WorldWideScience

Sample records for ablative materials

  1. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  2. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  3. Ablating and charring of heat shield materials

    Rahimian, M.H.; Shabani, M.R. [Univ. of Tehran, Faculty of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: rahimyan@ut.ac.ir; shubani@me.ut.ac.ir

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this research is to estimate ablating and charring of heat shield materials in severe aero thermal / erosive environments. This requires an accurate and rapid technique for its serious heat transfer with moving boundary. Aerodynamic heating is obtained by an explicit relation. Fully implicit method is used for heat transfer calculation. Moving boundary is captured by VOF method. Thickness of heat shield, temperature of moving surface and radiation heat is presented. The results are in good agreement with other calculations. (author)

  4. Ablating and charring of heat shield materials

    The objective of this research is to estimate ablating and charring of heat shield materials in severe aero thermal / erosive environments. This requires an accurate and rapid technique for its serious heat transfer with moving boundary. Aerodynamic heating is obtained by an explicit relation. Fully implicit method is used for heat transfer calculation. Moving boundary is captured by VOF method. Thickness of heat shield, temperature of moving surface and radiation heat is presented. The results are in good agreement with other calculations. (author)

  5. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm‑1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  6. Morphology Characterization of Uranium Particles From Laser Ablated Uranium Materials

    2011-01-01

    In the study, metallic uranium and uranium dioxide material were ablated by laser beam in order to simulate the process of forming the uranium particles in pyrochemical process. The morphology characteristic of uranium particles and the surface of

  7. Compatibility of dielectric and heat shield material combinations during ablations

    The surface recession and mass-transfer rates of materials suitable for reentry thermal protection of microwave antennas have been examined. Experiments were performed with subsonic-turbulent flow of air in a confined channel. In supporting experiments, selected material combinations were subjected to ablative splash tests in the Sandia High Enthalpy Arc Tunnel. Microwave window materials were tested adjacent to ablative heat shield materials in combinations and configurations under consideration for reentry vehicle applications. Test results indicated that fused silica was compatible with quartz-phenolic and carbon-phenolic heat shield materials while the ablative characteristics of hot-pressed boron nitride were very similar to those of the STC-7 carbon composite developed by Sandia Laboratories. (U.S.)

  8. Microscopic Scale Simulation of the Ablation of Fibrous Materials

    Lachaud, Jean Romain; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2010-01-01

    Ablation by oxidation of carbon-fiber preforms impregnated in carbonized phenolic matrix is modeled at microscopic scale. Direct numerical simulations show that the carbonized phenolic matrix ablates in volume leaving the carbon fibers exposed. This is due to the fact that the reactivity of carbonized phenolic is higher than the reactivity of carbon fibers. After the matrix is depleted, the fibers ablate showing progressive reduction of their diameter. The overall material recession occurs when the fibers are consumed. Two materials with the same carbon-fiber preform, density and chemical composition, but with different matrix distributions are studied. These studies show that at moderate temperatures (recession rate; a fact that is not captured by current models that are based on chemical composition only. Surprisingly, the response of these impregnated-fiber materials is weakly dependent on the microstructure at very high temperatures (e.g., Stardust peak heating conditions: 3360K).

  9. Permeability of ablative materials under rarefied gas conditions

    White, Craig; Scanlon, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical meshes of both cork and carbon fiber ablative materials in their virgin and pyrolized states, with realistic porosity and tortuosity, have been created from microcomputed tomography scans. The porosity of each material has been calculated from the microcomputed scans and used to extract smaller representative sample volumes to perform numerical simulations on. Direct simulation Monte Carlo simulations of rarefied gas flow through these materials have been performed to find the perme...

  10. Laser Ablation of Materials for Propulsion of Spacecraft

    Edwards, David L.; Carruth, Ralph; Campbell, Jonathan; Gray, Perry

    2004-01-01

    A report describes experiments performed as part of a continuing investigation of the feasibility of laser ablation of materials as a means of propulsion for small spacecraft. In each experiment, a specimen of ablative material was mounted on a torsion pendulum and irradiated with a laser pulse having an energy of 5 J. The amplitude of the resulting rotation of the torsion pendulum was taken to be an indication of the momentum transferred from the laser beam. Of the ablative materials tested, aluminum foils yielded the smallest rotation amplitudes of the order of 10 degrees. Black coating materials yielded rotation amplitudes of the order of 90 degrees. Samples of silver coated with a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) copolymer yielded the largest rotation amplitudes 6 to 8 full revolutions. The report presents a theory involving heating of a confined plasma followed by escape of the plasma to explain the superior momentum transfer performance of the FEP specimens. It briefly discusses some concepts for optimizing designs of spacecraft engines to maximize the thrust obtainable by exploiting the physical mechanisms of the theory. Also discussed is the use of laser-ablation engines with other types of spacecraft engines.

  11. Interfacial Design of Composite Ablative Materials Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project proposes the development of a computational software package to provide NASA with advanced materials...

  12. Bursting for enhanced ablation of materials

    Hendow, Sami; Rea, Edward; Kosa, Nadhir; Bengtsson, Magnus; Shakir, Sami

    2014-03-01

    A significant enhancement in the rate of material removal is demonstrated using a nanosecond-pulsed UV fiber laser in multi-pulsing burst mode, as compared to the case without bursting. Percussion drilling and scribing of thin-film and bulk material tests show that, in general, laser bursts with increased pulse count and reduced pulse spacing show higher rates of material removal. A considerable improvement in removal rate is demonstrated, when bursting is applied to scribing of mono-crystalline silicon (m-Si) and up to 30% in percussion drilling speed. Likewise, improved material removal is demonstrated for scribing of thin film of indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass or metal film on sapphire. Examples of material processing are given with and without bursting at similar experimental conditions of average power, scan speed, and burst/pulse energies. Experimental results included are for m-Si, ITO thin films on glass, and metal films on sapphire.

  13. Photogrammetric recession measurements of ablative materials in arcjets

    This paper describes an optical method for measuring the recession time histories of ablative thermal protection system (TPS) materials as they are tested in an arcjet facility. The method is non-intrusive and requires no external light source or modifications to the test article. It does require, first, a test article that exhibits texture as it ablates, and, second, high-resolution video images of the ablating surface from at least two directions. Software automatically reads the sequences of images and, by successive image cross correlation, tracks the deformation of a surface grid that conforms to the shape of the test article. Standard photogrammetric transformations are used to convert image-plane displacements of the surface grid to object-space displacements. The method yields a time history of the displacement of each node of the grid for the full time that the test article is exposed to the arcjet flow. Measurements have been made during many tests in the 60 MW arcjet at NASA Ames Research Center, including tests of TPS materials for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and Mars Science Laboratory. The photogrammetric recession measurements have been in good agreement with post-test measurements of the change in thickness of the test articles

  14. Laser Ablation Spectroscopy for Impurity Depth Profiling in Hot Wall Materials of Thermonuclear Fisuon reactors

    Jeļena Butikova

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT The main motivation of thesis work was showing the efficiency of the laser-induced ablation for analysis of the impurities in plasma facing components. The major tasks of the study are setting up and testing the equipment for laser ablation spectroscopy and developing methodology for impurity depth profiling. The thesis describes the investigation of the plasma facing materials of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak using laser-induced ablation spectroscopy and profilometry of ablation...

  15. Ablation mechanism study on metallic materials with a 10 ps laser under high fluence

    Single shot ablation of metallic materials of aluminium, titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and gold has been studied with 10 picoseconds (ps) laser pulses experimentally and theoretically. The ablation rate variation at high fluence was explained by a simplified predictive model based on critical-point phase separation (CPPS) theory. A comparison between experimental and numerical results inferred that CPPS may well be the dominant ablation mechanism for high fluence laser ablation at 10 ps laser duration.

  16. Intumescent-ablators as improved thermal protection materials

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    Nitroaromatic amine-based intumescent coatings were improved with regard to their thermal protection ability by adding endothermic decomposing fillers with endotherms at or near the exothermic reaction of the intumescent agent, since the effectiveness of the intumescent coatings without fillers is reduced by the exothermic behavior of the coatings during thermal activation. Fillers were dispersed directly in the base coating. Potassium fluoborate, ammonium fluoborate, zinc borate, and ammonium oxalate function as endothermic ablative materials at specific temperature regions, and also enhance the char formation during the intumescent process.

  17. Analysis of fabric materials cut using ultraviolet laser ablation

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Andrew Yeh, J.

    2016-04-01

    Laser ablation technology has widely been applied in the clothing industry in recent years. However, the laser mechanism would affect the quality of fabric contours and its components. Hence, this study examined carbonization and oxidation conditions and contour variation in nonwoven, cotton, and composite leather fabrics cut by using an ultraviolet laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. Processing parameters such as laser power, pulse frequency, scanning speed, and number of pulses per spot were adjusted to investigate component variation of the materials and to determine suitable cutting parameters for the fabrics. The experimental results showed that the weights of the component changed substantially by pulse frequency but slightly by laser power, so pulse frequency of 100 kHz and laser power of 14 W were the approximate parameters for three fabrics for the smaller carbonization and a sufficient energy for rapidly cutting, which the pulse duration of laser system was fixed at 300 μs and laser irradiance was 0.98 J/mm2 simultaneously. In addition, the etiolate phenomenon of nonwoven was reduced, and the component weight of cotton and composite leather was closed to the value of knife-cut fabric as the scanning speed increased. The approximate scanning speed for nonwoven and composite leather was 200 mm/s, and one for cotton was 150 mm/s, respectively. The sharper and firmer edge is obtained by laser ablation mechanism in comparison with traditional knife cutting. Experimental results can serve as the reference for laser cutting in the clothing industry, for rapidly providing smoother patterns with lower carbonization and oxidation edge in the fashion industry.

  18. Remote Recession Sensing of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    Winter, Michael W.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Gonzales, Gregory Lewis; Ho, Thanh

    2014-01-01

    Material recession and charring are two major processes determining the performance of ablative heat shield materials. Even in ground testing, the characterization of these two mechanisms relies on measurements of material thickness before and after testing, thus providing only information integrated over the test time. For recession measurements, optical methods such as imaging the sample surface during testing are under investigation but require high alignment and instrument effort, therefore being not established as a standard measurement method. For char depth measurements, the most common method so far consists in investigation of sectioned samples after testing or in the case of Stardust where core extractions were performed to determine char information. In flight, no reliable recession measurements are available, except total recession after recovering the heat shield on ground. Developments of mechanical recession sensors have been started but require substantial on board instrumentation adding mass and complexity. In this work, preliminary experiments to evaluate the feasibility of remote sensing of material recession and possibly char depth through optically observing the emission signatures of seeding materials in the post shock plasma is investigated. It is shown that this method can provide time resolved recession measurements without the necessity of accurate alignment procedures of the optical set-up and without any instrumentation on board of a spacecraft. Furthermore, recession data can be obtained without recovering flight hardware which would be a huge benefit for inexpensive heat shield material testing on board of small re-entry probes, e.g. on new micro-satellite re-entry probes as a possible future application of Cubesats or RBR

  19. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of laser-ablated materials

    An annealing model is extended to treat the vaporization process, and a hydrodynamic model describes the ablated material. We find that dynamic source and ionization effects accelerate the expansion front of the ablated plume with thermal vaporization temperature. The vaporization process and plume propagation in high background gas pressure are studied

  20. Nuclear radiation effects on the ablation performance of advanced composite heatshield materials

    Results are presented from experiments to define the influence of simulated nuclear radiation damage on the ablation response of carbon-phenolic materials. Tests were conducted in a 50 MW arc jet facility. Several damaging methods were used and the effects of material properties were studied. The data were used to refine theoretical models of the ablation response. Effects of nonisothermal thermocouple measurements and material expansion due to outgassing and delamination are included. Results show that the ablation response is critically dependent upon the char layer expansion characteristics and material properties are shown to have a significant influence. The effect of the simulated nuclear damage on the ablation performance of these materials is negligible

  1. Preparation of Nanostructurated Materials by ArF Laser Ablation

    Koštejn, Martin; Fajgar, Radek; Tomovska, R.; Blazevska-Gilev, J.

    -: -, 2014, s. 243. ISBN N. [International Conference on Nanosciences & Nanotechnologie (NN13) /10./. Thessaloniki (GR), 09.07.2014-12.07.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : laser ablation * electron diffraction * spectroscopy Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry

  2. Potential of short wavelength laser ablation of organic materials

    Jonathan S. Watson; Sestak, Stephen; Sherlock, Sarah; Greenwood, Paul F.; Fuentes, David

    2009-01-01

    Although the literature contains several articles on UV laser ablation of synthetic polymers [1] and human tissue for surgical applications, to our knowledge there is no published record on organic geochemical applications for UV laser pyrolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (LA-GC-MS). In this study we have demonstrated the use of a 213 nm UV laser beam for ablating kerogens and organic rich rocks to liberate and analyse hydrocarbon signatures and compared the results against IR laser...

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J., E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  4. Laser ablation characteristics of metallic materials: Role of Debye-Waller thermal parameter

    The interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a solid target results in the formation of a crater and a plasma plume. The characteristics of both depend on physical properties of target material, environmental conditions, and laser parameters (e.g. wavelength, pulse duration, energy, beam diameter) etc. It has been shown for numerous metals and their alloys that plasma threshold fluence, plasma threshold energy, ablation efficiency, ablation yield, angular distribution of laser produced plasma (LPP) ions, etc. are a unique function of the Debye-Waller thermal parameter B or the mean-square amplitude of atomic vibration of the target material for given experimental conditions. The FWHM of the angular distribution of LPP ions, ablation yield, and ablation efficiency increase whereas plasma threshold fluence and plasma threshold energy decrease as B-factor of the target material increases

  5. Analysis and removal of ITER relevant materials and deposits by laser ablation

    The analysis of the deposition of eroded wall material on the plasma-facing materials in fusion devices is one of the crucial issues to maintain the plasma performance and to fulfill safety requirements with respect to tritium retention by co-deposition. Laser ablation with minimal damage to the plasma facing material is a promising method for in situ monitoring and removal of the deposition, especially for plasma-shadowed areas which are difficult to reach by other cleaning methods like plasma discharge. It requires the information of ablation process and the ablation threshold for quantitative analysis and effective removal of the different deposits. This paper presents systemic laboratory experimental analysis of the behavior of the ITER relevant materials, graphite, tungsten, aluminum (as a substitution of beryllium) and mixed deposits ablated by a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with different energy densities (1–27 J/cm2, power density 0.3–3.9 GW/cm2). The mixed deposits consisted of W–Al–C layer were deposited on W substrate by magnetron sputtering and arc plasma deposition. The aim was to select the proper parameters for the quantitative analysis and for laser removal of the deposits by investigating the ablation efficiency and ablation threshold for the bulk materials and deposits. The comparison of the ablation and saturation energy thresholds for pure and mixed materials shows that the ablation threshold of the mixed layer depends on the concentration of the components. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of the elemental composition of deposits and then we select the laser parameters for the layer removal. Comparison of quantitative analysis results from laboratory to that from TEXTOR shows reasonable agreements. The dependence of the spectra on plasma parameters and ambient gas pressure is investigated

  6. Endometrial ablation

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  7. Comparative study of the ablation of materials by femtosecond and pico- or nanosecond laser pulses

    A series of studies was carried out on the ablation of steel, Si3N4 ceramic, and diamond in air by femtosecond (200 and 900 fs) pulses of different wavelengths (532 and 266 nm) and in a wide energy density range (1 - 103 J cm-2 ). The ablation rates were measured for different geometries of the irradiation surface [a shallow crater and a channel with a high (up to 10) aspect ratio]. The ablation rates (in a shallow crater) and the morphologies of the irradiated surface were compared for femtosecond and longer (220 ps, 7 ns) pulses. The role of the laser-generated plasma in the ablation of materials by subpicosecond pulses as well as the prospects for the practical application of ultrashort laser pulses in the processing of materials are analysed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  8. Estimation of surface heat flux for ablation and charring of thermal protection material

    Qian, Wei-qi; He, Kai-feng; Zhou, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ablation of the thermal protection material of the reentry hypersonic flight vehicle is a complex physical and chemical process. To estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurement is much more complex than the conventional inverse heat conduction problem case. In the paper, by utilizing a two-layer pyrogeneration-plane ablation model to model the ablation and charring of the material, modifying the finite control volume method to suit for the numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with variable-geometry, the CGM along with the associated adjoint problem is developed to estimate the surface heat flux. This estimation method is verified with a numerical example at first, the results show that the estimation method is feasible and robust. The larger is the measurement noise, the greater is the deviation of the estimated result from the exact value, and the measurement noise of ablated surface position has a significant and more direct influence on the estimated result of surface heat flux. Furthermore, the estimation method is used to analyze the experimental data of ablation of blunt Carbon-phenolic material Narmco4028 in an arc-heater. It is shown that the estimated surface heat flux agrees with the heating power value of the arc-heater, and the estimation method is basically effective and potential to treat the engineering heat conduction problem with ablation.

  9. Material properties of lithium fluoride for predicting XUV laser ablation rate and threshold fluence

    Blejchař, Tomáś; Nevrlý, Václav; Vašinek, Michal; Dostál, Michal; Pečínka, Lukáś; Dlabka, Jakub; Stachoň, Martin; Juha, Libor; Bitala, Petr; Zelinger, Zdeněk.; Pira, Peter; Wild, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with prediction of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser ablation of lithium fluoride at nanosecond timescales. Material properties of lithium fluoride were determined based on bibliographic survey. These data are necessary for theoretical estimation of surface removal rate in relevance to XUV laser desorption/ablation process. Parameters of XUV radiation pulses generated by the Prague capillary-discharge laser (CDL) desktop system were assumed in this context. Prediction of ablation curve and threshold laser fluence for lithium fluoride was performed employing XUV-ABLATOR code. Quasi-random sampling approach was used for evaluating its predictive capabilities in the means of variance and stability of model outputs in expected range of uncertainties. These results were compared to experimental data observed previously.

  10. Off-Hugoniot characterization of alternative inertial confinement fusion ablator materials.

    Moore, Alastair S.; Prisbrey, Shon; Baker, Kevin L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Fry, Jonathan; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Wu, Kuang-Jen J.; Kervin, Margaret L.; Schoff, Michael E.; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Hurricane, Omar A.

    2016-05-01

    The ablation material used during the National Ignition Campaign, a glow- discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple- shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile [1]. We investigate the performance of two other ablators, boron carbide (B4C) and high-density carbon (HDC) and compare with GDP under the same hohlraum conditions. Ablation performance is determined through measurement of the shock speed produced in planar samples of the ablator subjected to the identical multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environments that are similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. Simulations are in better agreement with the off-Hugoniot performance of B4C than either HDC or GDP.

  11. Experiment and analysis of ablation and condensation in NIF first wall materials

    Experiments were performed on Nova at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the ablation and condensation process of National Ignition Facility (NIF) first wall materials. Plates of candidate first wall materials (SiO2, B4, and Al2O3) were exposed to x-rays from hohlraums in the Nova chamber. Ablated material was collected and measured on a receiving plate which was blocked form direct x-ray exposure. This article presents the results form these experiments and comparisons with predictions from numerical simulations The net condensation flux was calculated using the TSUNAMI code, which was modified to incorporate the feature of condensation boundaries

  12. Comparison of Ablation Predictions for Carbonaceous Materials Using CEA and JANAF-Based Species Thermodynamics

    Milos, Frank S.

    2011-01-01

    In most previous work at NASA Ames Research Center, ablation predictions for carbonaceous materials were obtained using a species thermodynamics database developed by Aerotherm Corporation. This database is derived mostly from the JANAF thermochemical tables. However, the CEA thermodynamics database, also used by NASA, is considered more up to date. In this work, the FIAT code was modified to use CEA-based curve fits for species thermodynamics, then analyses using both the JANAF and CEA thermodynamics were performed for carbon and carbon phenolic materials over a range of test conditions. The ablation predictions are comparable at lower heat fluxes where the dominant mechanism is carbon oxidation. However, the predictions begin to diverge in the sublimation regime, with the CEA model predicting lower recession. The disagreement is more significant for carbon phenolic than for carbon, and this difference is attributed to hydrocarbon species that may contribute to the ablation rate.

  13. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  14. Characterization of Candidate Materials for Remote Recession Measurements of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    Butler, Bradley D.; Winter, Michael; Panerai, Francesco; Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Danehy, Paul M.; Splinter, Scott

    2016-01-01

    A method of remotely measuring surface recession of a material sample in a plasma flow through emission spectroscopy of the post shock layer was characterized through experiments in the NASA Langley HYMETS arc jet facility. Different methods for delivering the seed products into the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) material samples were investigated. Three samples were produced by seeding the PICA material with combinations of Al, Si, HfO2, VB2, Al2O3, SiO2, TiC, HfC, NaCl, and MgCl2 through infusing seed materials into a core of PICA, or through encapsulating seed material in an epoxy disk, mechanically bonding the disk to a PICA sample. The PICA samples seeded with the candidate tracers were then tested at surface temperatures near 2400 K under low pressure air plasma. The emission of Al, Ti, V, Na, and Mg in the post-shock layer was observed in the UV with a high resolution imaging spectrometer viewing the whole stagnation line from the side, and from UV to NIR with a fiber-coupled miniaturized spectrometer observing the sample surface in the wavelength range from 200 nm to 1,100 nm from the front through a collimator. Al, Na, and Mg were found to be emitting in the post-shock spectra even before the recession reached the seeding depth - therefore possibly characterizing the pyrolysis process rather than the recession itself. The appearance of Ti and V emission in the spectra was well correlated with the actual recession which was monitored through a video of the front surface of the sample. The applicability of a seed material as an indicator for recession appears to be related to the melting temperature of the seed material. Future parametric studies will be carried out in low power plasma facilities at the University of Kentucky.

  15. Preparation of nano-sized functional materials using laser ablation in liquids

    We propose a convenient technique applicable for investigations of various functions of nanoparticles produced by laser ablation in liquids. It was demonstrated that nanoparticles of anatase-TiO2, a electrode material for lithium secondary batteries, produced by laser ablation in acetone could be efficiently deposited on a substrate by using an electrophoresis technique. Analysis of the electrochemical properties of nanoparticles become much more facile with those deposited nanoparticles than with dispersed nanoparticles. In addition, it was demonstrated that comparison of the electrochemical properties between nanoparticles and microparticles were possible by means of this technique.

  16. Investigation of plumes produced by material ablation with two time-delayed femtosecond laser pulses

    We experimentally investigated and herewith reported the results of laser ablation of copper and gold with two time-delayed femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm in vacuum. The ablation plume dynamic was monitored by fast plume imaging and time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. Optical microscopy was used to follow the ablation depth as a function of the delay between the two laser pulses. Nanoparticles deposition on mica substrates was analysed by atomic force microscopy. We estimate roughly the plume's atomization degree - that is the mass fraction of atomized material over the total ablated mass - from the relative intensities of radiation emitted from atoms and nanoparticles. It is shown that the atomization degree depends critically on the time delay between both laser pulses and on the characteristic time of electron-lattice relaxation. The increase of the atomization degree is accompanied by the decrease of the ablation depth. Atomic force microscopy measurements confirm the partial atomization of nanoparticles, as the analyses of particle deposition on mica substrates show a large decrease of the number of nanoparticles for large delay between the two pulses.

  17. Low-order harmonic generation in nanosecond laser ablation plasmas of carbon containing materials

    In this work we report on a systematic study of the spatiotemporal behaviour of low-order harmonics generated in nanosecond laser ablation plasmas of carbon containing materials. Plasmas were generated from targets of graphite and boron carbide ablated with a nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Low-order harmonics (3rd and 5th) of the fundamental wavelength of a ns Nd:YAG driving laser, propagating perpendicularly to the ablation laser at variable time delays, were observed. The temporal study of the low-order harmonics generated under vacuum and atmospheres of Kr and Xe, revealed the presence of two populations that contribute to the harmonic generation (HG) at different times. It was found that under vacuum only small species contribute to the HG process, whereas under buffer gas, heavier species, such as clusters and nanoparticles, contribute to the HG at longer times. Optical emission spectroscopy, time of flight mass spectrometry and characterization of deposits collected on-line on a nearby substrate provided additional information that complemented the results of the spatiotemporal study of the generated harmonics. This approach to ablation plume analysis allows elucidating the identity of the nonlinear emitters in laser ablation plasmas and facilitates the investigation of efficient, nanoparticle-enhanced, coherent short wavelength generation processes.

  18. Production of nanodispersed materials and thin films by laser ablation techniques in liquid and in vacuum

    The methods of laser ablation of chemical compounds in a liquid medium and in vacuum used for the production of highly dispersed materials and films, respectively, are considered. Features and advantages of these methods are noted and the potential of their application for the design of novel materials is discussed. Examples of application of these methods in scientific research are given. The bibliography includes 177 references.

  19. Experiment and analysis of ablation and condensation in NIF first wall materials

    Jin, H.; Peterson, P.F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Turner, R.E.; Anderson, A.T.

    1996-06-14

    Experiments were performed on Nova at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the ablation and condensation process of National Ignition Facility (NIF) first wall materials. Plates of candidate first wall materials (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 4}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were exposed to x-rays from hohlraums in the Nova chamber. Ablated material was collected and measured on a receiving plate which was blocked form direct x-ray exposure. This article presents the results form these experiments and comparisons with predictions from numerical simulations The net condensation flux was calculated using the TSUNAMI code, which was modified to incorporate the feature of condensation boundaries.

  20. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  1. Equations of State for Ablator Materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion Simulations

    Sterne, P. A.; Benedict, L. X.; Hamel, S.; Correa, A. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Fratanduono, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the development of the tabular equation of state (EOS) models for ablator materials in current use at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in simulations of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We illustrate the methods with a review of current models for ablator materials and discuss some of the challenges in performing hydrocode simulations with high-fidelity multiphase models. We stress the importance of experimental data, as well as the utility of ab initio electronic structure calculations, in regions where data is not currently available. We illustrate why Hugoniot data alone is not sufficient to constrain the EOS models. These cases illustrate the importance of experimental EOS data in multi-megabar regimes, and the vital role they play in the development and validation of EOS models for ICF simulations.

  2. A FULLY IMPLICIT MATERIAL RESPONSE CODE WITH ABLATION AND PYROLYSIS FOR SIMULATION OF THERMAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS

    D'Ambrosio, Domenic; Dal Bianco, Alessandra; Mareschi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce and describe a 2-D fully implicit numerical simulation tool capable of evaluating the behaviour of an ablative charring thermal protection system during atmospheric entry. In particular, the computational tool can model the heat transfer inside a solid porous material and the decomposition of the latter, pyrolysis gas density, pressure and speed distributions and surface recession. The governing equations are fully coupled and are integrated using a t...

  3. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E.

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  4. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron.

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  5. Obtaining and characterization of composite material base on ablative phenolic resin and carbon fibers

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2002-01-01

    In this master paper is optimized a technological treatment for production of a molding compound based on short carbon fibers and ablative phenol- formaldehyde resin for high temperature application. The characterization of the starting raw materials is performed and molding compounds with different fiber/matrix ratio and different fiber length are obtained. From the different lab-samples molded parts are made by thermocompression. All physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the co...

  6. A simulation-based and analytic analysis of the off-Hugoniot response of alternative inertial confinement fusion ablator materials

    Moore, Alastair S.; Prisbrey, Shon; Baker, Kevin L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Fry, Jonathan; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Wu, Kuang-Jen J.; Kervin, Margaret L.; Schoff, Michael E.; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Hurricane, Omar A.

    2016-09-01

    The attainment of self-propagating fusion burn in an inertial confinement target at the National Ignition Facility will require the use of an ablator with high rocket-efficiency and ablation pressure. The ablation material used during the National Ignition Campaign (Lindl et al. 2014) [1], a glow-discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile (Robey et al., 2012). We investigate the performance of two other ablators, boron carbide (B4C) and high-density carbon (HDC) compared to the performance of GDP under the same hohlraum conditions. Ablation performance is determined through measurement of the shock speed produced in planar samples of the ablator material subjected to the identical multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environments that are similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. Simulations are in better agreement with the off-Hugoniot performance of B4C than either HDC or GDP, and analytic estimations of the ablation pressure indicate that while the pressure produced by B4C and GDP is similar when the ablator is allowed to release, the pressure reached by B4C seems to exceed that of HDC when backed by a Au/quartz layer.

  7. Ablation by-products of dental materials from the Er:YAG laser and the dental handpiece

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    Recently there has been much interest in lasers and their potential use to replace the dental drill. The research has been directed towards vital dental tissues. It must be understood that any laser to be used in dentistry which will replace the dental drill must also ablate and remove existing dental materials. Some concern exists about the ablation products when the Er:YAG laser is used to ablate dental materials. It is incumbent on the professionals using these lasers to understand the materials being produced by these lasers and protect themselves and their patients from possible toxic products. It is the intent of this paper to evaluate the products produced by the ablation of both dental amalgam and composite dental restorative materials and compare them with those produced by the traditional dental handpiece (drill).

  8. An experimental research to study the microwaves transmission characteristics of ablating material in arc-heated plasma flow

    An experimental research about the effect of ablating material on the reflection and the transmission of microwaves in arc-heated plasma flow is presented by using the C band microwave measuring system. The results show that the ablating material with accidented surface and its high temperature have remarkably affected the reflection and the transmission of microwaves. The experiment proves that the system has outstanding precision and reliability

  9. Multiscale Modeling of Ablation and Pyrolysis in PICA-Like materials

    Lachaud, Jean; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2008-01-01

    During atmospheric entry of planetary probes, the thermal protection system (TIPS) of the probe is exposed to high temperatures under low pressures. In these conditions, carbonous fibrous TIPS materials may undergo oxidation leading to mass loss and wall recession called ablation. This work aims to improve the understanding of material/environment interactions through a study of the coupling between oxygen transport in the Knudsen regime, heterogeneous oxidation of carbon, and surface recession. A 3D Random Walk Monte Carlo simulation tool is used for this study. The fibrous architecture of a model material, consisting of high porosity random array of carbon fibers, is numerically represented on a 3D Cartesian grid. Mass transport in the Knudsen regime from the boundary layer to the surface, and inside this porous material is simulated by random walk. A reaction probability is used to simulate the heterogeneous oxidation reaction. The surface recession of the fibers is followed by front tracking using a simplified marching cube approach. The output data of the simulations are ablation velocity and dynamic evolution of the material porosity. A parametric study is carried out to analyze the material behavior as a function of Knudsen number for the porous media (length of the mean free path compared to the mean pore diameter) and the intrinsic reactivity of the carbon fibers. The model is applied to Stardust mission reentry conditions and explains the unexpected behavior of the TIPS material that underwent mass loss in volume.

  10. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of the laser-ablated materials

    Rapid transformations through the liquid and vapor phases induced by laser-solid interactions are described by the authors' thermal model with the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to determine the vaporization temperature under different surface pressure condition. Hydrodynamic behavior of the vapor during and after ablation is described by gas dynamic equations. These two models are coupled. Modeling results show that lower background pressure results lower laser energy density threshold for vaporization. The ablation rate and the amount of materials removed are proportional to the laser energy density above its threshold. The authors also demonstrate a dynamic source effect that accelerates the unsteady expansion of laser-ablated material in the direction perpendicular to the solid. A dynamic partial ionization effect is studied as well. A self-similar theory shows that the maximum expansion velocity is proportional to csα, where 1 - α is the slope of the velocity profile. Numerical hydrodynamic modeling is in good agreement with the theory. With these effects, α is reduced. Therefore, the expansion front velocity is significantly higher than that from conventional models. The results are consistent with experiments. They further study how the plume propagates in high background gas condition. Under appropriate conditions, the plume is slowed down, separates with the background, is backward moving, and hits the solid surface. Then, it splits into two parts when it rebounds from the surface. The results from the modeling will be compared with experimental observations where possible

  11. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: carlos.molpeceres@upm.es; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J. [Dept. de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J. [CeRMAE Dept. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  12. Three-dimensional thermal simulation of nanosecond laser ablation for semitransparent material

    Ahn, Junsu, E-mail: junsuahn@kaist.ac.kr; Na, Suck-Joo, E-mail: sjna@kaist.ac.kr

    2013-10-15

    A numerical study of nanosecond laser ablation process for semitransparent material was performed. A heat source model using ray tracing is suggested for three-dimensional simulations of laser material processing based on the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. The model is capable to describe both the ray transmission into the material and the reflections from the material surface. In the computational implementation of the model, a stochastic approach was introduced to avoid the recursive branching of an incident ray into transmitted and reflected rays. Since the ray tracing highly depends on the shape of the target material, proper surface reconstruction method is also considered. For the spatially continuous representation of the free surface of the material, the piecewise linear surface of the VOF method was converted into the level set surface reconstructed by the interpolation of the signed distance function. The applicability of the model was validated by example simulations and experiments on polyimide workpiece with nanosecond laser.

  13. Non-Intrusive Sensor for In-Situ Measurement of Recession Rate of Ablative and Eroding Materials

    Papadopoulos, George (Inventor); Tiliakos, Nicholas (Inventor); Benel, Gabriel (Inventor); Thomson, Clint (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A non-intrusive sensor for in-situ measurement of recession rate of heat shield ablatives. An ultrasonic wave source is carried in the housing. A microphone is also carried in the housing, for collecting the reflected ultrasonic waves from an interface surface of the ablative material. A time phasing control circuit is also included for time-phasing the ultrasonic wave source so that the waves reflected from the interface surface of the ablative material focus on the microphone, to maximize the acoustic pressure detected by the microphone and to mitigate acoustic velocity variation effects through the material through a de-coupling process that involves a software algorithm. A software circuit for computing the location off of which the ultrasonic waves scattered to focus back at the microphone is also included, so that the recession rate of the heat shield ablative may be monitored in real-time through the scan-focus approach.

  14. Degradation of carbon-based materials under ablative conditions produced by a high enthalpy plasma jet

    Gilberto Petraconi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A stationary experiment was performed to study the degradation of carbon-based materials by immersion in a plasma jet. In the experiment, graphite and C/C composite were chosen as the target materials, and the reactive plasma jet was generated by an air plasma torch. For macroscopic study of the material degradation, the sample’s mass losses were measured as function of the exposure time under various temperatures on the sample surface. A microscopic analysis was then carried out for the study of microscopic aspects of the erosion of material surface. These experiments showed that the mass loss per unit area is approximately proportional to the exposure time and strongly depends on the temperature of the material surface. The mass erosion rate of graphite was appreciably higher than the C/C composite. The ablation rate in the carbon matrix region in C/C composite was also noticeably higher than that in the fiber region. In addition, the latter varied according to the orientation of fibers relatively to the flow direction. These tests indicated an excellent ablation resistance of the C/C composite, thus being a reliable material for rocket nozzles and heat shielding elements of the protection systems of hypersonic apparatuses from aerodynamic heating.

  15. Lightweight Ablative and Ceramic Thermal Protection System Materials for NASA Exploration Systems Vehicles

    Valentine, Peter G.; Lawrence, Timothy W.; Gubert, Michael K.; Milos, Frank S.; Kiser, James D.; Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Koenig, John R.

    2006-01-01

    As a collaborative effort among NASA Centers, the "Lightweight Nonmetallic Thermal Protection Materials Technology" Project was set up to assist mission/vehicle design trade studies, to support risk reduction in thermal protection system (TPS) material selections, to facilitate vehicle mass optimization, and to aid development of human-rated TPS qualification and certification plans. Missions performing aerocapture, aerobraking, or direct aeroentry rely on advanced heatshields that allow reductions in spacecraft mass by minimizing propellant requirements. Information will be presented on candidate materials for such reentry approaches and on screening tests conducted (material property and space environmental effects tests) to evaluate viable candidates. Seventeen materials, in three classes (ablatives, tiles, and ceramic matrix composites), were studied. In additional to physical, mechanical, and thermal property tests, high heat flux laser tests and simulated-reentry oxidation tests were performed. Space environmental effects testing, which included exposures to electrons, atomic oxygen, and hypervelocity impacts, was also conducted.

  16. Laser ablation in liquids as a new technique of sampling in elemental analysis of solid materials

    Laser ablation in liquid media is considered as a new sample preparation technique in the elemental composition analysis of materials using optical emission spectroscopy of inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). Solid samples are transformed into uniform colloidal solutions of nanosized analyte particles using laser radiation focused onto the sample surface. High homogeneity of the resulting solution allows performing the ICP-OES quantitative analysis especially for the samples, which are poorly soluble in acids. The technique is compatible with the conventional solution-based standards

  17. Experimental performance of an ablative material as an external insulator for a hypersonic research aircraft

    Puster, R. L.; Chapman, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    An ablative material composed of silica-filled elastomeric silicone was tested to evaluate its thermal and structural performance as an external insulator, or heat shield, for a hypersonic research aircraft. The material was also tested to determine whether it would form a durable char layer when initially heated and thereafter function primarily as an insulator with little further pyrolysis or char removal. Aerothermal tests were representative of nominal Mach 6 cruise conditions of the aircraft, and additional tests were representative of Mach 8 cruise and interference heating conditions. Radiant heating tests were used to simulate the complete nominal Mach 6 surface-temperature history. The silica char that formed during aerothermal tests was not durable. The char experienced a general and preferential surface recession, with the primary mechanism for char removal being erosion. Tests revealed that radiant heating is not a valid technique for simulating aerodynamic heating of the material.

  18. Characterization of material ablation driven by laser generated intense extreme ultraviolet light

    Tanaka, Nozomi; Masuda, Masaya; Deguchi, Ryo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Sunahara, Atsushi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    We present a comparative study on the hydrodynamic behaviour of plasmas generated by material ablation by the irradiation of nanosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV or XUV) or infrared laser pulses on solid samples. It was clarified that the difference in the photon energy deposition and following material heating mechanism between these two lights result in the difference in the plasma parameters and plasma expansion characteristics. Silicon plate was ablated by either focused intense EUV pulse (λ = 9-25 nm, 10 ns) or laser pulse (λ = 1064 nm, 10 ns), both with an intensity of ˜109 W/cm2. Both the angular distributions and energy spectra of the expanding ions revealed that the photoionized plasma generated by the EUV light differs significantly from that produced by the laser. The laser-generated plasma undergoes spherical expansion, whereas the EUV-generated plasma undergoes planar expansion in a comparatively narrow angular range. It is presumed that the EUV radiation is transmitted through the expanding plasma and directly photoionizes the samples in the solid phase, consequently forming a high-density and high-pressure plasma. Due to a steep pressure gradient along the direction of the target normal, the EUV plasma expands straightforward resulting in the narrower angular distribution observed.

  19. Characterization of material ablation driven by laser generated intense extreme ultraviolet light

    Tanaka, Nozomi, E-mail: tanaka-n@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Masuda, Masaya; Deguchi, Ryo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-09-14

    We present a comparative study on the hydrodynamic behaviour of plasmas generated by material ablation by the irradiation of nanosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV or XUV) or infrared laser pulses on solid samples. It was clarified that the difference in the photon energy deposition and following material heating mechanism between these two lights result in the difference in the plasma parameters and plasma expansion characteristics. Silicon plate was ablated by either focused intense EUV pulse (λ = 9–25 nm, 10 ns) or laser pulse (λ = 1064 nm, 10 ns), both with an intensity of ∼10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2}. Both the angular distributions and energy spectra of the expanding ions revealed that the photoionized plasma generated by the EUV light differs significantly from that produced by the laser. The laser-generated plasma undergoes spherical expansion, whereas the EUV-generated plasma undergoes planar expansion in a comparatively narrow angular range. It is presumed that the EUV radiation is transmitted through the expanding plasma and directly photoionizes the samples in the solid phase, consequently forming a high-density and high-pressure plasma. Due to a steep pressure gradient along the direction of the target normal, the EUV plasma expands straightforward resulting in the narrower angular distribution observed.

  20. Multidisciplinary approach to materials selection for bipropellant thrusters using ablative and radiative cooling

    A Adami; M Mortazavi; M Nosratollahi

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of costs is a main consideration in every space mission, and propulsion system is an important subsystem of those missions where orbital maneuvers are considered. Lighter propulsions with higher performance are necessary to reduce the mission costs. Bipropellant propulsions have been widely used in launch vehicles and upper-stages as well as deorbit modules because of better performances in comparison with other propulsion systems. Unfortunately heat transfer and thermal control limit bipropellant propulsion performance and maximum performance cannot be achieved. Well-known cooling methods such as regenerative and film cooling increase the cost using extra equipment and high temperature materials. In this paper, a new approach for cooling is presented based on combined ablative and radiative cooling. Governing equations are derived for two or three layers of thermal protection system (TPS) to optimize the TPS mass. The first layer is used as an ablative layer to control the temperature where the second and third layers are used as an insulator to control the heat fluxes. Proposed cooling method has been applied for two real bipropellant thrusters. According to the results, the presented algorithm can suitably predict the heat fluxes and satisfy the wall temperature constraint. Then, the algorithm has been used to minimize the wall temperatures as low as possible and replace high temperature materials (platinum alloy) with common materials (composite or steel). It is shown that selection of TPS materials affects the TPS mass and Isp simultaneously, but conversely. Best solution should be derived by trading off between structure temperature (cost), Isp (performance), and TPS thicknesses (geometry). Multidisciplinary approach to TPS and structure material selection of a bipropellant thruster is presented for a case study. It has been shown that mass and performance penalties of using TPS are acceptable, considering the advantages of using steel alloy instead

  1. Laser ablation of electronic materials including the effects of energy coupling and plasma interactions

    Zeng, Xianzhong

    2004-01-01

    Many laser ablation applications such as laser drilling and micromachining generate cavity structures. The study of laser ablation inside a cavity is of both fundamental and practical significance. In this dissertation, cavities with different aspect ratios (depth/diameter) were fabricated in fused silica by laser micromachining. Pulsed laser ablation in the cavities was studied and compared with laser ablation on a flat surface. The formation of laser-induced plasmas in the cavities and...

  2. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  3. Modeling Initial Stage of Ablation Material Pyrolysis: Graphitic Precursor Formation and Interfacial Effects

    Desai, Tapan G.; Lawson, John W.; Keblinski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    Reactive molecular dynamics simulations are used to study initial stage of pyrolysis of ablation materials and their composites with carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers. The products formed during pyrolysis are characterized and water is found as the primary product in all cases. The water formation mechanisms are analyzed and the value of the activation energy for water formation is estimated. A detailed study on graphitic precursor formation reveals the presence of two temperature zones. In the lower temperature zone (less than 2000 K) polymerization occurs resulting in formation of large, stable graphitic precursors, and in the high temperature zone (greater than 2000 K) polymer scission results in formation of short polymer chains/molecules. Simulations performed in the high temperature zone on the phenolic resin composites (with carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers) shows that the presence of interfaces had no substantial effect on the chain scission rate or the activation energy value for water formation.

  4. Dynamic materials evaluation by confined plasma ablation and laser-generated shocks

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Swift, D. C.; Forsman, A. C.; Kyrala, George A.; Johnson, Randall P.; Kopp, Roger A.; Hauer, Allan A.; Wark, Justin S.; Loveridge, A.; Allen, A. M.; Kalantar, Daniel H.

    2000-08-01

    Laser-generated shocks can and have been used to study their effects on single crystal materials during shock compression. While a crystal undergoes shock compression and release, the transient x- ray diffraction (TXD) of the Bragg and Laue signals is indicative of the change in the crystal lattice spacing. The lattice spacing directly relates to the strain in the crystal. From the dynamic lattice data, strain, strain rate, and/or phase change in a material may be determined. Confined ablation plasmas can efficiently launch a flyer plate for direct impact on a target material imparting a well-characterized shock input and generate kilobar to megabar pressure pulses over a wide range of pulse duration (EQ 1 - >= 20 ns). The laser-launched flyer plates are analogous to those launched by gas guns, but the smaller size provides an experimental method not easily accessible by larger gas gun experiments. With lasers, diagnostic equipment can be easily synchronized to study dynamic material parameters, i.e., single crystal shock dynamics, interfacial bond strengths of thin coatings, grain-interfaces, texture, and high strain rates (106 - 109 sec-1).

  5. Modeling and experiments of x-ray ablation of National Ignition Facility first wall materials

    This paper discusses results of modeling and experiments on the x-ray response of selected materials relevant to NIF target chamber design. X-ray energy deposition occurs in such small characteristic depths (on the order of a micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion significantly affect the material response, even during the typical 10-ns pulses. The finite-difference ablation model integrates four separate processes: x-ray energy deposition, heat conduction, hydrodynamics, and surface vaporization. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser facility in Livermore on response of various materials to NIF-relevant x-ray fluences. Fused silica, Si nitride, B carbide, B, Si carbide, C, Al2O3, and Al were tested. Response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with SEM and atomic force microscopes. Judgements were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material; relative importances of these processes were also studied with the x-ray response model

  6. Laser beam deflection as a probe of laser ablation of materials

    Helium-neon laser beam deflection is used to study excimer laser ablation of polymers and a YBa2Cu3O7-x superconductor. Density gradients above pulsed laser heated or ablated samples deflect the He-Ne laser beam and this is measured using a position sensitive detector. The technique permits the determination of the laser fluence threshold for ablation both in a vacuum and in air, and the velocity of the ablation products in a vacuum. A model of the thermal deflection at low fluence was developed which enables measurements of thermal diffusivity of the air

  7. Classification of plastic materials by imaging laser-induced ablation plumes

    Negre, Erwan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Pelascini, Frederic; Yu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A method of rapid classification and identification of plastic materials has been studied in this work. Such method is based on fast spectroscopic imagery of laser-induced ablation plume on plastics to be analyzed. More specifically, a classification schema has been developed first according to the nature of the CC bonds which characterize the polymer matrix. Our results show that the spatial distribution and the evolution of the molecular species in the ablation plume, such as C2 and CN, exhibit clear different behaviors for polymers without any native CC bond, with CC single bonds or with CC double bonds respectively. Therefore the morphological parameters of the populations of the molecular species extracted from the time-resolved spectroscopic images of the plumes provide efficient indicators to classify the polymers characterized by the above mentioned different kinds of CC bonds. When dealing with different polymers with the same kind of CC bond, CC single bond for instance, other indicators should be introduced to provide the further discrimination. Such indicators can be for example a specific native molecular bond other than CC bonds, CN for example, the total emission intensity of which may exhibit specific time evolution. The robustness of the developed classification schema has been then studied with respect to two of the most frequently used additives in plastics fabrication, graphite and titanium. Our results show a negligible influence of these additives in the morphology of the populations of the molecular species when such additives are mixed into the polymer matrix with the percentages usually used in plastics productions, which demonstrates the validity of the developed classification schema for plastics.

  8. Evaulation of B{sub 4}C as an ablator material for NIF capsules. Revision 1

    Burnham, A.K.; Alford, C.S.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Dittrich, T.R.; Wallace, R.J.; Honea, E.C.; King, C.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Steinman, D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-03-26

    Boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is examined as a potential fuel container and ablator for implosion capsules on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A capsule of pure B{sub 4}C encasing a layer of solid DT implodes stably and ignites with anticipated NIF x-ray drives, producing 18 MJ of energy. Thin films of B{sub 4}C were found to be resistant to oxidation and modestly transmitting in the infrared (IR), possibly enabling IR fuel characterization and enhancement for thin permeation barriers but not for full-thickness capsules. Polystyrene mandrels 0.5 mm in diameter were successfully coated with 0.15-2.0 micrometers of B{sub 4}C. Thickness estimated from optical density agreed well with those measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The B{sub 4}C microstructure was columnar but finer than for Be made at the same conditions. B{sub 4}C is a very strong material, with a fiber tensile strength capable of holding NIF fill pressures at room temperature, but it is also very brittle, and microscopic flaws or grain structure may limit the noncryogenic fill pressure. Argon (Ar) permeation rates were measured for a few capsules that had been further coated with 5 micrometers of plasma polymer. The B{sub 4}C coatings tended to crack under tensile load. Some shells filled more slowly than they leaked, suggesting that the cracks open and close under opposite pressure loading. As observed earlier for Ti coatings, 0.15-micrometer layers of B{sub 4}C had better gas retention properties than 2-micrometer layers, possibly because of fewer cracks. Permeation and fill strength issues for capsules with a full ablator thickness of B{sub 4}C are unresolved. 21 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Standard Test Method for Oxyacetylene Ablation Testing of Thermal Insulation Materials

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the screening of ablative materials to determine the relative thermal insulation effectiveness when tested as a flat panel in an environment of a steady flow of hot gas provided by an oxyacetylene burner. 1.2 This test method should be used to measure and describe the properties of materials, products, or assemblies in response to heat and flame under controlled laboratory conditions and should not be used to describe or appraise the fire hazard of materials, products, or assemblies under actual fire conditions. However, results of this test method may be used as elements of a fire risk assessment which takes into account all of the factors which are pertinent to an assessment of the fire hazard of a particular end use. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limi...

  10. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    Gomes, Marcos S. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Schenk, Emily R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Santos, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Professor Arthur Riedel 275, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Almirall, José R., E-mail: almirall@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K but were generally below 6 mg kg{sup −1} for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ∼ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ∼ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis. - Highlights: • An evaluation of LA-ICP-OES for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. • Orange citrus, soy and sugarcane plants were pressed into pellets and sampled directly. • The element menu consisted of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. • LODs for the method ranged from 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K. • The precision ranged from 4% RSD for Mn to 17% RSD for Zn (∼ 6.5% RSD average)

  11. Production and characterization of composite material based on ablative phenolic resin and carbon fibers

    The optimisation of technology for production of moulding compound based on short carbon fibers and ablative phenolic resin is carried out. The characterisation of the starting raw materials is performed and moulding compounds With different fiber/matrix ratios and different fiber lengths are prepared. From the different samples, mouldings are produced by thermal compression. All physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites are tested. From the obtained results the optimal fiber/matrix ratio, for high temperature moulding compounds production are determined. Also, in order to meet the request for high thermal and mechanics properties of the composite, optimization is carded out on the moulding process itself. The optimization is fulfilled by a planned experiment. The full factorial experimental design is applied in which the following parameters are varied: fiber length, temperature and time of the press cycle. Regression equations for the influence of the parameters to the impact resistance, compression strength, flexural strength and the modulus of elasticity of the molding, are obtained. The obtained mechanical properties of the composite rate this material for potential application in the automotive, leisure, military and other industries.(Author)

  12. Material Strength Effects on Feedthru of the Ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    Loomis, Eric; Peralta, Pedro; Fortin, Elizabeth; Lynch, Jenna

    2015-11-01

    Mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is of prime importance for producing self-heating and reaching ignition. One possible mitigation strategy involves the use of metal ablators (e.g., Be) that remain solid following passage of the first shock. Finite material strength in these capsules would alter the feedthru characteristics (oscillation frequency and decay rate) of perturbations initially on the outer surface. To study the physics associated with material strength effects on rippled shock oscillations and feedthru, experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Trident laser. These experiments directly measured the surface height amplitude imprinted by the shock ripple at the opposite free surface with 20 nm precision over a timespan of 25 ns using an in-situ diagnostic called Transient Imaging Displacement Interferometry (TIDI). Simulations from the Lawrence Livermore National Lab code HYDRA predicted that the free surface ripple grows about 3 times more without the use of a strength model in Cu for an initial 5 micron amplitude, 50 micron wavelength sinusoid driven to a free surface velocity of 600 m/s. By increasing the perturbation wavelength we slowed the shock oscillation frequency and decay rate to increase the free surface ripple amplitude to roughly half the perturbations initial amplitude. The time dependent imprinted amplitude was considerably less in high strength Fe versus the softer Cu. This research made possible by a grant from the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences - High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas.

  13. Ablation, surface activation, and electroless metallization of insulating materials by pulsed excimer laser irradiation

    Pulsed-laser irradiation of wide bandgap ceramic substrates, using photons with sub-bandgap energies, activates the ceramic surface for subsequent electroless copper deposition. The copper deposit is confined within the irradiated region when the substrate is subsequently immersed in an electroless copper bath. However, a high laser fluence (typically several j/cm2) and repeated laser shots are needed to obtain uniform copper coverage by this direct-irradiation process. In contrast, by first applying an evaporated SiOx thin film (with x ∼1), laser ablation at quite low energy density (∼0.5 J/cm2) results in re-deposition on the ceramic substrate of material that is catalytic for subsequent electroless copper deposition. Experiments indicate that the re-deposited material is on silicon, on which copper nucleates. Using an SiOx film on a laser-transparent substrate, quite fine (∼12 μm) copper lines can be formed at the boundary of the region that is laser-etched in SiOx. Using SiOx with an absorbing (polycrystalline) ceramic substrate, more-or-less uniform activation and subsequent copper deposition are obtained. In the later case, interactions with the ceramic substrate also may be important for uniform deposition

  14. Dissociation along the principal Hugoniot of the Laser Mégajoule ablator material.

    Colin-Lalu, P; Recoules, V; Salin, G; Plisson, T; Brambrink, E; Vinci, T; Bolis, R; Huser, G

    2016-08-01

    Glow discharge polymer hydrocarbon (GDP-CH) is used as the ablator material in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules for the Laser Mégajoule and National Ignition Facility. Due to its fabrication process, GDP-CH chemical composition and structure differ from commercially available plastics and detailed knowledge of its properties in the warm dense matter regime is needed to achieve accurate design of ICF capsules. First-principles ab initio simulations of the GDP-CH principal Hugoniot up to 8 Mbar were performed using the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) code abinit and showed that atomic bond dissociation has an effect on the compressibility. Results from these simulations are used to parametrize a quantum semiempirical model in order to generate a tabulated equation of state that includes dissociation. Hugoniot measurements obtained from an experiment conducted at the LULI2000 laser facility confirm QMD simulations as well as EOS modeling. We conclude by showing the EOS model influence on shock timing in a hydrodynamic simulation. PMID:27627404

  15. Thin film growing by the laser ablation technique: possibilities for growing of dosimetric materials

    In this talk we will present the basics about the laser ablation technique and how it is used for thin film growing, either as a single film or a stack of thin films, as well as some methods to characterize in real time the film thickness. Finally, we will discuss the possibilities of using laser ablation for growing thin films with applications to dosimetry. (Author)

  16. Study of the Wavelength Dependence in Laser Ablation of Advanced Ceramics and Glass-Ceramic Materials in the Nanosecond Range

    Daniel Sola; Jose I. Peña

    2013-01-01

    In this work, geometrical dimensions and ablation yields as a function of the machining method and reference position were studied when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials were machined with pulsed lasers in the nanosecond range. Two laser systems, emitting at 1064 and 532 nm, were used. It was shown that the features obtained depend on whether the substrate is processed by means of pulse bursts or by grooves. In particular, when the samples were processed by grooves, machined depth...

  17. Radial Movement of Pellet Ablation Material in Tokamaks Due to the Grad-B Effect

    Parks, P. B.; Sessions, W.; Ventrice, C. A.; Baylor, L. R.

    1998-11-01

    The mass source from a pellet represents a significant disturbance to the plasma. Initially the ablated substance is a highly localized, high-beta (>1) plasmoid, which will polarize and drift towards the low field side of the tokamak. Propagation of shear Alfvén waves brakes the outward motion,(P.B. Parks, Nucl. Fusion 32), 2137 (1992). much like its role as a restoring force in the ballooning mode. The grad-B drift drive will weaken because of pressure relaxation as the ablated substance spreads out along the field lines. The ablation blob will stop before it becomes assimilated into the plasma. An analytic model was developed to predict the stopping distance, i.e., the outward large-R shift for radial, vertical, and inside launch locations. Comparison of the model with experiments on TFTR, JET, DIII--D, and a 3D MHD simulation(H. Strauss, Int. Sherwood Fusion Theory Conf. 1998.) will be presented.

  18. Synthesis of nanohybrid materials by femtosecond laser ablation in liquid medium

    ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by means of femtosecond laser ablation of a ZnO target in different pure liquids such as deionized water and ethanol, and in solutions of doand octa-decanethiol. Samples produced in water at low laser fluence contained nanoparticles whose radius is less than the Bohr radius as revealed by photoluminescence measurements that illustrate explicitly the effect of quantum confinement directly linked to the presence of nanoparticles. In fact, particles of about 1 nm in diameter were identified by AFM and TEM observations, which also show the increase in ablated particle size when increasing the fluence. Processing in ethanol and at low fluence led to the formation of ZnO particles of a few nanometers in diameter. When ablating in thiol solutions, slow cluster-growth promotes the formation of facetted particles

  19. Production of microstructures in wide-band-gap and organic materials using pulsed laser ablation at 157 nm wavelength

    Haehnel, Falk; Bertram, Rene; Reisse, Guenter; Boettcher, Rene; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2010-11-01

    New results on three-dimensional microstructuring of fused silica, sapphire, calcium fluoride, magnesium fluoride, and PTFE using pulsed laser ablation at 157 nm wavelength are presented. A largely automated high-precision fluorine laser micromachining station was used for the investigations. In some fundamental investigations, threshold fluences of 0.9 J/cm2 for fused silica, 0.6 J/cm2 for sapphire, 1.7 J/cm2 for calcium fluoride, and of 0.05 J/cm2 for PTFE have been determined. The ablation rates at 3 J/cm2 fluence were 60 to 100 nm/pulse for the inorganic insulators and 450 nm/pulse for PTFE. In the second part of the paper, it is shown that on the basis of the knowledge of the ablation rates and the laser beam parameters, bores of a few µm size and complex 3D microstructures with a variety of geometries can be produced in the surface of these materials. Thereby, no cracking occurs if proper parameters are used.

  20. Investigation of the particle size distribution of the ejected material generated during the single femtosecond laser pulse ablation of aluminium

    Highlights: • Single 50 fs laser pulse ablation of an aluminium target in vacuum is investigated in our experiments. • Nanoparticles with large radii of several hundred nanometers are observed. • The nanoparticles are most likely from the mechanical tensile stress relaxation. - Abstract: Single femtosecond laser pulses are employed to ablate an aluminium target in vacuum, and the particle size distribution of the ablated material deposited on a mica substrate is examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The recorded AFM images show that these particles have a mean radius of several tens of nanometres. It is also determined that the mean radius of these deposited nanoparticles increases when the laser fluence at the aluminium target increases from 0.44 J/cm2 to 0.63 J/cm2. The mechanism of the laser-induced nanoparticle generation is thought to be photomechanical tensile stress relaxation. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm that the nanoparticles thus produced have the same structure as the bulk aluminium

  1. Observation of the dependence on the fluence and materials in femto-second laser ablation process by using the soft x-ray laser probe

    We have succeeded in simultaneous observation of the ablation front and the expansion front with thin filmy structure in the femto-second laser ablation process of a gold target by using the 13.9 nm soft x-ray probe (incident angle to the sample ∼70deg) with soft x-ray interferometer. The dependence on the laser local fluence and materials was obtained by the comparison between gold and tungsten. (author)

  2. Preliminary Evaluation of Techniques to Fabricate Beryllium, Polyimide, and Ge-doped CH/CD Ablator Materials

    Cook, B; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Nobile, A; McElfresh, M; Cooley, J; Alexander, D

    2004-11-08

    This report including appendices provides information to complete this deliverable. It summarizes the important features of each ablator material, with particular focus to its usefulness for ignition capsules. More detailed discussions of each ablator type are in the Appendix. Included at the end of each separate discussion in the Appendix is a list of all published work with an ICF focus on that ablator type. This report is organized into Be based and polymer (C) based ablators. We summarize status, outstanding issues, and how we plan to address them. Details are in the Appendix. For Be there are two fabrication routes, one by machining bulk pieces into hemi-shells which are then bonded together, and the other by sputtering Be with Cu dopant onto spherical plastic mandrels to build up a wall. This method allows for radial variation in the Cu dopant concentration, while the machining approach is best suited to a uniform doping level. For plastic, we have already made a down select, eliminating polyimide because its performance as an ablator has been seen to be significantly different from that predicted by simulations. The other polymer, GDP (glow discharge polymer or sometimes called plasma polymer) comes in both a normal (hydrogenated) and deuterated form. There are differences between them (besides the H or D) and these will be detailed. The choice between them will be determined in part by cryogenic measurement of the IR absorption spectrum of DT scheduled to occur in the next few months. An initial list of specifications for ignition targets exists. However these specifications are continuing to evolve. This is due to evolving plans for NIF's deliverable energy and to more refined design simulations. Many requirements are not well specified due to lack of knowledge of the effect on the implosion. These requirements include: grain size and texture, fill hole size, fill tube size, bond joint thickness, allowable porosity (size and number), diameter and wall

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation properties of transparent materials: impact of the laser process parameters on the machining throughput

    Matylitsky, V. V.; Hendricks, F.; Aus der Au, J.

    2013-03-01

    High average power, high repetition rate femtosecond lasers with μJ pulse energies are increasingly used for bio-medical and material processing applications. With the introduction of femtosecond laser systems such as the SpiritTM platform developed by High Q Lasers and Spectra-Physics, micro-processing of solid targets with femtosecond laser pulses have obtained new perspectives for industrial applications [1]. The unique advantage of material processing with subpicosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition, which leads to high ablation efficiency and accuracy in nearly all kinds of solid materials. The study on the impact of the laser processing parameters on the removal rate for transparent substrate using femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. In particular, examples of micro-processing of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) - bio-degradable polyester and XensationTM glass (Schott) machined with SpiritTM ultrafast laser will be shown.

  4. Progress in Research on Ablative Material Resins with High Carbonization Rate%烧蚀材料高成碳树脂的研究进展

    钟瑶冰; 魏伯荣; 刘郁杨

    2011-01-01

    耐烧蚀材料在国防工业上有十分重要的应用价值,碳化型烧蚀材料是利用高分子材料在高温碳化吸热量的材料.树脂基烧蚀材料一般要求具有高相对分子质量、高芳基化、高交联密度、高C/O比,以使材料烧蚀后成碳率高.材料的烧蚀率与成碳率成反比关系,树脂的成碳率越高,其耐烧蚀性能越好.材料的成碳率高低由树脂的化学结构决定.目前烧蚀材料的研究方向是:成碳率高、比热大、热导率小、密度小、碳化层强度高、热分解温度高的材料.综述了改性酚醛树脂:酚三嗪树脂、硼酚醛树脂及聚芳基乙炔树脂的合成、烧蚀性能、高成碳率的研究近况,并对今后烧蚀材料的研究作了展望.%Ablation-resistant materials play an important role in the defense industry, carbon-based ablative material is a kind of material which uses the feature that the carbonization of polymer material at high temperature can absorb heat. General requirements for resin-based ablative material are high molecular weight, high-arylation, high crosslinking density and high C / 0 ratio, so that the carbonization rate of materials can be higher after ablation. Material ablation rate is inversely proportional to the carbonization rate. The resin which has higher carbonization rate will possess better resistance to ablation. The carbonization rates of material are mainly determined by the chemical structure of resin. At present, the research trends of ablative material are summarized as follows: high carbonization rate, large specific heat capacity, low thermal conductivity, small density, carbon layer with high strength and high thermal decomposition temperature. The recent studies are summarized, such as on the synthesis of modified phenolic resin: phenolic triazine resin, boron phenolic resin and polyarylacetylene resin, ablation performance and high carbonization rates. And the future research on ablative material is prospected.

  5. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  6. Metallurgical and chemical characterization of copper alloy reference materials within laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Method development for minimally-invasive analysis of ancient bronze objects

    Walaszek, Damian, E-mail: damian.walaszek@empa.ch [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Senn, Marianne [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Faller, Markus [Laboratory for Jointing Technology and Corrosion, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Philippe, Laetitia [Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Wagner, Barbara; Bulska, Ewa [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Ulrich, Andrea [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of ancient metal objects provides important information for manufacturing studies and authenticity verification of ancient copper or bronze artifacts. Non- or minimal-destructive analytical methods are preferred to mitigate visible damage. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) enables the determination of major elements as well as impurities down to lower ppm-levels, however, accuracy and precision of analysis strongly depend on the homogeneity of reference materials used for calibration. Moreover, appropriate analytical procedures are required e.g. in terms of ablation strategies (scan mode, spot size, etc.). This study reviews available copper alloy (certified) reference materials — (C)RMs from different sources and contributes new metallurgical data on homogeneity and spatial elemental distribution. Investigations of the standards were performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) for the following copper alloy and bronze (certified) reference materials: NIST 454, BAM 374, BAM 211, BAM 227, BAM 374, BAM 378, BAS 50.01-2, BAS 50.03-4, and BAS 50.04-4. Additionally, the influence of inhomogeneities on different ablation and calibration strategies is evaluated to define an optimum analytical strategy in terms of line scan versus single spot ablation, variation of spot size, selection of the most appropriate RMs or minimum number of calibration reference materials. - Highlights: ► New metallographic data for copper alloy reference materials are provided. ► Influence of RMs homogeneity on quality of LA-ICPMS analysis was evaluated. ► Ablation and calibration strategies were critically discussed. ► An LA-ICPMS method is proposed for analyzing most typical ancient copper alloys.

  7. Metallurgical and chemical characterization of copper alloy reference materials within laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Method development for minimally-invasive analysis of ancient bronze objects

    The chemical composition of ancient metal objects provides important information for manufacturing studies and authenticity verification of ancient copper or bronze artifacts. Non- or minimal-destructive analytical methods are preferred to mitigate visible damage. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) enables the determination of major elements as well as impurities down to lower ppm-levels, however, accuracy and precision of analysis strongly depend on the homogeneity of reference materials used for calibration. Moreover, appropriate analytical procedures are required e.g. in terms of ablation strategies (scan mode, spot size, etc.). This study reviews available copper alloy (certified) reference materials — (C)RMs from different sources and contributes new metallurgical data on homogeneity and spatial elemental distribution. Investigations of the standards were performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) for the following copper alloy and bronze (certified) reference materials: NIST 454, BAM 374, BAM 211, BAM 227, BAM 374, BAM 378, BAS 50.01-2, BAS 50.03-4, and BAS 50.04-4. Additionally, the influence of inhomogeneities on different ablation and calibration strategies is evaluated to define an optimum analytical strategy in terms of line scan versus single spot ablation, variation of spot size, selection of the most appropriate RMs or minimum number of calibration reference materials. - Highlights: ► New metallographic data for copper alloy reference materials are provided. ► Influence of RMs homogeneity on quality of LA-ICPMS analysis was evaluated. ► Ablation and calibration strategies were critically discussed. ► An LA-ICPMS method is proposed for analyzing most typical ancient copper alloys

  8. Towards the Industrial Application of Spark Ablation for Nanostructured Functional Materials

    Pfeiffer, T.V.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructuring of functional materials is an essential part in the design of energy related devices – but the industrial tools we have to make these materials are lacking. This dissertation explores the green, flexible, and scalable spark discharge process for the fabrication of complex nanostructu

  9. femtosecond laser ablation

    Margetic, Vanja

    2003-01-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation was investigated as a solid sampling method for elemental chemical analysis. In comparison to the sampling with longer laser pulses, two aspects could be improved by using ultrashort pulses: elimination of the elemental fractionation from the ablation crater, which is necessary for an accurate quantitative analysis, and better control of the material removal (especially for metals), which increases the spatial resolution of microanalysis. Basic aspects of ultrashort...

  10. Materials for Multifunctional Balloon Catheters With Capabilities in Cardiac Electrophysiological Mapping and Ablation Therapy

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Lu, Nanshu; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Kim, Yun-Soung; Lee, Stephen P.; Xu, Lizhi; Wu, Jian; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Song, Jizhou; Liu, Zhuangjian; Viventi, Jonathan; de Graff, Bassel; Elolampi, Brian; Mansour, Moussa; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2011-01-01

    Development of advanced surgical tools for minimally invasive procedures represents an activity of central importance to improvements in human health. A key materials challenge is in the realization of bio-compatible interfaces between the classes of semiconductor and sensor technologies that might be most useful in this context and the soft, curvilinear surfaces of the body. This paper describes a solution based on biocompatible materials and devices that integrate directly with the thin ela...

  11. Laser ablation of the lysozyme protein: a model system for soft materials

    Schou, Jørgen; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin;

    expected in MAPLE, but is surprising in PLD, where a high degree of thermal fragmentation is typically required for generation of a sufficient amount of volatile decomposition products that drive the transfer of molecules to the film substrate. The experimental results will be discussed based on the...... ionization) in contrast to many other organic materials. Also the thermal properties, including the heat-induced decomposition behavior are comparatively well-known. For laser-irradiation at wavelengths above 310 nm, no photochemical processes occur initially, but the material is ejected via photothermal...

  12. Seven-wavelength pyrometer for determining surface temperature of ablation materials

    Yi, H.

    1985-01-01

    Results which were achieved by a seven-wavelength pyrometer last year are reported in this paper. These studies are directed toward the development of a method for determining the real surface temperature of thermal protection materials and for evaluating its emittance under varieties of reentry environment. A description of the data processing method and apparatus is also included.

  13. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ∼20 nm in depth and ∼500 μm or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern

  14. Femtosecond pulse laser ablation of metallic, semiconducting, ceramic, and biological materials

    Kautek, Wolfgang; Krueger, Joerg

    1994-09-01

    Production of holes and grooves of microcracks extending from an annular melting zone, or substantial disruption, respectively. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that the development of intense ultrashort pulse laser systems (>> 1012 W cm-2, (tau) bone material, and human cornea transplants. The fs-laser generates its own absorption in transparent materials by a multiphoton absorption process, and thus forces the absorption of visible radiation. Because the time is too short (< ps) for significant transport of mass and energy, the beam interaction generally results in the formation of a thin plasma layer of approximately solid state density. Only after the end of the subpicosecond laser pulse, it expands rapidly away from the surface without any light absorption and further plasma heating. Therefore, energy transfer (heat and impulse) to the target material, and thermal and mechanical disruption are minimized. In contrast to heat- affected zones (HAZ's) generated by conventional nanosecond pulse lasers of the order of 1 - 10 micrometers , HAZ's of less than 0.02 micrometers were observed.

  15. Increase in Volume of Ablation Zones during Follow-up Is Highly Suggestive of Ablation Site Recurrence in Colorectal Liver Metastases Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation

    Kele, Petra G.; de Jong, Koert P.; van der Jagt, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that volume changes of ablation zones (AZs) on successive computed tomography (CT) scans could predict ablation site recurrences (ASRs) in patients with colorectal liver metastases treated by radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Materials and Methods: RF ablation was perform

  16. On-line double isotope dilution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantitative analysis of solid materials

    Graphical abstract: Development and validation of a new on-line double IDMS methodology to achieve an accurate, precise, and time-effective strategy for direct determination of trace elements in solid samples by LA-ICP-MS. - Highlights: • Development of a double IDMS strategy for direct solid analysis by LA-ICP-MS. • The proposed method requires the sequential analysis of the sample and a standard. • The previous characterization of the spike solution is not required in double IDMS. • Quantitative bulk analysis of Sr, Rb and Pb were performed in silicate glasses and powdered samples. • Powdered samples were analyzed as pressed pellets and glasses prepared by fusion. - Abstract: We report on the determination of trace elements in solid samples by the combination of on-line double isotope dilution and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The proposed method requires the sequential analysis of the sample and a certified natural abundance standard by on-line IDMS using the same isotopically-enriched spike solution. In this way, the mass fraction of the analyte in the sample can be directly referred to the certified standard so the previous characterization of the spike solution is not required. To validate the procedure, Sr, Rb and Pb were determined in certified reference materials with different matrices, including silicate glasses (SRM 610, 612 and 614) and powdered samples (PACS-2, SRM 2710a, SRM 1944, SRM 2702 and SRM 2780). The analysis of powdered samples was carried out both by the preparation of pressed pellets and by lithium borate fusion. Experimental results for the analysis of powdered samples were in agreement with the certified values for all materials. Relative standard deviations in the range of 6–21% for pressed pellets and 3–21% for fused solids were obtained from n = 3 independent measurements. Minimal sample preparation, data treatment and consumption of the isotopically-enriched isotopes are the

  17. The direct determination of trace metals in gold and silver materials by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry without matrix matched standards

    Kogan, Valentina V.; Hinds, Michael W.; Ramendik, Gregory I.

    1994-04-01

    Typically, accurate trace element determination in solid samples by laser ablation ICP-MS requires calibration with matrix matched standards. Trace metal analysis was performed in high purity gold, high purity silver and 14 karat gold-silver alloys. A Nd : YAG laser was used to evaporate solid samples of precious metals into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Analytical data and a study of the crater sizes indicated that approximately the same amount of material for both gold and silver samples was vaporized by a Nd : YAG laser operated in a Q-switched mode with the following parameters: 210 mJ laser energy; 8 Hz repetition rate; and focused 7 mm below the sample surface. High purity gold and silver, and a 14 karat gold-silver alloy were analyzed for trace metals common to gold and silver reference materials. In general, the determination of Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd, Pt, Pb, and Bi did not strongly depend on whether gold or silver reference materials were used for calibration. This permits these trace metals to be determined directly with only one set of reference materials, by laser ablation ICP-MS, in a wide variety of gold-silver alloys.

  18. Ablative and fractional ablative lasers.

    Brightman, Lori A; Brauer, Jeremy A; Anolik, Robert; Weiss, Elliot; Karen, Julie; Chapas, Anne; Hale, Elizabeth; Bernstein, Leonard; Geronemus, Roy G

    2009-10-01

    The field of nonsurgical laser resurfacing for aesthetic enhancement continues to improve with new research and technological advances. Since its beginnings in the 1980s, the laser-resurfacing industry has produced a multitude of devices employing ablative, nonablative, and fractional ablative technologies. The three approaches largely differ in their method of thermal damage, weighing degrees of efficacy, downtime, and side effect profiles against each other. Nonablative technologies generate some interest, although only for those patient populations seeking mild improvements. Fractional technologies, however, have gained dramatic ground on fully ablative resurfacing. Fractional laser resurfacing, while exhibiting results that fall just short of the ideal outcomes of fully ablative treatments, is an increasingly attractive alternative because of its far more favorable side effect profile, reduced recovery time, and significant clinical outcome. PMID:19850197

  19. Local thermal ablation of renal cell carcinoma

    Purpose: With evolving local thermal ablation technology, the clinical application of thermal ablation has been actively investigated in the treatment for renal cell carcinoma. We review the evolution and current status of radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation for renal cell carcinoma. Materials and methods: All articles published in English on radiofrequency ablation or microwave ablation as a treatment for renal cell carcinoma were identified with a MEDLINE® and PubMed® search from 1990 to 2010. Results: Local thermal ablation has several advantages, including keeping more normal renal units, relatively simple operation, easy tolerance, fewer complications, a shorter hospitalization and convalescence period. Long-term data has determined radiofrequency ablation is responsible for poor surgical candidates with renal cell carcinoma, however, tumor size, location and shape might affect the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation. Microwave ablation can induce large ablation volumes and yield good local tumor control. Associated complications appear to be low. Conclusions: Local ablative approaches seem to represent an attractive alternative to extirpative surgery for the treatment of small renal neoplasms in select patients. Potential developments include concepts to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of thermal ablation by improving the guiding, monitoring capabilities and detection capacity of multi-center lesions to provide at least equivalent cancer control to conventional surgery.

  20. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  1. Trace elements in landfill calcite: a comparison of solution & laser ablation ICP-MS and calibration to different standard material (SRM NIST glass and USGS MACS carbonate)

    Strnad, L.; Ettler, V.; Mihaljevič, M.; Hladil, Jindřich

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2008), s. 235-236. ISSN 1885-7264. [Reunión de la Sociedad Española de Mineralogía /28./ ; Reunión de la Sociedad Española de Arcillas /21./. Zaragoza, 16.09.2008-19.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : trace elements * reference material * carbonate * ICP-MS * laser ablation Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.ehu.es/sem/macla_pdf/macla9/macla9_235.pdf

  2. Preliminary characterisation of new glass reference materials (GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G) by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm wavelengths

    Guillong, M.; Hametner, K.; Reusser, E.; Wilson, S.A.; Gunther, D.

    2005-01-01

    New glass reference materials GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G have been characterised using a prototype solid state laser ablation system capable of producing wavelengths of 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm. This system allowed comparison of the effects of different laser wavelengths under nearly identical ablation and ICP operating conditions. The wavelengths 213 nm and 266 nm were also used at higher energy densities to evaluate the influence of energy density on quantitative analysis. In addition, the glass reference materials were analysed using commercially available 266 nm Nd:YAG and 193 nm ArF excimer lasers. Laser ablation analysis was carried out using both single spot and scanning mode ablation. Using laser ablation ICP-MS, concentrations of fifty-eight elements were determined with external calibration to the NIST SRM 610 glass reference material. Instead of applying the more common internal standardisation procedure, the total concentration of all element oxide concentrations was normalised to 100%. Major element concentrations were compared with those determined by electron microprobe. In addition to NIST SRM 610 for external calibration, USGS BCR-2G was used as a more closely matrix-matched reference material in order to compare the effect of matrix-matched and non matrix-matched calibration on quantitative analysis. The results show that the various laser wavelengths and energy densities applied produced similar results, with the exception of scanning mode ablation at 266 nm without matrix-matched calibration where deviations up to 60% from the average were found. However, results acquired using a scanning mode with a matrix-matched calibration agreed with results obtained by spot analysis. The increased abundance of large particles produced when using a scanning ablation mode with NIST SRM 610, is responsible for elemental fractionation effects caused by incomplete vaporisation of large particles in the ICP.

  3. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 ± 0.14, 1.45 ± 0.13, and 1.74 ± 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 ± 0.09 and 1.26 ± 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 ± 0.65, 2.85 ± 0.72, and 4.45 ± 0.47 cm3 for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 ± 0.30 and 2.29 ± 0.55 cm3 got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  4. Ablation of lung tumours

    Gillams, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Radiofrequency, laser, microwave and cryotherapy have all been used for the ablation of lung tumours. However, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation are the most widely used technologies. RFA has been successfully applied to tumour measuring from

  5. Quantitative analysis of trace elements in environmental powders with laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry using non-sample-corresponding reference materials for signal evaluation

    Bauer, Gerald; Limbeck, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is an attractive alternative to traditional procedures for the analysis of environmental samples (i.e., conventional liquid measurement after sample digestion). However, for accurate quantification, certified reference materials (CRM) are necessary which match the composition of the sample and include all elements of interest at the required concentration levels. The limited availability of appropriate CRMs hampers therefore substantial application. In this work, an LA-ICP-MS procedure allowing for accurate determination of trace element contents in powdered environmental samples is presented. For LA-ICP-MS analysis, the samples are mixed with an internal standard (silver oxide) and a binder (sodium tetra borate) and subsequently pressed to pellets. Quantification is accomplished using a calibration function determined using CRMs with varying matrix composition and analyte content, pre-treated and measured in the same way as the samples. With this approach, matrix-induced ablation differences resulting from varying physical/chemical properties of the individual CRMs could be compensated. Furthermore, ICP-related matrix-effects could be minimized using collision/reaction cell technology. Applicability of the procedure has been demonstrated by assessment of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn in four different environmental CRMs (NIST SRM1648a (urban particulate matter), NIST SRM2709 (San Joaquin Soil), BCR144 (sewage sludge), and BCR723 (road dust)). Signal evaluation was performed by alternative use of three CRMs for calculation of the calibration function whereas the remaining fourth CRM acted as unknown sample, resulting in a good agreement between measured and certified values for all elements and reference materials.

  6. Meteoroid ablation models

    Popova, Olga

    2004-12-01

    The fate of entering meteoroids in atmosphere is determined by their size, velocity and substance properties. Material from ablation of small-sized meteors (roughly R≤0.01-1 cm) is mostly deposited between 120 and 80 km altitudes. Larger bodies (up to meter sizes) penetrate deeper into the atmosphere (down to 20 km altitude). Meteoroids of cometary origin typically have higher termination altitude due to substance properties and higher entry velocity. Fast meteoroids ( V>30-40 km/s) may lose a part of their material at higher altitudes due to sputtering. Local flow regime realized around the falling body determines the heat transfer and mass loss processes. Classic approach to meteor interaction with atmosphere allows describing two limiting cases: - large meteoroid at relatively low altitude, where shock wave is formed (hydrodynamical models); - small meteoroid/or high altitudes - free molecule regime of interaction, which assumes no collisions between evaporated meteoroid particles. These evaporated particles form initial train, which then spreads into an ambient air due to diffusion. Ablation models should make it possible to describe physical conditions that occur around meteor body. Several self-consistent hydrodynamical models are developed, but similar models for transition and free molecule regimes are still under study. This paper reviews existing ablation models and discusses model boundaries.

  7. Attachment and proliferation of human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) on laser-ablated titanium implant material

    Demand is increasing for shortening the long (3–6 months) osseointegration period to rehabilitate patients' damaged chewing apparatus in as short a time as possible. For dental implants, as for biomaterials in general, the bio- and osseointegration processes can be controlled at molecular and cellular levels by modification of the implant surface. One of the most promising of such surface modifications is laser ablation, as demonstrated by our previous results [46]. Commercially pure (CP4) sand-blasted, acid-etched titanium disks (Denti® System Ltd., Hungary) were irradiated with a KrF excimer laser (248 nm, fluence 0.4 J/cm2, FWHM 18 ns, 2000 pulses), or with a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 1.3 J/cm2, 10 ns, 200 pulses) then examined by SEM, AFM, and XPS. In vitro attachment (24 h) and proliferation (72 h) of MG-63 osteoblast cells were investigated via dimethylthiazol-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), alamarBlue (AB) assays alkaline phosphatase quantification (ALP) and SEM. SEM and AFM revealed significant changes in morphology and roughness. XPS confirmed the presence of TiO2 on each sample; after Nd:YAG treatment a reduced state of Ti (Ti3+) was also observed. MTT, AB and ALP measurements detected an increase in the number of cells between the 24- and 72 hour observations; however, laser treatment did not affect cell attachment and proliferation significantly. - Highlights: • CP4 titanium implant surfaces were modified with Nd:YAG and KrF excimer laser. • SEM and AFM revealed significant changes in morphology and roughness. • XPS confirmed the presence of TiO2 on each sample; after Nd:YAG treatment a reduced state of Ti (Ti3+) was found. • Cell proliferation experiments detected an increased number of MG-63 cells between the 24 h and 72 h observations. • Laser treatments neither disturbed, nor enhanced MG-63 cell attachment and proliferation significantly

  8. Time-stepping for laser ablation

    Harihar Khanal; David Autrique; Vasilios Alexiades

    2013-01-01

    Nanosecond laser ablation is a popular technique, applied in many areas of science and technology such as medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. We outline a computational model for radiative and collisional processes occurring during ns-laser ablation, and compare the performance of various low and high order time-stepping algorithms.

  9. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs

  10. A rapid isotope ratio analysis protocol for nuclear solid materials using nano-second laser-ablation time-of-flight ICP-MS

    The analysis of the isotopic composition of nuclear or non-nuclear solid materials is performed in a variety of fields, e.g., for quality assurance in the production of nuclear fuels, as signatures in forensics, nuclear safeguards, and non-proliferation control, in material characterization, geology, and archeology. We have investigated the capability of laser ablation (New Wave Research, 213 nm) coupled to time-of-flight (TOF) ICP-MS (GBC OptiMass 8000) as a rapid analytical protocol for multi-isotope screening of nuclear and non-nuclear solid samples. This includes natural and non-natural isotopic compositions for elements including Cu, Zr, Mo, Cd, In, Ba, Ta, W, Re, Pt, Pb, and U, in pure metals, alloys, and glasses. Without correcting for mass bias (mass fractionation), an overall precision and accuracy of about 4% (1σ) can be achieved by minimizing the deposited laser power and thus fractionation (mass removal based on thermal properties). The precision and accuracy in combination with literally no or minimized sample preparation enables a rapid isotope screening of solid samples that is of particular interest to support nuclear forensic and safeguard analysis.

  11. A rapid isotope ratio analysis protocol for nuclear solid materials using nano-second laser-ablation time-of-flight ICP-MS

    Buerger, S. [Chemical and Isotope Mass Spectrometry Group, Transuranium Research Institute, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6375 (United States); Department of Energy, New Brunswick Laboratory, 9800 South Cass Avenue, Bldg 350, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: stefan.buerger@ch.doe.gov; Riciputi, L.R. [Chemical and Isotope Mass Spectrometry Group, Transuranium Research Institute, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6375 (United States); Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of the isotopic composition of nuclear or non-nuclear solid materials is performed in a variety of fields, e.g., for quality assurance in the production of nuclear fuels, as signatures in forensics, nuclear safeguards, and non-proliferation control, in material characterization, geology, and archeology. We have investigated the capability of laser ablation (New Wave Research, 213 nm) coupled to time-of-flight (TOF) ICP-MS (GBC OptiMass 8000) as a rapid analytical protocol for multi-isotope screening of nuclear and non-nuclear solid samples. This includes natural and non-natural isotopic compositions for elements including Cu, Zr, Mo, Cd, In, Ba, Ta, W, Re, Pt, Pb, and U, in pure metals, alloys, and glasses. Without correcting for mass bias (mass fractionation), an overall precision and accuracy of about 4% (1{sigma}) can be achieved by minimizing the deposited laser power and thus fractionation (mass removal based on thermal properties). The precision and accuracy in combination with literally no or minimized sample preparation enables a rapid isotope screening of solid samples that is of particular interest to support nuclear forensic and safeguard analysis.

  12. Attachment and proliferation of human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) on laser-ablated titanium implant material

    Györgyey, Ágnes; Ungvári, Krisztina [Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Kecskeméti, Gabriella; Kopniczky, Judit [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Faculty of Science and Informatics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Hopp, Béla [Research Group on Laser Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Oszkó, Albert [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Informatics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Pelsöczi, István; Rakonczay, Zoltán [Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Nagy, Katalin [Department of Oral Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Turzó, Kinga, E-mail: kturzo@yahoo.com [Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2013-10-15

    Demand is increasing for shortening the long (3–6 months) osseointegration period to rehabilitate patients' damaged chewing apparatus in as short a time as possible. For dental implants, as for biomaterials in general, the bio- and osseointegration processes can be controlled at molecular and cellular levels by modification of the implant surface. One of the most promising of such surface modifications is laser ablation, as demonstrated by our previous results [46]. Commercially pure (CP4) sand-blasted, acid-etched titanium disks (Denti® System Ltd., Hungary) were irradiated with a KrF excimer laser (248 nm, fluence 0.4 J/cm{sup 2}, FWHM 18 ns, 2000 pulses), or with a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 1.3 J/cm{sup 2}, 10 ns, 200 pulses) then examined by SEM, AFM, and XPS. In vitro attachment (24 h) and proliferation (72 h) of MG-63 osteoblast cells were investigated via dimethylthiazol-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), alamarBlue (AB) assays alkaline phosphatase quantification (ALP) and SEM. SEM and AFM revealed significant changes in morphology and roughness. XPS confirmed the presence of TiO{sub 2} on each sample; after Nd:YAG treatment a reduced state of Ti (Ti{sup 3+}) was also observed. MTT, AB and ALP measurements detected an increase in the number of cells between the 24- and 72 hour observations; however, laser treatment did not affect cell attachment and proliferation significantly. - Highlights: • CP4 titanium implant surfaces were modified with Nd:YAG and KrF excimer laser. • SEM and AFM revealed significant changes in morphology and roughness. • XPS confirmed the presence of TiO{sub 2} on each sample; after Nd:YAG treatment a reduced state of Ti (Ti{sup 3+}) was found. • Cell proliferation experiments detected an increased number of MG-63 cells between the 24 h and 72 h observations. • Laser treatments neither disturbed, nor enhanced MG-63 cell attachment and proliferation significantly.

  13. Emerging Local Ablation Techniques

    Stone, Michael J.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-01-01

    Local ablation technologies for hepatic malignancy have developed rapidly in the past decade, with advances in several percutaneous or externally delivered treatment methods including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound. Research has focused on increasing the size of the ablation zone and minimizing heat-sink effects. More recent developments include improvements in treatment planning and navigation with integration of several ima...

  14. Studies of ablation pressure, ablative acceleration and ablative implosions

    Time and space resolved X-ray spectroscopy have been used to measure ablation rate and ablation pressure on plane targets irradiated by the first and second harmonics of Nd glass laser light. Streaked X-ray shadowgraphy has been applied to the study of ablatively imploded spherical shell targets uniformly irradiated by six 1.05 μm laser beams. The results give a direct measurement of shell acceleration and thus of ablation pressure and show evidence of fluid instability increasing as the shell ratio is varied from 10 to 100. A direct determination of implosion core density is also obtained. (author)

  15. A Self-Limiting Electro-Ablation Technique for the Top-Down Synthesis of Large-Area Monolayer Flakes of 2D Materials

    Das, Saptarshi; Bera, Mrinal K.; Tong, Sheng; Narayanan, Badri; Kamath, Ganesh; Mane, Anil; Paulikas, Arvydas P.; Antonio, Mark R.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Roelofs, Andreas K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of an electrochemical process that converts two dimensional layered materials of arbitrary thicknesses into monolayers. The lateral dimensions of the monolayers obtained by the process within a few seconds time at room temperature were as large as 0.5 mm. The temporal and spatial dynamics of this physical phenomenon, studied on MoS2 flakes using ex-situ AFM imaging, Raman mapping, and photoluminescence measurements trace the origin of monolayer formation to a substrate-assisted self-limiting electrochemical ablation process. Electronic structure and atomistic calculations point to the interplay between three essential factors in the process: (1) strong covalent interaction of monolayer MoS2 with the substrate; (2) electric-field induced differences in Gibbs free energy of exfoliation; (3) dispersion of MoS2 in aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. This process was successful in obtaining monolayers of other 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, like WS2 and MoTe2 as well. PMID:27323877

  16. Ablative Ceramic Foam Based TPS Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel composite material ablative TPS for planetary vehicles that can survive a dual heating exposure is proposed. NextGen's TPS concept is a bi-layer functional...

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm-2) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm-2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm-2. The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  18. Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation for Depth Profiling of Bacterial Biofilms

    Milasinovic, Slobodan; Liu, Yaoming; Gasper, Gerald L.; Zhao, Youbo; Johnston, Joanna L.; Gordon, Robert J.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Sample ablation by pulsed lasers is one option for removing material from a sample surface for in situ depth profiling during imaging mass spectrometry, but ablation is often limited by laser-induced damage of the remaining material. A preliminary evaluation was performed of sub-100 fs, 800 nm pulsed laser ablation for depth profiling of bacterial biofilms grown on glass by the drip flow method. Electron and optical microscopy were combined with laser desorption vacuum ultraviolet postionizat...

  19. Experimental investigation of interface conditions between oxidic melt and ablating concrete during MCCI by means of simulating material experiments: the Artemis program

    Full text of publication follows: In the frame work of R and D on Severe Accidents in PWR plants, an estimation by codes of time of basemat melt-through by Corium is required. For this, the heat flux distribution along the cavity wall must be properly modelled. Hence the knowledge of the heat transfer coefficient as well as the temperature at the interface between the melt and the solid become key issues. Phase diagram of the melt and composition governs the interface temperature which controls, at least partly, the thickness of the Corium crust formed on the molten concrete. Crust behaviour (time evolution of thickness, mechanical interaction with gas) implies a release mode of molten concrete in Corium which in turn alters the melt composition. Clearly, the molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) phenomenon is the result of a strong coupling between physico-chemistry and thermohydraulics. The main goal of the first test series of the Artemis program is to make a link between the interface temperature and the physico-chemistry of the melt (phase diagram) through tests conducted with simulating materials and to provide an insight on the existence, the behaviour and the composition of the crust. This test series considers 1D MCCI using a non eutectic LiCl-BaCl2 mixture poured at 1000 deg. C in a cylindrical test section (internal diameter 0.3 m) to interact with the 0.35 m deep basemat made of the same salt mixture at the eutectic composition. This 'concrete' was especially manufactured with sintered granulates to allow gas flow from the bottom (argon), then simulating gas released by concrete in the reactor case. Constant power is applied in the pool with an helical coil and 1D MCCI is ensured by counterbalancing heat losses by controlled heating at the lateral walls and at the top of the test section. Concrete ablation is followed from the output of 45 0.5 mm diameter thermocouples. An instrumented rod periodically investigates the temperature and the position

  20. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  1. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of brass in air and liquid media

    Laser ablation of brass in air, water, and ethanol was investigated using a femtosecond laser system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm and a pulse width less than 130 fs. Scanning electron and optical microscopy were used to study the efficiency and quality of laser ablation in the three ablation media at two different ablation modes. With a liquid layer thickness of 3 mm above the target, ablation rate was found to be higher in water and ethanol than in air. Ablation under water and ethanol showed cleaner surfaces and less debris re-deposition compared to ablation in air. In addition to spherical particles that are normally formed from re-solidified molten material, micro-scale particles with varying morphologies were observed scattered in the ablated structures (craters and grooves) when ablation was conducted under water. The presence of such particles indicates the presence of a non-thermal ablation mechanism that becomes more apparent when ablation is conducted under water.

  3. Laser ablation loading of a surface-electrode ion trap

    Leibrandt, David R.; Clark, Robert J.; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Antohi, Paul; Bakr, Waseem; Brown, Kenneth R.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate loading by laser ablation of $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions into a mm-scale surface-electrode ion trap. The laser used for ablation is a pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG with pulse energies of 1-10 mJ and durations of 3-5 ns. An additional laser is not required to photoionize the ablated material. The efficiency and lifetime of several candidate materials for the laser ablation target are characterized by measuring the trapped ion fluorescence signal for a number of consecutive loads. Addi...

  4. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  5. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  6. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  7. Laser ablation principles and applications

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  8. Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) Gap Filler for Heat Shield Assemblies Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this program Fiber Materials, Inc. (FMIREG) will develop practical methods for preparing Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) materials for joining...

  9. Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) Gap Filler for Heat Shield Assemblies Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this program, Fiber Materials, Inc. (FMI) will develop practical methods for preparing Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) materials for joining...

  10. Limitation for performing ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of small renal masses

    Park, Byung Kwan, E-mail: rapark@skku.ed [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Zip code: 135-710, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Zip code: 135-710, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo; Jeon, Seong Soo; Seo, Seong Il; Han, Deok Hyun [Department of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate which factor is involved in limiting ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of small renal masses. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with 31 renal masses underwent image-guided RF ablation. If a lesion was visible on US, US-guided RF ablation was performed. If a lesion was invisible on US or if the lesion was incompletely ablated or recurred following US-guided RF ablation, CT-guided RF ablation was performed. We analyzed the various factors which were involved in US-guided RF ablation. Results: Of 31 masses, thirteen were US-visible lesions and underwent US-guided RF ablation whereas thirteen were US-invisible lesions and thus underwent CT-guided RF ablation. The remaining five lesions were US-visible but needed additional CT-guided RF ablation, due to incomplete ablation (n = 4) or recurrence (n = 1); these renal masses (3.1 {+-} 1.0 cm) were significantly larger than those (1.8 {+-} 0.6 cm) ablated with US alone (p < 0.05). Steam bubbles (4.4 cm {+-} 0.7 cm) of the masses requiring additional CT-guided RF ablation were significantly larger than those (2.9 cm {+-} 0.7 cm) of the tumors completely ablated with US alone in size (p < 0.05). Conclusions: US-invisibility, lesion size, and steam bubbles may limit to perform US-guided RF ablation of small renal masses.

  11. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    Kang, H W [American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN (United States); Rizoiu, I [BioLase Technology, Irvine, CA (United States); Welch, A J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-12-21

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment.

  12. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment

  13. High resolution patterning of sapphire by F2-laser ablation

    Wiesner, Markus; Ihlemann, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The ablation behavior of single crystalline sapphire with nanosecond laser pulses at 157 nm wavelength is investigated. Ablation rates of about 10 to 100 nm/pulse are obtained at fluences ranging from 1 to 9 J/cm2. At moderate fluences, incubation behavior is observed, i.e. ablation starts after material modification by a number of laser pulses. The ablation can be utilized to fabricate sapphire micro-optics. The capability of creating lenses or gratings on the tip of sapphire fibers is demon...

  14. Simulation of pellet ablation for tokamak fueling with ITAPS front tracking

    A magnetohydrodynamic numerical model and parallel software for the ablation of cryogenic deuterium pellets in the process of tokamak fueling has been developed based on the method of front tracking of ITAPS Center. The main features of the model are the explicit tracking of material interfaces, a surface ablation model, a kinetic model for the electron heat flux, a cloud charging and rotation model, and an equation of state accounting for atomic processes in the ablation cloud. The software was used for the first systematic studies of the pellet ablation rate and properties of the ablation channel in magnetic fields. Simulations revealed new features of the pellet ablation such as strong dependence of the radius of the ablation channel and ablation rate on the 'warm-up' time and supersonic spinning of the ablation channel

  15. Pulsed laser ablation of solids basics, theory and applications

    Stafe, Mihai; Puscas, Niculae N

    2014-01-01

    The book introduces ‘the state of the art' of pulsed laser ablation and its applications. It is based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. The book reaches from the basics to advanced topics of pulsed laser ablation. Theoretical and experimental fundamental phenomena involved in pulsed laser ablation are discussed with respect to material properties, laser wavelength, fluence and intensity regime of the light absorbed linearly or non-linearly in the target material. The energy absorbed by the electrons leads to atom/molecule excitation, ionization and/or direct chemical bond breaking and is also transferred to the lattice leading to material heating and phase transitions. Experimental  non-invasive optical methods for analyzing these phenomena in real time are described. Theoretical models for pulsed laser ablation and phase transitions induced by laser beams and laser-vapour/plasma interaction during the plume expansion above the target are also presented. Calculations of the ablation speed and...

  16. A New Ablative Heat Shield Sensor Suite Project

    Bose, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    A new sensor suite is developed to measure performance of ablative thermal protection systems used in planetary entry vehicles for robotic and human exploration. The new sensor suite measures ablation of the thermal protection system under extreme heating encountered during planetary entry. The sensor technology is compatible with a variety of thermal protection materials, and is applicable over a wide range of entry conditions.

  17. Ablative microstructuring with plasma-based XUV lasers and efficient processing of materials by dual action of XUV/NIR–VIS ultrashort pulses

    Mocek, Tomáš; Jakubczak, Krzysztof; Kozlová, Michaela; Polan, Jiří; Homer, Pavel; Hřebíček, J.; Sawicka, Magdalena; Kim, I.J.; Park, S.B.; Kim, C. M.; Lee, G.H.; Kim, T.K.; Nam, C. H.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Hájková, Věra; Juha, Libor; Sobota, Jaroslav; Fořt, Tomáš; Rus, Bedřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 165, 6-10 (2010), s. 551-558. ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA ČR GC202/07/J008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : XUV lasers * ablation * microstructuring * laser-induced periodic surface structures Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.660, year: 2010

  18. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  19. Liver tumor ablation

    Minimal-invasive techniques for ablation of primary and secondary hepatic tumors gain increasingly clinical importance. This is especially true since surgical resection and classic chemotherapy is successful only in a limited number of patients. Local ablative methods incorporate chemo- (percutaneous alcohol instillation, transarterial chemoembolization), thermo- (radiofrequency-, laser-, microwave-, cryoablation, high intensive focused ultrasound) and radio-ablative techniques (interstitial brachytherapy, selective internal radiotherapy). Regarding their implementation and specific effects these methods are varying widely, nevertheless all of them have a high therapeutical efficacy together with a low complication rate in common - correct application presumed. The knowledge on specific indications and contraindications is crucial to implement these methods into multimodality therapy concepts. (orig.)

  20. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred. T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article rev...

  1. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C.; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, th...

  2. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm3), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm3), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs

  3. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    Cristescu, Mircea, E-mail: mcristescu@uwhealth.org [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology (United States); Abel, E. Jason, E-mail: abel@urology.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, Department of Urology (United States); Wells, Shane, E-mail: swells@uwhealth.org; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J., E-mail: tziemlewicz@uwhealth.org [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology (United States); Hedican, Sean P., E-mail: hedican@surgery.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, Department of Urology (United States); Lubner, Megan G., E-mail: mlubner@uwhealth.org; Hinshaw, J. Louis, E-mail: jhinshaw@uwhealth.org; Brace, Christopher L., E-mail: cbrace@uwhealth.org; Lee, Fred T., E-mail: flee@uwhealth.org [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  4. Suitability of a tumour-mimicking material for the evaluation of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation under magnetic resonance guidance

    Pichardo, S.; Kivinen, J.; Melodelima, D.; Curiel, L.

    2013-04-01

    This study tests the suitability of a tumour-mimic for targeting magnetic resonance (MR)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). An agarose-based tumour-mimic was injected as a warm solution that polymerized in tissue. Thermal characteristics and acoustic absorption of the mimic were observed within the values reported for tissues. The relaxation times at 3T were 1679 ± 15 ms for T1 and 41 ± 1 ms for T2. The mimic was clearly visible on in vivo images. With lower contrast the tumour-mimic was visible on T2-weighted images, where it was possible to detect the ablated tissue surrounding the mimic after sonications. HIFU sonications were performed to induce thermal ablation on and around the mimic using a Sonalleve system (Philips). MR thermometry maps were performed during HIFU. The average temperature when the sonication was done at the tumour-mimic was 67.6 ± 8.0 °C in vitro and 67.6 ± 5.0 °C in vivo. The average temperature for sonications at tissues was 68.4 ± 8.7 °C in vitro (liver) and 66.0 ± 2.6 °C in vivo (muscle), with no significant difference between tissue and tumour-mimic (p > 0.05). The tumour-mimic behaviour when using MR-guided HIFU was similar to tissues, showing that this mimic can be used as an alternative to tumour models for validating MR-guided HIFU devices targeting.

  5. Metal particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Liu, Chunyi; Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate metal particles of Zn and Al alloys using femtosecond (150 fs) and nanosecond (4 ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Characterization of particles and correlation with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) performance was investigated. Particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation were mainly primary particles with irregular shape and hard agglomerates (without internal voids). Particles produced by femtosecond laser ablation consisted of spherical primary particles and soft agglomerates formed from numerous small particles. Examination of the craters by white light interferometric microscopy showed that there is a rim of material surrounding the craters formed after nanosecond laser ablation. The determination of the crater volume by white light interferometric microscopy, considering the rim of material surrounding ablation craters, revealed that the volume ratio (fs/ns) of the craters on the selected samples was approximately 9 (Zn), 7 (NIST627 alloy) and 5 (NIST1711 alloy) times more ablated mass with femtosecond pulsed ablation compared to nanosecond pulsed ablation. In addition, an increase of Al concentration from 0 to 5% in Zn base alloys caused a large increase in the diameter of the particles, up to 65% while using nanosecond laser pulses. When the ablated particles were carried in argon into an ICP-MS, the Zn and Al signals intensities were greater by factors of {approx} 50 and {approx} 12 for fs vs. ns ablation. Femtosecond pulsed ablation also reduced temporal fluctuations in the {sup 66}Zn transient signal by a factor of ten compared to nanosecond laser pulses.

  6. MR Guided RF Ablation and Thermometery

    Sara Eskandari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nIntroduction: Liver metastasis is detected in more than one million people in each year. Only 10% of them are eligible for surgery. Radiofrequency ablation is the most popular local ablation technique for the management of the other 90% of the metastases. Complete ablation of the lesion with a safe margin is the goal of such a local ablative method. There is no routine available technique for monitoring the treatment process. MRI is the only method which can monitor tissue ablation in real time however interaction of radiofrequency energy by MRI acquisition makes it impossible for clinical use. "nMaterials and Methods: In our in-vitro study, the effect of bipolar needles were evaluated on the signal intensity of theliver parenchyma. This evaluation was repeated 15 times. A calibration curve was also calculated from the in-vitro measurement of tissue temperature with an interstitial NTC sensor with dedicated data collecting software written by our team. Finally the correlation between temperature and signal intensity was prepared and during the RF ablation, the temperature map could be created in an almost real time manner. "nResults: Our results show an exponential calibration curve for sensors and a linear reduction of the signal intensities during the RF procedure. "nConclusion: We introduce a method for calibration of the MRI signal intensity with tissue temperature between alternative RF pulses. This method brings MR monitoring as the practical method in clinical use. By this innovative technique it is possible for all the hospitals and clinics to use their routine MR scanner for monitoring this ablative technique without any additional hardware.  

  7. Determining ablation depth using CT imaging

    Urzová, J.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Remsa, Jan; Vopálka, R.

    Kladno: CTU Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, 2015 - (Jelínek, M.). s. 17 ISBN 978-80-01-05809-1. [Progressive Biomedical Materials and Technologies 2015. 09.10.2015-10.10.2015, Kladno] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ablation depth * CT imaging * excimer laser Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  8. Kilohertz laser ablation for doping helium nanodroplets

    Mudrich, M; Müller, S; Dvorak, M; Buenermann, O; Stienkemeier, F

    2007-01-01

    A new setup for doping helium nanodroplets by means of laser ablation at kilohertz repetition rate is presented. The doping process is characterized and two distinct regimes of laser ablation are identified. The setup is shown to be efficient and stable enough to be used for spectroscopy, as demonstrated on beam-depletion spectra of lithium atoms attached to helium nanodroplets. For the first time, helium droplets are doped with high temperature refractory materials such as titanium and tantalum. Doping with the non-volatile DNA basis Guanine is found to be efficient and a number of oligomers are detected.

  9. Fundamental studies of pulsed laser ablation

    Claeyssens, F

    2001-01-01

    dopant) have resulted in a coherent view of the resulting plume, which exhibits a multi-component structure correlated with different regimes of ablation, which are attributed to ejection from ZnO and ablation from a Zn melt. OES measurements show that the emitting Zn component within the plume accelerates during expansion in vacuum - an observation attributable to the presence of hot, fast electrons in the plume. The same acceleration behaviour is observed in the case of Al atomic emissions resulting from ablation of an Al target in vacuum. Deposition conditions, substrate temperature and background gas pressure were all varied in a quest for optimally aligned, high quality ZnO thin films. Initial ab initio calculations were performed also, to aid in understanding the stability of these c-axis aligned films. The pulsed ultraviolet (lambda = 193, 248 nm) laser ablation of graphite, polycrystalline diamond and ZnO targets has been investigated. Characteristics of the resulting plumes of ablated material have b...

  10. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  11. Renal Artery Embolization Combined With Radiofrequency Ablation in a Porcine Kidney Model: Effect of Small and Narrowly Calibrated Microparticles as Embolization Material on Coagulation Diameter, Volume, and Shape

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of renal artery embolization with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles on the coagulation diameter, volume, and shape of radiofrequency ablations (RFAs) in porcine kidneys. Forty-eight RFAs were performed in 24 kidneys of 12 pigs. In 6 animals, bilateral renal artery embolization was performed with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles. Upper and lower kidney poles were ablated with identical system parameters. Applying three-dimensional segmentation software, RFAs were segmented on registered 2 mm-thin macroscopic slices. Length, depth, width, volumesegmented, and volumecalculated were determined to describe the size of the RFAs. To evaluate the shape of the RFAs, depth-to-width ratio (perfect symmetry-to-lesion length was indicated by a ratio of 1), sphericity ratio (perfect sphere was indicated by a sphericity ratio of 1), eccentricity (perfect sphere was indicated by an eccentricity of 0), and circularity (perfect circle was indicated by a circularity of 1) were determined. Embolized compared with nonembolized RFAs showed significantly greater depth (23.4 ± 3.6 vs. 17.2 ± 1.8 mm; p segmented (8.6 ± 3.2 vs. 3.0 ± 0.7 ml; p calculated (8.4 ± 3.0 ml vs. 3.3 ± 1.1 ml; p < 0.001); significantly lower depth-to-width (1.17 ± 0.10 vs. 1.48 ± 0.44; p < 0.05), sphericity (1.55 ± 0.44 vs. 1.96 ± 0.43; p < 0.01), and eccentricity (0.84 ± 0.61 vs. 1.73 ± 0.91; p < 0.01) ratios; and significantly greater circularity (0.62 ± 0.14 vs. 0.45 ± 0.16; p < 0.01). Renal artery embolization with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles affected the coagulation diameter, volume, and shape of RFAs in porcine kidneys. Embolized RFAs were significantly larger and more spherical compared with nonembolized RFAs.

  12. Graded Density Carbon Bonded Carbon Fiber (CBCF) Preforms for Lightweight Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FMI currently manufactures Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) material for Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) systems, such as the Stardust Sample Return...

  13. Graded Density Carbon Bonded Carbon Fiber (CBCF) Preforms for Lightweight Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FMI has developed graded density CBCF preforms for graded density phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) material to meet NASA's future exploration mission...

  14. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma using microwave and radiofrequency ablation

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of thermal ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using microwave and radiofrequency (RF) energy application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 190 nodules in 97 patients (84 male, 13 female; mean age 53.4 years, range 24-74 years) with HCC were treated with microwave or RF ablation in the last 4 years. The applicators were introduced into the tumours under conscious analgesic sedation by intravenous administration of fentanyl citrate and droperidol and local anaesthesia in both thermal ablation procedures. The patients were then followed up with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate treatment response. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Complete ablation was obtained in 92.6% (176/190) nodules. The complete ablation rates were 94.6% (106/112) in microwave ablation and 89.7% (70/78) in RF ablation. The complete ablation rates in tumours≤2.0, 2.1-3.9 and ≥4.0 cm were 93.1, 93.8 and 86.4%, respectively. Local recurrence was found in 9.5% nodules and the rates in tumours≤2.0, 2.1-3.9 and ≥4.0 cm in diameter were 3.4, 9.9 and 31.8%, respectively. In the follow-up period, 7.1% nodules ablated by microwave and 12.8% by RF presented local recurrence. The 1, 2 and 3-year distant recurrence-free survivals were 47.2, 34.9 and 31.0%, respectively. Estimated mean survival was 32 months, and 1, 2 and 3-year cumulative survivals were 75.6, 58.5, and 50.0%, respectively. One and 2 years survivals of Child-Pugh class A, B and C patients were 83.8 and 70.4%, 78.2 and 53.2%, 36.3 and 27.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Thermal ablation therapy by means of microwave and RF energy application is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for hepatocellular carcinoma. Large tumours can be completely ablated, but have a significantly higher risk of local recurrence at follow-up

  15. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma using microwave and radiofrequency ablation

    Xu, H.-X.; Xie, X.-Y.; Lu, M.-D. E-mail: lumd@21cn.com; Chen, J.-W.; Yin, X.-Y.; Xu, Z.-F.; Liu, G.-J

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of thermal ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using microwave and radiofrequency (RF) energy application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 190 nodules in 97 patients (84 male, 13 female; mean age 53.4 years, range 24-74 years) with HCC were treated with microwave or RF ablation in the last 4 years. The applicators were introduced into the tumours under conscious analgesic sedation by intravenous administration of fentanyl citrate and droperidol and local anaesthesia in both thermal ablation procedures. The patients were then followed up with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate treatment response. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Complete ablation was obtained in 92.6% (176/190) nodules. The complete ablation rates were 94.6% (106/112) in microwave ablation and 89.7% (70/78) in RF ablation. The complete ablation rates in tumours{<=}2.0, 2.1-3.9 and {>=}4.0 cm were 93.1, 93.8 and 86.4%, respectively. Local recurrence was found in 9.5% nodules and the rates in tumours{<=}2.0, 2.1-3.9 and {>=}4.0 cm in diameter were 3.4, 9.9 and 31.8%, respectively. In the follow-up period, 7.1% nodules ablated by microwave and 12.8% by RF presented local recurrence. The 1, 2 and 3-year distant recurrence-free survivals were 47.2, 34.9 and 31.0%, respectively. Estimated mean survival was 32 months, and 1, 2 and 3-year cumulative survivals were 75.6, 58.5, and 50.0%, respectively. One and 2 years survivals of Child-Pugh class A, B and C patients were 83.8 and 70.4%, 78.2 and 53.2%, 36.3 and 27.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Thermal ablation therapy by means of microwave and RF energy application is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for hepatocellular carcinoma. Large tumours can be completely ablated, but have a significantly higher risk of local recurrence at follow-up.

  16. Ablation of CsI by XUV Capillary Discharge Laser

    Pira, Peter; Zelinger, Zdenek; Burian, Tomas; Vysin, Ludek; Wild, Jan; Juha, Libor; Lancok, Jan; Nevrly, Vaclav

    2015-09-01

    XUV capillary discharge laser (CDL) is suitable source for ablation of ionic crystals as material which is difficult to ablate by conventional laser. Single crystal of CsI was irradiated by 2.5 ns pulses of a 46.9 nm radiation at 2 Hz. The CDL beam was focused by Sc/Si multilayer spherical mirror. Attenuation length of CsI for this wavelength is 38 nm. Ablation rate was calculated after irradiation of 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 pulses. Depth of the craters was measured by optical profiler (white light interferometry). Ablation threshold was determined from craters after irradiation with the changing fluence and compared with modeling by XUV-ABLATOR.

  17. Nanoparticle fabrication of hydroxyapatite by laser ablation in water

    Synthetic polycrystalline hydroxyapatite was ablated in water with 337 nm radiation from a UV nitrogen pulsed laser. According to transmission electron microscopy micrographs, the ablated particles were approximately spherical and had a size of ∼80 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that particles had the same structure as the original crystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the surface chemical composition was close to that of the original material. The characteristics of the ablated particles and estimations of the temperature rise of the hydroxyapatite surface under laser irradiation are consistent with the mechanism of explosive boiling being responsible for ablation. The experimental observations offer the basis for preparation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles by laser ablation in water

  18. Probable approaches to develop particle beam energy drivers and to calculate wall material ablation with X ray radiation from imploded targets

    The first subject was the development of future ion beam driver with medium-mass ion specie. This may enable us to develop a compromised driver from the point of view of the micro-divergence angle and the cost. We produced nitrogen ion beams, and measured the micro-divergence angle on the anode surface. The measured value was 5-6mrad for the above beam with 300-400keV energy, 300A peak current and 50ns duration. This value was enough small and tolerable for the future energy driver. The corresponding value for the proton beam with higher peak current was 20-30mrad, which was too large. So that, the scale-up experiment with the above kind of medium-mass ion beam must be realized urgently to clarify the beam characteristics in more details. The reactor wall ablation with the implosion X-ray was also calculated as the second subject in this paper. (author)

  19. A study of angular dependence in the ablation rate of polymers by nanosecond pulses

    Pedder, James E. A.; Holmes, Andrew S.

    2006-02-01

    Measurements of ablation rate have traditionally been carried out only at normal incidence. However, in real-world applications ablation is often carried out at oblique angles, and it is useful to have prior knowledge of the ablation rate in this case. Detailed information about the angular dependence is also important for the development of ablation simulation tools, and can provide additional insight into the ablation mechanism. Previously we have reported on the angular dependence of direct-write ablation at 266 nm wavelength in solgel and polymer materials. In this paper we present a systematic study of angular dependence for excimer laser ablation of two polymer materials of interest for microfabrication: polycarbonate and SU8 photoresist. The results are used to improve simulation models to aid in mask design.

  20. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  1. Optical-vortex laser ablation

    Hamazaki, Junichi; Morita, Ryuji; Chujo, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tanda, Satoshi; Omatsu, Takashige

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation of Ta plates using nanosecond optical vortex pulses was carried out, for the first time. It was suggested that owing to orbital angular momentum of optical vortex, clearer and smoother processed surfaces were obtained with less ablation threshold fluence, in comparison with the ablation by a nonvortex annular beam modified from a spatially Gaussian beam.

  2. XUV-laser induced ablation of PMMA with nano-, pico-, and femtosecond pulses

    For conventional wavelength (UV-vis-IR) lasers delivering radiation energy to the surface of materials, ablation thresholds, etch (ablation) rates, and the quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically between short (typically nanosecond) and ultrashort (typically femtosecond) pulses. Various very short-wavelength (λ < 100 nm) lasers, emitting pulses with durations ranging from ∼10 fs to ∼1 ns, have recently been placed into routine operation. This has facilitated the investigation of how ablation characteristics depend on the pulse duration in the XUV spectral region. Ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) induced by three particular short-wavelength lasers emitting pulses of various durations, is reported in this contribution

  3. Spark ablation device

    Schmidt-Ott, A.; Pfeiffer, T.V.

    2013-01-01

    A spark ablation device for generating nanoparticles comprising a spark generator; the spark generator comprising first and second electrodes, wherein the spark generator further comprises at least one power source which is arranged to be operative at a first energy level for maintaining a discharge

  4. Tumor ablations in IMRI

    Roberto Blanco Sequeiros

    2002-01-01

    @@ IntroductionMagnetic resonance imaging based guidance control and monitoring of minimally invasive intervention has developed from a hypothetical concept to a practical possibility. Magnetic-resonance-guided interstitial therapy in principle is defined as a treatment technique for ablating deepseated tumors in the human body.

  5. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  6. Overview of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    Amar, Adam J.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the capabilities of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code is presented. CHAR is a one-, two-, and three-dimensional unstructured continuous Galerkin finite-element heat conduction and ablation solver with both direct and inverse modes. Additionally, CHAR includes a coupled linear thermoelastic solver for determination of internal stresses induced from the temperature field and surface loading. Background on the development process, governing equations, material models, discretization techniques, and numerical methods is provided. Special focus is put on the available boundary conditions including thermochemical ablation and contact interfaces, and example simulations are included. Finally, a discussion of ongoing development efforts is presented.

  7. Laser ablation in a liquid-confined environment using a nanosecond laser pulse

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ho; Welch, Ashley J.

    2008-04-01

    Laser ablation of aluminum metal with 1ns, 800nm pulse at low radiant exposures was investigated in air (dry) and water (wet) environments. Compared to dry ablation, an approximately eight times increase in material removal rate was associated with wet ablation. Based on optical reflectance and scanning electron microscope images, bubble formation/collapse was responsible for augmented acoustic pressure and ablation performance. Numerically simulated temperature distributions during wet ablation were consistent with the occurrence of explosive water vaporization near the critical temperature of water. Strong pressure emission during liquid vaporization and jet formation can account for enhanced ablation process. Radial expansion of bubbles minimized the redeposition of debris, leading to improvements in energy coupling to the target and ablation performance.

  8. Laser ablation in a liquid-confined environment using a nanosecond laser pulse

    Laser ablation of aluminum metal with 1 ns, 800 nm pulse at low radiant exposures was investigated in air (dry) and water (wet) environments. Compared to dry ablation, an approximately eight times increase in material removal rate was associated with wet ablation. Based on optical reflectance and scanning electron microscope images, bubble formation/collapse was responsible for augmented acoustic pressure and ablation performance. Numerically simulated temperature distributions during wet ablation were consistent with the occurrence of explosive water vaporization near the critical temperature of water. Strong pressure emission during liquid vaporization and jet formation can account for enhanced ablation process. Radial expansion of bubbles minimized the redeposition of debris, leading to improvements in energy coupling to the target and ablation performance

  9. Analytical optimization of the ablation efficiency at normal and non-normal incidence for generic super Gaussian beam profiles

    Arba-Mosquera, Samuel; Verma, Shwetabh

    2013-01-01

    We suggest a general method to determine the optimum laser parameters for maximizing the ablation efficiency for different materials (in particular human cornea) at different incidence angles. The model is comprehensive and incorporates laser beam characteristics and ablative spot properties. The model further provides a method to convert energy fluctuations during ablation to equivalent ablation deviations in the cornea. The proposed model can be used for calibration, verification and valida...

  10. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    Vasilios Alexiades; David Autrique

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu) target in a helium (He) background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model th...

  11. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  12. Transpiration cooling assisted ablative thermal protection of aerospace substructures

    Ablatives are heat-shielding materials used to protect aerospace substructures. These materials are sacrificial in nature and provide protection primarily through the large endothermic transformation during exposure to hyper thermal environment such as encountered in re-entry modules. The performance of certain ablatives was reported in terms of their TGA/DTA in Advanced Materials-97 (pp 57-65). The focus of this earlier research resided in the consolidation of interface between the refractory inclusion and the host polymeric matrix to improve thermal resistance. In the present work we explore the scope of transpiration cooling in ablative performance through flash evaporation of liquid incorporated in the host EPDM (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer) matrix. The compression-molded specimens were exposed separately to plasma flame (15000 C) and oxyacetylene torch (3000 C) and the back face transient temperature is recorded in situ employing a thermocouple/data logger system. Both head on impingement (HOI) and parallel flow (PF) through a central cavity in the ablator were used. It is observed that transpiration cooling is effective and yields (a) rapid thermal equilibrium in the specimen, (b) lower back face temperature and (c) lower ablation rate, compared to conventional ablatives. SEM/EDS analysis is presented to amplify the point. (author)

  13. Mécanismes fondamentaux de l'ablation laser femtoseconde en "flux intermédiaire"

    Petite, Guillaume

    2005-01-01

    This chapter aims at identifying what is specific to femtosecond laser ablation. It reviews the essential basic processes which contribute to femtosecond laser ablation of various materials : energy absorption by the material's electrons, electronic relaxation processes involving either electron-electron or electron-lattice interactions. A number of widely used models are briefly discussed, as well as some pending questions.

  14. Assessment of tbe Performance of Ablative Insulators Under Realistic Solid Rocket Motor Operating Conditions (a Doctoral Dissertation)

    Martin, Heath Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ablative insulators are used in the interior surfaces of solid rocket motors to prevent the mechanical structure of the rocket from failing due to intense heating by the high-temperature solid-propellant combustion products. The complexity of the ablation process underscores the need for ablative material response data procured from a realistic solid rocket motor environment, where all of the potential contributions to material degradation are present and in their appropriate proportions. For this purpose, the present study examines ablative material behavior in a laboratory-scale solid rocket motor. The test apparatus includes a planar, two-dimensional flow channel in which flat ablative material samples are installed downstream of an aluminized solid propellant grain and imaged via real-time X-ray radiography. In this way, the in-situ transient thermal response of an ablator to all of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical erosion mechanisms present in a solid rocket environment can be observed and recorded. The ablative material is instrumented with multiple micro-thermocouples, so that in-depth temperature histories are known. Both total heat flux and thermal radiation flux gauges have been designed, fabricated, and tested to characterize the thermal environment to which the ablative material samples are exposed. These tests not only allow different ablative materials to be compared in a realistic solid rocket motor environment but also improve the understanding of the mechanisms that influence the erosion behavior of a given ablative material.

  15. Thermal properties of ablative phenolic resins

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Dimeski, Dimko; BOGOEVA-GACEVA, Gordana

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic resins are known for their excellent thermal properties and chemical stability and are widely used in automotive industry, electrical engineering, military industry and industry of construction materials. Their attractive properties have been especially exploited in high temperature applications. Recently a wide range of phenolic resins for different applications is available on the market. In this paper the properties of two types of ablative phenolic resins are compared: resin B...

  16. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Joseph M Stavas

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft...

  17. Ames Infusion Stories for NASA Annual Technology Report: Development of an Ablative 3D Quartz / Cyanate Ester Composite Multi-Functional Material for the Orion Spacecraft Compression Pad

    Smith, Brandon; Jan, Darrell Leslie; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    Vehicles re-entering Earth's atmosphere require protection from the heat of atmospheric friction. The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) has more demanding thermal protection system (TPS) requirements than the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) missions, especially in regions where the structural load passes through. The use of 2-dimensional laminate materials along with a metal insert, used in EFT1 flight test for the compression pad region, are deemed adequate but cannot be extended for Lunar return missions.

  18. Thin film growing by the laser ablation technique: possibilities for growing of dosimetric materials; Crecimiento de capas delgadas por la tecnica de ablacion laser: posibilidades para crecimiento de materiales dosimetricos

    Rojas R, E.M.; Melo M, M.; Enriquez Z, E.; Fernandez G, M.; Haro P, E.; Hernandez P, J.L. [UAM-I, Laboratorio de Optica Cuantica, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this talk we will present the basics about the laser ablation technique and how it is used for thin film growing, either as a single film or a stack of thin films, as well as some methods to characterize in real time the film thickness. Finally, we will discuss the possibilities of using laser ablation for growing thin films with applications to dosimetry. (Author)

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation in pancreas

    Seicean, Andrada; Tefas, Cristian; Ungureanu, Bogdan;

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation of the pancreas represents a more effective tumor-destruction method compared to other ablation techniques. The endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation is indicated for locally advanced, non-metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, without the need of general...

  20. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry-a review.

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S

    2002-05-24

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas. PMID:18968642

  1. Role of shielding in modelling cryogenic deuterium pellet ablation

    For the better characterization of pellet ablation, the numerical LLP code has been enhanced by combining two relevant shielding mechanisms: that of the spherically expanding neutral cloud surrounding the pellet and that of the field elongated ionized material forming a channel flow. In contrast to our expectation the presence of the channel flow can increase the ablation rate although it reduces the heat flux travelling through it. The contribution of the different shielding effect in the ablation process is analysed for several pellet and plasma parameters and an ablation rate scaling is presented based on simple regression in the ASDEX Upgrade pellet and plasma parameter range. Finally the simulated results are compared with experimental data from typical ASDEX Upgrade discharges

  2. Excimer laser ablation of polycarbonate-based plastic substrates

    Ablation of polycarbonate-based plastics under excimer laser irradiation has been studied, with emphasis on the influence of specific inorganic additives in the polymer to the ablation process. Such additives consisted of 0.2 μm sized, (spherical) TiO2 grains, in either 5% or 10% mass concentration. Irradiation products are analyzed, with respect to roughness and ablation, by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and stylus-profilometry. In the surface region (0-5 μm) of the plastic substrate (i.e. where additives are nearly absent), single pulse irradiation at fluences below 1 J/cm2 yields no ablation and induces the formation of a spongeous polycarbonate medium. Upon repeated irradiation, ablation of this medium proceeds and gives access to the additive-containing material. Evidences are then obtained for subsequent ablation and for a particular structuring of the TiO2-containing material surface in the form of roll-forming cells. The cell formation is indicative of irradiation-monitored melting of the polymer and phase separation between additive and polymer

  3. The changes in complete blood count in thyroid cancer patients treated with radioactive iodine ablation therapy

    Bircan Sönmez; İsmail Doğan; Canan Yavruoğlu; Gamze Can; Mehmet Sönmez

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation therapy on the complete blood count (CBC) in thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred sixty four patients undergoing RAI ablation therapy after total thyroidectomy were included. CBC results were available from the patients’ medical records at the time of ablation and at the 1st, 6th, and 12th months after RAI therapy.Results: Hemoglobin (Hb), white blood cell (WBC) and platelet...

  4. Effect of air-flow on the evaluation of refractive surgery ablation patterns

    Dorronsoro, Carlos; Schumacher, Silvia; Pérez Merino, Pablo; Siegel, Jan; Mrochen, Michael; Marcos, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Allegretto Eye-Q laser platform (Wavelight GmbH, Erlangen, Germany) was used to study the effect of air-flow speed on the ablation of artificial polymer corneas used for testing refractive surgery patterns. Flat samples of two materials (PMMA and Filofocon A) were ablated at four different air flow conditions. The shape and profile of the ablated surfaces were measured with a precise non-contact optical surface profilometer. Significant asymmetries in the measured profiles were found when the...

  5. Ablation and Thermal Response Property Model Validation for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    Milos, F. S.; Chen, Y.-K.

    2009-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was the heatshield material for the Stardust probe and is also a candidate heatshield material for the Orion Crew Module. As part of the heatshield qualification for Orion, physical and thermal properties were measured for newly manufactured material, included emissivity, heat capacity, thermal conductivity, elemental composition, and thermal decomposition rates. Based on these properties, an ablation and thermal-response model was developed for temperatures up to 3500 K and pressures up to 100 kPa. The model includes orthotropic and pressure-dependent thermal conductivity. In this work, model validation is accomplished by comparison of predictions with data from many arcjet tests conducted over a range of stagnation heat flux and pressure from 107 Watts per square centimeter at 2.3 kPa to 1100 Watts per square centimeter at 84 kPa. Over the entire range of test conditions, model predictions compare well with measured recession, maximum surface temperatures, and in depth temperatures.

  6. Simulated ablation of carbon wall by alpha particles for a laser fusion reactor

    Thermal reactions of materials heated by charged particles may lead to serious damage in a laser fusion reactor. When charged particles irradiate and heat the wall material with high intensity like at above 109 W/cm2, the material can be ablated. Once the wall is ablated, expanding gas or plasma can disturb the propagation of laser light irradiating the fuel target if it stagnates long enough for next laser shot. In order to understand the ablation dynamics in detail, we have performed 1-D hydro simulation to evaluate this ablation. As a new feature, we introduce the calculation of energy deposition by charged particles focusing on the interaction between ablated material and charged particles

  7. Hydrodynamic stability theory of double ablation front structures in inertial confinement fusion

    For moderate-Z materials, the hydrodynamic structure of the ablation region formed by the irradiation of high intensity laser beams differs from that of low-Z materials (hydrogenic ablators). In particular, the role played by the radiative energy flux becomes non-negligible for increasing atomic number material and ended up forming a second ablation front. This structure of two separated ablation fronts, called double ablation (DA) front, was confirmed in the simulations carried out by Fujioka et al. In this work a linear stability theory of DA fronts is developed for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Two models are proposed. First, a sharp boundary model where the thin front approximation is assumed for both ablation fronts. The information about the corona region that permits to close the sharp boundary model is obtained from a prior self-consistent analysis of the electronic-radiative ablation (ERA) front. Numerical results are presented as well as an analytical approach for the radiation dominated regime of very steep double ablation front structure. Second, a self-consistent numerical method where the finite length of the ablation fronts is considered. Accurate hydrodynamic profiles are taken into account in the theoretical model by means of a fitting parameters method using one-dimensional simulation results. Numerical dispersion relation is compared to the analytical sharp boundary model showing an excellent agreement for the radiation dominated regime, and the stabilization due to smooth profiles. 2D simulations are presented to validate the linear stability theory

  8. Laser ablation of multilayer polymer films

    We study the efficiency of using multilayer structures as an etch-stop mechanism in the ablation of polyimide films by ultraviolet lasers. The study is done using a photothermal model that includes the light absorption by the decomposed fragments, which shield the polymer from the laser beam, an intermediate zone in which the polymer is suffering a phase transition and the underlying unburned material. The layers are differentiated from each other through their optical properties. Variation in the optical properties of polyimide has been achieved by a proper selection of impurities. From our modeling work, we conclude that optically thin foils may be used as etch stop in the ablation process when the penetration depth of the middle layer is around three times larger than the penetration depth of the surrounding layers, this for fluences below 200 mJ/cm2. We also present some experimental results

  9. Thermal Performance of Ablative/ Ceramic Composite

    Adriana STEFAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid thermal protection system for atmospheric earth re-entry based on ablative materials on top of ceramic matrix composites is investigated for the protection of the metallic structure in oxidative and high temperature environment of the space vehicles. The paper focuses on the joints of ablative material (carbon fiber based CALCARB® or cork based NORCOAT TM and Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC material (carbon fibers embedded in silicon carbide matrix, Cf/SiC, SICARBON TM or C/C-SiC using commercial high temperature inorganic adhesives. To study the thermal performance of the bonded materials the joints were tested under thermal shock at the QTS facility. For carrying out the test, the sample is mounted into a holder and transferred from outside the oven at room temperature, inside the oven at the set testing temperature (1100°C, at a heating rate that was determined during the calibration stage. The dwell time at the test temperature is up to 2 min at 1100ºC at an increasing rate of temperature up to ~ 9,5°C/s. Evaluating the atmospheric re-entry real conditions we found that the most suited cooling method is the natural cooling in air environment as the materials re-entering the Earth atmosphere are subjected to similar conditions. The average weigh loss was calculated for all the samples from one set, without differentiating the adhesive used as the weight loss is due to the ablative material consumption that is the same in all the samples and is up to 2%. The thermal shock test proves that, thermally, all joints behaved similarly, the two parts withstanding the test successfully and the assembly maintaining its integrity.

  10. LASER ABLATION STUDIES OF CONCRETE

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-s...

  11. Ablation characteristics of electrospun core-shell nanofiber by femtosecond laser.

    Park, ChangKyoo; Xue, Ruipeng; Lannutti, John J; Farson, Dave F

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the femtosecond laser ablation properties of core and shell polymers their relationship to the ablation characteristics of core-shell nanofibers. The single-pulse ablation threshold of bulk polycaprolactone (PCL) was measured to be 2.12J/cm(2) and that of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was 4.07J/cm(2). The incubation coefficients were measured to be 0.82±0.02 for PCL and 0.53±0.03 for PDMS. PDMS-PCL core-shell and pure PCL nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The energy/volume of pure PCL and PDMS-PCL core-shell nanofiber ablation was investigated by measuring linear ablation grooves made at different scanning speeds. At large scanning speed, higher energy/volume was required for machining PDMS-PCL nanofiber than for PCL nanofiber. However, at small scanning speed, comparable energy/volume was measured for PDMS-PCL and PCL nanofiber ablation. Additionally, in linear scanned ablation of PDMS-PCL fibers at small laser pulse energy and large scanning speed, there were partially ablated fibers where the shell was ablated but the core remained. This was attributed to the lower ablation threshold of the shell material. PMID:27157748

  12. The effect of radiofrequency ablation on different organs: Ex vivo and in vivo comparative studies

    Kim, Yoo Na [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyunchul, E-mail: rhimhc@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil; Kim, Young-sun; Lee, Min Woo; Chang, Ilsoo; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo K. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purposes of this study are to evaluate the ex vivo and in vivo efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on different porcine tissues by the ablation of three different sites simultaneously. Materials and methods: A multichannel RFA system, enables three separate tumors to be ablated simultaneously, was used. RFA procedures were applied to normal porcine liver, kidney, and muscle together ex vivo (n = 12) and in vivo (n = 17). Pre-impedances, defined as baseline systemic impedances of tissues before beginning RFA, and the areas of ablation zones were measured and compared. Results: The areas of ablation zones among three organs had a significant difference in decreasing order as follows: liver, muscle, and kidney in the ex vivo study (p = 0.001); muscle, liver, and kidney in the in vivo study (p < 0.0001). The areas of ablation zones between ex vivo and in vivo had a significant difference in the liver and muscle (each p < 0.05). There was no significant correlation between the areas of ablation zones and pre-impedances in both studies. Conclusions: Renal RFA produced the smallest ablation zone in both in vivo and ex vivo studies. Muscular RFA demonstrated the largest ablation zone in the in vivo study, and hepatic RFA showed the largest ablation zone in the ex vivo study. This variability in the tissues should be considered for performing an optimized RFA for each organ site.

  13. The inverse problem in zero linear ablation of aluminizing carbon composites under high heat flux

    Huang Haiming

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of zero linear ablation is introduced to describe the mass ablation without shape change, and it is employed to design thermal protection materials under an extreme thermal environment. Aluminizing carbon composites are used as a sample to study numerically the heat response. As indicated in the numerical results, the shape of the composites did not change under a high heat flux because the phase transition (melt or evaporation of aluminum can absorb a lot of energy before the ablation of carbon, and the zero linear ablation depends on not only the volume fraction of aluminum, but also the heating period and the heat flux.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster distribution from femtosecond laser ablation in aluminum

    Sonntag, S.; Trichet Paredes, C.; Roth, J.; Trebin, H.-R.

    2011-08-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation and plume evolution of aluminum is investigated for various inhomogeneous laser pulses. For the simulations of the atoms the molecular dynamics code IMD is used. The ablated gas-phase is scanned by a cluster algorithm (DBSCAN), from which we gain a cluster size distribution of the ablated material. Per single pulse, only a small portion of the total volume evaporates into the gas phase. Therefore—to have reasonable statistics—we have to deal with huge samples (6×107 atoms). The ablation threshold is determined by comparing the depth of the holes to the applied fluence. Angular and velocity distributions of the plume are compared to experiments.

  15. A study of structure formation on PET, PBT, and PS surfaces by excimer laser ablation

    Kim, Jongdae

    Usually polymer surface treatment is performed to modify surface layers by inserting some functional group and/or by inducing roughness on surfaces to improve their wettability, printability, and adhesion to other polymers or metals. In this work, different polymer surfaces were treated using an excimer laser (LPX 240i, Lambda Physik). Polystyrene, polyethylene terephtalate, and polybutylene terephtalate were chosen as model materials for this study. Films were made by cast film processing and stretched with biaxial stretching machine. With excimer laser treatment on polymer surfaces, it was found that we could produce 1--2 micron size structures depending on material properties and film processing conditions. Materials with lower UV absorption coefficient produced double digit micron size structures, while those with higher UV absorption coefficients produced single digit micron size structures. In all these cases the structures formed only on stretched films. In addition to those microstructure developments, the determination of ablation threshold fluence was of interest mainly for understanding fundamentals of ablation behavior and technical applications. In this study, ablation thresholds were measured by various methods including ablation depth, ablation weight, and ablation sound level measurements. Among these methods, we confirmed that the measurement by ablation sound level gives the most reliable results, because this method is based on single pulse ablation. To understand the ablation phenomenon, and how microstructures can be developed during ablation, different material processing and excimer laser conditions were chosen for experimentation. During our experiments, we observed incubation phenomenon during laser ablation and showed that this incubation was significant for materials with low UV absorption coefficients. Based on UV absorption value change after excimer laser irradiation, we proposed a mechanism to explain the ablation of PS films. From

  16. Effect of liquid properties on laser ablation of aluminum and titanium alloys

    Ouyang, Peixuan; Li, Peijie; Leksina, E. G.; Michurin, S. V.; He, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the effect of liquid properties on laser ablation in liquids, aluminum 5A06 and titanium TB5 targets were irradiated by single-pulse infrared laser in isopropanol, distilled water, glycerin and as a comparison, in air, respectively. Craters induced by laser ablation were characterized using scanning electron and white-light interferometric microscopies. The results show that for liquid-mediated ablation, craters with porous surface structures were formed in aluminum target through phase explosion, while no micro-cavities were formed in titanium target owing to high critical temperature of titanium. In addition, ablation rates of aluminum and titanium targets vary with types of ambient media in accordance with such sequence: air isopropanol properties on material-removal mechanisms for laser ablation in liquid is discussed. It is concluded that the density, thermal conductivity and acoustical impedance of liquid play a dominant role in laser ablation efficiency.

  17. Numerical study of the thermal ablation of wet solids by ultrashort laser pulses

    The ablation by ultrashort laser pulses at relatively low fluences (i.e., in the thermal regime) of solids wetted by a thin liquid film is studied using a generic numerical model. In comparison with dry targets, the liquid is found to significantly affect ablation by confining the solid and slowing down the expansion of the laser-heated material. These factors affect the relative efficiency of the various ablation mechanisms, leading, in particular, to the complete inhibition of phase explosion at lower fluences, a reduced ablation yield, and significant changes in the composition of the plume. As a consequence, at fluences above the ablation threshold, the size of the ejected nanoclusters is lower in presence of the liquid. Our results provide a qualitative understanding of the effect of wetting layers on the ablation process

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    Park, Jonathan K., E-mail: jonathan.park09@gmail.com [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology (United States); Al-Tariq, Quazi Z., E-mail: qat200@gmail.com [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States); Zaw, Taryar M., E-mail: taryar.zaw@gmail.com; Raman, Steven S., E-mail: sraman@mednet.ucla.edu; Lu, David S.K., E-mail: dlu@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo assess radiofrequency (RF) ablation efficacy, as well as the patency of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPSs), in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsRetrospective database review of patients with pre-existing TIPS undergoing RF ablation of HCC was conducted over a 159-month period ending in November 2013. TIPS patency pre- and post-RF ablation was assessed by ultrasound, angiography, and/or contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. Patient demographics and immediate post-RF ablation outcomes and complications were also reviewed.Results19 patients with 21 lesions undergoing 25 RF ablation sessions were included. Child-Pugh class A, B, and C scores were seen in 1, 13, and 5 patients, respectively. Eleven patients (58 %) ultimately underwent liver transplantation. Immediate technical success was seen in all ablation sessions without residual tumor enhancement (100 %). No patients (0 %) suffered liver failure within 1 month of ablation. Pre-ablation TIPS patency was demonstrated in 22/25 sessions (88 %). Of 22 cases with patent TIPS prior to ablation, post-ablation patency was demonstrated in 22/22 (100 %) at immediate post-ablation imaging and in 21/22 (95 %) at last follow-up (1 patient was incidentally noted to have occlusion 31 months later). No immediate complications were observed.ConclusionAblation efficacy was similar to the cited literature values for patients without TIPS. Furthermore, TIPS patency was preserved in the majority of cases. Patients with both portal hypertension and HCC are not uncommonly encountered, and a pre-existing TIPS does not appear to be a definite contraindication for RF ablation.

  19. EUV ablation of organic polymers at a high fluence

    Chiara; Liberatore; Klaus; Mann; Matthias; Mller; Ladislav; Pina; Libor; Juha; Jorge; J.Rocca; Akira; Endo; Tomas; Mocek

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary investigation on short-wavelength ablation mechanisms of poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) and poly(1,4-phenylene ether ether-sulfone)(PPEES) by extreme ultraviolet(EUV) radiation at 13.5 nm using a table-top laserproduced plasma from a gas-puff target at LLG(Gttingen) and at 46.9 nm by a 10 Hz desktop capillary discharge laser operated at the Institute of Physics(Prague) is presented.Ablation of polymer materials is initiated by photoinduced polymer chain scissions.The ablation occurs due to the formation of volatile products by the EUV radiolysis removed as an ablation plume from the irradiated material into the vacuum.In general,cross-linking of polymer molecules can compete with the chain decomposition.Both processes may influence the efficiency and quality of micro(nano)structuring in polymer materials.Wavelength is a critical parameter to be taken into account when an EUV ablation process occurs,because different wavelengths result in different energy densities in the near-surface region of the polymer exposed to nanosecond pulses of intense EUV radiation.

  20. Two-Dimensional Finite Element Ablative Thermal Response Analysis of an Arcjet Stagnation Test

    Dec, John A.; Laub, Bernard; Braun, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    The finite element ablation and thermal response (FEAtR, hence forth called FEAR) design and analysis program simulates the one, two, or three-dimensional ablation, internal heat conduction, thermal decomposition, and pyrolysis gas flow of thermal protection system materials. As part of a code validation study, two-dimensional axisymmetric results from FEAR are compared to thermal response data obtained from an arc-jet stagnation test in this paper. The results from FEAR are also compared to the two-dimensional axisymmetric computations from the two-dimensional implicit thermal response and ablation program under the same arcjet conditions. The ablating material being used in this arcjet test is phenolic impregnated carbon ablator with an LI-2200 insulator as backup material. The test is performed at the NASA, Ames Research Center Interaction Heating Facility. Spatially distributed computational fluid dynamics solutions for the flow field around the test article are used for the surface boundary conditions.

  1. Femtosecond laser ablation behavior of gold, crystalline silicon, and fused silica: a comparative study

    The influence of target material on the ablation behavior of femtosecond laser pulses was investigated. Three different materials, representing the spectrum of electrical conductivities, were selected: a dielectric (fused silica), a semiconductor (crystalline silicon), and a metal (gold). Ablation was performed in ambient air using a Ti:sapphire laser, which emits radiation at a wavelength of 785 nm and a pulse width of 130 fs. Surface morphology and ablation depth were evaluated using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Significant changes in surface morphology were observed with variation of the fluence and number of laser pulses. In all materials, two different ablation regimes were distinguished depending on the fluence. Ablation threshold, which was determined from the relationship between crater diameter squared and the logarithm of laser energy, was found to depend on the number of laser pulses incident on the same spot (i.e. incubation phenomenon). (paper)

  2. Laser ablation of iron: A comparison between femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses

    In this study, a comparison between femtosecond (fs) and picosecond (ps) laser ablation of electrolytic iron was carried out in ambient air. Experiments were conducted using a Ti:sapphire laser that emits radiation at 785 nm and at pulse widths of 110 ps and 130 fs, before and after pulse compression, respectively. Ablation rates were calculated from the depth of craters produced by multiple laser pulses incident normally to the target surface. Optical and scanning electron microscopy showed that picosecond laser pulses create craters that are deeper than those created by the same number of femtosecond laser pulses at the same fluence. Most of the ablated material was ejected from the ablation site in the form of large particles (few microns in size) in the case of picosecond laser ablation, while small particles (few hundred nanometers) were produced in femtosecond laser ablation. Thermal effects were apparent at high fluence in both femtosecond and picosecond laser ablation, but were less prevalent at low fluence, closer to the ablation threshold of the material. The quality of craters produced by femtosecond laser ablation at low fluence is better than those created at high fluence or using picosecond laser pulses

  3. Development of Low Density, Flexible Carbon Phenolic Ablators

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Covington, Alan; Doxtad, Evan; Beck, Robin; Gasch, Matt; Arnold, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) was the enabling TPS material for the Stardust mission where it was used as a single piece heatshield. PICA has the advantages of low density (approximately 0.27 grams per cubic centimeter) coupled with efficient ablative capability at high heat fluxes. Due to its brittle nature and low strain to failure recent efforts at NASA ARC have focused on alternative architectures to yield flexible and more conformal carbon phenolic materials with comparable densities to PICA. This presentation will discuss flexible alternatives to PICA and include preliminary mechanical and thermal properties as well as recent arc jet and LHMEL screening test results.

  4. Computational studies of ultraviolet ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate)

    The results from our recent molecular dynamics and electronic calculations studies of the interaction of ultraviolet light with poly(methyl methacrylate) are discussed. Molecular dynamics simulations in the photochemical and photothermal regimes demonstrate the delayed onset of ablation due to the slow pressure relaxation in the polymeric material. Electronic structure calculations show the possible wavelength-dependent pathways of exothermic and endothermic release of gaseous and small molecules which could induce the ablation pocess. The results from our studies are the centerpiece for the current development of the mesoscale model of the light irradiation of polymeric material

  5. Evaluation of ablation efficiency and surface morphology of human teeth upon irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    This study investigates changes in ablation efficiency and surface morphology induced in human dental enamel and dentin upon interaction with femtosecond laser pulses at variable energies and number of laser pulses. Craters were created using a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser ablation system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, pulse width of 130 fs, and repetition rate of 20 Hz. Various techniques, such as optical and scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were used to evaluate ablation depth, amount of material ablated, and surface morphology of the craters. Ablation rate (ablation depth per pulse) was found to be lower in enamel than dentin with the maximum rate occurring at fluence of 12.4 J cm−2 in both materials. A drop in ablation rate was observed for fluence greater than 12.4 J cm−2 and was attributed to attenuation of laser energy due to interaction with the laser-generated particles. Above this fluence, signs of thermal effects, such as melting and formation of droplets of molten material at the sample surface, were observed. The response of the ICP-MS indicated that the amount of ablated material removed from dentin is greater than that removed from enamel by a factor of 1.5 or more at all investigated fluence. (paper)

  6. Evaluation of ablation efficiency and surface morphology of human teeth upon irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates changes in ablation efficiency and surface morphology induced in human dental enamel and dentin upon interaction with femtosecond laser pulses at variable energies and number of laser pulses. Craters were created using a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser ablation system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, pulse width of 130 fs, and repetition rate of 20 Hz. Various techniques, such as optical and scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were used to evaluate ablation depth, amount of material ablated, and surface morphology of the craters. Ablation rate (ablation depth per pulse) was found to be lower in enamel than dentin with the maximum rate occurring at fluence of 12.4 J cm-2 in both materials. A drop in ablation rate was observed for fluence greater than 12.4 J cm-2 and was attributed to attenuation of laser energy due to interaction with the laser-generated particles. Above this fluence, signs of thermal effects, such as melting and formation of droplets of molten material at the sample surface, were observed. The response of the ICP-MS indicated that the amount of ablated material removed from dentin is greater than that removed from enamel by a factor of 1.5 or more at all investigated fluence.

  7. CT-based temperature monitoring during hepatic RF ablation : Feasibility in an animal model

    Bruners, Philipp; Pandeya, Ganga D.; Levit, Elena; Roesch, Eva; Penzkofer, Tobias; Isfort, Peter; Schmidt, Bernhardt; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Kuhl, Christiane K.; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper was to establish non-invasive CT-based temperature monitoring during hepatic radiofrequency (RF) ablation in an ex vivo porcine model followed by transfer of the technique into a feasibility in vivo experiment. Materials and methods: Bipolar RF ablations were performed

  8. Nephron-sparing percutaneous ablation of a 5 cm renal cell carcinoma by superselective embolization and percutaneous RF-ablation

    Purpose: To report on the nephron-sparing, percutaneous ablation of a large renal cell carcinoma by combined superselective embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation. Materials and Methods: A 5 cm renal cell carcinoma of a 43-year-old drug abusing male with serologically proven HIV, hepatitis B and C infection, who refused surgery, was superselectively embolized using microspheres (size: 500 - 700 μm) and a platinum coil under local anesthesia. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation using a 7F LeVeen probe (size of expanded probe tip: 40 mm) and a 200 Watt generator was performed one day after transcatheter embolization under general anesthesia. Results: The combined treatment resulted in complete destruction of the tumor without relevant damage of the surrounding healthy renal tissue. The patient was discharged 24 hours after RF ablation. No complications like urinary leaks or fistulas were observed and follow up CT one day and 4 weeks after the radiofrequency intervention revealed no signs of residual tumor growth. Conclusion: The combined transcatheter embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma has proved technically feasible, effective, and safe in this patient. It may be offered as an alternative treatment to partial or radical nephrectomy under certain circumstances. Abbreviations: RF = radiofrequency ablation; CT = computed tomography; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus. (orig.)

  9. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  10. Radiative Ablation of Disks Around Massive Stars

    Kee, N D

    2015-01-01

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities ($10^4 -10^6 L_\\odot$) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering. Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar...

  11. Osteoid Osteoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation

    Murat Çakar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Our aim is to evaluate the results of treatment with computed tomography (CT guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for osteoid osteomas which were localized in a difficult area for operation. Materials and Methods. Glenoid, distal tibia, humerus shaft, proximal humerus, and in third finger of the hand proximal phalanx were involved in one patient. Proximal femur was involved in three patients, distal femur was involved in three patients, and proximal tibia was involved in two patients. 9 males and 4 females were aged 4 to 34 years (mean age: 18.5 years. All patients had pain and were evaluated with X-rays, CT, bone scintigraphy, and MRI. In all patients, RF ablation was performed with local anesthesia. The lesion heated to 90°C for 6 minutes. Results. All of the patients achieved complete pain relief after ablation and were fully weight bearing without any support. In all patients, there was soft tissue edema after the procedure. During follow-up, all patients were free from the pain and there was no sign about the tumor. There was no other complication after the process. Conclusion. CT guided RFA is a minimally invasive, safe, and cost-effective treatment for osteoid osteoma placed in difficult area for surgery.

  12. Lesion size in relation to ablation site during radiofrequency ablation

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A;

    1998-01-01

    performed during two different flow-velocities in a tissue bath, while electrode contact pressure and position were unchanged. Target temperature was 80 degrees C. Obtained tip temperature, power consumption and lesion dimensions were measured. In vivo lesion volume, depth and width were found significantly...... convective cooling by induction of a flow around the electrode tip increases lesion dimensions and power consumptions. Furthermore we conclude that for the given target temperature the power consumption is positively correlated with lesion volume (p <0.001), whereas the obtained tip temperature is not.......This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation was...

  13. Optodynamic aspect of a pulsed laser ablation process

    Hrovatin, Rok; Možina, Janez

    1995-02-01

    A study of a pulsed laser ablation process is presented from a novel, optodynamic aspect. By quantitative analysis of laser-induced bulk ultrasonic and blast waves in the air the ablation dynamics is characterized. In this way the influence of the laser pulse parameters and of the interacting material on the ablation process was assessed. By the analysis of the laser drilling process of thin layered samples the material influence was demonstrated. Besides the ultrasonic evaluation of the laser pulse power density the plasma shielding for 10 ns laser pulses was analyzed by the same method. All measurements were noncontact. Bulk waves in the solid and blast waves in the air were measured simultaneously, an interferometric and a probe beam deflection method were used, respectively.

  14. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... laser parameters with tissue effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to a miniaturized 2,940 nm AFXL, spot size 225 µm, density 5%, power levels 1.15-2.22 W, pulse durations 50-225 microseconds, pulse repetition rates 100-500 Hz, and 2, 20, or 50 stacked pulses, resulting in pulse...... 190 to 347 µm. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse stacking with a small, low power 2,940 nm AFXL created reproducible shallow to deep micropores, and influenced micropore configuration. Mathematical modeling established relations between laser settings and micropore dimensions, which assists in choosing laser...

  15. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation

  16. Interfacial Design of Composite Ablative Materials Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I Small Business Innovative Research project proposes to develop a multiscale computational methodology capable of accurate prediction of the properties...

  17. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob;

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures...

  18. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  19. Ablative therapy for liver tumours

    Dick, E A; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Thomas, H C; Gedroyc, W M W

    2002-01-01

    Established ablative therapies for the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours, including percutaneous ethanol injection, cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation, are discussed. Newer techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging guided laser interstitial thermal therapy of liver tumours has produced a median survival rate of 40.8 months after treatment. The merits of this newly emerging technique are discussed, together with future developments, such as focused ultrasound therapy, ...

  20. Percutaneous Ablation of Hepatic Tumors

    McCarley, James R.; Soulen, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The liver is a common site of both primary and secondary malignancy resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Careful patient evaluation and triage allows for optimal utilization of all oncologic therapies, including radiation, systemic chemotherapy, surgery, transarterial therapies, and ablation. Although the role of interventional oncologists in the management of hepatic malignancies continues to evolve, the use of percutaneous ablation therapies has proven to be an effective and mi...

  1. Comparing ablation induced by fs, ps, and ns XUV-laser pulses

    Bittner, Michal; Juha, Libor; Chvostova, Dagmar; Letal, Vit; Krasa, Josef; Otcenasek, Zdenek; Kozlova, Michaela; Polan, Jiri; Praeg, Ansgar R.; Rus, Bedrich; Stupka, Michal; Krzywinski, Jacek; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Pelka, Jerzy B.; Sobierajski, Ryszard; Feldhaus, Josef; Boody, Frederick P.; Grisham, Michael E.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2004-09-01

    Ablation thresholds, etch rates, and quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically if a conventional, UV-Vis-IR laser delivers radiation energy onto a material surface in a short (nanosecond) or ultra-short (picosecond/femtosecond) pulses. Various short-wavelength (λ free-electron laser (FEL) operated at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF1 FEL) in Hamburg. The beam of the Ne-like Zn XUV laser (λ = 21.2 nm, τ < 100 ps) driven by the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) was also successfully focused by a spherical Si/Mo multilayer-coated mirror to ablate various materials. Based on the results of the experiment the etch rates for three different pulse durations are compared using the XUV-ABLATOR code to compensate for the wavelength difference. Comparing the values of etch rates calculated for short pulses with the measured ones for ultrashort pulses we may study the influence of pulse duration on the XUV ablation efficiency.

  2. UV laser ablation of intraocular lenses: SEM and AFM microscopy examination of the biomaterial surface

    Several new materials and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses (IOLs), in order to improve their optical properties, to reduce the diffractive aberrations and to decrease the incidence of posterior capsular opacification. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of UV (λ = 266 nm) laser pulses to ablate the intraocular lenses materials, and thus to provide an alternative to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs fabrication. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates of hydrophobic acrylic IOLs and PMMA IOLs. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the morphology of the ablated area by imaging the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological appearance of IOL samples reveals the effect of a photochemical and photothermal ablation mechanism.

  3. Findings of multidetector row computed tomography of HCCs treated by HIFU ablation

    Purpose: We evaluated the efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and a long-term study by follow-up multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) was conducted to evaluate the changes occurring in the treatment area following the HIFU ablation. Materials and methods: HIFU ablation was carried out in 14 patients with small HCCs (≤3 lesions, ≤3 cm in diameter). The HIFU system (Chongqing Haifu Tech) was used under ultrasound guidance. The evaluations were performed by follow-up CT at 1 week, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the HIFU ablation. Results: HIFU ablation was carried out successfully in 11 of the 14 patients. At 1 week after the HIFU, a peripheral rim enhancement was found in all cases (100%). This finding was persistent in 6 of the 11 cases (54.5%) at 1 month, and in 1 of the 11 (9%) cases at 3 months after HIFU ablation. In all cases, the rim enhancement disappeared by 6 or 12 months after the HIFU ablation. At the 12 months follow-up, a decrease in the diameter of the ablated lesions was found. The enhancement around the treated area was found to be persistent at the 12 months follow-up in the one case of recurrence of the treated site in which the safety margin was not sufficiently wide. During the follow-up period, there were 2 cases with residual of HCC tumors. We performed radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for these residual tumors after the HIFU ablation. Conclusion: To ascertain the cause of the peripheral enhancement on follow-up CT images after the HIFU ablation, in particular, to determine whether it might be caused by residual tumor or recurrence at the treated site, careful follow-up is important, especially in cases where the safety margin of the ablated area was not sufficiently wide.

  4. M\\'{e}canismes fondamentaux de l'ablation laser femtoseconde en "flux interm\\'{e}diaire"

    Petite, Guillaume

    2005-01-01

    This chapter aims at identifying what is specific to femtosecond laser ablation. It reviews the essential basic processes which contribute to femtosecond laser ablation of various materials : energy absorption by the material's electrons, electronic relaxation processes involving either electron-electron or electron-lattice interactions. A number of widely used models are briefly discussed, as well as some pending questions.

  5. Thermal-mechanical modeling of laser ablation hybrid machining

    Matin, Mohammad Kaiser

    2001-08-01

    Hard, brittle and wear-resistant materials like ceramics pose a problem when being machined using conventional machining processes. Machining ceramics even with a diamond cutting tool is very difficult and costly. Near net-shape processes, like laser evaporation, produce micro-cracks that require extra finishing. Thus it is anticipated that ceramic machining will have to continue to be explored with new-sprung techniques before ceramic materials become commonplace. This numerical investigation results from the numerical simulations of the thermal and mechanical modeling of simultaneous material removal from hard-to-machine materials using both laser ablation and conventional tool cutting utilizing the finite element method. The model is formulated using a two dimensional, planar, computational domain. The process simulation acronymed, LAHM (Laser Ablation Hybrid Machining), uses laser energy for two purposes. The first purpose is to remove the material by ablation. The second purpose is to heat the unremoved material that lies below the ablated material in order to ``soften'' it. The softened material is then simultaneously removed by conventional machining processes. The complete solution determines the temperature distribution and stress contours within the material and tracks the moving boundary that occurs due to material ablation. The temperature distribution is used to determine the distance below the phase change surface where sufficient ``softening'' has occurred, so that a cutting tool may be used to remove additional material. The model incorporated for tracking the ablative surface does not assume an isothermal melt phase (e.g. Stefan problem) for laser ablation. Both surface absorption and volume absorption of laser energy as function of depth have been considered in the models. LAHM, from the thermal and mechanical point of view is a complex machining process involving large deformations at high strain rates, thermal effects of the laser, removal of

  6. Fundamental Mechanisms of Pulsed Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue

    Albagli, Douglas

    The ability to cut and remove biological tissue with short pulsed laser light, a process called laser ablation, has the potential to revolutionize many surgical procedures. Ablation procedures using short pulsed lasers are currently being developed or used in many fields of medicine, including cardiology, ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, orthopedics, and urology. Despite this, the underlying physics of the ablation process is not well understood. In fact, there is wide disagreement over whether the fundamental mechanism is primarily photothermal, photomechanical, or photochemical. In this thesis, both experimental and theoretical techniques are developed to explore this issue. The photothermal model postulates that ablation proceeds through vaporization of the target material. The photomechanical model asserts that ablation is initiated when the laser-induced tensile stress exceeds the ultimate tensile strength of the target. I have developed a three dimensional model of the thermoelastic response of tissue to short pulsed laser irradiation which allows the time dependent stress distribution to be calculated given the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the target. A complimentary experimental technique has been developed to verify this model, measure the needed physical properties of the tissue, and record the thermoelastic response of the tissue at the onset of ablation. The results of this work have been widely disseminated to the international research community and have led to significant findings which support the photomechanical model of ablation of tissue. First, the energy deposited in tissue is an order of magnitude less than that required for vaporization. Second, unlike the one-dimensional thermoelastic model of laser-induced stress generation that has appeared in the literature, the full three-dimensional model predicts the development of significant tensile stresses on the surface of the target, precisely where ablation is observed to

  7. 飞秒激光与宽禁带物质相互作用过程中光子-电子-声子之间的微能量传导Ⅰ:光子吸收过程%Microscopic energy transport through photon-electron-phonon interactions during ultrashort laser ablation of wide bandgap materials Part Ⅰ:photon absorption

    姜澜; 李丽珊; 王素梅

    2009-01-01

    The new phenomena induced by femtosecond lasers lead to the new area of ultrafast science.It is a significant challenge to explain the phenomena associated with complex non-equilibrium and non-linear processes.Although there is a growing body of experimental observation,a comprehensive model remains undeveloped.We review the challenges in understanding the photon absorption stage mainly for the femtosecond ablation of wide bandgap materials at the intensities of 1013~1014 W/cm2.Major opinions and challenges in ionization mechanisms are presented by primarily considering multiphoton ionization and avalanche ionization.

  8. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation byradiofrequency

    Gianmattia del Genio; Federica del Genio; Pietro Schettino; Paolo Limongelli; Salvatore Tolone; Luigi Brusciano; Manuela Avellino; Chiara Vitiello; Giovanni Docimo; Angelo Pezzullo; Ludovico Docimo

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benignlesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is anestablished endoscopic technique for the eradication ofBarrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation ofesophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA)have been reported. We report a case of esophagealpapilloma successfully treated with a single sessionof radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation ofthe lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using anew catheter inserted through the working channelof endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue wasremoved by a specifically designed cup. Completeablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy withbiopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of asa new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patientswith esophageal papilloma.

  9. Direct coupling of a laser ablation cell to an AMS

    In rare cases, cleaned samples can be directly inserted into a negative ion source of an AMS and still meet the requirements for long-term and stable measurements. We present the coupling of a laser ablation system to the gas ion source of an AMS system (MICADAS, ETH Zurich) for direct and continuous CO2 introduction. Solid carbonate samples like stalagmites or corals are suitable sample materials, which can be ablated and decomposed continuously using a pulsed laser focused onto the surface of a solid sample, which is placed in an airtight ablation cell. CO2 formed during the ablation of a CaCO3 sample is continually flushed with He into the gas ion source. The production rate of CO2 can be adjusted via the laser pulse repetition rate (1–20 Hz), the crater diameter (1–150 μm) and the energy density applied (0.2–3 mJ/pulse) of the laser (frequency quintupled Nd:YAG at 213 nm with 5 ns pulse duration). In our first test, measurements of one sample with known age were replicated within one sigma. Blanks showed 5% contamination of modern carbon of yet unknown origin. In order to develop LA-AMS into a routine sampling tool the ablation cell geometry and settings of the gas ion source have to be further optimized.

  10. Insights into secondary reactions occurring during atmospheric ablation of micrometeoroids

    Court, Richard W.; Tan, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Ablation of micrometeoroids during atmospheric entry yields volatile gases such as water, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide, capable of altering atmospheric chemistry and hence the climate and habitability of the planetary surface. While laboratory experiments have revealed the yields of these gases during laboratory simulations of ablation, the reactions responsible for the generation of these gases have remained unclear, with a typical assumption being that species simply undergo thermal decomposition without engaging in more complex chemistry. Here, pyrolysis-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that mixtures of meteorite-relevant materials undergo secondary reactions during simulated ablation, with organic matter capable of taking part in carbothermic reduction of iron oxides and sulfates, resulting in yields of volatile gases that differ from those predicted by simple thermal decomposition. Sulfates are most susceptible to carbothermic reduction, producing greater yields of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide at lower temperatures than would be expected from simple thermal decomposition, even when mixed with meteoritically relevant abundances of low-reactivity Type IV kerogen. Iron oxides were less susceptible, with elevated yields of water, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide only occurring when mixed with high abundances of more reactive Type III kerogen. We use these insights to reinterpret previous ablation simulation experiments and to predict the reactions capable of occurring during ablation of carbonaceous micrometeoroids in atmospheres of different compositions.

  11. Percutaneous Renal Tumor Ablation: Radiation Exposure During Cryoablation and Radiofrequency Ablation

    IntroductionOnce reserved solely for non-surgical cases, percutaneous ablation is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for a wider array of patients with small renal masses and the radiation risk needs to be better defined as this transition continues.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of our renal tumor ablation database revealed 425 patients who underwent percutaneous ablation for treatment of 455 renal tumors over a 5-year time period. Imparted radiation dose information was reviewed for each procedure and converted to effective patient dose and skin dose using established techniques. Statistical analysis was performed with each ablative technique.ResultsFor the 331 cryoablation procedures, the mean DLP was 6987 mGycm (SD = 2861) resulting in a mean effective dose of 104.7 mSv (SD = 43.5) and the mean CTDIvol was 558 mGy (SD = 439) resulting in a mean skin dose of 563.2 mGy (SD = 344.1). For the 124 RFA procedures, the mean DLP was 3485 mGycm (SD = 1630) resulting in a mean effective dose of 50.3 mSv (SD = 24.0) and the mean CTDIvol was 232 mGy (SD = 149) resulting in a mean skin dose of 233.2 mGy (SD = 117.4). The difference in patient radiation exposure between the two renal ablation techniques was statistically significant (p < 0.001).ConclusionBoth cryoablation and RFA imparted an average skin dose that was well below the 2 Gy deterministic threshold for appreciable sequela. Renal tumor cryoablation resulted in a mean skin and effective radiation dose more than twice that for RFA. The radiation exposure for both renal tumor ablation techniques was at the high end of the medical imaging radiation dose spectrum

  12. Percutaneous Renal Tumor Ablation: Radiation Exposure During Cryoablation and Radiofrequency Ablation

    McEachen, James C., E-mail: james.mceachen2@gmail.com [Mayo Clinic, Division of Preventive, Occupational, and Aerospace Medicine (United States); Leng, Shuai; Atwell, Thomas D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Tollefson, Matthew K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Urology (United States); Friese, Jeremy L. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Wang, Zhen; Murad, M. Hassan [Mayo Clinic, Division of Preventive, Occupational, and Aerospace Medicine (United States); Schmit, Grant D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-02-15

    IntroductionOnce reserved solely for non-surgical cases, percutaneous ablation is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for a wider array of patients with small renal masses and the radiation risk needs to be better defined as this transition continues.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of our renal tumor ablation database revealed 425 patients who underwent percutaneous ablation for treatment of 455 renal tumors over a 5-year time period. Imparted radiation dose information was reviewed for each procedure and converted to effective patient dose and skin dose using established techniques. Statistical analysis was performed with each ablative technique.ResultsFor the 331 cryoablation procedures, the mean DLP was 6987 mGycm (SD = 2861) resulting in a mean effective dose of 104.7 mSv (SD = 43.5) and the mean CTDI{sub vol} was 558 mGy (SD = 439) resulting in a mean skin dose of 563.2 mGy (SD = 344.1). For the 124 RFA procedures, the mean DLP was 3485 mGycm (SD = 1630) resulting in a mean effective dose of 50.3 mSv (SD = 24.0) and the mean CTDI{sub vol} was 232 mGy (SD = 149) resulting in a mean skin dose of 233.2 mGy (SD = 117.4). The difference in patient radiation exposure between the two renal ablation techniques was statistically significant (p < 0.001).ConclusionBoth cryoablation and RFA imparted an average skin dose that was well below the 2 Gy deterministic threshold for appreciable sequela. Renal tumor cryoablation resulted in a mean skin and effective radiation dose more than twice that for RFA. The radiation exposure for both renal tumor ablation techniques was at the high end of the medical imaging radiation dose spectrum.

  13. The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.; Kulkarni, P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of femtosecond (fs) laser wavelength on laser ablation (LA) and its relation to laser generated aerosol counts and particle distribution, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) signal intensity, detection limits, and elemental fractionation. Four different NIST standard reference materials (610, 613, 615, and 616) were ablated using 400 nm and 800 nm fs laser pulses to study the effect of wavelength on laser ablation rate, accuracy, precision, and fract...

  14. Careful treatment planning enables safe ablation of liver tumors adjacent to major blood vessels by percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE)

    Kos Bor; Voigt Peter; Miklavcic Damijan; Moche Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a tissue ablation method, which relies on the phenomenon of electroporation. When cells are exposed to a sufficiently electric field, the plasma membrane is disrupted and cells undergo an apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Although heating effects are known IRE is considered as non-thermal ablation technique and is currently applied to treat tumors in locations where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. Materials and methods. The man...

  15. Laser Ablation of Polymer Microfluidic Devices

    Killeen, Kevin

    2004-03-01

    Microfluidic technology is ideal for processing precious samples of limited volumes. Some of the most important classes of biological samples are both high in sample complexity and low in concentration. Combining the elements of sample pre-concentration, chemical separation and high sensitivity detection with chemical identification is essential for realizing a functional microfluidic based analysis system. Direct write UV laser ablation has been used to rapidly fabricate microfluidic devices capable of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS. These chip-LC/MS devices use bio-compatible, solvent resistant and flexible polymer materials such as polyimide. A novel microfluidic to rotary valve interface enables, leak free, high pressure fluid switching between multiple ports of the microfluidic chip-LC/MS device. Electrospray tips with outer dimension of 50 um and inner of 15 um are formed by ablating the polymer material concentrically around a multilayer laminated channel structure. Biological samples of digested proteins were used to evaluate the performance of these microfluidic devices. Liquid chromatography separation and similar sample pretreatments have been performed using polymeric microfluidic devices with on-chip separation channels. Mass spectrometry was performed using an Agilent Technologies 1100 series ion trap mass spectrometer. Low fmol amounts of protein samples were positively and routinely identified by searching the MS/MS spectral data against protein databases. The sensitivity and separation performance of the chip-LC devices has been found to be comparable to state of the art nano-electrospray systems.

  16. Image and pathological changes after microwave ablation of breast cancer: A pilot study

    Zhou, Wenbin [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Jiang, Yanni [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Chen, Lin; Ling, Lijun; Liang, Mengdi; Pan, Hong [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang, Siqi [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Ding, Qiang [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Liu, Xiaoan, E-mail: liuxiaoan@126.com [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang, Shui, E-mail: ws0801@hotmail.com [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We report successful experience of MWA in breast cancer under local anesthesia. • We report MR imaging evaluation of microwave ablation zone in breast cancer. • Pathological changes after microwave ablation in breast cancer was reported. • 2 min MWA caused an ablation zone with three diameters > 2 cm in breast cancer. - Abstract: Purpose: To prospectively assess MR imaging evaluation of the ablation zone and pathological changes after microwave ablation (MWA) in breast cancer. Materials and methods: Twelve enrolled patients, diagnosed with non-operable locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), were treated by MWA and then neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by surgery. MR imaging was applied to evaluate the effect of MWA. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to analyze the ablated area. Results: All MWA procedures were performed successfully under local anesthesia. For a mean duration of 2.15 min, the mean largest, middle and smallest diameters in the ablated zone 24-h post-ablation in MR imaging were 2.98 cm ± 0.53, 2.51 cm ± 0.41 and 2.23 cm ± 0.41, respectively. The general shape of the ablation zone was close to a sphere. The ablated area became gradually smaller in MR imaging. No adverse effects related to MWA were noted in all 12 patients during and after MWA. HE staining could confirm the effect about 3 months after MWA, which was confirmed by TEM. Conclusions: 2 min MWA can cause an ablation zone with three diameters larger than 2 cm in breast cancer, which may be suitable for the local treatment of breast cancer up to 2 cm in largest diameter. However, the long-term effect of MWA in the treatment of small breast cancer should be determined in the future.

  17. Image and pathological changes after microwave ablation of breast cancer: A pilot study

    Highlights: • We report successful experience of MWA in breast cancer under local anesthesia. • We report MR imaging evaluation of microwave ablation zone in breast cancer. • Pathological changes after microwave ablation in breast cancer was reported. • 2 min MWA caused an ablation zone with three diameters > 2 cm in breast cancer. - Abstract: Purpose: To prospectively assess MR imaging evaluation of the ablation zone and pathological changes after microwave ablation (MWA) in breast cancer. Materials and methods: Twelve enrolled patients, diagnosed with non-operable locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), were treated by MWA and then neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by surgery. MR imaging was applied to evaluate the effect of MWA. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to analyze the ablated area. Results: All MWA procedures were performed successfully under local anesthesia. For a mean duration of 2.15 min, the mean largest, middle and smallest diameters in the ablated zone 24-h post-ablation in MR imaging were 2.98 cm ± 0.53, 2.51 cm ± 0.41 and 2.23 cm ± 0.41, respectively. The general shape of the ablation zone was close to a sphere. The ablated area became gradually smaller in MR imaging. No adverse effects related to MWA were noted in all 12 patients during and after MWA. HE staining could confirm the effect about 3 months after MWA, which was confirmed by TEM. Conclusions: 2 min MWA can cause an ablation zone with three diameters larger than 2 cm in breast cancer, which may be suitable for the local treatment of breast cancer up to 2 cm in largest diameter. However, the long-term effect of MWA in the treatment of small breast cancer should be determined in the future

  18. Ablation and radar-wave transmission performances of the nitride ceramic matrix composites

    2008-01-01

    The 2.5 dimensional silica fiber reinforced nitride matrix composites (2.5D SiO2f/Si3N4-BN) were prepared through the preceramic polymer impregnation pyro- lysis (PIP) method. The ablation and radar-wave transparent performances of the composite at high temperature were evaluated under arc jet. The composition and ablation surface microstructures were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that the 2.5D SiO2f/Si3N4-BN composites have a linear ablation rate of 0.33 mm/s and high radar-wave trans- parent ratio of 98.6%. The fused layer and the matrix are protected by each other, and no fused layer accumulates on the ablation surface. The nitride composite is a high-temperature ablation resistivity and microwave transparent material.

  19. On the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts in strongly radiating plasmas

    The effect of strong thermal radiation on the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts is investigated under the assumption that all the laser flux is absorbed at the critical surface. Special attention is paid to adequate formulation of the boundary-value problem for a steady-state planar ablation flow. The dependence of the laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiency ϕr on the laser intensity IL and wavelength λL is analyzed within the non-equilibrium diffusion approximation for radiation transfer. The scaling of the main ablation parameters with IL and λL in the strongly radiative regime 1−ϕr≪1 is derived. It is demonstrated that strongly radiating ablation fronts develop a characteristic extended cushion of “radiation-soaked” plasma between the condensed ablated material and the critical surface, which can efficiently suppress perturbations from the instabilities at the critical surface

  20. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  1. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  2. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatmentoption for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis,thermal ablation techniques provide a valid nonsurgicaltreatment alternative, thanks to their minimalinvasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile,proven efficacy in local disease control, virtuallyunlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Differentenergy sources are currently employed in clinics asphysical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgicalthermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency(RF) currents are the most used, whilemicrowave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasinglypopular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidlybecame the standard of care in ablation, especially inthe treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFAexhibits substantial performance limitations in thetreatment of large lesions and/or tumors located nearmajor heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the FarEastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promisingresults but also severe limitations in the controllabilityof the emitted field and in the high amount of poweremployed for the ablation of large tumors, resultingin a poor coagulative performance and a relativelyhigh complication rate, nowadays shows better resultsboth in terms of treatment controllability and of overallcoagulative performance, thanks to the improvementof technology. In this review we provide an extensiveand detailed overview of the key physical and technicalaspects of MWA and of the currently available systems,and we want to discuss the most relevant published dataon MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinicalresults and to the type and rate of complications, both inabsolute terms and in comparison with RFA.

  3. Formation and characterization of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution

    Golightly, Justin Samuel

    The work presented in this thesis encompassed laser ablation of various transition metals within a liquid environment. Through an improved understanding of the ablation process, control over the properties of the resultant nanoparticles can be obtained, and thusly nanoparticles can be tailored with specific properties. Creation of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution is a relatively youngtechnique for nanoparticle synthesis, and the work presented should prove useful in guiding further exploration in ablation processes in liquids for nanomaterial production. When a laser is focused onto a target under a liquid environment, the target material and its surrounding liquid are vaporized. The concoction of vapor is ejected normal to the surface as a bubble. The bubble has a temperature reaching the boiling point of the metal, and has a gradient to the boiling point of the solvent. The bubble expands until it reaches a critical volume, and then subsequently collapses. It is within this bubble that nanoparticle formation occurs. As the bubble expands, the vapor cools and nanoparticle growth transpires. During the bubble collapse, pressures reaching GigaPascals have been reported, and a secondary nanoparticle formation occurs as a result of these high pressures. Chapter 1 delves a little more into the nanoparticle formation mechanisms, as well as an introduction to the analytical techniques used for characterization. Ablation of titanium took place in isopropanol, ethanol, water, and n-hexane, under various fluences, with a 532 nm Nd:YAG operating at 10 Hz. It was found that a myriad of nanoparticles could be made with vastly different compositions that were both solvent and fluence dependent. Nanoparticles were made that incorporated carbon and oxygen from the solvent, showing how solvent choice is an important factor in nanoparticle creation. Chapter 3 discusses the results of the titanium work in great detail and demonstrates carbide production with ablation in

  4. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  5. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  6. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for lung tumors beneath the rib under CT fluoroscopic guidance with gantry tilt

    Suzuki, Takanobu; Yamagami, Takuji; Tanaka, Osamu; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko (Dept. of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine, Kamigyo, Kyoto (Japan)), e-mail: yamagami@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp

    2010-05-15

    Background: Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors has become a treatment of choice, especially for unresectable cases. However, RF ablation of small lung lesions located just beneath the rib is difficult. Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of gantry tilting for the performance of RF ablation of peripheral lesions located beneath the rib. Material and Methods: Our study was based on 18 of 293 lesions in the lung for which RF ablation was performed under CT scan fluoroscopic guidance at our institution between October 2004 and March 2009. For these 18 lesions, RF ablation was performed with gantry tilting because a rib blocked visualization of the RF ablation route even after other attempts had been made to change the relationship between the target and the rib. Results: All RF needles, with only one exception, were successfully advanced to hit the tumor. The commonest complication was a pneumothorax, which occurred in seven procedures. No serious complications occurred. The progression-free rates were 82.4% at 6 months, 62.5% at 12 months, and 30% at 24 months. Mean local progression-free duration was 17.6+-11.6 months (range 4-36 months). Conclusion: RF ablation under CT scan fluoroscopic guidance with gantry tilt is a useful and safe technique for RF ablation of lung nodules located beneath the rib

  7. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic metastasis: Results of treatment in forty patients

    Rath G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the local control of hepatic metastasis with radiofrequency ablation treatment. Materials and Methods: We did a retrospective analysis in 40 patients treated with radiofrequency ablation for hepatic metastasis. The tumors ablated included up to two metastatic liver lesions, with primaries in breast, gastrointestinal tract, cervix, etc. Radiofrequency ablation was performed under general anesthesia in all cases, using ultrasound guidance. Radionics Cool-Tip RF System was used to deliver the treatment. Results: The median age of patients treated was 49 years. There were 13 female and 27 male patients. The median tumor size ablated was 1.5 cm (0.75-4.0 cm. A total of 52 radiofrequency ablation cycles were delivered. Successful ablation was achieved in all patients with hepatic metastasis less than 3 cm in size. Pain was the most common complication seen (75%. One patients developed skin burns. At 2-year follow-up 7.5% of patients had locally recurrent disease. Conclusions: Radiofrequency ablation is a minimally invasive treatment modality. It can be useful in a select group of patients with solitary liver metastasis of less than 3 cm size.

  8. Influence of Coupled Radiation and Ablation on the Aerothermodynamic Environment of Planetary Entry Vehicles

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Mazaheri, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    A review of recently published coupled radiation and ablation capabilities involving the simulation of hypersonic flowfields relevant to Earth, Mars, or Venus entry is presented. The three fundamental mechanisms of radiation coupling are identified as radiative cooling, precursor photochemistry, and ablation-radiation interaction. The impact of these mechanisms are shown to be significant for a 3 m radius sphere entering Earth at hypothetical Mars return conditions (approximately 15 km/s). To estimate the influence precursor absorption on the radiative flux for a wide range of conditions, a simplified approach is developed that requires only the non-precursor solution. Details of a developed coupled ablation approach, which is capable of treating both massively ablating flowfields in the sublimation regime and weakly ablating diffusion Climited oxidation cases, are presented. A review of the two primary uncoupled ablation approximations, identified as the blowing correction and film coefficient approximations, is made and their impact for Earth and Mars entries is shown to be significant for recession and convective heating predictions. Fully coupled ablation and radiation simulations are presented for the Mars return sphere throughout its entire trajectory. Applying to the Mars return sphere the Pioneer- Venus heritage carbon phenolic heatshield, which has properties available in the open literature, the differences between steady state ablation and coupling to a material response code are shown to be significant.

  9. Ablation of Solid Hydrogen in a Plasma

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment....

  10. Soft thrombus formation in radiofrequency catheter ablation

    Demolin, JM; Eick, OJ; Munch, K; Koullick, E; Nakagawa, H; Wittkampf, FHM

    2002-01-01

    During RF catheter ablation, local temperature elevation can result in coagulum formation on the ablation electrode, resulting in impedance rise. A recent study has also demonstrated the formation of a so-called soft thrombus during experimental ablations. This deposit poorly adhered to the catheter

  11. Laser ablation at the hydrodynamic regime

    Gojani Ardian B.

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation of several metals and PVC polymer by high energy nanosecond laser pulses is investigated experimentaly. Visualization by shadowgraphy revealed the dynamics of the discontinuities in ambient air and ablation plume above the target surface, while surface profiling allowed for determination of the ablated mass.

  12. Deflection of uncooperative targets using laser ablation

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2015-09-01

    Owing to their ability to move a target in space without requiring propellant, laser-based deflection methods have gained attention among the research community in the recent years. With laser ablation, the vaporized material is used to push the target itself allowing for a significant reduction in the mass requirement for a space mission. Specifically, this paper addresses two important issues which are thought to limit seriously the potential efficiency of a laser-deflection method: the impact of the tumbling motion of the target as well as the impact of the finite thickness of the material ablated in the case of a space debris. In this paper, we developed a steady-state analytical model based on energetic considerations in order to predict the efficiency range theoretically allowed by a laser deflection system in absence of the two aforementioned issues. A numerical model was then implemented to solve the transient heat equation in presence of vaporization and melting and account for the tumbling rate of the target. This model was also translated to the case where the target is a space debris by considering material properties of an aluminium 6061-T6 alloy and adapting at every time-step the size of the computational domain along with the recession speed of the interface in order to account for the finite thickness of the debris component. The comparison between the numerical results and the analytical predictions allow us to draw interesting conclusions regarding the momentum coupling achievable by a given laser deflection system both for asteroids and space debris in function of the flux, the rotation rate of the target and its material properties. In the last section of this paper, we show how a reasonably small spacecraft could deflect a 56m asteroid with a laser system requiring less than 5kW of input power.

  13. Global sensitivity analysis of the XUV-ABLATOR code

    Nevrlý, Václav; Janku, Jaroslav; Dlabka, Jakub; Vašinek, Michal; Juha, Libor; Vyšín, Luděk.; Burian, Tomáš; Lančok, Ján.; Skřínský, Jan; Zelinger, Zdeněk.; Pira, Petr; Wild, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Availability of numerical model providing reliable estimation of the parameters of ablation processes induced by extreme ultraviolet laser pulses in the range of nanosecond and sub-picosecond timescales is highly desirable for recent experimental research as well as for practical purposes. Performance of the one-dimensional thermodynamic code (XUV-ABLATOR) in predicting the relationship of ablation rate and laser fluence is investigated for three reference materials: (i) silicon, (ii) fused silica and (iii) polymethyl methacrylate. The effect of pulse duration and different material properties on the model predictions is studied in the frame of this contribution for the conditions typical for two compact laser systems operating at 46.9 nm. Software implementation of the XUV-ABLATOR code including graphical user's interface and the set of tools for sensitivity analysis was developed. Global sensitivity analysis using high dimensional model representation in combination with quasi-random sampling was applied in order to identify the most critical input data as well as to explore the uncertainty range of model results.

  14. Deposition of fibrous nanostructure by ultrafast laser ablation

    This research work demonstrated that laser-induced reverse transfer (LIRT) can be used for controllable site-specific deposition of fibrous nanostructure. The LIRT method makes it possible to generate and deposit the fibrous nanostructure of a wide variety of materials on a transparent acceptor in a single-step process at an ambient condition. The deposition of fibrous nanostructures was conducted using ultrafast laser ablation of silicon and aluminum targets placed behind a glass acceptor. Femtosecond laser pulses pass through the transparent acceptor and hit the bulk donor. Consequently a mass quantity of nanoparticles ablates from the donor and then aggregates and forms a porous fibrous nanostructure on the transparent acceptor. Our experiments demonstrated that the gap between the target and the glass acceptor was critical in the formation and accumulation of nanofibers and it determines the density of the formed nanostructure. The formation mechanism of the nanostructures can be explained by the well-established theory of vapor condensation within the plume induced by ultrafast laser ablation. Experimental results also show that the length of the nanostructure can be controlled by the gap between the target and glass acceptor. Lastly, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis shows the oxygen concentration in the nanofibrous structure which is associated with oxidation of ablated material at ambient atmosphere.

  15. Implicit Coupling Approach for Simulation of Charring Carbon Ablators

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Gokcen, Tahir

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver with nonequilibrium gas/surface interaction for simulation of charring carbon ablators can be performed using an implicit approach. The material thermal response code used in this study is the three-dimensional version of Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal response program, which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation method. Coupling between the material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in flow solver and the surface energy balance in material response code. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted in flow code, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in material response code. It is demonstrated that the time-lagged explicit approach is sufficient for simulations at low surface heating conditions, in which the surface ablation rate is not a strong function of the surface temperature. At elevated surface heating conditions, the implicit approach has to be taken, because the carbon ablation rate becomes a stiff function of the surface temperature, and thus the explicit approach appears to be inappropriate resulting in severe numerical oscillations of predicted surface temperature. Implicit coupling for simulation of arc-jet models is performed, and the predictions are compared with measured data. Implicit coupling for trajectory based simulation of Stardust fore-body heat shield is also conducted. The predicted stagnation point total recession is compared with that predicted using the chemical equilibrium surface assumption

  16. Experimental investigations on vessel-hole ablation during severe accidents

    This report presents experimental results, and subsequent analyses, of scaled reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure site ablation tests conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Nuclear Power Safety (RIT/NPS). The goal of the test program is to reduce the uncertainty level associated with the phase-change-ablation process, and, thus, improve the characterization of the melt discharge loading on the containment. In a series of moderate temperature experiments, the corium melt is simulated by the binary oxide CaO-B2O3 or the binary eutectic and non-eutectic salts NaNO3-KNO3, while the RPV head steel is represented by a Pb, Sn or metal alloys plate. A complementary set of experiments was conducted at lower temperatures, using water as melt and salted ice as plate material. These experiments scale well to the postulated prototypical conditions. The multidimensional code HAMISA, developed at RIT/NPS, is employed to analyze the experiments with good pre- and post-test predictions. The effects of melt viscosity and crust surface roughness, along with failure site entrance and exit frictional losses on the ablation characteristics are investigated. Theoretical concept was proposed to describe physical mechanisms which govern the vessel-hole ablation process during core melt discharge from RPV. Experimental data obtained from hole ablation tests and separate-effect tests performed at RIT/NPS were used to validate component physical models of the HAMISA code. It is believed that the hole ablation phenomenology is quite well understood. Detailed description of experiments and experimental data, as well as results of analyses are provided in the appendixes

  17. Pulmonary Thermal Ablation: Comparison of Radiofrequency and Microwave Devices by Using Gross Pathologic and CT Findings in a Swine Model

    Brace, Christopher L.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Laeseke, Paul F.; Sampson, Lisa A.; Lee, Fred T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of equivalently sized radiofrequency and microwave ablation applicators in a normal porcine lung model. Materials and Methods: All experiments were approved by an institutional animal care and use committee. A total of 18 ablations were performed in vivo in normal porcine lungs. By using computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopic guidance, a 17-gauge cooled triaxial microwave antenna (n = 9) and a 17-gauge cooled radiofrequency (RF) electrode (n = 9) were placed percutaneously. Ablations were performed for 10 minutes by using either 125 W of microwave power or 200 W of RF power delivered with an impedance-based pulsing algorithm. CT images were acquired every minute during ablation to monitor growth. Animals were sacrificed after the procedure. Ablation zones were then excised and sectioned transverse to the applicator in 5-mm increments. Minimum and maximum diameter, cross-sectional area, length, and circularity were measured from gross specimens and CT images. Comparisons of each measurement were performed by using a mixed-effects model; P microwave ablation and mean cross-sectional area (8.25 cm2 ± 0.92 vs 5.45 cm2 ± 1.14, P microwave ablation, compared with RF ablation. With microwave ablation, the zones of ablation were also significantly more circular in cross section (mean circularity, 0.90 ± 0.06 vs 0.82 ± 0.09; P Microwave ablation with a 17-gauge high-power triaxial antenna creates larger and more circular zones of ablation than does a similarly sized RF applicator in a preclinical animal model. Microwave ablation may be a more effective treatment of lung tumors. © RSNA, 2009 PMID:19336667

  18. Image-guided radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Is MR guidance more effective than CT guidance?

    Clasen, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.clasen@med.uni-tuebingen.de [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hoppe-Seyler Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Rempp, Hansjörg, E-mail: hansjoerg.rempp@med.uni-tuebingen.de [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hoppe-Seyler Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Hoffmann, Rüdiger, E-mail: ruediger.hoffmann@med.uni-tuebingen.de [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hoppe-Seyler Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Graf, Hansjörg, E-mail: hansjoerg.graf@med.uni-tuebingen.de [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Section of Experimental Radiology, Hoppe-Seyler Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Pereira, Philippe L., E-mail: Philippe.Pereira@slk-kliniken.de [SLK Clinic Heilbronn, Clinic for Radiology, Minimal-invasive Therapies, and Nuclear Medicine, Am Gesundbrunnen 20-26, 74078 Heilbronn (Germany); Claussen, Claus D., E-mail: claus.claussen@med.uni-tuebingen.de [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hoppe-Seyler Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to retrospectively compare technique effectiveness of computed tomography (CT)-guided versus magnetic resonance (MR)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: In 35 consecutive patients 53 CT-guided (n = 29) or MR-guided (n = 24) ablation procedures were performed in the treatment of 56 (CT: 29; MR: 27) HCC. The entire ablation procedure was performed at a multislice CT-scanner or an interventional 0.2-Tesla MR-scanner. Assessment of treatment response was based on dynamic MR imaging at 1.5 Tesla. The mean follow-up was 22.9 months. Primary technique effectiveness was assessed 4 months after ablation therapy. Secondary technique effectiveness was assessed 4 months after a facultative second ablation procedure. Primary and secondary technique effectiveness of CT-guided and MR-guided RF ablation was compared by using Chi-Square (likelihood ratio) test. Results: Primary technique effectiveness after a single session was achieved in 26/27 (96.3%) HCC after MR-guided RF ablation and 23/29 (79.3%) HCC after CT-guided RF ablation (Chi-Square: p = 0.04). Secondary technique effectiveness was achieved in 26/27 (96.3%) HCC after MR-guided RF ablation and in 26/29 (89.7%) HCC after CT-guided RF ablation (Chi-Square: p = 0.32). A local tumor progression was detected in 8/52 (15.4%) tumors after initial technique effectiveness. Major complications were detected after 3/53 (5.7%) ablation procedures. Conclusions: CT-guided and MR-guided RF ablations are locally effective therapies in the treatment of HCC. Due to a higher rate of primary technique effectiveness MR-guided RF ablation may reduce the number of required sessions for complete tumor treatment.

  19. One-Dimensional Ablation with Pyrolysis Gas Flow Using a Full Newton's Method and Finite Control Volume Procedure

    Amar, Adam J.; Blackwell, Ben F.; Edwards, Jack R.

    2007-01-01

    The development and verification of a one-dimensional material thermal response code with ablation is presented. The implicit time integrator, control volume finite element spatial discretization, and Newton's method for nonlinear iteration on the entire system of residual equations have been implemented and verified for the thermochemical ablation of internally decomposing materials. This study is a continuation of the work presented in "One-Dimensional Ablation with Pyrolysis Gas Flow Using a Full Newton's Method and Finite Control Volume Procedure" (AIAA-2006-2910), which described the derivation, implementation, and verification of the constant density solid energy equation terms and boundary conditions. The present study extends the model to decomposing materials including decomposition kinetics, pyrolysis gas flow through the porous char layer, and a mixture (solid and gas) energy equation. Verification results are presented for the thermochemical ablation of a carbon-phenolic ablator which involves the solution of the entire system of governing equations.

  20. Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases

    The liver is the second only to lymph nodes as the most common site of metastatic disease irrespective of the primary tumor. Up to 50% of all patients with malignant diseases will develop liver metastases with a significant morbidity and mortality. Although the surgical resection leads to an improvement of the survival time, only approximately 20% of the patients are eligible for surgical intervention. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation represents one of the most important alternatives as well as complementary methods for the therapy of liver metastases. RF ablation can lead in a selected patient group to a palliation or to an increased life expectancy. RF ablation appears either safer (vs. cryotherapy) or easier (vs. laser) or more effective (percutaneous ethanol instillation [PEI]), transarterial chemoembolisation [TACE] in comparison with other minimal invasive procedures. RF ablation can be performed percutaneously, laparoscopically or intraoperatively and may be combined with chemotherapy as well as with surgical resection. Permanent technical improvements of RF systems, a better understanding of the underlying electrophysiological principles and an interdisciplinary approach will lead to a prognosis improvement in patients with liver metastases. (orig.)

  1. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  2. Ablation characteristics of special concrete due to an impinging zirconium-dioxide melt jet

    Highlights: • The jet impingement tests were performed for a special concrete of core-catcher. • The ablation rate and depth were measured 1.59 mm/s and 4.33 mm, respectively. • The experimental results were estimated well between the model prediction bounds. • The material ablation was described reasonably by a convective heat transfer model. - Abstract: Jet impingement experiments were performed to investigate the ablation characteristics of special concrete, which has been developed as one of the candidate protecting materials for the EU-APR1400 ex-vessel core catcher. In order to simulate the jet impingement phenomenon owing to the reactor vessel failure during a severe core meltdown accident, the experimental facility was established and the experimental conditions were determined based on parametric studies. The special concrete specimen was manufactured in accordance with the standard procedures, and its microstructures and physicochemical properties were analyzed to verify the requirements for the qualification. An induction melting technique in a cold crucible was employed to generate the zirconium-dioxide melt as a simulant of the corium melt. The special concrete was ablated uniformly over the impact area by jet impingement, and the average ablation depth was measured to be 4.33 mm. The average ablation rate in depth was evaluated as 1.59 mm/s using the temperature measurements of the specimen. As compared with the predictions by the models based on the convective and radiative heat transfer analysis, both the measured ablation rate and depth were estimated appropriately within the bounds of their limits. However, the convective heat transfer model turned out to predict the ablation characteristics of the special concrete more reasonably during the jet impingement even though some water content within the special concrete could lead to a sudden generation of the steam layer through which the material ablation is attenuated substantially by the

  3. A numerical simulation of ablation controlled arcs

    Godin, D.; Trepanier, J.Y. [Ecole Polytechnique, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Eby, S.D. [Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de Recherche en Calcul Applique, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Robin-Jouan, P. [GEC-Alsthom T and D, Villeurbanne, (France)

    1998-09-01

    An approach to model the ablation phenomenon of ablation controlled arcs using computational fluid dynamics was presented. Ablation controlled arcs are found in high voltage electrical equipment such as fuses and circuit-breakers. A qualitative prediction of the ablation level is critical from an industrial point of view because deliberate use of ablation is made to increase the pressure in a circuit-breaker chamber to allow for an efficient extinction when the current returns to zero. The numerical model was validated by comparing results of published experimental data. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  4. The internal structure and dynamics of the railgun plasma armature between infinitely wide ablating rails

    Frese, M.F. (NumerEx, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on computer simulations of the plasma flow in two-dimensionally symmetric railgun plasma arcs that were performed. The direction of symmetry is normal to the insulator surface, so that the rails are effectively infinite in width. The rail surface ablates according to one of two ablation models, in which either all absorbed energy flux, or only the excess over that which the rail material can conduct away, ablates mass. A number of combinations of initial conditions, boundary conditions and resistivity models were explored. The full ablation model produces an arc of continuously growing mass and length, in which the current distribution reaches from the projectile half-way to the breech. The conduction limited ablation model produces a compact arc approximately eight times the bore height in length, which ceases to ablate material from the rails before the projectile reaches a velocity of 1 km/s. There is need for further study in several areas. These include the arc initiation process, the ablation of the insulators, and three-dimensional effects.

  5. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    Y Al-Hadeethi

    Full Text Available Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX. The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased.

  6. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation

    Abdel-Daiem, A. M.; Ansari, M. Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S.; Salah, Numan A.; Al-Mujtaba, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  7. Short-wavelength ablation of solids: pulse duration and wavelength effects

    Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Chvostova, Dagmar; Letal, Vit; Krasa, Josef; Otcenasek, Zdenek; Kozlova, Michaela; Polan, Jiri; Prag, Ansgar R.; Rus, Bedrich; Stupka, Michal; Krzywinski, Jacek; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Pelka, Jerzy B.; Sobierajski, Ryszard H.; Ryc, Leszek; Feldhaus, Josef; Boody, Frederick P.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Bartnik, Andrzej; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Rakowski, Rafal; Kubat, P.; Pina, Ladislav; Grisham, Michael E.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J. G.

    2004-11-01

    For conventional wavelength (UV-Vis-IR) lasers delivering radiation energy to the surface of materials, ablation thresholds, ablation (etch) rates, and the quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically between short (typically nanosecond) and ultrashort (typically femtosecond) pulses. Various short-wavelength (l free-electron laser (FEL) operated at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF1 FEL) in Hamburg. The beam of the Ne-like Zn XUV laser (λ = 21.2 nm, τ < 100 ps) driven by the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) was also successfully focused by a spherical Si/Mo multilayer-coated mirror to ablate various materials. Based on the results of the experiments, the etch rates for three different pulse durations are compared using the XUV-ABLATOR code to compensate for the wavelength difference. Comparing the values of etch rates calculated for short pulses with those measured for ultrashort pulses, we can study the influence of pulse duration on XUV ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies measured with short pulses at various wavelengths (i.e. 86/46.9/21.2 nm from the above-mentioned lasers and ~ 1 nm from the double stream gas-puff Xe plasma source driven by PALS) show that the wavelength influences the etch rate mainly through the different attenuation lengths.

  8. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    Al-Hadeethi, Y; Al-Jedani, S; Razvi, M A N; Saeed, A; Abdel-Daiem, A M; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S; Salah, Numan A; Al-Mujtaba, A

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  9. Effect of Surface Nonequilibrium Thermochemistry in Simulation of Carbon Based Ablators

    Chen, Yih-Kang; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver using finite-rate gas/surface interaction model provides time-accurate solutions for multidimensional ablation of carbon based charring ablators. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Response and Ablation Program (TITAN), which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. Its governing equations include total energy balance, pyrolysis gas momentum conservation, and a three-component decomposition model. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) method. Loose coupling between material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in DPLR and the surface energy balance in TITAN. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted by finite-rate gas/surface interaction boundary conditions implemented in DPLR, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in TITAN. Two sets of gas/surface interaction chemistry between air and carbon surface developed by Park and Zhluktov, respectively, are studied. Coupled fluid-material response analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities are considered. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests was a Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). Computational predictions of in-depth material thermal response and surface recession are compared with the experimental measurements for stagnation cold wall heat flux ranging from 107 to 1100 Watts per square centimeter.

  10. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    Buxiang Zheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter, ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm2.

  11. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm2

  12. Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program for Spacecraft Heatshield Analysis

    Chen, Y. K.; Milos, Frank; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A fully implicit ablation and thermal response program has been developed for the simulation of one-dimensional transient transport of thermal energy in a multilayer stack of isotropic materials and structure which can ablate from a front surface and decompose in-depth. Equations and numerical procedures for solution are described. Solutions are compared with those of Aerotherm Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation Program, and with the arcjet data. The code is numerically more stable, and solves much wider range of problems compared with the existing explicit code. Applications of the code for the analysis of aeroshell heatshields of Stardust, Mars 2001, and Mars Microprobe using the advanced Light Weight Ceramic Ablators developed at the NASA Ames Research Center are presented and discussed in detail.

  13. Recent advances in laser ablation modelling for asteroid deflection methods

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2014-09-01

    Over the past few years, a series of studies have demonstrated the theoretical benefits of using laser ablation in order to mitigate the threat of a potential asteroid on a collision course with earth. Compared to other slow-push mitigation strategies, laser ablation allows for a significant reduction in fuel consumption since the ablated material is used as propellant. A precise modelling of the ablation process is however difficult due to the high variability in the physical parameters encountered among the different asteroids as well as the scarcity of experimental studies available in the literature. In this paper, we derive a new thermal model to simulate the efficiency of a laser-based detector. The useful material properties are first derived from thermochemical tables and equilibrium thermodynamic considerations. These properties are then injected in a 3D axisymetrical thermal model developed in Matlab. A temperature-dependent conduction flux is imposed on the exterior boundary condition that takes into account the balance between the incident power and the power losses due to the vaporization process across the Knudsen layer and the radiations respectively. A non-linear solver is finally used and the solution integrated over the ablation front to reconstruct the net thrust and the global mass flow. Compared to an initial 1D model, this new approach shows the importance of the parietal radiation losses in the case of a CW laser. Despite the low energy conversion efficiency, this new model still demonstrates the theoretical benefit of using lasers over more conventional low-thrust strategies.

  14. Novel Hybrid Ablative/Ceramic Layered Composite for Earth Re-entry Thermal Protection: Microstructural and Mechanical Performance

    Triantou, K.; Mergia, K.; Marinou, A.; Vekinis, G.; Bárcena, Jorge; Florez, S; Perez, B; Pinaud, G.; Bouilly, J.M.; Fischer, W.P.P.

    2015-01-01

    In view of spacecraft re-entry applications into planetary atmospheres, hybrid thermal protection systems based on layered composites of ablative materials and ceramic matrix composites are investigated. Joints of ASTERM (TM) lightweight ablative material with C-f/SiC (SICARBON (TM)) were fabricated using commercial high temperature inorganic adhesives. Sound joints without defects are produced and very good bonding of the adhesive with both base materials is observed. Mechanical shear tests ...

  15. Evaluation of a Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection During Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results

    PurposeTo evaluate whether thermoreversible poloxamer 407 15.4 % in water (P407) can protect non-target tissues adjacent to microwave (MW) ablation zones in a porcine model.Materials and MethodsMW ablation antennas were placed percutaneously into peripheral liver, spleen, or kidney (target tissues) under US and CT guidance in five swine such that the expected ablation zones would extend into adjacent diaphragm, body wall, or bowel (non-target tissues). For experimental ablations, P407 (a hydrogel that transitions from liquid at room temperature to semi-solid at body temperature) was injected into the potential space between target and non-target tissues, and the presence of a gel barrier was verified on CT. No barrier was used for controls. MW ablation was performed at 65 W for 5 min. Thermal damage to target and non-target tissues was evaluated at dissection.ResultsAntennas were placed 7 ± 3 mm from the organ surface for both control and gel-protected ablations (p = 0.95). The volume of gel deployed was 49 ± 27 mL, resulting in a barrier thickness of 0.8 ± 0.5 cm. Ablations extended into non-target tissues in 12/14 control ablations (mean surface area = 3.8 cm2) but only 4/14 gel-protected ablations (mean surface area = 0.2 cm2; p = 0.0005). The gel barrier remained stable at the injection site throughout power delivery.ConclusionWhen used as a hydrodissection material, P407 protected non-targeted tissues and was successfully maintained at the injection site for the duration of power application. Continued investigations to aid clinical translation appear warranted

  16. Evaluation of a Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection During Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results

    Moreland, Anna J., E-mail: ajmoreland@gmail.com; Lubner, Meghan G., E-mail: mlubner@uwhealth.org; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J., E-mail: tziemlewicz@uwhealth.org; Kitchin, Douglas R., E-mail: dkitchin@uwhealth.org; Hinshaw, J. Louis, E-mail: jhinshaw@uwhealth.org; Johnson, Alexander D., E-mail: ajohnsonuwbme@gmail.com; Lee, Fred T., E-mail: flee@uwhealth.org; Brace, Christopher L., E-mail: clbrace@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin – Madison, Department of Radiology, E3/366 Clinical Science Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate whether thermoreversible poloxamer 407 15.4 % in water (P407) can protect non-target tissues adjacent to microwave (MW) ablation zones in a porcine model.Materials and MethodsMW ablation antennas were placed percutaneously into peripheral liver, spleen, or kidney (target tissues) under US and CT guidance in five swine such that the expected ablation zones would extend into adjacent diaphragm, body wall, or bowel (non-target tissues). For experimental ablations, P407 (a hydrogel that transitions from liquid at room temperature to semi-solid at body temperature) was injected into the potential space between target and non-target tissues, and the presence of a gel barrier was verified on CT. No barrier was used for controls. MW ablation was performed at 65 W for 5 min. Thermal damage to target and non-target tissues was evaluated at dissection.ResultsAntennas were placed 7 ± 3 mm from the organ surface for both control and gel-protected ablations (p = 0.95). The volume of gel deployed was 49 ± 27 mL, resulting in a barrier thickness of 0.8 ± 0.5 cm. Ablations extended into non-target tissues in 12/14 control ablations (mean surface area = 3.8 cm{sup 2}) but only 4/14 gel-protected ablations (mean surface area = 0.2 cm{sup 2}; p = 0.0005). The gel barrier remained stable at the injection site throughout power delivery.ConclusionWhen used as a hydrodissection material, P407 protected non-targeted tissues and was successfully maintained at the injection site for the duration of power application. Continued investigations to aid clinical translation appear warranted.

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation of cadmium tungstate for scintillator arrays

    Richards, S.; Baker, M. A.; Wilson, M. D.; Lohstroh, A.; Seller, P.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafast pulsed laser ablation has been investigated as a technique to machine CdWO4 single crystal scintillator and segment it into small blocks with the aim of fabricating a 2D high energy X-ray imaging array. Cadmium tungstate (CdWO4) is a brittle transparent scintillator used for the detection of high energy X-rays and γ-rays. A 6 W Yb:KGW Pharos-SP pulsed laser of wavelength 1028 nm was used with a tuneable pulse duration of 10 ps to 190 fs, repetition rate of up to 600 kHz and pulse energies of up to 1 mJ was employed. The effect of varying the pulse duration, pulse energy, pulse overlap and scan pattern on the laser induced damage to the crystals was investigated. A pulse duration of ≥500 fs was found to induce substantial cracking in the material. The laser induced damage was minimised using the following operating parameters: a pulse duration of 190 fs, fluence of 15.3 J cm-2 and employing a serpentine scan pattern with a normalised pulse overlap of 0.8. The surface of the ablated surfaces was studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ablation products were found to contain cadmium tungstate together with different cadmium and tungsten oxides. These laser ablation products could be removed using an ammonium hydroxide treatment.

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  19. Leonid meteor ablation, energy exchange and trail morphology

    Zinn, John; Judd, O' Dean P.; ReVelle, D. O. (Douglas O.)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes theoretical model studies of the interaction of Leonid meteoroids with the earth's atmosphere. Subject to some modest-to-strenuous approximations we compute the rates of ablation and deceleration, energy deposition, and terminal altitudes of the meteors as functions of their initial mass and bulk density, velocity, trajectory entry angle, drag coefficient, heat of ablation, and an ablation energy transfer fraction. We find that the dominant energy deposition in the atmosphere is associated with the stopping of the ablated meteor particles and vapor by the surrounding air. Then having computed the energy deposition rates versus altitude we compute the hydrodynamic and radiative expansion of the hot wake material in the radial direction, along with the associated air chemistry. From the computed results we can then plot two-dimensional temperature contours -- as functions of the instantaneous distance behind the meteor and radial distance from the center of the wake, at various altitudes along the meteor's path. We also compute the rates of emission of radiation and the radiative efficiency, and discuss comparisons with observations.

  20. Performance Test of the Remote Operation Light Ablation Decontamination System

    Laser induced ablation studies of various materials are the topics in the laser-matter interaction. By virtue of the attainable high energies, lasers are excellent tools to induce a photoelectric response from metallic substrates. Contamination control has been a major concern for the nuclear electric power industry in recent years, but despite the positive steps taken to address the issue, important safety concern still remains. Laser ablation was shown to be potentially superior to all other methods. It is known that when laser intensity is high enough, especially in the case of high power short pulse laser, laser energy absorption occurs rapidly and only in a very thin layer on the target surface. The thin layer is thus instantaneously evaporated and removed. However, investigations into the properties of laser ablation decontamination and its possible application to nuclear facilities are still only in their early stages. In this paper, we used the light ablation decontamination system operated remotely by computer. The system was designed and fabricated by KAERI. The objective of the study is to investigate the performance of the system. Especially, the result of the decontamination test was presented

  1. Sonography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma

    Yu Mingan [Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Liang Ping, E-mail: Liangping301@hotmail.com [Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Yu Xiaoling; Cheng Zhigang; Han Zhiyu; Liu Fangyi; Yu Jie [Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sonography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma. Materials and methods: From May 2006 to March 2010, 15 patients (11 men, 4 women; mean age, 57.4 years) with 24 histologically proven intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma lesions (mean tumor size, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 cm; range, 1.3-9.9 cm) were treated with microwave ablation. Results: Thirty-eight sessions were performed for 24 nodules in 15 patients. The follow-up period was 4-31 months (mean, 12.8 {+-} 8.0 months). The ablation success rate, the technique effectiveness rate, and the local tumor progression rate were 91.7% (22/24), 87.5% (21/24), and 25% (6/24) respectively according to the results of follow-up. The cumulative overall 6, 12, 24 month survival rates were 78.8%, 60.0%, and 60.0%, respectively. Major complication occurred including liver abscess in two patients (13.3%) and needle seeding in one patient (6.7%). Both complications were cured satisfied with antibiotic treatment combined to catheter drainage for abscess and resection for needle seeding. The minor complications and side effects were experienced by most patients which subsided with supportive treatment. Conclusion: Microwave ablation can be used as a safe and effective technique to treat intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma.

  2. Sonography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sonography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma. Materials and methods: From May 2006 to March 2010, 15 patients (11 men, 4 women; mean age, 57.4 years) with 24 histologically proven intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma lesions (mean tumor size, 3.2 ± 1.9 cm; range, 1.3-9.9 cm) were treated with microwave ablation. Results: Thirty-eight sessions were performed for 24 nodules in 15 patients. The follow-up period was 4-31 months (mean, 12.8 ± 8.0 months). The ablation success rate, the technique effectiveness rate, and the local tumor progression rate were 91.7% (22/24), 87.5% (21/24), and 25% (6/24) respectively according to the results of follow-up. The cumulative overall 6, 12, 24 month survival rates were 78.8%, 60.0%, and 60.0%, respectively. Major complication occurred including liver abscess in two patients (13.3%) and needle seeding in one patient (6.7%). Both complications were cured satisfied with antibiotic treatment combined to catheter drainage for abscess and resection for needle seeding. The minor complications and side effects were experienced by most patients which subsided with supportive treatment. Conclusion: Microwave ablation can be used as a safe and effective technique to treat intrahepatic primary cholangiocarcinoma.

  3. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    Nemchinsky, V. A. [Keiser University, Fort Lauderdale Campus, FL, 33309, USA; Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-05-18

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  4. Laser ablation synthesis of indium oxide nanoparticles in water

    Acacia, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Ingegneria Elettronica, Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Barreca, F., E-mail: process@anmresearch.it [Advanced and Nano Materials Research s.r.l., Salita Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Barletta, E.; Spadaro, D.; Curro, G. [Advanced and Nano Materials Research s.r.l., Salita Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Neri, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica della Materia e Ingegneria Elettronica, Universita di Messina, Salita Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    Colloidal solutions of Indium oxide nanoparticles have been produced by means of laser ablation in liquids (LALs) technique by simply irradiating with a second harmonic (532 nm) Nd:YAG laser beam a metallic indium target immersed in distilled water and varying the laser fluence up to 10 J cm{sup -2} and the ablation time up to 120 min. At all the investigated fluences the vaporization process of the indium target is the dominant one. It produces a majority (>80%) of small size (<6 nm) nanoparticles, with a very limited content of larger ones (size between 10 and 20 nm). The amount of particles increases regularly with the ablation time, supporting the scalability of the production technique. The deposited nanoparticles stoichiometry has been verified by both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Optical bandgap values of 3.70 eV were determined by UV-vis absorption measurements. All these results confirm the complete oxidation of the ablated material.

  5. Performance Test of the Remote Operation Light Ablation Decontamination System

    Won, Hui Jun; Jung, Sun Hee; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Byung Seon; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Laser induced ablation studies of various materials are the topics in the laser-matter interaction. By virtue of the attainable high energies, lasers are excellent tools to induce a photoelectric response from metallic substrates. Contamination control has been a major concern for the nuclear electric power industry in recent years, but despite the positive steps taken to address the issue, important safety concern still remains. Laser ablation was shown to be potentially superior to all other methods. It is known that when laser intensity is high enough, especially in the case of high power short pulse laser, laser energy absorption occurs rapidly and only in a very thin layer on the target surface. The thin layer is thus instantaneously evaporated and removed. However, investigations into the properties of laser ablation decontamination and its possible application to nuclear facilities are still only in their early stages. In this paper, we used the light ablation decontamination system operated remotely by computer. The system was designed and fabricated by KAERI. The objective of the study is to investigate the performance of the system. Especially, the result of the decontamination test was presented

  6. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets of standard reference materials using femtosecond (150fs) and nanosecond (4ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the collected particles revealed that there are more and larger agglomerations of particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation. In contrast to the earlier findings for metal alloy samples, no correlation between the concentration of major elements and the median particle size was found. When the current data on glass were compared with the metal alloy data, there were clear differences in terms of particle size, crater depth, heat affected zone, and ICP-MS response. For example, glass particles were larger than metal alloy particles, the craters in glass were less deep than craters in metal alloys, and damage to the sample was less pronounced in glass compared to metal alloys samples. The femtosecond laser generated more intense ICP-MS signals compared to nanosecond laser ablation for both types of samples, although glass sample behavior was more similar between ns and fs-laser ablation than for metals alloys.

  7. Laser ablation synthesis of indium oxide nanoparticles in water

    Colloidal solutions of Indium oxide nanoparticles have been produced by means of laser ablation in liquids (LALs) technique by simply irradiating with a second harmonic (532 nm) Nd:YAG laser beam a metallic indium target immersed in distilled water and varying the laser fluence up to 10 J cm-2 and the ablation time up to 120 min. At all the investigated fluences the vaporization process of the indium target is the dominant one. It produces a majority (>80%) of small size (<6 nm) nanoparticles, with a very limited content of larger ones (size between 10 and 20 nm). The amount of particles increases regularly with the ablation time, supporting the scalability of the production technique. The deposited nanoparticles stoichiometry has been verified by both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Optical bandgap values of 3.70 eV were determined by UV-vis absorption measurements. All these results confirm the complete oxidation of the ablated material.

  8. Freedom from atrial fibrillation after cox maze III ablation during follow-up

    Fariborz Akbarzadeh; Rezayat Parvizi; Naser Safaie; Mohammad-Mahdi Karbalaei; Bita Hazhir-Karzar; Babak Bagheri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nearly 60% of patients undergoing mitral valve (MV) operations are affected by atrial fibrillation (AF). Cox Maze III ablation is one of the effective ways for restoring sinus rhythm for patients undergoing open heart surgery. The aim of present study was to evaluate efficacy of Maze III ablation procedure for restoring sinus rhythm among patients who had underwent open heart surgery. Materials and Methods: During present descriptive-analytic prospective study 114 patients with ch...

  9. X-ray ablation of hyaluronan hydrogels: Fabrication of three-dimensional microchannel networks

    Weon, B. M.; Chang, S.; Yeom, J.; Hahn, S. K.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.; Margaritondo, G.

    2009-09-01

    We present a simple and highly versatile protocol for polymer ablation: hard x-ray irradiation makes it possible to rapidly depolymerize hyaluronan hydrogels and fabricate three-dimensional network of microchannels. Photodynamic and photochemical analyses show that x-ray irradiation directly cleaves the polymer backbone and the total dose controls the degradation kinetics. This nonthermal ablation protocol may offer opportunities for processing organic polymers and biological materials.

  10. Emission characteristics of laser ablation-hollow cathode glow discharge spectral source

    Karatodorov Stefan; Mihailov Valentin; Grozeva Margarita

    2014-01-01

    The emission characteristics of a scheme combining laser ablation as sample introduction source and hollow cathode discharge as excitation source are presented. The spatial separation of the sample material introduction by laser ablation and hollow cathode excitation is achieved by optimizing the gas pressure and the sample-cathode gap length. At these conditions the discharge current is maximized to enhance the analytical lines intensity.

  11. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4±0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA

  12. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of a metal, a dielectric and a semiconductor illuminated at oblique angles of incidence

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Petrarca, Massimo; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    We report the measurements of fluence thresholds for single-shot femtosecond laser ablation, as functions of the angle of incidence and at different polarizations of the laser beam, for a metal, a dielectric and a semiconductor. We use the linear index of refraction, unperturbed by the ablating laser pulse, to compute the values of the laser fluence transmitted into the material, corresponding to the measured values of the ablation threshold fluence in the incident beam. Our data show that, in spite of the complex nonlinear ionization dynamics involved in the ablation process, thus computed transmitted threshold fluence is remarkably independent of the angle of incidence and polarization of the laser beam, for all three material types. We suggest that the angular dependence of ablation threshold can be utilized for profiling fluence distributions in ultra-intense femtosecond laser beams.

  14. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  15. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Russo, Richard E., E-mail: rerusso@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Bol' shakov, Alexander A. [Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Mao Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McKay, Christopher P. [NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method - LAMIS - can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  16. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  17. Doping He droplets by laser ablation with a pulsed supersonic jet source

    Katzy, R.; Singer, M.; Izadnia, S.; LaForge, A. C., E-mail: aaron.laforge@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Stienkemeier, F. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Laser ablation offers the possibility to study a rich number of atoms, molecules, and clusters in the gas phase. By attaching laser ablated materials to helium nanodroplets, one can gain highly resolved spectra of isolated species in a cold, weakly perturbed system. Here, we present a new setup for doping pulsed helium nanodroplet beams by means of laser ablation. In comparison to more well-established techniques using a continuous nozzle, pulsed nozzles show significant differences in the doping efficiency depending on certain experimental parameters (e.g., position of the ablation plume with respect to the droplet formation, nozzle design, and expansion conditions). In particular, we demonstrate that when the ablation region overlaps with the droplet formation region, one also creates a supersonic beam of helium atoms seeded with the sample material. The processes are characterized using a surface ionization detector. The overall doping signal is compared to that of conventional oven cell doping showing very similar dependence on helium stagnation conditions, indicating a comparable doping process. Finally, the ablated material was spectroscopically studied via laser induced fluorescence.

  18. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    Canteli, D., E-mail: david.canteli@ciemat.es [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ctra. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Torres, I.; Gandia, J.J. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 Degree-Sign C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  19. Doping He droplets by laser ablation with a pulsed supersonic jet source

    Laser ablation offers the possibility to study a rich number of atoms, molecules, and clusters in the gas phase. By attaching laser ablated materials to helium nanodroplets, one can gain highly resolved spectra of isolated species in a cold, weakly perturbed system. Here, we present a new setup for doping pulsed helium nanodroplet beams by means of laser ablation. In comparison to more well-established techniques using a continuous nozzle, pulsed nozzles show significant differences in the doping efficiency depending on certain experimental parameters (e.g., position of the ablation plume with respect to the droplet formation, nozzle design, and expansion conditions). In particular, we demonstrate that when the ablation region overlaps with the droplet formation region, one also creates a supersonic beam of helium atoms seeded with the sample material. The processes are characterized using a surface ionization detector. The overall doping signal is compared to that of conventional oven cell doping showing very similar dependence on helium stagnation conditions, indicating a comparable doping process. Finally, the ablated material was spectroscopically studied via laser induced fluorescence

  20. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    Highlights: ► A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. ► The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. ► A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 °C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  1. 915 MHz microwave ablation with high output power in in vivo porcine spleens

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 915 MHz microwave (MW) ablation with high output power in in vivo porcine spleens. Materials and methods: MW ablations were performed in 9 porcine spleens with an internally cooled 915 MHz antenna. Thermocouples were placed at 5, 10, 15, 20 mm away from the antenna to measure temperatures in real-time during MW emission. The energy was applied for 10 min at high output power of 60 W, 70 W or 80 W. Gross specimens were sectioned and measured to determine ablation size. Representative areas were examined by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Coagulation sizes and temperatures were compared among the three power groups. Results: Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed irreversible necrosis in the splenic coagulation area after MW ablation. As the power was increased, long-axis diameter enlarged significantly (p .05). The coagulation size of long-axis and short-axis diameter with 80 W in vivo spleen ablation was 6.43 ± 0.52 and 4.95 ± 0.30 cm, respectively. With the increase of output power, maximum temperatures at 5, 10, 15, 20 mm from the antenna were increased accordingly (p oC respectively. Conclusion: With internally cooled antenna and high output power, 915 MHz MW ablation in the spleen could produce irreversible tissue necrosis of clinical significance. MW ablation may be used as a promising minimally invasive method for the treatment of splenic diseases.

  2. Percutaneous laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation

    Pompili, Maurizio, E-mail: mpompili@rm.unicatt.i [Department of Internal Medicine, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, 00168 Roma (Italy); Pacella, Claudio Maurizio, E-mail: claudiomauriziopacella@gmail.co [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Ospedale Regina Apostolorum, Via S. Francesco D' Assisi, 50, 00041 Albano Laziale (RM) (Italy); Francica, Giampiero, E-mail: giampierofrancica@tin.i [Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Presidio Ospedaliero Camilliani, S. Maria della Pieta, Via S. Rocco, 9, 80026 Casoria (Namibia) (Italy); Angelico, Mario, E-mail: angelico@med.uniroma2.i [Hepatology Unit, Universita di Tor Vergata, Viale Oxford, 81, 00133 Rome (Italy); Tisone, Giuseppe, E-mail: tisone@med.uniroma2.i [Transplant and General Surgery Unit, Universita di Tor Vergata, Ospedale S. Eugenio, Piazzale dell' Umanesimo 10-00144 Rome (Italy); Craboledda, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.craboledda@virgilio.i [Department of Pathology, Ospedale S. Eugenio, Piazzale dell' Umanesimo, 10-00144 Rome (Italy); Nicolardi, Erica; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Gasbarrini, Giovanni [Department of Internal Medicine, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, 00168 Roma (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous laser ablation for the treatment of cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation. Materials and methods: The data of 9 male cirrhotic patients (mean age 50 years, range 45-60 years) with 12 biopsy proven nodules of hepatocellular carcinoma (mean diameter 2.0 cm, range 1.0-3.0 cm) treated by laser ablation before liver transplantation between June 2000 and January 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Laser ablation was carried out by inserting 300 nm optical fibers through 21-Gauge needles (from two to four) positioned under ultrasound guidance into the target lesions. A continuous wave Neodymium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet laser was used. Transarterial chemoembolization prior to liver transplantation was performed in two incompletely ablated tumors. Results: No procedure-related major complications were recorded. During the waiting time to liver transplantation local tumor progression after ablation occurred in 3 nodules (25%). At histological examination of the explanted livers complete necrosis was found in 8 nodules (66.7%, all treated exclusively with laser ablation), partial necrosis >50% in 3 nodules (25%), and partial necrosis <50% in 1 nodule. Conclusion: In patients with cirrhotic livers awaiting liver transplantation, percutaneous laser ablation is safe and effective for the management of small hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Percutaneous laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous laser ablation for the treatment of cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation. Materials and methods: The data of 9 male cirrhotic patients (mean age 50 years, range 45-60 years) with 12 biopsy proven nodules of hepatocellular carcinoma (mean diameter 2.0 cm, range 1.0-3.0 cm) treated by laser ablation before liver transplantation between June 2000 and January 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Laser ablation was carried out by inserting 300 nm optical fibers through 21-Gauge needles (from two to four) positioned under ultrasound guidance into the target lesions. A continuous wave Neodymium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet laser was used. Transarterial chemoembolization prior to liver transplantation was performed in two incompletely ablated tumors. Results: No procedure-related major complications were recorded. During the waiting time to liver transplantation local tumor progression after ablation occurred in 3 nodules (25%). At histological examination of the explanted livers complete necrosis was found in 8 nodules (66.7%, all treated exclusively with laser ablation), partial necrosis >50% in 3 nodules (25%), and partial necrosis <50% in 1 nodule. Conclusion: In patients with cirrhotic livers awaiting liver transplantation, percutaneous laser ablation is safe and effective for the management of small hepatocellular carcinoma.

  4. Laser-dye ablation technique for removal of carious dentin and enamel

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Gillings, Barrie R.; Dawes, Judith M.

    1997-05-01

    A GaAlAs semiconductor diode laser operating at a wavelength of 796 nm has been sued in conjunction with Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye to ablate carious dentin and enamel from extracted human teeth. The laser-dye ablation technique offers selective ablation as it is controlled by the placement of the ICG dye. In contrast with other laser techniques, the risk of collateral thermal damage is substantially reduced. The diode laser is suitable for ordinary fiber delivery and is cheaper and more compact than the higher power CO2; Er:YAG, Nd:YAG and Argon lasers currently being used by researchers. This paper reports the ablation of dental caries in fifty extracted teeth with various laser diode powers and dye concentrations. The mass of material ablated, temperature rise in the pulp and surface temperature were measured. The ablation was found to be efficient with negligible thermal damage to surrounding tissue. At the same time average surface temperatures reached during ablation may be sufficient to sterilize the treated surface. Hardness measurements and scanning electron microscopy of the laser treated cavity surfaces show the new surfaces to be suitable for placement of a dental filling.

  5. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck,; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop dur...

  6. Ablation of metals by extreme-ultraviolet pulsed laser

    Lančok, Ján; Pira, P.; Burian, Tomáš; Juha, Libor; Vyšín, Luděk; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Wild, J.

    Lille: European Materials Research Society, 2014 - (Lippert, T.). J-2-J-2 [E- MRS 2014 Spring Meeting. 26.05.2014-30.05.2014, Lille] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312 Grant ostatní: SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : XUV laser * ablation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  7. Special regime of liquid-assisted laser ablation of ceramics

    Sinev, D. A.; Dobrina, D. A.; Strusevich, A. V.; Veiko, V. P.; Baranov, M. A.; Yakusheva, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Results of experimental study the peculiarities of liquid-assisted laser ablation of alumina-silicate ceramics are reported giving attention particularly to effect of thin-wall glass macrosphere appearance at the end of irradiation onto a formed hole in bulk material. Typical times of formation, size and temperature dynamics, and chemical composition were determined; kinetics and mechanism of formation are discussed in presented paper.

  8. Follow-up results of laser saphenous ablation

    Mehmet Erdem Memetoğlu; Ozan Erbasan; Deniz Özel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study aimed to evaluatethe efficacy and durability of endovenous laser ablationwith 940 nanometer wavelength with at least one-yearfollow-up.Materials and methods: Between December 2009 andFebruary 2012, a total of 68 incompetent great saphenousveins and 4 small saphenous veins were treated byendovenous laser ablation, using 940 nanometer wavelengths.Patients underwent standard clinical and duplexfollow-up examinations with a mean of 18 months (range12 to 26 mon...

  9. Caries selective ablation: the handpiece

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    1995-05-01

    Caries selective ablation is fixed to a window of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of carious and healthy dentin, respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which acts in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium fall exactly into the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. Fluences are constant if the handpiece is used in contact mode or at a distance. Normally the surface of a bare fiber working in contact mode is destroyed after a few shots. Coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  10. Transient Ablation Regime in Circuit Breakers

    Alexandre, Martin; Jean-Yves, Trepanier; Marcelo, Reggio; Guo, Xueyan

    2007-12-01

    Nozzle wall ablation caused by high temperature electric arcs is studied in the context of high voltage SF6 circuit breakers. The simplified ablation model used in litterature has been updated to take into account the unsteady state of ablation. Ablation rate and velocity are now calculated by a kinetic model using two layers of transition, between the bulk plasma and the ablating wall. The first layer (Knudsen layer), right by the wall, is a kinetic layer of a few mean-free path of thickness. The second layer is collision dominated and makes the transition between the kinetic layer and the plasma bulk. With this new coupled algorithm, it is now possible to calculate the temperature distribution inside the wall, as well as more accurate ablation rates.

  11. Explosive character of the atheroma plaques ablation

    At the present time, ischemia (heart disease) is a main cause of the death in the world; a promising method for its treatment is the use of the technology of the laser light of raised power for the ablation of the atherosclerosis plaques. In this paper, the thermodynamic processes will be studied at the beginning and during atheroma ablation using Nd-YAG (10-50 w) and Argon (4-10 w) lasers of a theoretical point of view. The spatial distribution of the temperature during the ablation has been modelated by the method of finite volumes. The manifestation of the raised temperature of the tissue at the threshold of the ablation, which describes the explosive nature of the ablation by laser (popcorn effect), is observed and discussed. The results indicate the quantitative differences in the ablation behavior between the two used lasers, which can have important clinical implications particularly in the reduction of thermal damages to surrounding normal tissue. (author)

  12. Analytical model for CO(2) laser ablation of fused quartz.

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Baker, Howard J; Hall, Denis R

    2015-10-10

    This paper reports the development of an analytical model, with supporting experimental data, which quite accurately describes the key features of CO2 laser ablation of fused silica glass. The quantitative model of nonexplosive, evaporative material removal is shown to match the experimental data very well, to the extent that it can be used as a tool for ablative measurements of absorption coefficient and vaporization energy. The experimental results indicated that a minimum of 12  MJ kg-1 is required to fully vaporize fused quartz initially held at room temperature, which is in good agreement with the prediction of the model supplied with input data available in the literature. An optimal window for the machining of fused quartz was revealed in terms of pulse duration 20-80 μs and CO2 laser wavelength optimized for maximum absorption coefficient. Material removal rates of 0.33 μm per J cm-2 allow for a high-precision depth control with modest laser stability. The model may also be used as a parameter selection guide for CO2 laser ablation of fused silica or other materials of similar thermophysical properties. PMID:26479800

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation of Hepatic Cysts : Case Report

    Radiofrequency ablation has been frequently performed on intra-hepatic solid tumor, namely, hepatocellular carcinoma, metastatic tumor and cholangio carcinoma, for take the cure. But, the reports of radiofrequency ablation for intrahepatic simple cysts are few. In vitro experiment of animal and in vivo treatment for intrahepatic cysts of human had been reported in rare cases. We report 4 cases of radiofrequency ablation for symptomatic intrahepatic cysts

  14. Photoacoustic Characterization of Radiofrequency Ablation Lesions

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh ...

  15. Moderne Technologien in der Ablation des Vorhofflimmerns

    Haegeli, L; Duru, F.; Lüscher, T F

    2010-01-01

    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation has become an accepted therapy. The arrhythmia affects around 6% of the population over the age of 65 years. Electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins from the left atrium is the central strategy in catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, procedural outcomes and efficacy using sequential “point-by-point” radiofrequency lesion creation with a conventional ablation catheter are operator-dependent and time-consuming. Moreover, re...

  16. Computer-aided hepatic tumour ablation

    Voirin, D; Amavizca, M; Leroy, A; Letoublon, C; Troccaz, J; Voirin, David; Payan, Yohan; Amavizca, Miriam; Leroy, Antoine; Letoublon, Christian; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2001-01-01

    Surgical resection of hepatic tumours is not always possible. Alternative techniques consist in locally using chemical or physical agents to destroy the tumour and this may be performed percutaneously. It requires a precise localisation of the tumour placement during ablation. Computer-assisted surgery tools may be used in conjunction to these new ablation techniques to improve the therapeutic efficiency whilst benefiting from minimal invasiveness. This communication introduces the principles of a system for computer-assisted hepatic tumour ablation.

  17. Thermochromic tissue-mimicking phantom for optimisation of thermal tumour ablation.

    Negussie, Ayele H; Partanen, Ari; Mikhail, Andrew S; Xu, Sheng; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Maruvada, Subha; Wood, Bradford J

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to (1) develop a novel tissue-mimicking thermochromic (TMTC) phantom that permanently changes colour from white to magenta upon heating above ablative temperatures, and (2) assess its utility for specific applications in evaluating thermal therapy devices. Materials and methods Polyacrylamide gel mixed with thermochromic ink was custom made to produce a TMTC phantom that changes its colour upon heating above biological ablative temperatures (> 60 °C). The thermal properties of the phantom were characterised, and compared to those of human tissue. In addition, utility of this phantom as a tool for the assessment of laser and microwave thermal ablation was examined. Results The mass density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity of the TMTC phantom were measured as 1033 ± 1.0 kg/m(3), 0.590 ± 0.015 W/m.K, and 0.145 ± 0.002 mm(2)/s, respectively, and found to be in agreement with reported values for human soft tissues. Heating the phantom with laser and microwave ablation devices produced clearly demarcated regions of permanent colour change geographically corresponding to regions with temperature elevations above 60 °C. Conclusion The TMTC phantom provides direct visualisation of ablation dynamics, including ablation volume and geometry as well as peak absolute temperatures within the treated region post-ablation. This phantom can be specifically tailored for different thermal therapy modalities, such as radiofrequency, laser, microwave, or therapeutic ultrasound ablation. Such modality-specific phantoms may enable better quality assurance, device characterisation, and ablation parameter optimisation, or optimise the study of dynamic heating parameters integral to drug device combination therapies relying upon heat. PMID:27099078

  18. Cardiac Remodeling After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Li-Wei Lo, MD; Shih-Ann Chen, MD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency catheter ablation procedures are considered a reasonable option for patients with symptomatic, drug refractory atrial fibrillation (AF. Ablation procedures have been reported to effectively restore sinus rhythm and provide long-term relief of symptoms. Both electrical and structural remodeling occurs with AF. A reversal of the electrical remodeling develops within 1 week after restoration to sinus rhythm following the catheter ablation. The recovery rate is faster in the right atrium than the left atrium. Reverse structural remodeling takes longer and is still present 2 to 4 months after restoration of sinus rhythm. The left atrial transport function also improves after successful catheter ablation of AF. Left atrial strain surveys from echocardiography are able to identify patients who respond to catheter ablation with significant reverse remodeling after ablation. Pre-procedural delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging is also able to determine the degree of atrial fibrosis and is another tool to predict the reverse remodeling after ablation. The remodeling process is complex if recurrence develops after ablation. Recent evidence shows that a combined reverse electrical and structural remodeling occurs after ablation of chronic AF when recurrence is paroxysmal AF. Progressive electrical remodeling without any structural remodeling develops in those with recurrence involving chronic AF. Whether progressive atrial remodeling is the cause or consequence during the recurrence of AF remains obscure and requires further study.

  19. Aromatic Thermosetting Copolyesters for Ablative TPS Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Better performing ablative thermal protection systems than currently available are needed to satisfy requirements of the most severe crew exploration vehicles, such...

  20. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  1. Differences in Nanosecond Laser Ablation and Deposition of Tungsten, Boron, and WB2/B Composite due to Optical Properties

    Tomasz Moscicki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first attempt to the deposition of WB3 films using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser demonstrated that deposited coatings are superhard. However, they have very high roughness. The deposited films consisted mainly of droplets. Therefore, in the present work, the explanation of this phenomenon is conducted. The interaction of Nd:YAG nanosecond laser pulse with tungsten, boron, and WB2/B target during ablation is investigated. The studies show the fundamental differences in ablation of those materials. The ablation of tungsten is thermal and occurs due to only evaporation. In the same conditions, during ablation of boron, the phase explosion and/or fragmentation due to recoil pressure is observed. The deposited films have a significant contribution of big debris with irregular shape. In the case of WB2/B composite, ablation is significantly different. The ablation seems to be the detonation in the liquid phase. The deposition mechanism is related mainly to the mechanical transport of the target material in the form of droplets, while the gaseous phase plays marginal role. The main origin of differences is optical properties of studied materials. A method estimating phase explosion occurrence based on material data such as critical temperature, thermal diffusivity, and optical properties is shown. Moreover, the effect of laser wavelength on the ablation process and the quality of the deposited films is discussed.

  2. Characterization of degradation fragments released by arc-induced ablation of polymers in air

    Polymers exposed to high intensity arc plasmas release material in a process called arc-induced ablation. In order to investigate the degradation fragments released due to this process, two different polymeric materials, poly(oxymethylene) copolymer (POM-C) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were exposed to a transient, high-power arc plasma in air. A small fraction of the ablated material drifting away from the arcing volume was deposited on a fixed glass substrate during the total duration of a 2 kA ac current semicycle. In addition, another fraction of the released material was deposited on a second moving substrate to obtain a time-resolved streak ‘image’ of the arc-induced ablation process. For the first time, mass spectra of degradation fragments produced by arc-induced ablation were obtained from the material deposited on the substrates by using laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToF-MS). It was found that oligomers with mean molecular weight ranging between 400 and 600 Da were released from the surface of the studied polymers. The obtained spectra suggest that the detected degradation fragments of POM could be released by random chain scission of the polymer backbone. In turn, random chain scission and splitting-off the side groups are suggested as the main chemical mechanism leading to the release of PMMA fragments under arc-induced ablation. (paper)

  3. Computational Analysis of Arc-Jet Wedge Tests Including Ablation and Shape Change

    Goekcen, Tahir; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Skokova, Kristina A.; Milos, Frank S.

    2010-01-01

    Coupled fluid-material response analyses of arc-jet wedge ablation tests conducted in a NASA Ames arc-jet facility are considered. These tests were conducted using blunt wedge models placed in a free jet downstream of the 6-inch diameter conical nozzle in the Ames 60-MW Interaction Heating Facility. The fluid analysis includes computational Navier-Stokes simulations of the nonequilibrium flowfield in the facility nozzle and test box as well as the flowfield over the models. The material response analysis includes simulation of two-dimensional surface ablation and internal heat conduction, thermal decomposition, and pyrolysis gas flow. For ablating test articles undergoing shape change, the material response and fluid analyses are coupled in order to calculate the time dependent surface heating and pressure distributions that result from shape change. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests was Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator. Effects of the test article shape change on fluid and material response simulations are demonstrated, and computational predictions of surface recession, shape change, and in-depth temperatures are compared with the experimental measurements.

  4. Clinical outcome of percutaneous RF-ablation of non-operable patients with liver metastasis from breast cancer

    Kümler, Iben; Parner, Vibeke Kirk; Tuxen, Malgorzata K.;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite improved anti-neoplastic treatment the prognosis for patients with liver metastases from metastatic breast cancer remains poor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-two consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) at the Department...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster distribution from femtosecond laser ablation in aluminum

    Sonntag, S.; Trichet Paredes, C.; Roth, J.; Trebin, H.R. [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physics, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation and plume evolution of aluminum is investigated for various inhomogeneous laser pulses. For the simulations of the atoms the molecular dynamics code IMD is used. The ablated gas-phase is scanned by a cluster algorithm (DBSCAN), from which we gain a cluster size distribution of the ablated material. Per single pulse, only a small portion of the total volume evaporates into the gas phase. Therefore - to have reasonable statistics - we have to deal with huge samples (6 x 10{sup 7} atoms). The ablation threshold is determined by comparing the depth of the holes to the applied fluence. Angular and velocity distributions of the plume are compared to experiments. (orig.)

  6. Analysis of internal ablation for the thermal control of aerospace vehicles

    Camberos, Jose A.; Roberts, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    A new method of thermal protection for transatmospheric vehicles is introduced. The method involves the combination of radiation, ablation and transpiration cooling. By placing an ablating material behind a fixed-shape, porous outer shield, the effectiveness of transpiration cooling is made possible while retaining the simplicity of a passive mechanism. A simplified one-dimensional approach is used to derive the governing equations. Reduction of these equations to non-dimensional form yields two parameters which characterize the thermal protection effectiveness of the shield and ablator combination for a given trajectory. The non-dimensional equations are solved numerically for a sample trajectory corresponding to glide re-entry. Four typical ablators are tested and compared with results obtained by using the thermal properties of water. For the present level of analysis, the numerical computations adequately support the analytical model.

  7. Characterization of laser-induced damage in silicon solar cells during selective ablation processes

    Selective laser ablation of silicon nitride layers on crystalline silicon wafers was investigated for solar cell fabrication. Laser processing was performed with a nanosecond UV laser at various energy densities ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 J cm−2. Optical microscopy was used as a simple mean to assess the ablation threshold that was correlated to the temperature at the interface between the silicon nitride coating and the silicon substrate. Minority carrier lifetime measurements were performed using a microwave photo-conductance decay technique. Band to band photoluminescence spectroscopy proved to be a sensitive technique to qualify the laser-induced damage to the silicon substrate. The crystalline structure of silicon seemed to be maintained after silicon nitride ablation as shown by UV reflectivity measurements. Laser parameters corresponding to fluences of around 0.4 J cm−2 were found to achieve selective ablation of SiNx without causing detrimental damage to the surrounding material

  8. Analysis of laser ablation dynamics of CFRP in order to reduce heat affected zone

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Nariyama, Tatsuya; Nakai, Kazuki; Matsuoka, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Masuno, Shinichiro; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Nakano, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced plastic [CFRP], which has high strength, light weight and weather resistance, is attractive material applied for automobile, aircraft and so on. The laser processing of CFRP is one of suitable way to machining tool. However, thermal affected zone was formed at the exposure part, since the heat conduction property of the matrix is different from that of carbon fiber. In this paper, we demonstrated that the CFRP plates were cut with UV nanosecond laser to reduce the heat affected zone. The ablation plume and ablation mass were investigated by laser microscope and ultra-high speed camera. Furthermore, the ablation model was constructed by energy balance, and it was confirmed that the ablation rate was 0.028 μg/ pulse in good agreement with the calculation value of 0.03 μg/ pulse.

  9. Ablation of ionic crystals induced by capillary-discharge XUV laser

    Pira, Peter; Burian, Tomáš; Vyšín, Ludék; Chalupský, Jaromír; Lančok, Ján; Wild, Jan; Střižík, Michal; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Rocca, Jorge J.; Juha, Libor

    2011-06-01

    Single crystals of two fluorides (LiF and CaF2) and a tungstate (PbWO4) were irradiated by nanosecond pulses of 46.9- nm radiation provided by 10-Hz capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). The damage threshold was determined in LiF using the CDL beam focused by a Sc/Si multilayer-coated spherical mirror. Irradiated samples have been investigated by Nomarski (DIC - Differential Interference Contrast) microscopy and optical (WLI - white light intereferometry) profiler. After an exposure by a certain number of CDL pulses, an ablation rate can be calculated from WLI measured depth of the crater created by the XUV ablation. Potential use of XUV ablation of ionic crystals in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin layers of such a particular material, which is difficult to ablate by conventional UV-Vis- NIR lasers, is discussed in this contribution.

  10. Solar Wind Ablation of Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Fok, Mei-Ching H.; Delcourt, Dominique C.

    2009-01-01

    Internal plasma sources usually arise in planetary magnetospheres as a product of stellar ablation processes. With the ignition of a new star and the onset of its ultraviolet and stellar wind emissions, much of the volatiles in the stellar system undergo a phase transition from gas to plasma. Condensation and accretion into a disk is replaced by radiation and stellar wind ablation of volatile materials from the system- Planets or smaller bodies that harbor intrinsic magnetic fields develop an apparent shield against direct stellar wind impact, but UV radiation still ionizes their gas phases, and the resulting internal plasmas serve to conduct currents to and from the central body along reconnected magnetic field linkages. Photoionization and thermalization of electrons warms the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape of super-thermal particles, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Moreover, observations and simulations of auroral processes at Earth indicate that solar wind energy dissipation is concentrated by the geomagnetic field by a factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Thus internal plasmas enable coupling with the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body. The stellar wind is locally loaded and slowed to develop the required power. The internal source plasma is accelerated and heated, inflating the magnetosphere as it seeks escape, and is ultimately blown away in the stellar wind. Bodies with little sensible atmosphere may still produce an exosphere of sputtered matter when exposed to direct solar wind impact. Bodies with a magnetosphere and internal sources of plasma interact more strongly with the stellar wind owing to the magnetic linkage between the two created by reconnection.

  11. Using FT-IR Spectroscopy to Elucidate the Structures of Ablative Polymers

    Fan, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The composition and structure of an ablative polymer has a multifaceted influence on its thermal, mechanical and ablative properties. Understanding the molecular level information is critical to the optimization of material performance because it helps to establish correlations with the macroscopic properties of the material, the so-called structure-property relationship. Moreover, accurate information of molecular structures is also essential to predict the thermal decomposition pathways as well as to identify decomposition species that are fundamentally important to modeling work. In this presentation, I will describe the use of infrared transmission spectroscopy (FT-IR) as a convenient tool to aid the discovery and development of thermal protection system materials.

  12. Does Artificial Ascites Induce the Heat-Sink Phenomenon during Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of the Hepatic Subcapsular Area?: an in vivo Experimental Study Using a Rabbit Model

    Kim, Young-sun; Rhim, Hyunchul; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the heat-sink phenomenon induced by artificial ascites on the size of the ablation zone during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area in an in vivo rabbit model. Materials and Methods A total of 21 percutaneous rabbit liver RF ablations were performed with and without artificial ascites (5% dextrose aqueous solution). The rabbits were divided into three groups: a) control group (C, n = 7); b) room temperature ascites group...

  13. Therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation versus microwave ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF ablation versus microwave (MW ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC measuring ≤ 5 cm in greatest diameter. From January 2006 to December 2006, 78 patients had undergone RF ablation whereas 77 had undergone MW ablation. Complete ablation (CA, local tumour progression (LTP and distant recurrence (DR were compared. The overall survival curves were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier technique and compared with the log-rank test. The CA rate was 83.4% (78/93 for RF ablation and 86.7%(91/105 for MW ablation. The LTP rate was 11.8% (11/93 for RF ablation and 10.5% (11/105 for MW ablation. DR was found in 51 (65.4% in the RF ablation and 62 (80.5% in the MW ablation. There was no significant difference in the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates (P = 0.780 and the 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P = 0.123 between RF and MW ablation. At subgroup analyses, for patients with tumors ≤ 3.0 cm, there was no significant difference in the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates (P = 0.067 and the corresponding disease-free survival rates(P = 0.849. For patients with tumor diameters of 3.1-5.0 cm, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 87.1%, 61.3%, and 40.1% for RF ablation and 85.4%, 36.6%, and 22% for MW ablation, with no significant difference (P = 0.068. The corresponding disease-free survival rates were 74.2%, 54.8%, and 45.2% for the RF ablation group and 53.3%, 26.8%, and 17.1% for the MW ablation group. The disease-free survival curve for the RF ablation group was significantly better than that for the MW ablation group (P = 0.018. RF ablation and MW ablation are both effective methods in treating hepatocellular carcinomas, with no significant differences in CA, LTP, DR, and overall survival.

  14. Low-activity radioiodine for remnant ablation after surgery for differentiated thyroid cancer - Initial experience

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: residual thyroid tissue ablation with radioiodine after total thyroidectomy is one of the key elements in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) therapy. Clinicians worldwide have been trying to address what is the lowest effective radioiodine activity to successful ablation. This study intends to show our initial results using a low 131I activity -1850 MBq (50 mCi) - for that purpose in patients (pts) with low-risk DTC. Material and methods: 13 patients (12 female, 1 male; mean age 43.7 years; range 23-66 years), with histologically confirmed DTC (12 cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma- 3 pT1a N0, 1 pT1a N1, 4 pT1b N0, 2 pT2 N0 and 2 pT3 N0 and 1 case of follicular thyroid carcinoma - pT3 N0), underwent total thyroidectomy followed by an ablative 131I activity of 1850 MBq. An 131I whole body scan (WBS) was performed 6 months after the ablative activity as well as thyroglobulin (Tg) level determination. Ablative therapy, WBS and Tg measurements were performed at least 4 weeks after thyroid hormone withdrawal. Six months after ablative therapy, patients with negative WBS and stimulated Tg levels < 2 ng/ml were considered to have successful ablation. Results: complete thyroid tissue ablation was obtained in 9/13 pts with a success rate of 69.2%. Of the four remaining pts: one (pT1bN0) presented positive WBS; one (pT1aN0) showed both positive WBS and elevated Tg levels and the other two (pT2N0; pT3N0) presented Tg levels above the considered limit despite negative WBS. 3 of those patients who did not achieve a successful complete ablation presented high Tg levels (> 30 ng/ml) at the time of radioiodine treatment. Conclusion: although several studies have demonstrated good rates of ablation using low 131I activities, each center must assess whether the same results are found in its particular context. Our preliminary data reveals a successful ablation rate for post-thyroidectomy remnant thyroid tissue, in patients with low

  15. Initial institutional experience of uncooled single-antenna microwave ablation for large hepatocellular carcinoma

    Aim: To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and feasibility of a novel microwave generator, designed to deliver automatically adjusted energy by tissue permittivity feedback control into the tumour via an uncooled antenna, in patients with larger hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with HCC >5 cm in diameter received surgical or percutaneous microwave ablation with more than 12 months of follow-up. Microwave ablation was performed using a 902–928 MHz generator at 28 W; a single 14 G antenna without water-cooled system was used. The patients were followed up with contrast-enhanced CT and serum alpha-foetoprotein to monitor for tumour recurrence at 1 month and then every 3 months after tumour ablation. Results: The follow-up duration for the 11 male and three female patients (mean tumour size 5.77 cm, range 5–7 cm; mean age 63.8 years) was 15.8 months. The mean ablation time was 2025 s (range 900–3600 s), and the mean ablation session was 2.5 (range 1–4). The complete ablation rate was 85% (17 of 20). Local recurrence rate was 5.8% (1 of 17). All patients survived and the morbidity and mortality rate was 21.4% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: Microwave tissue ablation using this novel system with tissue permittivity feedback control and a single uncooled antenna has a high complete ablation rate and lower morbidity. It proved to be a fast, easy, and effective option for ablation of large (>5 cm) tumours. - Highlights: • We used a microwave system with tissue permittivity feedback control firstly in Asia. • It can deliver automatic-adjusted energy into tumors quickly via an uncooled antenna. • Tumor ablation using this system has a high complete ablation rate and safety. • It was proved to be a fast and effective option for large (>5 cm) tumor ablation

  16. Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile Impregnated Carbon Ablative TPS

    Boghozian, Tane; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Gasch, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic resin has extensive heritage as a TPS (Thermal Protection Systems) material, however, alternative resin systems such as Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile may offer improved performance compared to state-of-the-art phenolic resin. These alternative resin systems may have higher char yield, higher char strength, lower thermal conductivity and improved mechanical properties. In current work at NASA Ames alternative resin systems were uniformly infused into fibrous substrates and preliminary properties characterized. The density of the cyanate ester infused in fibrous substrate ranged from 0.25-0.3 grams per cubic centimeter compared to PICA (Phenolic resin impregnated carbon ablative) having a density of approximately 0.25 grams per cubic centimeter. The density of Phthalonitrile varies from 0.22-0.25 grams per cubic centimeter. Initial formulations of these new resin systems were recently tested at the LARC HyMETs (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) facility to evaluate their performance and data such as back face temperature, char yield, and recession are compared to PICA. Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile impregnated carbon ablative samples showed comparable performance to phenolic resin impregnated carbon ablative samples.

  17. Damage and ablation of large band gap dielectrics induced by a 46.9 nm laser beam

    Ritucci, A; Tomassetti, G; Reale, A; Arrizza, L; Zuppella, P; Reale, L; Palladino, L; Flora, F; Bonfigli, F; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Kaiser, J; Nilsen, J; Jankowski, A F

    2006-03-08

    We applied a 0.3 mJ, 1.7 ns, 46.9 nm soft X-ray Argon laser to ablate the surface of large band gap dielectrics: CaF{sub 2} and LiF crystals. The ablation versus the fluence of the soft X-ray beam has been studied varying the fluence in the range of 0.05-3 J/cm{sup 2}. An ablation threshold of 0.06 and 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} and an ablation depth of 14 and 20 nm have been found for CaF{sub 2} and LiF, respectively. These results define new ablation conditions for these large band gap dielectrics, which can be of interest for the fine processing of these materials.

  18. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant

  19. Does Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) Epiphysiodesis Affect Joint Cartilage?

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Abood, Ahmed Abdul-Hussein; Rahbek, Ole;

    Background: Epiphysiodesis made with RFA has resulted, in animal models, an effective procedure that disrupts the growth plate and induces LLD. This procedure involves an increase of temperature (>92°C) of the targeted region causing thermal damage. To our knowledge, no study that investigates...... the effect of this procedure in the adjacent joint articular cartilage has been reported Purpose / Aim of Study: Proof of concept that epiphysiodesis made with RFA is a safe procedure that disrupts the growth plate without damaging the adjacent joint articular cartilage Materials and Methods: RFA...... Epiphysiodesis RFA was done for 8 minutes in vivo in 40 growing pig tibia physis. In addition, three tibiae were ablated for 16 minutes, and three more for 24 minutes. As a damage reference, 6 tibiae were ablated on the joint articular cartilage for 8 minutes. MRI was done ex vivo after the procedure to evaluate...

  20. Dopant-enhanced ablation of nitrocellulose by a nitrogen laser

    Kosmidis, C. E.; Skordoulis, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    The photoetching behavior of pure nitrocellulose and of nitrocellulose dyed with stilbene-420, coumarin-120 and rhodamine 6G by 337 nm nitrogen laser pulses has been studied. Ablation with a low power nitrogen laser is hereby reported for the first time. A two step photochemical mechanism is proposed to account for the ablation of the pure material. With the addition of dyes strongly absorbing at 337 nm the photoetching rate of nitrocellulose can be increased significantly. This increase is proportional to the molar extinction coefficient of the dye at 337 nm and its concentration in the polymer. The photoetching mechanism and the energy transfer processes from the dye to the polymer are discussed in detail.

  1. Targets on superhydrophobic surfaces for laser ablation ion sources

    Renisch, D., E-mail: renisch@uni-mainz.de [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Fritz Strassmann Weg 2, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Beyer, T.; Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Block, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Duellmann, Ch.E. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Fritz Strassmann Weg 2, 55128 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 36, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Eberhardt, K. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Fritz Strassmann Weg 2, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Eibach, M. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Fritz Strassmann Weg 2, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2012-06-01

    Target preparation techniques for a laser ablation ion source at the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP have been investigated with regard to future experiments with actinides. To be able to perform mass measurements on these nuclides considering their limited availability, an efficient target preparation technique is mandatory. Here, we report on a new approach for target production using backings, which are pretreated in a way that a superhydrophobic surface is formed. This resulted in improved targets with a more homogeneous distribution of the target material compared to standard techniques with unmodified backings. It was demonstrated that the use of these new targets in a laser ablation ion source improved the ion production significantly.

  2. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser. PMID:19404369

  3. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths (∼ micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation

  4. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation for Uterine Adenomyosis

    Scarperi, Stefano; Pontrelli, Giovanni; Campana, Colette; Steinkasserer, Martin; Ercoli, Alfredo; Minelli, Luca; Bergamini, Valentino; Ceccaroni, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Symptomatic uterine adenomyosis, unresponsive to medical therapy, is a challenging condition for patients who desire to preserve their uterus. This study was an evaluation of the feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic radiofrequency thermal ablation of symptomatic nodular uterine adenomyosis. Methods: Fifteen women with symptomatic nodular adenomyosis, who had no plans for pregnancy but declined hysterectomy, underwent radiofrequency thermal ablation. Ultrasonogra...

  5. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  6. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment

  7. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...

  8. Modeling Of Laser Ablation And Fragmentation Of Human Calculi

    Gitomer, Steven J.; Jones, Roger D.; Howsare, Charles

    1989-09-01

    The large-scale radiation-hydrodynamics computer code LASNEX, has been used to model experimental results in the laser ablation and fragmentation of renal and biliary calculi. Recent experiments have demonstrated laser ablation and fragmentation of human calculi in vitro and in vivo. In the interaction, laser light incident upon the calculus is of sufficient intensity to produce a plasma (a hot ionized gas). The physical picture which emerges is as follows. The plasma couples to acoustic and shear waves which then propagate through the dense stone material, causing spall and fracture by reflection from material discontinuities or boundaries. Experiments have thus far yielded data on the interaction against which models can be tested. Data on the following have been published: (1) light emission, (2) absorption and emission spectra, (3) fragmentation efficiency, (4) cavitation bubble dynamics and (5) mass removal. We have performed one dimensional simulations of the laser-matter interaction to elucidate the im-portant physical mechanisms. We find that good quantitative fits between simulation and experiment are obtained for visible light emission, electron temperature, electron density, plasma pressure and cavitation bubble growth. With regard to mass removal, experiment and simulation are consistent with each other and give an excellent estimate of the ablation threshold. The modeling indicates that a very small ablation layer at the surface of the calulus is responsible for significant mass loss by fragmentation within the bulk of the calculus. With such quantitative fits in hand, we believe this type of modeling can now be applied to the study of other procedures involving plasma formation of interest to the medical community.

  9. Modeling of laser ablation and fragmentation of human calculi

    Gitomer, S.; Jones, R.D.; Howsare, C.

    1989-01-01

    The large-scale radiation-hydrodynamics computer code LASNEX, has been used to model experimental results in the laser ablation and fragmentation of renal and biliary calculi. Recent experiments have demonstrated laser ablation and fragmentation of human calculi in vitro and in vivo. In the interaction, laser light incident upon the calculus is of sufficient intensity to produce a plasma (a hot ionized gas). The physical picture which emerges is as follows. The plasma couples to acoustic and shear waves which then propagate through the dense stone material, causing spall and fracture by reflection from material discontinuities or boundaries. Experiments have thus far yielded data on the interaction against which models can be tested. Data on the following have been published: (1) light emission, (2) absorption and emission spectra, (3) fragmentation efficiency, (4) cavitation bubble dynamics and (5) mass removal. We have performed one dimensional simulations of the laser-matter interaction to elucidate the important physical mechanisms. We find that good quantitative fits between simulation and experiment are obtained for visible light emission, electron temperature, electron density, plasma pressure and cavitation bubble growth. With regard to mass removal, experiment and simulation are consistent with each other and give an excellent estimate of the ablation threshold. The modeling indicates that a very small ablation layer at the surface of the calculus is responsible for significant mass loss by fragmentation within the bulk of the calculus. With such quantitative fits in hand, we believe this type of modeling can now be applied to the study of other procedures involving plasma formation of interest to the medical community. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  10. High Heat Flux Block Ablator-in-Honeycomb Heat Shield Using Ablator/Aerogel-Filled Foam Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet and ARA Ablatives Laboratory previously developed and demonstrated advanced foam-reinforced carbon/phenolic ablators that offer substantially increased...

  11. New Technologies in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    John Rickard, MD, MPH; Saman Nazarian MD, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a major public health issue worldwide the incidence of which is likely to continue to rise. With the birth of pulmonary vein isolation(PVI, cardiac ablation has emerged as key strategy for the treatment of AF. PVI using traditional point by point radiofrequency ablation is time consuming and technically challenging. Refining patient selection for PVI also remains an important goal. New ablative strategies using catheter-based balloon technologies, such as cryothermy and laser-based systems, may simplify PVI. In addition, new MRI-based techniques offer the hope of refining patient selection prior to ablation. Lastly, FIRM mapping represents an entirely new approach to AF ablation via the targeting of mechanisms that perpetuate AF rather than simply targeting triggers alone.

  12. Phased RF ablation: results and concerns

    Alexandra Kiss, MD, PhD; G�bor S�ndorfi, MD; Edina Nagy-Bal�, MD, PhD; Mihran Martirosyan, MD; Zoltan Csanadi, MD, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available reatment of atrial fibrillation (AF with catheter ablation has proven to be a safe and effective treatment modality which is offered to an increasing number of patients in many centers. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI is an established cornerstone of AF ablation strategies. Athough the isolation of the pulmonary veins (PVs with irrigated focal radiofrequency (RF catheters using a point-by-point method is considered as the gold standard, it can be challenging to create contiguous lesions, time consuming, and require advanced three dimensional (3D mapping and navigational systems. The phased RF ablation system was designed to address many of these challenges associated with conventional focal RF ablation. In this review, we describe the main features of phased RF ablation and summarize the data available on clinical outcome with this technology.

  13. How to manage the patients with unsatisfactory results after ethanol ablation for thyroid nodules: Role of radiofrequency ablation

    Purpose: Although ethanol ablation (EA) is effective in the treatment of cystic thyroid nodules, it is less effective in nodules with solid component. Therefore refractory cases with solid component require another treatment modality such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA), which is effective in both solid and cystic thyroid nodules. We prospectively evaluated the efficacy of additional RFA and factors related to volume reduction in patients showing unsatisfactory results after a single session of EA. Materials and methods: Of 94 patients with predominantly cystic thyroid nodules who underwent EA, 20 patients underwent additional RFA because of incompletely resolved clinical problems (symptomatic score reduction 20% (p = 0.001). We identified no factors related to volume reduction after RFA. Conclusion: RFA is effective in treatment of benign predominantly cystic thyroid nodules in patients whose clinical problems were incompletely resolved after EA.

  14. Use of laser ablation in nuclear decontamination

    The development and the use of clean decontamination process appear to be one of the main priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. This is especially due to the fact of wastes minimization which is one of the principal commitments. One answer would be to use a photonic process such as the LASER process. The principle of this process is based on the absorption, by the contaminant, of the photon's energy. This energy then will propagate into the material and create some mechanical waves responsible of the interfaces embrittlement and de-cohesion. As we can see, this process so called LASER ablation does not use any chemicals and allows us to avoid any production of liquid waste. Since now a couple of years, the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA group (BE/CL) investigates this new decontamination technology. Many tests have been done in inactive conditions on various simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides firstly in order to estimate its efficiency but also to fully qualify it. After that, we decided to move on hot tests to fully validate this new process and to show its interest for the nuclear industry. Those hot tests have been done on two kinds of contaminated material (on tank pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and on metallic pieces covered with grease). Some information such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. (authors)

  15. Tumor ablation with irreversible electroporation.

    Bassim Al-Sakere

    Full Text Available We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 micros at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%, in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation.

  16. Studying ultrafast laser parameters to deter self-focusing for deep tissue ablation

    Martin, Chris; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast pulsed lasers are a promising tool for precise and noninvasive tissue surgery. The high peak intensity of the pulses allows nonlinear interaction with tissue, causing three-dimensional confined ablation without thermal damage. However, deep tissue ablation has been limited to a few scattering lengths due to laser beam extinction. As pulse energies are increased to overcome attenuation, unwanted side effects can occur such as self-focusing, where the highly intense pulse alters the refractive index of the material, causing a lensing effect and long filaments of damage or complete beam collapse before the focus. Here, we examine laser parameters to overcome self-focusing for deep tissue ablation. Through imaging ablation voids with third harmonic generation, we show that increasing the pulse width from 200-fs to 2-ps reduces self-focusing induced focal plane shifting and avoids multiple filamentation altogether, resulting in deeper ablation without extended axial damage. Additionally, we simulate beam propagation for pulses of different central wavelengths, and show that longer wavelengths can ablate deeper because of decreased scattering in tissue and a subsequent reduction in self-focusing.

  17. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed

  18. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  19. Femtosecond laser ablation of polymethyl-methacrylate with high focusing control

    The interest of laser ablation of transparent polymers with short pulses relies on the possibility of ablating the material with little thermal damage and high spatial resolution. This enables microscopic design features needed for microfluidic devices and micromachining. Laser ablation of polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) surface with an Yb:KYW laser beam was carried out in air environment at room temperature. The laser had a wavelength of 1027 nm and the pulse duration was 450 fs. An open aperture z-scan procedure was used as a method to determine with high precision and control the best focusing conditions of the laser beam on the surface of the samples For this, the transmitted energy was measured with a photodiode detector placed beyond the sample. This was possible due to the high transparency of PMMA to the laser wavelength. Ablation craters produced on the PMMA surface at different laser pulse energies after the z-scan focusing process were characterized by means of optical and scanning electron microscopies. The fluence threshold found for ablation of PMMA is 3.2 J/cm2. Well-defined craters, with diameters as small as 200 nm, can be obtained with pulse energies near the ablation threshold.

  20. Ex-vivo human lung tumor model. Use for temperature measurements during thermal ablation of NSCLC

    Koch, Franziska; Vietze, A.; Hosten, N. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ. Greifswald (Germany). Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology; Laskowsi, U. [Maerkische Kliniken Luedenscheid (Germany). Thoracic Surgery; Ritter, C. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ. Greifswald (Germany). Pharmacology; Linder, A. [Klinikum Bremen-Ost (Germany). Thoracic Surgery

    2011-03-15

    In the present study we used an ex-vivo human lung cancer model to compare temperature diffusion during thermal ablation using one laser fiber to that of a two-fiber approach. Furthermore, we examined whether there was a difference between temperature diffusion in normal lung tissue and tumor tissue during laser ablation. Materials and Methods: 48 resected lung specimens containing non-small cell lung cancer were connected to a perfusion/ventilation apparatus and treated with 1 (22 specimens, group 1) or, in a second experiment, with 1 (13 specimens, group 2) or 2 (13 specimens, group 3) laser fibers. During tumor ablation, temperatures were measured interstitially every 5 sec. Laser ablation was followed by the taking of samples of 13 specimens for histological examination. For comparison we performed laser ablation in 7 specimens with normal lung tissue. Results: Laser treatment and temperature control were technically feasible in all samples. Thirty min after starting laser ablation with 1 fiber, a temperature of 61{+-}17 C was achieved in group 1 at a distance of 10 mm from the laser fiber and a temperature of 74{+-}11 C was achieved in group 2 (p = 0.1). In the middle between two active laser fibers placed 20 mm apart, a temperature of 93{+-}7 C was achieved. The temperature reached in normal lung tissue after 20 min of laser ablation was 77{+-}15 C at a distance of 10 mm from the laser fiber. Conclusion: The ex-vivo model allowed performance of laser-induced thermal ablation in the perfused and ventilated lung. The use of two laser fibers increases the achieved temperatures significantly (p < 0.05). Temperatures reached in normal lung tissue were as high as in tumor tissue (p = 0.24). (orig.)

  1. Variables associated with vaginal discharge after ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation for adenomyosis.

    Xu, Rui-Fang; Zhang, Jing; Han, Zhi-Yu; Zhang, Bing-Song; Liu, Hui; Li, Xiu-Mei; Ge, Hai-Long; Dong, Xue-Juan

    2016-08-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyse the significant variables for vaginal discharge after ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (PMWA) therapy. Materials and methods PMWA was performed on 117 patients with adenomyosis from October 2012 to July 2014. The presence or absence, colour, quantity and duration of vaginal discharge, which was different from pre-ablation, were recorded within 1 year after PMWA. Patients were categorised into G1 (n = 26, without vaginal discharge), G2 (n = 40, vaginal discharge lasting 1 to 19 days), and G3 (n = 51, vaginal discharge lasting ≥20 days) groups. The potentially correlative variables were analysed. Variables with significant correlations with vaginal discharge post-ablation were identified via binary logistic regression analysis. Results The differences in adenomyosis type, pre-ablation uterine volume, total microwave ablation energy, total non-perfused volume (NPV) and minimum distance from the non-perfused lesion (NPL) margin to the endomyometrial junction (EMJ) among groups were statistically significant (p = 0.005, p = 0.000, p = 0.000, p = 0.005 and p = 0.000, respectively). Minimum distance from the NPL margin to the EMJ was the strongest predictor of vaginal discharge post-ablation with odds ratio (OR) 0.632, p = 0.018, 95% CI 0.432-0.923. Patients with diffuse adenomyosis were more likely to have prolonged vaginal discharge (≥20 days) post-ablation (OR 3.461, p = 0.000, 95% CI 1.759-7.536). Conclusion The minimum distance from the NPL margin to the EMJ and adenomyosis type were significantly associated with vaginal discharge post-ablation. PMID:27087631

  2. A model of pellet ablation with a multi-species ablatant

    The single species neutral - shielding model for the ablation of a hydrogenic pellet is extended by considering the ablatant as a mixture of four species: Molecular and atomic hydrogen, protons and electrons. Compared with the single-species-ablatant model, results of the analysis showed that the ablatant state differs considerably. The attenuation of the incoming electron energy and energy flux, however, are very much similar, irrespective of the ablatant composition. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate with respect to the plasma state of Te, ne and the pellet radius, rp remains the same; the ablation rate is reduced approximately by 15%. At some combinations of Te, ne and rp, a weak shock can appear when the ablated flow downstream becomes sonic. A sufficient but not necessary condition for its occurrence is that the ablatant approaches either a state of complete dissociation, or complete ionization. To study the possible existence of an effective energy absorbing spherical region around the pellet, a comparison between the local ablated electron collisional mean free path and the electron Larmor radius in the cloud is made. A critical field, Bc is then defined and evalued at the ionization radius, ri. For plasma state of fusion interest and pellet radius beyond 0.15 mm, Bc is well above 10 Tesla. (orig.) With 3 tabs., 7 figs., 21 refs

  3. Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (CA-TPS) for Venus and Saturn Backshells

    Beck, R.; Gasch, M.; Stackpoole, M.; Wilder, M.; Boghozian, T.; Chavez-Garcia, J.; Prabhu, Dinesh; Kazemba, Cole D.; Venkatapathy, E.

    2016-01-01

    This poster provides an overview of the work performed to date on the Conformal Ablative TPS (CA-TPS) element of the TPSM project out of GCDP. Under this element, NASA is developing improved ablative TPS materials based on flexible felt for reinforcement rather than rigid reinforcements. By replacing the reinforcements with felt, the resulting materials have much higher strain-to-failure and are much lower in thermal conductivity than their rigid counterparts. These characteristics should allow for larger tile sizes, direct bonding to aeroshells and even lower weight TPS. The conformal phenolic impregnated carbon felt (C-PICA) is a candidate for backshell TPS for both Venus and Saturn entry vehicles.

  4. Submicron surface patterning by laser ablation with short UV pulses using a proximity phase mask setup

    A new approach for the generation of large-area periodic surface structures on different materials, like polymers and semiconductors, by direct laser ablation is presented. The surfaces were illuminated with the interference pattern emerging in close proximity behind a laser irradiated phase mask. In the experiments, nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses at 248 nm were applied. To prevent contamination or damage of the phase mask caused by the ablated material, the mask is protected by a thin water film or a thin quartz plate. In addition we present a technique to eliminate a lateral variation of the generated structures due to insufficient alignment precision of the workpiece.

  5. The Effects of the Factors Related to the Patient and the Disease on the Performance of Ablation Therapy in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer who have Received I-131 Ablation Therapy

    Tarık Şengöz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate whether the factors related to the patient and the disease have any effect on the success of ablation therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who have received I-131 ablation therapy. Material and Methods: All the patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were referred for I-131 ablation therapy after thyroidectomy between July 2007 and September 2009. The patients had at least six months of follow-up. Age, gender, type of tumor, presence of capsule invasion, size of tumor, number of the tumors, localization of the tumor, invasion of thyroid capsule, lymph/vessel invasion, presence of metastatic lymph nodes, type of surgery, preablation values of thyroglobulin (Tg, AntiTg, TSH, surveys for the evaluation of metastatic disease, (thyroid and bone scintigraphy, neck and abdominal ultrasonography, chest and brain computerized tomography, administered dose, postablation I-131 whole body scan (WBS and diagnostic I-131 WBS, neck USG, values of Tg and AntiTg at the 6th month were recorded. The presence of residual thyroid activity on the 6th month diagnostic I-131 WBS image was accepted as the criterion for ablation success. Results: 191 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were assessed in this study. The overall success rate of the first ablation therapy was 74.3%. The success rate of the ablation therapy was 66% and 75% in metastatic group and non-metastatic group, respectively. Except the significant correlation between the number of pathologic lymph nodes and the success of ablation (p=0.025, there was no other significant correlation between the patient/disease related factors and the success of ablation therapy. Conclusion: Significant correlation between the number of the pathologic lymph nodes and the ablation therapy performance can also be due to statistical error because of the limited sample size. There was no significant correlation between other patient/disease related prognostic factors

  6. Ablation and plasma emission produced by dual femtosecond laser pulses

    Pairs of 80 fs, 800 nm laser pulses were used to ablate Si, Cu, and CaF2 in air. The spectrally resolved plasma emission was measured as a function of laser fluence and pulse delay. After an initial dip, the fluorescence was found to increase monotonically with pulse delay, reaching a plateau after some tens of picoseconds, depending on the material and fluence. The enhancement ratio (defined as the ratio of the fluorescence produced by the pulse pair to that produced by a single pulse of the same total fluence) reaches a maximum value of 6 and 11 at a fluence of ∼6 J/cm2 for Si and Cu, respectively, and declines to a value below 2 at higher fluences. In contrast, the enhancement for CaF2 increases slowly from zero near threshold to a broad maximum value of 2 near 50 J/cm2. Using reflectivity and atomic force microscopy measurements as diagnostics, we interpret the Si and Cu behavior in terms of a two phase mechanism, in which the first pulse melts the surface of the crystal and the second pulse ablates the resulting liquid film. A qualitatively different mechanism initiated by multiphoton absorption is involved in CaF2 ablation

  7. Superhydrophobic/superoleophilic magnetic elastomers by laser ablation

    Milionis, Athanasios, E-mail: am2vy@virginia.edu [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Fragouli, Despina; Brandi, Fernando; Liakos, Ioannis; Barroso, Suset [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Athanassiou, Athanassia, E-mail: athanassia.athanassiou@iit.it [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets. • Laser irradiation of the nanocomposites induces chemical and structural changes to the surface. • The laser-patterned surfaces exhibit superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. • The particle contribution in altering the surface and bulk properties of the material is studied. - Abstract: We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets with superhydrophobic and supeoleophilic surfaces generated by laser ablation. Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer free-standing films, loaded homogeneously with 2% wt. carbon coated iron nanoparticles, were ablated by UV (248 nm), nanosecond laser pulses. The laser irradiation induces chemical and structural changes (both in micro- and nano-scale) to the surfaces of the nanocomposites rendering them superhydrophobic. The use of nanoparticles increases the UV light absorption efficiency of the nanocomposite samples, and thus facilitates the ablation process, since the number of pulses and the laser fluence required are greatly reduced compared to the bare polymer. Additionally the magnetic nanoparticles enhance significantly the superhydrophobic and oleophilic properties of the PDMS sheets, and provide to PDMS magnetic properties making possible its actuation by a weak external magnetic field. These nanocomposite elastomers can be considered for applications requiring magnetic MEMS for the controlled separation of liquids.

  8. Micropatterned polysaccharide surfaces via laser ablation for cell guidance

    Barbucci, Rolando; Lamponi, Stefania; Pasqui, Daniela; Rossi, Antonella; Weber, Elisabetta

    2003-03-03

    Micropatterned materials were obtained by a controlled laser ablation of a photoimmobilised homogeneous layer of hyaluronic acid (Hyal) and its sulphated derivative (HyalS). The photoimmobilisation was performed by coating the polysaccharide, adequately functionalised with a photoreactive group, on aminosilanised glass substrate and immobilising it on the surface under UV light. Hyal or HyalS photoimmobilised samples were then subjected to laser ablation with wavelengths in the UV regions in order to drill the pattern. Four different patterns with stripes of 100, 50, 25 and 10 {mu}m were generated. A chemical characterisation by attenuated total reflection/Fourier transform infrared (ATR/FT-IR) and time of flight-secondary ions mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) confirmed the success of the laser ablation procedure and the presence of alternating stripes of polysaccharide and native glass. The exact dimensions of the stripes were determined by atomic force microscopy. The analysis of cell behaviour in terms of adhesion, proliferation and movement using mouse fibroblasts (3T3 line) and bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) was also performed.

  9. Thermal analysis of intense femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    Hu Hao-Feng; Ji Yang; Hu Yang; Ding Xiao-Yan; Liu Xian-Wen; Guo Jing-Hui; Wang Xiao-Lei; Zhai Hong-Chen

    2011-01-01

    This paper numerically simulates the process of ablation of an aluminum target by an intense femtosecond laser with a fluence of 40 J/cm2 based on the two-temperature equation, and obtains the evolution of the free electron temperature and lattice temperature over a large temporal and depth range, for the first time. By investigating the temporal evolution curves of the free electron temperature and lattice temperature at three representative depths of O,100 nm and 500 nm, it reveals different characteristics and mechanisms of the free electron temperature evolution at different depths. The results show that, in the intense femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum, the material ablation is mainly induced by the thermal conduction of free electrons, instead of the direct absorption of the laser energy;in addition, the thermal conduction of free electrons and the coupling effect between electrons and lattice will induce the temperature of free electrons deep inside the target to experience a process from increase to decrease and finally to increase again.

  10. Superhydrophobic/superoleophilic magnetic elastomers by laser ablation

    Highlights: • We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets. • Laser irradiation of the nanocomposites induces chemical and structural changes to the surface. • The laser-patterned surfaces exhibit superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. • The particle contribution in altering the surface and bulk properties of the material is studied. - Abstract: We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets with superhydrophobic and supeoleophilic surfaces generated by laser ablation. Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer free-standing films, loaded homogeneously with 2% wt. carbon coated iron nanoparticles, were ablated by UV (248 nm), nanosecond laser pulses. The laser irradiation induces chemical and structural changes (both in micro- and nano-scale) to the surfaces of the nanocomposites rendering them superhydrophobic. The use of nanoparticles increases the UV light absorption efficiency of the nanocomposite samples, and thus facilitates the ablation process, since the number of pulses and the laser fluence required are greatly reduced compared to the bare polymer. Additionally the magnetic nanoparticles enhance significantly the superhydrophobic and oleophilic properties of the PDMS sheets, and provide to PDMS magnetic properties making possible its actuation by a weak external magnetic field. These nanocomposite elastomers can be considered for applications requiring magnetic MEMS for the controlled separation of liquids

  11. Follow-up results of laser saphenous ablation

    Mehmet Erdem Memetoğlu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This retrospective study aimed to evaluatethe efficacy and durability of endovenous laser ablationwith 940 nanometer wavelength with at least one-yearfollow-up.Materials and methods: Between December 2009 andFebruary 2012, a total of 68 incompetent great saphenousveins and 4 small saphenous veins were treated byendovenous laser ablation, using 940 nanometer wavelengths.Patients underwent standard clinical and duplexfollow-up examinations with a mean of 18 months (range12 to 26 months after endovenous laser ablation. Patientsatisfaction regarding the procedure was assessed withthe use of a visual analog scale (range 1 to 100.Results: Post-procedural duplex scans showed total occlusionof the treated great saphenous veins in 56 patients(97% and sub-total occlusion in 2 (3% patients.For small saphenous veins, post-procedural duplex scansshowed total occlusion in 4 (100% patients.The average pre-procedure modified clinical picture, etiology,anatomic distribution and pathophysiology clinicalscore improved significantly after 12 months. Complicationsfrom our series included swelling and induration in3 patients (5%, skin pigmentation in 3 patients (5%. Patientsatisfaction with the surgical outcome was 83.2 %(±11.8, n=58.Conclusions: Our results seem to be satisfying, and thisstudy has reaffirmed the effectiveness and durability ofendovenous laser ablation with 940 wavelengths in thetreatment of great saphenous vein insufficiency.Key words: Duplex ultrasound, endovenous technique,saphenous vein, venous insufficiency.

  12. Neural Ablation and Regeneration in Pain Practice.

    Choi, Eun Ji; Choi, Yun Mi; Jang, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    A nerve block is an effective tool for diagnostic and therapeutic methods. If a diagnostic nerve block is successful for pain relief and the subsequent therapeutic nerve block is effective for only a limited duration, the next step that should be considered is a nerve ablation or modulation. The nerve ablation causes iatrogenic neural degeneration aiming only for sensory or sympathetic denervation without motor deficits. Nerve ablation produces the interruption of axonal continuity, degeneration of nerve fibers distal to the lesion (Wallerian degeneration), and the eventual death of axotomized neurons. The nerve ablation methods currently available for resection/removal of innervation are performed by either chemical or thermal ablation. Meanwhile, the nerve modulation method for interruption of innervation is performed using an electromagnetic field of pulsed radiofrequency. According to Sunderland's classification, it is first and foremost suggested that current neural ablations produce third degree peripheral nerve injury (PNI) to the myelin, axon, and endoneurium without any disruption of the fascicular arrangement, perineurium, and epineurium. The merit of Sunderland's third degree PNI is to produce a reversible injury. However, its shortcoming is the recurrence of pain and the necessity of repeated ablative procedures. The molecular mechanisms related to axonal regeneration after injury include cross-talk between axons and glial cells, neurotrophic factors, extracellular matrix molecules, and their receptors. It is essential to establish a safe, long-standing denervation method without any complications in future practices based on the mechanisms of nerve degeneration as well as following regeneration. PMID:26839664

  13. An experimental study of simultaneous ablation with dual probes in radiofrequency thermal ablation

    Jang, Il Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Seo, Heung Suk; Kim, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sun; Heo, Jeong Nam [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    To determine the differences between sequential ablation with a single probe and simultaneous ablation with dual probes. Using two 14-gauge expandable probes (nine internal prongs with 4-cm deployment), radiofrequency was applied sequentially (n=8) or simultaneously (n=8) to ten ex-vivo cow livers. Before starting ablation, two RF probes with an inter-probe space of 2 cm (n=8) or 3 cm (n=8) were inserted. In the sequential group, switching the connecting cable to an RF generator permitted ablation with the second probe just after ablation with the first probe had finished. In the simultaneous group, single ablation was performed only after connecting the shafts of both RF probes using a connection device. Each ablation lasted 7 minutes at a target temperature of 105-110 .deg. C. The size and shape of the ablated area, and total ablation time were then compared between the two groups. With 2-cm spacing, the group, mean length and overlapping width of ablated lesions were, respectively, 5.20 and 5.05 cm in the sequential group (n=4), and 5.81 and 5.65 cm in the simultaneous group (n=4). With 3-cm spacing, the corresponding figures were 4.99 and 5.60 cm in the sequential group (n=4), and 6.04 and 6.78 cm in the simultaneous group (n=4). With 2-cm spacing, the mean depth of the proximal waist was 0.58 cm in the sequential (group and 0.28 cm in the simultaneous group, while with 3-cm spacing, the corresponding figures were 1.65 and 1.48 cm. In neither group was there a distal waist. Mean total ablation time was 23.4 minutes in the sequential group and 14 minutes in the simultaneous group. In terms of ablation size and ablation time, simultaneous radiofrequency ablation with dual probes is superior to sequential ablation with a single probe. A simultaneous approach will enable an operator to overcome difficulty in probe repositioning during overlapping ablation, resulting in complete ablation with a successful safety margin.

  14. Percutaneous treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosis: A comparison of the safety of cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation

    Purpose: To compare the safety of image-guided percutaneous cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosis. Materials and methods: This retrospective HIPAA-compliant study received institutional review board approval. Forty-two adult patients with cirrhosis underwent image-guided percutaneous ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma from 2003 to 2011. Twenty-five patients underwent 33 cryoablation procedures to treat 39 tumors, and 22 underwent 30 radiofrequency ablation procedures to treat 39 tumors. Five patients underwent both cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation procedures. Complication rates and severity per procedure were compared between the ablation groups. Potential confounding patient, procedure, and tumor-related variables were also compared. Statistical analyses included Kruskal–Wallis, Wilcoxon rank sum, and Fisher's exact tests. Two-sided P-values <0.05 were considered significant. Results: The overall complication rates, 13 (39.4%) of 33 cryoablation procedures versus eight (26.7%) of 30 radiofrequency ablation procedures and severe/fatal complication rates, two (6.1%) of 33 cryoablation procedures versus one (3.3%) of 30 radiofrequency ablation procedures, were not significantly different between the ablation groups (both P = 0.26). Severe complications included pneumothoraces requiring chest tube insertion during two cryoablation procedures. One death occurred within 90 days of a radiofrequency ablation procedure; all other complications were managed successfully. Conclusion: No significant difference was seen in the overall safety of image-guided percutaneous cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosis

  15. Laser induced ablation studies from gold target

    Laser produced gold plasmas show an enhanced mass ablation rate and ablation pressure as compared to theoretical prediction. This is attributed to radiation effect. Experimental results indicate an increase in the C-J point density and an agreement with self-regulating ablation scaling. Using 1.06 μm laser radiation on 12.5 μm thick planar gold targets, at an absorbed laser intensity IA ≤ 2 x 1013 W/cm2, the experimental results are presented. (Author)

  16. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  17. Atrioventricular Junction Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Patel, Dilesh; Daoud, Emile G

    2016-04-01

    Atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation is an effective therapy in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who are intolerant to or unsuccessfully managed with rhythm control or medical rate control strategies. A drawback is that the procedure mandates a pacing system. Overall, the safety and efficacy of AVJ ablation is high with a majority of the patients reporting significant improvement in symptoms and quality-of-life measures. Risk of sudden cardiac death after device implantation is low, especially with an appropriate postprocedure pacing rate. Mortality benefit with AVJ ablation has been shown in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. PMID:26968669

  18. How I do it: Radiofrequency ablation

    Over the past decade, image-guided tumor ablation using thermal energy has emerged as a promising technique for treating focal, primary or secondary, nonoperable tumors. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is minimally invasive and requires less resources, time, and recovery period and is, moreover, relatively inexpensive. RFA has been used to treat tumors located in the liver, lung, bone, kidneys, brain, thyroid, breast, and pancreas. This article will describe how to choose an appropriate case; precisely place the needle into the tumor; the precautions to be taken before, during, and after the procedure; probable complications; and the follow-up of patients undergoing ablation

  19. Tumor Ablation: Common Modalities and General Practices

    Knavel, Erica M.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique that is commonly used in the treatment of tumors of the liver, kidney, bone, and lung. During tumor ablation, thermal energy is used to heat or cool tissue to cytotoxic levels (less than −40°C or more than 60°C). An additional technique is being developed that targets the permeability of the cell membrane and is ostensibly nonthermal. Within the classification of tumor ablation, there are several modalities used worldwide: radiofrequency, micro...

  20. The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse...... left atrial tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION: The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter...

  1. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  2. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    Baladi, Arash [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarraf Mamoory, Rasoul, E-mail: rsarrafm@modares.ac.ir [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  3. Ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of gold thin film targets: Theory and experiment

    Laser ablation of a gold thin film irradiated by ultrashort pulses is studied using molecular-dynamics simulations, and compared with that of a bulk target. A film thickness comparable to the ballistic electron depth in gold (≈ 100 nm) is considered, evidencing a significant change of the temperature spatial profile inside the target material, which eventually influences the material decomposition. Particular emphasis is given to the process of nanoparticle generation. The simulations indicate a more uniform heating of the sample in the case of the thin film, which is accompanied by a more homogeneous size distribution of the nanoparticles produced in the ablation process. An experimental characterization of the ultrashort-pulse ablation process is also carried out. The produced nanoparticles are collected on suitable substrates, and atomic force microscopy analysis of less than one layer deposits is performed. An ≈ 2 × narrowing of the nanoparticles equivalent to spherical diameter size distribution is observed in the case of ablation of the gold thin film, in fairly good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Moreover, interesting changes of the nanoparticle shape are evidenced, which are correlated to the changes in the nanoparticle ablation plume dynamics, as studied by time-gated imaging of its self-emission. Our findings suggest ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of thin films as a viable route to achieve a more uniform nanoparticle size distribution. - Highlights: • Nanoparticle generation at fs laser ablation of Au bulk target and thin film is studied. • The spatial confinement in depth at thin film geometry results in homogeneous heating. • Narrower and more homogeneous particle size distribution is observed for thin film

  4. Treatment of osteoid osteoma using CT-guided radiofrequency ablation versus MR-guided laser ablation: A cost comparison

    Objective: To compare the costs of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and MR-guided laser ablation (LA) for minimally invasive percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteoma. Materials and methods: Between November 2005 and October 2011, 20 patients (14 males, 6 females, mean age 20.3 ± 9.1 years) underwent CT-guided RFA and 24 patients (18 males, 6 females; mean age, 23.8 ± 13.8 years) MR-guided LA (open 1.0 Tesla, Panorama HFO, Philips, Best, Netherlands) for osteoid osteoma diagnosed on the basis of clinical presentation and imaging findings. Prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, and maintenance), staff costs, and expenditure for disposables were identified for CT-guided RFA and MR-guided LA procedures. Results: The average total costs per patient were EUR 1762 for CT-guided RFA and EUR 1417 for MR-guided LA. These were (RFA/LA) EUR 92/260 for equipment use, EUR 149/208 for staff, and EUR 870/300 for disposables. Conclusion: MR-guided LA is less expensive than CT-guided RFA for minimally invasive percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteoma. The higher costs of RFA are primarily due to the higher price of the disposable RFA probes.

  5. Ablation Modeling of Ares-I Upper State Thermal Protection System Using Thermal Desktop

    Sharp, John R.; Page, Arthur T.

    2007-01-01

    The thermal protection system (TPS) for the Ares-I Upper Stage will be based on Space Transportation System External Tank (ET) and Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) heritage materials. These TPS materials were qualified via hot gas testing that simulated ascent and re-entry aerothermodynamic convective heating environments. From this data, the recession rates due to ablation were characterized and used in thermal modeling for sizing the thickness required to maintain structural substrate temperatures. At Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the in-house code ABL is currently used to predict TPS ablation and substrate temperatures as a FORTRAN application integrated within SINDA/G. This paper describes a comparison of the new ablation utility in Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT with the heritage ABL code and empirical test data which serves as the validation of the Thermal Desktop software for use on the design of the Ares-I Upper Stage project.

  6. Contribution of material’s surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C6+ ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation

  7. Contribution of material’s surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma

    Kumaki, Masafumi, E-mail: rogus@asagi.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Steski, Dannie; Kanesue, Takeshi [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Ikeda, Shunsuke [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Washio, Masakazu [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C{sup 6+} ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation.

  8. Mechanism of Er:YAG laser-induced ablation of dental hard substances

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1993-07-01

    Er:YAG laser ablation was investigated by fast photography in a Schlieren optic setup. The results support the idea of continuous, thermally driven microexplosion type of ablation, which is based on the inhomogeneous distribution of strong (water) and weak absorbers (hydroxyapatite). Sudden vaporization and heating of the water content leads to a very effective material removal by bursting off the solid tissue components. Material is ejected in the form of particles when the threshold energy density for ablation (about 3 J cm-2) is reached. For high radiant exposure, initial plume velocity is in the order of the speed of sound in air. After leaving the tissue surface, particles are heated by the still incoming laser radiation, causing glowing and melting. No surface plasma and only weak pressure waves caused by individual spikes were observed.

  9. Typical flutter ablation as an adjunct to catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    Dipen Shah

    2008-01-01

    Typical atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation are frequently observed to coexist(1) .  In the current context of interventional electrophysiology, curative or at least definitive ablation is available for both arrhythmias. Despite their coexistence, it is not clear whether typical flutter ablation is necessary in all patients undergoing catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The following review explores the pathophysiology of both arrhythmias, their interrelationships and the availa...

  10. Typical flutter ablation as an adjunct to catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    Dipen Shah

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Typical atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation are frequently observed to coexist(1 .  In the current context of interventional electrophysiology, curative or at least definitive ablation is available for both arrhythmias. Despite their coexistence, it is not clear whether typical flutter ablation is necessary in all patients undergoing catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The following review explores the pathophysiology of both arrhythmias, their interrelationships and the available data pertaining to this theme.

  11. Local Ablative Strategies for Ductal Pancreatic Cancer (Radiofrequency Ablation, Irreversible Electroporation): A Review

    Salvatore Paiella; Roberto Salvia; Marco Ramera; Roberto Girelli; Isabella Frigerio; Alessandro Giardino; Valentina Allegrini; Claudio Bassi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has still a dismal prognosis. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) accounts for the 40% of the new diagnoses. Current treatment options are based on chemo- and radiotherapy regimens. Local ablative techniques seem to be the future therapeutic option for stage-III patients with PDAC. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) and Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) are actually the most emerging local ablative techniques used on LAPC. Initial clinical studies on ...

  12. Pulmonary oligometastases: Metastasectomy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy?

    Background and purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR; or stereotactic body radiotherapy, SBRT) emerges as treatment option for pulmonary oligometastatic disease (OMD), but there are no studies comparing SABR with pulmonary metastasectomy (PME). We analysed consecutive patients referred via a university-hospital based multidisciplinary team. Material and methods: Patients were offered PME as first choice and SABR in case they were considered to be less suitable surgical candidates. Overall survival was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were progression-free-survival, local control of treated metastases, and freedom-from-failure of a local-only treatment strategy without systemic therapy. Results: From 2007 until 2010, 110 patients were treated and analysed (PME, n = 68; SABR, n = 42). Median follow-up time was 43 months (minimally, 25). Estimated overall survival rates at one, three, and five years were 87%, 62%, and 41% for PME, and 98%, 60%, and 49% for SABR, respectively (logrank-test, p = 0.43). Local control at two years was 94% for SABR and 90% for PME. Progression-free survival was 17% at three years, but 43% of the patients still had not failed a local-only treatment strategy. Conclusions: Although SABR was second choice after PME, survival after PME was not better than after SABR. Prospective comparative studies are clearly required to define the role of both, SABR and PME in OMD

  13. Fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation for small hepatocellular carcinoma: a retrospective comparison with ultrasound-guided ablation

    Aim: To compare the therapeutic efficacy of fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation (F-RFA) and ultrasound-guided RFA (US-RFA) in treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: Between January 2006 and January 2012, 93 patients with small HCCs underwent percutaneous RFA. In 42 patients with 46 HCCs invisible on US, F-RFA was performed following intra-arterial iodised oil injection (group A). The remaining 51 patients with 58 HCCs received US-RFA (group B). Technical effectiveness, complications, local tumour progression, and patient survival were retrospectively compared between the two groups. Results: Technical effectiveness was achieved in 45 HCCs of group A (97.8%) and 64 HCCs of group B (96.6%; p=0.65). There was no major complication in either group. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year local tumour progression rates were lower in group A than those of group B with marginal significance (0%, 3.7% and 3.7% in group A, and 13%, 13%, and 13% in group B; p=0.05). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year patient survival rates were 100%, 58.3%, and 51.2% (group A), and 82.4%, 54.9%, and 46.1% (group B; p=0.26). Conclusions: F-RFA is a feasible and safe treatment for small HCC invisible on US. Its therapeutic efficacy was comparable with that of US-RFA. -- Highlights: •Fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation can treat small hepatocellular carcinoma invisible on ultrasonography. •Fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation can treat small hepatocellular carcinoma with unfavorable location. •Therapeutic efficacy of fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation is comparable with ultrasound-guided procedure

  14. Effect of Non-Equilibrium Surface Thermochemistry in Simulation of Carbon Based Ablators

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver using non-equilibrium gas/surface interaction model provides time-accurate solutions for the multidimensional ablation of carbon based charring ablators. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal-response and AblatioN Program (TITAN), which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. Its governing equations include total energy balance, pyrolysis gas mass conservation, and a three-component decomposition model. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) method. Loose coupling between the material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in DPLR and the surface energy balance in TITAN. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted by finite-rate gas/surface interaction boundary conditions implemented in DPLR, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in TITAN. Two sets of nonequilibrium gas/surface interaction chemistry between air and the carbon surface developed by Park and Zhluktov, respectively, are studied. Coupled fluid-material response analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities are considered. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests was Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). Computational predictions of in-depth material thermal response and surface recession are compared with the experimental measurements for stagnation cold wall heat flux ranging from 107 to 1100 Watts per square centimeter.

  15. Atrial Tachycardias Occurring After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation: Strategies for Mapping and Ablation

    Stavros Mountantonakis, MD

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of left atrial tachycardias (AT after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF is common, especially after more extensive ablation of persistent AF. These AT are invariably symptomatic and often do not respond to medical therapy. The initial strategy involves ventricular rate control, cardioversion, and observation as some tachycardias may resolve with time. For persistent ATs, effective management frequently requires catheter intervention. Careful characterization of the tachycardia mechanism is essential in designing an effective ablation strategy that would also avoid further creation of pro-arrhythmic substrate. With this review, we summarize the incidence, mechanism, diagnosis and treatment of ATs occurring after AF ablation.

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  17. Femtosecond laser surface ablation of polymethyl-methacrylate with position control through z-scan

    Spatial resolution of laser micromachining of polymers can be improved with the use of femtosecond laser pulses. Due to the short interaction time, thermal effects are significantly reduced. Additionally, the non-linear character of the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with transparent materials allows the modification inside their bulk also. However, this creates the challenge to accurately focus the laser beam in the surface when only surface ablation is required. Thus, this work presents a study of the laser ablation of a transparent polymer at different pulse energies and focusing positions controlled through z-scan transmittance measurements. Experiments were performed using an Yb:KYW laser with 450 fs pulses and 1027 nm wavelength. Morphological analysis of the polymer surface after irradiation was performed using scanning electron microscopy. Similar ablation craters were found for a range of sample positions around the beam waist. However, focused ion beam cross-sections of the craters unveil significant inner modifications under most of the focusing conditions leading to surface ablation. Hence, surface ablation without damaging the bulk material only occurs at critical positions where the beam waist is located slightly outside the sample. In situ monitoring of the sample position can be made through transmittance measurements. (paper)

  18. Effects of the absorption coefficient on resonant infrared laser ablation of poly(ethylene glycol)

    We describe experiments on resonant infrared laser ablation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) at two different resonant excitation wavelengths and for different molecular weights of PEG. The two resonant wavelengths correspond to different stretching vibrations of the polymer and have absorption coefficients that differ by roughly an order of magnitude. Ablation via excitation of the O-H terminal group stretching mode at 2.94 μm, the weaker of the two absorptions, is delayed in time by several microseconds with respect to ablation at 3.47 μm, the more strongly absorbing C-H stretching mode of the polymer. Time-resolved plume shadowgraphs along with ablation rate measurements for the two modes reveal that the absorption coefficient strongly affects the physical characteristics of the ejecta and plume, as well as the time scale for material removal. Temperature-rise calculations demonstrate that phase explosion is likely the operative mechanism in ablation at the C-H mode, while normal boiling may play a role in material removal at the O-H mode

  19. Processing of Dielectric Optical Coatings by Nanosecond and Femtosecond UV Laser Ablation

    Micro processing of dielectric optical coatings by UV laser ablation is demonstrated. Excimer laser ablation at deep UV wavelengths (248 nm, 193 nm) is used for the patterning of thin oxide films or layer stacks. The layer removal over extended areas as well as sub-μm-structuring is possible. The ablation of SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2, and Ta2O5 layers and layer systems has been investigated. Due to their optical, chemical, and thermal stability, these inorganic film materials are well suited for optical applications, even if UV-transparency is required. Transparent patterned films of SiO2 are produced by patterning a UV-absorbing precursor SiOx suboxide layer and oxidizing it afterwards to SiO2. In contrast to laser ablation of bulk material, in the case of thin films, the layer-layer or layer-substrate boundaries act as predetermined end points, so that precise depth control and a very smooth surface can be achieved. For large area ablation, nanosecond lasers are well suited; for patterning with submicron resolution, femtosecond excimer lasers are applied. Thus the fabrication of optical elements like dielectric masks, pixelated diffractive elements, and gratings can be accomplished.

  20. Thermal ablation of liver metastases. Current status and perspectives; Thermische Ablation von Lebermetastasen. Aktueller Stand und Perspektiven

    Vogl, T.; Mack, M.; Straub, R.; Zangos, S.; Woitaschek, D.; Eichler, K.; Engelmann, K. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany)

    2001-01-01

    Purpose. To present thermal ablation of liver metastases via laser induced thermotherapy. Material and methods. Different technical procedures of thermal ablation and online monitoring are used, as there are the MR-guided laser induced thermotherapy (LITT) and the radiofrequency ablation thermotherapy (RF). Results. In a prospective non randomized study 606 patients with liver metastases were treated via MR-guided laserinduced thermotherapy. Inclusion criteria were the exclusion of extrahepatic tumor spread and a number of metastases lower than 5 and a size lower than 50 mm in diameter. The local tumor control rate in the 3 month and 6 month control study was 98,3%, the complication rate 3,5% (clinically relevant: 1,2%). The mean survival rate was 40,9 months for all patients with liver metastases without statistically relevant differences for various primaries, like colorectal carcinoma, breast cancer and various other tumors. Results for radiofrequency are so far limited with incidence of a higher local tumor recurrence rate versus LITT. Conclusion. MR-guided LITT results in a high local tumor control rate with improved survival. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung. Vorstellung der thermischen Ablation von Lebermetastasen mittels laserinduzierter Thermotherapie (LITT). Material und Methodik. Verschiedene technische Verfahren der Ablation sowie 'Online-monitoring-Verfahren' werden vorgestellt. Derzeit gaengige Verfahren der Thermoablation stellen die MR-gesteuerte laserinduzierte Thermotherapie (LITT) sowie die Radiofrequenzablation (RF) dar. Ergebnisse. Im Rahmen einer prospektiven, nichtrandomisierten Studie wurden bislang 606 Patienten mit Lebermetastasen unterschiedlicher Primaertumoren mittels LITT perkutan therapiert. Die erzielte lokale Tumorkontrolle in der 3- bzw. 6-Monatskontrolle betrug dabei 98,3%, die Rate klinisch nicht relevanter Komplikationen 3,5%, die Rate klinisch relevanter Komplikationen 1,2%. Die mittlere Ueberlebensrate fuer das

  1. Assessing Temperature-Controlled Radiofrequency Tonsil Ablation for Treatment of Halitosis Caused by Chronic Tonsillitis with Caseum

    F Hashemian; H. Jafari Moez; F. Farahani; M.A. Seifrabei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Chronic tonsillitis with caseum has been proven to be the cause of halitosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of temperature-controlled radiofrequency tonsil ablation in the treatment of halitosis caused by chronic tonsil-litis with caseum. Materials & Methods: In this clinical trial study 28 adult patients with halitosis due to chronic tonsillitis with caseum were treated by temperature-controlled radiofrequency tonsil ablation an...

  2. Early Results of Endovenous Ablation with a 980-nm Diode Laser for an Incompetent Vein of Giacomini

    Park, Sang Woo; Lee, Song Am; Hwang, Jae Joon; Yun, Ik Jin; Kim, Jun Seok; Chang, Seong-Hwan; Chee, Hyun Keun; Chang, Il Soo

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of endovenous ablation of the incompetent vein of Giacomini using a 980-nm diode laser. Materials and Methods A total of 18 patients (18 limbs, 4%) had the incompetent vein of Giacomini. Retrograde reflux originating from the great saphenous vein was noted in sixteen limbs and paradoxical diastolic anterograde reflux from the saphenopopliteal junction was observed in two limbs. After tumescent anesthesia, laser ablation using a 980-nm waveleng...

  3. Terminology and Reporting Criteria for Radiofrequency Ablation of Tumors in the Scientific Literature: Systematic Review of Compliance with Reporting Standards

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of compliance with standardized terminology and reporting criteria for radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation, proposed by the International Working Group on Image-Guided Tumor Ablation in 2003, in the published reports. Materials and Methods Literature search in the PubMed database was performed using index keywords, PubMed limit system, and eligibility criteria. The entire content of each article was reviewed to assess the terminology used for procedure ...

  4. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling

  5. Laser-Induced Ablative Amorphisation of Montmorillonite

    Duchek, P.; Urbanová, Markéta; Pokorná, Dana; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 358, č. 23 (2012), s. 3382-3387. ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : laser ablation * montmorillonite * amorphization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2012

  6. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  7. Optical Effects on Laser Ablated Polymer Surfaces

    Prabhu, R. D.; Govinthasamy, R.; Murthy, N. S.

    2006-03-01

    Laser ablation of poly (ethylene terephthalate) and polyimide films were investigated using Excimer-UV laser. SEM analyses indicate the presence of rings for a wide range of ablation parameters (fluence, frequency and number of pulses). It is proposed that the particles present in the plasma plume could cause the incident laser light to diffract, similar to the optical effects observed in the femtosecond laser ablation of solids. The polymer surface provides a perfect medium to register the optical signatures as seen in the SEM images. The fringe-spacings observed in the images are compared with the theoretical diffraction patterns and the height of the plasma particles above the surface is estimated using an optimization scheme. The results of the analysis are consistent with experimentally observed dynamics of the plasma plume. It is proposed that such optical effects could be a routine feature in the laser ablation of polymers. The significance of such artifacts for lithography is discussed.

  8. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen;

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...... laser ablated plasma plume propagation in a background gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved....

  9. Phased RF ablation: results and concerns

    Alexandra Kiss, MD, PhD; G�bor S�ndorfi, MD; Edina Nagy-Bal�, MD, PhD; Mihran Martirosyan, MD; Zoltan Csanadi, MD, PhD

    2015-01-01

    reatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) with catheter ablation has proven to be a safe and effective treatment modality which is offered to an increasing number of patients in many centers. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is an established cornerstone of AF ablation strategies. Athough the isolation of the pulmonary veins (PVs) with irrigated focal radiofrequency (RF) catheters using a point-by-point method is considered as the gold standard, it can be challenging to create contiguous lesions, ti...

  10. Photogrammetric recession measurements of an ablating surface

    Schairer, Edward T. (Inventor); Heineck, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An instrument and method for measuring the time history of recession of an ablating surface of a test article during testing in a high enthalpy thermal test facility, such as an arcjet. The method advances prior art by providing time-history data over the full ablating surface without targets and without any modifications to the test article. The method is non-intrusive, simple to implement, requires no external light source, and does not interfere with normal operations of the arcjet facility.

  11. Hydrodynamic modeling of ns-laser ablation

    David Autrique; Vasilios Alexiades; Harihar Khanal

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation is a versatile and widespread technique, applied in an increasing number of medical, industrial and analytical applications. A hydrodynamic multiphase model describing nanosecond-laser ablation (ns-LA) is outlined. The model accounts for target heating and mass removal mechanisms as well as plume expansion and plasma formation. A copper target is placed in an ambient environment consisting of helium and irradiated by a nanosecond-laser pulse. The effect of variable laser ...

  12. Simple ablative implosion model: shell dynamics

    A simple model, derived from Newton's Second Law, for the ablative implosion of a thin spherical shell is presented. The scaling dependence of the implosion time, shell velocity, and mass loss on shell dimensions and the critical physical parameter, the ablation pressure, is derived. Finally, the model is used to examine implosion energy efficiency and to describe an interesting application, wall-recoil heating of a contained fuel gas

  13. Retained Foreign Body After Laser Ablation

    Ren, Shiyan; Liu, Peng; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yuguan

    2012-01-01

    Laser ablation for varicose veins is a common practice, and postoperative complications may happen. A retained foreign body could be left accidently in the treated leg. It is rarely reported in literature. We herein describe two cases of retained foreign body during the laser ablation for varicose veins. One patient with varicose veins received laser therapy 5 years earlier, and had experienced discomfort and pain. After investigation, an overlooked sheath fragment was removed surgically from...

  14. Ablation layers to prevent pitting in laser peening

    Hackel, Lloyd A

    2016-08-09

    A hybrid ablation layer that comprises a separate under layer is applied to a material to prevent pitting resulting from laser peening. The underlayer adheres to the surface of the workpiece to be peened and does not have bubbles and voids that exceed an acceptable size. One or more overlayers are placed over and in contact with the underlayer. Any bubbles formed under the over layers are insulated from the surface to be peened. The process significantly reduces the incidence of pits on peened surfaces.

  15. Usefulness of administration of SPIO prior to RF ablation for evaluation of the therapeutic effect: An experimental study using miniature pigs

    Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for assessing the efficacy of radiofrequency (RF) liver ablation. Material and methods: Using a protocol approved by the animal research committee of our university, nine RF liver ablations were performed in three miniature pigs. Six ablations were performed after administration of SPIO in two pigs (group A). Three ablations were performed in the other pig without administration of SPIO (group B). All pigs were sacrificed 4 days after the procedure. Harvested livers were scanned with a 1.5 T MR system before and after fixation with 10% buffered formalin, and MR images were precisely compared with histological specimens. Results: There were no histological differences between the two groups. All ablated liver lesions showed coagulation necrosis at the external layer. There were no viable cells inside the coagulation necrosis. All ablated lesions had a hypointense rim on fast low angle shot (FLASH) images. The rims of group A were thicker than those of group B. The rims of group B corresponded histologically to congestion and hemorrhagic necrosis area. The rims of the group A corresponded to hemorrhagic necrosis and coagulation necrosis areas. In group A, the hypointense rim reflected necrotic Kupffer cells that took up SPIO before RF liver ablation. Conclusion: Administration of SPIO made it possible to precisely evaluate ablated liver parenchyma by hypointense rim on FLASH images. This method is helpful for the evaluation of safety margin after RF ablation for liver tumors.

  16. Usefulness of administration of SPIO prior to RF ablation for evaluation of the therapeutic effect: An experimental study using miniature pigs

    Kakite, Suguru, E-mail: sugkaki@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Fujii, Shinya; Nakamatsu, Satoru; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Eijirou; Matsusue, Eiji; Ouchi, Yasufumi; Kaminou, Toshio [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Tokunaga, Shiho; Koda, Masahiko [Division of Medicine and Clinical Science, Department of Multidisciplinary Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Ogawa, Toshihide [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for assessing the efficacy of radiofrequency (RF) liver ablation. Material and methods: Using a protocol approved by the animal research committee of our university, nine RF liver ablations were performed in three miniature pigs. Six ablations were performed after administration of SPIO in two pigs (group A). Three ablations were performed in the other pig without administration of SPIO (group B). All pigs were sacrificed 4 days after the procedure. Harvested livers were scanned with a 1.5 T MR system before and after fixation with 10% buffered formalin, and MR images were precisely compared with histological specimens. Results: There were no histological differences between the two groups. All ablated liver lesions showed coagulation necrosis at the external layer. There were no viable cells inside the coagulation necrosis. All ablated lesions had a hypointense rim on fast low angle shot (FLASH) images. The rims of group A were thicker than those of group B. The rims of group B corresponded histologically to congestion and hemorrhagic necrosis area. The rims of the group A corresponded to hemorrhagic necrosis and coagulation necrosis areas. In group A, the hypointense rim reflected necrotic Kupffer cells that took up SPIO before RF liver ablation. Conclusion: Administration of SPIO made it possible to precisely evaluate ablated liver parenchyma by hypointense rim on FLASH images. This method is helpful for the evaluation of safety margin after RF ablation for liver tumors.

  17. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  18. A plasma model combined with an improved two-temperature equation for ultrafast laser ablation of dielectrics

    It remains a big challenge to theoretically predict the material removal mechanism in femtosecond laser ablation. To bypass this unresolved problem, many calculations of femtosecond laser ablation of nonmetals have been based on the free electron density distribution without the actual consideration of the phase change mechanism. However, this widely used key assumption needs further theoretical and experimental confirmation. By combining the plasma model and improved two-temperature model developed by the authors, this study focuses on investigating ablation threshold fluence, depth, and shape during femtosecond laser ablation of dielectrics through nonthermal processes (the Coulomb explosion and electrostatic ablation). The predicted ablation depths and shapes in fused silica, by using (1) the plasma model only and (2) the plasma model plus the two-temperature equation, are both in agreement with published experimental data. The widely used assumptions for threshold fluence, ablation depth, and shape in the plasma model based on free electron density are validated by the comparison study and experimental data

  19. Effect of variation of magnetic field on laser ablation depth of copper and aluminum targets in air atmosphere

    Singh, Khwairakpam Shantakumar; Sharma, Ashwini Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We report on the effect of transverse magnetic field on laser ablation of copper and aluminum targets both experimentally and numerically. The ablation depth is found to increase with magnetic field from 0 to 0.3 T and decreases at a higher magnetic field (0.5 T). It is demonstrated that the nanosecond laser ablation is mainly due to melt ejection and it solely depends on the thermo-physical parameters of the material. The increase in ablation depth with magnetic field is attributed to the increase in heat transfer from the plasma to the target, vapor pressure, and shock pressure. The ablation due to melt ejection is also calculated using vapor pressure through simulation and compared with the experimentally measured depth. In the presence of magnetic field, we introduce the magnetic pressure in Clausius-Clapeyron vapor pressure equation to account for the combined effect of magnetic field and atmospheric pressure on the vapor pressure of plasma. The ratio of calculated ablation depth at 0.3 T with respect to the absence of magnetic field is close to the corresponding experimental depth ratios indicating that the laser ablation modeling in the present work is validated. As the magnetic field increases, we observed the scattered mass at the center and around the crater. The size of deposited mass at the center is found to decrease at higher magnetic field which is attributed to breaking of large droplets into smaller ones due to increase in instability at higher magnetic field.

  20. Analysis of irradiated materials

    Papers presented at the UKAEA Conference on Materials Analysis by Physical Techniques (1987) covered a wide range of techniques as applied to the analysis of irradiated materials. These varied from reactor component materials, materials associated with the Authority's radwaste disposal programme, fission products and products associated with the decommissioning of nuclear reactors. An invited paper giving a very comprehensive review of Laser Ablation Microprobe Mass Spectroscopy (LAMMS) was included in the programme. (author)

  1. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please

  2. Experimental Observation of Nonlinear Mode Coupling In the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on the NIF

    Martinez, David

    2015-11-01

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the transition from linear to highly nonlinear regimes. This work is part of the Discovery Science Program on NIF and of particular importance to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where careful attention to the form of the rise to final peak drive is calculated to prevent the RT instability from shredding the ablator in-flight and leading to ablator mixing into the cold fuel. The growth of the ablative RT instability was investigated using a planar plastic foil with pre-imposed two-dimensional broadband modulations and diagnosed using x-ray radiography. The foil was accelerated for 12ns by the x-ray drive created in a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. The dependence on initial conditions was investigated by systematically changing the modulation amplitude, ablator material and the modulation pattern. For each of these cases bubble mergers were observed and the nonlinear evolution of the RT instability showed insensitivity to the initial conditions. This experiment provides critical data needed to validate current theories on the ablative RT instability for indirect drive that relies on the ablative stabilization of short-scale modulations for ICF ignition. This paper will compare the experimental data to the current nonlinear theories. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  3. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model

    Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent “pores” in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

  4. Ultrashort laser pulse ablation of copper, silicon and gelatin: effect of the pulse duration on the ablation thresholds and the incubation coefficients

    Nathala, Chandra S. R.; Ajami, Ali; Husinsky, Wolfgang; Farooq, Bilal; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Daskalova, Albena; Bliznakova, Irina; Assion, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the influence of the pulse duration on the ablation threshold and the incubation coefficient was investigated for three different types of materials: metal (copper), semiconductor (silicon) and biopolymer (gelatin). Ablation threshold values and the incubation coefficients have been measured for multiple Ti:sapphire laser pulses (3 to 1000 pulses) and for four different pulse durations (10, 30, 250 and 550 fs). The ablation threshold fluence was determined by extrapolation of curves from squared crater diameter versus fluence plots. For copper and silicon, the experiments were conducted in vacuum and for gelatin in air. For all materials, the ablation threshold fluence increases with the pulse duration. For copper, the threshold increases as τ 0.05, for silicon as τ 0.12 and for gelatin as τ 0.22. By extrapolating the curves of the threshold fluence versus number of pulses, the single-shot threshold fluence was determined for each sample. For 30 fs pulses, the single-shot threshold fluences were found to be 0.79, 0.35, and 0.99 J/cm2 and the incubation coefficients were found to be 0.75, 0.83 and 0.68 for copper, silicon and gelatin, respectively.

  5. Design and Laboratory Validation of a Capacitive Sensor for Measuring the Recession of Thin-Layered Ablator

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Bowman, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    Flight vehicles are typically instrumented with subsurface thermocouples to estimate heat transfer at the surface using inverse analysis procedures. If the vehicle has an ablating heat shield, however, temperature time histories from subsurface thermocouples no longer provide enough information to estimate heat flux at the surface. In this situation, the geometry changes and thermal energy leaves the surface in the form of ablation products. The ablation rate is required to estimate heat transfer to the surface. A new concept for a capacitive sensor has been developed to measure ablator depth using the ablator's dielectric effect on a capacitor's fringe region. Relying on the capacitor's fringe region enables the gage to be flush mounted in the vehicle's permanent structure and not intrude into the ablative heat shield applied over the gage. This sensor's design allows nonintrusive measurement of the thickness of dielectric materials, in particular, the recession rates of low-temperature ablators applied in thin (0.020 to 0.060 in. (0.05 to 0.15 mm)) layers. Twenty capacitive gages with 13 different sensing element geometries were designed, fabricated, and tested. A two-dimensional finite-element analysis was performed on several candidate geometries. Calibration procedures using ablator-simulating shims are described. A one-to-one correspondence between system output and dielectric material thickness was observed out to a thickness of 0.055 in. (1.4 mm) for a material with a permittivity about three times that of air or vacuum. A novel method of monitoring the change in sensor capacitance was developed. This technical memorandum suggests further improvements in gage design and fabrication techniques.

  6. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    J.N. Lodders; S. Parmar; N.L.M. Stienen; T.J. Martin; K.H. Karagozoglu; M.W. Heymans; B. Nandra; T. Forouzanfar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Desired data was retrieved

  7. SiOx Nanodandelion by Laser Ablation for Anode of Lithium-Ion Battery.

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Hongjun; Pan, Wei; Gong, Jianghong; Khalid, Bilal; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Silicon-based nanoparticles with unique "nanodandelion" structures are synthesized by a simple and efficient laser ablation method. Such material can be used as a stable anode for Li-ion batteries with a high capacity of ≈1500 mAh g(-1) and for more than 800 electrochemical cycles without obvious capacity decay. PMID:26449629

  8. Evaluation of Finite-Rate GasSurface Interaction Models for a Carbon Based Ablator

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Goekcen, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Two sets of finite-rate gas-surface interaction model between air and the carbon surface are studied. The first set is an engineering model with one-way chemical reactions, and the second set is a more detailed model with two-way chemical reactions. These two proposed models intend to cover the carbon surface ablation conditions including the low temperature rate-controlled oxidation, the mid-temperature diffusion-controlled oxidation, and the high temperature sublimation. The prediction of carbon surface recession is achieved by coupling a material thermal response code and a Navier-Stokes flow code. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal-response and Ablation Program, which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. The flow code solves the reacting full Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation method. Recession analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities with heat fluxes ranging from 45 to 1100 wcm2 are performed and compared with data for model validation. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests is Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator. Additionally, computational predictions of surface recession and shape change are in good agreement with measurement for arc-jet conditions of Small Probe Reentry Investigation for Thermal Protection System Engineering.

  9. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  10. Lip Reconstruction after Tumor Ablation

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimi, Azin; Kazemi, Mohammad; Shams, Amin; Hashemzadeh, Haleh

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all oral cavity carcinomas involve the lips, and the primary management of these lesions is complete surgical resection. Loss of tissue in the lips after resection is treated with a variety of techniques, depending on the extension and location of the defect. Here we review highly accepted techniques of lip reconstruction and some of new trials with significant clinical results. Reconstruction choice is primarily depend to size of the defect, localization of defect, elasticity of tissues. But patient’s age, comorbidities, and motivation are also important. According to the defect location and size, different reconstruction methods can be used. For defects involved less than 30% of lips, primary closures are sufficient. In defects with 35–70% lip involvement, the Karapandzic, Abbe, Estlander, McGregor or Gillies’ fan flaps or their modifications can be used. When lip remaining tissues are insufficient, cheek tissue can be used in Webster and Bernard advancement flaps and their various modifications. Deltopectoral or radial forearm free flaps can be options for large defects of the lip extending to the Jaws. To achieve best functional and esthetic results, surgeons should be able to choose most appropriate reconstruction method. Considering defects’ size and location, patients’ expects and surgeon’s ability and knowledge, a variety of flaps are presented in order to reconstruct defects resulted from tumor ablation. It’s necessary for surgeons to trace the recent innovations in lip reconstruction to offer best choices to patients. PMID:27308236

  11. Effect of ablatant composition on the ablation of a fuelling pellet

    The single species neutral-shielding model for the ablation of a hydrogenic pellet is extended by considering the ablatant as a mixture of four species: molecular and atomic hydrogen, protons and electrons. Compared with the results of the frozen flow, (i.e. the single species molecular hydrogen gas model), results of the analysis showed that the presence of dissociation and ionization effects caused a marked difference of the ablatant state. The attenuations of the incoming electron energy and energy flux, however, are very much similar irrespective of whether the ablated flow is in a frozen or an equilibrium state. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate with respect to the plasma state of Te, ne and the pellet radius remains the same; the ablation rate is reduced by approximately 15%. To examine the possible existence of a spherical shell around the pellet where most of the incoming electron energy is absorbed, acodmparison is made between the local electron collisional mean free path and the electron Larmor radius. A critical field at the ionization radius is evaluated. An effective spherical energyabsorbing region exists when the local field strength is below the critical value. For a plasma state of low Te and ne, (where the ablatant is hardly ionized), and for one near the thermonuclear condition (where a highly dense ablatant exists near the pellet), the effective energy absorption region is nearly spherical. 20 refs. (author)

  12. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.;

    2013-01-01

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at ~2 J cm-2 has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser...

  13. Laser ablation at 337 nm of nitrocellulose and nylon sensitized with organic dopants

    Skordoulis, Constantine D.; Kosmidis, Constantine E.

    1993-05-01

    The laser induced ablative decomposition of nitrocellulose and nylon sensitized with organic dopants (Stilbene 420, Coumarin 120, and Rhodamine 6G) has been studied. Ablation with a low power nitrogen laser is hereby reported for the first time. With the addition of dyes strongly absorbing at 337 nm the photoetching rate of the pure materials can be significantly increased. A two step photochemical mechanism considering the decomposition of the polymers from excited electronic states and the energy transfer process from the dye to the polymer are discussed.

  14. Temporal dependence of the mass ablation rate in uv irradiated spherical targets

    In this talk, measurements of thermal transport in spherical geometry using time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy are presented. The time dependence of the mass ablation rate (m) is determined by following the progress of the ablation surface through thin layers of material embedded at various depths below the surface of the target. These measurements made with 6, 12 and 24 uv (351 nm) beams from OMEGA are compared to previous thermal transport data and are in qualitative agreement with detailed LILAC hydrodynamic code simulations which predict a sharp decrease in m after the peak of the laser pulse. Viewgraphs of the talk comprise the report

  15. Ablation of a Deuterium Pellet in a Fusion Plasma Viewed as a Stopping Power Problem

    Chang, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    sublimation energy of hydrogen isotopes, shortly after the direct impact of the electrons, a dense cloud forms around the pellet. This cloud of ablated material then serves as a stopping medium for the incoming electrons, thus prolongs the pellet life-time. As a result, the deep penetration of the pellet into......At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low...

  16. Femtosecond x-ray diffuse scattering measurements of semiconductor ablation dynamics

    Lindenberg, A. M.; Engemann, S.; Gaffney, K. J.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Larsson, J.; Reis, D.; Lorazo, P.; Hastings, J. B.

    2008-05-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved small and wide-angle x-ray diffuse scattering techniques are applied to investigate the ultrafast nucleation processes that occur during the ablation process in semiconducting materials. Following intense optical excitation, a transient liquid state of high compressibility characterized by large-amplitude density fluctuations is observed and the build-up of these fluctuations is measured in real-time. Small-angle scattering measurements reveal the first steps in the nucleation of nanoscale voids below the surface of the semiconductor and support MD simulations of the ablation process.

  17. Short-pulse laser ablation of solids: From phase explosion to fragmentation

    The mechanisms of laser ablation in silicon are investigated close to the threshold energy for pulse durations of 500 fs and 50 ps. This is achieved using a unique model coupling carrier and atom dynamics within a unified Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics scheme. Under femtosecond laser irradiation, isochoric heating and rapid adiabatic expansion of the material provide a natural pathway to phase explosion. This is not observed under slower, nonadiabatic cooling with picosecond pulses where fragmentation of the hot metallic fluid is the only relevant ablation mechanism

  18. ABLATION OF A DEUTERIUM PELLET IN A FUSION PLASMA VIEWED AS A STOPPING POWER PROBLEM

    Chang, C

    1983-01-01

    At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low sublimation energy of hydrogen isotopes, shortly after the direct impact of the electrons, a dense cloud forms around the pellet. This cloud of ablated material then serves as a stopping medium for the...

  19. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant hepatic tumors: post-ablation syndrome

    To evaluate post-ablation syndrome after radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant hepatic tumors. Forty-two patients with primary (n=3D29) or secondary (n=3D13) hepatic tumors underwent radiofrequency thermal ablation. A total of 65 nodules ranging in size from 1.1 to 5.0 (mean, 3.1) cm were treated percutaneously using a 50W RF generator with 15G expandable needle electrodes. We retrospectively evaluated the spectrum of post-ablation syndrome including pain, fever (≥3D 38 deg C), nausea, vomiting, right shoulder pain, and chest discomfort according to frequency, intensity and duration, and the findings were correlated with tumor location and number of ablations. We also evaluated changes in pre-/post-ablation serum aminotransferase (ALT/AST) and prothrombin time, and correlated these findings with the number of ablations. Post-ablation syndrome was noted in 29 of 42 patients (69.0%), and most symptoms improved with conservative treatment. The most important of these were abdominal plan (n=3D20, 47.6%), fever (n=3D8, 19.0%), and nausea (n=3D7, 16.7%), and four of 42 (9.5%) patients complained of severe pain. The abdominal pain lasted from 3 hours to 5.5 days (mean; 20.4 hours), the fever from 6 hours to 5 days (mean; 63.0 hours). And the nausea from 1 hours to 4 days (mean; 21.0 hours). Other symptoms were right shoulder pain (n=3D6, 14.3%), chest discomfort (n=3D3, 7.1%), and headache (n=3D3, 7.1%). Seventeen of 20 patients (85%) with abdominal pain had subcapsular tumor of the liver. There was significant correlation between pain, location of the tumor, and a number of ablations. After ablation, ALT/AST was elevated more than two-fold in 52.6%/73.7% of patients, respectively but there was no significant correlation with the number of ablation. Post-ablation syndrome is a frequent and tolerable post-procedural process after radiofrequency thermal ablation. The spectrum of this syndrome provides a useful guideline for the post-ablation management. (author)

  20. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant hepatic tumors: post-ablation syndrome

    Choi, Jung Bin; Rhim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsoo; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Seo, Heung Suk; Lee, Seung Ro [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate post-ablation syndrome after radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant hepatic tumors. Forty-two patients with primary (n=3D29) or secondary (n=3D13) hepatic tumors underwent radiofrequency thermal ablation. A total of 65 nodules ranging in size from 1.1 to 5.0 (mean, 3.1) cm were treated percutaneously using a 50W RF generator with 15G expandable needle electrodes. We retrospectively evaluated the spectrum of post-ablation syndrome including pain, fever ({>=}3D 38 deg C), nausea, vomiting, right shoulder pain, and chest discomfort according to frequency, intensity and duration, and the findings were correlated with tumor location and number of ablations. We also evaluated changes in pre-/post-ablation serum aminotransferase (ALT/AST) and prothrombin time, and correlated these findings with the number of ablations. Post-ablation syndrome was noted in 29 of 42 patients (69.0%), and most symptoms improved with conservative treatment. The most important of these were abdominal plan (n=3D20, 47.6%), fever (n=3D8, 19.0%), and nausea (n=3D7, 16.7%), and four of 42 (9.5%) patients complained of severe pain. The abdominal pain lasted from 3 hours to 5.5 days (mean; 20.4 hours), the fever from 6 hours to 5 days (mean; 63.0 hours). And the nausea from 1 hours to 4 days (mean; 21.0 hours). Other symptoms were right shoulder pain (n=3D6, 14.3%), chest discomfort (n=3D3, 7.1%), and headache (n=3D3, 7.1%). Seventeen of 20 patients (85%) with abdominal pain had subcapsular tumor of the liver. There was significant correlation between pain, location of the tumor, and a number of ablations. After ablation, ALT/AST was elevated more than two-fold in 52.6%/73.7% of patients, respectively but there was no significant correlation with the number of ablation. Post-ablation syndrome is a frequent and tolerable post-procedural process after radiofrequency thermal ablation. The spectrum of this syndrome provides a useful guideline for the post-ablation management. (author)

  1. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  2. Ultra-short laser ablation of dielectrics: Theoretical analysis of threshold damage fluence and ablation depth

    A coupled theoretical model based on Fokker-Planck equation for ultra-short laser ablation of dielectrics is proposed. Multiphoton ionization and avalanche ionization are considered as the sources during the generation of free electrons. The impact of the electron distribution in thermodynamic nonequilibrium on relaxation time is taken into account. The calculation formula of ablation depth is deduced based on the law of energy conservation. Numerical calculations are performed for the femtosecond laser ablation of fused silica at 526 and 1053 nm. It shows that the threshold damage fluences and ablation depths resulted from the coupled model are in good agreement with the experimental results; while the damage thresholds resulted from the approximate model significantly differ from the experimental results for lasers of long pulse width. It is concluded that the coupled model can better describe the micro-process of ultra-short laser ablation of dielectrics.

  3. Ablation enhancement of silicon by ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    In this study, the ultrashort double-pulse ablation of silicon is investigated. An atomistic simulation model is developed to analyze the underlying physics. It is revealed that the double-pulse ablation could significantly increase the ablation rate of silicon, compared with the single pulse ablation with the same total pulse energy, which is totally different from the case of metals. In the long pulse delay range (over 1 ps), the enhancement is caused by the metallic transition of melted silicon with the corresponding absorption efficiency. At ultrashort pulse delay (below 1 ps), the enhancement is due to the electron excitation by the first pulse. The enhancement only occurs at low and moderate laser fluence. The ablation is suppressed at high fluence due to the strong plasma shielding effect.

  4. Physical mechanisms of SiNx layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiNx) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300 mJ/cm2 and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiNx layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiNx island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates

  5. Angled Cool-Tip Electrode for Radiofrequency Ablation of Small Superficial Subcapsular Tumors in the Liver: A Feasibility Study

    Kim, Il Jung; Lee, Shin Jae; Shin, Min Woo; Shin, Won Sun; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Gyoung Min; Kim, Man Deuk; Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Jin Sub; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall, in order to traverse normal liver parenchyma, and thereby, obtain favorable configuration of ablation margin. Materials and Methods In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 15 small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall in 15 patients, treated with radiofrequency ablation from March 2013 to June 2015 using a cool-tip electrode manually modified to create 25–35° angle at the junction between exposed and insulated segments. The tumors were hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 13) and metastases (n = 2: cholangiocellular carcinoma and rectosigmoid cancer), with maximum diameter of 10–26 mm (mean, 15.68 ± 5.29 mm). Under ultrasonographic guidance, the electrode tip was advanced to the depth of the tumors' epicenter about 1 cm from the margin. The tip was re-directed to penetrate the tumor for radiofrequency ablation. Minimal ablation margin was measured at immediate post-treatment CT. Radiological images and medical records were evaluated for success rate, length of minimal ablation margin and complications. Results Technical success rate of obtaining complete necrosis of the tumors was 100%, with no procedure-related complication. Minimal ablation margin ranged from 3–12 mm (mean, 7.07 ± 2.23 mm). CT/MRI follow-up at 21–1022 days (mean, 519.47 ± 304.51 days) revealed no local recurrence, but distant recurrence in 9 patients. Conclusion Using an angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular tumors abutting abdominal wall may be a feasible technique for obtaining adequate ablation margin and lower complication rate.

  6. Physical mechanisms of SiN{sub x} layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    Rapp, S., E-mail: rapp@hm.edu [Faculty of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstraße 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Straße 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Heinrich, G. [Technische Universität Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Straße 25., 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); Wollgarten, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Huber, H. P. [Faculty of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstraße 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Schmidt, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Lehrstuhl für Photonische Technologien, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 3-5, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-03-14

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiN{sub x} layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiN{sub x} island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates.

  7. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  8. Laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma-A review

    2008-01-01

    A wide range of local thermal ablative therapies have been developed in the treatment of non resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the last decade. Laser ablation (LA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are the two most widely used of these. This article provides an up to date overview of the role of laser ablation in the local treatment of HCC. General principles, technique, image guidance and patient selection are discussed. A review of published data on treatment efficacy, long term outcome and complication rates of laser ablation is included and comparison with RFA made. The role of laser ablation in combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation is also discussed.

  9. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between the thresholds and the laser parameters. Besides the ablated mass areal density, which fits the experimental data quite well, the ablation temperature, pyrolysis rate, and product components are also discussed for a better understanding of the ablation mechanism of POM. PMID:27607281

  10. Synthesis and characterization of a novel laser ablation sensitive triazene incorporated epoxy resin

    Patole, Archana S.

    2014-01-01

    New triazene monomer was synthesized and further employed as a crosslinking agent partner with epoxy matrix using ethyl methyl imidazole as a curing agent in order to investigate the effect of triazene moieties on polymeric properties for laser ablation application. The synthesized triazene monomer was characterized by analytical and spectroscopic methods, while the surface morphology of resist after laser ablation was visualized by optical laser scanning images and scanning electron microscopy. Thermogravimetrical investigations indicate the loss of nitrogen being the initial thermal decomposition step and exhibit sufficient stabilities for the requirements for laser ablation application. Fourier transform infra-red, nuclear magnetic resonance, and gas chromatography analyses showed the successful synthesis of triazene. The ablation results from the optical laser scanning images revealed that the etching depth could be controlled by varying the concentration of triazene monomer in the formulation of epoxy. The shear strength analysis revealed that that the shear strength increased with increasing the amount of triazene in the formulation of direct ablation sensitive resist. © 2014 The Korean Institute of Metals and Materials and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  11. Generation and elimination of polarization-dependent ablation of cubic crystals by femtosecond laser radiation.

    Li, Xin; Rong, Wenlong; Jiang, Lan; Zhang, Kaihu; Li, Cong; Cao, Qiang; Zhang, Guangming; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally showed that the π/2-period oscillation of an ablation area with laser polarization direction can be observed in GaAs, ZnSe, MgO and LiF with cubic crystal by a femtosecond laser (800 nm, 100 fs) and that the modulation in the ablation area can be controlled by the laser fluence. While the polarization dependence is sustained in a wide range of laser fluences for a narrow band-gap crystal, it is strongly suppressed with a slight augmentation of laser fluence in a wide band-gap material. The polarization-dependent ablation is explained by the crystal's orientation-dependent reduced-electron mass and the resultant contrasting nonlinear absorptions with slightly different reduced electron mass. The interplay between photoionization and avalanche ionization is discussed to interpret the influence of laser fluence on polarization-dependent ablation. Based on Keldysh's theory, polarization-dependent ablation occurs in a mixed regime between tunneling and multiphoton ionization. PMID:25606947

  12. Atmospheric pressure imaging mass spectrometry of drugs with various ablating lasers

    The atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric detection efficiency of organic species (tofisopam and verapamil) was measured by means of the laser ablation of dried solution drops containing known amount of the analyte. Ablated molecules were ionized by an atmospheric pressure laser plasma cell and then introduced in the TOF mass-spectrometer. The spot was formed by dripping 2 μl of solution on the stainless steel substrate and consequent drying. Then it was scanned by an intense ablating beam of various lasers (CO2, Nd:YAG and femtosecond fiber laser) until the spot was completely eroded during the non-stop MS-analysis of ablated material. The sensitivity was defined as the ratio of the total ion current integral of the relevant mass peaks to the amount of molecules in the spot. All the tested lasers are suitable for the ablation and subsequent MS-detection of organic species in dried solution spots given enough power deposition is provided. The measured sensitivity values reach 0.1 ions/fg of tested analytes

  13. First-Principles Investigations on Thermal Conductivity and Average Ionization of CH Ablators Under Extreme Conditions

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    A plastic CH ablator (polystyrene) is often used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target designs. Upon intense laser or x-ray ablations, a CH ablator can be shocked to warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions. Many-body coupling and quantum electron degeneracy are expected to play an essential role in determining the properties of such warm dense plasmas. Using ab initio methods of quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), we have performed investigations on the principal Hugoniot of a CH ablator, the first-principles equation-of-state table of CH, and its effect on ICF simulations. In this presentation, we focus on the thermal conductivity and average ionization of CH-ablators under a wide range of plasma temperatures and densities. The resulting thermal conductivity (κ) and average ionization () show large differences from the usual model predictions in the WDM regime. These results, being fitted with analytical functions of plasma density and temperature, have been incorporated into radiation -hydrodynamics codes. Their effects on the ICF implosion simulations will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Scientific Campaign 10 at LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  14. Desorption/ablation of lithium fluoride induced by extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    Blejchař Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of reliable modeling tools and input data required for the prediction of surface removal rate from the lithium fluoride targets irradiated by the intense photon beams is essential for many practical aspects. This study is motivated by the practical implementation of soft X-ray (SXR or extreme ultraviolet (XUV lasers for the pulsed ablation and thin film deposition. Specifically, it is focused on quantitative description of XUV laser-induced desorption/ablation from lithium fluoride, which is a reference large band-gap dielectric material with ionic crystalline structure. Computational framework was proposed and employed here for the reconstruction of plume expansion dynamics induced by the irradiation of lithium fluoride targets. The morphology of experimentally observed desorption/ablation craters were reproduced using idealized representation (two-zone approximation of the laser fluence profile. The calculation of desorption/ablation rate was performed using one-dimensional thermomechanic model (XUV-ABLATOR code taking into account laser heating and surface evaporation of the lithium fluoride target occurring on a nanosecond timescale. This step was followed by the application of two-dimensional hydrodynamic solver for description of laser-produced plasma plume expansion dynamics. The calculated plume lengths determined by numerical simulations were compared with a simple adiabatic expansion (blast-wave model.

  15. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  16. Fabrication of a super-hydrophobic surface on metal using laser ablation and electrodeposition

    Kwon, Min Ho; Shin, Hong Shik; Chu, Chong Nam

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the fabrication process of a super-hydrophobic metallic surface using laser ablation and electrodeposition was investigated. Re-entrant structure and surface roughness play an important role in forming a super-hydrophobic surface on intrinsically hydrophilic material. A micro pillar array with a re-entrant structure of copper on stainless steel was fabricated through a sequential process of laser ablation, insulating, mechanical polishing and electrodeposition. Spacing of the micro pillars in the array played a major role in the structure hydrophobicity that was confirmed by measuring the water contact angle. Surface morphology changed relative to the parameters of the laser ablation process and electrodeposition process. Under a gradual increase in current density during the electrodeposition process, surface morphology roughness was maximized for fabricating a super-hydrophobic surface. Finally, the super-hydrophobic surface was successfully fabricated on metal.

  17. Uniform laser ablation via photovoltaic effect of phthalocyanine/perylene derivative

    A uniform laser ablation was observed in a polystyrene film coated with a photovoltaic perylene/phthalocyanine bilayer when an incident took place at an intensity range of 109-1010 W/cm2 (λ=1064 nm, 1.1 ns FWHM). Without the bilayer coating, the laser pulse formed spiky structures in the polystyrene film as self-focusing traces of the laser pulse, while for the coated film, the uniform surface ablation trace without the spiky interior structures was observed. In the case of incident of 532 nm where the coating material exhibits no reflection, such difference depending the coating was not observed. These phenomena were coupled with the reflection and conduction properties via its photovoltaic effect, and agreed with the required ablation to achieve high-density compression of the fuel capsule for inertial fusion energy (IFE)

  18. Uniform laser ablation via photovoltaic effect of phthalocyanine/perylene derivative

    Nagai, Keiji; Yoshida, Hidetsugu; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Izawa, Yasukazu; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2002-09-30

    A uniform laser ablation was observed in a polystyrene film coated with a photovoltaic perylene/phthalocyanine bilayer when an incident took place at an intensity range of 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} ({lambda}=1064 nm, 1.1 ns FWHM). Without the bilayer coating, the laser pulse formed spiky structures in the polystyrene film as self-focusing traces of the laser pulse, while for the cd film, the uniform surface ablation trace without the spiky interior structures was observed. In the case of incident of 532 nm where the coating material exhibits no reflection, such difference depending the coating was not observed. These phenomena were coupled with the reflection and conduction properties via its photovoltaic effect, and agreed with the required ablation to achieve high-density compression of the fuel capsule for inertial fusion energy (IFE)

  19. Modification of narrow ablating capillaries under the influence of multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    Gubin, K V; Trunov, V I; Pestryakov, E V

    2016-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses that propagate through narrow ablating capillaries cause modification of capillary walls, which is studied experimentally and theoretically. At low intensities, laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and porous coating composed of sub-micron particles appear on the walls. At higher intensities, the surface is covered by deposited droplets of the size up to 10 $\\mu$m. In both cases, the ablated material forms a solid plug that completely blocks the capillary after several hundreds or thousands of pulses. The suggested theoretical model indicates that plug formation is a universal effect. It must take place in any narrow tube subject to ablation under the action of short laser pulses.

  20. A Brownian motion technique to simulate gasification and its application to C/C composite ablation

    Ablation of carbon-carbon composites (C/C) results in a heterogeneous surface recession mainly due to some gasification processes (oxidation, sublimation) possibly coupled to bulk mass transfer. In order to simulate and analyse the material/environment interactions during ablation, a Brownian motion simulation method featuring special Random Walk rules close to the wall has been implemented to efficiently simulate mass transfer in the low Peclet number regime. A sticking probability law adapted to this kind of Random Walk has been obtained for first-order heterogeneous reactions. In order to simulate the onset of surface roughness, the interface recession is simultaneously handled in 3D using a Simplified Marching Cube discretization. This tool is validated by comparison to analytical models. Then, its ability to provide reliable and accurate solutions of ablation phenomena in 3D is illustrated. (authors)

  1. The TriBeam system: Femtosecond laser ablation in situ SEM

    Femtosecond laser ablation offers the unique ability to remove material at rates that are orders of magnitude faster than existing ion beam technologies with little or no associated damage. By combining ultrafast lasers with state-of-the-art electron microscopy equipment, we have developed a TriBeam system capable of targeted, in-situ tomography providing chemical, structural, and topographical information in three dimensions of near mm3 sized volumes. The origins, development, physics, current uses, and future potential for the TriBeam system are described in this tutorial review. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • An emerging tool, the TriBeam, for in situ femtosecond (fs) laser ablation is presented. • Fs laser ablation aided tomography at the mm3-scale is demonstrated. • Fs laser induced deposition of Pt is demonstrated at sub-diffraction limit resolution. • Fs laser surface structuring is reviewed as well as micromachining applications

  2. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ˜2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  3. Design of a chamber for deposit of thin films by laser ablation

    The present work has as purpose to design a vacuum chamber, to the one that is denominated chamber of ablation, in which were carried out deposits of thin films using the well-known technique as laser ablation. To fulfill the purpose, the work has been distributed in the following way: in the chapter 1 there are discussed the generalities of the technique of ablation laser for the obtaining of materials in form of thin film, in the chapter 2 the basic concepts of the vacuum technology are mentioned that includes among other things, systems to produce vacuum and vacuum gages and in the chapter 3 the design of the chamber is presented with the accessories and specific systems. (Author)

  4. Plasma effects during ablation and drilling using pulsed solid-state lasers

    Breitling, Detlef; Ruf, Andreas; Berger, Peter W.; Dausinger, Friedrich H.; Klimentov, Sergei M.; Pivovarov, Paval A.; Kononenko, Taras V.; Konov, Vitali I.

    2003-09-01

    Plasma and vapor plumes generated by ultrashort laser pulses have been studied by various optical methods for both single pulse ablation as well as high-repetition rate drilling. Time-resolved shadow and resonance absorption photographs enable to determine the plume and vapor expansion behavior and, by means of an analytical shock wave model, allow to estimate an energy balance that can be refined by plasma transmission measurements. The results furthermore suggest that several types of laser-induced plasmas can be distinguished according to their origin: the material vapor plasma originating at the ablated surface even at moderate intensities, a breakdown plasma at increased power densities occurring in cold vapor or dust particles left from previous ablations during repetitively-pulsed processing and, finally, the optical breakdown in the pure atmosphere at high intensities. The latter also gives rise to nonlinear scattering phenomena resulting in a strong redistribution of the energy density in the beam profile.

  5. Laser ablation sample transfer for localized LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis of tissue.

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Murray, Kermit K

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a mid-infrared laser ablation sampling technique for nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry proteomic profiling of discrete regions from biological samples. Laser ablation performed in transmission geometry was used to transfer material from 50-µm thick tissue sections mounted on a glass microscope slide to a capturing solvent. Captured samples were processed using filter-aided sample preparation and enzymatically digested to produce tryptic peptides for data-dependent analysis with an ion trap mass spectrometer. Comparison with ultraviolet laser capture microdissection from neighboring regions on the same tissue section revealed that infrared laser ablation transfer has higher reproducibility between samples from different consecutive sections. Both techniques allowed for proteomics investigation of different organelles without the addition of surfactants. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27041656

  6. Large volume ablation of Sapphire with ultra-short laser pulses

    The superior optical and mechanical properties of Sapphire (Al2O3) are highly desirable in various opto-electronics and micro-mechanical applications. However, Sapphire's intrinsic hardness and resistance to most chemicals result in significant processing difficulties. Laser micro-machining is emerging as a promising technology, in particular, the use of ultra-short pulses for material ablation. In this work we investigate and characterize experimentally large volume ablation of Sapphire with femtosecond pulses, and compare the results to previously reported drilling and cutting experiments. We manage to identify optimized parameters for overcoming deleterious thermal effects and debris scattering, and demonstrate high quality 180 μm-deep ablation of 1 mm × 15 mm area in Sapphire.

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of polymethylmethacrylate via dual-color synthesized waveform

    We have demonstrated the laser ablation of PMMA using dual-color waveform synthesis of the fundamental (ω) and its second-harmonic (2ω) of a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. A modest and yet clear modulation (∼22%) in ablated area versus relative phase between the 2ω and ω beams with a power-ratio of 15% (28/183 mW) is revealed. This is explained qualitatively by the dependence of ablation on multiphoton ionization of which the rate is related to the relative phase of the synthesized waveform. At higher peak power ratios, the modulation decreases rapidly, as the two-photon-ionization rate of the 2ω dominates over that of the three- to four- photon ionization of the ω beam. This technique demonstrates the feasibility of phase-controlled laser processing of materials

  8. Ablation of polymers by focused EUV radiation from a table-top laser-produced plasma source

    Barkusky, Frank; Bayer, Armin; Mann, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated ablation of polymers with radiation of 13.5 nm wavelength, using a table-top laser produced plasma source based on solid gold as target material. A Schwarzschild objective with Mo/Si multilayer coatings was adapted to the source, generating an EUV spot of 5 μm diameter with a maximum energy density of ˜1.3 J/cm2. In combination with a Zirconium transmission filter, radiation of high spectral purity (2% bandwidth) can be provided on the irradiated spot. Ablation experiments were performed on PMMA, PTFE and PC. Ablation rates were determined for varying fluences using atomic force microscopy and white light interferometry. The slopes of these curves are discussed with respect to the chemical structure of the polymers. Additionally, the ablation behavior in terms of effective penetration depths, threshold fluences and incubation effects is compared to literature data for higher UV wavelength.

  9. Ablation of hard dental tissues with an ArF-pulsed excimer laser

    Neev, Joseph; Raney, Daniel; Whalen, William E.; Fujishige, Jack T.; Ho, Peter D.; McGrann, John V.; Berns, Michael W.

    1991-06-01

    The interaction of 15 ns pulses from an ArF excimer laser with hard dental tissue was investigated for the purpose of obtaining practical information on the ablation process. Dark field fast photography utilizing an auxiliary, 15 ns Nd:Yag laser 'probe', was used to study the ablation plume dynamics as a function of time, luminescence were studied at different fluence levels and prr. Dentin ablation was found to be about four times as efficient as ablation of enamel in the higher fluence levels tested (> 10 J/cm2) and about twice as efficient as the ablation in the lower fluence regime (approximately equals 1 J/cm2). The dentin etch depth per pulse was found to increase exponentially with fluence (at least up to the tested level of 11 J/cm2), while in enamel the etch depth per pulse appears to increase logarithmically with fluence. Dentin ablation yields a larger, more dense plume which can be ejected (depending on the fluence level) to a height of several millimeters above the surface with observed ejection velocity in access of 1200 m/s. The dentin plume consisted of a relatively uniform particle size distribution (0.1 micrometers to 10 micrometers in diameter). Enamel ablation, on the other hand, yields a smaller observed ejection velocities (about 800 m/s), and a much smaller plume of fine particles (about 0.1 micrometers in diameter) and gases, confined to within 0.5 mm of the surface. In addition, an even smaller amount of highly non-uniform debris, (from ten to several hundred micrometers in size) is observed to be ejected to higher levels, and reach roughly half the height of the corresponding dentin plume for similar fluence levels. Although both dentin and enamel yield lower ablation efficiencies at 1 Hz, no significant difference is detected between the ablation efficiency at 5 Hz and ablation 10 Hz prr. Both materials remained within 20 degree(s)C of room temperature even at fluences as high as 20 J/cm2 and prr as high as 10 Hz for enamel and 20 Hz for

  10. Percutaneous tumor ablation in medical radiology

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G. [University Hospital Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Helmberger, T.K. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical Univ. Munich (Germany). Dept. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Reiser, M.F. (eds.) [University Hospitals - Grosshadern and Innenstadt Munich Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2008-07-01

    Thermal ablation has become an integral part of oncology, especially in the field of interventional oncology. This very comprehensive book encompasses the different technologies employed in thermal ablation, its indications and the results achieved in various clinical conditions. The first part of the book clearly explains the basics of thermal ablative techniques such as laser-induced thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy, and localized tumor therapy. The latest developments in the application of minimally invasive therapies in localized neoplastic disease are demonstrated. In the main part of the book, techniques of guiding the applicators to the target structures by use of different imaging tools such as ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are discussed. The results are presented for a variety of clinical indications, including liver and lung tumors and metastases and some rather rare conditions involving the kidney, the head and neck, the prostate, and soft tissue structures. A large number of acknowledged experts have contributed to the book, which benefits from a lucid structure and excellent images. (orig.)

  11. Percutaneous tumor ablation in medical radiology

    Thermal ablation has become an integral part of oncology, especially in the field of interventional oncology. This very comprehensive book encompasses the different technologies employed in thermal ablation, its indications and the results achieved in various clinical conditions. The first part of the book clearly explains the basics of thermal ablative techniques such as laser-induced thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy, and localized tumor therapy. The latest developments in the application of minimally invasive therapies in localized neoplastic disease are demonstrated. In the main part of the book, techniques of guiding the applicators to the target structures by use of different imaging tools such as ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are discussed. The results are presented for a variety of clinical indications, including liver and lung tumors and metastases and some rather rare conditions involving the kidney, the head and neck, the prostate, and soft tissue structures. A large number of acknowledged experts have contributed to the book, which benefits from a lucid structure and excellent images. (orig.)

  12. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    Maksimovic, Ruzica [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, GD Rotterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Dill, Thorsten [Kerckhoff-Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Ristic, Arsen D.; Seferovic, Petar M. [Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia)

    2006-11-15

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  13. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  14. Characterization of UV laser ablation for microprocessing of a-Si:H thin films

    Molpeceres, C.; Lauzurica, S.; Ocaña, J. L.; Gandía, J. J.; Urbina, L.; Cárabe, J.; Villar, F.; Escarré, J.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J.

    2006-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon has been widely studied last years, both from the basic research and industrial points of view, due to the important set of potential applications that this material offers, ranging from Thin Films Transistors (TFTs) to solar cells technologies. In different fabrication steps of a-Si:H based devices, laser sources have been used as appropriate tools for cutting, crystallising, contacting, patterning, etc., and more recent research lines are undertaking the problem of a-Si:H selective laser ablation for different applications. The controlled ablation of photovoltaic materials with minimum debris and small heat affected zone with low processing costs, is one of the main difficulties for the successful implementation of laser micromachining as competitive technology in this field. This work presents a detailed study of a-Si:H laser ablation in the ns regime. Ablation curves are measured and fluence thresholds are determined. Additionally, and due to the improved performance in optolectronic properties associated to the nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H), some samples of this material have been also studied.

  15. Mechanism of laser ablation for aqueous media irradiated under confined-stress conditions

    Pulsed laser ablation of aqueous medium irradiated under conditions of temporal confinement of thermal stress is described. Time-resolved measurements of laser-induced transient stress waves with simultaneous imaging of ablation process by laser-flash photography were performed. Stress transients induced in aqueous solution of K2CrO4 by ablative nanosecond laser pulses at 355 nm were studied by a broad-band lithium niobate acoustic transducer. Recoil momentum upon material ejection was measured from the temporal profiles of the acoustic transducer signal as a function of incident laser fluence. Cavitation bubbles produced in the irradiated volume during the tensile phase of thermoelastic stress were shown to drive material ejection at temperatures substantially below 100 degree C. Experimental data are evident that nanosecond-pulse laser ablation of aqueous media (when temporal stress-confinement conditions are satisfied) include the following two main stages of material ejection: (1) ejection of water microdroplets due to expansion and rupture of subsurface cavitation bubbles; (2) ejection of liquid streams with substantial volume upon collapse of initial crater and large cavitation bubbles in the depth of irradiated volume (after coalescence of smaller bubbles). copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. Plasma Wind Tunnel Investigation of European Ablators in Nitrogen/Methane Using Emission Spectroscopy

    Ricarda Wernitz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For atmospheric reentries at high enthalpies ablative heat shield materials are used, such as those for probes entering the atmosphere of Saturn’s moon Titan, such as Cassini-Huygens in December, 2004. The characterization of such materials in a nitrogen/methane atmosphere is of interest. A European ablative material, AQ60, has been investigated in plasma wind tunnel tests at the IRS plasma wind tunnel PWK1 using the magnetoplasma dynamic generator RD5 as plasma source in a nitrogen/methane atmosphere. The dimensions of the samples are 45 mm in length with a diameter of 39 mm. The actual ablator has a thickness of 40 mm. The ablator is mounted on an aluminium substructure. The experiments were conducted at two different heat flux regimes, 1.4 MW/m2 and 0.3 MW/m2. In this paper, results of emission spectroscopy at these plasma conditions in terms of plasma species’ temperatures will be presented, including the investigation of the free-stream species, N2 and N2+, and the major erosion product C2, at a wavelength range around 500 nm–600 nm.

  17. Characterization of the aerosol produced by infrared femtosecond laser ablation of polyacrylamide gels for the sensitive inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection of selenoproteins

    A 2D high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation strategy (2-mm wide lane) previously developed for the detection of selenoproteins in gel electrophoresis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was found to increase signal sensitivity by a factor of 40 compared to conventional nanosecond ablation (0.12-mm wide lane) [G. Ballihaut, F. Claverie, C. Pecheyran, S. Mounicou, R. Grimaud and R. Lobinski, Sensitive Detection of Selenoproteins in Gel Electrophoresis by High Repetition Rate Femtosecond Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, Anal. Chem. 79 (2007) 6874-6880]. Such improvement couldn't be explained solely by the difference of amount of material ablated, and then, was attributed to the aerosol properties. In order to validate this hypothesis, the characterization of the aerosol produced by nanosecond and high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation of polyacrylamide gels was investigated. Our 2D high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation strategy of 2-mm wide lane was found to produce aerosols of similar particle size distribution compared to nanosecond laser ablation of 0.12-mm wide lane, with 38% mass of particles < 1 μm. However, at high repetition rate, when the ablated surface was reduced, the particle size distribution was shifted toward thinner particle diameter (up to 77% for a 0.12-mm wide lane at 285 μm depth). Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy was employed to visualize the morphology of the aerosol. In the case of larger ablation, the fine particles ejected from the sample were found to form agglomerates due to higher ablation rate and then higher collision probability. Additionally, investigations of the plasma temperature changes during the ablation demonstrated that the introduction of such amount of polyacrylamide gel particles had very limited impact on the ICP source (ΔT∼ 25 ± 5 K). This suggests that the cohesion forces between the thin particles composing these large aggregates were weak

  18. Characterization of the aerosol produced by infrared femtosecond laser ablation of polyacrylamide gels for the sensitive inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection of selenoproteins

    Claverie, Fanny [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Novalase SA, Z.I de la Briqueterie, 6 Impasse du bois de la Grange, 33610 Canejan (France); Pecheyran, Christophe [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: Christophe.pecheyran@univ-pau.fr; Mounicou, Sandra [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Ballihaut, Guillaume [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Laboratoire d' Ecologie Moleculaire (Microbiologie), UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, avenue de l' Universite, B.P. 1155, F-64013 Pau (France); Fernandez, Beatriz [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Alexis, Joel [Laboratoire Genie de Production, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tarbes, 47 avenue d' Azereix BP 1629, 65016 Tarbes (France)] (and others)

    2009-07-15

    A 2D high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation strategy (2-mm wide lane) previously developed for the detection of selenoproteins in gel electrophoresis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was found to increase signal sensitivity by a factor of 40 compared to conventional nanosecond ablation (0.12-mm wide lane) [G. Ballihaut, F. Claverie, C. Pecheyran, S. Mounicou, R. Grimaud and R. Lobinski, Sensitive Detection of Selenoproteins in Gel Electrophoresis by High Repetition Rate Femtosecond Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, Anal. Chem. 79 (2007) 6874-6880]. Such improvement couldn't be explained solely by the difference of amount of material ablated, and then, was attributed to the aerosol properties. In order to validate this hypothesis, the characterization of the aerosol produced by nanosecond and high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation of polyacrylamide gels was investigated. Our 2D high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation strategy of 2-mm wide lane was found to produce aerosols of similar particle size distribution compared to nanosecond laser ablation of 0.12-mm wide lane, with 38% mass of particles < 1 {mu}m. However, at high repetition rate, when the ablated surface was reduced, the particle size distribution was shifted toward thinner particle diameter (up to 77% for a 0.12-mm wide lane at 285 {mu}m depth). Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy was employed to visualize the morphology of the aerosol. In the case of larger ablation, the fine particles ejected from the sample were found to form agglomerates due to higher ablation rate and then higher collision probability. Additionally, investigations of the plasma temperature changes during the ablation demonstrated that the introduction of such amount of polyacrylamide gel particles had very limited impact on the ICP source ({delta}T{approx} 25 {+-} 5 K). This suggests that the cohesion forces between the thin particles composing these large

  19. Micromachining of ridge optical waveguides on top of He+-implanted β-BaB2O4 crystals by femtosecond laser ablation

    We report on a technique for the fabrication of ridge optical waveguides on top of β-BaB2O4 (BBO) crystals. The BBO crystals were first implanted by He+ ions to form planar optical waveguides. In the second step, the femtosecond laser ablation technique was employed for micromachining of ridge-type optical waveguides. A thorough study of material-specific ablation parameters for BBO has been performed in order to achieve ablated structures with smooth sidewalls. A further process of Ar+ ion smoothing in a plasma chamber was used to reduce the sidewall roughness of the ablated ridges from 75 to 35 nm root mean square. We demonstrated optical waveguiding in these femtosecond-ablated plasma-treated waveguides and measured total propagation losses of less than 10 dB/cm at 532 nm, making them suitable for nonlinear- and electro-optical applications

  20. Femtosecond-laser ablation dynamics of dielectrics: basics and applications for thin films

    Balling, P.; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    ejected from the dielectric following the femtosecond-laser excitation can potentially be used for thin-film deposition. The deposition rate is typically much smaller than that for nanosecond lasers, but film production by femtosecond lasers does possess several attractive features. First, the strong......Laser ablation of dielectrics by ultrashort laser pulses is reviewed. The basic interaction between ultrashort light pulses and the dielectric material is described, and different approaches to the modeling of the femtosecond ablation dynamics are reviewed. Material excitation by ultrashort laser......-field excitation makes it possible to produce films of materials that are transparent to the laser light. Second, the highly localized excitation reduces the emission of larger material particulates. Third, lasers with ultrashort pulses are shown to be particularly useful tools for the production of nanocluster...

  1. Microwave ablation versus laser ablation in occluding lateral veins in goats.

    Wang, Xu-hong; Wang, Xiao-ping; Su, Wen-juan; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Increasing number of endovenous techniques are available for the treatment of saphenous vein reflux and endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a frequently used method. A newly developed alternative, based on thermal therapy, is endovenous microwave ablation (EMA). This study evaluated the effect of the two procedures, in terms of coagulation and histological changes, in occluding lateral veins in goats. Twelve animals were randomized into two group, with 6 treated with EMA (EMA group), and the rest 6 with EVLA (EVLA group). Results of coagulation, including coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet activation, were assessed at three or four different time points: before, immediately after, 24 h (and 48 h) after ablation. The diameter change, a measure of efficacy, was ultrasonographically measured before and 1 month after the ablation. Histological changes were grossly and microscopically evaluated immediately, 1 and 3 month(s) after the ablation. The length of the ablated vein and preoperative average diameter were comparable between the two groups. In both EMA and EVLA groups, several coagulation parameters, fibrinolysis and platelet activation parameters only underwent slight changes. Ultrasound imaging displayed that the diameter reduction of the veins treated by EMA was significantly larger than by EVLA, in consistent with the results of macroscopic examination. Microscopic examination revealed necrosis and thickening of the vein wall, and occlusion of the lumen within 3 months after ablation in both EMA and EVLA groups. It is concluded that EMA is a minimally invasive therapy, which appears to be safe and effective for treatment of lateral veins in goats. PMID:26838749

  2. Complete regeneration of ablated eyestalk in penaeid prawn, Penaeus monodon

    Desai, U.M.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    Ablation of one eyestalk is generally practised in all commercial prawn hatcheries to induce gonad maturation and spawning. An observation was made that the ablated eyestalk of spent females of the tiger prawn Penaeus monodon was completely...

  3. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  4. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review.

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Koch, Guillaume; Caudrelier, Jean; Garnon, Julien; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Edalat, Faramarz; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option. PMID:27329231

  5. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thomas, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  6. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  7. Unexplained liver laceration after metastasis radiofrequency ablation

    Esther U(n)a; Javier Trueba; Jose Manuel Montes

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have established the role of radiofrequency (RF) ablation as a minimally invasive treatment for liver metastases. Although relatively safe, several complications have been reported with the increased use of RF ablation. We describe here a case of unexplained liver laceration after a RF procedure. A woman who presented a solitary metachronous liver metastasis underwent RF ablation treatment for this lesion. Six hours later the patient displayed fatigue and pallor.Emergency blood tests showed a haemoglobin level of < 7 g/dL and markedly elevated transaminase levels.A computed tomography examination revealed two areas of liver laceration with haematoma, one of them following the path of the needle and the other leading away from the first. Following a blood transfusion, the patient was haemodynamically stable and completely recovered 24 h later. The patient remained in bed for 1 wk. No surgical intervention was required, and she was discharged 1 wk later.

  8. Laser ablation of the protein lysozyme

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Amoruso, Salvatore; Wang, X.; Bruzzese, R.; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin; Dinescu, M.

    mechanics by laser impact. Samples of pressed lysozyme prepared in the same manner as in ns-experiments have been irradiated at 527 nm with >>300-fs pulses and at a similar fluence as in ns ablation. Even though the pulse energy was much smaller, there was a considerable ablation weight loss of lysozyme...... from each shot. This is the first time the ablation by fs-lasers of a protein has been recorded quantitatively. Films of lysozyme produced by fs-laser irradiation were analyzed by MALDI and a significant number of intact......Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently...

  9. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates microscopic vertical ablated channels that are surrounded by a thin layer of coagulated tissue, constituting the microscopic treatment zones (MTZs). AFR induces epidermal and dermal remodeling, which raises new possibilities for the treatment of a...... variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...... ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities with...

  10. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    Egger, Jan; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm's results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each o...

  11. Advances in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Over the last fifteen years, our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF) has paved the way for ablation to be utilized as an effective treatment option. With the aim of gaining more detailed anatomical representation, advances have been made using various imaging modalities, both before and during the ablation procedure, in planning and execution. Options have flourished from procedural fluoroscopy, electro anatomic mapping systems, pre procedural computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and combinations of these technologies. Exciting work is underway in an effort to allow the electro physiologist to assess scar formation in real time. One advantage would be to lessen the learning curve for what are very complex procedures. The hope of these developments is to improve the likelihood of a successful ablation procedure and to allow more patients access to this treatment

  12. A study of particle generation during laser ablation withapplications

    Liu, Chunyi

    2005-08-12

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  13. Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of spinal tumors

    Gevargez, Athour [Groenemeyer Institute of MicroTherapy, Bochum (Germany); Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, University of Witten/Herdecke, Bochum (Germany)], E-mail: gevargez@microtherapy.de; Groenemeyer, Dietrich H.W. [Groenemeyer Institute of MicroTherapy, Bochum (Germany); Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, University of Witten/Herdecke, Bochum (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with spinal tumors. Materials and methods: Forty-one patients (25 men, 16 women; age range, 46-82 years) with nonresectable primary or secondary tumor involvement of the spine unresponsive to chemo- and radiotherapy received RFA treatment. Two radiofrequency ablation systems, one with a cool-tip electrode and one with an expandable electrode catheter, were used. Both systems work impedance controlled with a power output of 150- 200 W. Each coagulation cycle lasted 12-15 min depending on tumor impedance. Several single RFA cycles of 15 min each were used for overlapping RFAs in tumors with diameters of more than 3 cm. Temperature was kept between 50 deg. C and 120 deg. C and was chosen according to spinal cord distance and patient heat tolerance during the ablation. Multi-slice computed tomography (CT) combined with C-arm fluoroscopy guided the intervention. Efficacy outcomes were assessed after about 6 weeks, 6 months, and more than 6 months using standardized questionnaires and indices regarding tumor pain, pain disability, functional activities, quality of life, neurological status, and tumor progression. Results: RFA significantly reduced tumor-induced pain within 6 weeks, improved daily activities, and maintained quality of life. Mean time to tumor progression was 730 {+-} 54 days (Kaplan-Meier estimate). No RFA-associated complications were reported. Conclusion: RFA of primary and secondary spinal tumors, which were unresponsive to chemo- and radiotherapy and prone to progression, is a safe, resource-saving, and highly effective percutaneous technique in patients with nonresectable spinal tumors.

  14. Symptomatic improvement after radiofrequency catheter ablation for typical atrial flutter

    O'Callaghan, P.; Meara, M; Kongsgaard, E; Poloniecki, J.; Luddington, L; Foran, J; Camm, A; Rowland, E; Ward, D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the changes in quality of life, arrhythmia symptoms, and hospital resource utilisation following catheter ablation of typical atrial flutter.
DESIGN—Patient questionnaire to compare the time interval following ablation with a similar time interval before ablation.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre.
PATIENTS—63 consecutive patients were studied. Four patients subsequently underwent an ablate and pace procedure, two died of co-morbid illnesses, and two were lost to follow up....

  15. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Valcavi, Roberto [Endocrinology Division and Thyroid Disease Center, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Pacella, Claudio M. [Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology Department, Ospedale Regina Apostolorum, Albano Laziale-Rome (IT); Rhim, Hyun Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Dong Kyu [Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation.

  16. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Valcavi, Roberto; Pacella, Claudio M.; Rhim, Hyunchul; Na, Dong Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation.

  17. Laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma-A review

    Gough-Palmer, Antony Lawrence; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw Michal Witold

    2008-01-01

    A wide range of local thermal ablative therapies have been developed in the treatment of non resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the last decade. Laser ablation (LA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are the two most widely used of these. This article provides an up to date overview of the role of laser ablation in the local treatment of HCC. General principles, technique, image guidance and patient selection are discussed. A review of published data on treatment efficacy, long term ...

  18. Ablation driven by hot electrons in shock ignition

    Piriz, A. R.; Rodriguez Prieto, G.; Tahir, N. A.; Zhao, Y. T.

    2016-03-01

    An analytical model for the ablation driven by hot electrons is developed. The hot electrons are assumed to carry on the totality of the absorbed laser energy. Efficient energy coupling requires to keep the critical surface sufficiently close to the ablation front. To achieve this goal for high laser intensities a short enough laser wavelength is required. Scaling laws for the ablation pressure and the other relevant magnitudes of the ablation cloud are found in terms of the laser and target parameters.

  19. Quantifying Local Stiffness Variations in Radiofrequency Ablations with Dynamic Indentation

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Varghese, Tomy; Brace, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Elastographic imaging can be used to monitor ablation procedures, however confident and clear determination of the ablation boundary is essential to ensure complete treatment of the pathological target. To investigate the potential for ablation boundary representation on elastographic images, local variations in the viscoelastic properties in radiofrequency ablated regions that were formed in vivo in porcine liver tissue were quantified using dynamic indentation. Spatial stiffness maps were t...

  20. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.