disease-specific expression, has fuelled the interest in using circulating microRNA profiles as harbingers of disease, i......, natural killer cells, neutrophil granulocytes, and monocyte-macrophages. Exploratory studies (only validated in a few cases) also show that specific profiles of circulating miRNAs are associated with different systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis...... systemic autoimmunity and summarize some proposed functions of miRNAs in immune regulation and dysregulation. We conclude that the studies suggest new hypotheses and additional experiments, and that further diagnostic development is highly dependent on analytical method development and on obtaining...

  20. Coeliac disease with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

    Miller, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients are described who have developed autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in association with their coeliac disease. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia may represent an extension of immunological disorders linked with coeliac disease, centred on the histocompatibility antigen B8.

  1. Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Igg4-Related Pseudotumor in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Muhammad Ali Khan; Sehrish Kamal; Mohammed Andaleeb Chowdhury; Usman Ahmad; Ali Nawras

    2014-01-01

    Context Autoimmune pancreatitis is classified into two distinct clinical profiles. Care report Type 1 autoimmunepancreatitis (AIP) is considered to be a manifestation of a novel clinicopathological entity called IgG4 related sclerosingdisease, diagnosed using the Mayo Clinic HISORt criteria. Extra-pancreatic manifestations can include involvement of bileducts, salivary gland, lung nodules, thyroiditis, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal masses, and retroperitoneal fibrosis. Type2 autoimmune ...

  2. Autoimmune thyroid disorders—An update

    Swain, Manorama; Swain, Truptirekha; Mohanty, Binoy Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), a common organ specific autoimmune disorder is seen mostly in women between 30–50 yrs of age. Thyroid autoimmunity can cause several forms of thyroiditis ranging from hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis) to hyperthyroidism (Graves’Disease). Prevalence rate of autoimmune mediated hypothyroidism is about 0.8 per 100 and 95% among them are women. Graves’ disease is about one tenth as common as hypothyroidism and tends to occur more in younger in...

  3. Autoimmune Skin Diseases in the Dog

    Parker, W M

    1981-01-01

    Diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases require very careful observation of the skin lesions, and selection of an intact vesicle for histopathological examination. If available, immunofluorescent studies can be very useful in confirming the diagnosis of autoimmune skin disease. Seven autoimmune skin diseases are briefly reviewed. Therapy must be aggressive and owner warned of the guarded prognosis.

  4. Multiparametric autoimmune diagnostics: recent advances

    Damoiseaux J

    2016-01-01

    Jan Damoiseaux Central Diagnostic Laboratory, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands Abstract: Autoimmune diagnostics in a routine clinical laboratory is constantly challenged by the discovery of new autoantibodies and technical innovations in the immunoassays applied. These challenges are, in particular, combined in the multiparametric immunoassays. Appropriate positioning of multiparametric immunoassays within the laboratory requires integrated knowledge of the c...

  5. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Ayesha Salahuddin; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 relate...

  6. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    Aaltonen, Johanna; Björses, Petra; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Peltonen, Leena Johanna

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does not show association to specific HLA haplotypes. Unravelling the APECED locus will identify a novel gene outside the HLA loci influencing the outcome of autoimmune diseases. We have assigned the di...

  7. Toll-Like Receptor Pathways in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Chen, Ji-Qing; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a family of chronic systemic inflammatory disorders, characterized by the dysregulation of the immune system which finally results in the break of tolerance to self-antigen. Several studies suggest that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. TLRs belong to the family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLRs are type I transmembrane proteins and located on various cellular membranes. Two main groups have been classified based on their location; the extracelluar group referred to the ones located on the plasma membrane while the intracellular group all located in endosomal compartments responsible for the recognition of nucleic acids. They are released by the host cells and trigger various intracellular pathways which results in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, as well as the expression of co-stimulatory molecules to protect against invading microorganisms. In particular, TLR pathway-associated proteins, such as IRAK, TRAF, and SOCS, are often dysregulated in this group of diseases. TLR-associated gene expression profile analysis together with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assessment could be important to explain the pathomechanism driving autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize recent findings on TLR pathway regulation in various autoimmune diseases, including Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and psoriasis. PMID:25687121

  8. Thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant Nigerians

    Oluwatosin O Kayode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Thyroid autoimmunity is a recognized disorder in pregnancy and is associated with a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Aim: This study set out to determine the relationship between pregnancy and thyroid autoimmunity in Nigerian women. Settings and Design: This was an analytical cross-sectional study carried out in a tertiary hospital in South Western Nigeria with a total study population of 108 pregnant and 52 nonpregnant women. Subjects and Methods: Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, free thyroxine and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab were quantitatively determined using enzyme linked immuno-assays. Pregnant women were grouped into three categories ( 28 weeks. The relationship between pregnancy and thyroid autoimmunity was determined using Spearman correlation. Analysis of variance was used in comparison of means, Chi-square test used in analyzing proportions while P ≤ 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean age of the pregnant women was 30.4 ± 6.0 years while the mean gestational age of all pregnant women was 20.6 ± 9.6 weeks. The mean TPO-Ab of 11.58 IU/ml in the pregnant was significantly higher than that of the controls of 7.23 IU/ml (P < 0.001. Out of 108 pregnant women, 27 (25% had elevated TPO-Ab as against about 2% of the nonpregnant women levels P < 0.001. The number of pregnant women with elevated TPO-Ab levels decreased from 33.3% in the first group to 25.6% and 15.2% in the second and third groups. Conclusion: Thyroid autoimmunity expressed by the presence of TPO-Ab is high among pregnant Nigerian women and the frequency of autoimmunity appears to decline with advancing gestational age.

  9. Epigenetics changes associated to environmental triggers in autoimmunity.

    Cañas, Carlos A; Cañas, Felipe; Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Ospina, Fabio E; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens and represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organs in different systems. While the pathogenesis of AID remains unclear, its aetiology is multifunctional and includes a combination of genetic, epigenetic, immunological and environmental factors. In AIDs, several epigenetic mechanisms are defective including DNA demethylation, abnormal chromatin positioning associated with autoantibody production and abnormalities in the expression of RNA interference (RNAi). It is known that environmental factors may interfere with DNA methylation and histone modifications, however, little is known about epigenetic changes derived of regulation of RNAi. An approach to the known environmental factors and the mechanisms that alter the epigenetic regulation in AIDs (with emphasis in systemic lupus erythematosus, the prototype of systemic AID) are showed in this review. PMID:26369426

  10. Acute exacerbation of autoimmune hepatitis induced by Twinrix

    Antal Csepregi; Gerhard Treiber; Christoph R(o)cken; Peter Malfertheiner

    2005-01-01

    We report on a 26-year-old man who presented with severe jaundice and elevated serum liver enzyme activities after having received a dose of Twinrix(○R). In his past medical history, jaundice or abnormal liver function tests were never recorded. Following admission, an elevated immunoglobulin G level and antinuclear antibodies at a titer of 320 with a homogenous pattern were found. Histology of a liver biopsy showed marked bridging liver fibrosis and a chronic inflammation, compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. Treatment was started with budesonide and ursodeoxycholic acid,and led to complete normalization of the pathological liver function tests. We believe that Twinrix(○R) led to an acute exacerbation of an unrecognized autoimmune hepatitis in our patient. The pathogenesis remains to be clarified. It is tempting to speculate that inactivated hepatitis A virus and/or recombinant surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus -as seen in patients with chronic hepatitis C and unrecognized autoimmune hepatitis who were treated with interferon alpha-might have been responsible for disease exacerbation.

  11. Dysbiosis may trigger autoimmune diseases via inappropriate posttranslational modification of host proteins

    Aaron eLerner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The gut ecosystem with myriads of microorganisms and the high concentration of immune system cells can be considered as a separate organ on its own. The balanced interaction between the host and microbial cells has been shaped during the long co-evolutionary process. In dysbiotic conditions, however, this balance is compromised and results in abnormal interaction between the host and microbiota. It is hypothesize here that the changed spectrum of microbial enzymes involved in posttranslational modification of proteins may contribute to the aberrant modification of host proteins thus generating autoimmune responses by the host, resulting in autoimmune diseases.

  12. Urine - abnormal color

    The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. ... Abnormal urine color may be caused by infection, disease, medicines, or food you eat. Cloudy or milky urine is a sign ...

  13. Vitiligo: A part of a systemic autoimmune process

    Gopal KVT

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Recent clinical and animal experimental studies postulate that the pathogenetic mechanisms of vitiligo could be of systemic origin as vitiligo is associated with ocular and auditory abnormalities as well as other autoimmune disorders.Hence, we studied genetic factors, systemic associations, ocular and auditory abnormalities of vitiligo. Methods: The study group included 150 new cases of various types of vitiligo. One hundred age- and sex-matched nonvitiligo cases were included as controls in the study. A complete family history was taken for all patients. Examination was carried out taking note of the type of vitiligo and approximate percentage of body surface involved. All relevant laboratory investigations, a thorough audiological examination including pure tone audiometry and a complete ophthalmologic examination were carried out in all patients and controls. Statistical analysis was done using the Chi square test. Results: Fifty-four vitiligo patients (36% had a family history of vitiligo. Anemia was present in 30 (20% vitiligo patients but only in five (5% controls, a difference that was statistically significant (c2 = 15.8, P < 0.001. Diabetes mellitus was present in 24 (16% vitiligo patients and only 2 (2% of controls (Chi square, c2 = 12.4, P < 0.001. Hypothyroidism and alopecia areata were present in 18 (12% and 11 (7.4% vitiligo patients respectively and none of the controls. Hypoacusis was seen in 30 (20% vitiligo patients and two (2% controls (c2 = 8.19, P < 0.005. Twenty-four vitiligo patients (16% and five controls (5% had specific ocular abnormalities like uveitis, iris and retinal pigmentary abnormalities (c2 = 7.39, P < 0.001. Conclusion: This study demonstrates statistically significant clinical evidence confirming that vitiligo is a part of systemic autoimmune process.

  14. Immunotherapeutic strategies in autoimmune uveitis

    Papotto, Pedro Henrique; Marengo, Eliana Blini; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an organ-specific disorder characterized by irreversible lesions to the eye that predominantly affect people in their most productive years and is among the leading causes of visual deficit and blindness. Currently available therapies are effective in the treatment of a wide spectrum of uveitis, but are often associated with severe side effects. Here, we review ongoing research with promising immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies, describing their specific features, in...

  15. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered ...

  16. Autoimmune hypophysitis or lymphocytic hypophysitis

    Paiva, I; Gomes, L.; C. Ribeiro; Carvalheiro, M; Ruas, A

    2003-01-01

    This entity, due to the pituitary lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, was described for the first time in 1962. The clinical suspicion relies on a rapidly progressing hypopituitarism, particularly with adrenal involvement, affecting women in the peripartum period or patients with previously recognized autoimmune disease. Diabetes insipidus is also often reported. A sellar mass is found in 80% of cases. The diagnosis is confirmed by histology, due to the absence of a specific serological test. The e...

  17. Animal Models of Autoimmune Neuropathy

    Soliven, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) comprises the cranial nerves, the spinal nerves with their roots and rami, dorsal root ganglia neurons, the peripheral nerves, and peripheral components of the autonomic nervous system. Cell-mediated or antibody-mediated immune attack on the PNS results in distinct clinical syndromes, which are classified based on the tempo of illness, PNS component(s) involved, and the culprit antigen(s) identified. Insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathy h...

  18. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  19. Historical reflections on autoimmune hepatitis

    Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),initially known as chronic active or active chronic hepatitis (and by various other names),first came under clinical notice in the late 1940s.However,quite likely,chronic active hepatitis (CAH) had been observed prior to this and was attributed to a persistently destructive virus infection of the liver.An earlier (and controversial) designation in 1956 as lupoid hepatitis was derived from associated L.E.cell test positivity and emphasized accompanying multisystem features and immunological aberrations.Young women featured prominently in early descriptions of CAH.AIH was first applied in 1965 as a descriptive term.Disease-characteristic autoantibodies were defined from the early 1960s,notably antinuclear antibody (ANA),smooth muscle antibody (SMA) and liver-kidney microsomal (LKM) antibody.These are still widely used diagnostically but their relationship to pathogenesis is still not evident.A liver and disease specific autoantigen has long been searched for but unsuccessfully.Prolonged immunosuppressive therapy with predisolone and azathioprine in the 1960s proved beneficial and remains standard therapy today.AIH like many other autoimmune diseases is associated with particular HLA alleles especially with the "ancestral" B8,DR3 haplotype,and also with DR4.Looking forwards,AIH is one of the several enigmatic autoimmune diseases that,despite being (relatively) organ specific,are marked by autoimmune reactivities with non-organ-specific autoantigens.New paradigms are needed to explain the occurrence,expressions and pathogenesis of such diseases.

  20. Historical reflections on autoimmune hepatitis

    Mackay, Ian R.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), initially known as chronic active or active chronic hepatitis (and by various other names), first came under clinical notice in the late 1940s. However, quite likely, chronic active hepatitis (CAH) had been observed prior to this and was attributed to a persistently destructive virus infection of the liver. An earlier (and controversial) designation in 1956 as lupoid hepatitis was derived from associated L.E. cell test positivity and emphasized accompanying multisy...

  1. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: a case report and literature review].

    Sun, Jia-peng; Lu, Xin-tian; Zhao, Wei-hong; Hua, Ying

    2015-12-18

    We described 1 case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), first diagnosed in our hospital, and reviewed the recent literature. The 11-month old male patient presented with a history of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly since 1 month after birth. He suffered recurrent infectious diseases including cytomegalovirus infection, parvovirus B19 infection and chronic diarrhea disease. Besides, his symptoms included hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The laboratory abnormality indicated an expanded population of alpha/beta double-negative T cells (DNTs) (27.18% of lymphocytes, 35.16% of CD3+ T lymphocytes) in peripheral blood, and autoantibodies including antinuclear antibody, double-stranded DNA and rheumatic factor were positive. Hyper gamma globulinemia and positive direct Coombs tests were seen in the patient. His parents were both healthy and denied autoimmune diseases. We identified a heterozygous point mutation in exon 3 of the FAS gene carrying c.309 A>C, resulting in a single base pair substitution in exon 3 of FAS gene which changed the codon of Arg103 to Ser103. Unfortunately, we were unable to obtain the gene results of the child's parents. The patient was treated with glucocorticoids in our hospital and with mycophenolatemofetil in other hospital. And we were informed that his anemia condition relieved through the telephone follow-up, but he still suffered recurrent infections, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly still existed. As we all know ALPS is characterized by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and thus cause lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmune disease, and increase the risk of lymphoma. It is more likely to be misdiagnosed as other diseases. ALPS should be suspected in the case of chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and autoimmune features. Flow cytometry approach is helpful for the diagnosis. Immunosuppressive drugs are the necessary treatment. PMID:26679669

  2. The urgent need to prevent type 1 autoimmune childhood diabetes.

    Laron, Zvi; Hampe, Christiane S; Shulman, Lester M

    2015-03-01

    Clinical onset of autoimmune Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) develops after an asymptomatic, complex interaction between host genetic and environmental factors lasting several years. The world-wide increase in T1DM incidence with no cure in sight necessitates the identification of the causative environmental factors in order to develop methods for preventing them from participating in the autoimmune process leading to T1DM. Human trials to prevent insulitis or development of T1DM (secondary prevention trials) have not as yet produced satisfactory outcomes despite promising results from T1DM animal models, possibly because the autoimmune response had already progressed too far and could not be stopped or reversed. Primary prevention trials conducted with individuals with increased genetic risk, but without signs of autoimmune response or metabolic abnormalities have also not yet produced any clear benefit. A correlation between month of birth and T1DM implicated seasonal infectious pathogens in the etiology of T1DM. This has prompted a search for those seasonal pathogens including viruses that might lead to onset of T1DM. Many studies investigated immediate viral triggers, e.g., viral infections at the time of clinical onset of T1DM. Fewer studies have investigated virus infections as the initial or early trigger in a cascade of events leading to development of TIDM. Seasonal virus infections of pregnant women may be transmitted in utero and induce the first damage to the developing fetus's beta-cells. The identification of specific pathogenic viruses may enable development for pregestational vaccines to diminish the incidence of childhood T1DM. PMID:25962204

  3. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  4. [Autoimmune hepatitis induced by isotretionine].

    Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos Lopez, Roxana; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Scavino, Yolanda; Morales, Alejandro; Tagle, Martín

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a teenage patient with the diagnosis of drug induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient is a 16 years old female, with the past medical history of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism controlled with levothyroxine, who started treatment with Isotretionin (®Accutane) 20 mg q/12 hours for a total of 3 months for the treatment of severe acne. The physical examination was within normal limits and the results of the laboratory exams are: Baseline values of ALT 28 U/L, AST 28 U/L. Three months later: AST 756 U/L, ALT 1199U/L, alkaline phosphatase 114 U/L, with normal bilirrubin levels throughout the process. The serology studies were negative for all viral hepatitis; ANA titers were positive (1/160) and igG levels were also elevated. A liver biopsy was performed, and was compatible with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Corticosteroid therapy was started with Prednisone 40 mg per day one week after stopping the treatment with isotretionin, observing an improvement in the laboratory values. We describe this case and review the world literature since there are no reported cases of Isotretinoin-induced autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27131947

  5. [Autoimmunization induced by interferon alpha therapy in chronic hepatitis C].

    Rocca, Pierre; Codes, Liana; Chevallier, Michèle; Trépo, Christian; Zoulim, Fabien

    2004-11-01

    We report the case of a 56 year-old woman with post-transfusion chronic hepatitis C who presented with a severe ALT flare up associated with a rapid progression of liver fibrosis during interferon alpha 2b therapy. Several hypotheses were considered to explain the etiology of this ALT flare: there was no viral super infection by other hepatotropic viruses, no toxic hepatitis, no metabolic disease, and no other specific liver diseases could be identified. HLA typing showed a specific profile A1 B8 DR3 (risk factor of auto-immunization during interferon alpha therapy) with antinuclear antibodies and anti smooth muscle antibodies. This case suggests that auto-immunization induced by interferon alpha should be investigated in case of ALT flare that is not followed by an HCV breakthrough. PMID:15657545

  6. Cardiovascular disease in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Hollan, Ivana; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Ahearn, Joseph M; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Curran, Sam; Goodyear, Carl S; Hestad, Knut A; Kahaleh, Bashar; Riggio, Marcello; Shields, Kelly; Wasko, Mary C

    2013-08-01

    Various autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs), including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with premature atherosclerosis. However, premature atherosclerosis has not been uniformly observed in systemic sclerosis. Furthermore, although experimental models of atherosclerosis support the role of antiphospholipid antibodies in atherosclerosis, there is no clear evidence of premature atherosclerosis in antiphospholipid syndrome (APA). Ischemic events in APA are more likely to be caused by pro-thrombotic state than by enhanced atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in ARDs is caused by traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Besides other factors, inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, the quantity and quality of lipoproteins, hypertension, insulin resistance/hyperglycemia, obesity and underweight, presence of platelets bearing complement protein C4d, reduced number and function of endothelial progenitor cells, apoptosis of endothelial cells, epigenetic mechanisms, renal disease, periodontal disease, depression, hyperuricemia, hypothyroidism, sleep apnea and vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the premature CVD. Although most research has focused on systemic inflammation, vascular inflammation may play a crucial role in the premature CVD in ARDs. It may be involved in the development and destabilization of both atherosclerotic lesions and of aortic aneurysms (a known complication of ARDs). Inflammation in subintimal vascular and perivascular layers appears to frequently occur in CVD, with a higher frequency in ARD than in non-ARD patients. It is possible that this inflammation is caused by infections and/or autoimmunity, which might have consequences for treatment. Importantly, drugs targeting immunologic factors participating in the subintimal inflammation (e.g., T- and B-cells) might have a protective effect on CVD. Interestingly, vasa vasorum and cardiovascular adipose tissue may

  7. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  9. MRI abnormalities and related risk factors of the brain in patients with neuromyelitis optica

    Objective: To investigate the MRI features of the brain in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and to evaluate the correlation between the brain abnormalities and related risk factors. Methods: Fifty-four patients with definite NMO according to 2006 Wingerchuk diagnosis criteria were enrolled in this study. MRI scanning of the brain was performed in these patients. Distribution and signal features of all the lesions were analyzed. A Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk factors of brain abnormalities. Results: Twenty-four NMO patients (44.4%) showed unremarkable findings and thirty (55.6%) showed abnormalities on brain MRI. Multiple and non-specific small lesions in the subcortical white matter and grey-white matter junction were the most frequent abnormalities on brain MRI (13/30, 43.3%). Typical lesion locations included corpus callosum, subependyma of ventricles, hypothalamus and brain stem. The lesions showed punctate, patchy and linear abnormal signals. Post-contrast MRI showed no abnormal enhancement in 16 cases. Logistic regression analysis showed that coexisting autoimmune disease or infection. history had correlations with abnormalities of the brain on MRI (OR=3.519, P<0.05). Conclusions: There was a high incidence of brain abnormalities in NMO. Subependymal white matter, corpus callosum, hypothalamus and brain stem were often involved in NMO. NMO patients with coexisting autoimmune disease and infection history had higher risk of brain abnormalities. (authors)

  10. Glucose abnormalities in hepatitis C virus infection.

    Huang, Jee-Fu; Yu, Ming-Lung; Dai, Chia-Yen; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2013-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most important causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and has a tremendous impact on public health worldwide. HCV is both hepatotropic and lymphotropic. Replication of HCV in diseased extrahepatic organs and tissues may either trigger latent autoimmunity or induce autoimmune disorders. In addition to established liver injury, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an important feature of extrahepatic metabolic disorders which is attributed to HCV infection. It also has some impact on the disease activity, disease course, clinical outcomes, and treatment efficacy of antiviral therapy. Previous experimental and clinical findings have highly suggested that HCV per se is diabetogenic. The cause-effect interaction between a common endocrine disorder and an infectious disease is an important issue to elucidate. Although the precise mechanisms whereby HCV infection leads to insulin resistance (IR) and glucose abnormalities are not entirely clear, it differs from the usual pathogenesis of T2DM in those with non-HCV liver diseases. This review initially highlights epidemiological and pathophysiological studies addressing the mutual link between chronic HCV infection (CHC) and T2DM. The characteristics of glucose abnormalities in this special population are depicted from the current evidence. The mutual roles of IR and CHC with respect to the prediction of treatment efficacy, how treatment response affects IR, and the role of pancreatic beta cell function in the entire suite are discussed. With the rapid progression of antiviral therapy for CHC in the past decade, we have also listed some points of future perspective in this issue. PMID:23347806

  11. Pain in experimental autoimmune encephalitis: a comparative study between different mouse models

    Lu Jianning

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain can be one of the most severe symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis (MS and develops with varying levels and time courses. MS-related pain is difficult to treat, since very little is known about the mechanisms underlying its development. Animal models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE mimic many aspects of MS and are well-suited to study underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Yet, to date very little is known about the sensory abnormalities in different EAE models. We therefore aimed to thoroughly characterize pain behavior of the hindpaw in SJL and C57BL/6 mice immunized with PLP139-151 peptide or MOG35-55 peptide respectively. Moreover, we studied the activity of pain-related molecules and plasticity-related genes in the spinal cord and investigated functional changes in the peripheral nerves using electrophysiology. Methods We analyzed thermal and mechanical sensitivity of the hindpaw in both EAE models during the whole disease course. Qualitative and quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of pain-related molecules and plasticity-related genes was performed on spinal cord sections at different timepoints during the disease course. Moreover, we investigated functional changes in the peripheral nerves using electrophysiology. Results Mice in both EAE models developed thermal hyperalgesia during the chronic phase of the disease. However, whereas SJL mice developed marked mechanical allodynia over the chronic phase of the disease, C57BL/6 mice developed only minor mechanical allodynia over the onset and peak phase of the disease. Interestingly, the magnitude of glial changes in the spinal cord was stronger in SJL mice than in C57BL/6 mice and their time course matched the temporal profile of mechanical hypersensitivity. Conclusions Diverse EAE models bearing genetic, clinical and histopathological heterogeneity, show different profiles of sensory and pathological changes and thereby enable

  12. Abdominal manifestations of autoimmune disorders

    Full text: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease was recognized as a systemic disease since various extrapancreatic lesions were observed in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The real etiology and pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still not clearly understood. Moreover the exact role of IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells in this disease has not yet been elucidated. only some inconsistent biological features such as hypergammaglobulinemia or hypocomplementemia support the autoimmune nature of the disease process. various names have been ascribed to this clinicopathological entity including IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease, IgG4-related disease, IgG4-related autoimmune disease, hyper-IgG4 disease and IgG4-related systemic disease. The extrapancreatic lesions of IgG4-RD also exhibit the same characteristic histologic features including dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, massive storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis as seen in IgG4-related pancreatitis. Abdominal manifestations include the following organs/systems: Bile ducts: Sclerosing cholangitis; Gallbladder and liver: Acalculous sclerosis cholecytitis with diffuse wall thickening; hepatic inflammatory pseudotumorts; Kidneys: round or wedge-shaped renal cortical nodules, peripheral cortical; lesions, mass like lesions or renal pelvic involvement; Prostate, urethra, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, uterine cervix; Autoimmune prostatitis; Retroperitoneum: Retroperitoneal fibrosis. thin or mildly thick homogeneous soft tissue lesion surrounding the abdominal aorta and its branches but also bulky masses causing hydronephroureterosis; Mesentery: Sclerosing mesenteritis usually involving the root of the mesentery; Bowel: Inflammatory bowel diseases mimicking Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. various types of sclerosing nodular lesions of the bowel wall; Stomach: Gastritis, gastric ulcers and focal masses mimicking submucosal tumor; omentum: Infiltration mimicking

  13. Possible Role of Autoimmunity in Patients with Premature Ovarian Insuf f iciency

    Renata Košir Pogačnik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the involvement of immune abnormality in patients with idiopathic premature ovarian insufficiency (POI. In addition to the known etiology, autoimmune disorders may be a pathologic mechanism for POI. Materials and Methods: Our study was a prospective controlled trial. Twenty women with POI, reasons other than autoimmune excluded, were enrolled in this study. The control group consisted of 17 healthy women. In both groups, family and personal history were taken and the levels of follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, anti-Müllerian hormone, inhibin B, antithyroglobulin and antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were determined. Antiovarian antibodies and subpopulations of peripheral blood T-lymhocytes were also determined. Results: Participants in the study group exhibited hypergonadotropichypogonadism, while high levels of follicle stimulating hormone and low levels of inhibin B and anti- Müllerian hormone were observed. In 16 (80% patients, POI was associated in their personal and familial history with another autoimmune disease. Fifty percent of patients presented highly elevated antithyroid antibodies. The lymphocyte subset, especially B cells, was significantly higher (p=0.014, and peripheral regulatory lymphocytes CD25+ high were significantly lower (p=0.015 in the study group than in the control group. Antiovarian antibodies were detected in 20% of patients with POI. Conclusion: We presume that the presence of anti-ovarian antibodies together with abnormalities of cellular immunity may in some cases potentially represent the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism in idiopathic POI.

  14. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    Elske T Massolt

    Full Text Available Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects.We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs. We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, Stem Cell Factor (SCF, Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF and IL-7 at baseline.BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, P<0.001, while EGF (506.9 vs 307.6 pg/ml, P = 0.003 and IGFBP-2 (388.3 vs 188.5 ng/ml, P = 0.028 were significantly higher in relatives than in HCs. Relatives who seroconverted in the next 5 years had significantly higher levels of SCF than non-seroconverters (26.5 vs 16.7 pg/ml, P = 0.017. In a cluster analysis with the previously published growth factors/cytokines SCF clustered together with IL-1β, IL-6 and CCL-3, of which high levels also preceded seroconversion.Relatives of AITD patients show aberrant serum levels of 4 hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors similar to the aberrancies found in mood disorder patients, suggesting that shared growth and differentiation defects in both the hematopoietic and neuronal system may underlie thyroid autoimmunity and mood disorders. A

  15. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency causes organ-specific autoimmune disease.

    Koji Hase

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID expressed by germinal center B cells is a central regulator of somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR. Humans with AID mutations develop not only the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2 associated with B cell hyperplasia, but also autoimmune disorders by unknown mechanisms. We report here that AID-/- mice spontaneously develop tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs in non-lymphoid tissues including the stomach at around 6 months of age. At a later stage, AID-/- mice develop a severe gastritis characterized by loss of gastric glands and epithelial hyperplasia. The disease development was not attenuated even under germ-free (GF conditions. Gastric autoantigen -specific serum IgM was elevated in AID-/- mice, and the serum levels correlated with the gastritis pathological score. Adoptive transfer experiments suggest that autoimmune CD4+ T cells mediate gastritis development as terminal effector cells. These results suggest that abnormal B-cell expansion due to AID deficiency can drive B-cell autoimmunity, and in turn promote TLO formation, which ultimately leads to the propagation of organ-specific autoimmune effector CD4+ T cells. Thus, AID plays an important role in the containment of autoimmune diseases by negative regulation of autoreactive B cells.

  16. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center reg...

  17. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 - a case report

    Bănică Diana; Frăţilă Ramona; Sima Alexandra; Vlad Adrian; Timar Romulus

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are characterized by the association of two or more autoimmune diseases. They are classified into two major subtypes, each having its own characteristics. The autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined by the presence of at least two of the following diseases: Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases belonging to the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 are: primary hypogonadism, myast...

  18. Autoimmune congenital heart block: complex and unusual situations.

    Brito-Zerón, P; Izmirly, P M; Ramos-Casals, M; Buyon, J P; Khamashta, M A

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune congenital heart block (ACHB) is an immune-mediated cardiac disease included among the manifestations collectively referred to as neonatal lupus. The placental transference of maternal Ro/La autoantibodies may damage the conduction tissues during fetal development leading to blocking of signal conduction at the atrioventricular (AV) node in an otherwise structurally normal heart. Irreversible complete AV block is the main cardiac manifestation of ACHB, but some babies may develop endocardial fibroelastosis, valvular insufficiency, and/or frank cardiomyopathies with significantly reduced cardiac function requiring transplant. The severity of ACHB is illustrated by a global mortality rate of 20% and pacemaker rates of at least 64%, often within the first year of life. This review analyses the main complex and/or unusual clinical situations associated with ACHB, including unusual maternal immunological profiles, infrequent maternal autoimmune diseases, cardiac damage unrelated to AV block, fetal invasive management, late complications after birth, risk of congenital heart block (CHB) in ovodonation and in vitro fertilization techniques, the role of maternal features other than autoimmunity, the influence of the birth order or the risk of CHB in twins and triplets. PMID:26762645

  19. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje;

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination...... abnormality independently predicted transition to disability or death [HR (95 % CI) 1.53 (1.01-2.34)]. The hazard increased with increasing number of abnormalities. Among MRI lesions, only ARWMC of severe grade independently predicted disability or death [HR (95 % CI) 2.18 (1.37-3.48)]. In our cohort...

  20. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    Santosh Paiaulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality.

  1. Pain in experimental autoimmune encephalitis: a comparative study between different mouse models

    Lu Jianning; Kurejova Martina; Wirotanseng Laura N; Linker Ralf A; Kuner Rohini; Tappe-Theodor Anke

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Pain can be one of the most severe symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) and develops with varying levels and time courses. MS-related pain is difficult to treat, since very little is known about the mechanisms underlying its development. Animal models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mimic many aspects of MS and are well-suited to study underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Yet, to date very little is known about the sensory abnormalities ...

  2. Interleukin-1 as a Common Denominator from Autoinflammatory to Autoimmune Disorders: Premises, Perils, and Perspectives

    Giuseppe Lopalco; Luca Cantarini; Antonio Vitale; Florenzo Iannone; Maria Grazia Anelli; Laura Andreozzi; Giovanni Lapadula; Mauro Galeazzi; Donato Rigante

    2015-01-01

    A complex web of dynamic relationships between innate and adaptive immunity is now evident for many autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, the first deriving from abnormal activation of innate immune system without any conventional danger triggers and the latter from self-/non-self-discrimination loss of tolerance, and systemic inflammation. Due to clinical and pathophysiologic similarities giving a crucial role to the multifunctional cytokine interleukin-1, the concept of autoinflammatio...

  3. Proifles of autoimmune hepatitis in Brunei Darussalam

    Anand Jalihal; Pemasari Upali Telisinghe; Vui Heng Chong

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inlfammatory disease of the liver. Data on the disease remain scarce in the Southeast Asia region. This study was undertaken to assess the proifles of AIH in Brunei Darussalam. METHODS: Nineteen patients with AIH treated at the hepatology clinic, RIPAS Hospital (up until December 2008) were reviewed. Demographic, laboratory, histologic, clinical, and therapeutic data of the patients were collected. RESULTS: The median age of the 19 patients at diagnosis was 52 years (range 33-70) with a male to female ratio of 1∶3.75. All patients were diagnosed with typeⅠAIH. The prevalence rate of the disease was 5.61/100 000 and was higher in the Chinese than in Malays and Indigenous people. Commonly seen presentations were abnormal liver function (52.6%), icteric hepatitis (36.8%), and decompensated liver disease (10.5%). Histologically advanced ifbrosis was found in 47.4% and cirrhosis in 21.1% of the patients. Immune-mediated diseases were present in 36.8%. In a follow-up for 31 months (range 0.25-102), three patients died, 2 had progressive liver failure and 1 had lymphoma. Complete biochemical response was seen in 75%of the patients, partial response in 12.5%, and no response in 12.5%. HLA DRB1*03 (DR3) was detected in 18.2%of the patients and DRB1*04 (DR4) in 45.5%. There were signiifcant associations between HLA Cw7 (P=0.038) and DQB1*04 (P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: The data of the 19 patients were comparable to those reported in the literature. Most of the patients were found to have abnormal biochemistry. There were signiifcant associations between HLA Cw7 and DQB1*04, but not between DRB1*03 (DR3) and DRB1*04 (DR4).

  4. Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy

    Sonal, Choudhary; Michael, McLeod; Daniele, Torchia; Paolo, Romanelli

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy is a rare autoimmune disorder. The clinical spectrum of symptoms is diverse; the diagnosis relying on the presence of at least two out of the three main conditions defining the syndrome: chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease.

  5. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...

  6. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Exhibiting Multiple Mass Lesions

    Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Hiramatsu, Yukiko; Kurita, Akira; Sawai, Yugo; Uza, Norimitsu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Our case is a first report of autoimmune pancreatitis with multiple masses within the pancreas which was pathologically diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and treated by steroid. The masses disappeared by steroid therapy. Our case is informative to know that autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes exhibits multiple masses within the pancreas and to diagnose it without unnecessary surgery.

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis exhibiting multiple mass lesions.

    Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Hiramatsu, Yukiko; Kurita, Akira; Sawai, Yugo; Uza, Norimitsu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Our case is a first report of autoimmune pancreatitis with multiple masses within the pancreas which was pathologically diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and treated by steroid. The masses disappeared by steroid therapy. Our case is informative to know that autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes exhibits multiple masses within the pancreas and to diagnose it without unnecessary surgery.

  8. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator.

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Su, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  9. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 - a case report

    Bănică Diana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are characterized by the association of two or more autoimmune diseases. They are classified into two major subtypes, each having its own characteristics. The autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined by the presence of at least two of the following diseases: Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases belonging to the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 are: primary hypogonadism, myasthenia gravis, celiac disease, pernicious anemia, alopecia, vitiligo. We are going to present the case of a patient, aged 40, with diabetes mellitus (probably latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult, chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease.

  10. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.;

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  11. Incipient primary biliary cirrhosis/autoimmune hepatitis overlap or hepatitic form of primary biliary cirrhosis: a case report

    Minz, Ranjana W; Chhabra, Seema; Aggarwal, Ritu; Das, Ashim; Saikia, Biman; Yogesh K Chawla

    2009-01-01

    A 42 year old asymptomatic female detected as incipient Primary Biliary Cirrhosis/Autoimmune Hepatitis overlap during routine checkup. The biochemical profile showed evolution from a mildly deranged liver function test in 2004 along with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate to a 4 times elevation of alkaline phosphatase in 2006 with mildly deranged alanine transaminase. Autoimmune markers demonstrable were Anti mitochondrial antibody M2 and sp100. Histopathology showed dual features, domi...

  12. Long-term follow-up of seven patients with ophthalmopathy not associated with thyroid autoimmunity: heterogeneity of autoimmune ophthalmopathy

    McCorquodale T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tom McCorquodale,1 Hooshang Lahooti,1 Bamini Gopinath,2 Jack R Wall11Department of Medicine, Nepean Clinical School, the University of Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia; 2Centre for Vision Research, the University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Ophthalmopathy is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. However, in approximately 5% of cases this autoimmune eye disorder occurs in the apparent absence of Graves' hyperthyroidism: the so-called euthyroid Graves' disease (EGD.Methods: Seven patients with EGD were followed for evidence of thyroid and orbital autoimmunity, for up to 10 years. Calsequestrin and collagen XIII antibodies were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and TSH-receptor (TSH-r antibodies were measured as TSH-r-binding antibody (TRAb and thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI. Eye signs were characterized and quantified as clinical activity score (CAS, NOSPECS classes, Nunery types 1 and 2, and margin-reflex distance (MRD.Results: Calsequestrin antibodies were detected on at least one occasion in three of the seven patients and collagen XIII antibodies were detected one or more times in five patients. In one patient with isolated congestive ophthalmopathy who was studied intensely, collagen XIII antibodies were initially positive and then became negative as the eye disease stabilized, while antibodies targeting calsequestrin were always negative. TRAb was not detected in any patient, but TSI was detected in three patients on one occasion each. Ultrasound abnormalities were found in four of the six patients for whom this was carried out, but there was no clear evidence for thyroiditis in any of these patients. For comparison, 13 patients were studied with typical Graves' ophthalmopathy. There were no significant differences compared to EGD in respect to the prevalence of positive calsequestrin or collagen XIII antibodies, but these patients included more

  13. Hepatitis A vaccine associated with autoimmune hepatitis

    PA Berry; G Smith-Laing

    2007-01-01

    To describe a case of probable relapsing autoimmune hepatitis associated with vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV). A case report and review of literature were written concerning autoimmune hepatitis in association with hepatitis A and other hepatotropic viruses. Soon after the administration of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, a man who had recently recovered from an uncharacterized but self-limiting hepatitic illness,experienced a severe deterioration (AST 1687 U/L, INR 1.4). Anti-nuclear antibodies were detectable, and liver biopsy was compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. The observation supports the role of HAV as a trigger of autoimmune hepatitis. Studies in helper T-cell activity and antibody expression against hepatic proteins in the context of hepatitis A infection are summarized, and the concept of molecular mimicry with regard to other forms of viral hepatitis and autoimmunity is briefly explored.

  14. CT of pleural abnormalities

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  15. Diagnostic criteria of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Longhi, Maria Serena; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. A set of inclusion and exclusion criteria for the diagnosis of AIH have been established by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG). There are two main types of AIH: type 1, positive for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMAs) and type 2, defined by the presence of anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM-1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC-1) autoantibodies. The central role of autoantibodies in the diagnosis of AIH has led the IAIHG to produce a consensus statement detailing appropriate and effective methods for their detection. Autoantibodies should be tested by indirect immunofluorescence at an initial dilution of 1/40 in adults and 1/10 in children on a freshly prepared rodent substrate that includes kidney, liver and stomach sections to allow for the simultaneous detection of all reactivities relevant to AIH. Anti-LKM-1 is often confused with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) if rodent kidney is used as the sole immunofluorescence substrate. The identification of the molecular targets of anti-LKM-1 and AMA has led to the establishment of immuno-assays based on the use of the recombinant or purified autoantigens. Perinuclear anti-nuclear neutrophil antibody (p-ANNA) is an additional marker of AIH-1; anti soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies are specific for autoimmune liver disease, can be present in AIH-1 and AIH-2 and are associated with a more severe clinical course. Anti-SLA are detectable by ELISA or radio-immuno-assays, but not by immunofluorescence. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to

  16. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  17. Multiparametric autoimmune diagnostics: recent advances

    Damoiseaux J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jan Damoiseaux Central Diagnostic Laboratory, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands Abstract: Autoimmune diagnostics in a routine clinical laboratory is constantly challenged by the discovery of new autoantibodies and technical innovations in the immunoassays applied. These challenges are, in particular, combined in the multiparametric immunoassays. Appropriate positioning of multiparametric immunoassays within the laboratory requires integrated knowledge of the clinical performance of the test system for each individual antigen, the conditions prescribed in disease criteria and/or guidelines, and the demands of the clinicians. This review provides a summary of the multiparametric immunoassays available, as well as the applications and restrictions in routine clinical practice. Keywords: autoantibodies, line immunoassay, dot immunoassay, addressable laser bead immunoassay, indirect immunofluorescence

  18. Immunoadsorption therapy in autoimmune encephalitides

    Golombeck, Kristin S.; Bien, Corinna; Abu-Tair, Mariam; Brand, Marcus; Bulla-Hellwig, Michael; Lohmann, Hubertus; Münstermann, Dieter; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Thölking, Gerold; Valentin, Rainer; Wiendl, Heinz; Melzer, Nico; Bien, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It was hypothesized that in encephalitides with autoantibodies directed to CNS surface antigens an antibody-removing intervention might speed up recovery. Methods: The outcome of autoimmune encephalitis in 19 patients with antibodies against surface antigens (leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 [LGI1], n = 3; contactin-associated protein-2 [CASPR2], n = 4; NMDA receptor [NMDAR], n = 7) and intracellular antigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase [GAD], n = 5) after immunoadsorption in addition to corticosteroid therapy was evaluated retrospectively. Modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores and data on seizures, memory, and antibody titers directly after immunoadsorption (early follow-up) and after a median of 4 months (late follow-up) were compiled. Results: Immediately after immunoadsorption, 9 of 14 patients with antibodies against LGI1, CASPR2, or NMDAR (64%), but none with GAD antibodies, had improved by at least one mRS point. Five of the 7 patients with LGI1 or CASRP2 antibodies had become seizure-free, and 2 patients with NMDAR antibodies had a memory improvement of more than 1 SD of a normal control population. At late follow-up, 12 of 14 patients with surface antibodies had improved (86%), and none of the patients with GAD antibodies. Conclusions: It is suggested that addition of immunoadsorption to immunosuppression therapy in patients with surface antibodies may accelerate recovery. This supports the pathogenic role of surface antibodies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that immunoadsorption combined with immunosuppression therapy is effective in patients with autoimmune encephalitis with surface antibodies. PMID:26977423

  19. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. PMID:26807990

  20. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    Cárdenas Roldán, Jorge; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Castellanos-de la Hoz, Juan; Giraldo-Villamil, Juliana; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladys; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb) and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb). The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients' outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted. PMID:23209899

  1. Vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid diseases: facts and unresolved questions.

    Bizzaro, Giorgia; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (levels lower than 20 ng/ml) is becoming a global health problem, since it is increasingly represented even among healthy subjects. Vitamin D, as an environmental factor, is involved in many biological processes, like perception of chronic pain and response to infections. In recent years, evidence has emerged pointing to an involvement of vitamin D in the development of many autoimmune diseases, and a severe vitamin D deficiency has been especially demonstrated in patients affected with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Low levels of vitamin D were found associated with antithyroid antibody presence, abnormal thyroid function, increased thyroid volume, increased TSH levels, and adverse pregnancy outcome in women with AITD. Vitamin D mediates its effect through binding to vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is harbored on many human immune cells, and in this way is able to modulate immune cells activity, triggering both innate and adaptive immune responses. As VDR gene polymorphisms were found to associate with AITD, the evidence links vitamin D deficiency to AITD either through gene polymorphism or by environmental factors (lack of dietary uptake and sun exposure). Vitamin D supplementation may be offered to AITD patients, but further research is needed to define whether it should be introduced in clinical practice. PMID:25407646

  2. Case of acute hepatitis E with concomitant signs of autoimmunity

    Catarina Lima Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis E have been described in developed countries, despite the more common occurrence in endemic areas and developing countries. We present the case of a 58 years old Portuguese female, with no epidemiological relevant factors, admitted with acute hepatitis with positive anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-smooth muscle antibody and high serum gamma globulin (> 1.5 fold increase. Serologies for hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, hereditary sensory neuropathy and varicella zoster virus were negative. Liver biopsy histology revealed changes compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. Prednisolone and azathioprine was started. She tested positive for immunoglobulin M anti hepatitis E virus (HEV with detectable viremia by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technique. HEV-RNA was confirmed through RT-PCR in a liver specimen, establishing the diagnosis of acute hepatitis E. Immunosuppression was stopped. She clinically improved, with resolution of laboratory abnormalities. Therefore, we confirmed acute hepatitis E as the diagnosis. We review the literature to elucidate about HEV infection and its autoimmune effects.

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  4. FDG-PET of autoimmune-related pancreatitis: preliminary results

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to elucidate the fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings in autoimmune-related pancreatitis (AIP), which is a reversible chronic pancreatitis with an autoimmune cause. The study group comprised six patients with clinically diagnosed AIP. After 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FDG had been injected intravenously, the abdomen and/or the whole body was scanned at 1 h post injection in all patients, and scanning was repeated at 2 h in four patients. PET findings were evaluated visually and/or semiquantitatively using the standardized uptake value (SUV). In four of the six patients, PET demonstrated intense uptake in the whole pancreas, which appeared swollen on computed tomography, and the accumulation increased with time in three patients. In one patient, intense focal uptake in the pancreatic head was observed, and the accumulation decreased over time. In the remaining patient, no abnormal accumulation in the pancreas was observed. Follow-up PET scanning after steroid therapy was performed in three patients, and intense FDG uptake was no longer observed. Our preliminary data show that AIP can cause intense FDG uptake in the pancreas. This fact, and the benign status of the condition, should be kept in mind when making a diagnosis with FDG-PET in patients with pancreatic disorders. (orig.)

  5. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  6. Experimental drugs for treatment of autoimmune myocarditis

    Han Lina; Guo Shuli; Wang Yutang; Yang Liming; Liu Siyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the experimental drugs for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis.Data sources The literatures published in English about different kinds of experimental drugs based on different therapeutic mechanisms for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis were obtained from PubMed from 2002 to 2013.Study selection Original articles regarding the experimental drugs for treatment of autoimmune myocarditis were selected.Results This study summarized the effects of the experimental drugs for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis,such as immunomodulators and immunosuppressants,antibiotics,Chinese medicinal herbs,cardiovascular diseases treatment drugs,etc.These drugs can significantly attenuate autoimmune myocarditis-induced inflammation and fibrosis,alleviate autoimmune myocarditis-triggered overt lymphocyte proliferation,and meanwhile reduce Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and increase Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10).Conclusion This study summarized recent advances in autoimmune myocarditis treatment and further proposes that traditional Chinese medicine and immune regulators will play important roles in the future.

  7. Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases.

    Tsuruta, Daisuke; Dainichi, Teruki; Hamada, Takahiro; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases are the best-characterized autoimmune skin diseases. Molecular diagnosis of these diseases has become possible due to the identification of their target autoantigens over the past three decades. In this review, we summarize methodology for categorizing autoimmune bullous diseases by means of combinations of direct and indirect immunofluorescence techniques using normal human skin sections, rat bladder sections and COS7 cells transfected with desmocollins 1-3 encoded vectors, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblotting with normal human epidermal extracts, dermal extracts, purified proteins from cell cultures and recombinant proteins. PMID:23325635

  8. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    张文娟; 安宇

    2015-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%–70%as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models.

  9. Autoimmunity in connection with a metal implant: a case of autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants.

    Loyo, Esthela; Jara, Luis J; López, Persio David; Puig, Ana Carolina

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) has been recently proposed by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin as a new entity that comprises several conditions: the macrophagic-myofasciitis syndrome, the Gulf War syndrome, silicosis and post-vaccination phenomena, autoimmunity related to infectious fragments, hormones, aluminum, silicone, squalene oil, and pristane. We report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed serial episodes of high fever, extreme fatigue, transient thrombocytopenia, multiple cervical adenopathies, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, neutropenia, severe proteinuria and urine sediment abnormalities, elevated serum ferritin levels, and transient low positive antinuclear antibodies 1 year after she had a nickel-titanium chin implant for cosmetic reasons. The clinical picture simulated a variety of probable diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, Kikuchi-Fujimoto syndrome, adult onset Still's disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, and hemophagocytic syndrome, among others, so she underwent an extensive medical investigation including two lymph node biopsies. She received treatment accordingly with steroids, methotrexate, and mofetil mycophenolate, with initial improvement of her symptoms, which recurred every time the dose was reduced. Two and a half years later the patient decided to retire the chin implant and afterwards all her systemic symptoms have disappeared. She remains in good health, without recurrence of any symptom and off medications until today. Albeit this patient fulfills proposed major ASIA criteria, to our knowledge it would be the first description of systemic features of autoinflammation in connection with a metal implant. PMID:26000140

  10. Ultrasonography of splenic abnormalities

    Ming-Jen Chen; Ming-Jer Huang; Wen-Hsiung Chang; Tsang-En Wang; Horng-Yuan Wang; Cheng-Hsin Chu; Shee-Chan Lin; Shou-Chuan Shih

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This report gives a comprehensive overview of ultrasonography of splenic abnormalities. Certain ultrasonic features are also discussed with pathologic correlation.METHODS: We review the typical ultrasonic characteristics of a wide range of splenic lesions, illustrating them with images obtained in our institution from 2000 to 2003.One hundred and three patients (47 men, 56 women),with a mean age of 54 years (range 9-92 years), were found to have an abnormal ultrasonic pattern of spleen.RESULTS: We describe the ultrasonic features of various splenic lesions such as accessory spleen, splenomegaly,cysts, cavernous hemangiomas, lymphomas, abscesses,metastatic tumors, splenic infarctions, hematomas, and rupture, based on traditional gray-scale and color Doppler sonography.CONCLUSION: Ultrasound is a widely available, noninvasive,and useful means of diagnosing splenic abnormalities. A combination of ultrasonic characteristics and clinical data may provide an accurate diagnosis. If the US appearance alone is not enough, US may also be used to guide biopsy of suspicious lesions.

  11. The efficacy of whole-body FDG-PET or PET/CT for autoimmune pancreatitis and associated extrapancreatic autoimmune lesions

    Nakajo, Masatoyo [Atsuchi Memorial Clinic PET Center, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima City (Japan); Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima (Japan); Jinnouchi, Seishi; Tateno, Rie [Atsuchi Memorial Clinic PET Center, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima City (Japan); Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Nakajo, Masayuki [Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy of whole-body {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and associated extrapancreatic autoimmune lesions. Whole-body FDG-PET or PET/computed tomography (CT) findings were reviewed in six patients with AIP. The initial PET scans were performed 1 h and 2 h after FDG injection in all six patients. Follow-up PET scans were performed during or following steroid therapy in five patients and in one patient who did not have steroid therapy. The initial PET scans revealed intense FDG uptake by AIP in all six patients. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) increased in four patients and was stable in two patients. The intense uptake in the pancreas disappeared during or following steroid therapy in five patients and in one patient who showed spontaneous remission of AIP. Abnormal FDG uptake by extrapancreatic autoimmune diseases was observed in five of the six patients: sclerosing sialadenitis (n = 5), lymphadenopathy (n = 5), retroperitoneal fibrosis (n = 2), interstitial nephritis (n = 2) and sclerosing cholecystitis (n = 1). Abnormal FDG uptake disappeared in the salivary glands (n = 4), lymph nodes (n = 4), retroperitoneum (n = 2), kidneys (n = 1) and gallbladder (n = 1) during or following steroid therapy and remained in the salivary glands and lymph nodes of a spontaneous remission patient. These results suggest that whole-body FDG-PET may be useful for detecting AIP and associated extrapancreatic autoimmune lesions and for monitoring their disease activity but that dual time point imaging may not be useful for differentiating malignancy from AIP. (orig.)

  12. Cyclosporine Treatment in a Patient with Concurrent Autoimmune Urticaria and Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Ju, Hye Young; Kim, Hei Sung; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune urticaria show a higher rate of seropositivity for other autoantibodies and often have a history of autoimmune conditions. They also tend to have more severe symptoms and to have a poor response to conventional antihistamine treatment. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder in which progressive liver injury is thought to be the result of a T-cell-mediated immunologic attack against liver cells in genetically predisposed individuals. While the associat...

  13. Autoimmune Cytopenias in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL may be complicated at any time by autoimmune phenomena.The most common ones are hematologic disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and autoimmune agranulocytosis (AG are, indeed, more rarely seen. However, they are probably underestimated due to the possible misleading presence of cytopenias secondary to leukemic bone marrow involvement or to chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The source of autoantibodies is still uncertain, despite the most convincing data are in favor of the involvement of resting normal B-cells. In general, excluding the specific treatment of underlying CLL, the managementof these complications is not different from that of idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias or of those associated to other causes. Among different therapeutic approaches, monoclonal antibody rituximab, given alone or in combination, has shown to be very effective.

  14. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    In this review article,we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim,namely,evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease.In fact,the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue.In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with "idiopathic"pancreatitis,we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis.Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low,we believe that in the future,by increasing our knowledge on the subject,we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis.

  15. Shaping the spectrum - From autoinflammation to autoimmunity.

    Hedrich, Christian M

    2016-04-01

    Historically, autoimmune-inflammatory disorders were subdivided into autoinflammatory vs. autoimmune diseases. About a decade ago, an immunological continuum was proposed, placing "classical" autoinflammatory disorders, characterized by systemic inflammation in the absence of high-titer autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes, at the one end, and autoimmune disorders at the other end. We provide an overview of recent developments and observations, filling in some of the gaps and showing strong interconnections between innate and adaptive immune mechanisms, indicating that disorders from both ends of the immunological spectrum indeed share key pathomechanisms. We focus on three exemplary disorders: i) systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis representing "classical" autoinflammatory disorders; ii) psoriasis, a mixed pattern disease; and iii) systemic lupus erythematosus, a prototypical autoimmune disease. We summarize scientific observations suggesting that, depending on disease stages and/or duration, individualized treatment targeting innate or adaptive immune mechanisms in disorders from either end of the immunological spectrum may control disease activity. PMID:26948930

  16. New mechanism revealed for regulation of autoimmunity

    2007-01-01

    @@ A healthy human body is equipped with a powerful immune system for resisting the attack of invading microorganisms. Unfortunately, the system sometimes goes awry and attacks the body itself.Autoimmunity is the failure of an organism to recognize its own constituent parts as"self," resulting in an immune response against its own cells and tissues. A disorder that results from such an aberrant immune response is termed an autoimmune disease.

  17. Screening tests for autoimmune-related immunotoxicity.

    Pieters, R; Albers, R

    1999-01-01

    A large number of chemicals induce or exacerbate autoimmune-like diseases in man. Because of the complexity of processes involved, these adverse effects are often if not always missed in standard toxicity testing. To date no validated and generally applicable predictive animal model exists and only a few chemicals have actually been shown to induce adverse autoimmune effects in certain animals. The popliteal lymph node assay (PLNA) is a very promising animal test to (pre)screen for systemic i...

  18. IL-17 Contributes to Autoimmune Hepatitis

    余海静; 黄加权; 刘阳; 艾国; 严伟明; 王晓晶; 宁琴

    2010-01-01

    The role of interleukin-17 (IL-17) in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) was investigated. A mouse model of experimental autoimmune hepatitis was established, and the syngeneic S-100 antigen emulsified in complete Freud's adjuvant was injected intraperitoneally into adult male C57BL/6 mice. The IL-17 expression in serum and the livers of the mice models was detected by using ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. IL-17 neutralizing antibody was used to study the biological effect of IL-17 in the experimental...

  19. Hepatitis A vaccine associated with autoimmune hepatitis

    Berry, PA; Smith-Laing, G

    2007-01-01

    To describe a case of probable relapsing autoimmune hepatitis associated with vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV). A case report and review of literature were written concerning autoimmune hepatitis in association with hepatitis A and other hepatotropic viruses. Soon after the administration of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, a man who had recently recovered from an uncharacterized but self-limiting hepatitic illness, experienced a severe deterioration (AST 1687 U/L, INR 1.4...

  20. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  1. Vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Kivity, Shaye; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zisappl, Michael; Shapira, Yinon; Nagy, Endre V.; Dankó, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Langevitz, Pnina; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The role of vitamin D as an immune modulator has been emphasized in recent years, and low levels of the hormone were observed in several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Vitamin D mediates its effect though binding to vitamin D receptor (VDR), and activation of VDR-responsive genes. While VDR gene polymorphism was found to associate with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), few studies examined levels of vitamin D in these patients and those t...

  2. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1 diabetes].

    Lechleitner, Monika; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    According to literature about 30 % of the patients with type 1 diabetes develop further autoimmune diseases. Thyroid dysfunction represents with 15‒30 % the most common disorder, followed by gastritis with 5‒10 %, celiac disease with 4‒9 % and vitiligo with 2‒10 %. Addison's disease seems to be less prevalent. Diagnostic procedures in the course of the comprehensive care for diabetic patients should therefore include screening for further autoimmune diseases. PMID:27052247

  3. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics

    Tozzoli, Renato; D’Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, ...

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; ARAKURA, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into o...

  5. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    Rozin, Alexander P; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide ...

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    L. Massironi; R. Cossutta; Massarotti, M.; Marasini, B; A. Mantero

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hu...

  7. Difficult treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis

    Albert; J; Czaja

    2010-01-01

    Treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis are complicated by the diversity of its clinical presentations,uncertainties about its natural history,evolving opinions regarding treatment end points,varied nature of refractory disease,and plethora of alternative immu-nosuppressive agents. The goals of this article are to review the difficult treatment decisions and to provide the bases for making sound therapeutic judgments. The English literature on the treatment problems in au-toimmune hepatitis were identif...

  8. Treatment of patients with severe autoimmune hepatitis

    Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory diseases of unknown origin that is characterised by a necro-inflammatory and fibrotic process and may result in liver failure or uncompensated liver cirrhosis. Normally AIH is responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, and treatment aims...... and tacrolimus) might salvage patients from transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil may also improve liver tests and reduce the requirement for corticosteroids. Besides, sirolimus is effective for treatment of de novo autoimmune hepatitis that sometimes develops after liver transplantation. Initial experience...

  9. Maternal autoimmune thyroid disease and pregnancy complication

    Gudović Aleksandra; Spremović-Radjenović Svetlana; Lazović Gordana; Marinković Jelena; Glišić Andreja; Milićević Srboljub

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim. Thyroid disorders exert a great impact on pregnancy course and outcome. The aim of the study was to investigate impact of autoimmune thyroid disorders on pregnancy course and outcome, frequency of pregnancy complications and pregnancy loss. Methods. We followed 63 pregnancies prospectively during the period 1985-2007, 28 with hyperthyroid and 15 with hypothyroid autoimmune disorders, and 20 healthy pregnancies. Follow up included clinical, sonographic and laboratory investigat...

  10. NK cell autoreactivity and autoimmune diseases

    Alessandro ePoggi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of Natural Killer (NK cells in organ specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands upregulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILC, comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alterating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular matrix components and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity.

  11. Uveitis in autoimmune hepatitis: A case report

    Roberto Giulio Romanelli; Giorgio La Villa; Fabio Almerigogna; Francesco Vizzutti; Elena Di Pietro; Valentina Fedi; Paolo Gentilini; Giacomo Laffi

    2006-01-01

    In this case report we describe for the first time an association between autoimmune hepatitis (AIH)and uveitis, without any doubts about other possible etiologies, such as HCV, since all the old reports describe the association of AIH with iridocyclitis before tests for HCV-related hepatitis could be available. A 38-year-old businessman with abnormal liver function tests and hyperemia of the bulbar conjunctiva was admitted to the hospital. Six years before admission,the patient presented with persistent fever, arthralgias,conjunctival hyperemia, leukocytosis and increased ESR, referred to acute rheumatic fever. The presence of systemic diseases, most commonly associated with uveitis, was investigated without results and the patient was then treated with topical corticosteroids. His symptoms resolved. A test for anti-nuclear antibodies was positive, at a titre of 1:320, with a speckled and nucleolar staining pattern. Liver ultrasound showed mild hepatomegaly with an increased echostructure of the liver. Percutaneous liver biopsy was performed under ultrasound assistance. Histological examination showed necroinflammation over the portal, periportal and lobular areas, fibrotic portal tracts, with periportal fibrosis and occasional portal-to-portal bridgings, but intact hepatic architecture. Some hepatocytes showed barely discernible granules of hemosiderin in the lobular area. Bile ductules had not any significant morphological alterations. METAVIR score was A2-F3, according to the modified HAI grading/fibrosis staging. The patient was diagnosed to have AIH with mild activity and fibrosis and was discharged on 25 mg prednisone, entering clinical and biochemical remission, further confirming diagnosis. After discharge the patient continued to have treatment with corticosteroids as an outpatient at a dose of 5 mg. On January 2002 the patient was readmitted to the hospital. A test for anti-nuclear antibodies was positive, at a titre of 1:320, with a speckled and

  12. Sweating in Systemic Abnormalities: Uremia and Diabetes Mellitus.

    Murota, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sweating disorders are sometimes observed in various systemic diseases that include genetic disorders, organ damage, metabolic impairment, autoimmune diseases, and neuropathic disorders. In these diseases, various symptoms such as autonomic failures, psychopathic disorders, abnormal skin innervation, and sweat gland dysfunction can interact with one another in diverse ways, resulting in impaired sweating. This review focuses on the influence of uremia (with or without hemodialysis) and diabetes mellitus on impaired sweating. Dialysis patients perspire less, but their sweat contains higher levels of uremic toxins than do healthy subjects. Neuropathic disorders in diabetes patients develop in relation to disease severity and can impair sweating. Physicians should consider the development of various problems, such as increased body temperature, dry skin, and increased susceptibility to infection, due to decreased sweating, as they are often found in these systemic abnormalities. PMID:27584963

  13. Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Igg4-Related Pseudotumor in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Muhammad Ali Khan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Autoimmune pancreatitis is classified into two distinct clinical profiles. Care report Type 1 autoimmunepancreatitis (AIP is considered to be a manifestation of a novel clinicopathological entity called IgG4 related sclerosingdisease, diagnosed using the Mayo Clinic HISORt criteria. Extra-pancreatic manifestations can include involvement of bileducts, salivary gland, lung nodules, thyroiditis, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal masses, and retroperitoneal fibrosis. Type2 autoimmune pancreatitis on the other hand is confirmed by histologically seen duct centric pancreatitis without elevationof IgG4 or involvement of other organs. In type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis, extrapancreatic manifestations like bile ductstrictures, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal nodules, retroperitoneal fibrosis respond to steroid therapy. Conclusion Wepresent a case of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis in which the renal mass did not respond to steroid therapy and was later on found to be renal cell carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge this is only the third reported case of autoimmune pancreatitis in which the patient had renal cell carcinoma. Our case highlights the importance of close follow up of lesions that do not respond to steroid treatment which in this case proved to be renal cell cancer.

  14. Autoimmune neurologic disorders in children.

    Lim, Ming; Gorman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune neurologic diseases are of major clinical importance in children. Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are now increasingly recognized in childhood, where the antibodies bind to cell surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The antibodies are directed towards ion channels, receptors, and membrane proteins; and the diseases include limbic encephalitis and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antibody encephalitis, among many others. Additionally there are conditions where the wider immune system is implicated. Neurologic features like seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders, with neuroimaging and electrophysiologic features, may indicate a specific antibody-mediated or immune disorder. Often, phenotypic overlap is observed between these conditions, and phenotypic variation seen in children with the same condition. Nevertheless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement, although huge efforts are still required to optimize the outcome for many patients. In many patients no antibodies have yet been identified, even though they respond to immunotherapies. Here we describe the known antibodies and associated diseases, discuss conditions that are thought to be immune-mediated but have no known immunologic biomarker, and provide guidelines for the investigation and classification of these disorders. PMID:27112693

  15. [Autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid cancer].

    Krátký, Jan; Jiskra, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Association between autoimmune thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer remains not clear. Although both diseases often occur simultaneously in histological samples, it is not yet clear whether CLT can be regarded as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy. This review focus on the known epidemiological and molecular genetics links between both diseases. Most studies have shown a significant association between thyroid cancer and positive antibodies to thyroglobulin and histological evidence of CLT, as well. Both disorders share some risk factors (greater incidence in women, in areas with adequate supply of iodine and in patients after radiotherapy of the neck) and molecular genetics linkage. For example: RET/PTC rearrangements could be more often found in carcinomas associated with CLT, but this mutation could be found in benign lesions such as CLT, as well. CLT seems to be a positive prognostic factor in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. It is associated with less invasive forms of tumor, lower occurrence of infiltrated lymphatic nodes and a lower risk of recurrence. PMID:26486481

  16. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution. PMID:27056852

  17. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  18. A population study of the association between thyroid autoantibodies in serum and abnormalities in thyroid function and structure

    Pedersen, I.B.; Laurberg, P.; Knudsen, N.; Jorgensen, T.; Perrild, H.; Ovesen, Lars; Rasmussen, Lone Banke

    2005-01-01

    autoantibodies in serum and abnormalities in thyroid function and structure, and to study the thyroid volume in subjects with subclinical autoimmune hypothyroidism. Design A population study including 4649 randomly selected subjects. Measurements Blood tests were used to analyse for thyroid peroxidase......Objective Patients with autoimmune overt hypothyroidism may present with goitrous Hashimoto's disease or autoimmune atrophic thyroiditis. Little is known about the prevalence of subclinical autoimmune hypothyroidism. The aims of this study were to evaluate the association between thyroid...... autoantibodies (TPO-Ab), thyroglobulin autoantibodies (Tg-Ab), TSH, fT3 and fT4. Results Thyroid volume was categorized as small (<6.6 ml) in 4.7%, normal (6.6-14.9 ml) in 60.4% and large (> 14.9 ml) in 34.9% of participants. Thyroid nodules were found in 29.7%. Serum TSH was low (<0.4 mIU/l) in 4.7%, normal (0...

  19. Pediatric Autoimmune Hepatitis in a Patient Who Presented With Erythema Nodosum: A Case Report

    Zohreh Kavehmanesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is a form of chronic hepatitis with unclear causative factors and is characterized by immunological and auto-immunological manifestations. Several extrahepatic manifestations, such as other autoimmune disorders, are associated with AIH. AIH with dermatological conditions as the initial manifestation is rare. We report the case of AIH in which erythema nodosum (EN was the first manifestation.Case Presentation: An 8-year-old girl with several persistent dermatological lesions was referred to our hospital several months ago. Her skin had nodular, painful, dry, and erythematous lesions, predominantly on the extensor areas of both the legs, with some erythematous patches on her face. Physical examination revealed that she had hepatosplenomegaly as well. Skin biopsy indicated EN. The results of the laboratory tests showed increased levels of several liver enzymes. The patient's International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG score was a definite indicator of AIH. The results of liver biopsy indicated AIH. Other causes of EN and abnormal liver function were ruled out. The only obvious cause of skin lesions was chronic inflammation due to an autoimmune response. The patient was treated for AIH, and her skin lesions along with other signs and symptoms resolved.Conclusions: AIH can present with protean clinical manifestations, and is thus associated with the risk of delayed diagnosis. Dermatological manifestations, including EN, could indicate a serious disease, and further investigation might be required. AIH should be considered as the possible diagnosis in such cases.

  20. Increased Incidence of Thyroid Dysfunction and Autoimmunity in Patients with Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Stefano Stagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormones may play a role in the pathophysiology of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC. An increased incidence of thyroid autoantibodies was recently observed in VKC, although there were no data on thyroid function. Two hundred and eighty-eight patients (202 males, 86 females; range 5.5 to 16.9 years with VKC were evaluated and compared with 188 normal age- and sex-matched subjects. In all subjects, serum concentrations of free T4, TSH, thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin, and TSHr autoantibodies were evaluated. In VKC, the family history of thyroid diseases showed no significant differences compared to the controls (9.4 versus 8.6%, whereas the family history of autoimmune diseases was significantly higher (13.2% versus 6.3%; P<0.05. Subclinical hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 6.6% (versus 1.6% of the controls; P<0.05 and overt hypothyroidism in 0.7% (versus 0.0% of the controls; P=NS. Finally, 5.2% of patients were positive for thyroid autoantibodies, which were significantly higher with respect to the controls (0.5%, P<0.05. In the patients positive for thyroid autoantibodies, 80% showed a sonography pattern that suggested autoimmune thyroiditis. Thyroid function and autoimmunity abnormalities are frequently present in children with VKC. Children with VKC should be screened for thyroid function and evaluated for thyroid autoimmunity.

  1. Holmes-Adie syndrome, autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease: A case report

    Timea Csak; Aniko Folhoffer; Andrea Horvath; Judit Halász; Csaba Diczházi; Zsuzsa Schaff; Ferenc Szalay

    2006-01-01

    A 35-year-old female patient presented with the following symptoms of Holmes-Adie syndrome: photophobia,enlargement of the left pupil unresponsive to light,Achilles areflexia. The pilocarpine test was positive. No tumor or other neurological abnormality was found. She had a 19-year history of autoimmune hepatitis. Flares up were observed following each 3 deliveries. At age of 31she presented with diarrhea and weight loss. Abdominal tumor was detected by ultrasound. The surgically removed tumor was histologically a benign mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma. Simultaneously, celiac disease was diagnosed. Gluten-free diet resulted in a significant improvement of celiac disease, but not of autoimmune hepatitis. Autonomic neuropathy was proven by standard cardiovascular tests. The patient was a homozygous carrier for HLA DQ2 antigen characteristic for celiac disease and heterozygous for HLA DR3 B8 frequent in autoimmune liver diseases. Our novel observation on association of Holmes-Adie syndrome with autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease is suggestive for a common immunological background for all three entities present in a patient with mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma.

  2. Human T lymphotropic virus type I in arthropathy and autoimmune disorders.

    Nishioka, K; Sumida, T; Hasunuma, T

    1996-08-01

    The progressive nature of the disease and the persistent inflammation affecting various organs are common features of idiopathic autoimmune disorders of unknown etiology. Therefore, the HTLV-I-associated disorders described in the present review are outstandingly important models for our understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of organ-specific immune disorders. HTLV-I arthropathy is characterized by chronic inflammatory and proliferative synovitis with lymphoid follicles and pannus formation in the affected joints, indistinguishable from the findings in idiopathic RA. The presence of the tax gene in HTLV-I-negative SS patients suggests that it is responsible for the exocrine gland abnormality, characterized by extensive lymphoproliferative epithelial lesions. Furthermore, the pulmonary lesions of HTLV-I bronchopneumonopathy are similar to those of idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis. Based on these observations, the clinical findings associated with the immunologic abnormalities in HTLV-I-infected patients provide us with valuable information for understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic inflammatory conditions associated with immune regulatory disorders. Although the clinical and pathologic features of the 2 common HTLV-I-associated disorders, ATL and HAM/TSP, have been well characterized and are clearly distinguishable from those of the idiopathic forms of these disorders, other HTLV-I-related autoimmune diseases, e.g., arthropathy, SS, or bronchopneumonopathy, are clinically indistinguishable from the idiopathic forms of the diseases. Such similarity may serve as a clue to the pathogenetic mechanisms of idiopathic autoimmune disorders. PMID:8702452

  3. Is there a Common Genetic Basis for Autoimmune Diseases?

    Juan-Manuel Anaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a diverse collection of diseases in terms of their demographic profile and primary clinical manifestations. The commonality between them however, is the damage to tissues and organs that arises from the response to self-antigens. The presence of shared pathophysiological mechanisms within ADs has stimulated searches for common genetic roots to these diseases. Two approaches have been undertaken to sustain the “common genetic origin” theory of ADs. Firstly, a clinical genetic analysis showed that autoimmunity aggregates within families of probands diagnosed with primary Sjögren's (pSS syndrome or type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. A literature review supported the establishment of a familiar cluster of ADs depending upon the proband's disease phenotype. Secondly, in a same and well-defined population, a large genetic association study indicated that a number of polymorphic genes (i.e. HLA-DRB1, TNF and PTPN22 influence the susceptibility for acquiring different ADs. Likewise, association and linkage studies in different populations have revealed that several susceptibility loci overlap in ADs, and clinical studies have shown that frequent clustering of several ADs occurs. Thus, the genetic factors for ADs consist of two types: those which are common to many ADs (acting in epistatic pleitropy and those that are specific to a given disorder. Their identification and functional characterization will allow us to predict their effect as well as to indicate potential new therapeutic interventions. Both autoimmunity family history and the co-occurrence of ADs in affected probands should be considered when performing genetic association and linkage studies.

  4. Role of IgE in autoimmunity.

    Sanjuan, Miguel A; Sagar, Divya; Kolbeck, Roland

    2016-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence to suggest that IgE plays a significant role in autoimmunity. The presence of circulating self-reactive IgE in patients with autoimmune disorders has been long known but, at the same time, largely understudied. However, studies have shown that the increased IgE concentration is not associated with higher prevalence for atopy and allergy in patients with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. IgE-mediated mechanisms are conventionally known to facilitate degranulation of mast cells and basophils and promote TH2 immunity, mechanisms that are not only central to mounting an appropriate defense against parasitic worms, noxious substances, toxins, venoms, and environmental irritants but that also trigger exuberant allergic reactions in patients with allergies. More recently, IgE autoantibodies have been recognized to participate in the self-inflicted damaging immune responses that characterize autoimmunity. Such autoimmune responses include direct damage on tissue-containing autoantigens, activation and migration of basophils to lymph nodes, and, as observed most recently, induction of type 1 interferon responses from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The importance of IgE as a central pathogenic mechanism in autoimmunity has now been clinically validated by the approval of omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, for patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria and for the clinical benefit of patients with bullous pemphigoid. In this review we summarize recent reports describing the prevalence of self-reactive IgE and discuss novel findings that incriminate IgE as central in the pathogenesis of inflammatory autoimmune disorders. PMID:27264000

  5.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life. PMID:27236159

  6. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben;

    2010-01-01

    Danish women with Turner's syndrome followed up for 12,461 person-years between 1980 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of first hospitalization for autoimmune disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: The overall risk of autoimmune...... disease among women with Turner's syndrome was twice that among Danish women in general (SIR 2.1 [95% CI 1.6-2.7]). For autoimmune diseases with a female predominance, the SIR among women with Turner's syndrome was 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.4), whereas the SIR for autoimmune diseases with a male predominance...... among these women was 3.9 (95% CI 2.5-5.8). Associations were strongest for Hashimoto thyroiditis (SIR 14.6 [95% CI 6.7-27.1]), a strongly female-predominant condition, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (SIR 4.1 [95% CI 2.5-6.3]). CONCLUSION: Women with Turner's syndrome are at excess risk of autoimmune...

  7. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    Inês Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT.

  8. Follicular helper T cell in immunity and autoimmunity

    D. Mesquita Jr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional concept that effector T helper (Th responses are mediated by Th1/Th2 cell subtypes has been broadened by the recent demonstration of two new effector T helper cells, the IL-17 producing cells (Th17 and the follicular helper T cells (Tfh. These new subsets have many features in common, such as the ability to produce IL-21 and to express the IL-23 receptor (IL23R, the inducible co-stimulatory molecule ICOS, and the transcription factor c-Maf, all of them essential for expansion and establishment of the final pool of both subsets. Tfh cells differ from Th17 by their ability to home to B cell areas in secondary lymphoid tissue through interactions mediated by the chemokine receptor CXCR5 and its ligand CXCL13. These CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells are considered an effector T cell type specialized in B cell help, with a transcriptional profile distinct from Th1 and Th2 cells. The role of Tfh cells and its primary product, IL-21, on B-cell activation and differentiation is essential for humoral immunity against infectious agents. However, when deregulated, Tfh cells could represent an important mechanism contributing to exacerbated humoral response and autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases. This review highlights the importance of Tfh cells by focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of normal immune response to infectious microorganisms and their role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  9. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês B.; Ferreira, Rogério; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT.

  10. Possible pathomechanism of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Prandota, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The hepatotropic viruses, measles, and herpesviruses as well as different drugs were repeatedly shown to act presumably as a trigger in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AI-H). On the other hand, it is known that viral infections stimulate interferon production, which inactivates the cytochrome P-450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of several endogenous substances and exogenous environmental agents. Moreover, it was reported that several cytokines, including interferons, as well as transforming growth factor beta1 and human hepatocyte growth factor, which are abundantly produced and released in the body during infections, also downregulated expression of major cytochrome P-450 and/or other biotransformation enzymes. It seems that all these factors, in addition to individual immune response and the nature and amount of the neoantigen(s) produced, impair the equilibrium of bioactivation and detoxication pathways, thus leading to the development of AI-H in a genetically predisposed person continually exposed to harmful environmental factor(s). Possible increased/decreased density of lysine residues at position D-related human leukocyte antigen locus (DR)beta71 of the antigen-binding groove may affect the eventual steroid-sparing effect of this critical amino acid at the cellular level. In addition, some food additives, such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and/or aspartame regularly consumed in excessive amounts, may eventually disturb the delicate balance between a positively charged amino acid residue at position DRbeta71 (lysine or arginine) and a negatively charged amino acid residue at position P4 on the antigenic peptide (glutamic acid or aspartic acid). This may favor formation of a salt bridge between these amino acid residues within the hypervariable region 3 on the alpha-helix of the DRbeta polypeptide and facilitate autoantigen presentation and CD4 T-helper cell activation. MSG and aspartate may also depress serum concentrations of growth hormone, which