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Sample records for ablation

  1. Endometrial ablation

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  2. Ablative and fractional ablative lasers.

    Brightman, Lori A; Brauer, Jeremy A; Anolik, Robert; Weiss, Elliot; Karen, Julie; Chapas, Anne; Hale, Elizabeth; Bernstein, Leonard; Geronemus, Roy G

    2009-10-01

    The field of nonsurgical laser resurfacing for aesthetic enhancement continues to improve with new research and technological advances. Since its beginnings in the 1980s, the laser-resurfacing industry has produced a multitude of devices employing ablative, nonablative, and fractional ablative technologies. The three approaches largely differ in their method of thermal damage, weighing degrees of efficacy, downtime, and side effect profiles against each other. Nonablative technologies generate some interest, although only for those patient populations seeking mild improvements. Fractional technologies, however, have gained dramatic ground on fully ablative resurfacing. Fractional laser resurfacing, while exhibiting results that fall just short of the ideal outcomes of fully ablative treatments, is an increasingly attractive alternative because of its far more favorable side effect profile, reduced recovery time, and significant clinical outcome. PMID:19850197

  3. Ablation of lung tumours

    Gillams, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Radiofrequency, laser, microwave and cryotherapy have all been used for the ablation of lung tumours. However, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation are the most widely used technologies. RFA has been successfully applied to tumour measuring from

  4. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs

  5. Emerging Local Ablation Techniques

    Stone, Michael J.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-01-01

    Local ablation technologies for hepatic malignancy have developed rapidly in the past decade, with advances in several percutaneous or externally delivered treatment methods including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound. Research has focused on increasing the size of the ablation zone and minimizing heat-sink effects. More recent developments include improvements in treatment planning and navigation with integration of several ima...

  6. Studies of ablation pressure, ablative acceleration and ablative implosions

    Time and space resolved X-ray spectroscopy have been used to measure ablation rate and ablation pressure on plane targets irradiated by the first and second harmonics of Nd glass laser light. Streaked X-ray shadowgraphy has been applied to the study of ablatively imploded spherical shell targets uniformly irradiated by six 1.05 μm laser beams. The results give a direct measurement of shell acceleration and thus of ablation pressure and show evidence of fluid instability increasing as the shell ratio is varied from 10 to 100. A direct determination of implosion core density is also obtained. (author)

  7. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  8. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  9. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  10. Laser ablation principles and applications

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  11. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  12. Liver tumor ablation

    Minimal-invasive techniques for ablation of primary and secondary hepatic tumors gain increasingly clinical importance. This is especially true since surgical resection and classic chemotherapy is successful only in a limited number of patients. Local ablative methods incorporate chemo- (percutaneous alcohol instillation, transarterial chemoembolization), thermo- (radiofrequency-, laser-, microwave-, cryoablation, high intensive focused ultrasound) and radio-ablative techniques (interstitial brachytherapy, selective internal radiotherapy). Regarding their implementation and specific effects these methods are varying widely, nevertheless all of them have a high therapeutical efficacy together with a low complication rate in common - correct application presumed. The knowledge on specific indications and contraindications is crucial to implement these methods into multimodality therapy concepts. (orig.)

  13. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred. T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article rev...

  14. femtosecond laser ablation

    Margetic, Vanja

    2003-01-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation was investigated as a solid sampling method for elemental chemical analysis. In comparison to the sampling with longer laser pulses, two aspects could be improved by using ultrashort pulses: elimination of the elemental fractionation from the ablation crater, which is necessary for an accurate quantitative analysis, and better control of the material removal (especially for metals), which increases the spatial resolution of microanalysis. Basic aspects of ultrashort...

  15. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  16. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  17. Optical-vortex laser ablation

    Hamazaki, Junichi; Morita, Ryuji; Chujo, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tanda, Satoshi; Omatsu, Takashige

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation of Ta plates using nanosecond optical vortex pulses was carried out, for the first time. It was suggested that owing to orbital angular momentum of optical vortex, clearer and smoother processed surfaces were obtained with less ablation threshold fluence, in comparison with the ablation by a nonvortex annular beam modified from a spatially Gaussian beam.

  18. Spark ablation device

    Schmidt-Ott, A.; Pfeiffer, T.V.

    2013-01-01

    A spark ablation device for generating nanoparticles comprising a spark generator; the spark generator comprising first and second electrodes, wherein the spark generator further comprises at least one power source which is arranged to be operative at a first energy level for maintaining a discharge

  19. Tumor ablations in IMRI

    Roberto Blanco Sequeiros

    2002-01-01

    @@ IntroductionMagnetic resonance imaging based guidance control and monitoring of minimally invasive intervention has developed from a hypothetical concept to a practical possibility. Magnetic-resonance-guided interstitial therapy in principle is defined as a treatment technique for ablating deepseated tumors in the human body.

  20. Meteoroid ablation models

    Popova, Olga

    2004-12-01

    The fate of entering meteoroids in atmosphere is determined by their size, velocity and substance properties. Material from ablation of small-sized meteors (roughly R≤0.01-1 cm) is mostly deposited between 120 and 80 km altitudes. Larger bodies (up to meter sizes) penetrate deeper into the atmosphere (down to 20 km altitude). Meteoroids of cometary origin typically have higher termination altitude due to substance properties and higher entry velocity. Fast meteoroids ( V>30-40 km/s) may lose a part of their material at higher altitudes due to sputtering. Local flow regime realized around the falling body determines the heat transfer and mass loss processes. Classic approach to meteor interaction with atmosphere allows describing two limiting cases: - large meteoroid at relatively low altitude, where shock wave is formed (hydrodynamical models); - small meteoroid/or high altitudes - free molecule regime of interaction, which assumes no collisions between evaporated meteoroid particles. These evaporated particles form initial train, which then spreads into an ambient air due to diffusion. Ablation models should make it possible to describe physical conditions that occur around meteor body. Several self-consistent hydrodynamical models are developed, but similar models for transition and free molecule regimes are still under study. This paper reviews existing ablation models and discusses model boundaries.

  1. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Joseph M Stavas

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft...

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation in pancreas

    Seicean, Andrada; Tefas, Cristian; Ungureanu, Bogdan;

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation of the pancreas represents a more effective tumor-destruction method compared to other ablation techniques. The endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation is indicated for locally advanced, non-metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, without the need of general...

  3. LASER ABLATION STUDIES OF CONCRETE

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-s...

  4. Lesion size in relation to ablation site during radiofrequency ablation

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A;

    1998-01-01

    performed during two different flow-velocities in a tissue bath, while electrode contact pressure and position were unchanged. Target temperature was 80 degrees C. Obtained tip temperature, power consumption and lesion dimensions were measured. In vivo lesion volume, depth and width were found significantly...... convective cooling by induction of a flow around the electrode tip increases lesion dimensions and power consumptions. Furthermore we conclude that for the given target temperature the power consumption is positively correlated with lesion volume (p <0.001), whereas the obtained tip temperature is not.......This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation was...

  5. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation

  6. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob;

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures...

  7. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  8. Ablative therapy for liver tumours

    Dick, E A; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Thomas, H C; Gedroyc, W M W

    2002-01-01

    Established ablative therapies for the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours, including percutaneous ethanol injection, cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation, are discussed. Newer techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging guided laser interstitial thermal therapy of liver tumours has produced a median survival rate of 40.8 months after treatment. The merits of this newly emerging technique are discussed, together with future developments, such as focused ultrasound therapy, ...

  9. Percutaneous Ablation of Hepatic Tumors

    McCarley, James R.; Soulen, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The liver is a common site of both primary and secondary malignancy resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Careful patient evaluation and triage allows for optimal utilization of all oncologic therapies, including radiation, systemic chemotherapy, surgery, transarterial therapies, and ablation. Although the role of interventional oncologists in the management of hepatic malignancies continues to evolve, the use of percutaneous ablation therapies has proven to be an effective and mi...

  10. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation byradiofrequency

    Gianmattia del Genio; Federica del Genio; Pietro Schettino; Paolo Limongelli; Salvatore Tolone; Luigi Brusciano; Manuela Avellino; Chiara Vitiello; Giovanni Docimo; Angelo Pezzullo; Ludovico Docimo

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benignlesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is anestablished endoscopic technique for the eradication ofBarrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation ofesophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA)have been reported. We report a case of esophagealpapilloma successfully treated with a single sessionof radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation ofthe lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using anew catheter inserted through the working channelof endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue wasremoved by a specifically designed cup. Completeablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy withbiopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of asa new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patientswith esophageal papilloma.

  11. Local thermal ablation of renal cell carcinoma

    Purpose: With evolving local thermal ablation technology, the clinical application of thermal ablation has been actively investigated in the treatment for renal cell carcinoma. We review the evolution and current status of radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation for renal cell carcinoma. Materials and methods: All articles published in English on radiofrequency ablation or microwave ablation as a treatment for renal cell carcinoma were identified with a MEDLINE® and PubMed® search from 1990 to 2010. Results: Local thermal ablation has several advantages, including keeping more normal renal units, relatively simple operation, easy tolerance, fewer complications, a shorter hospitalization and convalescence period. Long-term data has determined radiofrequency ablation is responsible for poor surgical candidates with renal cell carcinoma, however, tumor size, location and shape might affect the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation. Microwave ablation can induce large ablation volumes and yield good local tumor control. Associated complications appear to be low. Conclusions: Local ablative approaches seem to represent an attractive alternative to extirpative surgery for the treatment of small renal neoplasms in select patients. Potential developments include concepts to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of thermal ablation by improving the guiding, monitoring capabilities and detection capacity of multi-center lesions to provide at least equivalent cancer control to conventional surgery.

  12. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  13. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatmentoption for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis,thermal ablation techniques provide a valid nonsurgicaltreatment alternative, thanks to their minimalinvasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile,proven efficacy in local disease control, virtuallyunlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Differentenergy sources are currently employed in clinics asphysical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgicalthermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency(RF) currents are the most used, whilemicrowave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasinglypopular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidlybecame the standard of care in ablation, especially inthe treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFAexhibits substantial performance limitations in thetreatment of large lesions and/or tumors located nearmajor heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the FarEastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promisingresults but also severe limitations in the controllabilityof the emitted field and in the high amount of poweremployed for the ablation of large tumors, resultingin a poor coagulative performance and a relativelyhigh complication rate, nowadays shows better resultsboth in terms of treatment controllability and of overallcoagulative performance, thanks to the improvementof technology. In this review we provide an extensiveand detailed overview of the key physical and technicalaspects of MWA and of the currently available systems,and we want to discuss the most relevant published dataon MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinicalresults and to the type and rate of complications, both inabsolute terms and in comparison with RFA.

  14. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  15. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm-2) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm-2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm-2. The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  16. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  17. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  18. Soft thrombus formation in radiofrequency catheter ablation

    Demolin, JM; Eick, OJ; Munch, K; Koullick, E; Nakagawa, H; Wittkampf, FHM

    2002-01-01

    During RF catheter ablation, local temperature elevation can result in coagulum formation on the ablation electrode, resulting in impedance rise. A recent study has also demonstrated the formation of a so-called soft thrombus during experimental ablations. This deposit poorly adhered to the catheter

  19. Ablation of Solid Hydrogen in a Plasma

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment....

  20. Laser ablation at the hydrodynamic regime

    Gojani Ardian B.

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation of several metals and PVC polymer by high energy nanosecond laser pulses is investigated experimentaly. Visualization by shadowgraphy revealed the dynamics of the discontinuities in ambient air and ablation plume above the target surface, while surface profiling allowed for determination of the ablated mass.

  1. Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases

    The liver is the second only to lymph nodes as the most common site of metastatic disease irrespective of the primary tumor. Up to 50% of all patients with malignant diseases will develop liver metastases with a significant morbidity and mortality. Although the surgical resection leads to an improvement of the survival time, only approximately 20% of the patients are eligible for surgical intervention. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation represents one of the most important alternatives as well as complementary methods for the therapy of liver metastases. RF ablation can lead in a selected patient group to a palliation or to an increased life expectancy. RF ablation appears either safer (vs. cryotherapy) or easier (vs. laser) or more effective (percutaneous ethanol instillation [PEI]), transarterial chemoembolisation [TACE] in comparison with other minimal invasive procedures. RF ablation can be performed percutaneously, laparoscopically or intraoperatively and may be combined with chemotherapy as well as with surgical resection. Permanent technical improvements of RF systems, a better understanding of the underlying electrophysiological principles and an interdisciplinary approach will lead to a prognosis improvement in patients with liver metastases. (orig.)

  2. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  3. A numerical simulation of ablation controlled arcs

    Godin, D.; Trepanier, J.Y. [Ecole Polytechnique, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Eby, S.D. [Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de Recherche en Calcul Applique, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Robin-Jouan, P. [GEC-Alsthom T and D, Villeurbanne, (France)

    1998-09-01

    An approach to model the ablation phenomenon of ablation controlled arcs using computational fluid dynamics was presented. Ablation controlled arcs are found in high voltage electrical equipment such as fuses and circuit-breakers. A qualitative prediction of the ablation level is critical from an industrial point of view because deliberate use of ablation is made to increase the pressure in a circuit-breaker chamber to allow for an efficient extinction when the current returns to zero. The numerical model was validated by comparing results of published experimental data. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 ± 0.14, 1.45 ± 0.13, and 1.74 ± 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 ± 0.09 and 1.26 ± 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 ± 0.65, 2.85 ± 0.72, and 4.45 ± 0.47 cm3 for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 ± 0.30 and 2.29 ± 0.55 cm3 got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  5. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4±0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA

  6. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  7. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Russo, Richard E., E-mail: rerusso@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Bol' shakov, Alexander A. [Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Mao Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McKay, Christopher P. [NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method - LAMIS - can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  8. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  9. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck,; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop dur...

  10. Caries selective ablation: the handpiece

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    1995-05-01

    Caries selective ablation is fixed to a window of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of carious and healthy dentin, respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which acts in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium fall exactly into the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. Fluences are constant if the handpiece is used in contact mode or at a distance. Normally the surface of a bare fiber working in contact mode is destroyed after a few shots. Coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  11. Explosive character of the atheroma plaques ablation

    At the present time, ischemia (heart disease) is a main cause of the death in the world; a promising method for its treatment is the use of the technology of the laser light of raised power for the ablation of the atherosclerosis plaques. In this paper, the thermodynamic processes will be studied at the beginning and during atheroma ablation using Nd-YAG (10-50 w) and Argon (4-10 w) lasers of a theoretical point of view. The spatial distribution of the temperature during the ablation has been modelated by the method of finite volumes. The manifestation of the raised temperature of the tissue at the threshold of the ablation, which describes the explosive nature of the ablation by laser (popcorn effect), is observed and discussed. The results indicate the quantitative differences in the ablation behavior between the two used lasers, which can have important clinical implications particularly in the reduction of thermal damages to surrounding normal tissue. (author)

  12. Transient Ablation Regime in Circuit Breakers

    Alexandre, Martin; Jean-Yves, Trepanier; Marcelo, Reggio; Guo, Xueyan

    2007-12-01

    Nozzle wall ablation caused by high temperature electric arcs is studied in the context of high voltage SF6 circuit breakers. The simplified ablation model used in litterature has been updated to take into account the unsteady state of ablation. Ablation rate and velocity are now calculated by a kinetic model using two layers of transition, between the bulk plasma and the ablating wall. The first layer (Knudsen layer), right by the wall, is a kinetic layer of a few mean-free path of thickness. The second layer is collision dominated and makes the transition between the kinetic layer and the plasma bulk. With this new coupled algorithm, it is now possible to calculate the temperature distribution inside the wall, as well as more accurate ablation rates.

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation of Hepatic Cysts : Case Report

    Radiofrequency ablation has been frequently performed on intra-hepatic solid tumor, namely, hepatocellular carcinoma, metastatic tumor and cholangio carcinoma, for take the cure. But, the reports of radiofrequency ablation for intrahepatic simple cysts are few. In vitro experiment of animal and in vivo treatment for intrahepatic cysts of human had been reported in rare cases. We report 4 cases of radiofrequency ablation for symptomatic intrahepatic cysts

  14. Computer-aided hepatic tumour ablation

    Voirin, D; Amavizca, M; Leroy, A; Letoublon, C; Troccaz, J; Voirin, David; Payan, Yohan; Amavizca, Miriam; Leroy, Antoine; Letoublon, Christian; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2001-01-01

    Surgical resection of hepatic tumours is not always possible. Alternative techniques consist in locally using chemical or physical agents to destroy the tumour and this may be performed percutaneously. It requires a precise localisation of the tumour placement during ablation. Computer-assisted surgery tools may be used in conjunction to these new ablation techniques to improve the therapeutic efficiency whilst benefiting from minimal invasiveness. This communication introduces the principles of a system for computer-assisted hepatic tumour ablation.

  15. Photoacoustic Characterization of Radiofrequency Ablation Lesions

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh ...

  16. Moderne Technologien in der Ablation des Vorhofflimmerns

    Haegeli, L; Duru, F.; Lüscher, T F

    2010-01-01

    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation has become an accepted therapy. The arrhythmia affects around 6% of the population over the age of 65 years. Electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins from the left atrium is the central strategy in catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, procedural outcomes and efficacy using sequential “point-by-point” radiofrequency lesion creation with a conventional ablation catheter are operator-dependent and time-consuming. Moreover, re...

  17. Aromatic Thermosetting Copolyesters for Ablative TPS Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Better performing ablative thermal protection systems than currently available are needed to satisfy requirements of the most severe crew exploration vehicles, such...

  18. Cardiac Remodeling After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Li-Wei Lo, MD; Shih-Ann Chen, MD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency catheter ablation procedures are considered a reasonable option for patients with symptomatic, drug refractory atrial fibrillation (AF. Ablation procedures have been reported to effectively restore sinus rhythm and provide long-term relief of symptoms. Both electrical and structural remodeling occurs with AF. A reversal of the electrical remodeling develops within 1 week after restoration to sinus rhythm following the catheter ablation. The recovery rate is faster in the right atrium than the left atrium. Reverse structural remodeling takes longer and is still present 2 to 4 months after restoration of sinus rhythm. The left atrial transport function also improves after successful catheter ablation of AF. Left atrial strain surveys from echocardiography are able to identify patients who respond to catheter ablation with significant reverse remodeling after ablation. Pre-procedural delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging is also able to determine the degree of atrial fibrosis and is another tool to predict the reverse remodeling after ablation. The remodeling process is complex if recurrence develops after ablation. Recent evidence shows that a combined reverse electrical and structural remodeling occurs after ablation of chronic AF when recurrence is paroxysmal AF. Progressive electrical remodeling without any structural remodeling develops in those with recurrence involving chronic AF. Whether progressive atrial remodeling is the cause or consequence during the recurrence of AF remains obscure and requires further study.

  19. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  20. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm‑1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  1. Increase in Volume of Ablation Zones during Follow-up Is Highly Suggestive of Ablation Site Recurrence in Colorectal Liver Metastases Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation

    Kele, Petra G.; de Jong, Koert P.; van der Jagt, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that volume changes of ablation zones (AZs) on successive computed tomography (CT) scans could predict ablation site recurrences (ASRs) in patients with colorectal liver metastases treated by radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Materials and Methods: RF ablation was perform

  2. Therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation versus microwave ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF ablation versus microwave (MW ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC measuring ≤ 5 cm in greatest diameter. From January 2006 to December 2006, 78 patients had undergone RF ablation whereas 77 had undergone MW ablation. Complete ablation (CA, local tumour progression (LTP and distant recurrence (DR were compared. The overall survival curves were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier technique and compared with the log-rank test. The CA rate was 83.4% (78/93 for RF ablation and 86.7%(91/105 for MW ablation. The LTP rate was 11.8% (11/93 for RF ablation and 10.5% (11/105 for MW ablation. DR was found in 51 (65.4% in the RF ablation and 62 (80.5% in the MW ablation. There was no significant difference in the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates (P = 0.780 and the 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P = 0.123 between RF and MW ablation. At subgroup analyses, for patients with tumors ≤ 3.0 cm, there was no significant difference in the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates (P = 0.067 and the corresponding disease-free survival rates(P = 0.849. For patients with tumor diameters of 3.1-5.0 cm, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 87.1%, 61.3%, and 40.1% for RF ablation and 85.4%, 36.6%, and 22% for MW ablation, with no significant difference (P = 0.068. The corresponding disease-free survival rates were 74.2%, 54.8%, and 45.2% for the RF ablation group and 53.3%, 26.8%, and 17.1% for the MW ablation group. The disease-free survival curve for the RF ablation group was significantly better than that for the MW ablation group (P = 0.018. RF ablation and MW ablation are both effective methods in treating hepatocellular carcinomas, with no significant differences in CA, LTP, DR, and overall survival.

  3. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment

  4. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation for Uterine Adenomyosis

    Scarperi, Stefano; Pontrelli, Giovanni; Campana, Colette; Steinkasserer, Martin; Ercoli, Alfredo; Minelli, Luca; Bergamini, Valentino; Ceccaroni, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Symptomatic uterine adenomyosis, unresponsive to medical therapy, is a challenging condition for patients who desire to preserve their uterus. This study was an evaluation of the feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic radiofrequency thermal ablation of symptomatic nodular uterine adenomyosis. Methods: Fifteen women with symptomatic nodular adenomyosis, who had no plans for pregnancy but declined hysterectomy, underwent radiofrequency thermal ablation. Ultrasonogra...

  5. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...

  6. Time-stepping for laser ablation

    Harihar Khanal; David Autrique; Vasilios Alexiades

    2013-01-01

    Nanosecond laser ablation is a popular technique, applied in many areas of science and technology such as medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. We outline a computational model for radiative and collisional processes occurring during ns-laser ablation, and compare the performance of various low and high order time-stepping algorithms.

  7. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  8. High Heat Flux Block Ablator-in-Honeycomb Heat Shield Using Ablator/Aerogel-Filled Foam Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet and ARA Ablatives Laboratory previously developed and demonstrated advanced foam-reinforced carbon/phenolic ablators that offer substantially increased...

  9. New Technologies in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    John Rickard, MD, MPH; Saman Nazarian MD, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a major public health issue worldwide the incidence of which is likely to continue to rise. With the birth of pulmonary vein isolation(PVI, cardiac ablation has emerged as key strategy for the treatment of AF. PVI using traditional point by point radiofrequency ablation is time consuming and technically challenging. Refining patient selection for PVI also remains an important goal. New ablative strategies using catheter-based balloon technologies, such as cryothermy and laser-based systems, may simplify PVI. In addition, new MRI-based techniques offer the hope of refining patient selection prior to ablation. Lastly, FIRM mapping represents an entirely new approach to AF ablation via the targeting of mechanisms that perpetuate AF rather than simply targeting triggers alone.

  10. Phased RF ablation: results and concerns

    Alexandra Kiss, MD, PhD; G�bor S�ndorfi, MD; Edina Nagy-Bal�, MD, PhD; Mihran Martirosyan, MD; Zoltan Csanadi, MD, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available reatment of atrial fibrillation (AF with catheter ablation has proven to be a safe and effective treatment modality which is offered to an increasing number of patients in many centers. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI is an established cornerstone of AF ablation strategies. Athough the isolation of the pulmonary veins (PVs with irrigated focal radiofrequency (RF catheters using a point-by-point method is considered as the gold standard, it can be challenging to create contiguous lesions, time consuming, and require advanced three dimensional (3D mapping and navigational systems. The phased RF ablation system was designed to address many of these challenges associated with conventional focal RF ablation. In this review, we describe the main features of phased RF ablation and summarize the data available on clinical outcome with this technology.

  11. Tumor ablation with irreversible electroporation.

    Bassim Al-Sakere

    Full Text Available We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 micros at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%, in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation.

  12. A model of pellet ablation with a multi-species ablatant

    The single species neutral - shielding model for the ablation of a hydrogenic pellet is extended by considering the ablatant as a mixture of four species: Molecular and atomic hydrogen, protons and electrons. Compared with the single-species-ablatant model, results of the analysis showed that the ablatant state differs considerably. The attenuation of the incoming electron energy and energy flux, however, are very much similar, irrespective of the ablatant composition. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate with respect to the plasma state of Te, ne and the pellet radius, rp remains the same; the ablation rate is reduced approximately by 15%. At some combinations of Te, ne and rp, a weak shock can appear when the ablated flow downstream becomes sonic. A sufficient but not necessary condition for its occurrence is that the ablatant approaches either a state of complete dissociation, or complete ionization. To study the possible existence of an effective energy absorbing spherical region around the pellet, a comparison between the local ablated electron collisional mean free path and the electron Larmor radius in the cloud is made. A critical field, Bc is then defined and evalued at the ionization radius, ri. For plasma state of fusion interest and pellet radius beyond 0.15 mm, Bc is well above 10 Tesla. (orig.) With 3 tabs., 7 figs., 21 refs

  13. Neural Ablation and Regeneration in Pain Practice.

    Choi, Eun Ji; Choi, Yun Mi; Jang, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    A nerve block is an effective tool for diagnostic and therapeutic methods. If a diagnostic nerve block is successful for pain relief and the subsequent therapeutic nerve block is effective for only a limited duration, the next step that should be considered is a nerve ablation or modulation. The nerve ablation causes iatrogenic neural degeneration aiming only for sensory or sympathetic denervation without motor deficits. Nerve ablation produces the interruption of axonal continuity, degeneration of nerve fibers distal to the lesion (Wallerian degeneration), and the eventual death of axotomized neurons. The nerve ablation methods currently available for resection/removal of innervation are performed by either chemical or thermal ablation. Meanwhile, the nerve modulation method for interruption of innervation is performed using an electromagnetic field of pulsed radiofrequency. According to Sunderland's classification, it is first and foremost suggested that current neural ablations produce third degree peripheral nerve injury (PNI) to the myelin, axon, and endoneurium without any disruption of the fascicular arrangement, perineurium, and epineurium. The merit of Sunderland's third degree PNI is to produce a reversible injury. However, its shortcoming is the recurrence of pain and the necessity of repeated ablative procedures. The molecular mechanisms related to axonal regeneration after injury include cross-talk between axons and glial cells, neurotrophic factors, extracellular matrix molecules, and their receptors. It is essential to establish a safe, long-standing denervation method without any complications in future practices based on the mechanisms of nerve degeneration as well as following regeneration. PMID:26839664

  14. An experimental study of simultaneous ablation with dual probes in radiofrequency thermal ablation

    Jang, Il Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Seo, Heung Suk; Kim, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sun; Heo, Jeong Nam [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    To determine the differences between sequential ablation with a single probe and simultaneous ablation with dual probes. Using two 14-gauge expandable probes (nine internal prongs with 4-cm deployment), radiofrequency was applied sequentially (n=8) or simultaneously (n=8) to ten ex-vivo cow livers. Before starting ablation, two RF probes with an inter-probe space of 2 cm (n=8) or 3 cm (n=8) were inserted. In the sequential group, switching the connecting cable to an RF generator permitted ablation with the second probe just after ablation with the first probe had finished. In the simultaneous group, single ablation was performed only after connecting the shafts of both RF probes using a connection device. Each ablation lasted 7 minutes at a target temperature of 105-110 .deg. C. The size and shape of the ablated area, and total ablation time were then compared between the two groups. With 2-cm spacing, the group, mean length and overlapping width of ablated lesions were, respectively, 5.20 and 5.05 cm in the sequential group (n=4), and 5.81 and 5.65 cm in the simultaneous group (n=4). With 3-cm spacing, the corresponding figures were 4.99 and 5.60 cm in the sequential group (n=4), and 6.04 and 6.78 cm in the simultaneous group (n=4). With 2-cm spacing, the mean depth of the proximal waist was 0.58 cm in the sequential (group and 0.28 cm in the simultaneous group, while with 3-cm spacing, the corresponding figures were 1.65 and 1.48 cm. In neither group was there a distal waist. Mean total ablation time was 23.4 minutes in the sequential group and 14 minutes in the simultaneous group. In terms of ablation size and ablation time, simultaneous radiofrequency ablation with dual probes is superior to sequential ablation with a single probe. A simultaneous approach will enable an operator to overcome difficulty in probe repositioning during overlapping ablation, resulting in complete ablation with a successful safety margin.

  15. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  16. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  17. Atrioventricular Junction Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Patel, Dilesh; Daoud, Emile G

    2016-04-01

    Atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation is an effective therapy in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who are intolerant to or unsuccessfully managed with rhythm control or medical rate control strategies. A drawback is that the procedure mandates a pacing system. Overall, the safety and efficacy of AVJ ablation is high with a majority of the patients reporting significant improvement in symptoms and quality-of-life measures. Risk of sudden cardiac death after device implantation is low, especially with an appropriate postprocedure pacing rate. Mortality benefit with AVJ ablation has been shown in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. PMID:26968669

  18. How I do it: Radiofrequency ablation

    Over the past decade, image-guided tumor ablation using thermal energy has emerged as a promising technique for treating focal, primary or secondary, nonoperable tumors. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is minimally invasive and requires less resources, time, and recovery period and is, moreover, relatively inexpensive. RFA has been used to treat tumors located in the liver, lung, bone, kidneys, brain, thyroid, breast, and pancreas. This article will describe how to choose an appropriate case; precisely place the needle into the tumor; the precautions to be taken before, during, and after the procedure; probable complications; and the follow-up of patients undergoing ablation

  19. Laser induced ablation studies from gold target

    Laser produced gold plasmas show an enhanced mass ablation rate and ablation pressure as compared to theoretical prediction. This is attributed to radiation effect. Experimental results indicate an increase in the C-J point density and an agreement with self-regulating ablation scaling. Using 1.06 μm laser radiation on 12.5 μm thick planar gold targets, at an absorbed laser intensity IA ≤ 2 x 1013 W/cm2, the experimental results are presented. (Author)

  20. The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse...... left atrial tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION: The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter...

  1. Tumor Ablation: Common Modalities and General Practices

    Knavel, Erica M.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique that is commonly used in the treatment of tumors of the liver, kidney, bone, and lung. During tumor ablation, thermal energy is used to heat or cool tissue to cytotoxic levels (less than −40°C or more than 60°C). An additional technique is being developed that targets the permeability of the cell membrane and is ostensibly nonthermal. Within the classification of tumor ablation, there are several modalities used worldwide: radiofrequency, micro...

  2. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  3. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    Baladi, Arash [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarraf Mamoory, Rasoul, E-mail: rsarrafm@modares.ac.ir [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  4. Typical flutter ablation as an adjunct to catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    Dipen Shah

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Typical atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation are frequently observed to coexist(1 .  In the current context of interventional electrophysiology, curative or at least definitive ablation is available for both arrhythmias. Despite their coexistence, it is not clear whether typical flutter ablation is necessary in all patients undergoing catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The following review explores the pathophysiology of both arrhythmias, their interrelationships and the available data pertaining to this theme.

  5. Typical flutter ablation as an adjunct to catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    Dipen Shah

    2008-01-01

    Typical atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation are frequently observed to coexist(1) .  In the current context of interventional electrophysiology, curative or at least definitive ablation is available for both arrhythmias. Despite their coexistence, it is not clear whether typical flutter ablation is necessary in all patients undergoing catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The following review explores the pathophysiology of both arrhythmias, their interrelationships and the availa...

  6. Local Ablative Strategies for Ductal Pancreatic Cancer (Radiofrequency Ablation, Irreversible Electroporation): A Review

    Salvatore Paiella; Roberto Salvia; Marco Ramera; Roberto Girelli; Isabella Frigerio; Alessandro Giardino; Valentina Allegrini; Claudio Bassi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has still a dismal prognosis. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) accounts for the 40% of the new diagnoses. Current treatment options are based on chemo- and radiotherapy regimens. Local ablative techniques seem to be the future therapeutic option for stage-III patients with PDAC. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) and Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) are actually the most emerging local ablative techniques used on LAPC. Initial clinical studies on ...

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  8. Atrial Tachycardias Occurring After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation: Strategies for Mapping and Ablation

    Stavros Mountantonakis, MD

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of left atrial tachycardias (AT after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF is common, especially after more extensive ablation of persistent AF. These AT are invariably symptomatic and often do not respond to medical therapy. The initial strategy involves ventricular rate control, cardioversion, and observation as some tachycardias may resolve with time. For persistent ATs, effective management frequently requires catheter intervention. Careful characterization of the tachycardia mechanism is essential in designing an effective ablation strategy that would also avoid further creation of pro-arrhythmic substrate. With this review, we summarize the incidence, mechanism, diagnosis and treatment of ATs occurring after AF ablation.

  9. Ablative Ceramic Foam Based TPS Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel composite material ablative TPS for planetary vehicles that can survive a dual heating exposure is proposed. NextGen's TPS concept is a bi-layer functional...

  10. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  11. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling

  12. Laser-Induced Ablative Amorphisation of Montmorillonite

    Duchek, P.; Urbanová, Markéta; Pokorná, Dana; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 358, č. 23 (2012), s. 3382-3387. ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : laser ablation * montmorillonite * amorphization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2012

  13. Optical Effects on Laser Ablated Polymer Surfaces

    Prabhu, R. D.; Govinthasamy, R.; Murthy, N. S.

    2006-03-01

    Laser ablation of poly (ethylene terephthalate) and polyimide films were investigated using Excimer-UV laser. SEM analyses indicate the presence of rings for a wide range of ablation parameters (fluence, frequency and number of pulses). It is proposed that the particles present in the plasma plume could cause the incident laser light to diffract, similar to the optical effects observed in the femtosecond laser ablation of solids. The polymer surface provides a perfect medium to register the optical signatures as seen in the SEM images. The fringe-spacings observed in the images are compared with the theoretical diffraction patterns and the height of the plasma particles above the surface is estimated using an optimization scheme. The results of the analysis are consistent with experimentally observed dynamics of the plasma plume. It is proposed that such optical effects could be a routine feature in the laser ablation of polymers. The significance of such artifacts for lithography is discussed.

  14. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  15. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  16. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen;

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...... laser ablated plasma plume propagation in a background gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved....

  17. Retained Foreign Body After Laser Ablation

    Ren, Shiyan; Liu, Peng; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yuguan

    2012-01-01

    Laser ablation for varicose veins is a common practice, and postoperative complications may happen. A retained foreign body could be left accidently in the treated leg. It is rarely reported in literature. We herein describe two cases of retained foreign body during the laser ablation for varicose veins. One patient with varicose veins received laser therapy 5 years earlier, and had experienced discomfort and pain. After investigation, an overlooked sheath fragment was removed surgically from...

  18. Phased RF ablation: results and concerns

    Alexandra Kiss, MD, PhD; G�bor S�ndorfi, MD; Edina Nagy-Bal�, MD, PhD; Mihran Martirosyan, MD; Zoltan Csanadi, MD, PhD

    2015-01-01

    reatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) with catheter ablation has proven to be a safe and effective treatment modality which is offered to an increasing number of patients in many centers. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is an established cornerstone of AF ablation strategies. Athough the isolation of the pulmonary veins (PVs) with irrigated focal radiofrequency (RF) catheters using a point-by-point method is considered as the gold standard, it can be challenging to create contiguous lesions, ti...

  19. Photogrammetric recession measurements of an ablating surface

    Schairer, Edward T. (Inventor); Heineck, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An instrument and method for measuring the time history of recession of an ablating surface of a test article during testing in a high enthalpy thermal test facility, such as an arcjet. The method advances prior art by providing time-history data over the full ablating surface without targets and without any modifications to the test article. The method is non-intrusive, simple to implement, requires no external light source, and does not interfere with normal operations of the arcjet facility.

  20. Hydrodynamic modeling of ns-laser ablation

    David Autrique; Vasilios Alexiades; Harihar Khanal

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation is a versatile and widespread technique, applied in an increasing number of medical, industrial and analytical applications. A hydrodynamic multiphase model describing nanosecond-laser ablation (ns-LA) is outlined. The model accounts for target heating and mass removal mechanisms as well as plume expansion and plasma formation. A copper target is placed in an ambient environment consisting of helium and irradiated by a nanosecond-laser pulse. The effect of variable laser ...

  1. Simple ablative implosion model: shell dynamics

    A simple model, derived from Newton's Second Law, for the ablative implosion of a thin spherical shell is presented. The scaling dependence of the implosion time, shell velocity, and mass loss on shell dimensions and the critical physical parameter, the ablation pressure, is derived. Finally, the model is used to examine implosion energy efficiency and to describe an interesting application, wall-recoil heating of a contained fuel gas

  2. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  3. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  4. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm3), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm3), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs

  5. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    Cristescu, Mircea, E-mail: mcristescu@uwhealth.org [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology (United States); Abel, E. Jason, E-mail: abel@urology.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, Department of Urology (United States); Wells, Shane, E-mail: swells@uwhealth.org; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J., E-mail: tziemlewicz@uwhealth.org [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology (United States); Hedican, Sean P., E-mail: hedican@surgery.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, Department of Urology (United States); Lubner, Megan G., E-mail: mlubner@uwhealth.org; Hinshaw, J. Louis, E-mail: jhinshaw@uwhealth.org; Brace, Christopher L., E-mail: cbrace@uwhealth.org; Lee, Fred T., E-mail: flee@uwhealth.org [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  6. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... laser parameters with tissue effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to a miniaturized 2,940 nm AFXL, spot size 225 µm, density 5%, power levels 1.15-2.22 W, pulse durations 50-225 microseconds, pulse repetition rates 100-500 Hz, and 2, 20, or 50 stacked pulses, resulting in pulse...... 190 to 347 µm. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse stacking with a small, low power 2,940 nm AFXL created reproducible shallow to deep micropores, and influenced micropore configuration. Mathematical modeling established relations between laser settings and micropore dimensions, which assists in choosing laser...

  7. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  8. Lip Reconstruction after Tumor Ablation

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimi, Azin; Kazemi, Mohammad; Shams, Amin; Hashemzadeh, Haleh

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all oral cavity carcinomas involve the lips, and the primary management of these lesions is complete surgical resection. Loss of tissue in the lips after resection is treated with a variety of techniques, depending on the extension and location of the defect. Here we review highly accepted techniques of lip reconstruction and some of new trials with significant clinical results. Reconstruction choice is primarily depend to size of the defect, localization of defect, elasticity of tissues. But patient’s age, comorbidities, and motivation are also important. According to the defect location and size, different reconstruction methods can be used. For defects involved less than 30% of lips, primary closures are sufficient. In defects with 35–70% lip involvement, the Karapandzic, Abbe, Estlander, McGregor or Gillies’ fan flaps or their modifications can be used. When lip remaining tissues are insufficient, cheek tissue can be used in Webster and Bernard advancement flaps and their various modifications. Deltopectoral or radial forearm free flaps can be options for large defects of the lip extending to the Jaws. To achieve best functional and esthetic results, surgeons should be able to choose most appropriate reconstruction method. Considering defects’ size and location, patients’ expects and surgeon’s ability and knowledge, a variety of flaps are presented in order to reconstruct defects resulted from tumor ablation. It’s necessary for surgeons to trace the recent innovations in lip reconstruction to offer best choices to patients. PMID:27308236

  9. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.;

    2013-01-01

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at ~2 J cm-2 has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser...

  10. Effect of ablatant composition on the ablation of a fuelling pellet

    The single species neutral-shielding model for the ablation of a hydrogenic pellet is extended by considering the ablatant as a mixture of four species: molecular and atomic hydrogen, protons and electrons. Compared with the results of the frozen flow, (i.e. the single species molecular hydrogen gas model), results of the analysis showed that the presence of dissociation and ionization effects caused a marked difference of the ablatant state. The attenuations of the incoming electron energy and energy flux, however, are very much similar irrespective of whether the ablated flow is in a frozen or an equilibrium state. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate with respect to the plasma state of Te, ne and the pellet radius remains the same; the ablation rate is reduced by approximately 15%. To examine the possible existence of a spherical shell around the pellet where most of the incoming electron energy is absorbed, acodmparison is made between the local electron collisional mean free path and the electron Larmor radius. A critical field at the ionization radius is evaluated. An effective spherical energyabsorbing region exists when the local field strength is below the critical value. For a plasma state of low Te and ne, (where the ablatant is hardly ionized), and for one near the thermonuclear condition (where a highly dense ablatant exists near the pellet), the effective energy absorption region is nearly spherical. 20 refs. (author)

  11. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant hepatic tumors: post-ablation syndrome

    Choi, Jung Bin; Rhim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsoo; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Seo, Heung Suk; Lee, Seung Ro [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate post-ablation syndrome after radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant hepatic tumors. Forty-two patients with primary (n=3D29) or secondary (n=3D13) hepatic tumors underwent radiofrequency thermal ablation. A total of 65 nodules ranging in size from 1.1 to 5.0 (mean, 3.1) cm were treated percutaneously using a 50W RF generator with 15G expandable needle electrodes. We retrospectively evaluated the spectrum of post-ablation syndrome including pain, fever ({>=}3D 38 deg C), nausea, vomiting, right shoulder pain, and chest discomfort according to frequency, intensity and duration, and the findings were correlated with tumor location and number of ablations. We also evaluated changes in pre-/post-ablation serum aminotransferase (ALT/AST) and prothrombin time, and correlated these findings with the number of ablations. Post-ablation syndrome was noted in 29 of 42 patients (69.0%), and most symptoms improved with conservative treatment. The most important of these were abdominal plan (n=3D20, 47.6%), fever (n=3D8, 19.0%), and nausea (n=3D7, 16.7%), and four of 42 (9.5%) patients complained of severe pain. The abdominal pain lasted from 3 hours to 5.5 days (mean; 20.4 hours), the fever from 6 hours to 5 days (mean; 63.0 hours). And the nausea from 1 hours to 4 days (mean; 21.0 hours). Other symptoms were right shoulder pain (n=3D6, 14.3%), chest discomfort (n=3D3, 7.1%), and headache (n=3D3, 7.1%). Seventeen of 20 patients (85%) with abdominal pain had subcapsular tumor of the liver. There was significant correlation between pain, location of the tumor, and a number of ablations. After ablation, ALT/AST was elevated more than two-fold in 52.6%/73.7% of patients, respectively but there was no significant correlation with the number of ablation. Post-ablation syndrome is a frequent and tolerable post-procedural process after radiofrequency thermal ablation. The spectrum of this syndrome provides a useful guideline for the post-ablation management. (author)

  12. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant hepatic tumors: post-ablation syndrome

    To evaluate post-ablation syndrome after radiofrequency thermal ablation of malignant hepatic tumors. Forty-two patients with primary (n=3D29) or secondary (n=3D13) hepatic tumors underwent radiofrequency thermal ablation. A total of 65 nodules ranging in size from 1.1 to 5.0 (mean, 3.1) cm were treated percutaneously using a 50W RF generator with 15G expandable needle electrodes. We retrospectively evaluated the spectrum of post-ablation syndrome including pain, fever (≥3D 38 deg C), nausea, vomiting, right shoulder pain, and chest discomfort according to frequency, intensity and duration, and the findings were correlated with tumor location and number of ablations. We also evaluated changes in pre-/post-ablation serum aminotransferase (ALT/AST) and prothrombin time, and correlated these findings with the number of ablations. Post-ablation syndrome was noted in 29 of 42 patients (69.0%), and most symptoms improved with conservative treatment. The most important of these were abdominal plan (n=3D20, 47.6%), fever (n=3D8, 19.0%), and nausea (n=3D7, 16.7%), and four of 42 (9.5%) patients complained of severe pain. The abdominal pain lasted from 3 hours to 5.5 days (mean; 20.4 hours), the fever from 6 hours to 5 days (mean; 63.0 hours). And the nausea from 1 hours to 4 days (mean; 21.0 hours). Other symptoms were right shoulder pain (n=3D6, 14.3%), chest discomfort (n=3D3, 7.1%), and headache (n=3D3, 7.1%). Seventeen of 20 patients (85%) with abdominal pain had subcapsular tumor of the liver. There was significant correlation between pain, location of the tumor, and a number of ablations. After ablation, ALT/AST was elevated more than two-fold in 52.6%/73.7% of patients, respectively but there was no significant correlation with the number of ablation. Post-ablation syndrome is a frequent and tolerable post-procedural process after radiofrequency thermal ablation. The spectrum of this syndrome provides a useful guideline for the post-ablation management. (author)

  13. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  14. Ultra-short laser ablation of dielectrics: Theoretical analysis of threshold damage fluence and ablation depth

    A coupled theoretical model based on Fokker-Planck equation for ultra-short laser ablation of dielectrics is proposed. Multiphoton ionization and avalanche ionization are considered as the sources during the generation of free electrons. The impact of the electron distribution in thermodynamic nonequilibrium on relaxation time is taken into account. The calculation formula of ablation depth is deduced based on the law of energy conservation. Numerical calculations are performed for the femtosecond laser ablation of fused silica at 526 and 1053 nm. It shows that the threshold damage fluences and ablation depths resulted from the coupled model are in good agreement with the experimental results; while the damage thresholds resulted from the approximate model significantly differ from the experimental results for lasers of long pulse width. It is concluded that the coupled model can better describe the micro-process of ultra-short laser ablation of dielectrics.

  15. Ablation enhancement of silicon by ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    In this study, the ultrashort double-pulse ablation of silicon is investigated. An atomistic simulation model is developed to analyze the underlying physics. It is revealed that the double-pulse ablation could significantly increase the ablation rate of silicon, compared with the single pulse ablation with the same total pulse energy, which is totally different from the case of metals. In the long pulse delay range (over 1 ps), the enhancement is caused by the metallic transition of melted silicon with the corresponding absorption efficiency. At ultrashort pulse delay (below 1 ps), the enhancement is due to the electron excitation by the first pulse. The enhancement only occurs at low and moderate laser fluence. The ablation is suppressed at high fluence due to the strong plasma shielding effect.

  16. MR Guided RF Ablation and Thermometery

    Sara Eskandari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nIntroduction: Liver metastasis is detected in more than one million people in each year. Only 10% of them are eligible for surgery. Radiofrequency ablation is the most popular local ablation technique for the management of the other 90% of the metastases. Complete ablation of the lesion with a safe margin is the goal of such a local ablative method. There is no routine available technique for monitoring the treatment process. MRI is the only method which can monitor tissue ablation in real time however interaction of radiofrequency energy by MRI acquisition makes it impossible for clinical use. "nMaterials and Methods: In our in-vitro study, the effect of bipolar needles were evaluated on the signal intensity of theliver parenchyma. This evaluation was repeated 15 times. A calibration curve was also calculated from the in-vitro measurement of tissue temperature with an interstitial NTC sensor with dedicated data collecting software written by our team. Finally the correlation between temperature and signal intensity was prepared and during the RF ablation, the temperature map could be created in an almost real time manner. "nResults: Our results show an exponential calibration curve for sensors and a linear reduction of the signal intensities during the RF procedure. "nConclusion: We introduce a method for calibration of the MRI signal intensity with tissue temperature between alternative RF pulses. This method brings MR monitoring as the practical method in clinical use. By this innovative technique it is possible for all the hospitals and clinics to use their routine MR scanner for monitoring this ablative technique without any additional hardware.  

  17. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  18. Laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma-A review

    2008-01-01

    A wide range of local thermal ablative therapies have been developed in the treatment of non resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the last decade. Laser ablation (LA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are the two most widely used of these. This article provides an up to date overview of the role of laser ablation in the local treatment of HCC. General principles, technique, image guidance and patient selection are discussed. A review of published data on treatment efficacy, long term outcome and complication rates of laser ablation is included and comparison with RFA made. The role of laser ablation in combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation is also discussed.

  19. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between the thresholds and the laser parameters. Besides the ablated mass areal density, which fits the experimental data quite well, the ablation temperature, pyrolysis rate, and product components are also discussed for a better understanding of the ablation mechanism of POM. PMID:27607281

  20. Fundamental studies of pulsed laser ablation

    Claeyssens, F

    2001-01-01

    dopant) have resulted in a coherent view of the resulting plume, which exhibits a multi-component structure correlated with different regimes of ablation, which are attributed to ejection from ZnO and ablation from a Zn melt. OES measurements show that the emitting Zn component within the plume accelerates during expansion in vacuum - an observation attributable to the presence of hot, fast electrons in the plume. The same acceleration behaviour is observed in the case of Al atomic emissions resulting from ablation of an Al target in vacuum. Deposition conditions, substrate temperature and background gas pressure were all varied in a quest for optimally aligned, high quality ZnO thin films. Initial ab initio calculations were performed also, to aid in understanding the stability of these c-axis aligned films. The pulsed ultraviolet (lambda = 193, 248 nm) laser ablation of graphite, polycrystalline diamond and ZnO targets has been investigated. Characteristics of the resulting plumes of ablated material have b...

  1. Percutaneous tumor ablation in medical radiology

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G. [University Hospital Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Helmberger, T.K. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical Univ. Munich (Germany). Dept. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Reiser, M.F. (eds.) [University Hospitals - Grosshadern and Innenstadt Munich Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2008-07-01

    Thermal ablation has become an integral part of oncology, especially in the field of interventional oncology. This very comprehensive book encompasses the different technologies employed in thermal ablation, its indications and the results achieved in various clinical conditions. The first part of the book clearly explains the basics of thermal ablative techniques such as laser-induced thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy, and localized tumor therapy. The latest developments in the application of minimally invasive therapies in localized neoplastic disease are demonstrated. In the main part of the book, techniques of guiding the applicators to the target structures by use of different imaging tools such as ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are discussed. The results are presented for a variety of clinical indications, including liver and lung tumors and metastases and some rather rare conditions involving the kidney, the head and neck, the prostate, and soft tissue structures. A large number of acknowledged experts have contributed to the book, which benefits from a lucid structure and excellent images. (orig.)

  2. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  3. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    Maksimovic, Ruzica [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, GD Rotterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Dill, Thorsten [Kerckhoff-Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Ristic, Arsen D.; Seferovic, Petar M. [Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia)

    2006-11-15

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  4. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  5. Percutaneous tumor ablation in medical radiology

    Thermal ablation has become an integral part of oncology, especially in the field of interventional oncology. This very comprehensive book encompasses the different technologies employed in thermal ablation, its indications and the results achieved in various clinical conditions. The first part of the book clearly explains the basics of thermal ablative techniques such as laser-induced thermotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryotherapy, and localized tumor therapy. The latest developments in the application of minimally invasive therapies in localized neoplastic disease are demonstrated. In the main part of the book, techniques of guiding the applicators to the target structures by use of different imaging tools such as ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are discussed. The results are presented for a variety of clinical indications, including liver and lung tumors and metastases and some rather rare conditions involving the kidney, the head and neck, the prostate, and soft tissue structures. A large number of acknowledged experts have contributed to the book, which benefits from a lucid structure and excellent images. (orig.)

  6. Microwave ablation versus laser ablation in occluding lateral veins in goats.

    Wang, Xu-hong; Wang, Xiao-ping; Su, Wen-juan; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Increasing number of endovenous techniques are available for the treatment of saphenous vein reflux and endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a frequently used method. A newly developed alternative, based on thermal therapy, is endovenous microwave ablation (EMA). This study evaluated the effect of the two procedures, in terms of coagulation and histological changes, in occluding lateral veins in goats. Twelve animals were randomized into two group, with 6 treated with EMA (EMA group), and the rest 6 with EVLA (EVLA group). Results of coagulation, including coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet activation, were assessed at three or four different time points: before, immediately after, 24 h (and 48 h) after ablation. The diameter change, a measure of efficacy, was ultrasonographically measured before and 1 month after the ablation. Histological changes were grossly and microscopically evaluated immediately, 1 and 3 month(s) after the ablation. The length of the ablated vein and preoperative average diameter were comparable between the two groups. In both EMA and EVLA groups, several coagulation parameters, fibrinolysis and platelet activation parameters only underwent slight changes. Ultrasound imaging displayed that the diameter reduction of the veins treated by EMA was significantly larger than by EVLA, in consistent with the results of macroscopic examination. Microscopic examination revealed necrosis and thickening of the vein wall, and occlusion of the lumen within 3 months after ablation in both EMA and EVLA groups. It is concluded that EMA is a minimally invasive therapy, which appears to be safe and effective for treatment of lateral veins in goats. PMID:26838749

  7. Complete regeneration of ablated eyestalk in penaeid prawn, Penaeus monodon

    Desai, U.M.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    Ablation of one eyestalk is generally practised in all commercial prawn hatcheries to induce gonad maturation and spawning. An observation was made that the ablated eyestalk of spent females of the tiger prawn Penaeus monodon was completely...

  8. Unexplained liver laceration after metastasis radiofrequency ablation

    Esther U(n)a; Javier Trueba; Jose Manuel Montes

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have established the role of radiofrequency (RF) ablation as a minimally invasive treatment for liver metastases. Although relatively safe, several complications have been reported with the increased use of RF ablation. We describe here a case of unexplained liver laceration after a RF procedure. A woman who presented a solitary metachronous liver metastasis underwent RF ablation treatment for this lesion. Six hours later the patient displayed fatigue and pallor.Emergency blood tests showed a haemoglobin level of < 7 g/dL and markedly elevated transaminase levels.A computed tomography examination revealed two areas of liver laceration with haematoma, one of them following the path of the needle and the other leading away from the first. Following a blood transfusion, the patient was haemodynamically stable and completely recovered 24 h later. The patient remained in bed for 1 wk. No surgical intervention was required, and she was discharged 1 wk later.

  9. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  10. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review.

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Koch, Guillaume; Caudrelier, Jean; Garnon, Julien; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Edalat, Faramarz; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option. PMID:27329231

  11. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thomas, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  12. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  13. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  14. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    Egger, Jan; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm's results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each o...

  15. Advances in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Over the last fifteen years, our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF) has paved the way for ablation to be utilized as an effective treatment option. With the aim of gaining more detailed anatomical representation, advances have been made using various imaging modalities, both before and during the ablation procedure, in planning and execution. Options have flourished from procedural fluoroscopy, electro anatomic mapping systems, pre procedural computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and combinations of these technologies. Exciting work is underway in an effort to allow the electro physiologist to assess scar formation in real time. One advantage would be to lessen the learning curve for what are very complex procedures. The hope of these developments is to improve the likelihood of a successful ablation procedure and to allow more patients access to this treatment

  16. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates microscopic vertical ablated channels that are surrounded by a thin layer of coagulated tissue, constituting the microscopic treatment zones (MTZs). AFR induces epidermal and dermal remodeling, which raises new possibilities for the treatment of a...... variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...... ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities with...

  17. Laser ablation of the protein lysozyme

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Amoruso, Salvatore; Wang, X.; Bruzzese, R.; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin; Dinescu, M.

    mechanics by laser impact. Samples of pressed lysozyme prepared in the same manner as in ns-experiments have been irradiated at 527 nm with >>300-fs pulses and at a similar fluence as in ns ablation. Even though the pulse energy was much smaller, there was a considerable ablation weight loss of lysozyme...... from each shot. This is the first time the ablation by fs-lasers of a protein has been recorded quantitatively. Films of lysozyme produced by fs-laser irradiation were analyzed by MALDI and a significant number of intact......Lysozyme is a well-known protein, which is used in food processing because of its bactericidal properties. The mass (14307 amu) is in the range in which it easily can be monitored by mass spectrometric methods, for example by MALDI (Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization). We have recently...

  18. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Valcavi, Roberto; Pacella, Claudio M.; Rhim, Hyunchul; Na, Dong Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation.

  19. Symptomatic improvement after radiofrequency catheter ablation for typical atrial flutter

    O'Callaghan, P.; Meara, M; Kongsgaard, E; Poloniecki, J.; Luddington, L; Foran, J; Camm, A; Rowland, E; Ward, D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the changes in quality of life, arrhythmia symptoms, and hospital resource utilisation following catheter ablation of typical atrial flutter.
DESIGN—Patient questionnaire to compare the time interval following ablation with a similar time interval before ablation.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre.
PATIENTS—63 consecutive patients were studied. Four patients subsequently underwent an ablate and pace procedure, two died of co-morbid illnesses, and two were lost to follow up....

  20. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Valcavi, Roberto [Endocrinology Division and Thyroid Disease Center, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Pacella, Claudio M. [Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology Department, Ospedale Regina Apostolorum, Albano Laziale-Rome (IT); Rhim, Hyun Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Dong Kyu [Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation.

  1. Ablation driven by hot electrons in shock ignition

    Piriz, A. R.; Rodriguez Prieto, G.; Tahir, N. A.; Zhao, Y. T.

    2016-03-01

    An analytical model for the ablation driven by hot electrons is developed. The hot electrons are assumed to carry on the totality of the absorbed laser energy. Efficient energy coupling requires to keep the critical surface sufficiently close to the ablation front. To achieve this goal for high laser intensities a short enough laser wavelength is required. Scaling laws for the ablation pressure and the other relevant magnitudes of the ablation cloud are found in terms of the laser and target parameters.

  2. Quantifying Local Stiffness Variations in Radiofrequency Ablations with Dynamic Indentation

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Varghese, Tomy; Brace, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Elastographic imaging can be used to monitor ablation procedures, however confident and clear determination of the ablation boundary is essential to ensure complete treatment of the pathological target. To investigate the potential for ablation boundary representation on elastographic images, local variations in the viscoelastic properties in radiofrequency ablated regions that were formed in vivo in porcine liver tissue were quantified using dynamic indentation. Spatial stiffness maps were t...

  3. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  4. Laser ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma-A review

    Gough-Palmer, Antony Lawrence; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw Michal Witold

    2008-01-01

    A wide range of local thermal ablative therapies have been developed in the treatment of non resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the last decade. Laser ablation (LA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are the two most widely used of these. This article provides an up to date overview of the role of laser ablation in the local treatment of HCC. General principles, technique, image guidance and patient selection are discussed. A review of published data on treatment efficacy, long term ...

  5. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at ~2 J cm-2 has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation are similar; both show a singly peaked time-of-flight distribution. The angular distribution of ion emission and the deposition are well described by the adiabatic and isentropic model of plume ex...

  6. Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation

    A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm2. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown

  7. Kilohertz laser ablation for doping helium nanodroplets

    Mudrich, M; Müller, S; Dvorak, M; Buenermann, O; Stienkemeier, F

    2007-01-01

    A new setup for doping helium nanodroplets by means of laser ablation at kilohertz repetition rate is presented. The doping process is characterized and two distinct regimes of laser ablation are identified. The setup is shown to be efficient and stable enough to be used for spectroscopy, as demonstrated on beam-depletion spectra of lithium atoms attached to helium nanodroplets. For the first time, helium droplets are doped with high temperature refractory materials such as titanium and tantalum. Doping with the non-volatile DNA basis Guanine is found to be efficient and a number of oligomers are detected.

  8. Treatment of colorectal metastases: surgery, cryotherapy, or radiofrequency ablation

    Primrose, J N

    2002-01-01

    The liver is the most common site of metastases from colorectal cancer. There has therefore been growing interest in how liver metastases may be ablated. The most common techniques for ablation of liver metastases are surgical resection, cryotherapy, and increasingly in recent years, radiofrequency ablation.

  9. Cardiac ablation by transesophageal high intensity focused ultrasound

    JIANG Chen-xi; YU Rong-hui; MA Chang-sheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Cardiac ablation is an important modality of invasive therapy in modern cardiology, especially in the treatment of arrhythmias, as well as other diseases such as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Since Huang et al1 used radiofrequency (RF) to ablate canine atrial ventricular junction, RF has developed into the leading energy source in catheter ablation of arrhythmias.

  10. Monitoring of tumor radio frequency ablation using derivative spectroscopy

    Spliethoff, J.W.; Tanis, E.; Evers, Daniel James; Hendriks, B.H.; Prevoo, W.; Ruers, T.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of radio frequency (RF) ablation, an effective way to assess thermal tissue damage during and after the procedure is still lacking. We present a method for monitoring RF ablation efficacy based on thermally induced methemoglobin as a marker for full tissue ablation. Diffus

  11. Experimental measurement of ablation effects in plasma armature railguns

    Parker, J.V.; Parsons, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental evidence supporting the importance of ablation in plasma armature railguns is presented. Experiments conducted using the HYVAX and MIDI-2 railguns are described. Several indirect effects of ablation are identified from the experimental results. An improved ablation model of plasma armature dynamics is proposed which incorporates the restrike process.

  12. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors.

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-28

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  13. The Evolution of Tissue Stiffness at Radiofrequency Ablation Sites During Lesion Formation and in the Peri‐Ablation Period

    Eyerly, Stephanie A.; VEJDANI‐JAHROMI, MARYAM; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Wolf, Patrick D.

    2015-01-01

    Peri‐Ablation Monitoring of RFA Lesion Stiffness Introduction Elastography imaging can provide radiofrequency ablation (RFA) lesion assessment due to tissue stiffening at the ablation site. An important aspect of assessment is the spatial and temporal stability of the region of stiffness increase in the peri‐ablation period. The aim of this study was to use 2 ultrasound‐based elastography techniques, shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, to ...

  14. A review of the safety aspects of radio frequency ablation

    Abhishek Bhaskaran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In light of recent reports showing high incidence of silent cerebral infarcts and organized atrial arrhythmias following radiofrequency (RF atrial fibrillation (AF ablation, a review of its safety aspects is timely. Serious complications do occur during supraventricular tachycardia (SVT ablations and knowledge of their incidence is important when deciding whether to proceed with ablation. Evidence is emerging for the probable role of prophylactic ischemic scar ablation to prevent VT. This might increase the number of procedures performed. Here we look at the various complications of RF ablation and also the methods to minimize them. Electronic database was searched for relevant articles from 1990 to 2015. With better awareness and technological advancements in RF ablation the incidence of complications has improved considerably. In AF ablation it has decreased from 6% to less than 4% comprising of vascular complications, cardiac tamponade, stroke, phrenic nerve injury, pulmonary vein stenosis, atrio-esophageal fistula (AEF and death. Safety of SVT ablation has also improved with less than 1% incidence of AV node injury in AVNRT ablation. In VT ablation the incidence of major complications was 5–11%, up to 3.4%, up to 1.8% and 4.1–8.8% in patients with structural heart disease, without structural heart disease, prophylactic ablations and epicardial ablations respectively. Vascular and pericardial complications dominated endocardial and epicardial VT ablations respectively. Up to 3% mortality and similar rates of tamponade were reported in endocardial VT ablation. Recent reports about the high incidence of asymptomatic cerebral embolism during AF ablation are concerning, warranting more research into its etiology and prevention.

  15. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma using microwave and radiofrequency ablation

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of thermal ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using microwave and radiofrequency (RF) energy application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 190 nodules in 97 patients (84 male, 13 female; mean age 53.4 years, range 24-74 years) with HCC were treated with microwave or RF ablation in the last 4 years. The applicators were introduced into the tumours under conscious analgesic sedation by intravenous administration of fentanyl citrate and droperidol and local anaesthesia in both thermal ablation procedures. The patients were then followed up with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate treatment response. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Complete ablation was obtained in 92.6% (176/190) nodules. The complete ablation rates were 94.6% (106/112) in microwave ablation and 89.7% (70/78) in RF ablation. The complete ablation rates in tumours≤2.0, 2.1-3.9 and ≥4.0 cm were 93.1, 93.8 and 86.4%, respectively. Local recurrence was found in 9.5% nodules and the rates in tumours≤2.0, 2.1-3.9 and ≥4.0 cm in diameter were 3.4, 9.9 and 31.8%, respectively. In the follow-up period, 7.1% nodules ablated by microwave and 12.8% by RF presented local recurrence. The 1, 2 and 3-year distant recurrence-free survivals were 47.2, 34.9 and 31.0%, respectively. Estimated mean survival was 32 months, and 1, 2 and 3-year cumulative survivals were 75.6, 58.5, and 50.0%, respectively. One and 2 years survivals of Child-Pugh class A, B and C patients were 83.8 and 70.4%, 78.2 and 53.2%, 36.3 and 27.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Thermal ablation therapy by means of microwave and RF energy application is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for hepatocellular carcinoma. Large tumours can be completely ablated, but have a significantly higher risk of local recurrence at follow-up

  16. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma using microwave and radiofrequency ablation

    Xu, H.-X.; Xie, X.-Y.; Lu, M.-D. E-mail: lumd@21cn.com; Chen, J.-W.; Yin, X.-Y.; Xu, Z.-F.; Liu, G.-J

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of thermal ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using microwave and radiofrequency (RF) energy application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 190 nodules in 97 patients (84 male, 13 female; mean age 53.4 years, range 24-74 years) with HCC were treated with microwave or RF ablation in the last 4 years. The applicators were introduced into the tumours under conscious analgesic sedation by intravenous administration of fentanyl citrate and droperidol and local anaesthesia in both thermal ablation procedures. The patients were then followed up with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate treatment response. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Complete ablation was obtained in 92.6% (176/190) nodules. The complete ablation rates were 94.6% (106/112) in microwave ablation and 89.7% (70/78) in RF ablation. The complete ablation rates in tumours{<=}2.0, 2.1-3.9 and {>=}4.0 cm were 93.1, 93.8 and 86.4%, respectively. Local recurrence was found in 9.5% nodules and the rates in tumours{<=}2.0, 2.1-3.9 and {>=}4.0 cm in diameter were 3.4, 9.9 and 31.8%, respectively. In the follow-up period, 7.1% nodules ablated by microwave and 12.8% by RF presented local recurrence. The 1, 2 and 3-year distant recurrence-free survivals were 47.2, 34.9 and 31.0%, respectively. Estimated mean survival was 32 months, and 1, 2 and 3-year cumulative survivals were 75.6, 58.5, and 50.0%, respectively. One and 2 years survivals of Child-Pugh class A, B and C patients were 83.8 and 70.4%, 78.2 and 53.2%, 36.3 and 27.3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Thermal ablation therapy by means of microwave and RF energy application is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for hepatocellular carcinoma. Large tumours can be completely ablated, but have a significantly higher risk of local recurrence at follow-up.

  17. Pre-Procedural Imaging to Direct Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Anatomy and Ablation Strategy.

    Moussa Mansour; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Suhny Abbara; Godtfred Holmvang; E. Kevin Heist

    2008-01-01

    Successful catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) requires a detailed understanding of left atrial anatomy in order to maximize the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Common and rare variants of left atrial and pulmonary venous anatomy have been described which can affect the optimal ablation strategy for each individual patient. These variants include the presence of a right or left middle pulmonary vein, a left or right common pulmonary vein, a common inferior pulmonary vein, a ri...

  18. Pre-Procedural Imaging to Direct Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Anatomy and Ablation Strategy

    E. Kevin Heist MD PhD; Godtfred Holmvang MD; Suhny Abbara MD; Jeremy N. Ruskin MD; Moussa Mansour MD

    2008-01-01

    Successful catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) requires a detailed understanding of left atrial anatomy in order to maximize the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Common and rare variants of left atrial and pulmonary venous anatomy have been described which can affect the optimal ablation strategy for each individual patient. These variants include the presence of a right or left middle pulmonary vein, a left or right common pulmonary vein, a common inferior pulmonary vein, a ri...

  19. Effect of ablatant composition on the ablation of a fuelling pellet

    The single species neutral-shielding model for the ablation of a hydrogenic pellet is extended by considering the ablatant as a mixture of four species: molecular and atomic hydrogen, protons and electrons. Compared with the results of the frozen flow, (i.e. the single species molecular hydrogen gas model), results of the analysis showed that the presence of dissociation and ionization effects caused a marked difference of the ablatant state. The attenuations of the incoming electron energy and energy flux, however, are very much similar irrespective of whether the ablated flow is in a frozen or an equilibrium state. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate with respect to the plasma state of Te, ne and the pellet radius remains the same; the ablation rate is reduced by approximately 15%. To examine the possible existence of a spherical shell around the pellet where most of the incoming electron energy is absorbed, a comparison is made between the local electron collisional mean free path and the electron Larmor radius. A critical field at the ionization radius is evaluated. An effective spherical energy-absorbing region exists when the local field strength is below the critical value. For a plasma state of low Te and ne, (where the ablatant is hardly ionized), and for one near the thermonuclear condition (where a highly dense ablatant exists near the pellet), the effective energy absorption region is nearly spherical. In view of the variation of the plasma temperature and density as well as the pellet radius during the penetration of a pellet in a tokamak discharge, the existence of such an effective spherical energy absorption region still requires further exploration. (author)

  20. Determining ablation depth using CT imaging

    Urzová, J.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Remsa, Jan; Vopálka, R.

    Kladno: CTU Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, 2015 - (Jelínek, M.). s. 17 ISBN 978-80-01-05809-1. [Progressive Biomedical Materials and Technologies 2015. 09.10.2015-10.10.2015, Kladno] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ablation depth * CT imaging * excimer laser Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  1. Monitoring Atrial Fibrillation After Catheter Ablation

    Giovanni B Forleo, MD PhD; MAssimo Moltrasio, MD; Michela Casella MD, PhD; Antonio Dello Russo MD, PhD; Getano Fassini, MD; Manfredi Tesauro, MD, PhD; Claudio Tondo, MD, PhD.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although catheter ablation is an effective treatment for recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF, there is no consensus on the definition of success or follow-up strategies. Symptoms are the major motivation for undergoing catheter ablation in patients with AF, however it is well known that reliance on perception of AF by patients after AF ablation results in an underestimation of recurrence of the arrhythmia. Because symptoms of AF occurrence may be misleading, a reliable assessment of rhythm outcome is essential for the definition of success in both clinical care and research trials. Continuous rhythm monitoring over long periods of time is superior to intermittent recording using external monitors to detect the presence of AF episodes and to quantify the AF burden. Today, new devices implanted subcutaneously using a minimally invasive technique have been developed for continuous AF monitoring. Implantable devices keep detailed information about arrhythmia recurrences and might allow identification of very brief episodes of AF, the significance of which is still uncertain. In particular, it is not known whether there is any critical value of daily AF burden that has a prognostic significance. This issue remains an area of active discussion, debate and investigation. Further investigation is required to determine if continuous AF monitoring with implantable devices is effective in reducing stroke risk and facilitating maintenance of sinus rhythm after AF ablation.

  2. Nonfluoroscopic Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Cryoballoon

    Mansour Razminia, M.D., F.A.C.C.; Hany Demo, M.D.; Carlos Arrieta-Garcia, M.D.;

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The conventional method of cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation involves the use of fluoroscopy for visual guidance. The use of fluoroscopy is accompanied by significant radiation risks to the patient and the medical staff. Herein, we report our experience in performing successful nonfluoroscopic pulmonary vein isolation using cryoballoon ablation in 5 consecutive patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation Methods and Results: Five consecutive patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation underwent cryoballoon ablation for pulmonary vein isolation using a nonfluoroscopic approach. Pre-procedural cardiac computed tomography or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was not performed in any patient. A total of twenty pulmonary veins were identified and successfully isolated (100% with the guidance of intracardiac echocardiography and 3-dimensional electroanatomic mapping. No fluoroscopy was used for the procedures. There were no major procedural adverse events. Conclusion: In an unselected group of patients undergoing cryoballoon ablation, a nonfluoroscopic approach is feasible and can be performed safely and effectively while eliminating the risks associated with radiation to both the patient and the medical staff.

  3. Bending diamonds by femtosecond laser ablation

    Balling, Peter; Esberg, Jakob; Kirsebom, Kim;

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method based on femtosecond laser ablation for the fabrication of statically bent diamond crystals. Using this method, curvature radii of 1 m can easily be achieved, and the curvature obtained is very uniform. Since diamond is extremely tolerant to high radiation doses, partly due...

  4. NOVEL LASER ABLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SURFACE DECONTAMINATION

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel Laser Ablation Decontamination in Liquid (LADIL) technology for surface decontamination and safe removal of radioactive and/or toxic contaminants. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary conta...

  5. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  6. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  7. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  8. A chemical model of meteoric ablation

    T. Vondrak

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of the extraterrestrial dust entering the Earth's atmosphere ablates to produce metal vapours, which have significant effects on the aeronomy of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. A new Chemical Ablation Model (CAMOD is described which treats the physics and chemistry of ablation, by including the following processes: sputtering by inelastic collisions with air molecules before the meteoroid melts; evaporation of atoms and oxides from the molten particle; diffusion-controlled migration of the volatile constituents (Na and K through the molten particle; and impact ionization of the ablated fragments by hyperthermal collisions with air molecules. Evaporation is based on thermodynamic equilibrium in the molten meteoroid (treated as a melt of metal oxides, and between the particle and surrounding vapour phase. The loss rate of each element is then determined assuming Langmuir evaporation. CAMOD successfully predicts the meteor head echo appearance heights, observed from incoherent scatter radars, over a wide range of meteoroid velocities. The model also confirms that differential ablation explains common-volume lidar observations of K, Ca and Ca+ in fresh meteor trails. CAMOD is then used to calculate the injection rates into the atmosphere of a variety of elements as a function of altitude, integrated over the meteoroid mass and velocity distributions. The most abundant elements (Fe, Mg and Si have peak injection rates around 85 km, with Na and K about 8 km higher. The more refractory element Ca ablates around 82 km with a Na:Ca ratio of 4:1, which does therefore not explain the depletion of atomic Ca to Na, by more than 2 orders of magnitude, in the upper mesosphere. Diffusion of the most volatile elements (Na and K does not appear to be rate-limiting except in the fastest meteoroids. Non-thermal sputtering causes ~35% mass loss from the fastest (~60–70 km s−1 and smallest (10−17–10

  9. Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Patient Selection, Periprocedural Anticoagulation, Techniques, and Preventive Measures After Ablation.

    Link, Mark S; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Natale, Andrea

    2016-07-26

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia encountered by cardiologists and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for AF include age, male sex, genetic predisposition, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, obesity, excessive alcohol, smoking, hyperthyroidism, pulmonary disease, air pollution, heart failure, and possibly excessive exercise. The management of AF involves decisions about rate versus rhythm control. Asymptomatic patients are generally managed with rate control and anticoagulation. Symptomatic patients will desire rhythm control. Rhythm control options are either antiarrhythmic agents or ablation, with each having its own risks and benefits. Ablation of AF has evolved from a rare and complex procedure to a common electrophysiological technique. Selection of patients to undergo ablation is an important aspect of AF care. Patients with the highest success rates of ablation are those with normal structural hearts and paroxysmal AF, although those with congestive heart failure have the greatest potential benefit of the procedure. Although pulmonary vein isolation of any means/energy source is the approach generally agreed on for those with paroxysmal AF, optimal techniques for the ablation of nonparoxysmal AF are not yet clear. Anticoagulation reduces thromboembolic complications; the newer anticoagulants have eased management for both the patient and the cardiologist. Aggressive management of modifiable risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, obesity, excessive alcohol, smoking, hyperthyroidism, pulmonary disease, air pollution, and possibly excessive exercise) after ablation reduces the odds of recurrent AF and is an important element of care. PMID:27462054

  10. Contact Force and Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Waqas Ullah; Richard Schilling; Tom Wong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Catheters able to measure the force and vector of contact between the catheter tip and myocardium are now available. Pre-clinical work has established that the degree of contact between the radiofrequency ablation catheter and myocardium correlates with the size of the delivered lesion. Excess contact is associated with steam pops and perforation. Catheter contact varies within the left atrium secondary to factors including respiration, location, atrial rhythm and the trans-septal catheter delivery technology used. Compared with procedures performed without contact force (CF-sensing, the use of this technology has, in some studies, been found to improve complication rates, procedure and fluoroscopy times, and success rates. However, for each of these parameters there are also studies suggesting a lack of difference from the availability of CF data. Nevertheless, CF-sensing technology has been adopted as a standard of care in many institutions. It is likely that use of CF-sensing technology will allow for the optimization of each individual radiofrequency application to maximize efficacy and procedural safety. Recent work has attempted to define what these optimal targets should be, and approaches to do this include assessing for sites of pulmonary vein reconnection after ablation, or comparing the impedance response to ablation. Based on such work, it is apparent that factors including mean CF, force time integral (the area under the force-time curve and contact stability are important determinants of ablation efficacy. Multicenter prospective randomized data are lacking in this field and required to define the CF parameters required to produce optimal ablation.

  11. Femtosecond laser ablation of brass in air and liquid media

    Laser ablation of brass in air, water, and ethanol was investigated using a femtosecond laser system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm and a pulse width less than 130 fs. Scanning electron and optical microscopy were used to study the efficiency and quality of laser ablation in the three ablation media at two different ablation modes. With a liquid layer thickness of 3 mm above the target, ablation rate was found to be higher in water and ethanol than in air. Ablation under water and ethanol showed cleaner surfaces and less debris re-deposition compared to ablation in air. In addition to spherical particles that are normally formed from re-solidified molten material, micro-scale particles with varying morphologies were observed scattered in the ablated structures (craters and grooves) when ablation was conducted under water. The presence of such particles indicates the presence of a non-thermal ablation mechanism that becomes more apparent when ablation is conducted under water.

  12. Wavelength dependence of soft tissue ablation by using pulsed lasers

    Xianzeng Zhang; Shusen Xie; Qing Ye; Zhenlin Zhan

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of soft biological tissue was studied at 10.6-, 2.94-, and 2.08-μm wavelengths. The ablation effects were assessed by means of optical microscope, the ablation crater depths were measured with reading microscope. It was shown that Er:YAG laser produced the highest quality ablation with clear,sharp cuts following closely the patial contour of the incident beam and the lowest fluence threshold. The pulsed CO2 laser presented the moderate quality ablation with the highest ablation efficiency. The craters drilled with Ho:YAG laser were generally larger than the incident laser beam spot, irregular in shape, and clearly dependent on the local morphology of biotissue. The blation characteristics, including fluence threshold and ablation efficiency, varied substantially with wavelength. It is not evident that water is the only dominant chromophore in tissue.

  13. Tissue temperatures and lesion size during irrigated tip catheter radiofrequency ablation: an in vitro comparison of temperature-controlled irrigated tip ablation, power-controlled irrigated tip ablation, and standard temperature-controlled ablation

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A;

    2000-01-01

    The limited success rate of radiofrequency catheter ablation in patients with ventricular tachycardias related to structural heart disease may be increased by enlarging the lesion size. Irrigated tip catheter ablation is a new method for enlarging the size of the lesion. It was introduced in the...... power-controlled mode with high power and high infusion rate, and is associated with an increased risk of crater formation, which is related to high tissue temperatures. The present study explored the tissue temperatures during temperature-controlled irrigated tip ablation, comparing it with standard...... temperature-controlled ablation and power-controlled irrigated tip ablation. In vitro strips of porcine left ventricular myocardium were ablated. Temperature-controlled irrigated tip ablation at target temperatures 60 degrees C, 70 degrees C, and 80 degrees C with infusion of 1 mL saline/min were compared...

  14. The effect of ethanol infusion on the size of the ablated lesion in radiofrequency thermal ablation: A pilot study

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Seo, Heung Suk; Kim, Yong Soo; Joo, Kyoung Bin [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-15

    To assess the effect of ethanol infusion on the size of ablated lesion during radiofrequency (RF) thermal ablation. We performed an ex vivo experimental study using a total of 15 pig livers. Three groups were designed: 1)normal control (n=10), 2) saline infusion (n=10) 3) ethanol infusion (n=10). Two radiofrequency ablations were done using a 50 watt RF generator and a 15 guage expandable elections with four prongs in each liver. During ablation for 8 minutes, continuous infusion of fluid at a rate of 0.5 ml/min through the side arm of electrode was performed. We checked the frequency of the 'impeded-out' phenomenon due to abrupt increase of impedance during ablation. Size of ablated lesion was measured according to length, width, height, and subsequently volume after the ablations. The sizes of the ablated lesions were compared between the three groups. 'Impeded-out' phenomenon during ablation was noted 4 times in control group, although that never happened in saline or ethanol infusion groups. There were significant differences in the volumes of ablated lesions between control group (10.62 +- 1.45 cm{sup 3}) and saline infusion group (15.33 +- 2.47 cm{sup 3}), and saline infusion group and ethanol infusion group (18.78 +- 3.58 cm{sup 3}) (p<0.05). Fluid infusion during radiofrequency thermal ablation decrease a chance of charming and increase the volume of the ablated lesion. Ethanol infusion during ablation may induce larger volume of ablated lesion than saline infusion.

  15. Ablation properties of carbon/carbon composites with tungsten carbide

    The ablation properties and morphologies of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites with tungsten carbide (WC) filaments were investigated by ablation test on an arc heater and scanning electron microscopy. And the results were compared with those without tungsten carbide (WC) filaments tested under the same conditions. It shows that there is a big difference between C/C composites with and without WC filaments on both macroscopic and microscopic ablation morphologies and the ablation rates of the former are higher than the latter. It is found that the ablation process of C/C composites with WC filaments includes oxidation of carbon fibers, carbon matrices and WC, melting of WC and WO3, and denudation of WC, WO3 and C/C composites. Oxidation and melting of WC leads to the formation of holes in z directional carbon fiber bundles, which increases the coarseness of the ablation surfaces of the composites, speeds up ablation and leads to the higher ablation rate. Moreover, it is further found that the molten WC and WO3 cannot form a continuous film on the ablation surface to prevent further ablation of C/C composites.

  16. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  17. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms; Perkutane Thermoablation von Nierentumoren

    Tacke, J. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Passau (Germany); Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  18. Laser ablation of multilayer polymer films

    We study the efficiency of using multilayer structures as an etch-stop mechanism in the ablation of polyimide films by ultraviolet lasers. The study is done using a photothermal model that includes the light absorption by the decomposed fragments, which shield the polymer from the laser beam, an intermediate zone in which the polymer is suffering a phase transition and the underlying unburned material. The layers are differentiated from each other through their optical properties. Variation in the optical properties of polyimide has been achieved by a proper selection of impurities. From our modeling work, we conclude that optically thin foils may be used as etch stop in the ablation process when the penetration depth of the middle layer is around three times larger than the penetration depth of the surrounding layers, this for fluences below 200 mJ/cm2. We also present some experimental results

  19. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  20. Glycine Ablation during Comet/Meteoroid Impact

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Borucki, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Amino acids and other organic compounds important to the chemistry of life are thought to have been delivered to early Earth by asteroids and comets. The survivability of such compounds upon high speed entry is not well understood. If molecular processing occurs during entry, the nature of the new molecules produced by such processing is also an open question. To address this question, we have initiated a study of the ablation of glycine, the simplest amino acid, upon the high speed entry of a comet or meteoroid into an atmosphere. The study assumes glycine is distributed on the surface of the comet/meteoroid. The high speed impact creates electrons, ions, and radicals in the atmosphere that react with the surface and either desorb glycine or break it up. The ablation process is studied as a function of entry speed and atmospheric composition. The AURORA code from the commercially available software package CHEMKIN is used in the study.

  1. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of renal tumors.

    De Filippo, Massimo; Bozzetti, Francesca; Martora, Rosa; Zagaria, Raffaella; Ferretti, Stefania; Macarini, Luca; Brunese, Luca; Rotondo, Antonio; Rossi, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (PRFA) of renal malignancies is currently a therapeutic option for patients who are not able to undergo surgery. Some authors consider PRFA as the therapeutic standard in the treatment of renal neoplasms in non-operable patients due to comorbid conditions and in patients with mild-moderate renal failure, to preserve residual renal functionality. The use of PRFA has become more and more widespread due to a rise in the incidental detection of renal cell carcinomas with the ever-increasing use of Imaging for the study of abdominal diseases. Clinical studies indicate that RF ablation is an effective therapy with a low level of risk of complications, which provides good results in selected patients over short and medium term periods of time, however up to now few long-term studies have been carried out which can confirm the effectiveness of PRFA. PMID:25024061

  2. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods

  3. Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments

    Olson R.E.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash ρr, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  4. Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments

    Olson R.E.; Hicks D.G.; Meezan N.B.; Callahan D.A.; Landen O.L.; Jones O.S.; Langer S.H.; Kline J.L.; Wilson D.C.; Rinderknecht H.; Zylstra A.; Petrasso R.D.

    2013-01-01

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash ρr, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  5. Radioiodine Remnant Ablation: A Critical Review

    Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Padhy, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) is considered a safe and effective method for eliminating residual thyroid tissue, as well as microscopic disease if at all present in thyroid bed following thyroidectomy. The rationale of RRA is that in the absence of thyroid tissue, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement can be used as an excellent tumor marker. Other considerations are like the presence of significant remnant thyroid tissue makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases diffic...

  6. Ablating and charring of heat shield materials

    Rahimian, M.H.; Shabani, M.R. [Univ. of Tehran, Faculty of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: rahimyan@ut.ac.ir; shubani@me.ut.ac.ir

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this research is to estimate ablating and charring of heat shield materials in severe aero thermal / erosive environments. This requires an accurate and rapid technique for its serious heat transfer with moving boundary. Aerodynamic heating is obtained by an explicit relation. Fully implicit method is used for heat transfer calculation. Moving boundary is captured by VOF method. Thickness of heat shield, temperature of moving surface and radiation heat is presented. The results are in good agreement with other calculations. (author)

  7. Ablating and charring of heat shield materials

    The objective of this research is to estimate ablating and charring of heat shield materials in severe aero thermal / erosive environments. This requires an accurate and rapid technique for its serious heat transfer with moving boundary. Aerodynamic heating is obtained by an explicit relation. Fully implicit method is used for heat transfer calculation. Moving boundary is captured by VOF method. Thickness of heat shield, temperature of moving surface and radiation heat is presented. The results are in good agreement with other calculations. (author)

  8. Electrolytic Effects During Tissue Ablation by Electroporation.

    Rubinsky, L; Guenther, E.; Mikus, P; Stehling, M; Rubinsky, B

    2015-01-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation is a new tissue ablation technique that consists of applying pulsed electric fields across cells to induce cell death by creating permanent defects in the cell membrane. Nonthermal irreversible electroporation is of interest because it allows treatment near sensitive tissue structures such as blood vessels and nerves. Two recent articles report that electrolytic reaction products at electrodes can be combined with electroporation pulses to augment and o...

  9. Resolving Bias in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    Bowring, James; Horstwood, Matthew; Gehrels, George

    2013-06-01

    Increasingly, scientific investigations requiring geochronology utilize laser ablation (LA)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), taking advantage of the efficiency and throughput possible for uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) dating. A number of biases exist when comparing data among laboratories and an ongoing community-based effort is working to resolve and eliminate these biases to improve the accuracy of scientific interpretation based on these data.

  10. Thermal properties of ablative phenolic resins

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Dimeski, Dimko; BOGOEVA-GACEVA, Gordana

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic resins are known for their excellent thermal properties and chemical stability and are widely used in automotive industry, electrical engineering, military industry and industry of construction materials. Their attractive properties have been especially exploited in high temperature applications. Recently a wide range of phenolic resins for different applications is available on the market. In this paper the properties of two types of ablative phenolic resins are compared: resin B...

  11. A tubular electrode for radiofrequency ablation therapy

    Antunes, Carlos Lemos Lemos Lemos

    2012-07-06

    Purpose – Due to its good mechanical and biocompatibility characteristics, nitinol SEMS is a popular endoprothesis used for relieving stricture problems in hollow organs due to carcinomas. Besides its mechanical application, SEMS can be regarded as well as potential electrode for performing RF ablation therapy on the tumor. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical and experimental analyses in order to characterize the lesion volume induced in biological tissue using this kind of tubular electrode. Design/methodology/approach – Data concerning electrical conductivity and dimension of the damaged tissue after RF ablation procedure were obtained from ex vivo samples. Next, numerical models using 3D finite element method were obtained reassembling the conditions considered at experimentation setup and results were compared. Findings – Numerical and experimental results show that a regular volume of damaged tissue can be obtained considering this type of electrode. Also, results obtained from numerical simulation are close to those obtained by experimentation. Originality/value – SEMSs, commonly used as devices to minimize obstruction problems due to the growth of tumors, may still be considered as an active electrode for RF ablation procedures. A method considering this observation is presented in this paper. Also, numerical simulation can be regarded in this case as a tool for determining the lesion volume.

  12. Radiative Ablation of Disks Around Massive Stars

    Kee, N D

    2015-01-01

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities ($10^4 -10^6 L_\\odot$) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering. Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar...

  13. Osteoid Osteoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation

    Murat Çakar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Our aim is to evaluate the results of treatment with computed tomography (CT guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for osteoid osteomas which were localized in a difficult area for operation. Materials and Methods. Glenoid, distal tibia, humerus shaft, proximal humerus, and in third finger of the hand proximal phalanx were involved in one patient. Proximal femur was involved in three patients, distal femur was involved in three patients, and proximal tibia was involved in two patients. 9 males and 4 females were aged 4 to 34 years (mean age: 18.5 years. All patients had pain and were evaluated with X-rays, CT, bone scintigraphy, and MRI. In all patients, RF ablation was performed with local anesthesia. The lesion heated to 90°C for 6 minutes. Results. All of the patients achieved complete pain relief after ablation and were fully weight bearing without any support. In all patients, there was soft tissue edema after the procedure. During follow-up, all patients were free from the pain and there was no sign about the tumor. There was no other complication after the process. Conclusion. CT guided RFA is a minimally invasive, safe, and cost-effective treatment for osteoid osteoma placed in difficult area for surgery.

  14. KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures

    Malloy, Terrence R.

    1991-07-01

    In 1988, the KTP-532 laser was used to ablate a series of benign urethral strictures. Rather than using a single incision, as in urethrotomy, strictures were treated with a 360$DEG contact photoradiation. Thirty-one males, average age 53.2 years, received 37 treatments. Six patients underwent a second laser treatment. Stricture etiology was commonly iatrogenic (32%), traumatic (16%), and post-gonococcal (10%). Stricture location included mainly bulbar (49%), membranous (20%), and penile (12%) areas. The surgical technique consisted of a circumferential ablation followed by foley catheter placement (mean 10 days). Follow-up on 29 of 31 patients ranged from 1 to 16 months (mean 9.7) Complete success occurred in 17 patients (59%) who had no further symptoms or instrumentation. Partial success was seen in 6 patients (20.5%) with symptoms but no stricture recurrence. Six patients (20.5%) failed therapy requiring additional surgery or regular dilatations. No complications were encountered. Although longer assessment is required, KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures appears efficacious.

  15. Investigating Age Resolution in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    Horstwood, Matt; Kosler, Jan; Jackson, Simon; Pearson, Norman; Sylvester, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Workshop on Data Handling in LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Geochronology; Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 12-13 July 2008; Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) dating is an increasingly popular approach for determining the age of mineral grains and the timing of geological events. The spatial resolution offered by this technique allows detailed investigations of complex igneous and metamorphic processes, and the speed of data capture allows vast amounts of information to be gathered rapidly. Laser ablation U-Th-Pb dating is therefore becoming an increasingly influential technique to the geochronology community, providing cost-effective and ready access to age data for laboratories and end users worldwide. However, complications in acquiring, processing, and interpreting data can lead to inaccurate age information entering the literature. With the numbers of practitioners expanding rapidly, the need to standardize approaches and resolve difficulties (particularly involving the subjectivity in processing laser ablation U-Th-Pb data) is becoming important.

  16. Transient Newton rings in dielectrics upon fs laser ablation

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We report the appearance of transient Newton rings in dielectrics (sapphire and lead-oxide glass) during ablation with single fs laser pulses. Employing femtosecond microscopy with 800 nm excitation and 400 nm illumination, we observe a characteristic ring pattern that dynamically changes for increasing delay times between pump and probe pulse. Such transient Newton rings have been previously observed in metals and semiconductors at fluences above the ablation threshold and were related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer and at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Yet, it had been generally assumed that this phenomenon cannot be (and has not been) observed in dielectrics due to the different ablation mechanism and optical properties of dielectrics. The fact that we are able to observe them has important consequences for the comprehension of the ablation mechanisms in dielectrics and provides a new method for investigating these mechanisms in ...

  17. New tumor ablation techniques for cancer treatment (microwave, electroporation)

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumors at the end of the 1990's, indications for local ablation techniques have been extended to other organs, in particular, the lungs, kidneys and bones. These techniques have also been improved, in particular to try and overcome the limitations of radiofrequency techniques, especially the significant decrease in complete ablation rates for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors that are contiguous to vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is a rapidly developing thermal ablation technique similar to RFA but with numerous differences. Electroporation, a non-thermal ablation technique with other possibilities, is in earlier stages of clinical development. (authors)

  18. Picosecond laser ablation for silicon micro fuel cell fabrication

    We have investigated laser ablation as a microfabrication approach to produce micro fuel cells (MFCs) in silicon. Picosecond pulses (15 ps) at a wavelength of 355 nm are used to make all of the MFC structures. To assess the benefits and drawbacks of laser ablation, reference cells have been produced by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) using matching geometries. Ablated and etched cells have been evaluated and compared side by side. Our conclusion is that picosecond laser ablation is very well suited for MFC fabrication. The ablated cells match or excel DRIE-microfabricated cells in terms of current and power densities. Ablated MFCs achieved 47.6 mW cm−2 of power density and 121 mA cm−2 current density. (paper)

  19. Convergent ablation measurements of plastic ablators in gas-filled rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Masse, L.; Galmiche, D.

    2015-10-01

    Indirect-drive implosions experiments were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of uniformly doped plastic ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion. The first convergent ablation measurements in gas-filled rugby hohlraums are reported. Ignition relevant limb velocities in the range from 150 to 300 μm .n s-1 have been reached by varying the laser drive energy and the initial capsule aspect ratio. The measured capsule trajectory and implosion velocity are in good agreement with 2D integrated simulations and a zero-dimensional modeling of the implosions. We demonstrate experimentally the scaling law for the maximum implosion velocity predicted by the improved rocket model [Y. Saillard, Nucl. Fusion 46, 1017 (2006)] in the high-ablation regime case.

  20. Local Ablative Strategies for Ductal Pancreatic Cancer (Radiofrequency Ablation, Irreversible Electroporation): A Review.

    Paiella, Salvatore; Salvia, Roberto; Ramera, Marco; Girelli, Roberto; Frigerio, Isabella; Giardino, Alessandro; Allegrini, Valentina; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has still a dismal prognosis. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) accounts for the 40% of the new diagnoses. Current treatment options are based on chemo- and radiotherapy regimens. Local ablative techniques seem to be the future therapeutic option for stage-III patients with PDAC. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) and Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) are actually the most emerging local ablative techniques used on LAPC. Initial clinical studies on the use of these techniques have already demonstrated encouraging results in terms of safety and feasibility. Unfortunately, few studies on their efficacy are currently available. Even though some reports on the overall survival are encouraging, randomized studies are still required to corroborate these findings. This study provides an up-to-date overview and a thematic summary of the current available evidence on the application of RFA and IRE on PDAC, together with a comparison of the two procedures. PMID:26981115

  1. Local Ablative Strategies for Ductal Pancreatic Cancer (Radiofrequency Ablation, Irreversible Electroporation: A Review

    Salvatore Paiella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC has still a dismal prognosis. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC accounts for the 40% of the new diagnoses. Current treatment options are based on chemo- and radiotherapy regimens. Local ablative techniques seem to be the future therapeutic option for stage-III patients with PDAC. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA and Irreversible Electroporation (IRE are actually the most emerging local ablative techniques used on LAPC. Initial clinical studies on the use of these techniques have already demonstrated encouraging results in terms of safety and feasibility. Unfortunately, few studies on their efficacy are currently available. Even though some reports on the overall survival are encouraging, randomized studies are still required to corroborate these findings. This study provides an up-to-date overview and a thematic summary of the current available evidence on the application of RFA and IRE on PDAC, together with a comparison of the two procedures.

  2. Cooled Radiofrequency Ablation for Bilateral Greater Occipital Neuralgia

    Tiffany Vu; Akhil Chhatre

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a case of bilateral greater occipital neuralgia treated with cooled radiofrequency ablation. The case is considered in relation to a review of greater occipital neuralgia, continuous thermal and pulsed radiofrequency ablation, and current medical literature on cooled radiofrequency ablation. In this case, a 35-year-old female with a 2.5-year history of chronic suboccipital bilateral headaches, described as constant, burning, and pulsating pain that started at the subocci...

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation of Thyroid Nodules: Basic Principles and Clinical Application

    Ji Hoon Shin; Jung Hwan Baek; Eun Ju Ha; Jeong Hyun Lee

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has been gaining popularity as a minimally invasive treatment for benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. RF ablation of benign nodules demonstrated volume reductions of 33–58% after one month and 51–85% after six months, while solving nodule-related clinical problems. RF ablation has recently shown positive short-term results for locoregional control as well as symptom improvement in patients with recurrent thyroid cancers. This pa...

  4. Role of Remote Navigation Systems in AF Ablation

    Boris Schmidt, MD

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade atrial fibrillation (AF ablation has developed from being an experimental treatment option to an evidence based therapy implemented in current guidelines.1-2 Irrigated radiofrequency current guided ablations remain the golden standard of pulmonary vein isolation (PVI procedures. Although practiced more frequently, it remains a demanding procedure requiring skilful operators. Novel technologies such as balloon based catheters or remote navigation (RN systems have been developed to overcome the pitfalls of manual ablation procedures.

  5. Neuropsychological Decline After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Schwarz, N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article “Neuropsychological decline after cath- eter ablation of atrial fibrillation” by Schwarz et al. is the first publication that focused on cognitive side effects of elective circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI.1 Adverse neuropsychological changes after left atrial catheter ablation, as report- ed in this paper, were found in verbal memory and the result, conjoined with ischemic brain lesions, might represent cerebral side-effects of the ablation procedure.

  6. Numerical simulation of copper ablation by ultrashort laser pulses

    Ding, PengJi; Hu, BiTao; Li, Yuhong

    2011-01-01

    Using a modified self-consistent one-dimensional hydrodynamic lagrangian fluid code, laser ablation of solid copper by ultrashort laser pulses in vacuum was simulated to study fundamental mechanisms and to provide a guide for drilling periodic microholes or microgratings on the metal surface. The simulated laser ablation threshold is a approximate constancy in femtosecond regime and increases as the square root of pulse duration in picosecond regime. The ablation depth as a function of pulse ...

  7. Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation for Depth Profiling of Bacterial Biofilms

    Milasinovic, Slobodan; Liu, Yaoming; Gasper, Gerald L.; Zhao, Youbo; Johnston, Joanna L.; Gordon, Robert J.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Sample ablation by pulsed lasers is one option for removing material from a sample surface for in situ depth profiling during imaging mass spectrometry, but ablation is often limited by laser-induced damage of the remaining material. A preliminary evaluation was performed of sub-100 fs, 800 nm pulsed laser ablation for depth profiling of bacterial biofilms grown on glass by the drip flow method. Electron and optical microscopy were combined with laser desorption vacuum ultraviolet postionizat...

  8. RECENT ADVANCES IN PULSED LASER ABLATED PLASMA PLUMES: A REVIEW

    ASHUTOSH DWIVEDI

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation is a process in which an intense laser pulse interacts with the matter producing plasma. The present work describes the theoretical work being conducted in the past for the pulsed laser ablation phenomenon. It incorporates the theoretical models being proposed by various researchers around the globe for pulsed laser ablation. The main processes involved in the laser–matter interaction leading to plasma plume formation are the absorption and the reflection of the incident...

  9. Efficiency of ablative plasma energy transfer into a massive aluminum target using different atomic number ablators

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Stepniewski, W.; Jach, K.; Swierczynski, R.; Renner, Oldřich; Šmíd, Michal; Ullschmied, Jiří; Cikhart, J.; Klír, D.; Kubeš, P.; Řezáč, K.; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2015), s. 379-386. ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : ablator atomic number * crater volume * laser energy transfer * plasma ablative pressure Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 1.295, year: 2014

  10. Numerical modeling of ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of silicon

    Silicon ablation by a single ultrashort laser pulse is simulated through a computer model. The agreement between results obtained through the model and experimental data found in the literature supports the hypothesis made by the authors in considering thermal evaporation as the dominant ablation mechanism in silicon. Two distinctive thresholds are defined for the ablation procedure leading to a better interpretation of experimental data. The dependence of ablation fluence thresholds on both wavelength and pulse width is discussed. An approximate analytical model describing the crater formation process is proposed and indicative results are presented.

  11. Radiofrequency Ablation of Thyroid Nodules: Basic Principles and Clinical Application

    Ji Hoon Shin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF ablation has been gaining popularity as a minimally invasive treatment for benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. RF ablation of benign nodules demonstrated volume reductions of 33–58% after one month and 51–85% after six months, while solving nodule-related clinical problems. RF ablation has recently shown positive short-term results for locoregional control as well as symptom improvement in patients with recurrent thyroid cancers. This paper reviews the basic physics, indications, patient preparation, devices, procedures, clinical results, and complications of RF ablation.

  12. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation in children

    Botsa, Evanthia [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, First Pediatric Clinic, Agia Sofia Children' s Hospital, Athens (Greece); Poulou, Loukia S.; Koundouraki, Antonia; Thanos, Loukas [Sotiria General Hospital for Chest Diseases, Department of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Athens (Greece); Koutsogiannis, Ioannis [General Military Hospital NIMTS, Department of Medical Imaging, Athens (Greece); Ziakas, Panayiotis D. [Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Rhode Island Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, Providence, RI (United States); Alexopoulou, Efthimia [Attikon University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens University School of Medicine, Athens (Greece)

    2014-11-15

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation is a well-accepted technique of interventional oncology in adults. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation as a minimally invasive treatment for metastatic neoplasms in children. A total of 15 radiofrequency ablation sessions were performed in 12 children and young adults (median age 9.5; range 5-18 years) with metastatic malignancies. Seven children and young adults had secondary hepatic lesions, three had pulmonary and two had bone lesions. Radiofrequency ablation was performed under conscious sedation. The median lesion size was 1.7 cm (range 1.3-2.8 cm). The median time for ablation was 8 min (range 7-10 min). Radiofrequency procedures were technically successful in all tumors. Postablation imaging immediately after, and 1 month and 3 months after radiofrequency ablation showed total necrosis in all patients. At 6-month follow-up, three patients (all with lesion size >2 cm) had local recurrence and underwent a second radiofrequency ablation session. At 2-year follow-up no patient had recurrence of the treated tumor. Post-ablation syndrome occurred in four children. No major complication occurred. CT-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation was safe and efficient for palliative treatment in our cohort of patients. (orig.)

  13. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  14. Thermal character in organic polymers with nanojoule femtosecond laser ablation

    Xiaochang Ni(倪晓昌); Ching-Yue Wang(王清月); Yanfeng Li(栗岩峰); Minglie Hu(胡明列); Zhuan Wang(王专); Lu Chai(柴路)

    2003-01-01

    Ablation experiments with femtosecond (fs) laser pulse (pulse duration 37 fs, wavelength 800 nm) on organic polymers have been performed in air. The ablation threshold is found to be only several nanojoules. The diameters of the dots ablated in the organic polymers are influenced by the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses. It is observed that heat is diffused in a threadlike manner in all directions around the central focus region. Explanations of the observed phenomena are presented. A one-dimensional waveguide is also ablated in the organic polymers.

  15. The Role of Intracardiac Echocardiography in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Elad Anter, MD

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency catheter ablation of pulmonary veins has emerged as an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation. Advances in real-time intracardiac echocardiography with 2D and Doppler color flow imaging have led to it integration in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. It allows imaging of the left atrium and pulmonary veins, including identification of anatomic variations. It has an important role in guiding transseptal catheterization, imaging the pulmonary vein ostia, assisting in accurate placement of mapping and ablation catheters, monitoring lesion morphology and flow changes in the ablated pulmonary veins, hence allowing titration of energy delivery. Importantly, it allows instant detection of procedural complications.

  16. The Role of Intracardiac Echocardiography in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Elad Anter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency catheter ablation of pulmonary veins has emerged as an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation. Advances in real-time intracardiac echocardiography with 2D and Doppler color flow imaging have led to its integration in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. It allows imaging of the left atrium and pulmonary veins, including identification of anatomic variations. It has an important role in guiding transseptal catheterization, imaging the pulmonary vein ostia, assisting in accurate placement of mapping and ablation catheters, monitoring lesion morphology and flow changes in the ablated pulmonary veins, hence allowing titration of energy delivery. Importantly, it allows instant detection of procedural complications.

  17. Laser ablation loading of a surface-electrode ion trap

    Leibrandt, David R.; Clark, Robert J.; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Antohi, Paul; Bakr, Waseem; Brown, Kenneth R.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate loading by laser ablation of $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions into a mm-scale surface-electrode ion trap. The laser used for ablation is a pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG with pulse energies of 1-10 mJ and durations of 3-5 ns. An additional laser is not required to photoionize the ablated material. The efficiency and lifetime of several candidate materials for the laser ablation target are characterized by measuring the trapped ion fluorescence signal for a number of consecutive loads. Addi...

  18. High resolution patterning of sapphire by F2-laser ablation

    Wiesner, Markus; Ihlemann, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The ablation behavior of single crystalline sapphire with nanosecond laser pulses at 157 nm wavelength is investigated. Ablation rates of about 10 to 100 nm/pulse are obtained at fluences ranging from 1 to 9 J/cm2. At moderate fluences, incubation behavior is observed, i.e. ablation starts after material modification by a number of laser pulses. The ablation can be utilized to fabricate sapphire micro-optics. The capability of creating lenses or gratings on the tip of sapphire fibers is demon...

  19. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 ± 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 ± 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 ± 13.6 min and 43.7 ± 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 ± 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 ± 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 ± 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m2 before RF ablation vs. 47.2 ± 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m2 after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  20. Near-IR imaging of Erbium Laser Ablation with a Water Spray

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Maffei, Marie E.; Fried, William A.; Fried, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Near-IR (NIR) imaging can be used to view the formation of ablation craters during laser ablation since the enamel of the tooth is almost completely transparent near 1310-nm1. Laser ablation craters can be monitored under varying irradiation conditions to assess peripheral thermal and transient-stress induced damage, measure the rate and efficiency of ablation and provide insight into the ablation mechanism. There are fundamental differences in the mechanism of enamel ablation using erbium la...

  1. Mechanism study of skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    Fang, Qiyin

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms in laser tissue ablation is essential to improve clinical laser applications by reducing collateral damage and laser pulse energy requirement. The motive of this dissertation is to study skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses in a wide spectral region from near-infrared to ultraviolet for a clear understanding of the mechanism that can be used to improve future design of the pulsed lasers for dermatology and plastic surgery. Multiple laser and optical configurations have been constructed to generate 9 to 12ns laser pulses with similar profiles at 1064. 532, 266 and 213nm for this study of skin tissue ablation. Through measurements of ablation depth as a function cf laser pulse energy, the 589nm spectral line in the secondary radiation from ablated skin tissue samples was identified as the signature of the occurrence of ablation. Subsequently, this spectral signature has been used to investigate the probabilistic process of the ablation near the threshold at the four wavelengths. Measurements of the ablation probability were conducted as a function of the electrical field strength of the laser pulse and the ablation thresholds in a wide spectral range from 1064nm to 213nm were determined. Histology analysis and an optical transmission method were applied in assessing of the ablation depth per pulse to study the ablation process at irradiance levels higher than threshold. Because more than 70% of the wet weight of the skin tissue is water, optical breakdown and backscattering in water was also investigated along with a nonlinear refraction index measurement using a z-scan technique. Preliminary studies on ablation of a gelatin based tissue phantom are also reported. The current theoretical models describing ablation of soft tissue ablation by short laser pulses were critically reviewed. Since none of the existing models was found capable of explaining the experimental results, a new plasma-mediated model was developed

  2. Metal particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Liu, Chunyi; Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate metal particles of Zn and Al alloys using femtosecond (150 fs) and nanosecond (4 ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Characterization of particles and correlation with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) performance was investigated. Particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation were mainly primary particles with irregular shape and hard agglomerates (without internal voids). Particles produced by femtosecond laser ablation consisted of spherical primary particles and soft agglomerates formed from numerous small particles. Examination of the craters by white light interferometric microscopy showed that there is a rim of material surrounding the craters formed after nanosecond laser ablation. The determination of the crater volume by white light interferometric microscopy, considering the rim of material surrounding ablation craters, revealed that the volume ratio (fs/ns) of the craters on the selected samples was approximately 9 (Zn), 7 (NIST627 alloy) and 5 (NIST1711 alloy) times more ablated mass with femtosecond pulsed ablation compared to nanosecond pulsed ablation. In addition, an increase of Al concentration from 0 to 5% in Zn base alloys caused a large increase in the diameter of the particles, up to 65% while using nanosecond laser pulses. When the ablated particles were carried in argon into an ICP-MS, the Zn and Al signals intensities were greater by factors of {approx} 50 and {approx} 12 for fs vs. ns ablation. Femtosecond pulsed ablation also reduced temporal fluctuations in the {sup 66}Zn transient signal by a factor of ten compared to nanosecond laser pulses.

  3. Electroporation ablation: A new energy modality for ablation of arrhythmogenic cardiac substrate

    van Driel, VJHM

    2016-01-01

    At the very end of the Direct Current (DC) era, low-energy DC ablation was demonstrated to cause myocardial lesions by non-thermal irreversible electroporation (IRE) (permanent formation of pores in the cell membrane, leading to cell death), without arcing and/or barotrauma. To eliminate rather smal

  4. Radio-frequency ablation helps preserve nephrons in salvage of failed microwave ablation for a renal cancer in a solitary kidney

    Castle, Scott M.; Nelson Salas; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent tumors after renal ablative therapy present a challenge for clinicians. New ablative modalities, including microwave ablation (MWA), have very limited experience in methods of retreating ablation failures. Additionally, in MWA, no long-term outcomes have been reported. In patients having local tumor recurrence, options for surveillance or surgical salvage must be assessed. We present a case to help assess radio-frequency ablation (RFA) for salvage of failed MWA. We report a 63-year-...

  5. Thermal Performance of Ablative/ Ceramic Composite

    Adriana STEFAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid thermal protection system for atmospheric earth re-entry based on ablative materials on top of ceramic matrix composites is investigated for the protection of the metallic structure in oxidative and high temperature environment of the space vehicles. The paper focuses on the joints of ablative material (carbon fiber based CALCARB® or cork based NORCOAT TM and Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC material (carbon fibers embedded in silicon carbide matrix, Cf/SiC, SICARBON TM or C/C-SiC using commercial high temperature inorganic adhesives. To study the thermal performance of the bonded materials the joints were tested under thermal shock at the QTS facility. For carrying out the test, the sample is mounted into a holder and transferred from outside the oven at room temperature, inside the oven at the set testing temperature (1100°C, at a heating rate that was determined during the calibration stage. The dwell time at the test temperature is up to 2 min at 1100ºC at an increasing rate of temperature up to ~ 9,5°C/s. Evaluating the atmospheric re-entry real conditions we found that the most suited cooling method is the natural cooling in air environment as the materials re-entering the Earth atmosphere are subjected to similar conditions. The average weigh loss was calculated for all the samples from one set, without differentiating the adhesive used as the weight loss is due to the ablative material consumption that is the same in all the samples and is up to 2%. The thermal shock test proves that, thermally, all joints behaved similarly, the two parts withstanding the test successfully and the assembly maintaining its integrity.

  6. Ablation of polymers by ultraviolet pulsed laser

    The surface modifications of different polymers treated by far UV-Excimer laser (λ = 193mn, 248, 308nm) are analysed by X-Ray Photoelectrons Spectroscopy. The main feature observed depends strongly on the absorption coefficients. For the high absorbing polymers such (PVC, PS, PI,...) the mechanism of the UV-Excimer Laser interaction appears to be governed by an ablative photodecomposition process (APD) with an APD threshold. In the other limit, i.e. low absorbing polymer the interaction leads to a photothermal process. (author). 51 refs, 24 figs, 7 tabs

  7. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional...... ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities...

  8. Obtention of Ti nanoparticles by laser ablation

    The obtention of Ti nanoparticles around 5-30 nm diameter through the laser ablation technique is reported. The formation of nanoparticles is carried out in He atmosphere to different pressures, placing directly in Si substrates (100) and in Cu grids. The results show that the work pressure is an important parameter that allows to control the nanoparticles size. Also the plasma characterization results are presented where the Ti II is the predominant specie with an average kinetic energy of 1824 eV. (Author)

  9. Reduce proton energy spread by target ablation

    Zhao, Shuan; Chen, Jiaer; Yan, Xueqing

    2015-01-01

    It's shown that, with strong target ablation monoenergetic protons along the laser direction is available during the laser aluminum foil interaction, which is different from the classic TNSA theory. When the laser pre-pulse is too strong that the whole target is vaporized, the energetic electrons generated in the gas preplasma will play an important role for the ion acceleration because the sheath field will not be available. These electrons beam, which is highly directional, will setup triangle envelope acceleration field along the laser direction at the target rear, reducing the ion energy spread.

  10. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    Resonant laser ablation (RLA) typically relies on irradiation of a sample in a mass spectrometer with modest intensity laser pulses tuned to a one or two photon resonant transition in the analyte of interest. This paper shows that RLA is well suited for highly sensitive analyses of complex samples. The examples actually studied are trace components in rhenium and technetium in nickel. The authors also studied the 2+1 multiphoton ionization spectrum of iron-56 detected by RLA of Re containing 70 ppm iron. Two-photon transition rates for Fe transitions were calculated perturbatively and found to agree semi-quantitatively with experimentally observed intensities. 17 refs., 3 figs

  11. Ablation Plume Induced by Laser Euv Radiation

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Koláček, Karel; Schmidt, Jiří; Štraus, Jaroslav

    Dordrecht: Springer International Publishing, 2015 - (Rocca, J.; Menoni, C.; Marconi, M.), s. 397-403. (Springer Proceedings in Physics. 169). ISBN 978-3-319-19521-6. [International Conference on X-Ray Laser s/14./. Fort Collins, Colorado (US), 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29772S; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : EUV laser * laser ablation * plume * Au * Al * Si * Cu * energy measurements Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-19521-6_52

  12. Mitral valve perforation appearing years after radiofrequency ablation

    Fisch-Thomsen, Marie; Jensen, Jesper K; Egeblad, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    The case is reported of a young adult with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome who, three years after a complicated radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation procedure, developed dyspnea on exertion. Echocardiography revealed severe mitral valve regurgitation caused by a perforation of the posterior...... leaflet. Echocardiographic follow up is recommended after a complicated course of left-sided catheter ablation....

  13. Transonic ablation flow regimes of high-Z pellets

    Kim, Hyoungkeun; Parks, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we report results of numerical studies of the ablation of argon and neon pellets in tokamaks and compare them with theoretical predictions and studies of deuterium pellets. Results demonstrate the influence of atomic physics processes on the pellet ablation process.

  14. Delayed Development of Pneumothorax After Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    Acute pneumothorax is a frequent complication after percutaneous pulmonary radiofrequency (RF) ablation. In this study we present three cases showing delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation in 34 patients. Our purpose is to draw attention to this delayed complication and to propose a possible approach to avoid this major complication. These three cases occurred subsequent to 44 CT-guided pulmonary RF ablation procedures (6.8%) using either internally cooled or multitined expandable RF electrodes. In two patients, the pneumothorax, being initially absent at the end of the intervention, developed without symptoms. One of these patients required chest drain placement 32 h after RF ablation, and in the second patient therapy remained conservative. In the third patient, a slight pneumothorax at the end of the intervention gradually increased and led into tension pneumothorax 5 days after ablation procedure. Underlying bronchopleural fistula along the coagulated former electrode track was diagnosed in two patients. In conclusion, delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation can occur and is probably due to underlying bronchopleural fistula, potentially leading to tension pneumothorax. Patients and interventionalists should be prepared for delayed onset of this complication, and extensive track ablation following pulmonary RF ablation should be avoided.

  15. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  16. Laser ablation synthesis and spectral characterization of ruby nanoparticles

    Baranov, M. S.; Bardina, A. A.; Savelyev, A. G.; Khramov, V. N.; Khaydukov, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The laser ablation method was implemented for synthesis of ruby nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were obtained by nanosecond ablation of bulk ruby crystal in 10% ethanol water solution. The nanoparticles enable water colloid stability and exhibit narrow photoluminescent line at 694 nm when pumped at blue-green spectral range. The ruby nanoparticles were characterized by SEM and Z-sizer.

  17. Lung tumour ablation – where are we now?

    Gillams, A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Ablation of lung tumours is the fastest expanding area within interventional oncology. Radiofrequency, laser, microwave and cryotherapy have all been shown to be effective. Which of these ablation technologies becomes the preferred technique for lung tumours remains to be seen.

  18. A New Ablative Heat Shield Sensor Suite Project

    Bose, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    A new sensor suite is developed to measure performance of ablative thermal protection systems used in planetary entry vehicles for robotic and human exploration. The new sensor suite measures ablation of the thermal protection system under extreme heating encountered during planetary entry. The sensor technology is compatible with a variety of thermal protection materials, and is applicable over a wide range of entry conditions.

  19. Imaging evaluation of liver cancer after radiofrequency ablation therapy

    Radiofrequency ablation has been an important means of the comprehensive therapy for liver cancers, especially for the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinomas. Radiofrequency ablation has already showed encouraging clinical effects. However, due to the limitation of ablation extent the remnants of tumor lesions or the recurrence of tumor are often seen. Therefore, it is very important to accurately evaluate the curative effect of radiofrequency ablation. This paper aims to summarize the evaluation of curative effect of radiofrequency ablation with different imaging methods, and to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these different imaging methods in order to provide a correct reference for taking reasonable imaging means to help make the proper clinical treatment. (authors)

  20. Nanoparticle fabrication of hydroxyapatite by laser ablation in water

    Synthetic polycrystalline hydroxyapatite was ablated in water with 337 nm radiation from a UV nitrogen pulsed laser. According to transmission electron microscopy micrographs, the ablated particles were approximately spherical and had a size of ∼80 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that particles had the same structure as the original crystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the surface chemical composition was close to that of the original material. The characteristics of the ablated particles and estimations of the temperature rise of the hydroxyapatite surface under laser irradiation are consistent with the mechanism of explosive boiling being responsible for ablation. The experimental observations offer the basis for preparation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles by laser ablation in water

  1. Locally ablative therapies for primary and metastatic liver cancer.

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Madoff, David C

    2014-08-01

    Locally ablative therapies have an increasing role in the effective multidisciplinary approach towards the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. In patients who are not considered surgical candidates and have low volume disease, these therapies have now become established into consensus practice guidelines. A large range of therapeutic options exist including percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), cryoablation, percutaneous laser ablation (PLA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU); each having benefits and drawbacks. The greatest body of evidence supporting clinical utility in the liver currently exists for RFA, with PEI having fallen out of favor. MWA, IRE, SBRT and HIFU are relatively nascent technologies, and outcomes data supporting their use is promising. Future directions of ablative therapies include tandem approaches to improve efficacy in the treatment of liver tumors. PMID:24746315

  2. Chemothermal Therapy for Localized Heating and Ablation of Tumor

    Zhong-Shan Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemothermal therapy is a new hyperthermia treatment on tumor using heat released from exothermic chemical reaction between the injected reactants and the diseased tissues. With the highly minimally invasive feature and localized heating performance, this method is expected to overcome the ubiquitous shortcomings encountered by many existing hyperthermia approaches in ablating irregular tumor. This review provides a relatively comprehensive review on the latest advancements and state of the art in chemothermal therapy. The basic principles and features of two typical chemothermal ablation strategies (acid-base neutralization-reaction-enabled thermal ablation and alkali-metal-enabled thermal/chemical ablation are illustrated. The prospects and possible challenges facing chemothermal ablation are analyzed. The chemothermal therapy is expected to open many clinical possibilities for precise tumor treatment in a minimally invasive way.

  3. Pulsed laser ablation of solids basics, theory and applications

    Stafe, Mihai; Puscas, Niculae N

    2014-01-01

    The book introduces ‘the state of the art' of pulsed laser ablation and its applications. It is based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. The book reaches from the basics to advanced topics of pulsed laser ablation. Theoretical and experimental fundamental phenomena involved in pulsed laser ablation are discussed with respect to material properties, laser wavelength, fluence and intensity regime of the light absorbed linearly or non-linearly in the target material. The energy absorbed by the electrons leads to atom/molecule excitation, ionization and/or direct chemical bond breaking and is also transferred to the lattice leading to material heating and phase transitions. Experimental  non-invasive optical methods for analyzing these phenomena in real time are described. Theoretical models for pulsed laser ablation and phase transitions induced by laser beams and laser-vapour/plasma interaction during the plume expansion above the target are also presented. Calculations of the ablation speed and...

  4. Ablation of CsI by XUV Capillary Discharge Laser

    Pira, Peter; Zelinger, Zdenek; Burian, Tomas; Vysin, Ludek; Wild, Jan; Juha, Libor; Lancok, Jan; Nevrly, Vaclav

    2015-09-01

    XUV capillary discharge laser (CDL) is suitable source for ablation of ionic crystals as material which is difficult to ablate by conventional laser. Single crystal of CsI was irradiated by 2.5 ns pulses of a 46.9 nm radiation at 2 Hz. The CDL beam was focused by Sc/Si multilayer spherical mirror. Attenuation length of CsI for this wavelength is 38 nm. Ablation rate was calculated after irradiation of 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 pulses. Depth of the craters was measured by optical profiler (white light interferometry). Ablation threshold was determined from craters after irradiation with the changing fluence and compared with modeling by XUV-ABLATOR.

  5. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation.

    González-Castillo, J R; Rodriguez, E; Jimenez-Villar, E; Rodríguez, D; Salomon-García, I; de Sá, Gilberto F; García-Fernández, T; Almeida, D B; Cesar, C L; Johnes, R; Ibarra, Juana C

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag(+) concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). PMID:26464175

  6. Synthesis of nanocrystalline cubic zirconia using femtosecond laser ablation

    We report on the synthesis of nanocrystalline zirconia in liquid using femtosecond laser ablation. Nanocrystalline cubic zirconia has been prepared by femtosecond laser ablation of zirconium in ammonia, while nanocrystalline tetragonal and monoclinic zirconia was synthesized in water. The physical and chemical mechanisms of the formation of nanocrystalline metastable zirconia are discussed. The intrinsic properties of femtosecond laser ablation in liquid and OH−1 may be responsible for the synthesis of cubic zirconia. It is suggested that the femtosecond laser pulse can create higher temperature and pressure conditions at a localized area in the liquid than the nanosecond laser pulse and the cooling is also faster in the femtosecond laser ablation process, which determined the difference between the products synthesized with femtosecond and nanosecond-pulsed laser ablation.

  7. HIFU Tissue Ablation: Concept and Devices.

    Ter Haar, Gail

    2016-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is rapidly gaining clinical acceptance as a technique capable of providing non-invasive heating and ablation for a wide range of applications. Usually requiring only a single session, treatments are often conducted as day case procedures, with the patient either fully conscious, lightly sedated or under light general anesthesia. HIFU scores over other thermal ablation techniques because of the lack of necessity for the transcutaneous insertion of probes into the target tissue. Sources placed either outside the body (for treatment of tumors or abnormalities of the liver, kidney, breast, uterus, pancreas brain and bone), or in the rectum (for treatment of the prostate), provide rapid heating of a target tissue volume, the highly focused nature of the field leaving tissue in the ultrasound propagation path relatively unaffected. Numerous extra-corporeal, transrectal and interstitial devices have been designed to optimize application-specific treatment delivery for the wide-ranging areas of application that are now being explored with HIFU. Their principle of operation is described here, and an overview of their design principles is given. PMID:26486329

  8. Laser Ablation of Polymer Microfluidic Devices

    Killeen, Kevin

    2004-03-01

    Microfluidic technology is ideal for processing precious samples of limited volumes. Some of the most important classes of biological samples are both high in sample complexity and low in concentration. Combining the elements of sample pre-concentration, chemical separation and high sensitivity detection with chemical identification is essential for realizing a functional microfluidic based analysis system. Direct write UV laser ablation has been used to rapidly fabricate microfluidic devices capable of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS. These chip-LC/MS devices use bio-compatible, solvent resistant and flexible polymer materials such as polyimide. A novel microfluidic to rotary valve interface enables, leak free, high pressure fluid switching between multiple ports of the microfluidic chip-LC/MS device. Electrospray tips with outer dimension of 50 um and inner of 15 um are formed by ablating the polymer material concentrically around a multilayer laminated channel structure. Biological samples of digested proteins were used to evaluate the performance of these microfluidic devices. Liquid chromatography separation and similar sample pretreatments have been performed using polymeric microfluidic devices with on-chip separation channels. Mass spectrometry was performed using an Agilent Technologies 1100 series ion trap mass spectrometer. Low fmol amounts of protein samples were positively and routinely identified by searching the MS/MS spectral data against protein databases. The sensitivity and separation performance of the chip-LC devices has been found to be comparable to state of the art nano-electrospray systems.

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed.

  10. Radiofrequency ablation of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: preliminary experience.

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed. PMID:20411389